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Sample records for neonatal mouse brain

  1. Recent Progress in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Embryonic and Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic control mechanisms of mammalian brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool to characterize changes in brain anatomy in mutant mouse strains and injury progression in mouse models of fetal and neonatal brain injury. Progress in the last decade has enabled us to acquire MRI data with increasing anatomical details from the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain. High-resolution ex vivo MRI, especially with advanced diffusion MRI methods, can visualize complex microstructural organizations in the developing mouse brain. In vivo MRI of the embryonic mouse brain, which is critical for tracking anatomical changes longitudinally, has become available. Applications of these techniques may lead to further insights into the complex and dynamic processes of brain development. PMID:26973471

  2. Paternally biased X inactivation in mouse neonatal brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background X inactivation in female eutherian mammals has long been considered to occur at random in embryonic and postnatal tissues. Methods for scoring allele-specific differential expression with a high degree of accuracy have recently motivated a quantitative reassessment of the randomness of X inactivation. Results After RNA-seq data revealed what appeared to be a chromosome-wide bias toward under-expression of paternal alleles in mouse tissue, we applied pyrosequencing to mouse brain cDNA samples from reciprocal cross F1 progeny of divergent strains and found a small but consistent and highly statistically significant excess tendency to under-express the paternal X chromosome. Conclusions The bias toward paternal X inactivation is reminiscent of marsupials (and extraembryonic tissues in eutherians), suggesting that there may be retained an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mark driving the bias. Allelic bias in expression is also influenced by the sampling effect of X inactivation and by cis-acting regulatory variation (eQTL), and for each gene we quantify the contributions of these effects in two different mouse strain combinations while controlling for variability in Xce alleles. In addition, we propose an efficient method to identify and confirm genes that escape X inactivation in normal mice by directly comparing the allele-specific expression ratio profile of multiple X-linked genes in multiple individuals. PMID:20663224

  3. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of Novel Imprinted Genes in Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sun, Qi; McGrath, Sean D.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Soloway, Paul D.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted genes display differential allelic expression in a manner that depends on the sex of the transmitting parent. The degree of imprinting is often tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific, and may be altered in some diseases including cancer. Here we applied Illumina/Solexa sequencing of the transcriptomes of reciprocal F1 mouse neonatal brains and identified 26 genes with parent-of-origin dependent differential allelic expression. Allele-specific Pyrosequencing verified 17 of them, including three novel imprinted genes. The known and novel imprinted genes all are found in proximity to previously reported differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Ten genes known to be imprinted in placenta had sufficient expression levels to attain a read depth that provided statistical power to detect imprinting, and yet all were consistent with non-imprinting in our transcript count data for neonatal brain. Three closely linked and reciprocally imprinted gene pairs were also discovered, and their pattern of expression suggests transcriptional interference. Despite the coverage of more than 5000 genes, this scan only identified three novel imprinted refseq genes in neonatal brain, suggesting that this tissue is nearly exhaustively characterized. This approach has the potential to yield an complete catalog of imprinted genes after application to multiple tissues and developmental stages, shedding light on the mechanism, bioinformatic prediction, and evolution of imprinted genes and diseases associated with genomic imprinting. PMID:19052635

  4. Dose-dependent effects of levetiracetam after hypoxia and hypothermia in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Katja; Lueckemann, Laura; Kluever, Verena; Thavaneetharajah, Sinthuya; Hoeber, Daniela; Bendix, Ivo; Fandrey, Joachim; Bertsche, Astrid; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia to the developing brain remains a major cause of morbidity. Hypothermia is currently the only established neuroprotective treatment available for term born infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, saving one in seven to eight infants from developing severe neurological deficits. Therefore, additional treatments with clinically applicable drugs are indispensable. This study investigates a potential additive neuroprotective effect of levetiracetam combined with hypothermia after hypoxia-induced brain injury in neonatal mice. 9-day-old C57BL/6-mice (P9) were subjected either to acute hypoxia or room-air. After 90min of systemic hypoxia (6% O2), pups were randomized into six groups: 1) vehicle, 2) low-dose levetiracetam (LEV), 3) high-dose LEV, 4) hypothermia (HT), 5) HT combined with low-dose LEV and 6) HT combined with high-dose LEV. Pro-apoptotic factors, neuronal structures, and myelination were analysed by histology and on protein level at appropriate time points. On P28 to P37 long-term outcome was assessed by neurobehavioral testing. Hypothermia confers acute and long-term neuroprotection by reducing apoptosis and preservation of myelinating oligodendrocytes and neurons in a model of acute hypoxia in the neonatal mouse brain. Low-dose LEV caused no adverse effects after neonatal hypoxic brain damage treated with hypothermia whereas administration of high-dose LEV alone or in combination with hypothermia increased neuronal apoptosis after hypoxic brain injury. LEV in low- dosage had no additive neuroprotective effect following acute hypoxic brain injury. PMID:27216570

  5. The fetal brain transcriptome and neonatal behavioral phenotype in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Ferres, Millie A; Graham, Leah C; Wick, Heather C; Miczek, Klaus A; Slonim, Donna K; Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-09-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3-21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and postnatal neurocognition.

  6. The fetal brain transcriptome and neonatal behavioral phenotype in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Ferres, Millie A; Graham, Leah C; Wick, Heather C; Miczek, Klaus A; Slonim, Donna K; Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-09-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3-21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and postnatal neurocognition. PMID:25975229

  7. Marrow Stromal Cells Migrate Throughout Forebrain and Cerebellum, and They Differentiate into Astrocytes after Injection into Neonatal Mouse Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopen, Gene C.; Prockop, Darwin J.; Phinney, Donald G.

    1999-09-01

    Stem cells are a valuable resource for treating disease, but limited access to stem cells from tissues such as brain restricts their utility. Here, we injected marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice and asked whether these multipotential mesenchymal progenitors from bone marrow can adopt neural cell fates when exposed to the brain microenvironment. By 12 days postinjection, MSCs migrated throughout the forebrain and cerebellum without disruption to the host brain architecture. Some MSCs within the striatum and the molecular layer of the hippocampus expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and, therefore, differentiated into mature astrocytes. MSCs also populated neuron rich regions including the Islands of Calleja, the olfactory bulb, and the internal granular layer of the cerebellum. A large number of MSCs also were found within the external granular layer of the cerebellum. In addition, neurofilament positive donor cells were found within the reticular formation of the brain stem, suggesting that MSCs also may have differentiated into neurons. Therefore, MSCs are capable of producing differentiated progeny of a different dermal origin after implantation into neonatal mouse brains. These results suggest that MSCs are potentially useful as vectors for treating a variety of central nervous system disorders.

  8. Inhaled nitric oxide protects males but not females from neonatal mouse hypoxia-ischemia brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changlian; Sun, Yanyan; Gao, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Blomgren, Klas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently discovered that while under normal conditions inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) does not affect cerebral blood flow, it selectively dilates arterioles in the ischemic penumbra during experimental cerebral ischemia, thereby increasing collateral blood flow and reducing ischemic brain damage. The mechanism was verified in multiple models, but only in male animals. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of iNO on brain injury in neonatal males and females. Nine-day-old mice were subjected to unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), using 10% oxygen balanced with nitrogen, with or without 50 ppm NO. Brain injury 72 h after HI was reduced by iNO as judged by percentage of injury (-21.7%), atrophy (-23.7%), and total pathological score (-29%). The injury was significantly reduced in males (-32.4%, p<0.05) but not in females (-7.1%, n.s.). Neither the numbers nor the proliferation rates of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus were affected by iNO. In summary, intraischemic iNO reduced neonatal HI brain injury in a gender-related manner. PMID:24323275

  9. Involvement of ceramide in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the neonatal mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hegde, Medha; Ohsie, Jason; Paik, Sun-Mee; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    Acute administration of ethanol to 7-day-old mice is known to cause robust apoptotic neurodegeneration in the brain. Our previous studies have shown that such ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is accompanied by increases in lipids including ceramide, triglyceride, cholesterol ester, and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain. In this study, the effects of ethanol on lipid profiles as well as caspase-3 activation were examined in the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and inferior colliculus of the P7 mouse brain. We found that the cortex, hippocampus, and inferior colliculus, which showed substantial caspase-3 activation by ethanol, manifested significant elevations in ceramide, triglyceride, and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine. In contrast, the cerebellum, with the least caspase-3 activation, failed to show significant changes in ceramide and triglyceride, and exhibits much smaller increases in N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine than other brain regions. Ethanol-induced increases in cholesterol ester were observed in all brain regions tested. Inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase effectively blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation as well as elevations in ceramide, cholesterol ester, and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the expression of serine palmitoyltransferase was mainly localized in neurons and was enhanced in activated caspase-3-positive neurons generated by ethanol. These results indicate that de novo ceramide synthesis has a vital role in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain. PMID:20663015

  10. Transcriptomic analyses of neurotoxic effects in mouse brain after intermittent neonatal administration of thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Qu, Fengqin; Xie, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengli; Liu, Hongmei; Song, Shuhui; Chen, Tingting; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Yun; Guo, Caixia; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Thimerosal is a vaccine antimicrobial preservative which has long been suspected an iatrogenic factor possibly contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. The association between infant vaccine thimerosal exposure and autism remains an open question. Although thimerosal has been removed from mandatory childhood vaccines in the United States, thimerosal-preserved vaccines are still widely used outside of the United States especially in developing countries. Notably, thimerosal-containing vaccines are being given to the newborns within the first 12-24 h after birth in some countries. To examine the possible neurotoxic effects of early neonatal exposure to a higher level of thimerosal, FVB mice were subcutaneously injected with thimerosal-mercury at a dose which is 20× higher than that used for regular Chinese infant immunization during the first 4 months of life. Thimerosal-treated mice exhibited neural development delay, social interaction deficiency, and inclination of depression. Apparent neuropathological changes were also observed in adult mice neonatally treated with thimerosal. High-throughput RNA sequencing of autistic-behaved mice brains revealed the alternation of a number of canonical pathways involving neuronal development, neuronal synaptic function, and the dysregulation of endocrine system. Intriguingly, the elevation of anterior pituitary secreting hormones occurred exclusively in male but not in female thimerosal-treated mice, demonstrating for the first time the gender bias of thimerosal-mercury toxicity with regard to endocrine system. Our results indicate that higher dose of neonatal thimerosal-mercury (20× higher than that used in human) is capable of inducing long-lasting substantial dysregulation of neurodevelopment, synaptic function, and endocrine system, which could be the causal involvements of autistic-like behavior in mice.

  11. Transcriptomic analyses of neurotoxic effects in mouse brain after intermittent neonatal administration of thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Qu, Fengqin; Xie, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengli; Liu, Hongmei; Song, Shuhui; Chen, Tingting; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Yun; Guo, Caixia; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Thimerosal is a vaccine antimicrobial preservative which has long been suspected an iatrogenic factor possibly contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. The association between infant vaccine thimerosal exposure and autism remains an open question. Although thimerosal has been removed from mandatory childhood vaccines in the United States, thimerosal-preserved vaccines are still widely used outside of the United States especially in developing countries. Notably, thimerosal-containing vaccines are being given to the newborns within the first 12-24 h after birth in some countries. To examine the possible neurotoxic effects of early neonatal exposure to a higher level of thimerosal, FVB mice were subcutaneously injected with thimerosal-mercury at a dose which is 20× higher than that used for regular Chinese infant immunization during the first 4 months of life. Thimerosal-treated mice exhibited neural development delay, social interaction deficiency, and inclination of depression. Apparent neuropathological changes were also observed in adult mice neonatally treated with thimerosal. High-throughput RNA sequencing of autistic-behaved mice brains revealed the alternation of a number of canonical pathways involving neuronal development, neuronal synaptic function, and the dysregulation of endocrine system. Intriguingly, the elevation of anterior pituitary secreting hormones occurred exclusively in male but not in female thimerosal-treated mice, demonstrating for the first time the gender bias of thimerosal-mercury toxicity with regard to endocrine system. Our results indicate that higher dose of neonatal thimerosal-mercury (20× higher than that used in human) is capable of inducing long-lasting substantial dysregulation of neurodevelopment, synaptic function, and endocrine system, which could be the causal involvements of autistic-like behavior in mice. PMID:24675092

  12. Apoptotic effects of the 'designer drug' methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) on the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Adám, Agota; Gerecsei, László István; Lepesi, Nikolett; Csillag, András

    2014-09-01

    The designer drug of cathinone family, methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), is a cheap and frequently used psychoactive drug of abuse. However, its mechanism of action, particularly its potential detrimental effect on the developing brain, is largely unknown, despite the fact that pregnant females may occur among the users. The objective of our study was to identify the brain areas sensitive for a possible apoptotic effect of the widely abused MDPV on the developing brain. To this end, we used a mouse model which can be compared with the human fetus of third trimester, considering the developmental stage of the brain. Litters of 7-day-old C57BL/6J mice were treated either with i.p. injection of 10mg/kg b.wt.of MDPV or vehicle (saline), and sacrificed after 24h. Similar dose of MDPV enhanced locomotor activity of pups. The brains were processed for anti-caspase 3 (Casp3) immunohistochemistry and the apoptotic cells were identified and counted. We found prominent increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the piriform cortex, retrosplenial area, hippocampus CA1 and nucleus accumbens, whereas the overall density of cells did not change significantly in these regions. The neurons of the nucleus accumbens appeared to be especially sensitive to MDPV: Casp3-immunoreactive cells marked out the core and shell regions of the accumbens. Highest percentage of apoptotic cells as compared to total cell density was also found in the nucleus accumbens. However, we did not observe the same effect on the brain of adult mice. Thus, MDPV did not seem to increase apoptosis in the mature nervous system. The results are in agreement with the assumption that cathinones (in particular MDPV) may adversely affect neural integrity in the developing CNS.

  13. Apoptotic effects of the 'designer drug' methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) on the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Adám, Agota; Gerecsei, László István; Lepesi, Nikolett; Csillag, András

    2014-09-01

    The designer drug of cathinone family, methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), is a cheap and frequently used psychoactive drug of abuse. However, its mechanism of action, particularly its potential detrimental effect on the developing brain, is largely unknown, despite the fact that pregnant females may occur among the users. The objective of our study was to identify the brain areas sensitive for a possible apoptotic effect of the widely abused MDPV on the developing brain. To this end, we used a mouse model which can be compared with the human fetus of third trimester, considering the developmental stage of the brain. Litters of 7-day-old C57BL/6J mice were treated either with i.p. injection of 10mg/kg b.wt.of MDPV or vehicle (saline), and sacrificed after 24h. Similar dose of MDPV enhanced locomotor activity of pups. The brains were processed for anti-caspase 3 (Casp3) immunohistochemistry and the apoptotic cells were identified and counted. We found prominent increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the piriform cortex, retrosplenial area, hippocampus CA1 and nucleus accumbens, whereas the overall density of cells did not change significantly in these regions. The neurons of the nucleus accumbens appeared to be especially sensitive to MDPV: Casp3-immunoreactive cells marked out the core and shell regions of the accumbens. Highest percentage of apoptotic cells as compared to total cell density was also found in the nucleus accumbens. However, we did not observe the same effect on the brain of adult mice. Thus, MDPV did not seem to increase apoptosis in the mature nervous system. The results are in agreement with the assumption that cathinones (in particular MDPV) may adversely affect neural integrity in the developing CNS. PMID:25063209

  14. Non-invasive imaging of transgenic GFP expression in neonatal mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhuo, Lang

    2007-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a traditional biomarker for astrocytes of the central nervous system. In this study, non-invasive in vivo imaging of GFAP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in the brain of neonatal transgenic mice is used as a novel method to investigate the relationship between the expression of the transgene at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hr post-treatment in mice subjected to a single administration of 12 mg/kg of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH 3-MPTP). The GFP elevation was found to peak at 6 hr and lasted to at least 8 hr after the toxin treatment. Histological examination of fixed brain sections using immunohistochemistry (IHC) shows an increase in GFP and GFAP signal from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the hippocampus. The results have provided quantitative fluorescence and qualitative histological evidence for the activation of the GFAP-GFP transgene in astrocytes following neurotoxin 2'-CH 3-MPTP administration, suggesting that the model described here could be used to study neuronal degeneration such as Parkinson's disease and in general, developmental neurotoxicity in live animals.

  15. Transduction of the choroid plexus and ependyma in neonatal mouse brain by vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus and adeno-associated virus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Watson, Deborah J; Passini, Marco A; Wolfe, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of gene transfer into the developing mouse brain has shown that when adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) or AAV2 vectors are injected into the cerebral lateral ventricles at birth, widespread parenchymal transduction occurs. Lentiviral vectors have not been tested by this route. In this study, we found that injection of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) resulted in targeted transduction of the ependymal cells lining the ventricular system and the choroid plexus along the entire rostrocaudal axis of the brain, whereas a Mokola pseudotype transduced only a few cells after injection into the neonatal ventricle. In contrast, when lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with either VSV-G or Mokola glycoprotein are injected into the adult mouse brain, they transduce similar patterns of cells. An Ebola-Zaire-pseudotyped vector did not transduce any neonatal CNS cells, as was also the case for adult parenchymal injections. Long-term gene expression (12 months) occurred with a constitutively active mammalian promoter and a self-inactivating long terminal repeat (LTR), whereas the cytomegalovirus promoter in a vector with an intact LTR was expressed only in short-term experiments. We found that an AAV5 vector also targeted the ependymal and choroid plexus cells throughout the ventricular system. This vector exhibited limited penetration from the ventricle to other structures, which was significantly different from the previously reported patterns of transduction after intraventricular injection of AAV1 and AAV2 vectors. PMID:15703488

  16. Genetic deletion of neuronal pentraxin 1 expression prevents brain injury in a neonatal mouse model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Thatipamula, Shabarish; Al Rahim, Md; Zhang, Jiangyang; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and children for which there is no promising therapy at present. Previously, we reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of the long-pentraxin family, following HI injury in neonatal brain. Here, we report that genetic deletion of NP1 expression prevents HI injury in neonatal brain. Elevated expression of NP1 was observed in neurons, not in astrocytes, of the ipsilateral cortical layers (I-IV) and in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas of WT brains following hypoxia-ischemia; brain areas that developed infarcts (at 24-48 h), showed significantly increased numbers of TUNEL-(+) cells and tissue loss (at 7 days). In contrast, NP1-KO mice showed no evidence of brain infarction and tissue loss after HI. The immunofluorescence staining of brain sections with mitochondrial protein COX IV and subcellular fractionation analysis showed increased accumulation of NP1 in mitochondria, pro-death protein Bax activation and NP1 co-localization with activated caspase-3 in WT, but not in the NP1-KO brains; corroborating NP1 interactions with the mitochondria-derived pro-death pathways. Disruption of NP1 translocation to mitochondria by NP1-siRNA in primary cortical cultures significantly reduced ischemic neuronal death. NP1 was immunoprecipitated with activated Bax [6A7] proteins; HI caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bax, thereby, facilitating Bax translocation to mitochondrial and neuronal death. To further delineate the specificity of NPs, we found that NP1 but not the NP2 induction is specifically involved in brain injury mechanisms and that knockdown of NP1 only results in neuroprotection. Furthermore, live in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fractional anisotropy (FA) mapping showed no sign of delayed brain injury or tissue loss in the NP1-KO mice as compared to the WT at different post-HI periods (4-24 weeks

  17. Assessment of long-term safety and efficacy of intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Donega, Vanessa; Nijboer, Cora H.; van Velthoven, Cindy T. J.; Youssef, Sameh A.; de Bruin, Alain; van Bel, Frank; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: For clinical translation, we assessed whether intranasal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment after hypoxia–ischemia (HI) induces neoplasia in the brain or periphery at 14 mo. Furthermore, the long-term effects of MSCs on behavior and lesion size were determined. Method: HI was induced in 9-d-old mice. Pups received an intranasal administration of 0.5 × 106 MSCs or vehicle at 10 d post-HI. Full macroscopical and microscopical pathological analysis of 39 organs per mouse was performed. Sensorimotor behavior was assessed in the cylinder-rearing test at 10 d, 28 d, 6 mo, and 9 mo. Cognition was measured with the novel object recognition test at 3 and 14 mo post-HI. Lesion size was determined by analyzing mouse-anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and mouse-anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) staining at 5 wk and 14 mo. Results: At 14 mo post-HI, we did not observe any neoplasia in the nasal turbinates, brain, or other organs of HI mice treated with MSCs. Furthermore, our results show that MSC-induced improvement of sensorimotor and cognitive function is long lasting. In contrast, HI-vehicle mice showed severe behavioral impairment. Recovery of MAP2- and MBP-positive area lasted up to 14 mo following MSC treatment. Conclusion: Our results provide strong evidence of the long-term safety and positive effects of MSC treatment following neonatal HI in mice. PMID:26270577

  18. A gestational ketogenic diet alters maternal metabolic status as well as offspring physiological growth and brain structure in the neonatal mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of the ketogenic diet (KD) among women of child-bearing age has been increasing, leading to increased interest in identifying the diet’s suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the effect of a gestational KD on offspring growth. Since ketones have been reported to play a role in cerebral lipid and myelin synthesis, it is particularly important to investigate the diet’s impact on brain anatomy of the offspring. Methods To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse neonates whose mothers were fed either a standard diet (SD) or a KD prior to and during gestation. Images were collected at postnatal (P) 11.5 and 21.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Maternal metabolic status was also tracked during lactation, by following their body weight, blood glucose, ketone, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations. Results The KD dams exhibit a significant reduction in maternal fertility and litter size, as well as a high risk of developing fatal ketoacidosis by mid-lactation. To increase survival of the KD dams and offspring, fostering of P2.5 pups (from both KD and SD litters) by SD-foster dams was carried out. This resulted in stabilization of blood ketones of the KD dams, and aversion of the fatal ketoacidosis. We also note a slower and smaller weight loss for the KD compared with the SD dams. The average fostered KD pup exhibits retarded growth by P21.5 compared with the average fostered SD pup. An anatomical comparison of their brains further revealed significant structural differences at P11.5, and particularly at P21.5. The KD brain shows a relative bilateral decrease in the cortex, fimbria, hippocampus, corpus callosum and lateral ventricle, but a relative volumetric enlargement of the hypothalamus and medulla. Conclusion A gestational ketogenic diet deleteriously affects maternal fertility and increases susceptibility to fatal ketoacidosis during lactation. Prenatal and early postnatal exposure to

  19. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  20. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  1. Differential Regenerative Capacity of Neonatal Mouse Hearts after Cryoinjury

    PubMed Central

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury. PMID:25555840

  2. Differential regenerative capacity of neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjury.

    PubMed

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury.

  3. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  4. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  5. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development.

  6. Claudin immunolocalization in neonatal mouse epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Yerlikaya, Seda; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-11-01

    Emerging evidence supports the notion that claudins (Cldns) are dynamically regulated under normal conditions to respond to the selective permeability requirements of various tissues, and that their expression is developmentally controlled. We describe the localization of those Cldns that we have previously demonstrated to be functionally important in epidermal differentiation and the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier, e.g., Cldn1, Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18, and the presence of Cldn3 and Cldn5 in various neonatal mouse epithelia including the epidermis, nail, oral mucosa, tongue, and stomach. Cldn1 is localized in the differentiated and/or undifferentiated compartments of the epidermis and nail and in the dorsal surface of the tongue and glandular compartment of the stomach but is absent from the oral mucosa and the keratinized compartment of the stomach. Cldn3 is present in the basal cells of the nail matrix and both compartments of the murine stomach but not in the epidermis, oral mucosa, or tongue. Cldn5 is found in the glandular compartment of the stomach but not in the epidermis, nail unit, oral mucosa, forestomach, and tongue. Cldn6, Cldn11, and Cldn18 occur in the differentiating suprabasal compartment of the epidermis, nail, and oral mucosa and in the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the tongue and the keratinized squamous epithelium of the stomach. The simple columnar epithelium of the glandular stomach stains for Cldn18 and reveals a non-membranous pattern for Cldn6 and Cldn11 expression. Our results demonstrate differential Cldn protein profiles in various epithelial tissues and their differentiation stages. Although the molecular mechanisms regulating Cldn expression are unknown, elucidation of their differential localization patterns in tissues with diverse permeability requirements should provide a better understanding of the role of tight junctions in tissue function. PMID:17828607

  7. Pathophysiology of Citrobacter diversus neonatal meningitis: comparative studies in an infant mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, A L; Russell, R G; Johnson, D; Lagos, R; Sechter, I; Morris, J G

    1991-01-01

    Citrobacter diversus is a cause of devastating neonatal meningitis, with illness characterized by formation of multiple brain abscesses. We developed an infant mouse intracranial inoculation model to evaluate the pathophysiology of C. diversus neonatal infections. Eighteen of 26 strains inoculated intracranially at a dose of ca. 3.3 x 10(3) CFU caused greater than 50% mortality in 2-day-old mice. No correlation was seen between the epidemiologic characteristics of a strain and its rate of mortality. When seven C. diversus isolates (four isolates from patients with meningitis, three from non-central nervous system [CNS] sites) were further evaluated, mortality was significantly correlated with bacteremia. The initial lesion in the CNS was a suppurative ventriculitis beginning 1 to 2 days postinoculation. Subsequent ventriculomegaly was associated with ventriculitis and periventricular abscessation. Brain lesions were seen with all strains, although strains of low virulence (as measured by having no bacteremia and low mortality) caused less-severe damage. An age-related susceptibility to C. diversus brain lesions was demonstrated, with 5-day-old mice showing a significant reduction in, and 8-day-old mice being apparently resistant to, infection and CNS damage. Our data indicate that C. diversus has a propensity to cause abscess formation in the neonatal mouse brain, with characteristic pathologic findings; however, the factors that determine whether a strain will cause meningitis in a human infant remain to be identified. Images PMID:2004815

  8. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (less than 32 weeks' gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI. We demonstrated previously that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has an important role in oligodendrocyte development. Here we examine whether enhanced EGFR signalling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioural recovery in the developing brain. Using an established mouse model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin-binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioural deficits on white-matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signalling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and potentially applicable to the treatment of premature children with white matter injury.

  9. [Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: pathogenesis and neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B

    2014-01-01

    The perinatal period represents a clinical setting of potential risk for injury to developing brain secondary to many causes, with the chance for long-lasting, profound neurocognitive deficits. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury leads to serious long-term morbidities. The leading pathogenetic mechanisms are hypoxia and/or ischemia, as a result of perinatal asphyxia. Understanding of the underlying pathophysiology will help the physicians in the general supportive management and neuroprotection of the neonatal brain.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  11. The neonate brain detects speech structure.

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit; Macagno, Francesco; Cogoi, Silvia; Peña, Marcela; Mehler, Jacques

    2008-09-16

    What are the origins of the efficient language learning abilities that allow humans to acquire their mother tongue in just a few years very early in life? Although previous studies have identified different mechanisms underlying the acquisition of auditory and speech patterns in older infants and adults, the earliest sensitivities remain unexplored. To address this issue, we investigated the ability of newborns to learn simple repetition-based structures in two optical brain-imaging experiments. In the first experiment, 22 neonates listened to syllable sequences containing immediate repetitions (ABB; e.g., "mubaba," "penana"), intermixed with random control sequences (ABC; e.g., "mubage," "penaku"). We found increased responses to the repetition sequences in the temporal and left frontal areas, indicating that the newborn brain differentiated the two patterns. The repetition sequences evoked greater activation than the random sequences during the first few trials, suggesting the presence of an automatic perceptual mechanism to detect repetitions. In addition, over the subsequent trials, activation increased further in response to the repetition sequences but not in response to the random sequences, indicating that recognition of the ABB pattern was enhanced by repeated exposure. In the second experiment, in which nonadjacent repetitions (ABA; e.g., "bamuba," "napena") were contrasted with the same random controls, no discrimination was observed. These findings suggest that newborns are sensitive to certain input configurations in the auditory domain, a perceptual ability that might facilitate later language development. PMID:18768785

  12. [Brain signaling mechanisms during neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Rizzotti, Alina; Aguero, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    The brain and the immune system are the two major adaptive systems of the body. During an immune response the developing neonatal brain and the immune system "cross-talk" and this course of action is essential for maintaining homeostasis. Two pathway are involved in this intercommunication: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This overview focuses on the role of SNS in neuroimmune interactions, an area that has received much less attention than the role of HPA axis. Evidence suggests that norepinephrine (NE) is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in different organs and tissues. Under stimulation, NE is released from the sympathetic nerve terminals in these organs and tissues .Through stimulation of specific receptors, locally released NE, or circulating catecholamines such as epinephrine, affect lymphocyte traffic, circulation, and proliferation, and modulate cytokine production and the functional activity of different lymphoid cells. In addition, recent evidence is discussed that NE and epinephrine, through stimulation of the beta(2)-adrenoreceptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, inhibit the production of type 1/proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma by antigen-presenting cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, whereas they stimulate the production of type 2/anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Thus, the activation of SNS during an immune response might be aimed to localize the inflammatory response.

  13. Mathematical model of the neonatal mouse ventricular action potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linda J.; Sobie, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies for heart disease are based largely on our understanding of the adult myocardium. The dramatic differences in action potential (AP) shape between neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes, however, indicate that a different set of molecular interactions in neonatal myocytes necessitates different treatment for newborns. Computational modeling is useful for synthesizing data to determine how interactions between components lead to systems-level behavior, but this technique has not been used extensively to study neonatal heart cell function. We created a mathematical model of the neonatal (day 1) mouse myocyte by modifying, based on experimental data, the densities and/or formulations of ion transport mechanisms in an adult cell model. The new model reproduces the characteristic AP shape of neonatal cells, with a brief plateau phase and longer duration than the adult (APD80=60.1 vs. 12.6 ms). The simulation results are consistent with experimental data, including: 1) decreased density, and altered inactivation, of transient outward K+ currents, 2) increased delayed rectifier K+ currents, 3) Ca2+ entry through T-type as well as L-type Ca2+ channels, 4) increased Ca2+ influx through Na+-Ca2+ exchange, and 5) Ca2+ transients resulting from transmembrane Ca2+ entry rather than release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Simulations performed with the model generated novel predictions, including increased SR Ca2+ leak and elevated intracellular [Na+] in neonatal compared with adult myocytes. This new model can therefore be used for testing hypotheses and obtaining a better quantitative understanding of differences between neonatal and adult physiology. PMID:18408122

  14. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances J; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 T. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately 2 h. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI-based mouse brain atlas.

  15. Hypernatraemic dehydration in a neonate: brain MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Musapasaoglu, H; Agildere, A Muhtesem; Teksam, M; Tarcan, A; Gurakan, B

    2008-02-01

    Severe hypernatremic dehydration can cause serious neurological complications in neonates. The most significant problems include brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhage, sinus thrombosis, haemorrhagic infarcts and permanent brain damage. The symptoms of many of these complications are similar. With respect to brain MRI findings in hypernatremic neonates, this is a report that describes linear lesions that represent intracranial haemorrhage at the grey-white matter junction. These MRI findings may be helpful for diagnosing hypernatremic dehydration, and for ruling out differential diagnoses for complications of this disorder.

  16. Potential for photoacoustic imaging of the neonatal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Kosik, Ivan; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for imaging neonatal brain injury. Since PAI combines many of the merits of both optical and ultrasound imaging, images with high contrast, high resolution, and a greater penetration depth can be obtained when compared to more traditional optical methods. However, due to the strong attenuation and reflection of photoacoustic pressure waves at the skull bone, PAI of the brain is much more challenging than traditional methods (e.g. near infrared spectroscopy) for optical interrogation of the neonatal brain. To evaluate the potential limits the skull places on 3D PAI of the neonatal brain, we constructed a neonatal skull phantom (1.4-mm thick) with a mixture of epoxy and titanium dioxide powder that provided acoustic insertion loss (1-5MHz) similar to human infant skull bone. The phantom was molded into a realistic infant skull shape by means of a CNCmachined mold that was based upon a 3D CAD model. To evaluate the effect of the skull bone on PAI, a photoacoustic point source was raster scanned within the phantom brain cavity to capture the imaging operator of the 3D PAI system (128 ultrasound transducers in a hemispherical arrangement) with and without the intervening skull phantom. The resultant imaging operators were compared to determine the effect of the skull layer on the PA signals in terms of amplitude loss and time delay.

  17. Neonatal brain injury as a consequence of insufficient cerebral oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Placha, Katerina; Luptakova, Dominika; Baciak, Ladislav; Ujhazy, Eduard; Juranek, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic-ischemic injury represents a serious health care and socio-economical problem since it is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity of newborns. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is often associated with signs of perinatal asphyxia, with an incidence of about 2-4 per 1,000 live births and mortality rate up to 20%. In about one half of survivors, cerebral hypoxic-ischemic insult may result in more or less pronounced neuro-psychological sequelae of immediate or delayed nature, such as seizures, cerebral palsy or behavioural and learning disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Hypoxic-ischemic injury develops as a consequence of transient or permanent restriction of blood supply to the brain. Severity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy varies depending on the intensity and duration of hypoxia-ischemia, on the type and size of the brain region affected, and on the maturity of the foetal/neonatal brain. Though a primary cause of hypoxic-ischemic injury is lack of oxygen in the neonatal brain, underlying mechanisms of subsequent events that are critical for developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are less understood. Their understanding is however necessary for elaborating effective management for newborns that underwent cerebral hypoxic-ischemic insult and thus are at risk of a negative outcome. The present paper summarizes current knowledge on cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury of the neonate, fundamental processes involved in etiopathogenesis, with a special focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms and particular attention on certain controversial aspects of oxidative stress involvement. PMID:27179569

  18. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  19. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M; Mortrud, Marty T; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Phillips, John W; Hohmann, John G; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R; Zeng, Hongkui

    2014-04-10

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain's wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  20. Neuroprotective agents for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Chen, Wu; Sinha, Bharati; Tu, Yanyang; Manning, Simon; Thomas, Niranjan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Jiang, Hong; Ma, He; Kroessler, Daphne A; Yao, Jiemin; Li, Zhipu; Inder, Terry E; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury in newborns is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that claims thousands of lives each year. In this review, we summarize the promising neuroprotective agents tested on animal models and pilot clinical studies of neonatal H-I brain injury according to the different phases of the disease. These agents target various phases of injury including the early phase of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as late-phase inflammatory reaction and neural repair. We analyze the cell survival and cell death pathways modified by these agents in neonatal H-I brain injury. We aim to 'build a bridge' between animal trials of neuroprotective agents and potential candidate treatments for future clinical applications against H-I encephalopathy. PMID:26360053

  1. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Beare, Richard J; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; Loh, Wai Y; Matthews, Lillian G; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Spittle, Alicia J; Anderson, Peter J; Doyle, Lex W; Inder, Terrie E; Seal, Marc L; Thompson, Deanne K

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T 2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T 2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T 2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T 2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical

  2. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  3. Discordance of Prenatal and Neonatal Brain Development in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Niyati; Kang, Chaeryon; Wolfe, Honor M.; Hertzberg, Barbara S.; Smith, J. Keith; Lin, Weili; Gerig, Guido; Hamer, Robert M.; Gilmore, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Discordance of birth weight has been observed in twin pairs, though little is known about prenatal and early neonatal discordance of head and brain size, and the role that zygosity and chorionicity play in discordances of early brain development in twins. Aims To compare prenatal and neonatal discordances of head size in monozygotic –monochorionic (MZ-MC), monozygotic-dichorionic (MZ-DC), and same-sex dizygotic-dichorionic twin pairs (DZ). Study Design Subjects prospectively had ultrasounds at 22 and 32 weeks gestational age, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain MRI after birth. Subjects 88 twin pairs recruited from two university hospital prenatal diagnostic clinics; 22 MZ-MC, 17 MZ-DC, and 49 same sex DZ pairs. Outcome measures Discordance of head circumference (HC) and weight at 22 weeks, 32 weeks and birth, as well as intracranial volume (ICV) on neonatal MRI. Results There were no group differences in discordance of head circumference and weight on the 22 or 32 week ultrasounds, or at birth. MZ-MC twins tended to have numerically greater discordances of HC and weight. There was a significant group difference in ICV on neonatal MRI (ANOVA, p = 0.0143), with DZ twins having significantly greater discordance than MZ-MC (p = 0.028) or MZ-DC (p = 0.0131) twins. Conclusions This study indicates that zygosity and chorionicity do not contribute to significant discordances of head size in late prenatal development. DZ twins do have significantly greater discordances of ICV on neonatal MRI, suggesting a relatively greater genetic influence on brain growth in the first weeks after birth. PMID:18804925

  4. Neuroprotection by selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 in neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cuicui; Ginet, Vanessa; Sun, Yanyan; Koike, Masato; Zhou, Kai; Li, Tao; Li, Hongfu; Li, Qian; Wang, Xiaoyang; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Truttmann, Anita C.; Kroemer, Guido; Puyal, Julien; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perinatal asphyxia induces neuronal cell death and brain injury, and is often associated with irreversible neurological deficits in children. There is an urgent need to elucidate the neuronal death mechanisms occurring after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We here investigated the selective neuronal deletion of the Atg7 (autophagy related 7) gene on neuronal cell death and brain injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal deletion of Atg7 prevented HI-induced autophagy, resulted in 42% decrease of tissue loss compared to wild-type mice after the insult, and reduced cell death in multiple brain regions, including apoptosis, as shown by decreased caspase-dependent and -independent cell death. Moreover, we investigated the lentiform nucleus of human newborns who died after severe perinatal asphyxia and found increased neuronal autophagy after severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy compared to control uninjured brains, as indicated by the numbers of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3)-, LAMP1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1)-, and CTSD (cathepsin D)-positive cells. These findings reveal that selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 is strongly protective against neuronal death and overall brain injury occurring after HI and suggest that inhibition of HI-enhanced autophagy should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human newborns developing severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26727396

  5. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  6. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  7. Effects of Low Dose Particle Radiation to Mouse Neonatal Neurons in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, K.; Vazquez, M. E.; Okayasu, R.; Nagaoka, S.

    To investigate effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to CNS system, we adopted mouse neonatal brain cells in culture being exposed to heavy ions by HIMAC at NIRS and NSRL at BNL. The applied dose varied from 0.05Gy up to 2.0Gy. The subsequent biological effectswere evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and neuron survival focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains, SCID, B6, B6C3F1, C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to particle radiation as evaluated by 10% apoptotic criterion. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID and B6 cells exposing to different ions (H, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed in the high LET (55 -200 keV/μ m) and low dose (<0.5 Gy) regions. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. In this repot, a result of memory and learning function to adult mice after whole-body and brainlocal irradiation at carbon ion and iron ion.

  8. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity. PMID:27047695

  9. Transcriptional and Translational Heterogeneity among Neonatal Mouse Spermatogonia1

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Brian P.; Mutoji, Kazadi N.; Velte, Ellen K.; Ko, Daijin; Oatley, Jon M.; Geyer, Christopher B.; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subset of undifferentiated spermatogonia responsible for ongoing spermatogenesis in mammalian testes. Spermatogonial stem cells arise from morphologically homogeneous prospermatogonia, but growing evidence suggests that only a subset of prospermatogonia develops into the foundational SSC pool. This predicts that subtypes of undifferentiated spermatogonia with discrete mRNA and protein signatures should be distinguishable in neonatal testes. We used single-cell quantitative RT-PCR to examine mRNA levels of 172 genes in individual spermatogonia from 6-day postnatal (P6) mouse testes. Cells enriched from P6 testes using the StaPut or THY1+ magnetic cell sorting methods exhibited considerable heterogeneity in the abundance of specific germ cell and stem cell mRNAs, segregating into one somatic and three distinct spermatogonial clusters. However, P6 Id4-eGFP+ transgenic spermatogonia, which are known to be enriched for SSCs, were more homogeneous in their mRNA levels, exhibiting uniform levels for the majority of genes examined (122 of 172). Interestingly, these cells displayed nonuniform (50 of 172) expression of a smaller cohort of these genes, suggesting there is substantial heterogeneity even within the Id4-eGFP+ population. Further, although immunofluorescence staining largely demonstrated conformity between mRNA and protein levels, some proteins were observed in patterns that were disparate from those detected for the corresponding mRNAs in Id4-eGFP+ spermatogonia (e.g., Kit, Sohlh2, Stra8), suggesting additional heterogeneity is introduced at the posttranscriptional level. Taken together, these data demonstrate the existence of multiple spermatogonial subtypes in P6 mouse testes and raise the intriguing possibility that these subpopulations may correlate with the development of functionally distinct spermatogenic cell types. PMID:25568304

  10. New Antioxidant Drugs for Neonatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Longini, Mariangela; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The brain injury concept covers a lot of heterogeneity in terms of aetiology involving multiple factors, genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, endocrinological, toxic, and infectious mechanisms, acting in antenatal or postnatal period. Increased vulnerability of the immature brain to oxidative stress is documented because of the limited capacity of antioxidant enzymes and the high free radicals (FRs) generation in rapidly growing tissue. FRs impair transmembrane enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase activity resulting in persistent membrane depolarization and excessive release of FR and excitatory aminoacid glutamate. Besides being neurotoxic, glutamate is also toxic to oligodendroglia, via FR effects. Neuronal cells die of oxidative stress. Excess of free iron and deficient iron/binding metabolising capacity are additional features favouring oxidative stress in newborn. Each step in the oxidative injury cascade has become a potential target for neuroprotective intervention. The administration of antioxidants for suspected or proven brain injury is still not accepted for clinical use due to uncertain beneficial effects when treatments are started after resuscitation of an asphyxiated newborn. The challenge for the future is the early identification of high-risk babies to target a safe and not toxic antioxidant therapy in combination with standard therapies to prevent brain injury and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. PMID:25685254

  11. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  12. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  13. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  14. Effects of intravenous administration of umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells in a mouse model of neonatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Taguchi, A; Ohshima, M; Kasahara, Y; Sato, Y; Tsuda, H; Otani, K; Yamahara, K; Ihara, M; Harada-Shiba, M; Ikeda, T; Matsuyama, T

    2014-03-28

    Neonatal stroke occurs in approximately 1/4000 live births and results in life-long neurological impairments: e.g., cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based specific treatment for neonates with stroke. Several studies have reported the benefits of umbilical cord blood (UCB) cell treatment in rodent models of neonatal brain injury. However, all of the studies examined the effects of administering either the UCB mononuclear cell fraction or UCB-derived mesenchymal stem cells in neonatal rat models. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of human UCB CD34(+) cells (hematopoietic stem cell/endothelial progenitor cells) in a mouse model of neonatal stroke, which we recently developed. On postnatal day 12, immunocompromized (SCID) mice underwent permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO). Forty-eight hours after MCAO, human UCB CD34(+) cells (1×10(5)cells) were injected intravenously into the mice. The area in which cerebral blood flow (CBF) was maintained was temporarily larger in the cell-treated group than in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group at 24h after treatment. With cell treatment, the percent loss of ipsilateral hemispheric volume was significantly ameliorated (21.5±1.9%) compared with the PBS group (25.6±5.1%) when assessed at 7weeks after MCAO. The cell-treated group did not exhibit significant differences from the PBS group in either rotarod (238±46s in the sham-surgery group, 175±49s in the PBS group, 203±54s in the cell-treated group) or open-field tests. The intravenous administration of human UCB CD34(+) cells modestly reduced histological ischemic brain damage after neonatal stroke in mice, with a transient augmentation of CBF in the peri-infarct area. PMID:24444827

  15. Intracerebroventricular and Intravascular Injection of Viral Particles and Fluorescent Microbeads into the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Kosugi, Isao; Sakao-Suzuki, Makiko; Meguro, Shiori; Tsutsui, Yoshihiro; Iwashita, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    In the study on the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis, the infection method is critical. The first of the two main infectious routes to the brain is the hematogenous route, which involves infection of the endothelial cells and pericytes of the brain. The second is the intracerebroventricular (ICV) route. Once within the central nervous system (CNS), viruses may spread to the subarachnoid space, meninges, and choroid plexus via the cerebrospinal fluid. In experimental models, the earliest stages of CNS viral distribution are not well characterized, and it is unclear whether only certain cells are initially infected. Here, we have analyzed the distribution of cytomegalovirus (CMV) particles during the acute phase of infection, termed primary viremia, following ICV or intravascular (IV) injection into the neonatal mouse brain. In the ICV injection model, 5 µl of murine CMV (MCMV) or fluorescent microbeads were injected into the lateral ventricle at the midpoint between the ear and eye using a 10-µl syringe with a 27 G needle. In the IV injection model, a 1-ml syringe with a 35 G needle was used. A transilluminator was used to visualize the superficial temporal (facial) vein of the neonatal mouse. We infused 50 µl of MCMV or fluorescent microbeads into the superficial temporal vein. Brains were harvested at different time points post-injection. MCMV genomes were detected using the in situ hybridization method. Fluorescent microbeads or green fluorescent protein expressing recombinant MCMV particles were observed by fluorescent microscopy. These techniques can be applied to many other pathogens to investigate the pathogenesis of encephalitis. PMID:27501398

  16. Periventricular/intraventricular hemorrhage in neonatal mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mengzhou; Balasubramaniam, Janani; Buist, Richard J; Peeling, James; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2003-11-01

    Periventricular/intraventricular hemorrhage (PVH/IVH) into brain can occur in premature infants and is associated with poor developmental outcome. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a model of PVH/IVH in newborn mouse. We hypothesized that periventricular germinal matrix would exhibit reduced cell proliferation. PVH/IVH was induced in 1-day-old mice by injection of autologous blood into the periventricular tissue. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained from 15 minutes to 14 days later. Mice were killed 4 hours to 28 days later. Cell proliferation, dying cells, astrocyte and microglial reactions, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were quantified. Histological studies showed that MRI accurately localizes the hematoma but overestimates its size. The hematoma, located in the striatum and germinal tissue, always extended into the lateral ventricles. Cell proliferation, measured by Ki67 immunoreactivity, was suppressed bilaterally in germinal matrix and beyond from 8 hours to 7 days. Increased cell death was observed in the ipsilateral striatum and germinal matrix 1 and 2 days after PVH/IVH. Astrocyte and microglia reaction peaked at 2 days and persisted up to 28 days. Inflammatory response was minimal. Extravasated blood might play an important role in brain damage following PVH/IVH through suppression of cell proliferation.

  17. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  18. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  19. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks.

  20. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  1. Automated core-penumbra quantification in neonatal ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Yuan, Xiangpeng; Turenius, Christine I; Tone, Beatriz; Ambadipudi, Kamalakar; Snyder, Evan Y; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HII) and arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) result in irreversibly injured (core) and salvageable (penumbral) tissue regions. Identification and reliable quantification of salvageable tissue is pivotal to any effective and safe intervention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the current standard to distinguish core from penumbra using diffusion-perfusion mismatch (DPM). However, subtle MR signal variations between core-penumbral regions make their visual delineation difficult. We hypothesized that computational analysis of MRI data provides a more accurate assessment of core and penumbral tissue evolution in HII/AIS. We used two neonatal rat-pup models of HII/AIS (unilateral and global hypoxic-ischemia) and clinical data sets from neonates with AIS to test our noninvasive, automated computational approach, Hierarchical Region Splitting (HRS), to detect and quantify ischemic core-penumbra using only a single MRI modality (T2- or diffusion-weighted imaging, T2WI/DWI). We also validated our approach by comparing core-penumbral images (from HRS) to DPM with immunohistochemical validation of HII tissues. Our translational and clinical data results showed that HRS could accurately and reliably distinguish the ischemic core from penumbra and their spatiotemporal evolution, which may aid in the vetting and execution of effective therapeutic interventions as well as patient selection.

  2. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. )

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  3. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  4. Brain Maturation in Neonatal Rodents is Impeded by Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Rany; Lee, Hedok; Feng, Tian; Park, June-Hee; Nedergaard, Maiken; Jacob, Zvi; Enikolopov, Grigori; Benveniste, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of data shows neuronal demise after general anesthesia in the very young rodent brain. Here we apply proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), testing the hypothesis that neurotoxic exposure during peak synaptogenesis can be tracked via changes in neuronal metabolites. Methods 1HMRS spectra was acquired in the brain (thalamus) of neonatal rat pups 24- and 48 h after sevoflurane exposure on post-natal day (PND) 7 and 15, and in unexposed, sham controls. A repeated measure ANOVA was performed to examine if changes in metabolites were different between exposed and unexposed groups. Sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity on PND7 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results In unexposed PND7 pups (N=21), concentration of NAA ([NAA]) increased by 16% from PND8 to PND9, whereas in exposed PND7 pups (N=19), [NAA] did not change and concentration of choline compounds ([GPC+PCh]) decreased by 25%. In PND15 rats, [NAA] increased from PND16 to PND17 for both the exposed (N=14) and unexposed (N=16) groups. Two-way ANOVA for PND7 pups demonstrated changes over time observed in [NAA] (p=0.031) and [GPC+PCh] (p=0.024) were different between those two groups. Conclusions We demonstrated that normal [NAA] increase from PND8 to PND9 was impeded in sevoflurane-exposed rats when exposed at PND7; however, not impeded when exposed on PND15. Furthermore, we showed that non-invasive 1HMRS is sufficiently sensitive to detect subtle differences in developmental time trajectory of [NAA]. This is potentially clinically relevant since 1HMRS can be applied across species, and may be useful in providing evidence of neurotoxicity in the human neonatal brain. PMID:26181336

  5. Estetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Nisolle, Michelle; Munaut, Carine; Pequeux, Christel; Gerard, Celine; Noel, Agnes; Foidart, Jean-Michel

    2014-11-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a recently described natural estrogen with four hydroxyl-groups that is synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver. It has important antioxidative activity. The aim of the present study was to define the importance of E4 in the attenuation of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Antioxidative effect of 650μM, 3.25mM and 6.5mM E4 on primary hippocampal cell cultures was studied before/after H202-induced oxidative stress. To examine oxidative stress and cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase activity and cell proliferation colorimetric assays were performed. To study the neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of E4 in vivo neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy model of 7-day-old newborn rat pups was used. The neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of estetrol before/after hypoxic-ischemic insult was studied in 1mg/kg/day, 5mg/kg/day, 10mg/kg/day, 50mg/kg/day E4 pretreated/treated groups and compared with the sham and the vehicle treated groups. The body temperature of the rat pups was examined along with their body and brain weights. Brains were studied at the level of the hippocampus and cortex. Intact cell counting and expressions of microtubule-associated protein-2, doublecortin and vascular-endothelial growth factor were evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemistry. ELISAs were performed on blood samples to detect concentrations of S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein as brain damage markers. This work reveals for the first time that E4 significantly decreases LDH activity and enhances cell proliferation in primary hippocampal neuronal cell cultures in vitro, and decreases the early gray matter loss and promotes neuro- and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:25079370

  6. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine.

  7. Cell type- and brain region-resolved mouse brain proteome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kirti; Schmitt, Sebastian; Bergner, Caroline G; Tyanova, Stefka; Kannaiyan, Nirmal; Manrique-Hoyos, Natalia; Kongi, Karina; Cantuti, Ludovico; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Philips, Mari-Anne; Rossner, Moritz J; Mann, Matthias; Simons, Mikael

    2015-12-01

    Brain transcriptome and connectome maps are being generated, but an equivalent effort on the proteome is currently lacking. We performed high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics for in-depth analysis of the mouse brain and its major brain regions and cell types. Comparisons of the 12,934 identified proteins in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and cortical neurons with deep sequencing data of the transcriptome indicated deep coverage of the proteome. Cell type-specific proteins defined as tenfold more abundant than average expression represented about a tenth of the proteome, with an overrepresentation of cell surface proteins. To demonstrate the utility of our resource, we focused on this class of proteins and identified Lsamp, an adhesion molecule of the IgLON family, as a negative regulator of myelination. Our findings provide a framework for a system-level understanding of cell-type diversity in the CNS and serves as a rich resource for analyses of brain development and function. PMID:26523646

  8. Design and construction of a brain phantom to simulate neonatal MR images.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Kamran; Moghaddam, Hamid Abrishami; Grebe, Reinhard; Gondry-Jouet, Catherine; Wallois, Fabrice

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the design and construction of a 3D digital neonatal neurocranial phantom and its application for the simulation of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. Commonly used digital brain phantoms (e.g. BrainWeb) are based on the adult brain. With the growing interest in computer-aided methods for neonatal MR image processing, there is a growing demand a digital phantom and brain MR image simulator especially for the neonatal brains. This is due to the pronounced differences between adult and neonatal brains not only in terms of size but also, more importantly, in terms of geometrical proportions and the need to subdivide white matter into two different tissue types in neonates. Therefore the neonatal brain phantom created in the here presented work consists of 9 different tissue types: skin, fat, muscle, skull, dura mater, gray matter, myelinated white matter, nonmyelinated white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. Each voxel has a vector consisting of 9 components, one for each of these nine tissue types. This digital phantom can be used to map simulated magnetic resonance signal intensities resulting in simulated MR images of the newborns head. These images with controlled degradation of the image data present a representative, reproducible data set ideal for development and evaluation of neonatal MRI analysis methods, e.g. segmentation and registration algorithms.

  9. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia.

    PubMed

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn; Munir, Jared; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-11-26

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiation of the donor cells is influenced by the host environment, such that more donor cells differentiated as oligodendrocytes in the hypomyelinated shiverer brain than in myelin wild-types, in which hGPCs were more likely to remain as progenitors. Yet in each recipient, both the number and relative proportion of mouse GPCs fell as a function of time, concomitant with the mitotic expansion and spread of donor hGPCs. By a year after neonatal xenograft, the forebrain GPC populations of implanted mice were largely, and often entirely, of human origin. Thus, neonatally implanted hGPCs outcompeted and ultimately replaced the host population of mouse GPCs, ultimately generating mice with a humanized glial progenitor population. These human glial chimeric mice should permit us to define the specific contributions of glia to a broad variety of neurological disorders, using human cells in vivo.

  10. Rosiglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Strum, Jay C; Shehee, Ron; Virley, David; Richardson, Jill; Mattie, Michael; Selley, Paula; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nock, Christina; Saunders, Ann; Roses, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was found to simulate mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain in an apolipoprotein (Apo) E isozyme-independent manner. Rosiglitazone induced both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and estrogen-stimulated related receptor alpha (ESRRA) mRNA, a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Transcriptomics and proteomics analysis suggested the mitochondria produced in the presence of human ApoE3 and E4 were not as metabolically efficient as those in the wild type or ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we propose that PPARgamma agonism induces neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and improves glucose utilization leading to improved cellular function and provides mechanistic support for the improvement in cognition observed in treatment of Alzheimer's patients with rosiglitazone.

  11. Neonatal vitamin D and childhood brain tumor risk.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Parveen; Doody, David R; Mckean-Cowdin, Roberta; Mueller, Beth A

    2015-05-15

    Vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is common. Compelling animal evidence suggests carcinogenic effects of vitamin D deficiency on the brains of offspring; however, the impact of circulating vitamin D [25(OH)D] on childhood brain tumor (CBT) risk has not been previously evaluated. Using linked birth-cancer registry data in Washington State, 247 CBT cases (<15 years at diagnosis; born 1991 or later) were identified. A total of 247 birth year-, sex- and race-matched controls were selected from the remaining birth certificates. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure circulating levels of vitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in neonatal dried blood spots. Overall, no significant associations were observed. However, when stratified by median birth weight (3,458 g), there was evidence of increasing risk of CBT with increasing 25(OH)D3 among children in the higher birth weight category. Compared to the lowest quartile (2.8-7.7 ng/mL), odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the second (7.7-<11.0 ng/mL), third (11.0-<14.7 ng/mL) and fourth (14.7-37.0) quartiles of 25(OH)D3 were 1.7 (1.0-3.3), 2.4 (1.2-4.8) and 2.6 (1.2-5.6), respectively. Among children in the lower birth weight category, there was suggestive evidence of a protective effect: ORs and 95% CIs for the second, third and fourth quartiles were 0.9 (0.4-1.9), 0.7 (0.3-1.4) and 0.6 (0.3-1.3), respectively. Any associations of neonatal vitamin D with CBT may be birth weight-specific, suggesting the possible involvement of insulin-like growth factor 1, circulating levels of which have been associated with vitamin D and accelerated fetal growth.

  12. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  13. Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A six-hour hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15 min or 2 hr after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and Caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha during neonatal brain development affects anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-15

    A nascent literature suggests that neonatal infection is a risk factor for the development of brain, behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in later life. It has been documented that neonatal infection raises the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in neonate rodents and such infections may result in neonatal brain injury, at least in part, through pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, previous studies have shown that TNF-α is involved in cellular differentiation, neurogenesis and programmed cell death during the development of the central nervous system. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to TNF-α can affect body weight, stress-induced corticosterone (COR), anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult mice. In the present study, neonatal mice were treated to recombinant mouse TNF-α (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 1 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 3 and 5, then adult male and female mice were exposed to different behavioral tests. The results indicated that neonatal TNF-α treatment reduced body weight in neonatal period in both sexes. In addition, this study presents findings indicating that high doses of TNF- increase stress-induced COR levels, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult males, but increase levels of anxiety without significantly influencing depression in adult female mice [corrected]. Our findings suggest that TNF-α exposure during neonatal period can alter brain and behavior development in a dose and sex-dependent manner in mice.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha during neonatal brain development affects anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-15

    A nascent literature suggests that neonatal infection is a risk factor for the development of brain, behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in later life. It has been documented that neonatal infection raises the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in neonate rodents and such infections may result in neonatal brain injury, at least in part, through pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, previous studies have shown that TNF-α is involved in cellular differentiation, neurogenesis and programmed cell death during the development of the central nervous system. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to TNF-α can affect body weight, stress-induced corticosterone (COR), anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult mice. In the present study, neonatal mice were treated to recombinant mouse TNF-α (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 1 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 3 and 5, then adult male and female mice were exposed to different behavioral tests. The results indicated that neonatal TNF-α treatment reduced body weight in neonatal period in both sexes. In addition, this study presents findings indicating that high doses of TNF- increase stress-induced COR levels, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult males, but increase levels of anxiety without significantly influencing depression in adult female mice [corrected]. Our findings suggest that TNF-α exposure during neonatal period can alter brain and behavior development in a dose and sex-dependent manner in mice. PMID:24398264

  16. Acid extrusion via blood–brain barrier causes brain alkalosis and seizures after neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Mohamed M.; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Watkins, Paul V.; Voipio, Juha; Kanold, Patrick O.; Kaila, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Birth asphyxia is often associated with a high seizure burden that is predictive of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. The mechanisms underlying birth asphyxia seizures are unknown. Using an animal model of birth asphyxia based on 6-day-old rat pups, we have recently shown that the seizure burden is linked to an increase in brain extracellular pH that consists of the recovery from the asphyxia-induced acidosis, and of a subsequent plateau level well above normal extracellular pH. In the present study, two-photon imaging of intracellular pH in neocortical neurons in vivo showed that pH changes also underwent a biphasic acid–alkaline response, resulting in an alkaline plateau level. The mean alkaline overshoot was strongly suppressed by a graded restoration of normocapnia after asphyxia. The parallel post-asphyxia increase in extra- and intracellular pH levels indicated a net loss of acid equivalents from brain tissue that was not attributable to a disruption of the blood–brain barrier, as demonstrated by a lack of increased sodium fluorescein extravasation into the brain, and by the electrophysiological characteristics of the blood–brain barrier. Indeed, electrode recordings of pH in the brain and trunk demonstrated a net efflux of acid equivalents from the brain across the blood–brain barrier, which was abolished by the Na/H exchange inhibitor, N-methyl-isobutyl amiloride. Pharmacological inhibition of Na/H exchange also suppressed the seizure activity associated with the brain-specific alkalosis. Our findings show that the post-asphyxia seizures are attributable to an enhanced Na/H exchange-dependent net extrusion of acid equivalents across the blood–brain barrier and to consequent brain alkalosis. These results suggest targeting of blood–brain barrier-mediated pH regulation as a novel approach in the prevention and therapy of neonatal seizures. PMID:23125183

  17. Acid extrusion via blood-brain barrier causes brain alkalosis and seizures after neonatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed M; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Watkins, Paul V; Voipio, Juha; Kanold, Patrick O; Kaila, Kai

    2012-11-01

    Birth asphyxia is often associated with a high seizure burden that is predictive of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. The mechanisms underlying birth asphyxia seizures are unknown. Using an animal model of birth asphyxia based on 6-day-old rat pups, we have recently shown that the seizure burden is linked to an increase in brain extracellular pH that consists of the recovery from the asphyxia-induced acidosis, and of a subsequent plateau level well above normal extracellular pH. In the present study, two-photon imaging of intracellular pH in neocortical neurons in vivo showed that pH changes also underwent a biphasic acid-alkaline response, resulting in an alkaline plateau level. The mean alkaline overshoot was strongly suppressed by a graded restoration of normocapnia after asphyxia. The parallel post-asphyxia increase in extra- and intracellular pH levels indicated a net loss of acid equivalents from brain tissue that was not attributable to a disruption of the blood-brain barrier, as demonstrated by a lack of increased sodium fluorescein extravasation into the brain, and by the electrophysiological characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Indeed, electrode recordings of pH in the brain and trunk demonstrated a net efflux of acid equivalents from the brain across the blood-brain barrier, which was abolished by the Na/H exchange inhibitor, N-methyl-isobutyl amiloride. Pharmacological inhibition of Na/H exchange also suppressed the seizure activity associated with the brain-specific alkalosis. Our findings show that the post-asphyxia seizures are attributable to an enhanced Na/H exchange-dependent net extrusion of acid equivalents across the blood-brain barrier and to consequent brain alkalosis. These results suggest targeting of blood-brain barrier-mediated pH regulation as a novel approach in the prevention and therapy of neonatal seizures.

  18. Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinchao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Fengfang; Lin, Weinian

    2015-01-01

    Damage-activated stem/progenitor cells play important roles in regenerating lost cells and in tissue repair. Previous studies reported that the mouse utricle has limited hair cell regeneration ability after hair cell ablation. However, the potential progenitor cell population regenerating new hair cells remains undiscovered. In this study, we first found that Lgr5, a Wnt target gene that is not usually expressed in the neonatal mouse utricle, can be activated by 24 h neomycin treatment in a sub-population of supporting cells in the striolar region of the neonatal mouse utricle. Lineage tracing demonstrated that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate new hair cells in explant culture. We isolated the damage-activated Lgr5-positive cells with flow cytometry and found that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate hair cells in vitro, and self-renew to form spheres, which maintained the capacity to differentiate into hair cells over seven generations of passages. Our results suggest that damage-activated Lgr5-positive supporting cells act as hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse utricle, which may help to uncover a potential route to regenerate hair cell in mammals.

  19. A neonatal perspective on Homo erectus brain growth.

    PubMed

    Cofran, Zachary; DeSilva, Jeremy M

    2015-04-01

    The Mojokerto calvaria has been central to assessment of brain growth in Homo erectus, but different analytical approaches and uncertainty in the specimen's age at death have hindered consensus on the nature of H. erectus brain growth. We simulate average annual rates (AR) of absolute endocranial volume (ECV) growth and proportional size change (PSC) in H. erectus, utilizing estimates of H. erectus neonatal ECV and a range of ages for Mojokerto. These values are compared with resampled ARs and PSCs from ontogenetic series of humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas from birth to six years. Results are consistent with other studies of ECV growth in extant taxa. There is extensive overlap in PSC between all living species through the first postnatal year, with continued but lesser overlap between humans and chimpanzees to age six. Human ARs are elevated above those of apes, although there is modest overlap up to 0.50 years. Ape ARs overlap throughout the sequence, with gorillas slightly elevated over chimpanzees up to 0.50 years. Simulated H. erectus PSCs can be found in all living species by 0.50 years, and the median falls below the human and chimpanzee ranges after 2.5 years. H. erectus ARs are elevated above those of all extant taxa prior to 0.50 years, and after two years they fall out of the human range but are still above ape ranges. A review of evidence for the age at death of Mojokerto supports an estimate of around one year, indicating absolute brain growth rates in the lower half of the human range. These results point to secondary altriciality in H. erectus, implying that key human adaptations for increasing the energy budget of females may have been established by at least 1 Ma. PMID:25771994

  20. Distribution of Cytoglobin in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Stefan; Wystub, Sylvia; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex (CCo), in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells), in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes), basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum (VP)), and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes) were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei), epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus (SC). The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive (Cygb-IR) fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide (NO)-synthase in neurons, which supports a

  1. Evaluation of an automatic brain segmentation method developed for neonates on adult MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Viergever, Max A.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is of clinical relevance in images acquired at all ages. The literature presents a clear distinction between methods developed for MR images of infants, and methods developed for images of adults. The aim of this work is to evaluate a method developed for neonatal images in the segmentation of adult images. The evaluated method employs supervised voxel classification in subsequent stages, exploiting spatial and intensity information. Evaluation was performed using images available within the MRBrainS13 challenge. The obtained average Dice coefficients were 85.77% for grey matter, 88.66% for white matter, 81.08% for cerebrospinal fluid, 95.65% for cerebrum, and 96.92% for intracranial cavity, currently resulting in the best overall ranking. The possibility of applying the same method to neonatal as well as adult images can be of great value in cross-sectional studies that include a wide age range.

  2. Neonatal Vitamin D and Childhood Brain Tumor Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Parveen; Doody, David R.; Mckean-Cowdin, Roberta; Mueller, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is common. Compelling animal evidence suggests carcinogenic effects of vitamin D deficiency on the brains of offspring; however the impact of circulating vitamin D [25(OH)D] on childhood brain tumor (CBT) risk has not been previously evaluated. Using linked birth-cancer registry data in Washington State, 247 CBT cases (< 15 years at diagnosis; born 1991 or later) were identified. 247 birth year, sex and race-matched controls were selected from the remaining birth certificates. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure circulating levels of vitamin D3 [25-(OH)D3] in neonatal dried blood spots. Overall, no significant associations were observed. However, when stratified by median birth weight (3,458 grams), there was evidence of increasing risk of CBT with increasing 25-(OH)D3 among children in the higher birth weight category. Compared to the lowest quartile (2.8-7.7 ng/mL), odds ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the 2nd (7.7-< 11.0 ng/mL), 3rd (11.0-<14.7 ng/mL) and 4th (14.7-37.0) quartiles of 25-(OH)D3 were 1.7 (1.0-3.3), 2.4 (1.2-4.8) and 2.6 (1.2-5.6), respectively. Among children in the lower birth weight category, there was suggestive evidence of a protective effect: ORs and 95% CI for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th quartiles were 0.9 (0.4-1.9), 0.7 (0.3-1.4) and 0.6 (0.3-1.3), respectively. Any associations of neonatal vitamin D with CBT may be birth weight-specific, suggesting the possible involvement of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), circulating levels of which have been associated with vitamin D and accelerated fetal growth. PMID:25348494

  3. Effect of different cryoprotectant agents on spermatogenesis efficiency in cryopreserved and grafted neonatal mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Cengiz; Mullen, Brendan; Jarvi, Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Lo, Kirk C

    2013-08-01

    Restoration of male fertility associated with use of the cryopreserved testicular tissue would be a significant advance in human and animal assisted reproductive technology. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of four different cryoprotectant agents (CPA) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in cryopreserved and allotransplanted neonatal mouse testicular tissue. Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) with 5% fetal bovine serum including either 0.7 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 0.7 M propylene glycol (PrOH), 0.7 M ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol was used as the cryoprotectant solution. Donor testes were collected and dissected from neonatal pups of CD-1 mice (one day old). Freezing and seeding of the testicular whole tissues was performed using an automated controlled-rate freezer. Four fresh (non-frozen) or frozen-thawed pieces of testes were subcutaneously grafted onto the hind flank of each castrated male NCr nude recipient mouse and harvested after 3 months. Fresh neonatal testes grafts recovered from transplant sites had the most advanced rate of spermatogenesis with elongated spermatid and spermatozoa in 46.6% of seminiferous tubules and had higher levels of serum testosterone compared to all other frozen-thawed-graft groups (p<0.05). Fresh grafts and frozen-thawed grafts in the DMSO group had the highest rate of tissue survival compared to PrOH, EG, and glycerol after harvesting (p>0.05). The most effective CPA for the freezing and thawing of neonatal mouse testes was DMSO in comparison with EG (p<0.05) in both pre-grafted and post-grafted tissues based on histopathological evaluation. Likewise, the highest level of serum testosterone was obtained from the DMSO CPA group compared to all other cryoprotectants evaluated (p<0.05). The typical damage observed in the frozen-thawed grafts included disruption of the interstitial stroma, intercellular connection ruptures, and detachment of spermatogonia from the basement membrane. These findings

  4. Viral transduction of the neonatal brain delivers controllable genetic mosaicism for visualising and manipulating neuronal circuits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yoen; Ash, Ryan T; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Levites, Yona; Golde, Todd E; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2013-04-01

    The neonatal intraventricular injection of adeno-associated virus has been shown to transduce neurons widely throughout the brain, but its full potential for experimental neuroscience has not been adequately explored. We report a detailed analysis of the method's versatility with an emphasis on experimental applications where tools for genetic manipulation are currently lacking. Viral injection into the neonatal mouse brain is fast, easy, and accesses regions of the brain including the cerebellum and brainstem that have been difficult to target with other techniques such as electroporation. We show that viral transduction produces an inherently mosaic expression pattern that can be exploited by varying the titer to transduce isolated neurons or densely-packed populations. We demonstrate that the expression of virally-encoded proteins is active much sooner than previously believed, allowing genetic perturbation during critical periods of neuronal plasticity, but is also long-lasting and stable, allowing chronic studies of aging. We harness these features to visualise and manipulate neurons in the hindbrain that have been recalcitrant to approaches commonly applied in the cortex. We show that viral labeling aids the analysis of postnatal dendritic maturation in cerebellar Purkinje neurons by allowing individual cells to be readily distinguished, and then demonstrate that the same sparse labeling allows live in vivo imaging of mature Purkinje neurons at a resolution sufficient for complete analytical reconstruction. Given the rising availability of viral constructs, packaging services, and genetically modified animals, these techniques should facilitate a wide range of experiments into brain development, function, and degeneration. PMID:23347239

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment for neonatal ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2012-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies have been proven effective in experimental models of numerous disorders. Treatment of ischemic brain injury by transplantation of MSCs in neonatal animal models has been shown to be effective in reducing lesion volume and improving functional outcome. The beneficial effect of MSC transplantation to treat neonatal brain injury might be explained by the great plasticity of the neonatal brain. The neonatal brain is still in a developmentally active phase, leading to a better efficiency of MSC transplantation than that observed in experiments using adult models of stroke. Enhanced neurogenesis and axonal remodeling likely underlie the improved functional outcome following MSC treatment after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. With respect to the mechanism of repair by MSCs, MSCs do not survive long term and replace damaged tissue themselves. We propose that MSCs react to the needs of the ischemic cerebral environment by secretion of several growth factors, cytokines, and other bioactive molecules to regulate damage and repair processes. Parenchymal cells react to the secretome of the MSCs and contribute to stimulate repair processes. These intrinsic adaptive properties of MSCs make them excellent candidates for a novel therapy to treat the devastating effects of HI encephalopathy in the human neonate. PMID:22430383

  6. Optimization of 3D MP-RAGE for neonatal brain imaging at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lori-Anne; DeVito, Timothy J; Winter, Jeff D; Orr, Timothy N; Thompson, R Terry; Gelman, Neil

    2007-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown great potential for studying the impact of prematurity and pathology on brain development. We have investigated the potential of optimized T1-weighted 3D magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo imaging (MP-RAGE) for obtaining contrast between white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) in neonates at 3 T. Using numerical simulations, we predicted that the inversion time (TI) for obtaining strongest contrast at 3 T is approximately 2 s for neonates, whereas for adults, this value is approximately 1.3 s. The optimal neonatal TI value was found to be insensitive to reasonable variations of the assumed T1 relaxation times. The maximum theoretical contrast for neonates was found to be approximately one third of that for adults. Using the optimized TI values, MP-RAGE images were obtained from seven neonates and seven adults at 3 T, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured for WM versus five GM regions. Compared to adults, neonates exhibited lower CNR between cortical GM and WM and showed a different pattern of regional variation in CNR. These results emphasize the importance of sequence optimization specifically for neonates and demonstrate the challenge in obtaining strong contrast in neonatal brain with T1-weighted 3D imaging. PMID:17391887

  7. Olfactory classical conditioning in neonatal mouse pups using thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Bieke; Matrot, Boris; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Van den Bergh, Omer; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gallego, Jorge

    2012-04-01

    Mouse models are increasingly used to investigate genetic contributions to developmental disorders in children, especially newborns. In particular, early cognitive assessment in newborn mice is critical to evaluate pediatric drug efficacy and toxicity. Unfortunately, methods for behavioral tests in newborn mice are scarce. Therefore, developing such tests for newborn mice is a priority challenge for neurogenetics and pharmacological research. The aim of the present study was to develop a conditioning method well suited to high-throughput cognitive screening in newborn mice. To this end, we developed an odor-preference conditioning test using ambient temperature as an unconditioned stimulus (US) and artificial odors as conditioned stimuli (CS). First, we showed that mouse pups move toward the thermoneutral temperature when offered a choice between a thermoneutral and cold environment, thus showing thermotaxis. Second, we conducted a classical conditioning paradigm in pups aged six to ten days. In terms of central nervous system development, this period corresponds to extreme prematurity to early post-term period in humans. During acquisition, the pups were alternatively exposed to odor CS paired with either cold or warm temperatures. Immediately after acquisition, the pups underwent a two-odor choice test, which showed preference for the odor previously paired with the warm temperature, thus showing conditioning. The proposed paradigm is easy to conduct, and requires modest experimenter interference. The method is well suited for high-throughput screening of early associative disorders in newborn mice.

  8. Maternal obesity leads to increased proliferation and numbers of astrocytes in the developing fetal and neonatal mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Glendining, Kelly A; Grattan, David R; Jasoni, Christine L

    2016-10-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy is associated with chronic maternal, placental, and fetal inflammation; and it elevates the risk for offspring obesity. Changes in the development of the hypothalamus, a brain region that regulates body weight and energy balance, are emerging as important determinants of offspring risk, but such changes are only beginning to be defined. Here we focused on the hypothesis that the pathological exposure of developing hypothalamic astrocytes to cytokines would alter their development. A maternal high-fat diet (mHFD) mouse model was used to investigate changes in hypothalamic astrocytes in the fetus during late gestation and in early neonates by using immunochemistry, confocal microscopy, and qPCR. The number of astrocytes and the proportion of proliferating astrocytes was significantly higher in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus at both ages compared to control offspring from normal weight pregnancies. Supplemental to this we found that cultured fetal hypothalamic astrocytes proliferated significantly in response to IL6 (10ng/ml), one of the cytokines significantly elevated in fetuses of obese dams, via the JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway. Thus, maternal obesity during pregnancy stimulated the proliferation and thereby increased numbers of astrocytes in the fetal as well as early neonatal hypothalamus, which may be driven, during fetal life, by IL6. PMID:27326907

  9. Reflection mode photoacoustic imaging through infant skull toward noninvasive imaging of neonatal brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Chamberland, David L.; Xi, Guohua; Carson, Paul L.

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of transcranial imaging of neonatal brains with reflection mode photoacoustic technology has been explored. By using unembalmed infant skulls and fresh canine brains, experiments have been conducted to examine the ultrasound and light attenuation in the skull bone as well as consequent photoacoustic images through the skull. Mapping of blood vessels in a transcranial manner has been successfully achieved by employing the raster scan of a single-element transducer or a 2D PVDF array transducer. Experimental results indicate that noninvasive photoacoustic imaging of neonatal brain with a depth of 2 cm or more beneath the skull is feasible when working with near-infrared light. This study suggests that the emerging photoacoustic technology may become a powerful tool in the future for noninvasive diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of disorders in prenatal or neonatal brains.

  10. Composition and function of the undernourished neonatal mouse intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Ajami, Nadim J; Wong, Matthew C; Bessard, Brooke C; Conner, Margaret E; Petrosino, Joseph F

    2015-10-01

    Undernutrition remains one of the key global health challenges facing children today. Distinct microbial profiles have been associated with obesity and undernutrition, although mechanisms behind these associations are unknown. We sought to understand how protein-energy undernutrition alters the microbiome and to propose mechanisms by which these alterations influence the malnourished phenotype. Outbred CD1 neonatal mice were undernourished by timed separation from lactating dams, while control animals nursed ad libitum. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and compositional analysis identified microbes from luminal contents of ileum, cecum and colon, while whole metagenome shotgun sequencing identified microbial gene content. Our results suggest that the most important determinant of microbiome composition is body compartment; communities derived from ileum are distinct from those from cecum and colon as observed by phylogenetic clustering analysis. However, within each compartment, microbiota from undernourished and control mice cluster separately. At the phylum level, undernourished mice harbor more Verrucomicrobia and less Bacteroidetes in the distal intestine; these changes are driven by an increase in Akkermansia muciniphila and decreases in Bacteroides and Alistipes. Undernourished mice have an overall loss of microbial community richness and diversity and are deficient in multiple microbial genetic pathways including N-glycan, inositol phosphate and one-carbon metabolism. Losses in these microbial genes may confer less efficient extraction of energy from nondigestible dietary components including glycans and phytates, whereas epigenetic alterations provide a means of persistently altering metabolism even after adequate nutrition is restored. Thus, the microbiome of an undernourished host may perpetuate states of poor nutrition via multiple mechanisms.

  11. Spontaneous hair cell regeneration in the neonatal mouse cochlea in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brandon C; Chai, Renjie; Lenoir, Anne; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhang, LingLi; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Chalasani, Kavita; Steigelman, Katherine A; Fang, Jie; Rubel, Edwin W; Cheng, Alan G; Zuo, Jian

    2014-02-01

    Loss of cochlear hair cells in mammals is currently believed to be permanent, resulting in hearing impairment that affects more than 10% of the population. Here, we developed two genetic strategies to ablate neonatal mouse cochlear hair cells in vivo. Both Pou4f3(DTR/+) and Atoh1-CreER™; ROSA26(DTA/+) alleles allowed selective and inducible hair cell ablation. After hair cell loss was induced at birth, we observed spontaneous regeneration of hair cells. Fate-mapping experiments demonstrated that neighboring supporting cells acquired a hair cell fate, which increased in a basal to apical gradient, averaging over 120 regenerated hair cells per cochlea. The normally mitotically quiescent supporting cells proliferated after hair cell ablation. Concurrent fate mapping and labeling with mitotic tracers showed that regenerated hair cells were derived by both mitotic regeneration and direct transdifferentiation. Over time, regenerated hair cells followed a similar pattern of maturation to normal hair cell development, including the expression of prestin, a terminal differentiation marker of outer hair cells, although many new hair cells eventually died. Hair cell regeneration did not occur when ablation was induced at one week of age. Our findings demonstrate that the neonatal mouse cochlea is capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration after damage in vivo. Thus, future studies on the neonatal cochlea might shed light on the competence of supporting cells to regenerate hair cells and on the factors that promote the survival of newly regenerated hair cells.

  12. Does Magnetic Resonance Brain Scanning at 3.0 Tesla Pose a Hyperthermic Challenge to Term Neonates?

    PubMed

    Cawley, Paul; Few, Karen; Greenwood, Richard; Malcolm, Paul; Johnson, Glyn; Lally, Pete; Thayyil, Sudhin; Clarke, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation 3-Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners offer improved neonatal neuroimaging, but the greater associated radiofrequency radiation may increase the risk of hyperthermia. Safety data for neonatal 3-T MR scanning are lacking. We measured rectal temperatures continuously in 25 neonates undergoing 3-T brain MR imaging and observed no significant hyperthermic threat.

  13. Neonatal brain abnormalities and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years in children born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Omizzolo, Cristina; Scratch, Shannon E; Stargatt, Robyn; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; Cheong, Jeanie; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie E; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Using prospective longitudinal data from 198 very preterm and 70 full term children, this study characterised the memory and learning abilities of very preterm children at 7 years of age in both verbal and visual domains. The relationship between the extent of brain abnormalities on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years of age in very preterm children was also investigated. Neonatal MRI scans were qualitatively assessed for global, white-matter, cortical grey-matter, deep grey-matter, and cerebellar abnormalities. Very preterm children performed less well on measures of immediate memory, working memory, long-term memory, and learning compared with term-born controls. Neonatal brain abnormalities, and in particular deep grey-matter abnormality, were associated with poorer memory and learning performance at 7 years in very preterm children. Findings support the importance of cerebral neonatal pathology for predicting later memory and learning function.

  14. Structure and function of neonatal social communication in a genetic mouse model of autism

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomohisa; Okabe, Shota; Ó Broin, Pilib; Nishi, Akira; Ye, Kenny; Beckert, Michael V.; Izumi, Takeshi; Machida, Akihiro; Kang, Gina; Abe, Seiji; Pena, Jose L.; Golden, Aaron; Kikusui, Takefumi; Hiroi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    A critical step toward understanding autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is to identify both genetic and environmental risk factors. A number of rare copy number variants (CNVs) have emerged as robust genetic risk factors for ASD, but not all CNV carriers exhibit ASD and the severity of ASD symptoms varies among CNV carriers. Although evidence exists that various environmental factors modulate symptomatic severity, the precise mechanisms by which these factors determine the ultimate severity of ASD are still poorly understood. Here, using a mouse heterozygous for Tbx1 (a gene encoded in 22q11.2 CNV), we demonstrate that a genetically-triggered neonatal phenotype in vocalization generates a negative environmental loop in pup-mother social communication. Wild-type pups used individually diverse sequences of simple and complicated call types, but heterozygous pups used individually invariable call sequences with less complicated call types. When played back, representative wild-type call sequences elicited maternal approach, but heterozygous call sequences were ineffective. When the representative wild-type call sequences were randomized, they were ineffective in eliciting vigorous maternal approach behavior. These data demonstrate that an ASD risk gene alters the neonatal call sequence of its carriers and this pup phenotype in turn diminishes maternal care through atypical social communication. Thus, an ASD risk gene induces, through atypical neonatal call sequences, less than optimal maternal care as a negative neonatal environmental factor. PMID:26666205

  15. Structure and function of neonatal social communication in a genetic mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Okabe, S; Broin, P Ó; Nishi, A; Ye, K; Beckert, M V; Izumi, T; Machida, A; Kang, G; Abe, S; Pena, J L; Golden, A; Kikusui, T; Hiroi, N

    2016-09-01

    A critical step toward understanding autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is to identify both genetic and environmental risk factors. A number of rare copy number variants (CNVs) have emerged as robust genetic risk factors for ASD, but not all CNV carriers exhibit ASD and the severity of ASD symptoms varies among CNV carriers. Although evidence exists that various environmental factors modulate symptomatic severity, the precise mechanisms by which these factors determine the ultimate severity of ASD are still poorly understood. Here, using a mouse heterozygous for Tbx1 (a gene encoded in 22q11.2 CNV), we demonstrate that a genetically triggered neonatal phenotype in vocalization generates a negative environmental loop in pup-mother social communication. Wild-type pups used individually diverse sequences of simple and complicated call types, but heterozygous pups used individually invariable call sequences with less complicated call types. When played back, representative wild-type call sequences elicited maternal approach, but heterozygous call sequences were ineffective. When the representative wild-type call sequences were randomized, they were ineffective in eliciting vigorous maternal approach behavior. These data demonstrate that an ASD risk gene alters the neonatal call sequence of its carriers and this pup phenotype in turn diminishes maternal care through atypical social communication. Thus, an ASD risk gene induces, through atypical neonatal call sequences, less than optimal maternal care as a negative neonatal environmental factor. PMID:26666205

  16. A systematic analysis of neonatal mouse heart regeneration after apical resection.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Donald Marion; O'Meara, Caitlin Claire; Ho, Nhi Ngoc; Gannon, Joseph; Cai, Lei; Lee, Richard Theodore

    2015-02-01

    The finding that neonatal mice are able to regenerate myocardium after apical resection has recently been questioned. We determined if heart regeneration is influenced by the size of cardiac resection and whether surgical retraction of the ventricular apex results in an increase in cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity. We performed moderate or large apical ventricular resections on neonatal mice and quantified scar infiltration into the left ventricular wall at 21 days post-surgery. Moderately resected hearts had 15±2% of the wall infiltrated by a collagen scar; significantly greater scar infiltration (23±4%) was observed in hearts with large resections. Resected hearts had higher levels of cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity relative to sham hearts. Surgically retracting the ventricle often resulted in fibrosis and induced cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity that were comparable to that of resected hearts. We conclude that apical resection in neonatal mice induces cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity and neomyogenesis, although scarring can occur. Surgical technique and definition of approach to assessing the extent of regeneration are both critical when using the neonatal mouse apical resection model.

  17. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  18. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  19. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Neonatal Brain Temperature Using a Zero-Heat-Flux Sensor Matrix.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Louis; Bongers, Edwin; Lamichhane, Bishal; Bambang-Oetomo, Sidarto

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of preterm neonates must be maintained within a narrow window to ensure their survival. Continuously measuring their core temperature provides an optimal means of monitoring their thermoregulation and their response to environmental changes. However, existing methods of measuring core temperature can be very obtrusive, such as rectal probes, or inaccurate/lagging, such as skin temperature sensors and spot-checks using tympanic temperature sensors. This study investigates an unobtrusive method of measuring brain temperature continuously using an embedded zero-heat-flux (ZHF) sensor matrix placed under the head of the neonate. The measured temperature profile is used to segment areas of motion and incorrect positioning, where the neonate's head is not above the sensors. We compare our measurements during low motion/stable periods to esophageal temperatures for 12 preterm neonates, measured for an average of 5 h per neonate. The method we propose shows good correlation with the reference temperature for most of the neonates. The unobtrusive embedding of the matrix in the neonate's environment poses no harm or disturbance to the care work-flow, while measuring core temperature. To address the effect of motion on the ZHF measurements in the current embodiment, we recommend a more ergonomic embedding ensuring the sensors are continuously placed under the neonate's head.

  20. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome

    PubMed Central

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J. F.; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of “wiring cost” explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost in the mouse connectome by using data from 461 systematically acquired anterograde-tracer injections into the right cortical and subcortical regions of the mouse brain. We estimated brain-wide weights, distances, and wiring costs of axonal projections and performed a multiscale topological and spatial analysis of the resulting weighted and directed mouse brain connectome. Our analysis showed that the mouse connectome has small-world properties, a hierarchical modular structure, and greater-than-minimal wiring costs. High-participation hubs of this connectome mediated communication between functionally specialized and anatomically localized modules, had especially high wiring costs, and closely corresponded to regions of the default mode network. Analyses of independently acquired histological and gene-expression data showed that nodal participation colocalized with low neuronal density and high expression of genes enriched for cognition, learning and memory, and behavior. The mouse connectome contains high-participation hubs, which are not explained by wiring-cost minimization but instead reflect competitive selection pressures for integrated network topology as a basis for higher cognitive and behavioral functions. PMID:26216962

  1. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J F; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-08-11

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of "wiring cost" explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost in the mouse connectome by using data from 461 systematically acquired anterograde-tracer injections into the right cortical and subcortical regions of the mouse brain. We estimated brain-wide weights, distances, and wiring costs of axonal projections and performed a multiscale topological and spatial analysis of the resulting weighted and directed mouse brain connectome. Our analysis showed that the mouse connectome has small-world properties, a hierarchical modular structure, and greater-than-minimal wiring costs. High-participation hubs of this connectome mediated communication between functionally specialized and anatomically localized modules, had especially high wiring costs, and closely corresponded to regions of the default mode network. Analyses of independently acquired histological and gene-expression data showed that nodal participation colocalized with low neuronal density and high expression of genes enriched for cognition, learning and memory, and behavior. The mouse connectome contains high-participation hubs, which are not explained by wiring-cost minimization but instead reflect competitive selection pressures for integrated network topology as a basis for higher cognitive and behavioral functions. PMID:26216962

  2. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases.

  3. Neonatal Brain Abscess due to Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Monojit; Thapa, Rajoo; Mallick, Debkrishna; Datta, Asok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) causing brain abscess in newborn infants is rare. Presented herein, is a 27-day-old male neonate who developed two frontal lobe abscesses in association with K. pneumoniae sepsis and meningitis. Antibiotic susceptibility testing utilizing the double-disk synergy method (Cefotaxime and Amoxycillin-Clavulanate) confirmed the extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production by the isolate. He was treated simultaneously with antibiotics (Meropenem and Amikacin) and abscess aspiration through the anterior fontanelle, with less than satisfactory outcome. ESBL producing K. pneumoniae brain abscess in neonates is extremely rare in the English literature. Emperical carbapenems and aminoglycoside coverage in neonates with K. pneumoniae sepsis and brain abscess, especially in areas with high rate of ESBL producing bacteria may be warranted. PMID:25584278

  4. Long term creatine monohydrate supplementation, following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, improves neuromuscular coordination and spatial learning in male albino mouse.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-04-01

    Creatine is known to rescue animals following brain damage. Present study was designed to demonstrate the effect of long term (15 week) supplementation of 2% creatine monohydrate (Cr), following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, on learning and memory formation in male albino mouse. Albino mice pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by 8% hypoxia for 25 minutes. Following weaning, animals were separated and grouped on the basis of dietry supplementation for 15 weeks followed by a battery of neurological tests including Morris water maze, open field and rota rod. It was observed that HI mice fed on 2% Cr for 15 weeks performed better than their littermates mice on normal rodent diet during water maze (learning and memory) and rotating rod (neuro-muscular coordination and balance) test while the results of open field test remained unaffected. It was also observed that Cr treated animals had a reduced brain infarct volume than untreated but this difference did not reached statistical significance. We have also observed an overall increase in body weight in Cr treated mice during the study. Over all our results are indicating that long term Cr supplementation is beneficial for male albino following hypoxic ischemic insult.

  5. Neonatal brain MRI and motor outcome at school age in children with neonatal encephalopathy: a review of personal experience.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Barnett, Anna L

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review (i) the spectrum of neuromotor function at school age in children who had been born full-term and presented with neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and low Apgar scores and (ii) the relation between the presence/absence of such difficulties and neonatal brain MRI. Motor outcome appears to be mainly related to the severity of basal ganglia and internal capsule involvement. Severe basal ganglia lesions were always associated with the most severe outcome, microcephaly, tetraplegia, and severe global delay, whereas more discrete basal ganglia lesions were associated with athetoid cerebral palsy, with normal cognitive development, or minor neuro-motor abnormalities. White matter lesions were associated with abnormal motor outcome only if the internal capsule was involved. Children with moderate white matter changes but normal internal capsule had normal motor outcome at school age. PMID:14640307

  6. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  7. Perinatal Iron and Copper Deficiencies Alter Neonatal Rat Circulating and Brain Thyroid Hormone Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Anderson, Grant W.

    2010-01-01

    Copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and iodine/thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies lead to similar defects in late brain development, suggesting that these micronutrient deficiencies share a common mechanism contributing to the observed derangements. Previous studies in rodents (postweanling and adult) and humans (adolescent and adult) indicate that Cu and Fe deficiencies affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, leading to altered TH status. Importantly, however, relationships between Fe and Cu deficiencies and thyroidal status have not been assessed in the most vulnerable population, the developing fetus/neonate. We hypothesized that Cu and Fe deficiencies reduce circulating and brain TH levels during development, contributing to the defects in brain development associated with these deficiencies. To test this hypothesis, pregnant rat dams were rendered Cu deficient (CuD), FeD, or TH deficient from early gestation through weaning. Serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), and brain T3 levels, were subsequently measured in postnatal d 12 (P12) pups. Cu deficiency reduced serum total T3 by 48%, serum total T4 by 21%, and whole-brain T3 by 10% at P12. Fe deficiency reduced serum total T3 by 43%, serum total T4 by 67%, and whole-brain T3 by 25% at P12. Brain mRNA analysis revealed that expression of several TH-responsive genes were altered in CuD or FeD neonates, suggesting that reduced TH concentrations were sensed by the FeD and CuD neonatal brain. These results indicate that at least some of the brain defects associated with neonatal Fe and Cu deficiencies are mediated through reductions in circulating and brain TH levels. PMID:20573724

  8. Effects of heavy ion to the primary culture of mouse brain cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Kohno, Yukio; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    To investigate effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to CNS system, we adopted mouse neonatal brain cells in culture being exposed to heavy ions by HIMAC at NIRS and NSRL at BNL. The applied dose varied from 0.05 Gy up to 2.0 Gy. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and neuron survival focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains, SCID, B6, B6C3F1, C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to particle radiation as evaluated by 10% apoptotic criterion. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID and B6 cells exposing to different ions (H, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed in the high LET (55-200 keV/micrometers) and low dose (<0.5 Gy) regions. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. In this report, a result of memory and learning function to adult mice after whole-body and brain local irradiation at carbon ion and iron ion.

  9. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of paraquat accumulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Tarasewicz, Elizabeth; Mathew, Jason; Ohman Strickland, Pamela A.; Buckley, Brian; Richardson, Jason R.; Richfield, Eric K.

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a potential human neurotoxicant and is used in models of oxidative stress. We determined the toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in adult mouse brain following repeated or prolonged PQ exposure. PQ accumulated in different brain regions and reached a plateau after ~18 i.p. (10 mg/kg) doses and resulted in modest morbidity and mortality unpredictably associated with dose interval and number. PQ had divergent effects on horizontal locomotor behavior depending on the number of doses. PQ decreased striatal dopamine levels after the 18th to 36th i.p. dose (10 mg/kg) and reduced the striatal level of tyrosine hydroxylase. Drinking water exposure to PQ (0.03– 0.05 mg/ml) did not result in any mortality and resulted in concentration and time dependent levels in the brain. The brain half-life of PQ varied with mouse strain. PQ accumulates and may saturate a site in mouse brain resulting in complex PQ level and duration-related consequences. These findings should alter our risk assessment of this compound and demonstrate a useful, but complex dynamic model for understanding the consequences of PQ in the brain. PMID:19084006

  10. Neonatal exposure to PFOS and PFOA in mice results in changes in proteins which are important for neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Niclas; Eriksson, Per; Viberg, Henrik

    2009-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) belong to the family of perfluorinated compounds. They are used in industrial and consumer applications, e.g., clothing fabrics, carpets, and food packaging. PFOS and PFOA are present in the environment and are found in dust and human milk, which implies that newborns and toddlers can be directly exposed to these agents during brain development. Recently, we reported that PFOS and PFOA can cause neurobehavioral defects and changes in the cholinergic system, in the adult animal, when given directly to neonatal mice, and thereby showing similarities with other investigated persistent organic pollutants, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethan, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In recent studies, we have also seen that highly brominated PBDEs can affect the levels of proteins that are important for neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the neonatal mouse brain. The present study shows that a single oral dose of either 21 micromol PFOS or PFOA/kg body weight (11.3 or 8.70 mg), given directly to the neonatal mice on postnatal day 10, significantly increased the levels of CaMKII, GAP-43, and synaptophysin in the hippocampus of the neonatal mouse. Both compounds significantly increased the levels of synaptophysin and tau in cerebral cortex, and PFOA also increased the levels of tau in hippocampus. These proteins are important for normal brain development, and altered levels of these proteins during a critical period of the brain growth spurts could be one of the mechanisms behind earlier reported behavioral defects. PMID:19211617

  11. Non-invasive assessment of neonatal brain oxygen metabolism: A review of newly available techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiying; Chalak, Lina F; Lu, Hanzhang

    2014-10-01

    Because oxidative metabolism is the primary form of energy production in the brain, the amount of oxygen consumed by the brain, denoted by a physiological parameter termed cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), represents a key marker for tissue viability and brain function. Quantitative assessment of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the neonate may provide an important marker in better understanding normal brain development and in making diagnosis and treatment decisions in neonatal brain injuries. Measurement of CMRO2 in humans has been a challenging task, particularly in neonates. Recently, several promising techniques have been proposed to quantify neonatal CMRO2 and the purpose of this article is to provide a technical review of these techniques. Among these, we will focus the review on the NIRS optic based methods and MRI methods which are non-invasive, have been applied in normal and sick newborns and show great potentials. Potential clinical prospects of CMRO2 techniques are discussed in the context of their advantages, challenges and limitations.

  12. Doppler velocimetry of ductus venous in preterm fetuses with brain sparing effect: neonatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cosmo, Ynesmara Coelho; Júnior, Edward Araujo; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; de Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Nassar; Mattar, Rosiane; Lopes, Laudelino Marques; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Souza, Eduardo; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective to evaluate the relationship between ductus venous (DV) and Doppler velocimetry in neonatal outcome in severe compromised preterm fetuses. Methods the study was designed as an observational and cross-sectional study with 52 premature neonates with brain sparing effect. The criteria of neonatal severe morbidity were: severe intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 3 or 4), retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4), cystic periventricular leukomalatia, bronchopneumo dysplasia and neonatal mortality. The fetuses were divided in two groups: group 0 - all the fetuses with ventricular systole/atrial contraction (S/A) in DV ratio values less them 3.4; group 1 - fetuses with values of S/A ratio greater than 3.4. Results 42% of fetuses showed abnormal S/A ratio in DV and 48% showed birth weight below percentile 3 for gestational age. There was no statistical significance comparing the 02 groups according to bronchopneumo dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4) and intraventricular hemorrhage (grade 3 or 4). Only one fetus presented cystic periventricular leukomalatia. We found statistically significant association between abnormal DV S/A ratio and neonatal mortality (CI 95%, 1.28 –38.22, p< 0.002). Conclusions our results suggest that abnormal DV blood flow detected by Doppler examination isn’t associated with severe neonatal morbidity but with neonatal mortality. PMID:23181172

  13. Estrogen receptor subtypes selectively mediate female mouse reproductive abnormalities induced by neonatal exposure to estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Hajime; Iguchi, Taisen

    2008-11-20

    Perinatal exposure to estrogens such as diethylstilbestrol (DES), and to estrogenic chemicals, induces persistent anovulation caused by alteration of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, polyovular follicles, uterine abnormalities and persistent vaginal changes in mice. Most activities of estrogenic chemicals are mediated through estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and/or ERbeta. However, little was known about the relative contribution of the individual ER subtypes in induction of abnormalities. We tested the effects of neonatal exposure to ER selective ligands and DES on female mice. Transactivation assays using mouse ERalpha and ERbeta showed that 10(-10)M DES activated both ER subtypes and that the ERalpha agonist (propyl pyrazole triol, PPT) and the ERbeta agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN) selectively activated their respective ERs at 10(-9)M. Neonatal female mice were injected subcutaneously with DES, PPT or DPN and the animals were examined at 13 and 15 weeks of age, respectively. Persistent estrous smears and anovulation were induced in all mice by 0.025-2.5 microg DES and 2.5-25 microg PPT, but not by DPN, suggesting that the observed anovulation was primarily mediated through ERalpha. Disorganization of uterine musculature and ovary-independent vaginal epithelial cell proliferation accompanied by persistent expression of EGF-related genes and interleukin-1-related genes were also mediated through ERalpha. In contrast, polyovular follicles were induced by neonatal treatment with both ERalpha and ERbeta ligands, suggesting that ovarian abnormalities are mediated through both ER subtypes.

  14. A versatile new technique to clear mouse and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Large volumes imaging with microscopic resolution is limited by light scattering. In the last few years based on refractive index matching, different clearing approaches have been developed. Organic solvents and water-based optical clearing agents have been used for optical clearing of entire mouse brain. Although these methods guarantee high transparency and preservation of the fluorescence, though present other non-negligible limitations. Tissue transformation by CLARITY allows high transparency, whole brain immunolabelling and structural and molecular preservation. This method however requires a highly expensive refractive index matching solution limiting practical applicability. In this work we investigate the effectiveness of a water-soluble clearing agent, the 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) to clear mouse and human brain. TDE does not quench the fluorescence signal, is compatible with immunostaining and does not introduce any deformation at sub-cellular level. The not viscous nature of the TDE make it a suitable agent to perform brain slicing during serial two-photon (STP) tomography. In fact, by improving penetration depth it reduces tissue slicing, decreasing the acquisition time and cutting artefacts. TDE can also be used as a refractive index medium for CLARITY. The potential of this method has been explored by imaging a whole transgenic mouse brain with the light sheet microscope. Moreover we apply this technique also on blocks of dysplastic human brain tissue transformed with CLARITY and labeled with different antibody. This clearing approach significantly expands the application of single and two-photon imaging, providing a new useful method for quantitative morphological analysis of structure in mouse and human brain.

  15. Mechanisms of Mouse Neural Precursor Expansion after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Krista D.; Goodus, Matthew T.; Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Jiang, Yuhui; Loporchio, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) is the leading cause of brain damage resulting from birth complications. Studies in neonatal rats have shown that H-I acutely expands the numbers of neural precursors (NPs) within the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of these studies was to establish which NPs expand after H-I and to determine how leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) insufficiency affects their response. During recovery from H-I, the number of Ki67+ cells in the medial SVZ of the injured hemisphere increased. Similarly, the number and size of primary neurospheres produced from the injured SVZ increased approximately twofold versus controls, and, upon differentiation, more than twice as many neurospheres from the damaged brain were tripotential, suggesting an increase in neural stem cells (NSCs). However, multimarker flow cytometry for CD133/LeX/NG2/CD140a combined with EdU incorporation revealed that NSC frequency diminished after H-I, whereas that of two multipotential progenitors and three unique glial-restricted precursors expanded, attributable to changes in their proliferation. By quantitative PCR, interleukin-6, LIF, and CNTF mRNA increased but with significantly different time courses, with LIF expression correlating best with NP expansion. Therefore, we evaluated the NP response to H-I in LIF-haplodeficient mice. Flow cytometry revealed that one subset of multipotential and bipotential intermediate progenitors did not increase after H-I, whereas another subset was amplified. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that neonatal H-I alters the composition of the SVZ and that LIF is a key regulator for a subset of intermediate progenitors that expand during acute recovery from neonatal H-I. PMID:26063918

  16. Neonatal handling and gender modulate brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone levels following repeated stressors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Panagiotaropoulos, Theofanis; Pondiki, Stavroula; Papaioannou, Agapi; Alikaridis, Filaretos; Stamatakis, Antonis; Gerozissis, Kyriaki; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal handling affects the response to repeated stress in a sexually dimorphic manner. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these gender-dependent effects, we investigated the consequences of neonatal androgenization and handling on adult stress reactivity by determining: (a) immobility time during repeated forced swimming, (b) plasma corticosterone levels, and (c) brain serotonin and dopamine levels and turnover after either repeated forced swimming, or repeated forced swimming followed by repeated restraint stress. In neonatally androgenized females, immobility time was lower in the handled than in the non-handled rats, a pattern resembling that of the males, suggesting that the sexually dimorphic effect of handling on immobility time can be attributed to the organizational effects of testosterone. No differences were found between androgenized females and females injected neonatally with vehicle, indicating that the gender differences in circulating corticosterone are not due to the organizational effects of testosterone. The stress of a neonatal injection interacted with neonatal handling resulting in lower plasma corticosterone and hypothalamic dopamine and serotonin levels in the neonatally injected handled animals following repeated forced swimming. The serotonergic system appears to be sensitive to both the organizational actions of testosterone and the effects of handling, since handled androgenized females had higher serotonin levels and decreased turnover following repeated forced swimming stress, compared to those injected neonatally with vehicle. Handling resulted in increased hypothalamic and striatal serotonin levels in both males and females following repeated forced swimming. Our results reveal that handling has gender-dependent effects on adult hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brain monoaminergic system reactivity to stress and that these effects can be attributed to both the organizational and activational effects of gonadal

  17. Severity of brain injury following neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and outcome at age 5 years.

    PubMed

    Glass, P; Bulas, D I; Wagner, A E; Rajasingham, S R; Civitello, L A; Papero, P H; Coffman, C E; Short, B L

    1997-07-01

    Neurodevelopmental evaluation in childhood provides an opportunity to study complex neurological compensation following documented neonatal brain injury, and furnishes important clinical information which may have an impact on patient care. We studied 152 term children treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as neonates and who received routine neonatal neuroimaging and comprehensive neurodevelopmental evaluation at age 5 years. The cohort was divided into four groups based on an independent neuroimaging score: No lesion, N=88; Mild lesion, N=38; Moderate lesion, N=12; and Severe lesion, N=14. Standardized testing at age 5 included complete neuropsychological assessment, neurological evaluation, and assessment of motor function. All testing was conducted without knowledge of the neuroimaging score. The occurrence of disability by severity of neuroimaging was: No lesion=10%; Mild=13%; Moderate=33%; Severe=57%. The relative risk within the ECMO population for disability at age 5 after moderate or severe neonatal lesion was 4.3 (CI=1.0 to 17.5) and 11.7 (CI=3.3 to 41.3), respectively. The remaining non-disabled children who had moderate to severe lesions functioned within normal limits. Severity of neonatal neuroimaging was inversely associated with IQ scores, pre-academic skills, and neuromotor function. The effect size was small but the rank order was predictable. Our data identify in 5-year-old children an impact of brain lesion severity demonstrated on routine neonatal neuroimaging. The results indicate potential compensation following moderate and severe lesions, and suggest a subtle but consistent influence of even mild neonatal brain injury.

  18. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  19. Neonatal pain in very preterm infants: long-term effects on brain, neurodevelopment and pain reactivity.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth Eckstein

    2013-01-01

    Effects of early life psychosocial adversity have received a great deal of attention, such as maternal separation in experimental animal models and abuse/neglect in young humans. More recently, long-term effects of the physical stress of repetitive procedural pain have begun to be addressed in infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care. Preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and stress, which cannot be distinguished in neonates. The focus of this review is clinical studies of long-term effects of repeated procedural pain-related stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in relation to brain development, neurodevelopment, programming of stress systems, and later pain sensitivity in infants born very preterm (24-32 weeks' gestational age). Neonatal pain exposure has been quantified as the number of invasive and/or skin-breaking procedures during hospitalization in the NICU. Emerging studies provide convincing clinical evidence for an adverse impact of neonatal pain/stress in infants at a time of physiological immaturity, rapidly developing brain microstructure and networks, as well as programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Currently it appears that early pain/stress may influence the developing brain and thereby neurodevelopment and stress-sensitive behaviors, particularly in the most immature neonates. However, there is no evidence for greater prevalence of pain syndromes compared to children and adults born healthy at full term. In addressing associations between pain/stress and outcomes, careful consideration of confounding clinical factors related to prematurity is essential. The need for pain management for humanitarian care is widely advocated. Non-pharmacological interventions to help parents reduce their infant's stress may be brain-protective. PMID:24228168

  20. The pentose phosphate pathway and pyruvate carboxylation after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Eva M F; Morken, Tora S; Widerøe, Marius; Håberg, Asta K; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    The neonatal brain is vulnerable to oxidative stress, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) may be of particular importance to limit the injury. Furthermore, in the neonatal brain, neurons depend on de novo synthesis of neurotransmitters via pyruvate carboxylase (PC) in astrocytes to increase neurotransmitter pools. In the adult brain, PPP activity increases in response to various injuries while pyruvate carboxylation is reduced after ischemia. However, little is known about the response of these pathways after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). To this end, 7-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxia. Animals were injected with [1,2-(13)C]glucose during the recovery phase and extracts of cerebral hemispheres ipsi- and contralateral to the operation were analyzed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After HI, glucose levels were increased and there was evidence of mitochondrial hypometabolism in both hemispheres. Moreover, metabolism via PPP was reduced bilaterally. Ipsilateral glucose metabolism via PC was reduced, but PC activity was relatively preserved compared with glucose metabolism via pyruvate dehydrogenase. The observed reduction in PPP activity after HI may contribute to the increased susceptibility of the neonatal brain to oxidative stress.

  1. Glial fibrillary acidic protein as a biomarker for brain injury in neonatal CHD.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Stephanie L; Mansouri, Fahad F; Everett, Allen D; Graham, Ernest M; Burd, Irina; Sekar, Priya

    2016-10-01

    Neonates with critical CHD have evidence, by imaging, of preoperative brain injury, although the timing is unknown. We used circulating postnatal serum glial fibrillary acidic protein as a measure of acute perinatal brain injury in neonates with CHD. Glial fibrillary acidic protein was measured on admission and daily for the first 4 days of life in case and control groups; we included two control groups in this study - non-brain-injured newborns and brain-injured newborns. Comparisons were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's multiple comparisons, Student's t-test, and χ2 test of independence where appropriate. In aggregate, there were no significant differences in overall glial fibrillary acidic protein levels between CHD patients (n=56) and negative controls (n=23) at any time point. By day 4 of life, 7/56 (12.5%) CHD versus 0/23 (0%) normal controls had detectable glial fibrillary acidic protein levels. Although not statistically significant, the 5/10 (50%) left heart obstruction group versus 1/17 (6%) conoventricular, 0/13 (0%) right heart, and 1/6 (17%) septal defect patients trended towards elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein at day 4 of life. Overall, glial fibrillary acidic protein reflected no evidence for significant peripartum brain injury in neonates with CHD, but there was a trend for elevation by postnatal day 4 in neonates with left heart obstruction. This pilot study suggests that methods such as monitoring glial fibrillary acidic protein levels may provide new tools to optimise preoperative care and neuroprotection in high-risk neonates with specific types of CHD.

  2. Periodic properties of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rozov, Stanislav V; Zant, Janneke C; Karlstedt, Kaj; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2014-01-01

    Brain histamine is involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and alertness. Despite the widespread use of the mouse as an experimental model, the periodic properties of major markers of the mouse histaminergic system have not been comprehensively characterized. We analysed the daily levels of histamine and its first metabolite, 1-methylhistamine, in different brain structures of C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains, and the mRNA level and activity of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in C57BL/6J mice. In the C57BL/6J strain, histamine release, assessed by in vivo microdialysis, underwent prominent periodic changes. The main period was 24 h peaking during the activity period. Additional 8 h periods were also observed. The release was highly positively correlated with active wakefulness, as shown by electroencephalography. In both mouse strains, tissue histamine levels remained steady for 24 h in all structures except for the hypothalamus of CBA/J mice, where 24-h periodicity was observed. Brain tissue 1-methylhistamine levels in both strains reached their maxima in the periods of activity. The mRNA level of histidine decarboxylase in the tuberomamillary nucleus and the activities of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in the striatum and cortex did not show a 24-h rhythm, whereas in the hypothalamus the activities of both enzymes had a 12-h periodicity. These results show that the activities of histamine-metabolizing enzymes are not under simple direct circadian regulation. The complex and non-uniform temporal patterns of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain suggest that histamine is strongly involved in the maintenance of active wakefulness.

  3. Lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA is critical for neonatal lethality in Prader-Willi syndrome mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feng; Prints, Yelena; Dhar, Madhu; Johnson, Dabney K; Garnacho-Montero, Carmen; Nicholls, Robert; Francke, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by the lack of paternal expression of imprinted genes in the human chromosome region 15q11-13. Recent studies of rare human translocation patients narrowed the PWS critical genes to a 121-kb region containing PWCR1/HBII-85 and HBII-438 snoRNA genes. The existing mouse models of PWS that lack the expression of multiple genes, including Snrpn, Ube3a, and many intronic snoRNA genes, are characterized by 80%-100% neonatal lethality. To define the candidate region for PWS-like phenotypes in mice,we analyzed the expression of several genetic elements in mice carrying the large radiation-induced p30PUb deletion that includes the p locus. Mice having inherited this deletion from either parent develop normally into adulthood. By Northern blot and RTPCR assays of brain tissue, we found that Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNAs are expressed normally, while MBII-52 snoRNAs are not expressed when the deletion is paternally inherited. Mapping of the distal deletion breakpoint indicated that the p30PUb deletion includes the entire MBII-52 snoRNA gene cluster and three previously unmapped EST sequences. The lack of expression of these elements in mice with a paternal p30PUb deletion indicates that they are not critical for the neonatal lethality observed in PWS mouse models. In addition, we identified MBII-436, the mouse homolog of the HBII-436 snoRNA, confirmed its imprinting status, and mapped it outside of the p30PUb deletion. Taking together all available data, we conclude that the lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA expression is the most likely cause for the neonatal lethality in PWS model mice.

  4. Neuro-Interventions for the Neonates with Brain Arteriovenous Fistulas: With Special Reference to Access Routes

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki; TERADA, Aiko; ISHIGURO, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal neuro-intervention is challenging. The purpose of this article is to report the neuro-intervention for the neonates with brain arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), with special reference to access routes. Fifteen neonates (12 boys and 3 girls) who underwent neuro-intervention within the first 14 days of life were included. Their diagnoses included vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (6), dural sinus malformations with arteriovenous (AV) shunts (6), pial AVF (2), and epidural AVF (1). Birth weight ranged from 1,538 g to 3,778 g (mean 2,525 g). Neuro-interventions, especially access routes, in the neonatal periods (< 1 month) were retrospectively reviewed. All neonates presented with severe cardiac failure. In total, 29 interventions (mean 1.9) were performed within 1 month. Although 12 neonates with birth weight more than 2,700 g could be treated through transfemoral arterial routes, 3 neonates with birth weight less than 2,200 g could not be treated successfully by femoral arterial routes. Interventions were performed through 19 femoral arterial, 3 femoral venous, 2 umbilical arterial, 3 umbilical venous, 3 transcardiac, and 2 direct carotid routes. Their overall outcomes were six good recovery, one moderate disability, two severe disabilities, one vegetative state, and five deaths with a mean follow-up period of 7 years 2 months. Neuro-intervention for the neonates with birth weight more than 2,700 g can be performed by femoral arterial routes using a 4F sheath. For those with birth weight less than 2,200 g, however, alternative access routes are required. PMID:26853455

  5. Polydatin prevents hypertrophy in phenylephrine induced neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes and pressure-overload mouse models.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming; Ding, Wenwen; Liao, Yansong; Liu, Ye; Yan, Dewen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Rongming; Zheng, Na; Liu, Shuaiye; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that polydatin (PD), a resveratrol glucoside, may have beneficial actions on the cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, the current study focused on the underlying mechanism of the PD anti-hypertrophic effect in cultured cardiomyocytes and in progression from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure in vivo. Experiments were performed on cultured neonatal rat, ventricular myocytes as well as adult mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Treatment of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine for three days produced a marked hypertrophic effect as evidenced by significantly increased cell surface area and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) protein expression. These effects were attenuated by PD in a concentration-dependent manner with a complete inhibition of hypertrophy at the concentration of 50 µM. Phenylephrine increased ROCK activity, as well as intracellular reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation. The oxidizing agent DTDP similarly increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and induced hypertrophic remodeling. PD treatment inhibited phenylephrine-induced oxidative stress and consequently suppressed ROCK activation in cardiomyocytes. Hypertrophic remodeling and heart failure were demonstrated in mice subjected to 13 weeks of TAC. Upregulation of ROCK signaling pathway was also evident in TAC mice. PD treatment significantly attenuated the increased ROCK activity, associated with a markedly reduced hypertrophic response and improved cardiac function. Our results demonstrated a robust anti-hypertrophic remodeling effect of polydatin, which is mediated by inhibition of reactive oxygen species dependent ROCK activation.

  6. Diffusion MRI of the neonate brain: acquisition, processing and analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Pannek, Kerstin; Guzzetta, Andrea; Colditz, Paul B; Rose, Stephen E

    2012-10-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is a popular noninvasive imaging modality for the investigation of the neonate brain. It enables the assessment of white matter integrity, and is particularly suited for studying white matter maturation in the preterm and term neonate brain. Diffusion tractography allows the delineation of white matter pathways and assessment of connectivity in vivo. In this review, we address the challenges of performing and analysing neonate dMRI. Of particular importance in dMRI analysis is adequate data preprocessing to reduce image distortions inherent to the acquisition technique, as well as artefacts caused by head movement. We present a summary of techniques that should be used in the preprocessing of neonate dMRI data, and demonstrate the effect of these important correction steps. Furthermore, we give an overview of available analysis techniques, ranging from voxel-based analysis of anisotropy metrics including tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to recently developed methods of statistical analysis addressing issues of resolving complex white matter architecture. We highlight the importance of resolving crossing fibres for tractography and outline several tractography-based techniques, including connectivity-based segmentation, the connectome and tractography mapping. These techniques provide powerful tools for the investigation of brain development and maturation. PMID:22903761

  7. On the edge of language acquisition: inherent constraints on encoding multisyllabic sequences in the neonate brain.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Alissa L; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables - tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences. After familiarization with a six-syllable sequence, the neonate brain responded to the change (as shown by an increase in oxy-hemoglobin) when the two edge syllables switched positions but not when two middle syllables switched positions (Experiment 1), indicating that they encoded the syllables at the edges of sequences better than those in the middle. Moreover, when a 25 ms pause was inserted between the middle syllables as a segmentation cue, neonates' brains were sensitive to the change (Experiment 2), indicating that subtle cues in speech can signal a boundary, with enhanced encoding of the syllables located at the edges of that boundary. These findings suggest that neonates' brains can encode information from multisyllabic sequences and that this encoding is constrained. Moreover, subtle segmentation cues in a sequence of syllables provide a mechanism with which to accurately encode positional information from longer sequences. Tracking the order of syllables is necessary to understand language and our results suggest that the foundations for this encoding are present at birth.

  8. Celecoxib attenuates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced brain inflammation and white matter injury in the neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, L-W; Kaizaki, A; Tien, L-T; Pang, Y; Tanaka, S; Numazawa, S; Bhatt, A J; Cai, Z

    2013-06-14

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire-hanging maneuver test was performed 24h after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties.

  9. Neonatal Brain Hemorrhage (NBH) of Prematurity: Translational Mechanisms of the Vascular-Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; Poblete, Roy; Krafft, Paul R.; Rolland, William B.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain hemorrhage (NBH) of prematurity is an unfortunate consequence of preterm birth. Complications result in shunt dependence and long-term structural changes such as post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, gliosis, and neurological dysfunction. Several animal models are available to study this condition, and many basic mechanisms, etiological factors, and outcome consequences, are becoming understood. NBH is an important clinical condition, of which treatment may potentially circumvent shunt complication, and improve functional recovery (cerebral palsy, and cognitive impairments). This review highlights key pathophysiological findings of the neonatal vascular-neural network in the context of molecular mechanisms targeting the post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus affecting this vulnerable infant population. PMID:25620100

  10. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  11. Morphological features of the neonatal brain support development of subsequent cognitive, language, and motor abilities.

    PubMed

    Spann, Marisa N; Bansal, Ravi; Rosen, Tove S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the role of brain maturation in the development of cognitive abilities derives primarily from studies of school-age children to adults. Little is known about the morphological features of the neonatal brain that support the subsequent development of abilities in early childhood, when maturation of the brain and these abilities are the most dynamic. The goal of our study was to determine whether brain morphology during the neonatal period supports early cognitive development through 2 years of age. We correlated morphological features of the cerebral surface assessed using deformation-based measures (surface distances) of high-resolution MRI scans for 33 healthy neonates, scanned between the first to sixth week of postmenstrual life, with subsequent measures of their motor, language, and cognitive abilities at ages 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We found that morphological features of the cerebral surface of the frontal, mesial prefrontal, temporal, and occipital regions correlated with subsequent motor scores, posterior parietal regions correlated with subsequent language scores, and temporal and occipital regions correlated with subsequent cognitive scores. Measures of the anterior and middle portions of the cingulate gyrus correlated with scores across all three domains of ability. Most of the significant findings were inverse correlations located bilaterally in the brain. The inverse correlations may suggest either that a more protracted morphological maturation or smaller local volumes of neonatal brain tissue supports better performance on measures of subsequent motor, language, and cognitive abilities throughout the first 2 years of postnatal life. The correlations of morphological measures of the cingulate with measures of performance across all domains of ability suggest that the cingulate supports a broad range of skills in infancy and early childhood, similar to its functions in older children and adults.

  12. Morphological features of the neonatal brain support development of subsequent cognitive, language, and motor abilities

    PubMed Central

    Spann, Marisa N.; Bansal, Ravi; Rosen, Tove S.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of brain maturation in the development of cognitive abilities derives primarily from studies of school-age children to adults. Little is known about the morphological features of the neonatal brain that support the subsequent development of abilities in early childhood, when maturation of the brain and these abilities are the most dynamic. The goal of our study was to determine whether brain morphology during the neonatal period supports early cognitive development through two years of age. We correlated morphological features of the cerebral surface assessed using deformation-based measures (surface distances) of high-resolution MRI scans for 33 healthy neonates, scanned between the first to sixth week of postmenstrual life, with subsequent measures of their motor, language, and cognitive abilities at ages 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We found that morphological features of the cerebral surface of the frontal, mesial prefrontal, temporal, and occipital regions correlated with subsequent motor scores, posterior parietal regions correlated with subsequent language scores, and temporal and occipital regions correlated with subsequent cognitive scores. Measures of the anterior and middle portions of the cingulate gyrus correlated with scores across all three domains of ability. Most of the significant findings were inverse correlations located bilaterally in the brain. The inverse correlations may suggest either that a more protracted morphological maturation or smaller local volumes of neonatal brain tissue supports better performance on measures of subsequent motor, language, and cognitive abilities throughout the first two years of postnatal life. The correlations of morphological measures of the cingulate with measures of performance across all domains of ability suggest that the cingulate supports a broad range of skills in infancy and early childhood, similar to its functions in older children and adults. PMID:24615961

  13. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  14. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  15. Distribution of alarin immunoreactivity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Nicole; Mayer, Christian; Santic, Radmila; Navio, Ruben Peco; Wagner, Andrea; Bauer, Hans Christian; Sperk, Guenther; Boehm, Ulrich; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Alarin is a 25 amino acid peptide that belongs to the galanin peptide family. It is derived from the galanin-like peptide gene by a splice variant, which excludes exon 3. Alarin was first identified in gangliocytes of neuroblastic tumors and later shown to have a vasoactive function in the skin. Recently, alarin was demonstrated to stimulate food intake as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rodents, suggesting that it might be a neuromodulatory peptide in the brain. However, the individual neurons in the central nervous system that express alarin have not been identified. Here, we determined the distribution of alarin-like immunoreactivity (alarin-LI) in the adult murine brain. The specificity of the antibody against alarin was demonstrated by the absence of labeling after pre-absorption of the antiserum with synthetic alarin peptide and in transgenic mouse brains lacking neurons expressing the GALP gene. Alarin-LI was observed in different areas of the murine brain. A high intensity of alarin-LI was detected in the accessory olfactory bulb, the medial preoptic area, the amygdala, different nuclei of the hypothalamus such as the arcuate nucleus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, the trigeminal complex, the locus coeruleus, the ventral chochlear nucleus, the facial nucleus, and the epithelial layer of the plexus choroideus. The distinct expression pattern of alarin in the adult mouse brain suggests potential functions in reproduction and metabolism.

  16. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  17. An enzyme histochemical study of large muscle fibres in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, K N; Stewart, R J; Bacciocchi, G

    1990-01-01

    Small clusters of extra large muscle fibres were identified in hindlimb muscles of neonatal mice (strain C57BL/10ScSn). At two days of age they had a significantly greater cross-sectional area than their normal counterparts (P less than 0.01). Fibre typing methods (NADH-tetrazolium reductase, ATPase and phosphorylase) classified them as 2A fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG fibres). The activity of NADH-tetrazolium reductase and the lysosomal enzymes beta-glucuronidase, acid phosphatase and dipeptidyl peptidase II were all elevated in the large fibres. Microsomal aminopeptidase (mAPP), a membrane-bound enzyme, also showed increased activity. The fibres are probably the mouse equivalent of the Wohlfart B fibres of the human fetus, with which comparison is made. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Figs. 9-10 PMID:2254160

  18. Lgr5+ cells regenerate hair cells via proliferation and direct transdifferentiation in damaged neonatal mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Chai, Renjie; Kim, Grace S; Pham, Nicole; Jansson, Lina; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Kuo, Bryan; May, Lindsey A; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, Lisa L; Cheng, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment of endogenous progenitors is critical during tissue repair. The inner ear utricle requires mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) to detect linear acceleration. After damage, non-mammalian utricles regenerate HCs via both proliferation and direct transdifferentiation. In adult mammals, limited transdifferentiation from unidentified progenitors occurs to regenerate extrastriolar Type II HCs. Here we show that HC damage in neonatal mouse utricle activates the Wnt target gene Lgr5 in striolar supporting cells. Lineage tracing and time-lapse microscopy reveal that Lgr5+ cells transdifferentiate into HC-like cells in vitro. In contrast to adults, HC ablation in neonatal utricles in vivo recruits Lgr5+ cells to regenerate striolar HCs through mitotic and transdifferentiation pathways. Both Type I and II HCs are regenerated, and regenerated HCs display stereocilia and synapses. Lastly, stabilized ß-catenin in Lgr5+ cells enhances mitotic activity and HC regeneration. Thus Lgr5 marks Wnt-regulated, damage-activated HC progenitors and may help uncover factors driving mammalian HC regeneration.

  19. Loss of apolipoprotein E exacerbates the neonatal lethality of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome mouse

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Curzio; Pandit, Bhaswati; Yu, Hongwei; Tint, G. Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B.

    2007-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by a genetic defect in cholesterol biosynthesis; mutations in the enzyme 3ß-hydroxysterol Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7) lead to a failure of cholesterol (and desmosterol) synthesis, with an accumulation of precursor sterols, such as 7-dehydrocholesterol. Extensive genotype–phenotype analyses have indicated that there is considerable variation in the severity of the disease, much of which is not explained by defects in the Dhcr7 gene alone. Factors ranging from variations in maternal–fetal cholesterol transfer during pregnancy, to other genetic factors have been proposed to account for this variability. Variations at the APOE locus affect plasma cholesterol levels in humans and this polymorphic gene has been found to be associated with cardiovascular as well as neurological disorders. This locus has recently been implicated in accounting for some of the variations in SLOS. To address whether maternal hypercholesterolemia can affect fetal outcome, we tested the ability of maternal hypercholesterolemia to rescue the neonatal lethality in a mouse model of SLOS. Maternal hypercholesterolemia, induced by ApoE or Ldl-r deficiency not only failed to ameliorate the postnatal lethality, it increased the prenatal mortality of Dhcr7 deficient pups. Thus the murine data suggest that maternal loss of ApoE or Ldl-r function further exacerbates the neonatal lethality, suggesting they may play a role in maternal transfer of cholesterol to the embryo. PMID:17197219

  20. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  1. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  2. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Marc; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo. PMID:27408697

  3. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide controls pathogen load and brain damage by enhancing phagocytosis of Escherichia coli K1 in neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Goth, Kerstin A; Prasadarao, Nemani V

    2010-03-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis in humans. In this study, we sought to determine the pathophysiologic relevance of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) in experimental E. coli K1 meningitis. By using a newborn mouse model of meningitis, we demonstrate that E. coli infection triggered the expression of iNOS in the brains of mice. Additionally, iNOS-/- mice were resistant to E. coli K1 infection, displaying normal brain histology, no bacteremia, no disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and reduced inflammatory response. Treatment with an iNOS specific inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG), of wild-type animals before infection prevented the development of bacteremia and the occurrence of meningitis. The infected animals treated with AG after the development of bacteremia also completely cleared the pathogen from circulation and prevented brain damage. Histopathological and micro-CT analysis of brains revealed significant damage in E. coli K1-infected mice, which was completely abrogated by AG administration. Peritoneal macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes isolated from iNOS-/- mice or pretreated with AG demonstrated enhanced uptake and killing of the bacteria compared with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from wild-type mice in which E. coli K1 survive and multiply. Thus, NO produced by iNOS may be beneficial for E. coli to survive inside the macrophages, and prevention of iNOS could be a therapeutic strategy to treat neonatal E. coli meningitis. PMID:20093483

  4. ADVANCES IN THE CELL-BASED TREATMENT OF NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Pabon, Mibel M.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for adult stroke has reached limited clinical trials. Here, we provide translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury requiring a careful consideration of clinically relevant animal models, feasible stem cell sources, and validated safety and efficacy endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. To this end, we refer to existing translational guidelines, in particular the recommendations outlined in the consortium of academicians, industry partners and regulators called Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS. Although the STEPS guidelines are directed at enhancing the successful outcome of cell therapy in adult stroke, we highlight overlapping pathologies between adult stroke and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We are, however, cognizant that the neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury displays disease symptoms distinct from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:23565051

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Induced Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a clinical condition in the neonate, resulting from oxygen deprivation around the time of birth. HIE affects 1–5/1000 live births worldwide and is associated with the development of neurological deficits, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. Even though the brain is considered as an immune-privileged site, it has innate and adaptive immune response and can produce complement (C) components and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Dysregulation of cerebral expression of AMPs and C can exacerbate or ameliorate the inflammatory response within the brain. Brain ischemia triggers a prolonged inflammatory response affecting the progression of injury and secondary energy failure and involves both innate and adaptive immune systems, including immune-competent and non-competent cells. Following injury to the central nervous system (CNS), including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI), resident microglia, and astroglia are the main cells providing immune defense to the brain in a stimulus-dependent manner. They can express and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and therefore trigger prolonged inflammation, resulting in neurodegeneration. Microglial cells express and release a wide range of inflammation-associated molecules including several components of the complement system. Complement activation following neonatal HI injury has been reported to contribute to neurodegeneration. Astrocytes can significantly affect the immune response of the CNS under pathological conditions through production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory AMPs. Astrocytes express β-defensins, which can chemoattract and promote maturation of dendritic cells (DC), and can also limit inflammation by controlling the viability of these same DC. This review will focus on the balance of complement components and AMPs within the CNS following neonatal HI injury and the effect of that balance on the subsequent brain damage

  6. Copper deficiency in neonatal mice alters brain catecholamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.R.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper (Cu) deficiency was investigated in Swiss albino mice to develop a model that alters brain catecholamine metabolism without serious growth impairment. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding a diet low in Cu to dams beginning either 7 days (d) prior, 4d prior, 4d after, or on the day of parturition. All 4-week-old male Cu-deficient ({minus}Cu) offspring were anemic and exhibited biochemical characteristics of Cu deficiency when compared to their respective +Cu control mice. However, the best model, which resulted in altered catecholamine metabolism characterized by elevation of dopamine (DA) and depression in norepinephrine (NE) in brain, heart, and spleen, was when treatment began 4d prior to birth. Body and brain weight were not altered. However, levels of Cu in brain and liver of {minus}Cu mice were markedly reduced to 21% and 31% of those measured in +Cu controls, respectively. Furthermore, brain NE and DA concentrations of {minus}Cu mice were 72% and 132% of those quantified in +Cu offspring, respectively. A plausible explanation is that dietary Cu deficiency results in lower activity of brain dopamine-{beta}-monooxygenase, the Cu dependent enzyme that catalyzes conversion of DA to NE. It is not yet known if these changes in Ne and DA pool size altered the quantity or characteristics of the neuronal catecholamine receptors, and more importantly, whether or not the observed changes are reversible by nutritional intervention.

  7. Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress in four functional brain areas of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Higher aluminum (Al) content in infant formula and its effects on neonatal brain development are a cause for concern. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution and concentration of Al in neonatal rat brain following Al treatment, and oxidative stress in brain tissues induced by Al overload. Methods Postnatal day 3 (PND 3) rat pups (n =46) received intraperitoneal injection of aluminum chloride (AlCl3), at dosages of 0, 7, and 35 mg/kg body wt (control, low Al (LA), and high Al (HA), respectively), over 14 d. Results Aluminum concentrations were significantly higher in the hippocampus (751.0 ± 225.8 ng/g v.s. 294.9 ± 180.8 ng/g; p < 0.05), diencephalon (79.6 ± 20.7 ng/g v.s. 20.4 ± 9.6 ng/g; p < 0.05), and cerebellum (144.8 ± 36.2 ng/g v.s. 83.1 ± 15.2 ng/g; p < 0.05) in the HA group compared to the control. The hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem of HA animals displayed significantly higher levels of lipid peroxidative products (TBARS) than the same regions in the controls. However, the average superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem were lower in the HA group compared to the control. The HA animals demonstrated increased catalase activity in the diencephalon, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem, compared to controls. Conclusion Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress (H2O2) in the hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem in neonatal rats. PMID:22613782

  8. Expression profiling of long noncoding RNAs in neonatal and adult mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Wu, Ji

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, advancements in genome-wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is pervasively transcribed in the genome and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated lncRNAs as a new class of regulatory molecules are involved in mammalian development (Carninci et al. (2005); Fatica and Bozzoni (2014)), but very few studies have been conducted on the potential roles of lncRNAs in mammalian testis development. To get insights into the expression patterns of lncRNA during mouse testis development, we investigated the lncRNAs expression profiles of neonatal and adult mouse testes using microarray platform and related results have been published (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013) e75750.). Here, we describe in detail the experimental system, methods and validation for the generation of the microarray data associated with our recent publication (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013) e75750.). Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database repository with the dataset identifier GSE43442. PMID:26217809

  9. Effects of pre- and neonatal exposure to bisphenol A on murine brain development.

    PubMed

    Tando, So; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Ikeda, Jun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fushiki, Shinji

    2007-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), known as an environmental endocrine disrupter, is widely used in industry and dentistry. We investigated the effects of fetal and neonatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) on the brain development of mice. The density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in substantia nigra was significantly decreased in BPA-exposed female mice (3 microg/g powder food), but not in the male mice, as compared with that of the control mice. The densities of calbindin D-28 K-, calretinin- and parvalbumin-IR neurons in the cerebral cortex were not different between BPA-exposed and the control mice. The present study indicates that chronic exposure of BPA during prenatal and neonatal periods causes a decrease of TH-positive neurons in substantia nigra only in female mice brain. PMID:17113258

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Anandamide Metabolism in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates inflammation and contributes to neurodegeneration. Best known for its pathological up-regulation, COX-2 is also constitutively expressed within the brain and mediates synaptic transmission through prostaglandin synthesis. Along with arachidonic acid, COX-2 oxygenates the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in vitro. Inhibition of COX-2 enhances retrograde signaling in the hippocampus, suggesting COX-2 mediates endocannabinoid tone in healthy brain. The degree to which COX-2 may regulate endocannabinoid metabolism in vivo is currently unclear. Therefore, we explored the effect of COX-2 inhibition on [3H]AEA metabolism in mouse brain. Although AEA is hydrolyzed primarily by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), ex vivo autoradiography revealed that COX-2 inhibition by nimesulide redirected [3H]AEA substrate from COX-2 to FAAH in the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. These data indicate that COX-2 possesses the capacity to metabolize AEA in vivo and can compete with FAAH for AEA in several brain regions. Temporal fluctuations in COX-2 expression were observed in the brain, with an increase in COX-2 protein and mRNA in the hippocampus at midnight compared with noon. COX-2 immunolocalization was robust in the hippocampus and several cortical regions. Although most regions exhibited no temporal changes in COX-2 immunolocalization, increased numbers of immunoreactive cells were detected at midnight in layers II and III of the somatosensory and visual cortices. These temporal variations in COX-2 distribution reduced the enzyme's contribution toward [3H]AEA metabolism in the somatosensory cortex at midnight. Taken together, our findings establish COX-2 as a mediator of regional AEA metabolism in mouse brain. PMID:20702753

  11. Mouse Models of Brain Metastasis for Unravelling Tumour Progression.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R

    2016-01-01

    Secondary tumours in the brain account for 40 % of triple negative breast cancer patients, and the percentage may be higher at the time of autopsy. The use of in vivo models allow us to recapitulate the molecular mechanisms potentially used by circulating breast tumour cells to proliferate within the brain.Metastasis is a multistep process that depends on the success of several stages including cell evasion from the primary tumour, distribution and survival within the blood stream and cerebral microvasculature, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and proliferation within the brain microenvironment. Cellular adhesion molecules are key proteins involved in all of the steps in the metastatic process. Our group has developed two different in vivo models to encompass both seeding and colonisation stages of the metastatic process: (1) haematogenous dissemination of tumour cells by direct injection into the left ventricle of the heart, and (2) direct implantation of the tumour cells into the mouse brain.This chapter describes, in detail, the practical implementation of the intracerebral model, which can be used to analyse tumour proliferation within a specific area of the central nervous system and tumour-host cell interactions. We also describe the use of immunohistochemistry techniques to identify, at the molecular scale, tumour-host cell interactions, which may open new windows for brain metastasis therapy.

  12. Label-free structural photoacoustic tomography of intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Capitalizing on endogenous hemoglobin contrast, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a deep-tissue highresolution imaging modality, has drawn increasing interest in neuro-imaging. However, most existing studies are limited to functional imaging on the cortical surface, and the deep-brain structural imaging capability of PACT has never been demonstrated. Here, we explicitly studied the limiting factors of deep-brain PACT imaging. We found that the skull distorted the acoustic signal and blood suppressed the structural contrast from other chromophores. When the two effects are mitigated, PACT can provide high-resolution label-free structural imaging through the entire mouse brain. With 100 μm in-plane resolution, we can clearly identify major structures of the brain, and the image quality is comparable to that of magnetic resonance microscopy. Spectral PACT studies indicate that structural contrasts mainly originate from cytochrome and lipid. The feasibility of imaging the structure of the brain in vivo has also been discussed. Our results demonstrate that PACT is a promising modality for both structural and functional brain imaging.

  13. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P.; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B.; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0±0.9 x 10−6 cm/s to 2.9±1.0 x 10−6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10−6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  14. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0 ± 0.9 x 10-6 cm/s to 2.9 ± 1.0 x 10-6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10-6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  15. Fascin1 Is dispensable for mouse development but is favorable for neonatal survival

    PubMed Central

    Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Fumio; Yamashiro, Shigeko

    2009-01-01

    Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, has been demonstrated to be critical for filopodia formation in cultured cells, and thus is believed to be vital in motile activities including neurite extension and cell migration. To test whether fascin1 plays such essential roles within a whole animal, we have generated and characterized fascin1-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, fascin1-deficient mice are viable and fertile with no major developmental defect. Nissl staining of serial coronal brain sections reveals that fascin1-deficient brain is grossly normal except that knockout mouse brain lacks the posterior region of the anterior commissure neuron and has larger lateral ventricle. Fascin1-deficient, dorsal root ganglion neurons are able to extend neurites in vitro as well as those from wild-type mice, although fascin1-deficient growth cones are smaller and exhibit fewer and shorter filopodia than wild-type counterparts. Likewise, fascin1-deficient, embryonic fibroblasts are able to assemble filopodia, though filopodia are fewer, shorter and short-lived. These results indicate that fascin1-mediated filopodia assembly is dispensable for mouse development. PMID:19343791

  16. Effects of neonatal treatment with the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, on adult rat brain and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Newson, Penny N; van den Buuse, Maarten; Martin, Sally; Lynch-Frame, Ann; Chahl, Loris A

    2014-10-01

    Treatment of neonatal rats with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonist, capsaicin, produces life-long loss of sensory neurons expressing TRPV1 channels. Previously it was shown that rats treated on day 2 of life with capsaicin had behavioural hyperactivity in a novel environment at 5-7 weeks of age and brain changes reminiscent of those found in subjects with schizophrenia. The objective of the present study was to investigate brain and behavioural responses of adult rats treated as neonates with capsaicin. It was found that the brain changes found at 5-7 weeks in rats treated as neonates with capsaicin persisted into adulthood (12 weeks) but were less in older rats (16-18 weeks). Increased prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle was found in these rats at 8 and 12 weeks of age rather than the deficit commonly found in animal models of schizophrenia. Subjects with schizophrenia also have reduced flare responses to niacin and methylnicotinate proposed to be mediated by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). Flare responses are accompanied by cutaneous plasma extravasation. It was found that the cutaneous plasma extravasation responses to methylnicotinate and PGD2 were reduced in capsaicin-treated rats. In conclusion, several neuroanatomical changes observed in capsaicin-treated rats, as well as the reduced cutaneous plasma extravasation responses, indicate that the role of TRPV1 channels in schizophrenia is worthy of investigation.

  17. Therapeutic Hypothermia as a Neuroprotective Strategy in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Sinha, B.; Pandya, R.S.; Lin, N.; Popp, A.J.; Li, J.; Yao, J.; Wang, X.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence shows that artificially lowering body and brain temperature can significantly reduce the deleterious effects of brain injury in both newborns and adults. Although the benefits of therapeutic hypothermia have long been known and applied clinically, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and traumatic brain injury both trigger a series of biochemical and molecular events that cause additional brain insult. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia seems to ameliorate the molecular cascade that culminates in neuronal damage. Hypothermia attenuates the toxicity produced by the initial injury that would normally produce reactive oxygen species, neurotransmitters, inflammatory mediators, and apoptosis. Experiments have been performed on various depths and levels of hypothermia to explore neuroprotection. This review summarizes what is currently known about the beneficial effects of therapeutic hypothermia in experimental models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and traumatic brain injury, and explores the molecular mechanisms that could become the targets of novel therapies. In addition, this review summarizes the clinical implications of therapeutic hypothermia in newborn hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and adult traumatic brain injury. PMID:22834830

  18. Neonatal hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in the rat brain: the role of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Andrea Pereira; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Dias; de Souza, Laila Oliveira; Bitencourt, Fernanda; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Coelho, Juliana Gonzales; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the consequences of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) have received great attention. However, the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia affects the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In addition, recent studies have shown that hyperglycemia induces oxidative damage in the adult rat brain. In this regard, no study has assessed oxidative stress as a possible mechanism that affects the brain normal function in neonatal hyperglycemic rats. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether neonatal hyperglycemia elicits oxidative stress in the brain of neonate rats subjected to a streptozotocin-induced neonatal hyperglycemia model (5-day-old rats). The activities of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6-PGD), NADPH oxidase (Nox), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), the production of superoxide anion, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), and the protein carbonyl content were measured. Neonatal hyperglycemic rats presented increased activities of G6PD, 6PGD, and Nox, which altogether may be responsible for the enhanced production of superoxide radical anion that was observed. The enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, and GSHPx) that were observed in neonatal hyperglycemic rats, which may be caused by a rebound effect of oxidative stress, were not able to hinder the observed lipid peroxidation (TBA-RS) and protein damage in the brain. Consequently, these results suggest that oxidative stress could represent a mechanism that explains the harmful effects of neonatal hyperglycemia on the CNS.

  19. Blood-brain barrier permeability is increased after acute adult stroke but not neonatal stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Daneman, Richard; Zhou, Lu; Lee, Sarah Y; Derugin, Nikita; Wendland, Michael F; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2012-07-11

    The immaturity of the CNS at birth greatly affects injury after stroke but the contribution of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the differential response to stroke in adults and neonates is poorly understood. We asked whether the structure and function of the BBB is disrupted differently in neonatal and adult rats by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. In adult rats, albumin leakage into injured regions was markedly increased during 2-24 h reperfusion but leakage remained low in the neonates. Functional assays employing intravascular tracers in the neonates showed that BBB permeability to both large (70 kDa dextran) and small (3 kDa dextran), gadolinium (III)-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid tracers remained largely undisturbed 24 h after reperfusion. The profoundly different functional integrity of the BBB was associated with the largely nonoverlapping patterns of regulated genes in endothelial cells purified from injured and uninjured adult and neonatal brain at 24 h (endothelial transcriptome, 31,042 total probe sets). Within significantly regulated 1266 probe sets in injured adults and 361 probe sets in neonates, changes in the gene expression of the basal lamina components, adhesion molecules, the tight junction protein occludin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were among the key differences. The protein expression of collagen-IV, laminin, claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens protein 1 was also better preserved in neonatal rats. Neutrophil infiltration remained low in acutely injured neonates but neutralization of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in the systemic circulation enhanced neutrophil infiltration, BBB permeability, and injury. The markedly more integrant BBB in neonatal brain than in adult brain after acute stroke may have major implications for the treatment of neonatal stroke. PMID:22787045

  20. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention.

  1. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  2. Comparative mouse brain tractography of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Moldrich, Randal X.; Pannek, Kerstin; Hoch, Renee; Rubenstein, John L.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Richards, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography can be employed to simultaneously analyse three-dimensional white matter tracts in the brain. Numerous methods have been proposed to model diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance data for tractography, and we have explored the functionality of some of these for studying white and grey matter pathways in ex vivo mouse brain. Using various deterministic and probabilistic algorithms across a range of regions of interest we found that probabilistic tractography provides a more robust means of visualizing both white and grey matter pathways than deterministic tractography. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of probabilistic tractography profiles to streamline number, step size, curvature, fiber orientation distribution, and whole-brain versus region of interest seeding. Using anatomically well-defined cortico-thalamic pathways, we show how density maps can permit the topographical assessment of probabilistic tractography. Finally, we show how different tractography approaches can impact on dMRI assessment of tract changes in a mouse deficient for the frontal cortex morphogen, fibroblast growth factor 17. In conclusion, probabilistic tractography can elucidate the phenotypes of mice with neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders in a quantitative manner. PMID:20303410

  3. Developmental synchrony of thalamocortical circuits in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Poh, Joann S; Li, Yue; Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-08-01

    The thalamus is a deep gray matter structure and consists of axonal fibers projecting to the entire cortex, which provide the anatomical support for its sensorimotor and higher-level cognitive functions. There is limited in vivo evidence on the normal thalamocortical development, especially in early life. In this study, we aimed to investigate the developmental patterns of the cerebral cortex, the thalamic substructures, and their connectivity with the cortex in the first few weeks of the postnatal brain. We hypothesized that there is developmental synchrony of the thalamus, its cortical projections, and corresponding target cortical structures. We employed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and divided the thalamus into five substructures respectively connecting to the frontal, precentral, postcentral, temporal, and parietal and occipital cortex. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure cortical thickness. We found age-related increases in cortical thickness of bilateral frontal cortex and left temporal cortex in the early postnatal brain. We also found that the development of the thalamic substructures was synchronized with that of their respective thalamocortical connectivity in the first few weeks of the postnatal life. In particular, the right thalamo-frontal substructure had the fastest growth in the early postnatal brain. Our study suggests that the distinct growth patterns of the thalamic substructures are in synchrony with those of the cortex in early life, which may be critical for the development of the cortical and subcortical functional specialization.

  4. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  6. Gender-specific effects of CGP 55845, GABAB receptor antagonist, on neuromuscular coordination, learning and memory formation in albino mouse following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia insult.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Quratul Ane; Akbar, Atif; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-06-01

    GABAB receptor antagonists are experimentally proved as spatial memory enhancers in mouse models but their role has not been described following hypoxic-ischemic insult. 10-day-old albino mice were subjected to Murine model of hypoxia and ischemia. Following brain damage, mice were fed on normal rodent diet till they were 13 weeks old. At this time point, mice were divided into two groups. Group 1 received saline and group 2 received intraperitoneally CGP 55845 (1 mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight) for 12 days. Behavioural observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test along with brain infarct measurement in both CGP 55845 treated and untreated groups. It was observed that application of GABAB receptor antagonist improved the over all motor function in male and female albino mice but effects were more pronounced in males. In open field, CGP 55845-treated female mice showed poor performance. CGP 55845 had no significant effect on learning and memory formation during Morris water maze test and also on brain infract size in both genders following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy. Effects of CGP 55845 can be further explored in a dose and duration dependent manner to improve the learning and memory in albino mice following neonatal brain damage.

  7. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  8. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. PMID:27345710

  9. Prolonged Toxicokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Paraquat in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Winnik, Bozena; Thiruchelvam, Mona J.; Buckley, Brian; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg; Richfield, Eric K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ) has been implicated as a risk factor for the Parkinson disease phenotype (PDP) in humans and mice using epidemiologic or experimental approaches. The toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in the brain are not well understood. Objectives The TK and TD of PQ in brain were measured after single or repeated doses. Methods Brain regions were analyzed for PQ levels, amount of lipid peroxidation, and functional activity of the 20S proteasome. Results Paraquat (10 mg/kg, ip) was found to be persistent in mouse ventral midbrain (VM) with an apparent half-life of approximately 28 days and was cumulative with a linear pattern between one and five doses. PQ was also absorbed orally with a concentration in brain rising linearly after single doses between 10 and 50 mg/kg. The level of tissue lipid peroxides (LPO) was differentially elevated in three regions, being highest in VM, lower in striatum (STR), and least in frontal cortex (FCtx), with the earliest significant elevation detected at 1 day. An elevated level of LPO was still present in VM after 28 days. Despite the cumulative tissue levels of PQ after one, three, and five doses, the level of LPO was not further increased. The activity of the 20S proteasome in the striatum was altered after a single dose and reduced after five doses. Conclusions These data have implications for PQ as a risk factor in humans and in rodent models of the PDP. PMID:17938734

  10. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  11. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Matthew A; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J; Reilly, John F; Young, Warren G; Bloom, Floyd E; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-07-19

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional "imprint" consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org).

  12. [Toxic effect of formaldehyde on mouse different brain regions].

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Hua; Cai, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Min; Li, Hui; You, Hui-Hui; Mei, Yu-Fei; Yang, Xu; Ding, Shu-Mao

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of the nervous system lesions induced by formaldehyde (FA). Male Balb/c mice were exposed to gaseous formaldehyde for 7 days (8 h/d) with three different concentrations (0, 0.5 and 3.0 mg/m(3)). A group of animals injected with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA (0.01 mL/g) was also set and exposed to 3.0 mg/m(3) FA. The concentrations of cAMP, cGMP, NO and the activity of NOS in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem were determined by corresponding assay kits. The results showed that, compared with the control (0 mg/m(3) FA) group, the cAMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem were significantly increased in 0.5 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05), but decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05); The concentration of cAMP in hippocampus was significantly decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05). In comparison with the control group, L-NMMA group showed unchanged cAMP contents and NOS activities in different brain regions, but showed increased cGMP contents in hippocampus and NO contents in cerebral cortex (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group, L-NMMA group showed increased contents of cAMP and reduced NOS activities in different brain regions, as well as significantly decreased cGMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem and NO content in brain stem. These results suggest that the toxicity of FA on mouse nervous system is related to NO/cGMP and cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:26490067

  13. [Toxic effect of formaldehyde on mouse different brain regions].

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Hua; Cai, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Min; Li, Hui; You, Hui-Hui; Mei, Yu-Fei; Yang, Xu; Ding, Shu-Mao

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of the nervous system lesions induced by formaldehyde (FA). Male Balb/c mice were exposed to gaseous formaldehyde for 7 days (8 h/d) with three different concentrations (0, 0.5 and 3.0 mg/m(3)). A group of animals injected with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA (0.01 mL/g) was also set and exposed to 3.0 mg/m(3) FA. The concentrations of cAMP, cGMP, NO and the activity of NOS in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem were determined by corresponding assay kits. The results showed that, compared with the control (0 mg/m(3) FA) group, the cAMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem were significantly increased in 0.5 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05), but decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05); The concentration of cAMP in hippocampus was significantly decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05). In comparison with the control group, L-NMMA group showed unchanged cAMP contents and NOS activities in different brain regions, but showed increased cGMP contents in hippocampus and NO contents in cerebral cortex (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group, L-NMMA group showed increased contents of cAMP and reduced NOS activities in different brain regions, as well as significantly decreased cGMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem and NO content in brain stem. These results suggest that the toxicity of FA on mouse nervous system is related to NO/cGMP and cAMP signaling pathways.

  14. Machine-learning to characterise neonatal functional connectivity in the preterm brain.

    PubMed

    Ball, G; Aljabar, P; Arichi, T; Tusor, N; Cox, D; Merchant, N; Nongena, P; Hajnal, J V; Edwards, A D; Counsell, S J

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is adversely affected by preterm birth. Magnetic resonance image analysis has revealed a complex fusion of structural alterations across all tissue compartments that are apparent by term-equivalent age, persistent into adolescence and adulthood, and associated with wide-ranging neurodevelopment disorders. Although functional MRI has revealed the relatively advanced organisational state of the neonatal brain, the full extent and nature of functional disruptions following preterm birth remain unclear. In this study, we apply machine-learning methods to compare whole-brain functional connectivity in preterm infants at term-equivalent age and healthy term-born neonates in order to test the hypothesis that preterm birth results in specific alterations to functional connectivity by term-equivalent age. Functional connectivity networks were estimated in 105 preterm infants and 26 term controls using group-independent component analysis and a graphical lasso model. A random forest-based feature selection method was used to identify discriminative edges within each network and a nonlinear support vector machine was used to classify subjects based on functional connectivity alone. We achieved 80% cross-validated classification accuracy informed by a small set of discriminative edges. These edges connected a number of functional nodes in subcortical and cortical grey matter, and most were stronger in term neonates compared to those born preterm. Half of the discriminative edges connected one or more nodes within the basal ganglia. These results demonstrate that functional connectivity in the preterm brain is significantly altered by term-equivalent age, confirming previous reports of altered connectivity between subcortical structures and higher-level association cortex following preterm birth.

  15. Dopamine exerts activation-dependent modulation of spinal locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Jennifer M; Whelan, Patrick J

    2012-12-01

    Monoamines can modulate the output of a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate networks, including the spinal cord networks that control walking. Here we examined the multiple changes in the output of locomotor networks induced by dopamine (DA). We found that DA can depress the activation of locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord following ventral root stimulation. By examining disinhibited rhythms, where the Renshaw cell pathway was blocked, we found that DA depresses a putative recurrent excitatory pathway that projects onto rhythm-generating circuitry of the spinal cord. This depression was D(2) but not D(1) receptor dependent and was not due exclusively to depression of excitatory drive to motoneurons. Furthermore, the depression in excitation was not dependent on network activity. We next compared the modulatory effects of DA on network function by focusing on a serotonin and a N-methyl-dl-aspartate-evoked rhythm. In contrast to the depressive effects on a ventral root-evoked rhythm, we found that DA stabilized a drug-evoked rhythm, reduced the frequency of bursting, and increased amplitude. Overall, these data demonstrate that DA can potentiate network activity while at the same time reducing the gain of recurrent excitatory feedback loops from motoneurons onto the network.

  16. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  17. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  18. Use of resting state functional MRI to study brain development and injury in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Smyser, Christopher D.; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in methodology have led to expanded application of resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to the study of term and prematurely-born infants during the first years of life, providing fresh insight into the earliest forms of functional cerebral development. In this review, we detail our evolving understanding of the use of rs-fMRI for studying neonates. We initially focus on the biological processes of cortical development related to resting state network development. We then review technical issues principally affecting neonatal investigations, including the effects of subject motion during acquisition and image distortions related to magnetic susceptibility effects. We next summarize the literature in which rs-fMRI is used to study normal brain development during the early postnatal period, the effects of prematurity and the effects of cerebral injury. Finally, we review potential future directions for the field, such as the use of complementary imaging modalities and advanced analysis techniques. PMID:25813667

  19. [Evaluation of a long-term sensomotor deficit after neonatal rat brain ischemia/hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Silachev, D N; Shubina, M I; Iankauskas, S S; Mkrtchian, V P; Manskikh, V N; Guliaev, M V; Zorov, D B

    2013-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging method showed that ischemia/hypoxia of the brain of neonatal rats made by the protocol suggested by Levine-Rice induces one-sided lesions in the areas of cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Unilateral ischemic injury leads to a long-term sensorimotor and behavioral distortions within 90-115 days after the operation which has been tested in animals by the battery of tests including Cylinder, Beam-walking, Staircase and Limb-placing test. Chosen battery of tests in combination with magnetic resonance imaging allows to reliably estimate the long-term sensorimotor recovery in adult animals suffered an injury in neonatal age. PMID:24450172

  20. Baby STEPS: a giant leap for cell therapy in neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Borlongan, Cesar V; Weiss, Michael D

    2011-07-01

    We advance Baby STEPS or Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm in Stroke as a guide in facilitating the critical evaluation in the laboratory of the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for neonatal encephalopathy. The need to carefully consider the clinical relevance of the animal models in mimicking human neonatal brain injury, selection of the optimal stem cell donor, and the application of functional outcome assays in small and large animal models serve as the foundation for preclinical work and beginning to understand the mechanism of this cellular therapy. The preclinical studies will aid our formulation of a rigorous human clinical trial that encompasses not only efficacy testing but also monitoring of safety indices and demonstration of mechanisms of action. This schema forms the basis of Baby STEPS. Our goal is to resonate the urgent call to enhance the successful translation of cell therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  1. Neonatal Parathion Exposure Disrupts Serotonin and Dopamine Synaptic Function in Rat Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Wrench, Nicola; Ryde, Ian T.; Lassiter, T. Leon; Levin, Edward D.; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of exposure to developmental neurotoxicants are influenced by environmental factors. In the present study, we examined the role of dietary fat intake. We administered parathion to neonatal rats and then evaluated whether a high-fat diet begun in adulthood could modulate the persistent effects on 5HT and DA systems. Neonatal rats received parathion on postnatal days 1-4 at 0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day, straddling the cholinesterase inhibition threshold. In adulthood, half the animals in each exposure group were given a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. We assessed 5HT and DA concentrations and turnover in brain regions containing their respective cell bodies and projections. In addition, we monitored 5HT1A and 5HT2 receptor binding and the concentration of 5HT presynaptic transporters. Neonatal parathion exposure evoked widespread increases in neurotransmitter turnover, indicative of presynaptic hyperactivity, further augmented by 5HT receptor upregulation. In control rats, consumption of a high-fat diet recapitulated many of the changes seen with neonatal parathion exposure; the effects represented convergent mechanisms, since the high-fat diet often obtunded further increases caused by parathion. Neonatal parathion exposure causes lasting hyperactivity of 5HT and DA systems accompanied by 5HT receptor upregulation, consistent with “miswiring” of neuronal projections. A high-fat diet obtunds the effect of parathion, in part by eliciting similar changes itself. Thus, dietary factors may produce similar synaptic changes as do developmental neurotoxicants, potentially contributing to the increasing incidence in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:19616088

  2. Brain Injury in Chronically Ventilated Preterm Neonates: Collateral Damage Related to Ventilation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Albertine, Kurt H.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Brain injury is a frequent co-morbidity in chronically ventilated preterm infants. However, the molecular basis of the brain injury remains incompletely understood. The focus of this paper is the subtler (diffuse) form of brain injury that has white matter and gray matter lesions, without germinal matrix hemorrhage-intraventricular hemorrhage, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, or cystic periventricular leukomalacia. The purpose of this review is to synthesize data that suggest diffuse lesions to white matter and gray matter are collateral damage related to ventilator strategy. Evidence is introduced from the two large-animal, physiological models of evolving neonatal chronic lung disease that suggest an epigenetic mechanism may underlie the collateral damage. PMID:22954278

  3. Comparison of transcranial ultrasound and cranial MRI in evaluations of brain injuries from neonatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Pan, Jia-Hua; Chen, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full-term infants with early-stage brain injuries from asphyxia were examined with two-dimensional ultrasound and color Doppler to assess the use of ultrasound in evaluating early brain injuries after neonatal asphyxia. The sonographic features of ultrasound and color Doppler were compared to those of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound was used to monitor the brain parenchyma, lateral ventricles, and cerebral hemodynamics in the asphyxia group and full-term control group 24, 48, and 72 h after birth. MRI and diffusion-weight imaging (DWI) were performed within 72 h. Cerebral edema changes were most obvious with ultrasound within 48 h of asphyxia, while the cerebral hemodynamic changes were most obvious within 24 h. These results suggested that ultrasound detected early cerebral edema better than MRI did. PMID:26770434

  4. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4 -induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis.

  5. Maternal Oxytocin Administration Before Birth Influences the Effects of Birth Anoxia on the Neonatal Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Boksa, Patricia; Zhang, Ying; Nouel, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    Ineffective contractions and prolonged labor are common birth complications in primiparous women, and oxytocin is the most common agent given for induction or augmentation of labor. Clinical studies in humans suggest oxytocin might adversely affect the CNS response to hypoxia at birth. In this study, we used a rat model of global anoxia during Cesarean section birth to test if administering oxytocin to pregnant dams prior to birth affects the acute neonatal CNS response to birth anoxia. Anoxic pups born from dams pre-treated with intravenous injections or infusions of oxytocin before birth showed significantly increased brain lactate, a metabolic indicator of CNS hypoxia, compared to anoxic pups from dams pre-treated with saline. Anoxic pups born from dams given oxytocin before birth also showed decreased brain ATP compared to anoxic pups from saline dams. Direct injection of oxytocin to postnatal day 2 rat pups followed by exposure to anoxia also resulted in increased brain lactate and decreased brain ATP, compared to anoxia exposure alone. Oxytocin pre-treatment of the dam decreased brain malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, as well as protein kinase C activity, both in anoxic pups and controls, suggesting oxytocin may reduce aspects of oxidative stress. Finally, when dams were pretreated with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, maternal oxytocin no longer potentiated effects of anoxia on neonatal brain lactate, suggesting this effect of oxytocin may be mediated via prostaglandin production or other COX-derived products. The results indicate that maternal oxytocin administration may have multiple acute effects on CNS metabolic responses to anoxia at birth.

  6. Bulk regional viral injection in neonatal mice enables structural and functional interrogation of defined neuronal populations throughout targeted brain areas.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Claire E J; Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to label and manipulate specific cell types is central to understanding the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Here, we have developed a simple, affordable strategy for labeling of genetically defined populations of neurons throughout a targeted brain region: Bulk Regional Viral Injection (BReVI). Our strategy involves a large volume adeno-associated virus (AAV) injection in the targeted brain region of neonatal Cre driver mice. Using the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) as a model system, we tested the ability of BReVI to broadly and selectively label tufted cells, one of the two principal neuron populations of the OB, in CCK-IRES-Cre mice. BReVI resulted in labeling of neurons throughout the injected OB, with no spatial bias toward the injection site and no evidence of damage. The specificity of BReVI labeling was strikingly similar to that seen previously using immunohistochemical staining for cholecystokinin (CCK), an established tufted cell marker. Hence, the CCK-IRES-Cre line in combination with BReVI can provide an important tool for targeting and manipulation of OB tufted cells. We also found robust Cre-dependent reporter expression within three days of BReVI, which enabled us to assess developmental changes in the number and laminar distribution of OB tufted cells during the first three postnatal weeks. Furthermore, we demonstrate that BReVI permits structural and functional imaging in vivo, and can be combined with transgenic strategies to facilitate multi-color labeling of neuronal circuit components. BReVI is broadly applicable to different Cre driver lines and can be used to regionally manipulate genetically defined populations of neurons in any accessible brain region. PMID:26594154

  7. Bulk regional viral injection in neonatal mice enables structural and functional interrogation of defined neuronal populations throughout targeted brain areas

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, Claire E. J.; Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to label and manipulate specific cell types is central to understanding the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Here, we have developed a simple, affordable strategy for labeling of genetically defined populations of neurons throughout a targeted brain region: Bulk Regional Viral Injection (BReVI). Our strategy involves a large volume adeno-associated virus (AAV) injection in the targeted brain region of neonatal Cre driver mice. Using the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) as a model system, we tested the ability of BReVI to broadly and selectively label tufted cells, one of the two principal neuron populations of the OB, in CCK-IRES-Cre mice. BReVI resulted in labeling of neurons throughout the injected OB, with no spatial bias toward the injection site and no evidence of damage. The specificity of BReVI labeling was strikingly similar to that seen previously using immunohistochemical staining for cholecystokinin (CCK), an established tufted cell marker. Hence, the CCK-IRES-Cre line in combination with BReVI can provide an important tool for targeting and manipulation of OB tufted cells. We also found robust Cre-dependent reporter expression within three days of BReVI, which enabled us to assess developmental changes in the number and laminar distribution of OB tufted cells during the first three postnatal weeks. Furthermore, we demonstrate that BReVI permits structural and functional imaging in vivo, and can be combined with transgenic strategies to facilitate multi-color labeling of neuronal circuit components. BReVI is broadly applicable to different Cre driver lines and can be used to regionally manipulate genetically defined populations of neurons in any accessible brain region. PMID:26594154

  8. An ISO-surface folding analysis method applied to premature neonatal brain development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Rousseau, Francois; Iordanova, Bistra; Glenn, Orit; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we describe the application of folding measures to tracking in vivo cortical brain development in premature neonatal brain anatomy. The outer gray matter and the gray-white matter interface surfaces were extracted from semi-interactively segmented high-resolution T1 MRI data. Nine curvature- and geometric descriptor-based folding measures were applied to six premature infants, aged 28-37 weeks, using a direct voxelwise iso-surface representation. We have shown that using such an approach it is feasible to extract meaningful surfaces of adequate quality from typical clinically acquired neonatal MRI data. We have shown that most of the folding measures, including a new proposed measure, are sensitive to changes in age and therefore applicable in developing a model that tracks development in premature infants. For the first time gyrification measures have been computed on the gray-white matter interface and on cases whose age is representative of a period of intense brain development.

  9. Sex-related differences in effects of progesterone following neonatal hypoxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Bethany L; Won, Soonmi; Geddes, Rastafa I; Sayeed, Iqbal; Stein, Donald G

    2015-06-01

    There is no satisfactory therapeutic intervention for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy. Progesterone is known to be effective in treating traumatic brain injury in adult animals but its effects in neonatal brains have not been reported. Brain injuries were induced by a unilateral common carotid artery ligation plus hypoxia exposure. Progesterone was administered immediately after hypoxia and daily for 5 days at 8 mg/kg, followed by a tapered dose for two days. At six weeks post-injury, lesion size and inflammatory factors were evaluated. Progesterone-treated, HI-injured male animals, but not females, showed significant long-term tissue protection compared to vehicle, suggesting an important sex difference in neuroprotection. Progesterone-treated, HI-injured male rats had fewer activated microglia in the cortex and hippocampus compared to controls. The rats were tested for neurological reflexes, motor asymmetry, and cognitive performance at multiple time points. The injured animals exhibited few detectable motor deficits, suggesting a high level of age- and injury-related neuroplasticity. There were substantial sex differences on several behavioral tests, indicating that immature males and females should be analyzed separately. Progesterone-treated animals showed modest beneficial effects in both sexes compared to vehicle-treated injured animals. Sham animals given progesterone did not behave differently from vehicle-treated sham animals on any measures.

  10. Space-Frequency Detail-Preserving Construction of Neonatal Brain Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuyao; Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Brain atlases are an integral component of neuroimaging studies. However, most brain atlases are fuzzy and lack structural details, especially in the cortical regions. In particular, neonatal brain atlases are especially challenging to construct due to the low spatial resolution and low tissue contrast. This is mainly caused by the image averaging process involved in atlas construction, often smoothing out high-frequency contents that indicate fine anatomical details. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for detail-preserving construction of atlases. Our approach combines space and frequency information to better preserve image details. This is achieved by performing reconstruction in the space-frequency domain given by wavelet transform. Sparse patch-based atlas reconstruction is performed in each frequency subband. Combining the results for all these subbands will then result in a refined atlas. Compared with existing atlases, experimental results indicate that our approach has the ability to build an atlas with more structural details, thus leading to better performance when used to normalize a group of testing neonatal images. PMID:27169138

  11. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wissink, Erin M; Smith, Norah L; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  12. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wissink, Erin M.; Smith, Norah L.; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  13. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  14. Effects of inter-alpha inhibitor proteins on neonatal brain injury: Age, task and treatment dependent neurobehavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Threlkeld, Steven W; Gaudet, Cynthia M; La Rue, Molly E; Dugas, Ethan; Hill, Courtney A; Lim, Yow-Pin; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is frequently associated with premature and/or full term birth related complications. HI injury often results in learning and processing deficits that reflect widespread damage to an extensive range of cortical and sub-cortical brain structures. Further, inflammation has been implicated in the long-term progression and severity of HI injury. Recently, inter-alpha inhibitor proteins (IAIPs) have been shown to attenuate inflammation in models of systemic infection. Importantly, preclinical studies of neonatal HI injury and neuroprotection often focus on single time windows of assessment or single behavioral domains. This approach limits translational validity, given evidence for a diverse spectrum of neurobehavioral deficits that may change across developmental windows following neonatal brain injury. Therefore, the aims of this research were to assess the effects of human IAIPs on early neocortical cell death (72h post-insult), adult regional brain volume measurements (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, corpus callosum) and long-term behavioral outcomes in juvenile (P38-50) and adult (P80+) periods across two independent learning domains (spatial and non-spatial learning), after postnatal day 7 HI injury in rats. Here, for the first time, we show that IAIPs reduce acute neocortical neuronal cell death and improve brain weight outcome 72h following HI injury in the neonatal rat. Further, these longitudinal studies are the first to show age, task and treatment dependent improvements in behavioral outcome for both spatial and non-spatial learning following systemic administration of IAIPs in neonatal HI injured rats. Finally, results also show sparing of brain regions critical for spatial and non-spatial learning in adult animals treated with IAIPs at the time of injury onset. These data support the proposal that inter-alpha inhibitor proteins may serve as novel therapeutics for brain injury associated with premature birth and

  15. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R(-/-)) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction size evaluated. Flow cytometry was performed on brain-infiltrating cells, and semi-automated analysis of flow cytometric data was applied. A1R(-/-) mice displayed larger infarctions (+33%, p < 0.05) and performed worse in beam walking tests (44% more mistakes, p < 0.05) than wild-type (WT) mice. Myeloid cell activation after injury was enhanced in A1R(-/-) versus WT brains. Activated B lymphocytes expressing IL-10 infiltrated the brain after HI in WT, but were less activated and did not increase in relative frequency in A1R(-/-). Also, A1R(-/-) B lymphocytes expressed less IL-10 than their WT counterparts, the A1R antagonist DPCPX decreased IL-10 expression whereas the A1R agonist CPA increased it. CD4(+) T lymphocytes including FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells, were unaffected by genotype, whereas CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses were smaller in A1R(-/-) mice. Using PCA to characterize the immune profile, we could discriminate the A1R(-/-) and WT genotypes as well as sham operated from HI-subjected animals. We conclude that A1R signaling modulates IL-10 expression by immune cells, influences the activation of these cells in vivo, and affects outcome after HI. PMID:26608888

  16. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  17. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-01

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  18. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology

  19. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology.

  20. The metabolism of phospholipids in mouse brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P. A.; Rowe, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    1. Slices of mouse brain grey matter were incubated with [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate. Doubly labelled phospholipids were extracted from subcellular fractions prepared from the slices in a mixture of metabolic inhibitors, under conditions where there was negligible change in radioactive labelling during the preparation. Two tissue fractions were studied in detail; one contained a high proportion of mitochondria and the other was mainly microsomal. 2. In all tissue fractions the highest incorporations of both [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate occurred into phosphatidylcholine. 3. After incubation for 1hr., the 32P/14C ratios for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid in the mitochondrial fraction were similar to those in the microsomal fraction. 4. The 32P/14C ratios were similar in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and much lower than those in phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol. PMID:16742443

  1. Pontine Reticulospinal Projections in the Neonatal Mouse: Internal Organization and Axon Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Magne S.; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    We recently characterized physiologically a pontine reticulospinal (pRS) projection in the neonatal mouse that mediates synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons via parallel uncrossed and crossed pathways (Sivertsen et al. [2014] J Neurophysiol 112:1628–1643). Here we characterize the origins, anatomical organization, and supraspinal axon trajectories of these pathways via retrograde tracing from the high cervical spinal cord. The two pathways derive from segregated populations of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting pRS neurons with characteristic locations within the pontine reticular formation (PRF). We obtained estimates of relative neuron numbers by counting from sections, digitally generated neuron position maps, and 3D reconstructions. Ipsilateral pRS neurons outnumber contralateral pRS neurons by threefold and are distributed about equally in rostral and caudal regions of the PRF, whereas contralateral pRS neurons are concentrated in the rostral PRF. Ipsilateral pRS neuron somata are on average larger than contralateral. No pRS neurons are positive in transgenic mice that report the expression of GAD, suggesting that they are predominantly excitatory. Putative GABAergic interneurons are interspersed among the pRS neurons, however. Ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons have distinctly different trajectories within the brainstem. Their initial spinal funicular trajectories also differ, with ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons more highly concentrated medially and laterally, respectively. The larger size and greater number of ipsilateral vs. contralateral pRS neurons is compatible with our previous finding that the uncrossed projection transmits more reliably to spinal motoneurons. The information about supraspinal and initial spinal pRS axon trajectories should facilitate future physiological assessment of synaptic connections between pRS neurons and spinal neurons. PMID:26400815

  2. Stable, Covalent Attachment of Laminin to Microposts Improves the Contractility of Mouse Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical output of contracting cardiomyocytes, the muscle cells of the heart, relates to healthy and disease states of the heart. Culturing cardiomyocytes on arrays of elastomeric microposts can enable inexpensive and high-throughput studies of heart disease at the single-cell level. However, cardiomyocytes weakly adhere to these microposts, which limits the possibility of using biomechanical assays of single cardiomyocytes to study heart disease. We hypothesized that a stable covalent attachment of laminin to the surface of microposts improves cardiomyocyte contractility. We cultured cells on polydimethylsiloxane microposts with laminin covalently bonded with the organosilanes 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. We measured displacement of microposts induced by the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, which attach better than mature cardiomyocytes to substrates. We observed time-dependent changes in contractile parameters such as micropost deformation, contractility rates, contraction and relaxation speeds, and the times of contractions. These parameters were affected by the density of laminin on microposts and by the stability of laminin binding to micropost surfaces. Organosilane-mediated binding resulted in higher laminin surface density and laminin binding stability. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane provided the highest laminin density but did not provide stable protein binding with time. Higher surface protein binding stability and strength were observed with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. In cultured cardiomyocytes, contractility rate, contraction speeds, and contraction time increased with higher laminin stability. Given these variations in contractile function, we conclude that binding of laminin to microposts via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde improves contractility observed by an increase in beating rate and contraction speed as it occurs during the

  3. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  4. Automatic tissue segmentation of neonate brain MR Images with subject-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule.

  5. Brain barrier properties and cerebral blood flow in neonatal mice exposed to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Baburamani, Ana A; Lehner, Christine; Leverin, Anna-Lena; Smith, Peter L P; Nilsson, Holger; Svedin, Pernilla; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2015-05-01

    Insults to the developing brain often result in irreparable damage resulting in long-term deficits in motor and cognitive functions. The only treatment today for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns is hypothermia, which has limited clinical benefit. We have studied changes to the blood-brain barriers (BBB) as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a neonatal model of HIE to further understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Nine-day old mice pups, brain roughly equivalent to the near-term human fetus, were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Hypoxia-ischemia increased BBB permeability to small and large molecules within hours after the insult, which normalized in the following days. The opening of the BBB was associated with changes to BBB protein expression whereas gene transcript levels were increased showing direct molecular damage to the BBB but also suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Brain pathology was closely related to reductions in rCBF during the hypoxia as well as the areas with compromised BBB showing that these are intimately linked. The transient opening of the BBB after the insult is likely to contribute to the pathology but at the same time provides an opportunity for therapeutics to better reach the infarcted areas in the brain.

  6. Brain barrier properties and cerebral blood flow in neonatal mice exposed to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Baburamani, Ana A; Lehner, Christine; Leverin, Anna-Lena; Smith, Peter L P; Nilsson, Holger; Svedin, Pernilla; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2015-05-01

    Insults to the developing brain often result in irreparable damage resulting in long-term deficits in motor and cognitive functions. The only treatment today for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns is hypothermia, which has limited clinical benefit. We have studied changes to the blood-brain barriers (BBB) as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a neonatal model of HIE to further understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Nine-day old mice pups, brain roughly equivalent to the near-term human fetus, were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Hypoxia-ischemia increased BBB permeability to small and large molecules within hours after the insult, which normalized in the following days. The opening of the BBB was associated with changes to BBB protein expression whereas gene transcript levels were increased showing direct molecular damage to the BBB but also suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Brain pathology was closely related to reductions in rCBF during the hypoxia as well as the areas with compromised BBB showing that these are intimately linked. The transient opening of the BBB after the insult is likely to contribute to the pathology but at the same time provides an opportunity for therapeutics to better reach the infarcted areas in the brain. PMID:25627141

  7. Automatic Tissue Segmentation of Neonate Brain MR Images with Subject-specific Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Consing, Kirsten Zaldarriaga; Styner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule. PMID:26089584

  8. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  9. Stress-related gene expression in brain and adrenal gland of porcine fetuses and neonates.

    PubMed

    Schwerin, Manfred; Kanitz, Ellen; Tuchscherer, Margret; Brüssow, Klaus-Peter; Nürnberg, Gerd; Otten, Winfried

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to examine stress-induced effects on gene expression of specific markers for HPA axis and neuronal activity in fetuses and neonatal pigs. Brain, pituitary gland, and adrenal gland were obtained to determine the mRNA levels for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), ACTH receptor (MC2R), c-jun and c-fos. The suitability of these molecular markers was determined in neonatal pigs which were maternally deprived for two hours. It was found that maternal deprivation caused significantly higher transcript levels of c-fos and CRH in brain accompanied by a down-regulation of CRHR1 mRNA and an up-regulation of c-jun in the pituitary gland. To determine the effect of elevated maternal cortisol levels on gene expression of these molecular markers in fetuses, pregnant sows were treated with 100 IU ACTH (Synacthen Depot) s.c. every two days between Day 49 and Day 75 of gestation (normal gestation length 114 days). Animals were killed 48 hours after the last ACTH administration and fetuses of each sow were isolated. The ACTH treatment of sows significantly increased mRNA expression of c-fos but not of CRH in the fetal brain, and significantly decreased MC2R mRNA expression in the adrenal gland. However, HPA axis seems not to be fully developed in Day 77-fetuses because fetal pituitary CRHR1 and POMC mRNA expression was low in most of the fetuses. Although the expression of endocrine regulatory factors was partially incomplete in fetuses at the beginning of the third-trimester, ACTH dependent activation of c-fos mRNA in brain indicates a stress-related increase of neuronal activity. Based on these results it is assumed that prenatal stress in pigs may also have effects on the activity of the HPA axis in the offspring.

  10. Apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yimei; Xu, Xiaohua; Dou, Hongbo; Hua, Ying; Xu, Jinwen; Hui, Xu

    2015-01-01

    More and more evidences suggestted that ApoE plays an important role in modulating the systemic and central nervous inflammatory responses. However, there is a lack of exacted mechanism of ApoE. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether apolipoprotein E (ApoE) induced inflammatory responses and apoptosis in neonatal mice brain from ApoE deficient (ApoE-/-) and wildtype (WT). Compared to control group, the microglia cell from ApoE-/- mice showed more severe inflammation and cell death such as iNOS and IL-1β. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory such as TGF-β, IL-10 from microglia and astrocytes in ApoE-/- mice were decreased. On the other way, TGF-β from astrocytes can inhibit inflammation factors secretion from microglia. Our findings suggested that the anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 mainly from microglia and TGF-β mainly from astrocyte is significant decreased after Loss of ApoE function in ApoE-/- mice which induced severe inflammation. Furthrtmore, anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 and TGF-β Therefore, we conclude that apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes. PMID:25785051

  11. Modelling Blood Flow and Metabolism in the Preclinical Neonatal Brain during and Following Hypoxic-Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Alan; Robertson, Nicola J.; Cooper, Chris E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) is a major cause of neonatal brain injury, often leading to long-term damage or death. In order to improve understanding and test new treatments, piglets are used as preclinical models for human neonates. We have extended an earlier computational model of piglet cerebral physiology for application to multimodal experimental data recorded during episodes of induced HI. The data include monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and the model simulates the circulatory and metabolic processes that give rise to the measured signals. Model extensions include simulation of the carotid arterial occlusion used to induce HI, inclusion of cytoplasmic pH, and loss of metabolic function due to cell death. Model behaviour is compared to data from two piglets, one of which recovered following HI while the other did not. Behaviourally-important model parameters are identified via sensitivity analysis, and these are optimised to simulate the experimental data. For the non-recovering piglet, we investigate several state changes that might explain why some MRS and NIRS signals do not return to their baseline values following the HI insult. We discover that the model can explain this failure better when we include, among other factors such as mitochondrial uncoupling and poor cerebral blood flow restoration, the death of around 40% of the brain tissue. PMID:26445281

  12. Brain Penetration and Efficacy of Different Mebendazole Polymorphs in a Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Wanjiku, Teresia; Rudek, Michelle A; Joshi, Avadhut; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mebendazole (MBZ), first used as an antiparasitic drug, shows preclinical efficacy in models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Three different MBZ polymorphs (A, B and C) exist and a detailed assessment of the brain penetration, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor properties of each individual MBZ polymorph is necessary to improve mebendazole-based brain cancer therapy. Experimental Design and Results In this study, various marketed and custom-formulated MBZ tablets were analyzed for their polymorph content by IR spectroscopy and subsequently tested in orthotopic GL261 mouse glioma model for efficacy and tolerability. The pharmacokinetics and brain concentration of MBZ polymorphs and two main metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. We found that polymorph B and C both increased survival in a GL261 glioma model, as B exhibited greater toxicity. Polymorph A showed no benefit. Both, polymorph B and C, reached concentrations in the brain that exceeded the IC50 in GL261 cells 29-fold. In addition, polymorph C demonstrated an AUC0-24h brain-to-plasma (B/P) ratio of 0.82, whereas B showed higher plasma AUC and lower B/P ratio. In contrast, polymorph A presented markedly lower levels in the plasma and brain. Furthermore, the combination with elacridar was able to significantly improve the efficacy of polymorph C in GL261 glioma and D425 medulloblastoma models in mice. Conclusion Among MBZ polymorphs, C reaches therapeutically effective concentrations in the brain tissue and tumor with less side effects and is the better choice for brain cancer therapy. Its efficacy can be further enhanced by combination with elacridar. PMID:25862759

  13. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Parallel states of pathological Wnt signaling in neonatal brain injury and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Harrington, Emily P; Baranzini, Sergio E; Silbereis, John C; Shiow, Lawrence R; Yuen, Tracy J; Huang, Eric J; Lomvardas, Stavros; Rowitch, David H

    2014-04-01

    In colon cancer, mutation of the Wnt repressor APC (encoding adenomatous polyposis coli) leads to a state of aberrant and unrestricted high-activity signaling. However, the relevance of high Wnt tone in non-genetic human disease is unknown. Here we demonstrate that distinct functional states of Wnt activity determine oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation and myelination. Mouse OPCs with genetic Wnt dysregulation (high tone) express multiple genes in common with colon cancer, including Lef1, Sp5, Ets2, Rnf43 and Dusp4. Surprisingly, we found that OPCs in lesions of hypoxic human neonatal white matter injury upregulated markers of high Wnt activity and lacked expression of APC. We also found that lack of Wnt repressor tone promoted permanent white matter injury after mild hypoxic insult. These findings suggest a state of pathological high-activity Wnt signaling in human disease tissues that lack predisposing genetic mutation.

  15. Relationship between opioid therapy, tissue-damaging procedures, and brain metabolites as measured by proton MRS in asphyxiated term neonates.

    PubMed

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Ashwal, Stephen; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Ebner, Charlotte; Fayard, Elba; Sowers, Lawrence; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effects of opioid and tissue-damaging procedures (TDPs) [i.e. procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) known to result in pain, stress, and tissue damage] on brain metabolites, we reviewed the medical records of 28 asphyxiated term neonates (eight opioid-treated, 20 non-opioid treated) who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within the first month of life as well as eight newborns with no clinical findings of asphyxial injury. We found that lower creatine (Cr), myoinositol (Ins), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) (p < or = 0.03) and higher Cho/Cr and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) Cr (p < or = 0.02) correlated with increased TDP incidence in the first 2 d of life (DOL). We also found that occipital gray matter (OGM) NAA/Cr was decreased (p = 0.03) and lactate (Lac) was present in a significantly higher amount (40%; p = 0.03) in non-opioid-treated neonates compared with opioid-treated neonates. Compared with controls, untreated neonates showed larger changes in more metabolites in basal ganglia (BG), thalami (TH), and OGM with greater significance than treated neonates. Our data suggest that TDPs affect spectral metabolites and that opioids do not cause harm in asphyxiated term neonates exposed to repetitive TDPs in the first 2-4 DOL and may provide a degree of neuroprotection.

  16. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans. PMID:26872850

  17. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans.

  18. Osteopontin-Rac1 on Blood-Brain Barrier Stability Following Rodent Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brandon; Malaguit, Jay; Casel, Darlene; Doycheva, Desislava; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H; Lekic, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a neuroprotective molecule that is upregulated following rodent neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (nHI) brain injury. Because Rac1 is a regulator of blood-brain barrier (BBB) stability, we hypothesized a role for this in OPN signaling. nHI was induced by unilateral ligation of the right carotid artery followed by hypoxia (8 % oxygen for 2 h) in P10 Sprague-Dawley rat pups. Intranasal (iN) OPN was administered at 1 h post-nHI. Groups consisted of: (1) Sham, (2) Vehicle, (3) OPN, and (4) OPN + Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Evans blue dye extravasation (BBB permeability) was quantified 24 h post-nHI, and brain edema at 48 h. Increased BBB permeability and brain edema following nHI was ameliorated in the OPN treatment group. However, those rat pups receiving OPN co-treatment with the Rac1 inhibitor experienced no improvement compared with vehicle. OPN protects the BBB following nHI, and this was reversed by Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). PMID:26463959

  19. Detail-preserving construction of neonatal brain atlases in space-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyao; Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-06-01

    Brain atlases are commonly utilized in neuroimaging studies. However, most brain atlases are fuzzy and lack structural details, especially in the cortical regions. This is mainly caused by the image averaging process involved in atlas construction, which often smoothes out high-frequency contents that capture fine anatomical details. Brain atlas construction for neonatal images is even more challenging due to insufficient spatial resolution and low tissue contrast. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for detail-preserving construction of population-representative atlases. Our approach combines spatial and frequency information to better preserve image details. This is achieved by performing atlas construction in the space-frequency domain given by wavelet transform. In particular, sparse patch-based atlas construction is performed in all frequency subbands, and the results are combined to give a final atlas. For enhancing anatomical details, tissue probability maps are also used to guide atlas construction. Experimental results show that our approach can produce atlases with greater structural details than existing atlases. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2133-2150, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  1. Effect of combined therapy with ephedrine and hyperbaric oxygen on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Xiao, Nong; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2009-11-13

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) is a major cause of brain injury in the newborn, and there is a lack of effective therapies to reduce injury-related disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of ephedrine and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into sham operation, HI, ephedrine, HBO, and combined group. The ephedrine group was intraperitoneally injected with ephedrine, HBO group was treated for 2h at 2.5 absolute atmosphere (ATA) per day, the combined group received both ephedrine and HBO treatments, the sham operation and HI groups were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline. Rat brains at 7 days after HI, were collected to determine histopathological damage and the expression levels of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A. Four weeks after insult, animals were challenged with Morris water maze test. The expressions of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A were reduced in treating groups compared to those in HI group (P<0.01). Compared with the single treatment groups, the expression levels of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A were significantly reduced in the combined group (P<0.01). Compared with the single treatment groups, the average time of escape latency was significantly shorter (P<0.01) and the number of platform location crossing was more (P<0.05) in combined group. These findings indicate that the combination of ephedrine and HBO can enhance the neuroprotective effect in the neonatal rat HI model partially mediated by inhibiting Caspase-3 and Nogo-A pathways.

  2. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4-induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis. PMID:26011625

  3. Use of High Resolution 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Study Brain White Matter Development in Live Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yu; McMurray, Matthew S.; Oguz, Ipek; Yuan, Hong; Styner, Martin A.; Lin, Weili; Johns, Josephine M.; An, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5) and PND14, using only 3 h of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D rapid acquisition relaxation enhancement DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild-to-moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in magnetic resonance images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild-to-moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. fractional anisotropy values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment. PMID:22013426

  4. Early Supplementation of Phospholipids and Gangliosides Affects Brain and Cognitive Development in Neonatal Piglets123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongnan; Radlowski, Emily C; Conrad, Matthew S; Li, Yao; Dilger, Ryan N; Johnson, Rodney W

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because human breast milk is a rich source of phospholipids and gangliosides and breastfed infants have improved learning compared with formula-fed infants, the importance of dietary phospholipids and gangliosides for brain development is of interest. Objective: We sought to determine the effects of phospholipids and gangliosides on brain and cognitive development. Methods: Male and female piglets from multiple litters were artificially reared and fed formula containing 0% (control), 0.8%, or 2.5% Lacprodan PL-20 (PL-20; Arla Foods Ingredients), a phospholipid/ganglioside supplement, from postnatal day (PD) 2 to PD28. Beginning on PD14, performance in a spatial T-maze task was assessed. At PD28, brain MRI data were acquired and piglets were killed to obtain hippocampal tissue for metabolic profiling. Results: Diet affected maze performance, with piglets that were fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 making fewer errors than control piglets (80% vs. 75% correct on average; P < 0.05) and taking less time to make a choice (3 vs. 5 s/trial; P < 0.01). Mean brain weight was 5% higher for piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 (P < 0.05) than control piglets, and voxel-based morphometry revealed multiple brain areas with greater volumes and more gray and white matter in piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 than in control piglets. Metabolic profiling of hippocampal tissue revealed that multiple phosphatidylcholine-related metabolites were altered by diet. Conclusion: In summary, dietary phospholipids and gangliosides improved spatial learning and affected brain growth and composition in neonatal piglets. PMID:25411030

  5. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Bouslama, Myriam; Adla-Biassette, Homa; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Bollen, Bieke; Brissaud, Olivier; Matrot, Boris; Gressens, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group), a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group), and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group). Exposure to moderate IH (8% O2) consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine whether in

  6. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Bouslama, Myriam; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Bollen, Bieke; Brissaud, Olivier; Matrot, Boris; Gressens, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group), a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group), and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group). Exposure to moderate IH (8% O2) consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine whether in

  7. An Experimental Study of the Potential Biological Effects Associated with 2-D Shear Wave Elastography on the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Cao, Xiaolin; Song, Danfei

    2016-07-01

    2-D Shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging is widely used in clinical practice, and some researchers have applied this technique in the evaluation of neonatal brains. However, the immediate and long-term impacts of dynamic radiation force exposure on the neonatal central nervous system remain unknown. In this study, we exposed neonatal mice to 2-D SWE scanning for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min under diagnostic mode (mechanical index [MI]: 1.3; thermal index [TI]: 0.5), respectively. For the control group, the neonatal mice were sham irradiated for 30 min with the machine powered off. Their brains were collected and analyzed using histologic staining and western blot analysis at 24 h and 3 mo after the 2-D SWE scanning. The Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory function of the mice at 3 mo of age. The results indicated that using 2-D SWE in evaluating brains of neonatal mice does not cause detectable histologic changes, nor does it have long-term effects on their learning and memory abilities. However, the PI3 K/AKT/mTOR pathway was disturbed when the 2-D SWE scanning lasted for more than 30 min, and the expression of p-PKCa was suppressed by 10 min or more in 2-D SWE scanning. Although these injuries may be self-repaired as the mice grow, more attention should be paid to the scanning duration when applying 2-D-SWE elastography in the assessment of neonatal brains.

  8. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G.; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Bastin, Mark E.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2–41+6). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development. PMID:27242423

  9. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  10. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Bastin, Mark E; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39(+5) weeks, range 37(+2)-41(+6)). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development.

  11. Development of a Novel Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Decarboxylase Knockout Mouse: Dietary Taurine Reduces Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunkyue; Park, Seung Yong; Schuller-Levis, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    We engineered a CSAD KO mouse to investigate the physiological roles of taurine. The disruption of the CSAD gene was verified by Southern, Northern, and Western blotting. HPLC indicated an 83% decrease of taurine concentration in the plasma of CSAD−/−. Although CSAD−/− generation (G)1 and G2 survived, offspring from G2 CSAD−/− had low brain and liver taurine concentrations and most died within 24 hrs of birth. Taurine concentrations in G3 CSAD−/− born from G2 CSAD−/− treated with taurine in the drinking water were restored and survival rates of G3 CSAD−/− increased from 15% to 92%. The mRNA expression of CDO, ADO, and TauT was not different in CSAD−/− compared to WT and CSAD mRNA was not expressed in CSAD−/−. Expression of Gpx 1 and 3 was increased significantly in CSAD−/− and restored to normal levels with taurine supplementation. Lactoferrin and the prolactin receptor were significantly decreased in CSAD−/−. The prolactin receptor was restored with taurine supplementation. These data indicated that CSAD KO is a good model for studying the effects of taurine deficiency and its treatment with taurine supplementation. PMID:24639894

  12. Clinical significance of elevated serum A-FABP and free fatty acid in neonates with hypoxic ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Jiang, Lian; Zhang, Huifen; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lianshan

    2016-01-01

    The main function of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) is to regulate fatty acid metabolism as its molecular chaperone. The clinical significance of A-FABP in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) neonates is not yet clear. Free fatty acid (FFA) in cerebral cortex increases along with hypoxia ischemia degree. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether FFA can induce A-FABP expression and elevate the serum A-FABP level in HIBD neonates. In the present study, 42 HIBD neonates were selected including 11 cases as mild, 16 cases as moderate and 15 cases as severe. The serum was collected from peripheral vein at 72 h after the first visit (acute stage) and 7 days after birth (recovery stage), and the serum from 10 normal neonates was used as the control. The serum level of A-FABP and FFA in 42 neonates with acute phase and recovery phase HIBD were detected using ELISA and copper colorimetric method. The overall serum A-FABP content in HIBD neonates at the acute stage was significantly higher compared to the normal neonates (P<0.05). The serum A-FABP level in severe HIBD neonates was significantly higher than that in mild HIBD, moderate HIBD and normal neonates (P<0.05). The serum FFA level in HIBD neonates at the acute stage was 1,521.57±605.63 µmol/l, which was significantly higher than that in the normal neonates 838.24±294.22 µmol/l. The serum FFA levels in mild, moderate and severe HIBD neonates were significantly higher than those in the normal neonates. The overall A-FABP level in HIBD neonates at the recovery stage was significantly lower compared to the acute stage, which was significant in severe HIBD neonates. A-FABP levels in mild and moderate HIBD neonates at recovery stage were decreased compared with the acute stage, although there was no statistical difference. There was a positive correlation between serum A-FABP and FFA in HIBD neonates at acute stage (r=0.369, P<0.05). In conclusion, serum A-FABP and FFA levels were signifcantly increased in

  13. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Wilkinson, A G; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases 'uniformly' distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  14. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    PubMed Central

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  15. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; MacNaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  16. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    PubMed

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ).

  17. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  18. Localized q-space imaging of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    King, M D; Houseman, J; Gadian, D G; Connelly, A

    1997-12-01

    Localized q-space imaging was used to obtain water displacement profiles from mouse brain. These profiles take the form of unidirectional diffusive displacement probability distributions. Two groups of mice were studied, a normal group and a group in which surgery had been performed to produce a unilateral reduction in the supply of blood to the forebrain. q-Space measurements were made both in vivo and postmortem. The displacement profiles were characterized using the summary parameter prob[d < 10], which is the proportion of water molecules that undergo a net diffusive displacement that is less than +/-10 microm, during the diffusion period (50 ms). The range of prob[d < 10] values in the normal group was 0.71 to 0.77 in vivo compared with 0.78 to 0.87 in the impaired hemisphere of the surgically treated group. An increase in prob[d < 10] occurred postmortem to yield values in the range 0.79 to 0.81 and 0.80 to 0.89 in the normal and surgically treated group, respectively. These observations are consistent with the diffusion-weighted image intensity changes that occur after a period of ischemia.

  19. New Japanese encephalitis vaccines: alternatives to production in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Thomas, Stephen J

    2011-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavivirus maintained in a zoonotic cycle and transmitted by the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus, causes epidemics of encephalitis throughout much of Asia. Resident populations, including short- or long-term visitors to enzootic regions, are at risk of infection and disease. For the past several decades, killed viral vaccines prepared in tissue culture or mouse brain have been used effectively to immunize travelers and residents of enzootic countries. Cost, efficacy and safety concerns led to the development of a live-attenuated virus vaccine (SA14-14-2) and more recently, to the licensure in the USA, Europe, Canada, and Australia of a purified inactivated, tissue culture-based Japanese encephalitis vaccine (IXIARO(®), referred to as IC51; Intercell AG, Vienna, Austria). In addition, a live-attenuated yellow fever-Japanese encephalitis chimeric vaccine (IMOJEV™, referred to as Japanese encephalitis-CV; Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France) was recently licensed in Australia and is under review in Thailand. A broad portfolio of safe and effective Japanese encephalitis vaccines has become available to meet the needs of at-risk populations; when appropriately delivered, these new vaccines should greatly diminish the burden of disease.

  20. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction.

  1. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  2. Measuring Complexity of Mouse Brain Morphological Changes Using GeoEntropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-fiqi, Heba Z.; Pham, Tuan D.; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Crane, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on research into human neurodegenerative diseases, an effective computing approach for the analysis of complex brain morphological changes would represent a significant technological innovation. The availability of mouse models of such disorders provides an experimental system to test novel approaches to brain image analysis. Here we utilize a mouse model of a neurodegenerative disorder to model changes to cerebellar morphology during the postnatal period, and have applied the GeoEntropy algorithm to measure the complexity of morphological changes.

  3. Inhibition of Na+/H+ Exchanger Isoform 1 Is Neuroprotective in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, Neil; Uluc, Kutluay; Kendigelen, Pinar; Hagemann, Tracy; Akture, Erinc; Messing, Albee; Ferrazzano, Peter; Sun, Dandan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in neonatal hypoxia/ischemia (HI). HI was induced by unilateral ligation of the left common carotid artery in postnatal day 9 (P9) mice, and subsequent exposure of animals to 8% O2 for 55 min. A pre/posttreatment group received a selective and potent NHE-1 inhibitor HOE 642 (0.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 5 min before HI, then at 24 and 48 h after HI. A posttreatment group received HOE 642 (0.5 mg/kg) at 10 min, 24 h, and 48 h after HI. Saline injections were used as vehicle controls. The vehicle-control brains at 72 h after HI exhibited neuronal degeneration in the ipsilateral hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus, as identified with Fluoro-Jade C positive staining and loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) expression. NHE-1 protein was upregulated in glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive reactive astrocytes. In HOE 642–treated brains, the morphologic hippocampal structures were better preserved and displayed less neurodegeneration and a higher level of MAP2 expression. Motor-learning deficit was detected at 4 weeks of age after HI in the vehicle control group. Inhibition of NHE-1 in P9 mice not only reduced neurodegeneration during the acute stage of HI but also improved the striatum-dependent motor learning and spatial learning at 8 weeks of age after HI. These findings suggest that NHE-1–mediated disruption of ionic homeostasis contributes to striatal and CA1 pyramidal neuronal injury after neonatal HI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1803–1813. PMID:20712402

  4. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  5. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  6. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  7. Intranasal administration of IGF-1 attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuying; Fan, Lir-Wan; Rhodes, Philip G.; Cai, Zhengwei

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether intranasal administration (iN) of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) provides neuroprotection to the neonatal rat brain following cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), two doses of rhIGF-1 (50 μg at a 1 h interval) were infused into the right naris of postnatal day 7 (P7) rat pups with or without a prior HI insult (right common carotid artery ligation, followed by an exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 h). Our result showed that rhIGF-1 administered via iN was successfully delivered into the brain 30 min after the second dose. In the following studies rhIGF-1 was administered to P7 rat pups at 0, 1 or 2 h after HI at the dose described above. Pups in the control group received cerebral HI and vehicle treatment. Pups that underwent sham operation and vehicle treatment served as the sham group. Brain pathological changes were evaluated 2 and 15 d after HI. Our results showed that rhIGF-1 treatment up to 1 hr after cerebral HI effectively reduced brain injury as compared to that in the vehicle-treated rats. Moreover, rhIGF-1 treatment improved neurobehavioral performance (tested on P5-P21) in juvenile rats subjected to HI. Our results further showed that rhIGF-1 inhibited apoptotic cell death, possibly through activating the Akt signal transduction pathway. rhIGF-1 enhanced proliferation of neuronal and oligodendroglial progenitors after cerebral HI as well. These data suggest that iN administration of IGF-1 has the potential to be used for clinical treatment. PMID:19332057

  8. Brain stem serotonin protects blood pressure in neonatal rats exposed to episodic anoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiao T; Cummings, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    In neonatal rodents, a loss of brain stem serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] in utero or at birth compromises anoxia-induced gasping and the recovery of heart rate (HR) and breathing with reoxygenation (i.e., autoresuscitation). How mean arterial pressure (MAP) is influenced after an acute loss of brain stem 5-HT content is unknown. We hypothesized that a loss of 5-HT for ∼1 day would compromise MAP during episodic anoxia. We injected 6-fluorotryptophan (20 mg/kg ip) into rat pups (postnatal days 9-10 or 11-13, n = 22 treated, 24 control), causing a ∼70% loss of brain stem 5-HT. Pups were exposed to a maximum of 15 anoxic episodes, separated by 5 min of room air to allow autoresuscitation. In younger pups, we measured breathing frequency and tidal volume using "head-out" plethysmography and HR from the electrocardiogram. In older pups, we used whole body plethysmography to detect gasping, while monitoring MAP. Gasp latency and the time required for respiratory, HR, and MAP recovery following each episode were determined. Despite normal gasp latency, breathing frequency and a larger tidal volume (P < 0.001), 5-HT-deficient pups survived one-half the number of episodes as controls (P < 0.001). The anoxia-induced decrease in MAP experienced by 5-HT-deficient pups was double that of controls (P = 0.017), despite the same drop in HR (P = 0.48). MAP recovery was delayed ∼10 s by 5-HT deficiency (P = 0.001). Our data suggest a loss of brain stem 5-HT leads to a pronounced, premature loss of MAP in response to episodic anoxia. These data may help explain why some sudden infant death syndrome cases die from what appears to be cardiovascular collapse during apparent severe hypoxia. PMID:24136109

  9. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  10. BRAIN HYPOTHERMIA THERAPY FOR NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH A SEVERELY ELEVATED SERUM CREATINE KINASE LEVEL.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hidetoshi; Imamura, Takashi; Maeda, Hajime; Shibukawa, Yasuko; Fukuda, Yutaka; Kin, Shogo; Ariga, Hiromichi; Nagasawa, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that brain hypothermia therapy (BHT) after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) can improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, there have been no reports of the neurodevelopmental outcomes for the infant with a serum creatine kinase (CK) level above 20,000 IU/L in association with neonatal HIE. We report a female infant with a very high serum CK level (26,428 IU/L) associated with neonatal asphyxia. We diagnosed this infant with moderate HIE, and BHT was achieved by head cooling within 6 hours after birth to an esophageal temperature of 34.5°C. There were no significant adverse events during BHT, and the CK level spontaneously decreased. Although we report only the short-term outcomes for this case, she presents neurodevelopmental delays at the age of 18 months. It may be correlated between high serum CK level and long-term neurodevelopmental delays. PMID:25946908

  11. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  12. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  13. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  14. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA.

  15. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  16. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Yanal; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Taewoo; Takahashi, Hazuki; Orlando, Valerio; Carninci, Piero; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs. PMID:27112104

  17. Acute TrkB inhibition rescues phenobarbital-resistant seizures in a mouse model of neonatal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kang, S K; Johnston, M V; Kadam, S D

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Phenobarbital (PB) resistance is common and poses a serious challenge in clinical management. Using a newly characterized neonatal mouse model of ischemic seizures, this study investigated a novel strategy for rescuing PB resistance. A small-molecule TrkB antagonist, ANA12, used to selectively and transiently block post-ischemic BDNF-TrkB signaling in vivo, determined whether rescuing TrkB-mediated post-ischemic degradation of the K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2) rescued PB-resistant seizures. The anti-seizure efficacy of ANA12 + PB was quantified by (i) electrographic seizure burden using acute continuous video-electroencephalograms and (ii) post-treatment expression levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 using Western blot analysis in postnatal day (P)7 and P10 CD1 pups with unilateral carotid ligation. ANA12 significantly rescued PB-resistant seizures at P7 and improved PB efficacy at P10. A single dose of ANA12 + PB prevented the post-ischemic degradation of KCC2 for up to 24 h. As anticipated, ANA12 by itself had no anti-seizure properties and was unable to prevent KCC2 degradation at 24 h without follow-on PB. This indicates that unsubdued seizures can independently lead to KCC2 degradation via non-TrkB-dependent pathways. This study, for the first time as a proof-of-concept, reports the potential therapeutic value of KCC2 modulation for the management of PB-resistant seizures in neonates. Future investigations are required to establish the mechanistic link between ANA12 and the prevention of KCC2 degradation. PMID:26452067

  18. Protective effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG against human rotavirus-induced diarrhoea in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Xiang, Yun; Li, Na; Wang, Baoxiang; Ai, Hongwu; Wang, Xiaomei; Huang, Laiqiang; Zheng, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Group A human rotaviruses (RV) are a leading cause of severe dehydration and gastroenteritis in infants and young children. A large body of evidence suggests that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has an effect on the incidence and severity of acute RV-induced diarrhoea; however, the timing and dosage of LGG treatment remains controversial. In the present study, a neonatal mouse model with human RV-induced diarrhoea was set up and the pathophysiological characteristics of the animals were examined. Our results indicated that RV-infected mice developed diarrhoea, accompanied by increased secretion of intestinal mucosa sIgA and serum interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, as well as decreased serum IgA. In addition, epithelium vacuolation was noticed in the jejunum microvillus of RV-infected mice. After intragastric administration of low (2 × 10(5) CFU), middle (2 × 10(7) CFU) or high (2 × 10(9) CFU) levels of LGG for four consecutive days before or after RV infection respectively, the RV-infected mice showed a shortened duration of diarrhoea and decreased epithelium vacuolation in the jejunum. Administration of a high dose of LGG before the RV infection was found to have better protective effects against RV infection than other regimens. This study demonstrates that the protective effects of LGG against RV-induced diarrhoea are highly correlated with the timing and dosage of LGG administration in neonatal mice.

  19. Nitric oxide induces hypoxia ischemic injury in the neonatal brain via the disruption of neuronal iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Harris, Valerie A; Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation is involved in hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-mediated neonatal brain injury. H2O2 can react with free iron to form the hydroxyl radical, through Fenton Chemistry. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if there was a role for the hydroxyl radical in neonatal HI brain injury and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Our data demonstrate that HI increases the deposition of free iron and hydroxyl radical formation, in both P7 hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and the neonatal rat exposed to HI. Both these processes were found to be nitric oxide (NO) dependent. Further analysis demonstrated that the NO-dependent increase in iron deposition was mediated through increased transferrin receptor expression and a decrease in ferritin expression. This was correlated with a reduction in aconitase activity. Both NO inhibition and iron scavenging, using deferoxamine administration, reduced hydroxyl radical levels and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased NO generation leads to neuronal cell death during neonatal HI, at least in part, by altering iron homeostasis and hydroxyl radical generation.

  20. Antenatal depression, treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and neonatal brain structure: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shaili C; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Steiner, Rachel J; Cornea, Emil; Woolson, Sandra; Ahn, Mihye; Verde, Audrey R; Hamer, Robert M; Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Gilmore, John H; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this propensity-matched cohort study was to evaluate the impact of prenatal SSRI exposure and a history of maternal depression on neonatal brain volumes and white matter microstructure. SSRI-exposed neonates (n=27) were matched to children of mothers with no history of depression or SSRI use (n=54). Additionally, neonates of mothers with a history of depression, but no prenatal SSRI exposure (n=41), were matched to children of mothers with no history of depression or SSRI use (n=82). Structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion weighted imaging scans were acquired with a 3T Siemens Allegra scanner. Global tissue volumes were characterized using an automatic, atlas-moderated expectation maximization segmentation tool. Local differences in gray matter volumes were examined using deformation-based morphometry. Quantitative tractography was performed using an adaptation of the UNC-Utah NA-MIC DTI framework. SSRI-exposed neonates exhibited widespread changes in white matter microstructure compared to matched controls. Children exposed to a history of maternal depression but no SSRIs showed no significant differences in brain development compared to matched controls. No significant differences were found in global or regional tissue volumes. Additional research is needed to clarify whether SSRIs directly alter white matter development or whether this relationship is mediated by depressive symptoms during pregnancy. PMID:27254086

  1. P-glycoprotein in the developing human brain: a review of the effects of ontogeny on the safety of opioids in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jessica; Koren, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    The human blood brain barrier is responsible for maintaining brain homeostasis and protecting against potentially toxic substances. The ATP-binding cassette drug efflux protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key player in actively extruding a wide range of xenobiotics such as opioids from the brain. Because the blood brain barrier is structurally and functionally immature in neonates, opioids may have a greater penetration to the central nervous system. This may influence the efficacy and safety of opioids in the newborn. Understanding the extent of P-gp's expression in the brain in the embryo, fetus, and newborn will facilitate rational opioid use during pregnancy and the neonatal period. This review aims to summarize the current evidence that associates the ontogeny of P-gp and the susceptibility to opioid-induced adverse respiratory effects in neonates. To date, evidence suggests that the expression of P-gp in the human brain is low at birth, contributing to increased susceptibility.

  2. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Saif I; Dondzillo, Anna; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Felsen, Gidon; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  3. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  4. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  5. Fetal Stress and Programming of Hypoxic/Ischemic-Sensitive Phenotype in the Neonatal Brain: Mechanisms and Possible Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxicischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other for brain disorders. PMID:22627492

  6. Traumatic brain injury in the neonate, child and adolescent human: an overview of pathology.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, William L

    2012-05-01

    In the middle of the last century it had been thought that a good recovery of function and behavior would occur after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in very young human beings. A recent major change in thinking states that early childhood TBI may result in a severe compromise of normal brain growth and development such that TBI, rather, may compromise later normal development resulting in a need for very long term patient care and management. The mechanisms of injury and pathology within the injured brain are reviewed and compared between when injury occurs at or close to the time of birth, in an infant, in a young child, in a child between ages 5 and 10, in young and older adolescents and in young adulthood. Our understanding of pathophysiological responses by cells of the human central nervous system has recently greatly increased but has really only served to illustrate the great complexity of interactions between different types of cell within the growing and developing CNS. The hypothesis is developed that the outcome for a very young patient differs with the relative state of development of injured cells at the locus of injury. And that the potential for either repair, re-instatement of normal cellular and organ function or for continued normal development is much reduced after an early brain insult (EBI) compared with TBI in a slightly older child or young adult patient. The advent of increasingly sophisticated non-invasive imaging technology has allowed assessment of the influence and time course of brain pathology both early and late after TBI. This has generated greater confidence on the part of clinicians in forecasting outcomes for an injured patient. But our increased understanding has still not allowed development of therapeutic strategies that might ameliorate the effect of an injury. It is suggested that an improved integration of major clinical and scientific effort needs to be made to appreciate the import of multiple interactions between cells

  7. Use of early biomarkers in neonatal brain damage and sepsis: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Iliana; Auriti, Cinzia; Ronchetti, Maria Paola; Prencipe, Giusi; Gazzolo, Diego; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The identification of early noninvasive biochemical markers of disease is a crucial issue of the current scientific research, particularly during the first period of life, since it could provide useful and precocious diagnostic information when clinical and radiological signs are still silent. The ideal biomarker should be practical and sensitive in the precocious identification of at risk patients. An earlier diagnosis may lead to a larger therapeutic window and improve neonatal outcome. Brain damage and sepsis are common causes of severe morbidity with poor outcome and mortality during the perinatal period. A large number of potential biomarkers, including neuroproteins, calcium binding proteins, enzymes, oxidative stress markers, vasoactive agents, and inflammatory mediators, have been so far investigated. The aim of the present review was to provide a brief overview of some of the more commonly investigated biomarkers used in case of neonatal brain damage and sepsis.

  8. Laboratory investigations on neuroparalytic accidents associated with suckling mouse brain rabies vaccine. III. -- Preservation of vaccine potency after elimination of murine brain myelin by centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Larghi, O P; Varela-Diaz, V M; Soto, E; Imas, B; Cuba-Caparo, A; Fuenzalida, E

    1976-01-01

    Myelin, which has been found in nine day-old mouse brain, was eliminated from weanling mouse brain suspensions by centrifugation at 17,000 g for 10 min, as demonstrated by electron microscopy and guinea-pig inoculation tests for encephalitogenic activity. This centrifugation procedure did not affect the potency of seven batches of suckling mouse brain vaccine, when centrifuged and non-centrifuged samples of the same batches were compared by a modified NIH potency test (t = 0.17). The present results with weanling mouse brain preparations suggest that centrifugation at 17,000 g be used in the preparation of rabies suckling mouse brain vaccine instead of the 1,900 g currently employed, which does not eliminate myelin. This new procedure would be expected to reduce the number of postvaccinal reactions which are attributable to the small amount of myelin which remains in vaccines prepared with new-born animal brains following the current procedure.

  9. Neonatal tissue injury reduces the intrinsic excitability of adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Baccei, M L

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage during the neonatal period evokes long-lasting changes in nociceptive processing within the adult spinal cord which contribute to persistent alterations in pain sensitivity. However, it remains unclear if the observed modifications in neuronal activity within the mature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) following early injury reflect shifts in the intrinsic membrane properties of these cells. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to identify the effects of neonatal surgical injury on the intrinsic excitability of both GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic neurons within lamina II of the adult SDH using in vitro patch clamp recordings from spinal cord slices prepared from glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (Gad-GFP) mice. The results demonstrate that hindpaw surgical incision at postnatal day (P) 3 altered the passive membrane properties of both Gad-GFP and adjacent, non-GFP neurons in the mature SDH, as evidenced by decreased membrane resistance and more negative resting potentials in comparison to naïve littermate controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in the prevalence of spontaneous activity within the GABAergic population. Both Gad-GFP and non-GFP neurons displayed a significant elevation in rheobase and decreased instantaneous firing frequency after incision, suggesting that early tissue damage lowers the intrinsic membrane excitability of adult SDH neurons. Isolation of inward-rectifying K(+) (K(ir)) currents revealed that neonatal incision significantly increased K(ir) conductance near physiological membrane potentials in GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, lamina II neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that neonatal tissue injury causes a long-term dampening of intrinsic firing across the general population of lamina II interneurons, but the underlying ionic mechanisms may be cell-type specific.

  10. Multicolor Fluorescence Imaging of Traumatic Brain Injury in a Cryolesion Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is characterized by initial tissue damage, which then can lead to secondary processes such as cell death and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Clinical and preclinical studies of traumatic brain injury typically employ anatomical imaging techniques and there is a need for new molecular imaging methods that provide complementary biochemical information. Here, we assess the ability of a targeted, near-infrared fluorescent probe, named PSS-794, to detect cell death in a brain cryolesion mouse model that replicates certain features of traumatic brain injury. In short, the model involves brief contact of a cold rod to the head of a living, anesthetized mouse. Using noninvasive whole-body fluorescence imaging, PSS-794 permitted visualization of the cryolesion in the living animal. Ex vivo imaging and histological analysis confirmed PSS-794 localization to site of brain cell death. The nontargeted, deep-red Tracer-653 was validated as a tracer dye for monitoring blood-brain-barrier disruption, and a binary mixture of PSS-794 and Tracer-653 was employed for multicolor imaging of cell death and blood-brain-barrier permeability in a single animal. The imaging data indicates that at 3 days after brain cryoinjury the amount of cell death had decreased significantly, but the integrity of the blood-brain-barrier was still impaired; at 7 days, the blood-brain-barrier was still three times more permeable than before cryoinjury. PMID:22860222

  11. Transplanted transgenically marked oligodendrocytes survive, migrate and myelinate in the normal mouse brain as they do in the shiverer mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, F; Duhamel-Clerin, E; Gansmüller, A; Baron-Van Evercooren, A; Villarroya, H; Gumpel, M

    1994-05-01

    The dye Hoechst 33342 was combined with an immunodetectable transgene product (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, CAT) expressed in differentiated oligodendrocytes to trace their fate after transplantation in the normal and the shiverer mouse brain. In the shiverer brain, the technique allowed us to visualize grafted cells inside myelin basic protein-positive myelin patches. Most of these cells were CAT-positive/Hoechst 33342-negative, reinforcing our hypothesis that cell division probably follows migration of grafted oligodendrocytes. Correlation of their morphology and distribution with their location in the host CNS suggested a local effect on the cell division and morphogenesis of the grafted material. When compared with transplantation of fragments of normal newborn donor tissue into the newborn shiverer brain, no difference could be seen between the behaviour of normal and transgenic oligodendrocytes. In the normal brain, transgenic oligodendrocytes survived at least 150 days and successfully myelinated the host axons. The timing of differentiation of grafted cells was similar in both types of recipient brains. Migration occurred rostrally and caudally. Although migrating cells could be observed along the meninges and the blood vessels, migration occurred preferentially along white matter tracts. The extent of migration was influenced by the site of implantation, and grafted cells could be found up to 6 mm from the grafting point. No differences in the timing of differentiation or the pattern or extent of migration could thus be demonstrated when transgenic oligodendrocytes were transplanted in the normal or the shiverer brain. This validates our previous studies using the newborn shiverer mouse as recipient.

  12. Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Activation Mediated p53 Downregulation Protects Against Hypoxic-Ischemia in the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yi-Fang; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chow, Yen-Hung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Chou, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This study determined if dietary restriction (DR) protects against hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain via insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/Akt pathway-mediated downregulation of p53 in the neurovascular unit. On postnatal (P) day 7, HI was induced in rat pups grouped from P1 into normal litter size (NL, 12 pups/dam) and increased litter size (DR, 18 pups/dam). In vivo IRS-1 anti-sense oligonucleotide and IRS-1 overexpressed recombinant adenovirus were given, and neurovascular damage was assessed. In vitro models of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) examined the inhibition and overexpression of IRS-1 on p53 and cell death in neurons and endothelial cells. Compared to NL pups, DR pups had significantly higher IRS-1, p-IRS-1, and pAkt levels, decreased p53, more tight junction proteins, reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage after HI, and less infarct volumes at P21. Immunofluorescence revealed that IRS-1 was upregulated in the endothelial cells and neurons of DR pups. IRS-1 downregulation in DR pups reduced p-Akt, increased p53, worsened BBB damage, and increased brain injury, whereas IRS-1 overexpression in NL pups upregulated p-Akt, decreased p53, attenuated BBB damage, and decreased brain injury. In vitro, IRS-1 downregulation aggravated cell death in neurons and endothelial cells and is associated with decreased p-Akt and increased p53. In contrast, IRS-1 overexpression reduced cell death in endothelial cells with increased p-Akt and decreased p53. In conclusion, DR reduces neurovascular damage after HI in the neonatal brain through an IRS-1/Akt-mediated p53 downregulation, suggesting that IRS-1 signaling is a therapeutic target for hypoxic brain injury in neonates.

  13. Glial-Restricted Precursors Protect Neonatal Brain Slices from Hypoxic-Ischemic Cell Death Without Direct Tissue Contact.

    PubMed

    Sweda, Romy; Phillips, Andre W; Marx, Joel; Johnston, Michael V; Wilson, Mary Ann; Fatemi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs) are tripotential progenitors that have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in several preclinical models of neurological disorders, including neonatal brain injury. The mechanisms of action of these cells, however, require further study, as do clinically relevant questions such as timing and route of cell administration. Here, we explored the effects of GRPs on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia during acute and subacute stages, using an in vitro transwell co-culture system with organotypic brain slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD-exposed slices that were then co-cultured with GRPs without direct cell contact had decreased tissue injury and cortical cell death, as evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. This effect was more pronounced when cells were added during the subacute phase of the injury. Furthermore, GRPs reduced the amount of glutamate in the slice supernatant and changed the proliferation pattern of endogenous progenitor cells in brain slices. In summary, we show that GRPs exert a neuroprotective effect on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia without the need for direct cell-cell contact, thus confirming the rising view that beneficial actions of stem cells are more likely attributable to trophic or immunomodulatory support rather than to long-term integration. PMID:27149035

  14. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  15. OAT3-mediated extrusion of the 99mTc-ECD metabolite in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Okada, Maki; Odaka, Kenichi; Yui, Joji; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-04-01

    After administration of the (99m)Tc complex with N,N'-1,2-ethylenediylbis-L-cysteine diethyl ester ((99m)Tc-ECD), a brain perfusion imaging agent, the radioactive metabolite is trapped in primate brain, but not in mouse and rat. Here, we investigate the involvement of metabolite extrusion by organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier in mice, in this species difference. The efflux rate of radioactivity in the cerebrum of Oat3(-/-) mice at later phase was 20% of that of control mice. Thus, organic anion transporters in mouse brain would be involved in the low brain retention of radioactivity after (99m)Tc-ECD administration.

  16. Evaluation of Neuronal Protective Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Severe Whole-brain Ischemia in Mouse Model and Analysis of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Go; OKAMOTO, Ken; KUSANO, Teruo; MATSUDA, Yoko; FUSE, Akira; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  17. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong; Nahm, Sang-Soep

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains.

  18. CXCR4/SDF1 interaction inhibits the primordial to primary follicle transition in the neonatal mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Holt, Janet E; Jackson, Andrew; Roman, Shaun D; Aitken, R John; Koopman, Peter; McLaughlin, Eileen A

    2006-05-15

    The molecular mechanisms behind the entry of the primordial follicle into the growing follicle pool remain poorly understood. To investigate this process further, a microarray-based comparison was undertaken between 2-day postpartum mouse ovaries consisting of primordial follicles/naked oocytes only and those with both primordial follicles and newly activated follicles (7-day postpartum). Gene candidates identified included the chemoattractive cytokine stromal derived factor-1 (SDF1) and its receptor CXCR4. SDF1 and CXCR4 have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes including the migration of embryonic germ cells to the gonads. SDF1-alpha expression increased with the developmental stage of the follicle. Embryonic expression was found to be dichotomous post-germ cell migration, with low expression in the female. Immunohistochemical studies nonetheless indicate that the autocrine pattern of expression ligand and receptor begins during embryonic life. Addition of recombinant SDF1-alpha to neonatal mouse ovaries in vitro resulted in significantly higher follicle densities than for control ovaries. TUNEL analysis indicated no detectable difference in populations of apoptotic cells of treated or control ovaries. Treated ovaries also contained a significantly lower percentage of activated follicles as determined by measurement of oocyte diameter and morphological analysis. Treatment of cultured ovaries with an inhibitor of SDF1-alpha, AMD3100, ablated the effect of SDF1-alpha. By retaining follicles in an unactivated state, SDF1/CXCR4 signaling may play an important role in maintaining the size and longevity of the primordial follicle pool. PMID:16545793

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism influences the association of the methylome with maternal anxiety and neonatal brain volumes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Pan, Hong; Tuan, Ta Anh; Teh, Ai Ling; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; McEwen, Lisa M; Li, Yue; Chen, Helen; Broekman, Birit F P; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang Mei; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Kobor, Michael S; Qiu, Anqi; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2015-02-01

    Early life environments interact with genotype to determine stable phenotypic outcomes. Here we examined the influence of a variant in the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) gene (Val66Met), which underlies synaptic plasticity throughout the central nervous system, on the degree to which antenatal maternal anxiety associated with neonatal DNA methylation. We also examined the association between neonatal DNA methylation and brain substructure volume, as a function of BDNF genotype. Infant, but not maternal, BDNF genotype dramatically influences the association of antenatal anxiety on the epigenome at birth as well as that between the epigenome and neonatal brain structure. There was a greater impact of antenatal maternal anxiety on the DNA methylation of infants with the methionine (Met)/Met compared to both Met/valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes. There were significantly more cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites where methylation levels covaried with right amygdala volume among Met/Met compared with both Met/Val and Val/Val carriers. In contrast, more cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites covaried with left hippocampus volume in Val/Val infants compared with infants of the Met/Val or Met/Met genotype. Thus, antenatal Maternal Anxiety × BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism interactions at the level of the epigenome are reflected differently in the structure of the amygdala and the hippocampus. These findings suggest that BDNF genotype regulates the sensitivity of the methylome to early environment and that differential susceptibility to specific environmental conditions may be both tissue and function specific.

  20. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Lauren A; Huh, Jimmy W; Raghupathi, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  1. Cerebrovascular autoregulation after rewarming from hypothermia in a neonatal swine model of asphyxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Larson, Abby C; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Wang, Bing; Yang, Zeng-Jin; Shaffner, Donald H; Koehler, Raymond C; Lee, Jennifer K

    2013-11-01

    After hypoxic brain injury, maintaining blood pressure within the limits of cerebral blood flow autoregulation is critical to preventing secondary brain injury. Little is known about the effects of prolonged hypothermia or rewarming on autoregulation after cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that rewarming would shift the lower limit of autoregulation (LLA), that this shift would be detected by indices derived from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and that rewarming would impair autoregulation during hypertension. Anesthetized neonatal swine underwent sham surgery or hypoxic-asphyxic cardiac arrest, followed by 2 h of normothermia and 20 h of hypothermia, with or without rewarming. Piglets were further divided into cohorts for cortical laser-Doppler flow (LDF) measurements during induced hypotension or hypertension. We also tested whether indices derived from NIRS could identify the LDF-derived LLA. The LLA did not differ significantly among groups with sham surgery and hypothermia (29 ± 8 mmHg), sham surgery and rewarming (34 ± 7 mmHg), arrest and hypothermia (29 ± 10 mmHg), and arrest and rewarming (38 ± 11 mmHg). The LLA was not affected by arrest (P = 0.60), temperature (P = 0.08), or interaction between arrest and temperature (P = 0.73). The NIRS-derived indices detected the LLA accurately, with the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves of 0.81-0.96 among groups. In groups subjected to arrest and hypothermia, with or without rewarming, the slope of LDF relative to cerebral perfusion pressure during hypertension was not significantly different from zero (P > 0.10). In conclusion, rewarming did not shift the LLA during hypotension or affect autoregulation during hypertension after asphyxic cardiac arrest. The NIRS-derived autoregulation indices identified the LLA accurately.

  2. Automated Detection of Brain Abnormalities in Neonatal Hypoxia Ischemic Injury from MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sun, Yu; Bhanu, Bir; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of three automated brain injury detection methods, namely symmetry-integrated region growing (SIRG), hierarchical region splitting (HRS) and modified watershed segmentation (MWS) in human and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets for the detection of hypoxic ischemic injuries (HII). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, 1.5T) data from neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, as well as T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, 11.7T, 4.7T) at seven different time-points (1, 4, 7, 10, 17, 24 and 31 days post HII) in rat-pup model of hypoxic ischemic injury were used to check the temporal efficacy of our computational approaches. Sensitivity, specificity, similarity were used as performance metrics based on manual (‘gold standard’) injury detection to quantify comparisons. When compared to the manual gold standard, automated injury location results from SIRG performed the best in 62% of the data, while 29% for HRS and 9% for MWS. Injury severity detection revealed that SIRG performed the best in 67% cases while HRS for 33% data. Prior information is required by HRS and MWS, but not by SIRG. However, SIRG is sensitive to parameter-tuning, while HRS and MWS are not. Among these methods, SIRG performs the best in detecting lesion volumes; HRS is the most robust, while MWS lags behind in both respects. PMID:25000294

  3. Development of pacemaker activity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the neonatal mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Liu, L W; Thuneberg, L; Huizinga, J D

    1998-11-01

    Intestinal motor patterns are not well developed in premature infants. Similarly, in neonatal mice, irregular motor patterns were observed. Pacemaker cells, identified in the small intestine as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) associated with Auerbach's plexus (ICC-APs), contribute to the generation of peristaltic movements. The objective of the present study was to assess the hypothesis that abnormal gut motor activity in (preterm) newborns can be associated with underdeveloped ICCs. Specifically, the aim was to identify at which point the electrical pacemaker activity is fully developed and whether or not the development of pacemaker activity has a structural correlation with the developmental stage of ICCs. Pacemaker activity was identified as that component of the slow wave that is insensitive to L-type calcium (Ca2+) channel blockers and displays a characteristic reduction in frequency in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump. In newborn, unfed neonates, action potentials occurred that were irregular in frequency and amplitude and sensitive to verapamil. CPA (5 microM) abolished all action potentials. Quiescent spots were observed in approximately 50% of impalements. Six hours after birth, slow-wave activity appeared at a regular frequency and amplitude, and a well-defined plateau phase was observed. Verapamil did not affect the frequency, 5 microM CPA decreased it. The effect of CPA on the pacemaker frequency 2 days after birth was identical to that observed in adult mice. In 2-hr-old neonates, ICCs could be identified through selective uptake of methylene blue, but ultrastructural features were not fully developed. At 48 hr, a complete ICC network covering Auerbach's plexus was formed, confirmed by electron microscopy. In summary, the pacemaker component of the slow waves can be identified in neonates as early as 6 hr after birth. The pacemaker component was fully developed 2 days after birth

  4. Therapeutic benefit of lentiviral-mediated neonatal intracerebral gene therapy in a mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Annalisa; Salvagno, Camilla; Maderna, Claudio; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Morena, Francesco; Kulik, Willem; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio; Martino, Sabata; Gritti, Angela

    2014-06-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC) deficiency. Gene therapy (GT) should provide rapid, extensive and lifetime GALC supply in central nervous system (CNS) tissues to prevent or halt irreversible neurologic progression. Here we used a lentiviral vector (LV) to transfer a functional GALC gene in the brain of Twitcher mice, a severe GLD model. A single injection of LV.GALC in the external capsule of Twitcher neonates resulted in robust transduction of neural cells with minimal and transient activation of inflammatory and immune response. Importantly, we documented a proficient transduction of proliferating and post-mitotic oligodendroglia, a relevant target cell type in GLD. GALC activity (30-50% of physiological levels) was restored in the whole CNS of treated mice as early as 8 days post-injection. The early and stable enzymatic supply ensured partial clearance of storage and reduction of psychosine levels, translating in amelioration of histopathology and enhanced lifespan. At 6 months post-injection in non-affected mice, LV genome persisted exclusively in the injected region, where transduced cells overexpressed GALC. Integration site analysis in transduced brain tissues showed no aberrant clonal expansion and preferential targeting of neural-specific genes. This study establishes neonatal LV-mediated intracerebral GT as a rapid, effective and safe therapeutic intervention to correct CNS pathology in GLD and provides a strong rationale for its application in this and similar leukodystrophies, alone or in combination with therapies targeting the somatic pathology, with the final aim of providing an effective and timely treatment of these global disorders.

  5. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  6. Non-specific Immunostaining by a Rabbit Antibody against Gustducin α Subunit in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Kevin; Chen, Bei; Cohen, Akiva S.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2015-01-01

    Gustducin is a guanosine nucleotide-binding protein functionally coupled with taste receptors and thus originally identified in taste cells of the tongue. Recently, bitter taste receptors and gustducin have been detected in the airways, digestive tracts and brain. The existing studies showing taste receptors and gustducin in the brain were carried out exclusively on frozen sections. In order to avoid the technical shortcomings associated with frozen sectioning, we performed immunofluorescence staining using vibratome-cut sections from mouse brains. Using a rabbit gustducin antibody, we could not detect neurons or astrocytes as reported previously. Rather, we found dense fibers in the nucleus accumbens and periventricular areas. We assumed these staining patterns to be specific after confirmation with conventional negative control staining. For the verification of this finding, we stained gustducin knockout mouse brain and tongue sections with the same rabbit gustducin antibody. Whereas negative staining was confirmed in the tongue, intensive fibers were constantly stained in the brain. Moreover, immunostaining with a goat gustducin antibody could not demonstrate the fibers in the brain tissue. The present study implies a cross immunoreaction that occurs with the rabbit gustducin antibody in mouse brain samples, suggesting that the conventional negative controls may not be sufficient when an immunostaining pattern is to be verified. PMID:25411190

  7. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  8. High-speed label-free functional photoacoustic microscopy of mouse brain in action.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wong, Terence T W; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-05-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for three-dimensional high-resolution, high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. We implemented a single-wavelength pulse-width-based method with a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both resting and stimulated states in the mouse brain.

  9. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study the BBB, 2) Available mouse genetic tools that can aid in the study of the BBB, and 3) Potential tools that if generated could greatly aid in our understanding of the BBB. PMID:23305182

  10. Discrimination of fearful and angry emotional voices in sleeping human neonates: a study of the mismatch brain responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Yunzhe; Hou, Xinlin; Sun, Guoyu; Cheng, Yawei; Luo, Yuejia

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate processing of human voices with different threat-related emotions is of evolutionarily adaptive value for the survival of individuals. Nevertheless, it is still not clear whether the sensitivity to threat-related information is present at birth. Using an odd-ball paradigm, the current study investigated the neural correlates underlying automatic processing of emotional voices of fear and anger in sleeping neonates. Event-related potential data showed that the fronto-central scalp distribution of the neonatal brain could discriminate fearful voices from angry voices; the mismatch response (MMR) was larger in response to the deviant stimuli of anger, compared with the standard stimuli of fear. Furthermore, this fear–anger MMR discrimination was observed only when neonates were in active sleep state. Although the neonates' sensitivity to threat-related voices is not likely associated with a conceptual understanding of fearful and angry emotions, this special discrimination in early life may provide a foundation for later emotion and social cognition development. PMID:25538587

  11. Dynamics of the mouse brain cortical synaptic proteome during postnatal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Miguel A.; Klemmer, Patricia; Gebuis, Titia; Hassan, Chopie; van Nierop, Pim; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Smit, August B.; Li, Ka Wan

    2016-01-01

    Development of the brain involves the formation and maturation of numerous synapses. This process requires prominent changes of the synaptic proteome and potentially involves thousands of different proteins at every synapse. To date the proteome analysis of synapse development has been studied sparsely. Here, we analyzed the cortical synaptic membrane proteome of juvenile postnatal days 9 (P9), P15, P21, P27, adolescent (P35) and different adult ages P70, P140 and P280 of C57Bl6/J mice. Using a quantitative proteomics workflow we quantified 1560 proteins of which 696 showed statistically significant differences over time. Synaptic proteins generally showed increased levels during maturation, whereas proteins involved in protein synthesis generally decreased in abundance. In several cases, proteins from a single functional molecular entity, e.g., subunits of the NMDA receptor, showed differences in their temporal regulation, which may reflect specific synaptic development features of connectivity, strength and plasticity. SNARE proteins, Snap 29/47 and Stx 7/8/12, showed higher expression in immature animals. Finally, we evaluated the function of Cxadr that showed high expression levels at P9 and a fast decline in expression during neuronal development. Knock down of the expression of Cxadr in cultured primary mouse neurons revealed a significant decrease in synapse density. PMID:27748445

  12. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji; Serafini, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear.

  13. Retinoic acid induces multiple hallmarks of the prospermatogonia-to-spermatogonia transition in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Busada, Jonathan T; Kaye, Evelyn P; Renegar, Randall H; Geyer, Christopher B

    2014-03-01

    In mammals, most neonatal male germ cells (prospermatogonia) are quiescent and located in the center of the testis cords. In response to an unknown signal, prospermatogonia transition into spermatogonia, reenter the cell cycle, divide, and move to the periphery of the testis cords. In mice, these events occur by 3-4 days postpartum (dpp), which temporally coincides with the onset of retinoic acid (RA) signaling in the neonatal testis. RA has a pivotal role in initiating germ cell entry into meiosis in both sexes, yet little is known about the mechanisms and about cellular changes downstream of RA signaling. We examined the role of RA in mediating the prospermatogonia-to-spermatogonia transition in vivo and found 24 h of precocious RA exposure-induced germ cell changes mimicking those that occur during the endogenous transition at 3-4 dpp. These changes included: 1) spermatogonia proliferation; 2) maturation of cellular organelles; and 3), expression of markers characteristic of differentiating spermatogonia. We found that germ cell exposure to RA did not lead to cellular loss from apoptosis but rather resulted in a delay of ∼2 days in their entry into meiosis. Taken together, our results indicate that exogenous RA induces multiple hallmarks of the transition of prospermatogonia to spermatogonia prior to their entry into meiosis.

  14. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Rockland, Kathleen; Seung, H. Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse. PMID:25558063

  15. Localization of PPAR isotypes in the adult mouse and human brain

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Anna; Truitt, Jay; Merriman, Morgan; Ponomareva, Olga; Jameson, Kelly; Ferguson, Laura B.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. PPAR agonists have well-documented anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles in the central nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that PPAR agonists are attractive therapeutic agents for treating neurodegenerative diseases as well as addiction. However, the distribution of PPAR mRNA and protein in brain regions associated with these conditions (i.e. prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, ventral tegmental area) is not well defined. Moreover, the cell type specificity of PPARs in mouse and human brain tissue has yet to be investigated. We utilized quantitative PCR and double immunofluorescence microscopy to determine that both PPAR mRNA and protein are expressed ubiquitously throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PPARs have unique cell type specificities that are consistent between species. PPARα was the only isotype to colocalize with all cell types in both adult mouse and adult human brain tissue. Overall, we observed a strong neuronal signature, which raises the possibility that PPAR agonists may be targeting neurons rather than glia to produce neuroprotection. Our results fill critical gaps in PPAR distribution and define novel cell type specificity profiles in the adult mouse and human brain. PMID:27283430

  16. Effects of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury and Hypothermic Neuroprotection on Neural Progenitor Cells in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minhye; Lim, Sanghee; Kang, Eunchai; Furmanski, Orion; Song, Hongjun; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Mintz, C David

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury (HI) results in widespread cerebral encephalopathy and affects structures that are essential for neurocognitive function, such as the hippocampus. The dentate gyrus contains a reservoir of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) that are critical for postnatal development and normal adult function of the hippocampus, and may also facilitate the recovery of function after injury. Using a neonatal mouse model of mild-to-moderate HI and immunohistochemical analysis of NSPC development markers, we asked whether these cells are vulnerable to HI and how they respond to both injury and hypothermic therapy. We found that cleaved caspase-3 labeling in the subgranular zone, where NSPCs are located, is increased by more than 30-fold after HI. The population of cells positive for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and nestin (PCNA+Nes+), which represent primarily actively proliferating NSPCs, are acutely decreased by 68% after HI. The NSPC population expressing NeuroD1, a marker for NSPCs transitioning to become fate-committed neural progenitors, was decreased by 47%. One week after HI, there was a decrease in neuroblasts and immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, as measured by doublecortin (DCX) immunolabeling, and at the same time PCNA+Nes+ cell density was increased by 71%. NSPCs expressing Tbr2, which identifies a highly proliferative intermediate neural progenitor population, increased by 107%. Hypothermia treatment after HI partially rescues both the acute decrease in PCNA+Nes+ cell density at 1 day after injury and the chronic loss of DCX immunoreactivity and reduction in NeuroD1 cell density measured at 1 week after injury. Thus, we conclude that HI causes an acute loss of dentate gyrus NSPCs, and that hypothermia partially protects NSPCs from HI. PMID:26087836

  17. Prolactin transport into mouse brain is independent of prolactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rosemary S E; Wyatt, Amanda K; Herbison, Ryan E; Knowles, Penelope J; Ladyman, Sharon R; Binart, Nadine; Banks, William A; Grattan, David R

    2016-02-01

    The anterior pituitary hormone prolactin exerts important physiologic actions in the brain. However, the mechanism by which prolactin crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain is not completely understood. On the basis of high expression of the prolactin receptor in the choroid plexus, it has been hypothesized that the receptor may bind to prolactin in the blood and translocate it into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This study aimed to test this hypothesis by investigating transport of (125)I-labeled prolactin ((125)I-prolactin) into the brain of female mice in the presence and absence of the prolactin receptor (PRLR(-/-)). Peripherally administered prolactin rapidly activates brain neurons, as evidenced by prolactin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (pSTAT5) in neurons within 30 min of administration. The transport of prolactin into the brain was saturable, with transport effectively blocked only by a very high dose of unlabeled ovine prolactin. Transport was regulated, as in lactating mice with chronically elevated levels of prolactin, the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain was significantly increased compared to nonlactating controls. There was no change in the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain in PRLR(-/-) mice lacking functional prolactin receptors compared to control mice, indicating transport is independent of the prolactin receptor. These data suggest that prolactin transport into the brain involves another as yet unidentified transporter molecule. Because CSF levels of (125)I-prolactin were very low, even up to 90 min after administration, the data suggest that CSF is not the major route by which blood prolactin gains access to neurons in the brain.

  18. Convection Enhanced Delivery of Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus into the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kevin R; Gordon, Marcia N

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has become an extremely useful tool for the study of gene over expression or knockdown in the central nervous system of experimental animals. One disadvantage of intracranial injections of rAAV vectors into the brain parenchyma has been restricted distribution to relatively small volumes of the brain. Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a method for delivery of clinically relevant amounts of therapeutic agents to large areas of the brain in a direct intracranial injection procedure. CED uses bulk flow to increase the hydrostatic pressure and thus improve volume distribution. The CED method has shown robust gene transfer and increased distribution within the CNS and can be successfully used for different serotypes of rAAV for increased transduction of the mouse CNS. This chapter details the surgical injection of rAAV by CED into a mouse brain.

  19. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment promotes neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhichun; Liu, Jing; Ju, Rong

    2013-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage has been used clinically for many years, but its effectiveness remains controversial. In addition, the mechanism of this potential neuroprotective effect remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (7 days old) subjected to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Six hours after modeling, rats were treated with hyperbaric oxygen once daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats increased at day 3 after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and peaked at day 5. After hyperbaric oxygen treatment, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells began to increase at day 1, and was significantly higher than that in normal rats and model rats until day 21. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that hyperbaric oxygen treatment could attenuate pathological changes to brain tissue in neonatal rats, and reduce the number of degenerating and necrotic nerve cells. Our experimental findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen treatment enhances the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, and has therapeutic potential for promoting neurological recovery following brain injury.

  1. Neonatal Neurobehavior and Diffusion MRI Changes in Brain Reorganization Due to Intrauterine Growth Restriction in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Eixarch, Elisenda; Batalle, Dafnis; Illa, Miriam; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects 5–10% of all newborns and is associated with a high risk of abnormal neurodevelopment. The timing and patterns of brain reorganization underlying IUGR are poorly documented. We developed a rabbit model of IUGR allowing neonatal neurobehavioral assessment and high resolution brain diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the study was to describe the pattern and functional correlates of fetal brain reorganization induced by IUGR. Methodology/Principal Findings IUGR was induced in 10 New Zealand fetal rabbits by ligation of 40–50% of uteroplacental vessels in one horn at 25 days of gestation. Ten contralateral horn fetuses were used as controls. Cesarean section was performed at 30 days (term 31 days). At postnatal day +1, neonates were assessed by validated neurobehavioral tests including evaluation of tone, spontaneous locomotion, reflex motor activity, motor responses to olfactory stimuli, and coordination of suck and swallow. Subsequently, brains were collected and fixed and MRI was performed using a high resolution acquisition scheme. Global and regional (manual delineation and voxel based analysis) diffusion tensor imaging parameters were analyzed. IUGR was associated with significantly poorer neurobehavioral performance in most domains. Voxel based analysis revealed fractional anisotropy (FA) differences in multiple brain regions of gray and white matter, including frontal, insular, occipital and temporal cortex, hippocampus, putamen, thalamus, claustrum, medial septal nucleus, anterior commissure, internal capsule, fimbria of hippocampus, medial lemniscus and olfactory tract. Regional FA changes were correlated with poorer outcome in neurobehavioral tests. Conclusions IUGR is associated with a complex pattern of brain reorganization already at birth, which may open opportunities for early intervention. Diffusion MRI can offer suitable imaging biomarkers to characterize and monitor

  2. High t-PA release by neonate brain microvascular endothelial cells under glutamate exposure affects neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vincent Jean; Lecointre, Maryline; Laudenbach, Vincent; Ali, Carine; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Berezowski, Vincent; Carmeliet, Peter; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno José; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a consolidated hypothesis in neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor mediated effects. In brain microvascular endothelial cell (nBMEC) cultures from neonates, t-PA content and release upon glutamate are higher than in adult (aBMECs) cultures. Owing to the variety of t-PA substrates and receptor targets, the study was aimed at determining the putative roles of endothelial t-PA in the neonatal brain parenchyma under glutamate challenge. Basal t-PA release was 4.4 fold higher in nBMECs vs aBMECs and glutamate was 20 fold more potent to allow Evans blue vascular permeability in neonate microvessels indicating that, under noxious glutamate (50 μM) exposure, high amounts of endothelial t-PA stores may be mobilized and may access the nervous parenchyma. Culture media from nBMECS or aBMECs challenged by excitotoxic glutamate were applied to neuron cultures at DIV 11. While media from adult cells did not evoke more LDH release in neuronal cultures that under glutamate alone, media from nBMECs enhanced 2.2 fold LDH release. This effect was not observed with media from t-PA(-/-) nBMECs and was inhibited by hr-PAI-1. In Cortical slices from 10 day-old mice, hrt-PA associated with glutamate evoked neuronal necrosis in deeper (more mature) layers, an effect reversed by NMDA receptor GluN1 amino-terminal domain antibody capable of inhibiting t-PA potentiation of the receptor. In superficial layers (less mature), hrt-PA alone inhibited apoptosis, an effect reversed by the EGF receptor antagonist AG1478. Applied to immature neurons in culture (DIV5), media from nBMEC rescued 85.1% of neurons from cell death induced by serum deprivation. In cortical slices, the anti-apoptotic effect of t-PA fitted with age dependent localization of less mature neurons. These data suggest that in the immature brain, propensity of vessels to release high amounts of t-PA may not only

  3. Changing Iron Content of the Mouse Brain during Development

    PubMed Central

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; McCormick, Sean P.; Abbott, Louise C.; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is crucial to many processes in the brain yet the percentages of the major iron-containing species contained therein, and how these percentages change during development, have not been reliably determined. To do this, C57BL/6 mice were enriched in 57Fe and their brains were examined by Mössbauer, EPR, and electronic absorption spectroscopy; Fe concentrations were evaluated using ICP-MS. Excluding the contribution of residual blood hemoglobin, the three major categories of brain Fe included ferritin (an iron storage protein), mitochondrial iron (consisting primarily of Fe/S clusters and hemes), and mononuclear nonheme high-spin (NHHS) FeII and FeIII species. Brains from prenatal and one-week old mice were dominated by ferritin and were deficient in mitochondrial Fe. During the next few weeks of life, the brain grew and experienced a burst of mitochondriogenesis. Overall brain Fe concentration and the concentration of ferritin declined during this burst phase, suggesting that the rate of Fe incorporation was insufficient to accommodate these changes. The slow rate of Fe import and export to/from the brain, relative to other organs, was verified by an isotopic labeling study. Iron levels and ferritin stores replenished in young adult mice. NHHS FeII species were observed in substantial levels in brains of several ages. A stable free-radical species that increased with age was observed by EPR spectroscopy. Brains from mice raised on an Fe-deficient diet showed depleted ferritin iron but normal mitochondrial iron levels. PMID:22810488

  4. The role and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression in brain development and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiyong; Heijnen, Cobi J; van der Kooij, Michael A; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank

    2009-12-11

    During neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, activation of transcription of a series of genes is induced to stimulate erythropoiesis, anti-apoptosis, apoptosis, necrosis and angiogenesis. A key factor mediating these gene transcriptions is hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). During hypoxia, HIF-1alpha protein is stabilized and heterodimerizes with HIF-1beta to form HIF-1, subsequently regulating the expression of target genes. HIF-1alpha participates in early brain development and proliferation of neuronal precursor cells. Under pathological conditions, HIF-1alpha is known to play an important role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: on the one hand, HIF-1alpha has neuroprotective effects whereas it can also have neurotoxic effects. HIF-1alpha regulates the transcription of erythropoietin (EPO), which induces several pathways associated with neuroprotection. HIF-1alpha also promotes the expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), which is related to neovascularization in hypoxic-ischemic brain areas. In addition, HIF-1alpha has an anti-apoptotic effect by increasing the expression of anti-apoptotic factors such as EPO during mild hypoxia. The neurotoxic effects of HIF-1alpha are represented by its participation in the apoptotic process by increasing the stability of the tumor suppressor protein p53 during severe hypoxia. Moreover, HIF-1alpha plays a role in cell necrosis, by interacting with calcium and calpain. HIF-1alpha can also exacerbate brain edema via increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given these properties, HIF-1alpha has both neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects after hypoxia-ischemia. These events are cell type specific and related to the severity of hypoxia. Unravelling of the complex functions of HIF-1alpha may be important when designing neuroprotective therapies for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  5. Connectome and Maturation Profiles of the Developing Mouse Brain Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Parker, Drew; Ghanbari, Yasser; Smith, Alex; Hua, Kegang; Mori, Susumu; Abel, Ted; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive effort to establish a structural mouse connectome using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging coupled with connectivity analysis tools. This work lays the foundation for imaging-based structural connectomics of the mouse brain, potentially facilitating a whole-brain network analysis to quantify brain changes in connectivity during development, as well as deviations from it related to genetic effects. A connectomic trajectory of maturation during postnatal ages 2-80 days is presented in the C57BL/6J mouse strain, using a whole-brain connectivity analysis, followed by investigations based on local and global network features. The global network measures of density, global efficiency, and modularity demonstrated a nonlinear relationship with age. The regional network metrics, namely degree and local efficiency, displayed a differential change in the major subcortical structures such as the thalamus and hippocampus, and cortical regions such as visual and motor cortex. Finally, the connectomes were used to derive an index of "brain connectivity index," which demonstrated a high correlation (r = 0.95) with the chronological age, indicating that brain connectivity is a good marker of normal age progression, hence valuable in detecting subtle deviations from normality caused by genetic, environmental, or pharmacological manipulations.

  6. Decrease in Prosaposin in the Dystrophic mdx Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-ling; Li, Cheng; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Shouichiro; Wang, Zhan-You; Cao, Ya-ming; Matsuda, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin gene induces metabolic and structural disorders in the brain. A lack of dystrophin in brain structures is involved in impaired cognitive function. Prosaposin (PS), a neurotrophic factor, is abundant in the choroid plexus and various brain regions. We investigated whether PS serves as a link between dystrophin loss and gross and/or ultrastructural brain abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings The distribution of PS in the brains of juvenile and adult mdx mice was investigated by immunochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. Immunochemistry revealed lower levels of PS in the cytoplasm of neurons of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and choroid plexus in mdx mice. Western blotting confirmed that PS levels were lower in these brain regions in both juveniles and adults. Even with low PS production in the choroids plexus, there was no significant PS decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In situ hybridization revealed that the primary form of PS mRNA in both normal and mdx mice was Pro+9, a secretory-type PS, and the hybridization signals for Pro+9 in the above-mentioned brain regions were weaker in mdx mice than in normal mice. We also investigated mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Stronger activation of ERK1/2 was observed in mdx mice, ERK1/2 activity was positively correlated with PS activity, and exogenous PS18 stimulated both p-ERK1/2 and PS in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions/Significance Low levels of PS and its receptors suggest the participation of PS in some pathological changes in the brains of mdx mice. PMID:24244600

  7. Editor's Highlight: Neonatal Activation of the Xenobiotic-Sensors PXR and CAR Results in Acute and Persistent Down-regulation of PPARα-Signaling in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have emerged regarding the potential long-lasting effects due to developmental exposure to xenobiotics. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are critical xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors that are highly expressed in liver. The goal of this study was to test our hypothesis that neonatal exposure to PXR- or CAR-activators not only acutely but also persistently regulates the expression of drug-processing genes (DPGs). A single dose of the PXR-ligand PCN (75 mg/kg), CAR-ligand TCPOBOP (3 mg/kg), or vehicle (corn oil) was administered intraperitoneally to 3-day-old neonatal wild-type mice. Livers were collected 24 h post-dose or from adult mice at 60 days of age, and global gene expression of these mice was determined using Affymetrix Mouse Transcriptome Assay 1.0. In neonatal liver, PCN up-regulated 464 and down-regulated 449 genes, whereas TCPOBOP up-regulated 308 and down-regulated 112 genes. In adult liver, there were 15 persistently up-regulated and 22 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to PCN, as well as 130 persistently up-regulated and 18 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to TCPOBOP. Neonatal exposure to both PCN and TCPOBOP persistently down-regulated multiple Cyp4a members, which are prototypical-target genes of the lipid-sensor PPARα, and this correlated with decreased PPARα-binding to the Cyp4a gene loci. RT-qPCR, western blotting, and enzyme activity assays in livers of wild-type, PXR-null, and CAR-null mice confirmed that the persistent down-regulation of Cyp4a was PXR and CAR dependent. In conclusion, neonatal exposure to PXR- and CAR-activators both acutely and persistently regulates critical genes involved in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism in liver. PMID:27413110

  8. Editor's Highlight: Neonatal Activation of the Xenobiotic-Sensors PXR and CAR Results in Acute and Persistent Down-regulation of PPARα-Signaling in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have emerged regarding the potential long-lasting effects due to developmental exposure to xenobiotics. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are critical xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors that are highly expressed in liver. The goal of this study was to test our hypothesis that neonatal exposure to PXR- or CAR-activators not only acutely but also persistently regulates the expression of drug-processing genes (DPGs). A single dose of the PXR-ligand PCN (75 mg/kg), CAR-ligand TCPOBOP (3 mg/kg), or vehicle (corn oil) was administered intraperitoneally to 3-day-old neonatal wild-type mice. Livers were collected 24 h post-dose or from adult mice at 60 days of age, and global gene expression of these mice was determined using Affymetrix Mouse Transcriptome Assay 1.0. In neonatal liver, PCN up-regulated 464 and down-regulated 449 genes, whereas TCPOBOP up-regulated 308 and down-regulated 112 genes. In adult liver, there were 15 persistently up-regulated and 22 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to PCN, as well as 130 persistently up-regulated and 18 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to TCPOBOP. Neonatal exposure to both PCN and TCPOBOP persistently down-regulated multiple Cyp4a members, which are prototypical-target genes of the lipid-sensor PPARα, and this correlated with decreased PPARα-binding to the Cyp4a gene loci. RT-qPCR, western blotting, and enzyme activity assays in livers of wild-type, PXR-null, and CAR-null mice confirmed that the persistent down-regulation of Cyp4a was PXR and CAR dependent. In conclusion, neonatal exposure to PXR- and CAR-activators both acutely and persistently regulates critical genes involved in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism in liver.

  9. Hypothermia modulates cytokine responses after neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic injury and reduces brain damage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangpeng; Ghosh, Nirmalya; McFadden, Brian; Tone, Beatriz; Bellinger, Denise L; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While hypothermia (HT) is the standard-of-care for neonates with hypoxic ischemic injury (HII), the mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effect are poorly understood. We examined ischemic core/penumbra and cytokine/chemokine evolution in a 10-day-old rat pup model of HII. Pups were treated for 24 hr after HII with HT (32℃; n = 18) or normothermia (NT, 35℃; n = 15). Outcomes included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurobehavioral testing, and brain cytokine/chemokine profiling (0, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-HII). Lesion volumes (24 hr) were reduced in HT pups (total 74%, p < .05; penumbra 68%, p < .05; core 85%, p = .19). Lesion volumes rebounded at 72 hr (48 hr post-HT) with no significant differences between NT and HT pups. HT reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at all time points (p < .05); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) trended toward being decreased in HT pups (p = .09). The stem cell signaling molecule, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) was not altered by HT. Our data demonstrate that HT reduces total and penumbral lesion volumes (at 24 and 48 hr), potentially by decreasing IL-1β without affecting SDF-1. Disassociation between the increasing trend in HII volumes from 48 to 72 hr post-HII when IL-1β levels remained low suggests that after rewarming, mechanisms unrelated to IL-1β expression are likely to contribute to this delayed increase in injury. Additional studies should be considered to determine what these mechanisms might be and also to explore whether extending the duration or degree of HT might ameliorate this delayed increase in injury.

  10. Hypothermia modulates cytokine responses after neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic injury and reduces brain damage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangpeng; Ghosh, Nirmalya; McFadden, Brian; Tone, Beatriz; Bellinger, Denise L; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While hypothermia (HT) is the standard-of-care for neonates with hypoxic ischemic injury (HII), the mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effect are poorly understood. We examined ischemic core/penumbra and cytokine/chemokine evolution in a 10-day-old rat pup model of HII. Pups were treated for 24 hr after HII with HT (32℃; n = 18) or normothermia (NT, 35℃; n = 15). Outcomes included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurobehavioral testing, and brain cytokine/chemokine profiling (0, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-HII). Lesion volumes (24 hr) were reduced in HT pups (total 74%, p < .05; penumbra 68%, p < .05; core 85%, p = .19). Lesion volumes rebounded at 72 hr (48 hr post-HT) with no significant differences between NT and HT pups. HT reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at all time points (p < .05); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) trended toward being decreased in HT pups (p = .09). The stem cell signaling molecule, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) was not altered by HT. Our data demonstrate that HT reduces total and penumbral lesion volumes (at 24 and 48 hr), potentially by decreasing IL-1β without affecting SDF-1. Disassociation between the increasing trend in HII volumes from 48 to 72 hr post-HII when IL-1β levels remained low suggests that after rewarming, mechanisms unrelated to IL-1β expression are likely to contribute to this delayed increase in injury. Additional studies should be considered to determine what these mechanisms might be and also to explore whether extending the duration or degree of HT might ameliorate this delayed increase in injury. PMID:25424430

  11. Hypoxia-Ischemia or Excitotoxin-Induced Tissue Plasminogen Activator- Dependent Gelatinase Activation in Mice Neonate Brain Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Omouendze, Priscilla L.; Henry, Vincent J.; Porte, Baptiste; Dupré, Nicolas; Carmeliet, Peter; Gonzalez, Bruno J.; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day–old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1) genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O2). Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c.) injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo). Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA−/− and enhanced in PAI-1−/− mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA−/− mice. In PAI-1−/− mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1−/− and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM) induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA−/−mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL). In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have neuroprotection

  12. Celecoxib reduces brain dopaminergic neuronaldysfunction, and improves sensorimotor behavioral performance in neonatal rats exposed to systemic lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced in inflammatory cells in response to cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 has a role in the inflammatory process. The objective of the current study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain inflammation, dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction and sensorimotor behavioral impairments. Methods Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) was performed in rat pups on postnatal Day 5 (P5), and celecoxib (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered (i.p.) five minutes after LPS injection. Sensorimotor behavioral tests were carried out 24 h after LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined on P6. Results Our results showed that LPS exposure resulted in impairment in sensorimotor behavioral performance and injury to brain dopaminergic neurons, as indicated by loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity, as well as decreases in mitochondria activity in the rat brain. LPS exposure also led to increases in the expression of α-synuclein and dopamine transporter proteins and enhanced [3H]dopamine uptake. Treatment with celecoxib significantly reduced LPS-induced sensorimotor behavioral disturbances and dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated LPS-induced increases in the numbers of activated microglia and astrocytes and in the concentration of IL-1β in the neonatal rat brain. The protective effect of celecoxib was also associated with an attenuation of LPS-induced COX-2+ cells, which were double labeled with TH + (dopaminergic neuron) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) + (astrocyte) cells. Conclusion Systemic LPS administration induced brain inflammatory responses in neonatal rats; these inflammatory responses included induction of COX-2 expression in TH neurons and astrocytes. Application of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib after LPS treatment attenuated the inflammatory

  13. Design of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouls, John C.; Izenson, Michael G.; Greeley, Harold P.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-04-01

    We present the design process of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain at 9.4 T. The yttrium barium copper oxide coil has been designed through an iterative process of three-dimensional finite-element simulations and validation against room temperature copper coils. Compared to previous designs, the Helmholtz pair provides substantially higher B1 homogeneity over an extended volume of interest sufficiently large to image biologically relevant specimens. A custom-built cryogenic cooling system maintains the superconducting probe at 60 ± 0.1 K. Specimen loading and probe retuning can be carried out interactively with the coil at operating temperature, enabling much higher through-put. The operation of the probe is a routine, consistent procedure. Signal-to-noise ratio in a mouse brain increased by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 as compared to a room-temperature solenoid coil optimized for mouse brain microscopy. We demonstrate images encoded at 10 × 10 × 20 μm for an entire mouse brain specimen with signal-to-noise ratio of 18 and a total acquisition time of 16.5 h, revealing neuroanatomy unseen at lower resolution. Phantom measurements show an effective spatial resolution better than 20 μm.

  14. Elevated Endogenous Erythropoietin Concentrations Are Associated with Increased Risk of Brain Damage in Extremely Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Allred, Elizabeth; Logan, J. Wells; Fichorova, Raina N.; Engelke, Stephen; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Holm, Mari; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to determine, in very preterm infants, whether elevated perinatal erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations are associated with increased risks of indicators of brain damage, and whether this risk differs by the co-occurrence or absence of intermittent or sustained systemic inflammation (ISSI). Methods Protein concentrations were measured in blood collected from 786 infants born before the 28th week of gestation. EPO was measured on postnatal day 14, and 25 inflammation-related proteins were measured weekly during the first 2 postnatal weeks. We defined ISSI as a concentration in the top quartile of each of 25 inflammation-related proteins on two separate days a week apart. Hypererythropoietinemia (hyperEPO) was defined as the highest quartile for gestational age on postnatal day 14. Using logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression models, we compared risks of brain damage among neonates with hyperEPO only, ISSI only, and hyperEPO+ISSI, to those who had neither hyperEPO nor ISSI, adjusting for gestational age. Results Newborns with hyperEPO, regardless of ISSI, were more than twice as likely as those without to have very low (< 55) Mental (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.5-3.5) and/or Psychomotor (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.6-3.7) Development Indices (MDI, PDI), and microcephaly at age two years (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.5-3.8). Newborns with both hyperEPO and ISSI had significantly increased risks of ventriculomegaly, hemiparetic cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and MDI and PDI < 55 (ORs ranged from 2.2-6.3), but not hypoechoic lesions or other forms of cerebral palsy, relative to newborns with neither hyperEPO nor ISSI. Conclusion hyperEPO, regardless of ISSI, is associated with elevated risks of very low MDI and PDI, and microcephaly, but not with any form of cerebral palsy. Children with both hyperEPO and ISSI are at higher risk than others of very low MDI and PDI, ventriculomegaly, hemiparetic cerebral palsy, and microcephaly. PMID:25793991

  15. Quantitative analysis of cytokine-induced vascular toxicity and vascular leak in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Irwan, Yetty Y; Feng, Yi; Gach, H Michael; Symanowski, James T; McGregor, John R; Veni, Gopalkrishna; Schabel, Matthias; Samlowski, Wolfram E

    2009-09-30

    A storm of inflammatory cytokines is released during treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), closely approximating changes initially observed during sepsis. These signals induce profound changes in neurologic function and cognition. Little is known about the mechanisms involved. We evaluated a number of experimental methods to quantify changes in brain blood vessel integrity in a well-characterized IL-2 treatment mouse model. Measurement of wet versus dry weight and direct measurement of small molecule accumulation (e.g. [(3)H]-H(2)O, sodium fluorescein) were not sensitive or reliable enough to detect small changes in mouse brain vascular permeability. Estimation of brain water content using proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements using a 7T mouse MRI system was sensitive to 1-2% changes in brain water content, but was difficult to reproduce in replicate experiments. Successful techniques included use of immunohistochemistry using specific endothelial markers to identify vasodilation in carefully matched regions of brain parenchyma and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI. Both techniques indicated that IL-2 treatment induced vasodilation of the brain blood vessels. DCE MRI further showed a 2-fold increase in the brain blood vessel permeability to gadolinium in IL-2 treated mice compared to controls. Both immunohistochemistry and DCE MRI data suggested that IL-2 induced toxicity in the brain results from vasodilation of the brain blood vessels and increased microvascular permeability, resulting in perivascular edema. These experimental techniques provide us with the tools to further characterize the mechanism responsible for cytokine-induced neuropsychiatric toxicity.

  16. Transfontanellar Duplex Brain Ultrasonography Resistive Indices as a Prognostic Tool in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Before and After Treatment with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Gerner, Gwendolyn J; Burton, V Joanna; Poretti, Andrea; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Cristofalo, Elizabeth; Tekes, Aylin; Seyfert, Donna; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Leppert, Mary; Allen, Marilee; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Northington, Frances J; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prior to therapeutic hypothermia (i.e., cooling), transfontanellar duplex brain sonography resistive indices (RI) were studied as bedside non-invasive measures of cerebral hemodynamics in neonates who suffered from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We compared pre- and post-cooling RI values and examined the relationships between RI values and specific long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Transfontanellar duplex brain sonography, including RI, were obtained for 28 neonates prior to brain cooling and for 20 neonates following brain cooling. All RI values were sampled in the anterior cerebral artery at the beginning of each ultrasound study. Neurodevelopmental assessment was conducted between ages 20-32 months with the Mullen Scale of Early Learning. The relationships between pre- and post-cooling RI and cognitive and motor outcomes were studied. RESULT Neonates with RI values <0.60 prior to and following cooling were more likely to die or have severe neurodevelopmental disability by ages 20-32 months than those with RI >0.60. Lower RI values were associated with specific neurodevelopmental deficits in motor skill attainment. CONCLUSION Pre- and post-cooling transfontanellar duplex brain sonography RI values may be a useful prognostic tool, in conjunction with other clinical information, for neonates diagnosed with HIE. The results of this study suggest that further study of the prognostic value of RI values for short- and long-term outcomes is warranted. PMID:26609871

  17. Effect of soman on the cholinergic system in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, H.L.; Szakal, A.R.; Little, D.M.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of soman on levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) and turnover rate of ACh have been studied in whole brain and brain regions (cerebellum, medulla-pons, midbrain, corpus striatum, hippocampus and cortex) of mice. Animals were injected with saline or a dose of soman up to 80..mu..g/kg, i.v. and were sacrificed by focussed microwave irradiation of the head. The tracer, /sup 3/H-Ch was injected (i.v.) 2 min prior to sacrifice and turnover rate of ACh was quantitated by using HPLC with electrochemical detection. A behaviorally effective dose of 80 ..mu..g/kg soman increased the levels of ACh significantly in whole brain (57.5%), corpus striatum (42.8%), hippocampus (24.1%) and cortex (43.1%). The levels of Ch were also increased in cerebellum (80.1%), midbrain (75.7%), corpus striatum (86.0%) and cortex (52.5%). The turnover rate of ACh was decreased in whole brain (53.8%), cerebellum (80.4%), medulla-pons (66.8%), midbrain (57.0%), corpus striatum (62.1%) and cortex (52.6%). The duration of these effects lasted more than 1 hr and the results indicate that the decrease in ACh turnover is not due necessarily to an increase in brain levels of ACh and/or Ch.

  18. Brain resistance to HSV-1 encephalitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, G; Calistri, A; Cavaggioni, A; Favero, M; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Palù, G

    2002-06-01

    Brain resistance to intracerebral superinfections develops after a peripheral inoculation of neurovirulent viruses. Superinfection resistance combines specificity, toward the virus used for the peripheral inoculum, and short-term duration after the inoculum. In order to study this unusual combination, neurovirulent superinfections were made on albino Swiss mice previously infected with a nasal inoculum. A herpesvirus strain SC16, or a homologue recombinant virus carrying the reporter lac Z gene or a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a virus taxonomically unrelated to Herpesviridae) were used. The mice underwent a neurological examination and their survival rate was recorded. The brains superinfected with the reporter virus were stained for the beta-galactosidase reaction to trace the virus spread and the inflammatory infiltrates were characterized immunocytochemically. The results confirm and extend previous observations about virus specificity and short-term duration of superinfection resistance. They show, moreover, an enhanced brain inflammation with T-cells and macrophages infiltrating the tissue around microvessels, at a time when both neurovirulence and the spread of herpesvirus in the brain are reduced. The results suggest that the immune response to superinfection in the nervous tissue is enhanced by blood-brain barrier mechanisms that promote the timely extravasation of immune cells.

  19. Following the ontogeny of retinal waves: pan-retinal recordings of population dynamics in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Maccione, Alessandro; Hennig, Matthias H; Gandolfo, Mauro; Muthmann, Oliver; van Coppenhagen, James; Eglen, Stephen J; Berdondini, Luca; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2014-04-01

    The immature retina generates spontaneous waves of spiking activity that sweep across the ganglion cell layer during a limited period of development before the onset of visual experience. The spatiotemporal patterns encoded in the waves are believed to be instructive for the wiring of functional connections throughout the visual system. However, the ontogeny of retinal waves is still poorly documented as a result of the relatively low resolution of conventional recording techniques. Here, we characterize the spatiotemporal features of mouse retinal waves from birth until eye opening in unprecedented detail using a large-scale, dense, 4096-channel multielectrode array that allowed us to record from the entire neonatal retina at near cellular resolution. We found that early cholinergic waves propagate with random trajectories over large areas with low ganglion cell recruitment. They become slower, smaller and denser when GABAA signalling matures, as occurs beyond postnatal day (P) 7. Glutamatergic influences dominate from P10, coinciding with profound changes in activity dynamics. At this time, waves cease to be random and begin to show repetitive trajectories confined to a few localized hotspots. These hotspots gradually tile the retina with time, and disappear after eye opening. Our observations demonstrate that retinal waves undergo major spatiotemporal changes during ontogeny. Our results support the hypotheses that cholinergic waves guide the refinement of retinal targets and that glutamatergic waves may also support the wiring of retinal receptive fields.

  20. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  1. GFAPδ Expression in Glia of the Developmental and Adolescent Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L.; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M.

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans. PMID:23285135

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  3. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  4. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  5. Fluorescent-Protein Stabilization and High-Resolution Imaging of Cleared, Intact Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Martin K.; Scherbarth, Annemarie; Sprengel, Rolf; Engelhardt, Johann; Theer, Patrick; Giese, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain. PMID:25993380

  6. Morphological asymmetries of mouse brain assessed by geometric morphometric analysis of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Barbeito-Andrés, Jimena; Bernal, Valeria; Gonzalez, Paula N

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian brain has repeated structures at both sides of the median plane, although some asymmetries have been described even under normal conditions. Characterizing normal patterns of asymmetry in mouse brain is important to recognize features that depart from expected ranges in the most widely used mammalian model. Analyses on brain morphology based on magnetic resonance image (MRI) have largely focused on volumes while less is known about shape asymmetry. We introduce a flexible protocol based on geometric morphometrics to assess patterns of asymmetry in shape and size of mouse brain from microMRI scans. After systematic digitization of landmarks and semilandmarks, we combine multivariate methods for statistical analyses with visualization tools to display the results. No preliminary treatment of the images (e.g. space normalization) is needed to collect data on MRI slices and visual representations improve the interpretation of the results. Results indicated that the protocol is highly repeatable. Asymmetry was more evident for shape than for size. Particularly, fluctuating asymmetry accounted for more variation than directional asymmetry in all brain regions. Since this approach can detect subtle shape variation between sides, it is a promising methodology to explore morphological changes in the brain of model organisms and can be applied in future studies addressing the effect of genetic and environmental factors on brain morphology. PMID:27108357

  7. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  8. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain. PMID:26898475

  9. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  10. Morphological asymmetries of mouse brain assessed by geometric morphometric analysis of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Barbeito-Andrés, Jimena; Bernal, Valeria; Gonzalez, Paula N

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian brain has repeated structures at both sides of the median plane, although some asymmetries have been described even under normal conditions. Characterizing normal patterns of asymmetry in mouse brain is important to recognize features that depart from expected ranges in the most widely used mammalian model. Analyses on brain morphology based on magnetic resonance image (MRI) have largely focused on volumes while less is known about shape asymmetry. We introduce a flexible protocol based on geometric morphometrics to assess patterns of asymmetry in shape and size of mouse brain from microMRI scans. After systematic digitization of landmarks and semilandmarks, we combine multivariate methods for statistical analyses with visualization tools to display the results. No preliminary treatment of the images (e.g. space normalization) is needed to collect data on MRI slices and visual representations improve the interpretation of the results. Results indicated that the protocol is highly repeatable. Asymmetry was more evident for shape than for size. Particularly, fluctuating asymmetry accounted for more variation than directional asymmetry in all brain regions. Since this approach can detect subtle shape variation between sides, it is a promising methodology to explore morphological changes in the brain of model organisms and can be applied in future studies addressing the effect of genetic and environmental factors on brain morphology.

  11. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71-4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  12. Towards ultrahigh resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Ali; Bely, Nicholas; Chen, Chen; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing high-resolution functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing both mechanical and optical scanning in the photoacoustic microscopy, we can image spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images is going to be acquired noninvasively with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. We developed an optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) with diode laser. Laser light was raster scanned due to XY-stage movement. Images from ultra-high OR-PAM can then be used to study brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy.

  13. Automatic macroscopic density artefact removal in a Nissl-stained microscopic atlas of whole mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, W; Li, A; Wu, J; Yang, Z; Meng, Y; Wang, S; Gong, H

    2013-08-01

    Acquiring a whole mouse brain at the micrometer scale is a complex, continuous and time-consuming process. Because of defects caused by sample preparation and microscopy, the acquired image data sets suffer from various macroscopic density artefacts that worsen the image quality. We have to develop the available preprocessing methods to improve image quality by removing the artefacts that effect cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization. In this study, a set of automatic artefact removal methods is proposed for images obtained by tissue staining and optical microscopy. These methods significantly improve the complicated images that contain various structures, including cells and blood vessels. The whole mouse brain data set with Nissl staining was tested, and the intensity of the processed images was uniformly distributed throughout different brain areas. Furthermore, the processed image data set with its uniform brightness and high quality is now a fundamental atlas for image analysis, including cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization.

  14. Endogenous extracellular serotonin modulates the spinal locomotor network of the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Mary J; Tran, Michelle A; Whelan, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) can potently activate and modulate spinal locomotor circuits in a variety of species. Many of these findings have been obtained by applying serotonin exogenously to the isolated spinal cord of in vitro preparations, which has the drawback of indiscriminately activating extrasynaptic receptors and neurons. To investigate the role of endogenously released serotonin in modulating locomotor networks, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram was used. Fictive locomotion was elicited by either electrical stimulation of the brainstem or the sacral 4 (S4) dorsal root. The addition of 20 microm of citalopram caudal to thoracic segment 5 (T5) had an overall inhibitory effect on the lumbar central pattern generator (CPG). Left-right and flexor-extensor coupling were significantly decreased, and there was also a phase shift in the flexor-extensor relationship. In addition, there was a significant decrease in burst amplitude. These effects were observed during both afferent and brainstem evoked fictive locomotion. When citalopram was added in the presence of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) antagonists, the inhibitory effects were largely reversed. The remaining excitatory effects were mediated by 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(2) receptors. These results suggest that endogenous 5-HT release can modulate locomotor-like activity early in neonatal development.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor-PPARα axis in fetal mouse liver prepares neonates for milk lipid catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Gianpaolo; Tan, Chek Kun; Khaled, Nourhène; Montagner, Alexandra; Leuenberger, Nicolas; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Guillou, Hervé; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hepatic lipid catabolism is essential for the newborns to efficiently use milk fat as an energy source. However, it is unclear how this critical trait is acquired and regulated. We demonstrate that under the control of PPARα, the genes required for lipid catabolism are transcribed before birth so that the neonatal liver has a prompt capacity to extract energy from milk upon suckling. The mechanism involves a fetal glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-PPARα axis in which GR directly regulates the transcriptional activation of PPARα by binding to its promoter. Certain PPARα target genes such as Fgf21 remain repressed in the fetal liver and become PPARα responsive after birth following an epigenetic switch triggered by β-hydroxybutyrate-mediated inhibition of HDAC3. This study identifies an endocrine developmental axis in which fetal GR primes the activity of PPARα in anticipation of the sudden shifts in postnatal nutrient source and metabolic demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11853.001 PMID:27367842

  16. High-resolution prediction of mouse brain connectivity using gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-02-01

    The brain is a multi-level system in which the high-level functions are generated by low-level genetic mechanisms. Thus, elucidating the relationship among multiple brain levels via correlative and predictive analytics is an important area in brain research. Currently, studies in multiple species have indicated that the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns are predictive of brain wiring. Specifically, results on the worm Caenorhabditis elegans have shown that the prediction of neuronal connectivity using gene expression signatures yielded statistically significant results. Recent studies on the mammalian brain produced similar results at the coarse regional level. In this study, we provide the first high-resolution, large-scale integrative analysis of the transcriptome and connectome in a single mammalian brain at a fine voxel level. By using the Allen Brain Atlas data, we predict voxel-level brain connectivity based on the gene expressions in the adult mouse brain. We employ regularized models to show that gene expression is predictive of connectivity at the voxel-level with an accuracy of 93%. We also identify a set of genes playing the most important role in connectivity prediction. We use only this small number of genes to predict the brain wiring with an accuracy over 80%. We discover that these important genes are enriched in neurons as compared to glia, and they perform connectivity-related functions. We perform several interesting correlative studies to further elucidate the transcriptome-connectome relationship.

  17. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  18. Effect of the Fusarium toxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, on the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z H; Deng, H D; Deng, Y T; Deng, J L; Zuo, Z C; Yu, S M; Shen, L H; Cui, H M; Xu, Z W; Hu, Y C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find effects of Fusarium toxins on brain injury in mice. We evaluated the individual and combined effect of the Fusarium toxins zearalenone and deoxynivalenol on the mouse brain. We examined brain weight, protein, antioxidant indicators, and apoptosis. After 3 and 5days of treatment, increased levels of nitric oxide, total nitric oxide synthase, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and malondialdehyde were observed in the treatment groups. This was accompanied by reduced levels of brain protein, superoxide dismutase (apart from the low-dose zearalenone groups), glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity, and percentage of apoptotic cells. By day 12, most of these indicators had returned to control group levels. The effects of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol were dose-dependent, and were synergistic in combination. Our results suggest that brain function is affected by zearalenone and deoxynivalenol.

  19. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  20. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:27515290

  1. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury.

  2. Vitexin reduces hypoxia-ischemia neonatal brain injury by the inhibition of HIF-1alpha in a rat pup model.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; He, Miao; Sanchez, Russell M; Huang, Wen-Xian; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the early suppression of HIF-1α after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury provides neuroprotection. Vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), an HIF-1α inhibitor, is a c-glycosylated flavone that has been identified in medicinal plants. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with vitexin would protect against HI brain injury. Newborn rat pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia (8% O2 at 37 °C). Vitexin (30, 45 or 60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min or 3 h after HI. Vitexin, administered 5 min after HI, was neuroprotective as seen by decreased infarct volume evaluated at 48 h post-HI. This neuroprotection was removed when vitexin was administered 3 h after HI. Neuronal cell death, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain edema, HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were evaluated using a combination of Nissl staining, IgG staining, brain water content, immunohistochemistry and Western blot at 24 and 48 h after HI. The long-term effects of vitexin were evaluated by brain atrophy measurement, Nissl staining and neurobehavioral tests. Vitexin (45 mg/kg) ameliorated brain edema, BBB disruption and neuronal cell death; Upregulation of HIF-1α by dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) increased the BBB permeability and brain edema compared to HI alone. Vitexin attenuated the increase in HIF-1α and VEGF. Vitexin also had long-term effects of protecting against the loss of ipsilateral brain and improveing neurobehavioral outcomes. In conclusion, our data indicate early HIF-1α inhibition with vitexin provides both acute and long-term neuroprotection in the developing brain after neonatal HI injury. PMID:26187393

  3. Practical Application of Microelectroporation into Developing Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Ogawa, Masaharu

    One key approach toward understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying embryonic development involves the overexpression or misexpression of target genes in specific regions and at specific time points. The mouse gene-knockout system has been used extensively for loss-of-function studies due to the availability of a large number of mutant lines and the technical advantages of this system. In contrast, gain-of-function analyses have been performed through the production of knock-in and transgenic animals and with the use of various viruses (Cornetta 2006; Jakobsson et al., 2003; Hashimoto and Mikoshiba, 2004). However, it is not always possible to express or suppress genes in a spatially and temporally restricted manner, and the generation of genetically modified mice and recombinant viruses is time consuming and labor intensive. With the aim of solving these problems, many attempts have been made to apply the electroporation technique in research on developmental biology. Due to the accessibility of the avian embryo, it has been used as a classic model system for the study of developmental events in vertebrates. A novel technique for successful gene delivery into chick embryos has been established; this technique is known as in ovo electroporation and appears to be an excellent method, permitting quick and direct examination of the function of the delivered genes (Muramatsu et al., 1997; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Nakamura et al., 2000; Yasuda et al., 2000). It seems that this technique can be adapted to the mouse embryo and would permit more rapid functional analysis of genes than is achieved by the generation of knockout or transgenic mouse lines. However, the inaccessibility of embryos in the mammalian uterus renders in utero manipulations targeting precise regions difficult or impossible at most stages of development. Efforts have been undertaken by various researchers to establish an in utero electroporation system, and there have been several

  4. Transport of thyroxine across the blood-brain barrier is directed primarily from brain to blood in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.

    1985-12-23

    The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the transport of thyroxine was examined in mice. Radioiodinated (hot thyroxine (hT/sub 4/) administered icv had a half-time disappearance from the brain of 30 min. This increased to 60 min (p < 0.001) when administered with 211 pmole/mouse of unlabeled (cold) thyroxine (cT/sub 4/). The Km for this inhibition of hT/sub 4/ transport out of the brain by cT/sub 4/ was 9.66 pmole/brain. Unlabeled 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (cT/sub 3/) was unable to inhibit transport of hT/sub 4/ out of the brain, although both cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.05) and cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.05) did inhibit transport of radioiodinated 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (hT/sub 3/) to a small degree. Entry of hT/sub 4/ into the brain after peripheral administration was negligible and was not affected by either cT/sub 4/ nor cT/sub 3/. By contrast, the entry of hT/sub 3/ into the brain after peripheral administration was inhibited by cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.001) and was increased by cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.01). The levels of the unlabeled thyroid hormones administered centrally in these studies did not affect bulk flow, as assessed by labeled red blood cells (/sup 99m/Tc-RBC), or the carrier mediated transport of iodide out of the brain. Likewise, the vascular space of the brain and body, as assessed by /sup 99m/Tc-RBC, was unchanged by the levels of peripherally administered unlabeled thyroid hormones. Therefore, the results of these studies are not due to generalized effects of thyroid hormones on BBB transport. The results indicate that in the mouse the major carrier-mediated system for thyroxine in the BBB transports thyroxine out of the brain, while the major system for triiodothyronine transports hormone into the brain. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  5. MRI as a tool to study brain structure from mouse models for mental retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan; Kooy, R. F.; Reyniers, E.; Fransen, E.; Oostra, B. A.; Willems, Peter; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1998-07-01

    Nowadays, transgenic mice are a common tool to study brain abnormalities in neurological disorders. These studies usually rely on neuropathological examinations, which have a number of drawbacks, including the risk of artefacts introduced by fixation and dehydration procedures. Here we present 3D Fast Spin Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in combination with 2D and 3D segmentation techniques as a powerful tool to study brain anatomy. We set up MRI of the brain in mouse models for the fragile X syndrome (FMR1 knockout) and Corpus callosum hypoplasia, mental Retardation, Adducted thumbs, Spastic paraplegia and Hydrocephalus (CRASH) syndrome (L1CAM knockout). Our major goal was to determine qualitative and quantitative differences in specific brain structures. MRI of the brain of fragile X and CRASH patients has revealed alterations in the size of specific brain structures, including the cerebellar vermis and the ventricular system. In the present MRI study of the brain from fragile X knockout mice, we have measured the size of the brain, cerebellum and 4th ventricle, which were reported as abnormal in human fragile X patients, but found no evidence for altered brain regions in the mouse model. In CRASH syndrome, the most specific brain abnormalities are vermis hypoplasia and abnormalities of the ventricular system with some degree of hydrocephalus. With the MRI study of L1CAM knockout mice we found vermis hypoplasia, abnormalities of the ventricular system including dilatation of the lateral and the 4th ventricles. These subtle abnormalities were not detected upon standard neuropathological examination. Here we proved that this sensitive MRI technique allows to measure small differences which can not always be detected by means of pathology.

  6. Brain oxygen tension controls the expansion of outer subventricular zone-like basal progenitors in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne K; Braunschweig, Lena; Marrone, Lara; Storch, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex shows a conserved six-layered structure that differs between species in the total number of cortical neurons produced owing to differences in the relative abundance of distinct progenitor populations. Recent studies have identified a new class of proliferative neurogenic cells in the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) in gyrencephalic species such as primates and ferrets. Lissencephalic brains of mice possess fewer OSVZ-like progenitor cells and these do not constitute a distinct layer. Most in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that oxygen regulates the maintenance, proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells. Here we dissect the effects of fetal brain oxygen tension on neural progenitor cell activity using a novel mouse model that allows oxygen tension to be controlled within the hypoxic microenvironment in the neurogenic niche of the fetal brain in vivo. Indeed, maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21% and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal brain oxygenation. Increased oxygen tension in fetal mouse forebrain in vivo leads to a marked expansion of a distinct proliferative cell population, basal to the SVZ. These cells constitute a novel neurogenic cell layer, similar to the OSVZ, and contribute to corticogenesis by heading for deeper cortical layers as a part of the cortical plate.

  7. In vitro fertilization of oocytes from polyovular follicles in mouse ovaries exposed neonatally to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, T; Kamiya, K; Uesugi, Y; Sayama, K; Takasugi, N

    1991-01-01

    In 35-day-old female ICR/JCL mice given 5 daily injections of 1 microgram diethylstilbestrol (DES) from the day of birth, a significantly higher incidence of polyovular follicles was found in the ovaries than in those of age-matched control mice. Gap junctions of granulosa cells of mature follicles in neonatally DES-exposed mice were larger than those of the controls. When stimulated by gonadotropins (PMSG and hCG) and caged with males, the number of tubal embryos in DES-exposed mice was less, but the rate of fertilization and development was not different compared to the controls. Division of oocytes collected from the ovaries of 40-day-old DES-exposed and control mice after stimulation of gonadotropins was examined 24 to 72 h after in vitro insemination to ascertain whether fertilization had occurred in oocytes from polyovular follicles. Seventy-seven % of oocytes from uniovular follicles of control mice developed up to 8-cell stage embryos following in vitro insemination; 66% of those from similar follicles of DES-exposed mice developed into the same stage. By contrast, only 47% of oocytes from polyovular follicles of DES-exposed mice showed the division up to 8-cell stage 72 h after insemination, indicating a significantly lower fertilization rate compared to the oocytes from uniovular follicles of control and DES-exposed mice. Without insemination, oocytes taken from the same pools in these experiments never divided during the period of manipulation and incubation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Monoaminergic modulation of spinal viscero-sympathetic function in the neonatal mouse thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Amanda L; Sawchuk, Michael; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Descending serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems project diffusely to sensory, motor and autonomic spinal cord regions. Using neonatal mice, this study examined monoaminergic modulation of visceral sensory input and sympathetic preganglionic output. Whole-cell recordings from sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in spinal cord slice demonstrated that serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine modulated SPN excitability. Serotonin depolarized all, while noradrenaline and dopamine depolarized most SPNs. Serotonin and noradrenaline also increased SPN current-evoked firing frequency, while both increases and decreases were seen with dopamine. In an in vitro thoracolumbar spinal cord/sympathetic chain preparation, stimulation of splanchnic nerve visceral afferents evoked reflexes and subthreshold population synaptic potentials in thoracic ventral roots that were dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Visceral afferent stimulation also evoked bicuculline-sensitive dorsal root potentials thought to reflect presynaptic inhibition via primary afferent depolarization. These dorsal root potentials were likewise dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Concomitant monoaminergic depression of population afferent synaptic transmission recorded as dorsal horn field potentials was also seen. Collectively, serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine were shown to exert broad and comparable modulatory regulation of viscero-sympathetic function. The general facilitation of SPN efferent excitability with simultaneous depression of visceral afferent-evoked motor output suggests that descending monoaminergic systems reconfigure spinal cord autonomic function away from visceral sensory influence. Coincident monoaminergic reductions in dorsal horn responses support a multifaceted modulatory shift in the encoding of spinal visceral afferent activity. Similar monoamine-induced changes have been observed for somatic sensorimotor function, suggesting an integrative

  9. Vibrio cholerae-induced inflammation in the neonatal mouse cholera model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne L; Patimalla, Bharathi; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the acute diarrheal disease of cholera. Innate immune responses to V. cholerae are not a major cause of cholera pathology, which is characterized by severe, watery diarrhea induced by the action of cholera toxin. Innate responses may, however, contribute to resolution of infection and must be required to initiate adaptive responses after natural infection and oral vaccination. Here we investigated whether a well-established infant mouse model of cholera can be used to observe an innate immune response. We also used a vaccination model in which immunized dams protect their pups from infection through breast milk antibodies to investigate innate immune responses after V. cholerae infection for pups suckled by an immune dam. At the peak of infection, we observed neutrophil recruitment accompanied by induction of KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), NOS-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17a. Pups suckled by an immunized dam did not mount this response. Accessory toxins RtxA and HlyA played no discernible role in neutrophil recruitment in a wild-type background. The innate response to V. cholerae deleted for cholera toxin-encoding phage (CTX) and part of rtxA was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for CTX-carried genes or for RtxA in the absence of cholera toxin (CTX). Two extracellular V. cholerae DNases were not required for neutrophil recruitment, but DNase-deficient V. cholerae caused more clouds of DNA in the intestinal lumen, which appeared to be neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), suggesting that V. cholerae DNases combat NETs. Thus, the infant mouse model has hitherto unrecognized utility for interrogating innate responses to V. cholerae infection.

  10. Quantitative map of multiple auditory cortical regions with a stereotaxic fine-scale atlas of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukano, Hiroaki; Horie, Masao; Hishida, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging studies have recently revealed the presence of multiple auditory cortical regions in the mouse brain. We have previously demonstrated, using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging, at least six regions in the mouse auditory cortex, including the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), the secondary auditory field (AII), dorsoanterior field (DA), dorsomedial field (DM), and dorsoposterior field (DP). While multiple regions in the visual cortex and somatosensory cortex have been annotated and consolidated in recent brain atlases, the multiple auditory cortical regions have not yet been presented from a coronal view. In the current study, we obtained regional coordinates of the six auditory cortical regions of the C57BL/6 mouse brain and illustrated these regions on template coronal brain slices. These results should reinforce the existing mouse brain atlases and support future studies in the auditory cortex. PMID:26924462

  11. Repetitive noxious neonatal stimuli increases dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, J M; Lima, M; Avanzi, R D T; Gomes da Silva, S; Suchecki, D; Guinsburg, R; Covolan, L

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal noxious stimulation has been proposed to model pain triggered by diagnostic/therapeutic invasive procedures in premature infants. Previous studies have shown that hippocampal neurogenesis rate and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats may be altered by neonatal noxious stimuli. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether noxious stimulation during neonatal period alters the nociceptive response and dentate gyrus neurogenesis when compared to rats subjected to a single noxious stimulus in late infancy. Plasma corticosterone and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were measured. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in adolescent rats (postnatal day 40; P40) exposed twice to intra-plantar injections of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) on P1 and P21 (group P1P21) or P8 and P21 (P8P21) or exposed once on P21 (pubertal). On P21, one subset of animals received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and was euthanized on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. Another subset was sampled for thermal response or plasma corticosterone measurement and hippocampal BDNF levels. Proliferative cell rate in dentate gyrus was the highest in all re-exposed groups (P < 0.001), except for P8 females (P8P21F), revealing also a sex difference, where P8P21 males showed higher rate than females (P < 0.001). Stimulated groups took longer than CTL animals to lick the paws (P < 0.001), regardless of the age when the noxious stimulus was applied. Re-exposed groups had lower corticosterone plasma level (P1P21 M and F, P8P21M) than controls. On the contrary, hippocampal BDNF was increased in males from both re-exposed groups. These results show that infant noxious stimulation in neonatally previously stimulated rats is related to high proliferation in the DG and this association seems to be modified by the animal's sex. The new generated dentate granule cells in the hippocampus may have a role in the long

  12. Multiple Antenatal Dexamethasone Treatment Alters Brain Vessel Differentiation in Newborn Mouse Pups.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Schlundt, Marian; Fehrholz, Markus; Ehrke, Alexander; Kunzmann, Steffen; Liebner, Stefan; Speer, Christian P; Förster, Carola Y

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal steroid treatment decreases morbidity and mortality in premature infants through the maturation of lung tissue, which enables sufficient breathing performance. However, clinical and animal studies have shown that repeated doses of glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone and betamethasone lead to long-term adverse effects on brain development. Therefore, we established a mouse model for antenatal dexamethasone treatment to investigate the effects of dexamethasone on brain vessel differentiation towards the blood-brain barrier (BBB) phenotype, focusing on molecular marker analysis. The major findings were that in total brains on postnatal day (PN) 4 triple antenatal dexamethasone treatment significantly downregulated the tight junction protein claudin-5, the endothelial marker Pecam-1/CD31, the glucocorticoid receptor, the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and Abc transporters (Abcb1a, Abcg2 Abcc4). Less pronounced effects were found after single antenatal dexamethasone treatment and in PN10 samples. Comparisons of total brain samples with isolated brain endothelial cells together with the stainings for Pecam-1/CD31 and claudin-5 led to the assumption that the morphology of brain vessels is affected by antenatal dexamethasone treatment at PN4. On the mRNA level markers for angiogenesis, the sonic hedgehog and the Wnt pathway were downregulated in PN4 samples, suggesting fundamental changes in brain vascularization and/or differentiation. In conclusion, we provided a first comprehensive molecular basis for the adverse effects of multiple antenatal dexamethasone treatment on brain vessel differentiation. PMID:26274818

  13. A pharmacological evidence of positive association between mouse intermale aggression and brain serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A V; Osipova, D V; Naumenko, V S; Terenina, E; Mormède, P; Popova, N K

    2012-07-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the regulation of mouse intermale aggression. Previously, it was shown that intensity of mouse intermale aggression was positively associated with activity of the key enzyme of 5-HT synthesis - tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) in mouse brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pharmacological activation or inhibition of 5-HT synthesis in the brain on intermale aggression in two mouse strains differing in the TPH2 activity: C57BL/6J (B6, high TPH2 activity, high aggressiveness) and CC57BR/Mv (BR, low TPH2 activity, low aggressiveness). Administration of 5-HT precursor L-tryptophan (300 mg/kg, i.p.) to BR mice significantly increased the 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in the midbrain as well as the number of attacks and their duration in the resident-intruder test. And vice versa, administration of TPH2 inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (300 mg/kg, i.p., for 3 consecutive days) to B6 mice dramatically reduced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in brain structures and attenuated the frequency and the duration of aggressive attacks. At the same time, L-tryptophan or pCPA did not influence the percentage of aggressive mice and the attack latency reflecting the threshold of aggressive reaction. This result indicated that the intensity of intermale aggression, but not the threshold of aggressive reaction is positively dependent on 5-HT metabolism in mouse brain.

  14. Functional networks underlying latent inhibition learning in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Puga, Frank; Barrett, Douglas W; Bastida, Christel C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2007-10-15

    The present study reports the first comprehensive map of brain networks underlying latent inhibition learning and the first application of structural equation modeling to cytochrome oxidase data. In latent inhibition, repeated exposure to a stimulus results in a latent form of learning that inhibits subsequent associations with that stimulus. As neuronal energy demands to form learned associations changes, so does the induction of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase. Therefore, cytochrome oxidase can be used as an endpoint metabolic marker of the effects of experience on regional brain metabolic capacity. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to map brain regions in mice trained on a tone-footshock fear conditioning paradigm with either tone preexposure (latent inhibition), conditioning only (acquisition), conditioning followed by tone alone (extinction), or no handling or conditioning (naive). The ventral cochlear nucleus, medial geniculate, CA1 hippocampus, and perirhinal cortex showed modified metabolic capacity due to latent inhibition. Structural equation modeling was used to determine the causal influences in an anatomical network of these regions and others thought to mediate latent inhibition, including the accumbens and entorhinal cortex. An uncoupling of ascending influences between auditory regions was observed in latent inhibition. There was also a reduced influence on the accumbens from the perirhinal cortex in both latent inhibition and extinction. The results suggest a specific network with a neural mechanism of latent inhibition that appears to involve sensory gating, as evidenced by modifications in metabolic capacity and effective connectivity between auditory regions and reduced perirhinal cortex influence on the accumbens.

  15. A Novel Mouse Model of Penetrating Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja; Wing, Ian D.; Davidsson, Johan; Plantman, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) has been difficult to model in small laboratory animals, such as rats or mice. Previously, we have established a non-fatal, rat model for pTBI using a modified air-rifle that accelerates a pellet, which hits a small probe that then penetrates the experimental animal’s brain. Knockout and transgenic strains of mice offer attractive tools to study biological reactions induced by TBI. Hence, in the present study, we adapted and modified our model to be used with mice. The technical characterization of the impact device included depth and speed of impact, as well as dimensions of the temporary cavity formed in a brain surrogate material after impact. Biologically, we have focused on three distinct levels of severity (mild, moderate, and severe), and characterized the acute phase response to injury in terms of tissue destruction, neural degeneration, and gliosis. Functional outcome was assessed by measuring bodyweight and motor performance on rotarod. The results showed that this model is capable of reproducing major morphological and neurological changes of pTBI; as such, we recommend its utilization in research studies aiming to unravel the biological events underlying injury and regeneration after pTBI. PMID:25374559

  16. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  17. Effects of PAMAM dendrimers in the mouse brain after a single intranasal instillation.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Sone, Hideko; Kurokawa, Yoshika; Zeng, Yang; Zeng, Qin; Nitta, Hiroshi; Hirano, Seishiro

    2014-08-01

    Dendrimers are highly branched spherical nanomaterials produced for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications such as a drug delivery system. The toxicological profiles of dendrimers are largely unknown. We investigated the in vivo effects of nasal exposure to polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on their effects on neurological biomarkers in the mouse brain. A single dose of PAMAM dendrimers (3 or 15μg/mouse) was intranasally administered to 8-week old male BALB/c mice. Twenty-four hours after administration, the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex were collected and potential biomarkers in the blood and brain were examined using blood marker, microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses. No remarkable changes in standard serum biochemical markers were observed in the blood. A microarray analysis showed the alterations of the genes expression level related to pluripotent network, serotonin-anxiety pathway, TGF-beta receptor signaling, prostaglandin synthesis-regulation, complement-coagulation cascades, and chemokine-signaling pathway and non-odorant GPCR signaling pathways in brain tissues. Brain derived-neurotrophic factor mRNA was up-regulated in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice treated with a high dose of dendrimers. These findings suggest that PAMAM dendrimers may reach the brain via the systemic circulation or an olfactory nerve route after intranasal instillation, and indicate that a single intranasal administration of PAMAM dendrimers may potentially lead to neuronal effects by modulating the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathway.

  18. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  19. 3D culture of murine neural stem cells on decellularized mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jorrit; Reekmans, Kristien; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSC) in diseased or injured brain tissue is widely studied as a potential treatment for various neurological pathologies. However, effective cell replacement therapy relies on the intrinsic capacity of cellular grafts to overcome hypoxic and/or immunological barriers after transplantation. In this context, it is hypothesized that structural support for grafted NSC will be of utmost importance. With this study, we present a novel decellularization protocol for 1.5 mm thick mouse brain sections, resulting in the generation of acellular three-dimensional (3D) brain sections. Next, the obtained 3D brain sections were seeded with murine NSC expressing both the eGFP and luciferase reporter proteins (NSC-eGFP/Luc). Using real-time bioluminescence imaging, the survival and growth of seeded NSC-eGFP/Luc cells was longitudinally monitored for 1-7 weeks in culture, indicating the ability of the acellular brain sections to support sustained ex vivo growth of NSC. Next, the organization of a 3D maze-like cellular structure was examined using confocal microscopy. Moreover, under mitogenic stimuli (EGF and hFGF-2), most cells in this 3D culture retained their NSC phenotype. Concluding, we here present a novel protocol for decellularization of mouse brain sections, which subsequently support long-term 3D culture of undifferentiated NSC.

  20. Behavioral disturbances in adult mice following neonatal virus infection or kynurenine treatment – role of brain kynurenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xicong; Holtze, Maria; Powell, Susan B; Terrando, Niccolò; Larsson, Markus K.; Persson, Anna; Olsson, Sara K.; Orhan, Funda; Kegel, Magdalena; Asp, Linnea; Goiny, Michel; Schwieler, Lilly; Engberg, Göran; Karlsson, Håkan; Erhardt, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to infections in early life is considered a risk-factor for developing schizophrenia. Recently we reported that a neonatal CNS infection with influenza A virus in mice resulted in a transient induction of the brain kynurenine pathway, and subsequent behavioral disturbances in immune-deficient adult mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential role in this regard of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and at the cholinergic α7 nicotinic receptor. C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with neurotropic influenza A/WSN/33 virus (2400 plaque-forming units) at postnatal day (P) 3 or with L-kynurenine (2×200 mg/kg/day) at P7-16. In mice neonatally treated with L-kynurenine prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle, anxiety, and learning and memory were also assessed. Neonatally infected mice showed enhanced sensitivity to d-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as adults. Neonatally L-kynurenine treated mice showed enhanced sensitivity to d-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as well as mild impairments in prepulse inhibition and memory. Also, d-amphetamine tended to potentiate dopamine release in the striatum in kynurenine-treated mice. These long-lasting behavioral and neurochemical alterations suggest that the kynurenine pathway can link early-life infection with the development of neuropsychiatric disturbances in adulthood. PMID:24140727

  1. Oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse brain; the effect of LPS-induced inflammatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kazunori; Furube, Eriko; Muneoka, Shiori; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-19

    Evidence have been accumulated that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain. The fornix, projection and commissure pathway of hippocampal neurons, carries signals from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain and has critical role in memory and learning. However, basic characterization of adult oligodendrogenesis in this brain region is not well understood. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to examine the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and the effect of acute inflammatory stimulation on oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse. We demonstrated the proliferation of OPCs and a new generation of mature oligodendrocytes by using bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Oligodendrogenesis of adult fornix was also demonstrated by using oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 transgenic mouse. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) attenuated proliferation of OPCs in the fornix together with reduced proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells. Time course analysis showed that a single administration of LPS attenuated the proliferation of OPCs during 24-48 h. On the other hand, consecutive administration of LPS did not suppress proliferation of OPCs. The treatment of LPS did not affect differentiation of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes. Treatment of a microglia inhibitor minocycline significantly attenuated basal proliferation of OPCs under normal condition. In conclusion, the present study indicates that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs and a single administration of LPS transiently attenuates proliferation of OPCs without changing differentiation in the fornix of the adult mouse brains.

  2. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-08-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges.

  3. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach.

    PubMed

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges. PMID:27534708

  4. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    PubMed Central

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges. PMID:27534708

  5. Maternal Hypoxia Increases the Activity of MMPs and Decreases the Expression of TIMPs in the Brain of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wenni; Chen, Wanqiu; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Ma, Qingyi; Souvenir, Rhonda; Zhang, Lubo; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2010-01-01

    A recent study has shown that increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9) has detrimental effect on the brain after neonatal hypoxia. The present study determined the effect of maternal hypoxia on neuronal survivability and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, as well as the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) in the brain of neonatal rats. Pregnant rats were exposed to 10.5% oxygen for 6 days from the gestation day 15 to day 21. Pups were sacrificed at day 0, 4, 7, 14, and 21 after birth. Body weight and brain weight of the pups were measured at each time point. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the protein abundance of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were determined by zymography and Western blotting, respectively. The tissue distribution of MMPs was examined by immunofluorescence staining. The neuronal death was detected by Nissl staining. Maternal hypoxia caused significant decreases in body and brain size, increased activity of MMP-2 at day 0, and increased MMP-9 at day 0 and 4. The increased activity of the MMPs was accompanied by an overall tendency towards a reduced expression of TIMPs at all ages with the significance observed for TIMPs at day 0, 4, and 7. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increased expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 in the hippocampus at day 0 and 4. Nissl staining revealed significant cell death in the hippocampus at day 0, 4, and 7. Functional tests showed worse neurobehavioral outcomes in the hypoxic animals. PMID:20017119

  6. Endothelin receptor-A (ETa) inhibition fails to improve neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Nikan H; Lee, Lillian K; Zhou, Yilin; Chen, Wanqiu; Rolland, William; Fathali, Nancy; Martin, Robert; Applegate, Richard; Stier, Gary; Zhang, John H

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is an important cause of mortality and disability in newborns. It is a result of insufficient oxygen and glucose circulation to the brain, initiating long-term cerebral damage and cell death. Emerging evidence suggests that endothelin receptor-A (ETA) activation can play an important role in mediating brain damage. In this study, we investigated the role of ETA receptor inhibition using ABT-627 in neonatal HI injured rats. Postnatal day 10 Sprague-Dawley rat pups (n=91) were assigned to the following groups: sham (n=28), HI (vehicle, n=32), and HI with ABT-627 at 3 mg/kg (n=31). The Rice-Vannucci model was used to induce ischemia by ligating the right common carotid artery, followed by a 2 h hypoxic episode using 8% oxygen in a 37°C chamber. Postoperative assessment was conducted at 48 h after injury and again at 4 weeks. At the acute time point, investigative markers included cerebral edema, infarction volume, and body weight change. Neurobehavioral testing was measured at 4 weeks post-injury. Our findings indicated that ABT-627 had no effect on the measured parameters. This study suggests that ETA receptor blockade using ABT-627 post-treatment fails to improve neurological outcomes in neonatal HI injured rats. PMID:21725757

  7. Novel Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Mouse Models for Type 1 Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Chen, Wanqiu; Jun, Kristine; Arthur, Helen M.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Endoglin (ENG) is a causative gene of type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1). HHT1 patients have a higher prevalence of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) than the general population and patients with other HHT subtypes. The pathogenesis of brain AVM in HHT1 patients is currently unknown and no specific medical therapy is available to treat patients. Proper animal models are crucial for identifying the underlying mechanisms for brain AVM development and for testing new therapies. However, creating HHT1 brain AVM models has been quite challenging because of difficulties related to deleting Eng-floxed sequence in Eng2fl/2fl mice. To create an HHT1 brain AVM mouse model, we used several Cre transgenic mouse lines to delete Eng in different cell-types in Eng2fl/2fl mice: R26CreER (all cell types after tamoxifen treatment), SM22α-Cre (smooth muscle and endothelial cell) and LysM-Cre (lysozyme M-positive macrophage). An adeno-associated viral vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF) was injected into the brain to induce focal angiogenesis. We found that SM22α-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo caused AVMs in the postnatal brain, spinal cord, and intestines. Induction of Eng deletion in adult mice using R26CreER plus local VEGF stimulation induced the brain AVM phenotype. In both models, Eng-null endothelial cells were detected in the brain AVM lesions, and formed mosaicism with wildtype endothelial cells. However, LysM-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo did not cause AVM in the postnatal brain even after VEGF stimulation. In this study, we report two novel HHT1 brain AVM models that mimic many phenotypes of human brain AVM and can thus be used for studying brain AVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. Further, our data indicate that macrophage Eng deletion is insufficient and that endothelial Eng homozygous deletion is required for HHT1 brain AVM development. PMID:24520391

  8. Development of the vitamin A-storing cell in mouse liver during late fetal and neonatal periods.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, E; Hirosawa, K; Abe, K; Naka, S

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin A-storing cells in perinatal mouse liver were studied by chemical and autoradiographic analyses of exogenous vitamin A. The amount of retinyl palmitate in the fetal liver increased significantly following oral administration of retinyl acetate to the mother, suggesting the existence of storage sites of the vitamin in fetal liver. Light microscope semi-serial autoradiography of the fetal liver on the 15th day of gestation showed that 3H-vitamin A administered to the mother was incorporated into cells distributed exclusively along the hepatic blood vessels and the blood islands. Mitotic figures of the labeled cells were frequently observed. Electron microscope autoradiography revealed that the vitamin was incorporated into lipid droplets, rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of the fibroblast-like cells in close apposition to the endothelial cells. The labeled cells differed in their ultrastructure from the vitamin A-storing cells (Ito cells) of the adult liver. In the later gestational period, silver grains tended to be more concentrated in lipid droplets, and the cytological features of the labeled cells became similar to those of the vitamin A-storing cells. Both retinyl palmitate content and the labeling of lipid droplets increased rapidly in the liver of neonates after commencement of suckling. The labeled cells had the same appearance as the vitamin A-storing cells (Ito cells). It is concluded that vitamin A transported across the placenta is taken up in the fetal liver by the cells distributed along the blood vessels, and that these cells proliferate in accordance with vascular development and gradually take on the characteristics of vitamin A-storing cells during the perinatal period. A defensive role of the vitamin A-storing cell against the toxic effects of vitamin A is also suggested. PMID:6476398

  9. Sustained High Levels of Interleukin-6 Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 in a Neonate Mouse Model ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Wei Xin; Foo, Damian G. W.; Trasti, Scott L.; Tan, Eng Lee; Alonso, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children and has been consistently associated with the most severe complications of the disease, including central nervous system inflammation and pulmonary edema. Increasing frequency and amplitude of EV71 outbreaks have raised awareness and concerns worldwide. Previous reports proposed that overwhelming virus replication combined with the induction of massive proinflammatory cytokines is responsible for the pathogenicity of EV71. Specifically, elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed consistently in patients and strongly correlated with disease severity. In this study, we show in the neonate mouse model that sustained high levels of IL-6 produced upon EV71 infection lead to severe tissue damage and eventually death of the animals. Administration of anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibodies after the onset of the clinical symptoms successfully improved the survival rates and clinical scores of the infected hosts. Compared to untreated infected controls, anti-IL-6-treated mice displayed reduced tissue damage, absence of splenic atrophy, and increased immune cell activation. In addition, markedly elevated systemic levels of IL-10 were measured in the protected animals. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in virus titers between anti-IL-6-treated mice and untreated mice, indicating that the anti-IL-6 antibody-mediated protection is independent of the virus load. Our findings thus demonstrate that IL-6 plays a major role in EV71-induced immunopathogenesis. As there is still neither vaccine nor treatment available against EV71, anti-IL-6 antibody treatment represents a potential therapeutic approach to providing protection from the most severe complications of the disease. PMID:21228224

  10. Segmental organization of vestibulospinal inputs to spinal interneurons mediating crossed activation of thoracolumbar motoneurons in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Kasumacic, Nedim; Lambert, François M; Coulon, Patrice; Bras, Helene; Vinay, Laurent; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C

    2015-05-27

    Vestibulospinal pathways activate contralateral motoneurons (MNs) in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of the neonatal mouse exclusively via axons descending ipsilaterally from the vestibular nuclei via the lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST; Kasumacic et al., 2010). Here we investigate how transmission from the LVST to contralateral MNs is mediated by descending commissural interneurons (dCINs) in different spinal segments. We test the polysynaptic nature of this crossed projection by assessing LVST-mediated ventral root (VR) response latencies, manipulating synaptic responses pharmacologically, and tracing the pathway transynaptically from hindlimb extensor muscles using rabies virus (RV). Longer response latencies in contralateral than ipsilateral VRs, near-complete abolition of LVST-mediated calcium responses in contralateral MNs by mephenesin, and the absence of transsynaptic RV labeling of contralateral LVST neurons within a monosynaptic time window all indicate an overwhelmingly polysynaptic pathway from the LVST to contralateral MNs. Optical recording of synaptically mediated calcium responses identifies LVST-responsive ipsilateral dCINs that exhibit segmental differences in proportion and dorsoventral distribution. In contrast to thoracic and lower lumbar segments, in which most dCINs are LVST responsive, upper lumbar segments stand out because they contain a much smaller and more ventrally restricted subpopulation of LVST-responsive dCINs. A large proportion of these upper lumbar LVST-responsive dCINs project to contralateral L5, which contains many of the hindlimb extensor MNs activated by the LVST. A selective channeling of LVST inputs through segmentally and dorsoventrally restricted subsets of dCINs provides a mechanism for targeting vestibulospinal signals differentially to contralateral trunk and hindlimb MNs in the mammalian spinal cord.

  11. Effect of montelukast on the expression of interleukin-18, telomerase reverse transcriptase, and Bcl-2 in the brain tissue of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, J L; Zhao, X H; Zhang, D L; Zhang, J B; Liu, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of montelukast on the expression of interleukin (IL)-18, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and Bcl-2 in the brain tissue of neonatal rats with hypox-ic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). To establish the model of HIBD, 8% oxygen was applied to rats after the unilateral carotid artery was ligated. Twenty rats were randomly assigned to the control group, while another 40 were used to establish the HIBD model and were randomly divided equally into model group and treatment group. A 0.1 mg/kg dose of montelukast or an equal volume of saline was intraperitoneally injected to the rats in the treatment group and the model group, respectively. Brain tissue from 4 rats in each group was sampled at 0, 6, 12, 24, and 72 h after brain damage, and immunohistochemistry was used to measure IL-18, TERT and Bcl-2 expressions. IL-18, TERT, and Bcl-2 levels increased after 12 h in both the model group and treatment group, peaked after 48 h, and then decreased. Although not statistically significant, IL-18, TERT, and Bcl-2 expressions after 24, 48, and 96 h were all lower in the treatment group than those in the model group. In conclusion, montelukast has a protective effect on the cerebral tissue of neonatal rats with HIBD, and may mediate an increase of TERT and Bcl-2 levels but not of IL-18. Further study is required to elucidate the mechanism of the protective effect of montelukast on HIBD. PMID:26345821

  12. Evidence of infectious asthma phenotype: Chlamydia-induced allergy and pathogen-specific IgE in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katir K; Webley, Wilmore C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose etiology is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that early-life respiratory infections with atypical bacteria may play an important role in the induction or exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease. The current study utilized a neonatal mouse ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization model of asthma to determine the course of early-life respiratory tract infection by Chlamydia. Neonatal (day 1) and adult (6 wks) BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with Chlamydia (MoPn) and 7 weeks later were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Allergic airway disease was characterized by examination of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cellularity, cytokine production and antibody response. The presence of Chlamydia was determined by PCR and culture. Ova-specific IgE was quantified by ELISA and Chlamydia-specific IgE was determined via Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection in neonatal mice induced increased production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, 5, 10, and 13) in both BAL and serum, while infected adult mice produced increased Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ). The BAL from infected neonates contained significantly elevated levels of eosinophils compared to infected adult mice. Although adult mice cleared the infection ∼30 days post infection (pi), neonates were still infected 66 days after initial infection. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in both the BAL and serum of neonatal mice beginning 28 days post infection, however, infected adult mice did not produce Chlamydia-specific IgE antibodies over the course of the study. When allergic airway was induced using Ova, infected neonatal mice increased their production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by >2 fold compared to uninfected controls and infected adult groups. Our findings demonstrate that early-life Chlamydia infection induces a Th2-dominant cytokine response in the airways of neonatal mice, leading to chronic infection. More significantly, early life respiratory

  13. Mapping oxygen concentration in the awake mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Declan G; Parpaleix, Alexandre; Roche, Morgane; Charpak, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Although critical for brain function, the physiological values of cerebral oxygen concentration have remained elusive because high-resolution measurements have only been performed during anesthesia, which affects two major parameters modulating tissue oxygenation: neuronal activity and blood flow. Using measurements of capillary erythrocyte-associated transients, fluctuations of oxygen partial pressure (Po2) associated with individual erythrocytes, to infer Po2 in the nearby neuropil, we report the first non-invasive micron-scale mapping of cerebral Po2 in awake, resting mice. Interstitial Po2 has similar values in the olfactory bulb glomerular layer and the somatosensory cortex, whereas there are large capillary hematocrit and erythrocyte flux differences. Awake tissue Po2 is about half that under isoflurane anesthesia, and within the cortex, vascular and interstitial Po2 values display layer-specific differences which dramatically contrast with those recorded under anesthesia. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring energy parameters non-invasively in physiological conditions to precisely quantify and model brain metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12024.001 PMID:26836304

  14. Focal cerebral ischemia activates neurovascular restorative dynamics in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Min; Hu, Xiaoming; Lu, Shiduo; Gan, Yu; Li, Peiying; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers regeneration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs), which are associated with neovascularization and white matter repair in the brain. This study analyzed the dynamics of neurogenesis, neovascularization, and white matter injury/repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and elucidated their temporal association. Mice were subjected to MCAO for 60 minutes and sacrificed up to 28 days after reperfusion. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as measured by double staining of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) with DCX or tomato lectin, respectively, were substantially activated soon after ischemia and persisted for 4 weeks. Despite the moderate recovery of functional vessels in infarct margin from 7 days post-ischemia, a significant decrease in vascular density remained over time. Clusters of immature neurons localized proximal to angiogenic blood vessels beginning 14 days after ischemia, suggesting interplay between neurogenesis and revascularization. Progenitors of oligodendrocytes (NG2+) constitutively presented in the normal brain and proliferated soon after ischemia. However, axon damage and the loss of white matter integrity after ischemic stroke were almost irreversible, as revealed by sustained decreases of myelin basic protein (MBP) and neurofilament-200 expression. PMID:22202008

  15. Relationship of impaired brain glucose metabolism to learning deficit in the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Nishikawa, H; Hirai, K; Kato, K; Miyamoto, M

    1996-10-11

    The relationship between brain glucose metabolism and learning deficit was examined in the senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, which has been proven to be a useful murine model of age-related behavioral disorders. SAMP8, 7 months old, exhibited marked learning impairment in the passive avoidance task, as compared with the control strain, senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1. SAMP8 also exhibited a reduction in brain glucose metabolism, as indicated by a reduction in [14C]2-deoxyglucose accumulation in the brain following the intravenous injection impaired glucose metabolism correlated significantly with the learning impairment in all brain regions in SAMR1 and SAMP8. In the SAMP8, a significant correlation was observed in the posterior half of the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that the SAMP8 strain is a useful model of not only age-related behavioral disorders, but also glucose hypometabolism observed in aging and dementias. PMID:8905734

  16. Imaging whole-brain cytoarchitecture of mouse with MRI-based quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Xie, Luke; Dibb, Russell; Li, Wei; Decker, Kyle; Zhang, Yuyao; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Chunlei

    2016-08-15

    The proper microstructural arrangement of complex neural structures is essential for establishing the functional circuitry of the brain. We present an MRI method to resolve tissue microstructure and infer brain cytoarchitecture by mapping the magnetic susceptibility in the brain at high resolution. This is possible because of the heterogeneous magnetic susceptibility created by varying concentrations of lipids, proteins and irons from the cell membrane to cytoplasm. We demonstrate magnetic susceptibility maps at a nominal resolution of 10-μm isotropic, approaching the average cell size of a mouse brain. The maps reveal many detailed structures including the retina cell layers, olfactory sensory neurons, barrel cortex, cortical layers, axonal fibers in white and gray matter. Olfactory glomerulus density is calculated and structural connectivity is traced in the optic nerve, striatal neurons, and brainstem nerves. The method is robust and can be readily applied on MRI scanners at or above 7T. PMID:27181764

  17. DHA but Not EPA Emulsions Preserve Neurological and Mitochondrial Function after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sosunov, Sergey A.; Williams, Jill J.; Zirpoli, Hylde; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Deckelbaum, Richard J.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with triglyceride emulsions of docosahexaenoic acid (tri-DHA) protected neonatal mice against hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury. The mechanism of this neuroprotection remains unclear. We hypothesized that administration of tri-DHA enriches HI-brains with DHA/DHA metabolites. This reduces Ca2+-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and attenuates brain injury. Methods 10-day-old C57BL/6J mice following HI-brain injury received tri-DHA, tri-EPA or vehicle. At 4–5 hours of reperfusion, mitochondrial fatty acid composition and Ca2+ buffering capacity were analyzed. At 24 hours and at 8–9 weeks of recovery, oxidative injury, neurofunctional and neuropathological outcomes were evaluated. In vitro, hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ buffering capacity were measured in the presence or absence of DHA or EPA. Results Only post-treatment with tri-DHA reduced oxidative damage and improved short- and long-term neurological outcomes. This was associated with increased content of DHA in brain mitochondria and DHA-derived bioactive metabolites in cerebral tissue. After tri-DHA administration HI mitochondria were resistant to Ca2+-induced membrane permeabilization. In vitro, hyperoxia increased mitochondrial ROS production and reduced Ca2+ buffering capacity; DHA, but not EPA, significantly attenuated these effects of hyperoxia. Conclusions Post-treatment with tri-DHA resulted in significant accumulation of DHA and DHA derived bioactive metabolites in the HI-brain. This was associated with improved mitochondrial tolerance to Ca2+-induced permeabilization, reduced oxidative brain injury and permanent neuroprotection. Interaction of DHA with mitochondria alters ROS release and improves Ca2+ buffering capacity. This may account for neuroprotective action of post-HI administration of tri-DHA. PMID:27513579

  18. Mitochondrial Optic Atrophy (OPA) 1 Processing Is Altered in Response to Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Baburamani, Ana A.; Hurling, Chloe; Stolp, Helen; Sobotka, Kristina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Thornton, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of mitochondrial function and subsequent induction of cell death pathways are key hallmarks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, both in animal models and in term infants. Mitoprotective therapies therefore offer a new avenue for intervention for the babies who suffer life-long disabilities as a result of birth asphyxia. Here we show that after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons or in a mouse model of HI, mitochondrial protein homeostasis is altered, manifesting as a change in mitochondrial morphology and functional impairment. Furthermore we find that the mitochondrial fusion and cristae regulatory protein, OPA1, is aberrantly cleaved to shorter forms. OPA1 cleavage is normally regulated by a balanced action of the proteases Yme1L and Oma1. However, in primary neurons or after HI in vivo, protein expression of YmelL is also reduced, whereas no change is observed in Oma1 expression. Our data strongly suggest that alterations in mitochondria-shaping proteins are an early event in the pathogenesis of neonatal HI injury. PMID:26393574

  19. Intrinsic expression of transcortin in neural cells of the mouse brain: a histochemical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Sivukhina, Elena; Helbling, Jean-Christophe; Minni, Amandine M; Schäfer, H Hendrik; Pallet, Véronique; Jirikowski, Gustav F; Moisan, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-15

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, transcortin) has been shown to be expressed in the brain of rat and human species. In this study, we examined the CBG brain expression and cDNA structure in mice, comparing wild-type (Cbg(+/+)) and Cbg knockout mice (Cbg(-/-), obtained by genetic disruption of the SerpinA6 alias Cbg gene). We used double immunofluorescence labeling with specific neuronal and glial markers to analyze the cellular localization of CBG in various regions of the mouse brain. In wild-type (Cbg(+/+)) mice, we found CBG immunoreactivity in neuronal perikarya of the magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei, amygdala, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pituitary. A portion of glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes) contained CBG immunoreactivity, including some of the ependymal cells and choroid plexus cells. No CBG immunoreactivity was detected in Cbg(-/-) brain tissues. Using RT-PCR, we showed that the full-length Cbg mRNA is present in those regions, indicating an intrinsic expression of the steroid-binding globulin. Furthermore, sequencing analysis showed that Cbg cDNA obtained from the mouse hypothalamus was homologous to Cbg cDNA obtained from the liver. Finally, we have evaluated the relative levels of CBG expression in various brain regions and in the liver by quantitative PCR. We found that brain levels of Cbg mRNA are low compared with the liver but significantly higher than in CBG-deficient mice. Although derived from the same gene as liver CBG, brain CBG protein may play a specific or complementary role that requires the production and analysis of brain-specific Cbg knockout models. PMID:22996440

  20. Gene expression based mouse brain parcellation using Markov random field regularized non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Haynor, David R.; Thompson, Carol L.; Lein, Ed; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the geography of genetic expression in the mouse brain has opened previously unexplored avenues in neuroinformatics. The Allen Brain Atlas (www.brain-map.org) (ABA) provides genome-wide colorimetric in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression images at high spatial resolution, all mapped to a common three-dimensional 200μm3 spatial framework defined by the Allen Reference Atlas (ARA) and is a unique data set for studying expression based structural and functional organization of the brain. The goal of this study was to facilitate an unbiased data-driven structural partitioning of the major structures in the mouse brain. We have developed an algorithm that uses nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to perform parts based analysis of ISH gene expression images. The standard NMF approach and its variants are limited in their ability to flexibly integrate prior knowledge, in the context of spatial data. In this paper, we introduce spatial connectivity as an additional regularization in NMF decomposition via the use of Markov Random Fields (mNMF). The mNMF algorithm alternates neighborhood updates with iterations of the standard NMF algorithm to exploit spatial correlations in the data. We present the algorithm and show the sub-divisions of hippocampus and somatosensory-cortex obtained via this approach. The results are compared with established neuroanatomic knowledge. We also highlight novel gene expression based sub divisions of the hippocampus identified by using the mNMF algorithm.

  1. Transcriptomic configuration of mouse brain induced by adolescent exposure to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Eun, Jung Woo; Kwack, Seung Jun; Noh, Ji Heon; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie Hongjian; Ryu, Jae Chun; Ahn, Young Min; Min, Jin-Hye; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Rhee, Gyu Seek; Nam, Suk Woo

    2009-05-15

    The amphetamine derivative ({+-})-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is a synthetic amphetamine analogue used recreationally to obtain an enhanced affiliative emotional response. MDMA is a potent monoaminergic neurotoxin with the potential to damage brain serotonin and/or dopamine neurons. As the majority of MDMA users are young adults, the risk that users may expose the fetus to MDMA is a concern. However, the majority of studies on MDMA have investigated the effects on adult animals. Here, we investigated whether long-term exposure to MDMA, especially in adolescence, could induce comprehensive transcriptional changes in mouse brain. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse brain regions demonstrated significant gene expression changes in the cerebral cortex. Supervised analysis identified 1028 genes that were chronically dysregulated by long-term exposure to MDMA in adolescent mice. Functional categories most represented by this MDMA characteristic signature are intracellular molecular signaling pathways of neurotoxicity, such as, the MAPK signaling pathway, the Wnt signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, long-term potentiation, and the long-term depression signaling pathway. Although these resultant large-scale molecular changes remain to be studied associated with functional brain damage caused by MDMA, our observations delineate the possible neurotoxic effects of MDMA on brain function, and have therapeutic implications concerning neuro-pathological conditions associated with MDMA abuse.

  2. Dysbindin-Associated Proteome in the P2 Synaptosome Fraction of Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The gene DTNBP1 encodes the protein dysbindin and is among the most promising and highly investigated schizophrenia-risk genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that dysbindin plays an important role in the regulation of neuroplasticity. Dysbindin was reported to be a stable component of BLOC-1 complex in the cytosol. However, little is known about the endogenous dysbindin-containing complex in the brain synaptosome. In this study, we investigated the associated proteome of dysbindin in the P2 synaptosome fraction of mouse brain. Our data suggest that dysbindin has three isoforms associating with different complexes in the P2 fraction of mouse brain. To facilitate immunopurification, BAC transgenic mice expressing a tagged dysbindin were generated, and 47 putative dysbindin-associated proteins, including all components of BLOC-1, were identified by mass spectrometry in the dysbindin-containing complex purified from P2. The interactions of several selected candidates, including WDR11, FAM91A1, snapin, muted, pallidin, and two proteasome subunits, PSMD9 and PSMA4, were verified by coimmunoprecipitation. The specific proteasomal activity is significantly reduced in the P2 fraction of the brains of the dysbindin-null mutant (sandy) mice. Our data suggest that dysbindin is functionally interrelated to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and offer a molecular repertoire for future study of dysbindin functional networks in brain. PMID:25198678

  3. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  4. Bitter Taste Stimuli Induce Differential Neural Codes in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.; Boughter, John D.; Lemon, Christian H.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests taste stimuli commonly classified as “bitter” induce heterogeneous neural and perceptual responses. Here, the central processing of bitter stimuli was studied in mice with genetically controlled bitter taste profiles. Using these mice removed genetic heterogeneity as a factor influencing gustatory neural codes for bitter stimuli. Electrophysiological activity (spikes) was recorded from single neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius during oral delivery of taste solutions (26 total), including concentration series of the bitter tastants quinine, denatonium benzoate, cycloheximide, and sucrose octaacetate (SOA), presented to the whole mouth for 5 s. Seventy-nine neurons were sampled; in many cases multiple cells (2 to 5) were recorded from a mouse. Results showed bitter stimuli induced variable gustatory activity. For example, although some neurons responded robustly to quinine and cycloheximide, others displayed concentration-dependent activity (p<0.05) to quinine but not cycloheximide. Differential activity to bitter stimuli was observed across multiple neurons recorded from one animal in several mice. Across all cells, quinine and denatonium induced correlated spatial responses that differed (p<0.05) from those to cycloheximide and SOA. Modeling spatiotemporal neural ensemble activity revealed responses to quinine/denatonium and cycloheximide/SOA diverged during only an early, at least 1 s wide period of the taste response. Our findings highlight how temporal features of sensory processing contribute differences among bitter taste codes and build on data suggesting heterogeneity among “bitter” stimuli, data that challenge a strict monoguesia model for the bitter quality. PMID:22844505

  5. Mapping of the full length and the truncated interleukin-18 receptor alpha in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Alboni, Silvia; Cervia, Davide; Ross, Brendon; Montanari, Claudia; Gonzalez, Alejandro Sanchez; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; De Vries, David; Sugama, Shuei; Brunello, Nicoletta; Blom, Joan; Tascedda, Fabio; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The cytokine IL-18 acts on the CNS both in physiological and pathological conditions. Its action occurs through the heterodimeric receptor IL-18Rα\\β. To better understand IL-18 central effects, we investigated in the mouse brain the distribution of two IL-18Rα transcripts, a full length and an isoform lacking the intracellular domain hypothesized to be a decoy receptor. Both isoforms were expressed in neurons throughout the brain primarily with overlapping distribution but also with some unique pattern. These data suggest that IL-18 may modulate neuronal functions and that its action may be regulated through expression of a decoy receptor. PMID:19640592

  6. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-02-27

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in /sup 3/H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture.

  7. High-speed Label-free Functional Photoacoustic Microscopy of Mouse Brain in Action

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which is capable of three-dimensional high-resolution high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. A single-wavelength pulse-width-based method was implemented to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution and a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in the brain in both resting and stimulated states. PMID:25822799

  8. The relation between motor activity and [3H]uridine uptake in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pakkenberg, H; Fog, R

    2006-12-01

    Using microautoradiography ex vivo we tested the effect of forced running on a roller drum for 3 h on the nuclear incorporation of [5-(3)H uridine] in mouse brain. Specific neuron types with increased nuclear labelling included primary motor cortex layer 5 nerve cells with nuclei greater than 12 microm (+38%) and large neuron nuclei in putamen (+58%). Mice running for 45 min do not show any change in the labelling of nerve cell nuclei compared with mice moving freely in the cage. The [(3)H]uridine uptake in other cell types, e.g. other neurons in cortical layer 5, neurons in sensory cortex and in the other cell layers in motor cortex, were not different from control mice. We conclude that RNA synthesis is normally low in adult mouse brain, but that physical exercise stimulates RNA synthesis in specific populations of large neurons in the motor system.

  9. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  10. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  11. A prior feature SVM-MRF based method for mouse brain segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teresa; Bae, Min Hyeok; Zhang, Min; Pan, Rong; Badea, Alexandra

    2012-02-01

    We introduce an automated method, called prior feature Support Vector Machine-Markov Random Field (pSVMRF), to segment three-dimensional mouse brain Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) images. Our earlier work, extended MRF (eMRF) integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Markov Random Field (MRF) approaches, leading to improved segmentation accuracy; however, the computation of eMRF is very expensive, which may limit its performance on segmentation and robustness. In this study pSVMRF reduces training and testing time for SVM, while boosting segmentation performance. Unlike the eMRF approach, where MR intensity information and location priors are linearly combined, pSVMRF combines this information in a nonlinear fashion, and enhances the discriminative ability of the algorithm. We validate the proposed method using MR imaging of unstained and actively stained mouse brain specimens, and compare segmentation accuracy with two existing methods: eMRF and MRF. C57BL/6 mice are used for training and testing, using cross validation. For formalin fixed C57BL/6 specimens, pSVMRF outperforms both eMRF and MRF. The segmentation accuracy for C57BL/6 brains, stained or not, was similar for larger structures like hippocampus and caudate putamen, (~87%), but increased substantially for smaller regions like susbtantia nigra (from 78.36% to 91.55%), and anterior commissure (from ~50% to ~80%). To test segmentation robustness against increased anatomical variability we add two strains, BXD29 and a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Segmentation accuracy for new strains is 80% for hippocampus, and caudate putamen, indicating that pSVMRF is a promising approach for phenotyping mouse models of human brain disorders.

  12. Protective effect of novel substituted nicotine hydrazide analogues against hypoxic brain injury in neonatal rats via inhibition of caspase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chang-Bo; Li, Juan; Li, Lu-Yi; Sun, Feng-Jie

    2016-07-01

    In hypoxic-ischemic injury of the brain of neonates, the level of caspase-3 was found to be aberrantly activated. Its overexpression leads to the alteration of cytoskeleton protein fodrin and loss of DNA repair enzyme which ultimately results in neurological impairment and disability. Concerning this, the present study was intended to develop novel nicotine hydrazide analogues as caspase inhibitors via efficient synthetic route. These compounds were subsequently tested for inhibitory activity against caspase-3 and -7 where they exhibit highly potent activity against caspase-3 revealing compound 5k as most potent inhibitor (IC50=19.4±2.5μM). In Western blot analysis, 5k considerably inhibits the overexpression of caspase-3. The aryl nicotinate of compound 5k, as indicated by molecular docking was found to engage His121 and critical enzyme thiols, i.e., Cys163 of caspase-3 for its potent activity. Moreover, histopathological examination of brain tissues and hippocampus neurons showed that compound 5k considerably improves the brain injury and exert neuroprotective effects in hypoxic-ischemic (HI). In brain homogenate, 5k significantly improves the activity of MDA, SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and T-AOC to exert its beneficial effect against oxidative stress induced by HI injury. PMID:27216999

  13. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  14. On the Edge of Language Acquisition: Inherent Constraints on Encoding Multisyllabic Sequences in the Neonate Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, Alissa L.; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables--tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences.…

  15. Effect of incubation temperature on infectivity titration of mouse brain-passaged avian infectious bronchitis virus in laboratory host systems.

    PubMed

    Yachida, S; Iritani, Y; Katagiri, K

    1979-09-01

    Mouse brain-passaged infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) could not be assayed for its infectivity at 39.5 degrees C, but could be so at 37 degrees C and 39.5 degrees C. Antigen accumulation was not detected by immunofluorescence in CEK cells infected with mouse brain-passaged IBV at 39.5 degrees C, perhaps due to the difference in the cellular environments.

  16. Protective effect of polydatin on learning and memory impairments in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury by up‑regulating brain‑derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Qu, Yunxia; He, Huiming; Fan, Xiaolei; Qin, Yuanhua; Mao, Weifeng; Xu, Lixin

    2014-12-01

    Polydatin is a key component of Polygonum cuspidatum, a herb with medical and nutritional value. The present study investigated the protective effect of polydatin against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury (HIBI). The unilateral common carotid artery ligation method was used to generate neonatal HIBI rats. Y‑maze testing revealed that rats with HIBI exhibited memory impairment, while rats with HIBI treated with polydatin displayed enhanced long‑term learning and memory. Of note, polydatin was found to upregulate the expression of hippocampal brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rats with HIBI. BDNF has a role in protecting HIBI‑induced brain tissue injury and alleviating memory impairment. These findings showed that polydatin had a protective effect against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with HIBI and that the protective effect may be mediated through the upregulation of BDNF.

  17. Protective effect of polydatin on learning and memory impairments in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury by up‑regulating brain‑derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Qu, Yunxia; He, Huiming; Fan, Xiaolei; Qin, Yuanhua; Mao, Weifeng; Xu, Lixin

    2014-12-01

    Polydatin is a key component of Polygonum cuspidatum, a herb with medical and nutritional value. The present study investigated the protective effect of polydatin against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury (HIBI). The unilateral common carotid artery ligation method was used to generate neonatal HIBI rats. Y‑maze testing revealed that rats with HIBI exhibited memory impairment, while rats with HIBI treated with polydatin displayed enhanced long‑term learning and memory. Of note, polydatin was found to upregulate the expression of hippocampal brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rats with HIBI. BDNF has a role in protecting HIBI‑induced brain tissue injury and alleviating memory impairment. These findings showed that polydatin had a protective effect against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with HIBI and that the protective effect may be mediated through the upregulation of BDNF. PMID:25241777

  18. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  19. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  20. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions. PMID:17169347

  1. Immunochemical detection of arylamine N-acetyltransferase during mouse embryonic development and in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Stanley, L A; Copp, A J; Pope, J; Rolls, S; Smelt, V; Perry, V H; Sim, E

    1998-11-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are important in susceptibility to xenobiotic-induced disorders (e.g., drug-induced autoimmune disease, bladder cancer), but their role in endogenous metabolism is yet to be elucidated. The discovery that human NAT1 acts upon p-aminobenzoylgluatamate (p-ABG) to generate p-acetamidobenzoylglutamate (p-AABG), a major urinary metabolite of folic acid, suggests that human NAT1 may play a role in folic acid metabolism and hence in the normal development of the neural tube. In this study we examined the distribution of NAT in neuronal tissue from adult mice and embryos. Immunohistochemical staining of the adult mouse cerebellum revealed NAT2 (the mouse homologue of human NAT1) expression in the cell bodies and dendrites of Purkinje cells and in the neuroglia of the molecular layer. In embryos, NAT2 was detected in developing neuronal tissue on days 9.5, 11.5, and 13.5. It was expressed intensely in the nerual tube around the time of closure. The level of expression subsequently declined in the neuroepithelium but increased in glial cells. In addition, NAT2 was detected in the developing heart and gut. These findings demonstrate that the embryo itself expresses an enzyme which is involved in the metabolism of folic acid, so that the role played by both mother and embryo must be considered when examining the role of folic acid in embryonic development. These findings imply that polymorphisms in NAT genes could play a role in determining susceptibility to neural tube defects (NTD) and orofacial clefting, developmental disorders which can be prevented by dietary administration of folic acid. PMID:9839355

  2. Maternal vitamin D deficiency alters fetal brain development in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Jazmin E; Tesic, Dijana; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Zosky, Graeme R; Smith, Jeremy T; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to vitamin D is thought to be critical for optimal fetal neurodevelopment, yet vitamin D deficiency is apparent in a growing proportion of pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine whether a mouse model of vitamin D-deficiency alters fetal neurodevelopment. Female BALB/c mice were placed on either a vitamin D control (2,195 IU/kg) or deficient (0 IU/kg) diet for 5 weeks prior to and during pregnancy. Fetal brains were collected at embryonic day (E) 14.5 or E17.5 for morphological and gene expression analysis. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy reduced fetal crown-rump length and head size. Moreover, lateral ventricle volume was reduced in vitamin D-deficient foetuses. Expression of neurotrophin genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) was altered, with Bdnf reduced at E14.5 and increased at E17.5 following vitamin D deficiency. Brain expression of forkhead box protein P2 (Foxp2), a gene known to be important in human speech and language, was also altered. Importantly, Foxp2 immunoreactive cells in the developing cortex were reduced in vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. At E17.5, brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was reduced in females, as was TH protein localization (to identify dopamine neurons) in the substantia nigra of vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. Overall, we show that prenatal vitamin D-deficiency leads to alterations in fetal mouse brain morphology and genes related to neuronal survival, speech and language development, and dopamine synthesis. Vitamin D appears to play an important role in mouse neurodevelopment. PMID:25753408

  3. Prioritizing the development of mouse models for childhood brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Kevin K; Ozkan, Emin D; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in hundreds of genes contribute to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction associated with developmental brain disorders (DBDs). Due to the sheer number of risk factors available for study combined with the cost of developing new animal models, it remains an open question how genes should be prioritized for in-depth neurobiological investigations. Recent reviews have argued that priority should be given to frequently mutated genes commonly found in sporadic DBD patients. Intrigued by this idea, we explored to what extent "high priority" risk factors have been studied in animals in an effort to assess their potential for generating valuable preclinical models capable of advancing the neurobiological understanding of DBDs. We found that in-depth whole animal studies are lacking for many high priority genes, with relatively few neurobiological studies performed in construct valid animal models aimed at understanding the pathological substrates associated with disease phenotypes. However, some high priority risk factors have been extensively studied in animal models and they have generated novel insights into DBD patho-neurobiology while also advancing early pre-clinical therapeutic treatment strategies. We suggest that prioritizing model development toward genes frequently mutated in non-specific DBD populations will accelerate the understanding of DBD patho-neurobiology and drive novel therapeutic strategies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. PMID:26231830

  4. Mapping the mouse brain with rs-fMRI: An optimized pipeline for functional network identification.

    PubMed

    Zerbi, Valerio; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The use of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) in translational research is a powerful tool to assess brain connectivity and investigate neuropathology in mouse models. However, despite encouraging initial results, the characterization of consistent and robust resting state networks in mice remains a methodological challenge. One key reason is that the quality of the measured MR signal is degraded by the presence of structural noise from non-neural sources. Notably, in the current pipeline of the Human Connectome Project, a novel approach has been introduced to clean rs-fMRI data, which involves automatic artifact component classification and data cleaning (FIX). FIX does not require any external recordings of physiology or the segmentation of CSF and white matter. In this study, we evaluated the performance of FIX for analyzing mouse rs-fMRI data. Our results showed that FIX can be easily applied to mouse datasets and detects true signals with 100% accuracy and true noise components with very high accuracy (>98%), thus reducing both within- and between-subject variability of rs-fMRI connectivity measurements. Using this improved pre-processing pipeline, maps of 23 resting state circuits in mice were identified including two networks that displayed default mode network-like topography. Hierarchical clustering grouped these neural networks into meaningful larger functional circuits. These mouse resting state networks, which are publicly available, might serve as a reference for future work using mouse models of neurological disorders.

  5. Lipoprotein lipase expression exclusively in liver. A mouse model for metabolism in the neonatal period and during cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, M; Weinstock, P H; Chajek-Shaul, T; Radner, H; Yin, B; Breslow, J L; Goldberg, I J

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the rate-limiting enzyme in triglyceride hydrolysis, is normally not expressed in the liver of adult humans and animals. However, liver LPL is found in the perinatal period, and in adults it can be induced by cytokines. To study the metabolic consequences of liver LPL expression, transgenic mice producing human LPL specifically in the liver were generated and crossed onto the LPL knockout (LPL0) background. LPL expression exclusively in liver rescued LPL0 mice from neonatal death. The mice developed a severe cachexia during high fat suckling, but caught up in weight after switching to a chow diet. At 18 h of age, compared with LPL0 mice, liver-only LPL-expressing mice had equally elevated triglycerides (10,700 vs. 14,800 mg/dl, P = NS), increased plasma ketones (4.3 vs. 1.7 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and glucose (28 vs. 15 mg/dl, P < 0.05), and excessive amounts of intracellular liver lipid droplets. Adult mice expressing LPL exclusively in liver had slower VLDL turnover than wild-type mice, but greater VLDL mass clearance, increased VLDL triglyceride production, and three- to fourfold more plasma ketones. In summary, it appears that liver LPL shunts circulating triglycerides to the liver, which results in a futile cycle of enhanced VLDL production and increased ketone production, and subsequently spares glucose. This may be important to sustain brain and muscle function at times of metabolic stress with limited glucose availability. PMID:9727057

  6. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  7. Cellular Composition and Organization of the Subventricular Zone and Rostral Migratory Stream in the Adult and Neonatal Common Marmoset Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Hirota, Yuki; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; He, Xiaoping; Hayakawa-Yano, Yoshika; Yamada, Masayuki; Hikishima, Keigo; Tabata, Hidenori; Iwanami, Akio; Nakajima, Kazunori; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Toshio; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle contains neural stem cells. In rodents, these cells generate neuroblasts that migrate as chains toward the olfactory bulb along the rostral migratory stream (RMS). The neural-stem-cell niche at the ventricular wall is conserved in various animal species, including primates. However, it is unclear how the SVZ and RMS organization in nonhuman primates relates to that of rodents and humans. Here we studied the SVZ and RMS of the adult and neonatal common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a New World primate used widely in neuroscience, by electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical detection of cell-type-specific markers. The marmoset SVZ contained cells similar to type B, C, and A cells of the rodent SVZ in their marker expression and morphology. The adult marmoset SVZ had a three-layer organization, as in the human brain, with ependymal, hypocellular, and astro-cyte-ribbon layers. However, the hypocellular layer was very thin or absent in the adult-anterior and neonatal SVZ. Anti-PSA-NCAM staining of the anterior SVZ in whole-mount ventricular wall preparations of adult marmosets revealed an extensive network of elongated cell aggregates similar to the neuroblast chains in rodents. Time-lapse recordings of marmoset SVZ explants cultured in Matrigel showed the neuroblasts migrating in chains, like rodent type A cells. These results suggest that some features of neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the SVZ are common to marmosets, humans, and rodents. This basic description of the adult and neonatal marmoset SVZ will be useful for future studies on adult neurogenesis in primates. PMID:21246550

  8. Estimation of ambient GABA levels in layer I of the mouse neonatal cortex in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Myakhar, Olga; Unichenko, Petr; Kirmse, Knut; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2010-07-01

    GABAergic synapses on Cajal-Retzius neurons in layer I of the murine neocortex experience GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R)-mediated tonic inhibition. Extracellular GABA concentration ([GABA](o)) that determines the strength of GABA(B)R-mediated inhibition is controlled by GABA transporters (GATs). In this study, we hypothesized that the strength of presynaptic GABA(B)R activation reflects [GABA](o) in the vicinity of synaptic contacts. Slices obtained from two age groups were used, namely postnatal days (P)2-3 and P5-7. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Minimal electrical stimulation in layer I was applied to elicit evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) using a paired-pulse protocol. Three parameters were selected for comparison: the mean eIPSC amplitude, paired-pulse ratio, and failure rate. When GAT-1 and GAT-2/3 were blocked by NO-711 (10 microM) and SNAP-5114 (40 microM), respectively, no tonic GABA(B)R-mediated inhibition was observed. In order to restore the control levels of GABA(B)R-mediated inhibition, 250 and 125 nm exogenous GABA was required at P2-3 and P5-7, respectively. Addition of 3-mercaptopropionic acid, a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, did not significantly change the obtained values arguing against the suggestion that a mechanism different from GATs contributes to [GABA](o) control. We conclude that juxtasynaptic [GABA](o) is higher (about 250 nM) at P2-3 than at P5-7 (about 125 nM). As both radial cell migration and corticogenesis in general are strongly dependent on [GABA](o) and the formation of the last layer 2/3 is finished by P4 in rodents, the observed [GABA](o) reduction in layer I might reflect this crucial event in the cortical development. PMID:20421290

  9. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  10. Expression Profile of DNA Damage Signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    Exposure of living systems to radiation results in a wide assortment of lesions, the most signif-icant of is damage to genomic DNA which induce several cellular functions such as cell cycle arrest, repair, apoptosis etc. The radiation induced DNA damage investigation is one of the im-portant area in biology, but still the information available regarding the effects of proton is very limited. In this report, we investigated the differential gene expression pattern of DNA damage signaling genes particularly, damaged DNA binding, repair, cell cycle arrest, checkpoints and apoptosis using quantitative real-time RT-PCR array in proton exposed mouse brain tissues. The expression profiles showed significant changes in DNA damage related genes in 2Gy proton exposed mouse brain tissues as compared with control brain tissues. Furthermore, we also show that significantly increased levels of apoptotic related genes, caspase-3 and 8 activities in these cells, suggesting that in addition to differential expression of DNA damage genes, the alteration of apoptosis related genes may also contribute to the radiation induced DNA damage followed by programmed cell death. In summary, our findings suggest that proton exposed brain tissue undergo severe DNA damage which in turn destabilize the chromatin stability.

  11. Analysis of chaperone mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain by meta analysis of the Allen Brain Atlas.

    PubMed

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T N; Borchelt, David R

    2010-10-28

    The pathology of many neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins in various cell types and regional substructures throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. The accumulation of these aggregated proteins signals dysfunction of cellular protein homeostatic mechanisms such as the ubiquitin/proteasome system, autophagy, and the chaperone network. Although there are several published studies in which transcriptional profiling has been used to examine gene expression in various tissues, including tissues of neurodegenerative disease models, there has not been a report that focuses exclusively on expression of the chaperone network. In the present study, we used the Allen Brain Atlas online database to analyze chaperone expression levels. This database utilizes a quantitative in situ hybridization approach and provides data on 270 chaperone genes within many substructures of the adult mouse brain. We determined that 256 of these chaperone genes are expressed at some level. Surprisingly, relatively few genes, only 30, showed significant variations in levels of mRNA across different substructures of the brain. The greatest degree of variability was exhibited by genes of the DnaJ co-chaperone, Tetratricopeptide repeat, and the HSPH families. Our analysis provides a valuable resource towards determining how variations in chaperone gene expression may modulate the vulnerability of specific neuronal populations of mammalian brain.

  12. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D; Levin, Eli C; Nagele, Robert G; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses-a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin-were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD.

  13. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D; Levin, Eli C; Nagele, Robert G; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses-a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin-were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  14. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C.; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D.; Levin, Eli C.; Nagele, Robert G.; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  15. Prenatal pharmacotherapy rescues brain development in a Down's syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Sandra; Stagni, Fiorenza; Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giacomini, Andrea; De Franceschi, Marianna; Moldrich, Randal; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Mardon, Karine; Giuliani, Alessandro; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual impairment is a strongly disabling feature of Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder of high prevalence (1 in 700-1000 live births) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence shows that widespread neurogenesis impairment is a major determinant of abnormal brain development and, hence, of intellectual disability in Down's syndrome. This defect is worsened by dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations. Most of the pharmacotherapies designed to improve cognitive performance in Down's syndrome have been attempted in Down's syndrome mouse models during adult life stages. Yet, as neurogenesis is mainly a prenatal event, treatments aimed at correcting neurogenesis failure in Down's syndrome should be administered during pregnancy. Correction of neurogenesis during the very first stages of brain formation may, in turn, rescue improper brain wiring. The aim of our study was to establish whether it is possible to rescue the neurodevelopmental alterations that characterize the trisomic brain with a prenatal pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine, a drug that is able to restore post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down's syndrome. Pregnant Ts65Dn females were treated with fluoxetine from embryonic Day 10 until delivery. On post-natal Day 2 the pups received an injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and were sacrificed after either 2 h or after 43 days (at the age of 45 days). Untreated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice exhibited a severe neurogenesis reduction and hypocellularity throughout the forebrain (subventricular zone, subgranular zone, neocortex, striatum, thalamus and hypothalamus), midbrain (mesencephalon) and hindbrain (cerebellum and pons). In embryonically treated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice, precursor proliferation and cellularity were fully restored throughout all brain regions. The recovery of proliferation potency and cellularity was still present in treated Ts65Dn 45-day-old mice. Moreover, embryonic treatment restored

  16. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  17. A genome-scale map of expression for a mouse brain section obtained using voxelation

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Mark H.; Geng, Alex B.; Khan, Arshad H.; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Boline, Jyl; Levy, Shawn; Toga, Arthur W.; Smith, Richard D.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2007-08-20

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological diseases. We have reconstructed 2- dimensional images of gene expression for 20,000 genes in a coronal slice of the mouse brain at the level of the striatum by using microarrays in combination with voxelation at a resolution of 1 mm3. Good reliability of the microarray results were confirmed using multiple replicates, subsequent quantitative RT-PCR voxelation, mass spectrometry voxelation and publicly available in situ hybridization data. Known and novel genes were identified with expression patterns localized to defined substructures within the brain. In addition, genes with unexpected patterns were identified and cluster analysis identified a set of genes with a gradient of dorsal/ventral expression not restricted to known anatomical boundaries. The genome-scale maps of gene expression obtained using voxelation will be a valuable tool for the neuroscience community.

  18. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to abnormal brain activity (increased interictal discharges) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. PMID:25069089

  19. Understanding dynamics of the system using Hilbert phases: An application to study neonatal and fetal brain signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, R. B.; Vairavan, S.; Wilson, J. D.; Preissl, H.; Vrba, J.; Lowery, C. L.; Eswaran, H.

    2009-10-01

    The Hilbert phase ϕ(t) of a signal x(t) exhibits slips when the magnitude of their successive phase difference |ϕ(ti+1)-ϕ(ti)| exceeds π . By applying this approach to periodic, uncorrelated, and long-range correlated data, we show that the standard deviation of the time difference between the successive phase slips Δτ normalized by the percentage of slips in the data is characteristic of the correlation in the data. We consider a 50×50 square lattice and model each lattice point by a second-order autoregressive (AR2) process. Further, we model a subregion of the lattice using a different set of AR2 parameters compared to the rest. By applying the proposed approach to the lattice model, we show that the two distinct parameter regions introduced in the lattice are clearly distinguishable. Finally, we demonstrate the application of this approach to spatiotemporal neonatal and fetal magnetoencephalography signals recorded using 151 superconducting quantum interference device sensors to identify the sensors containing the neonatal and fetal brain signals and discuss the improved performance of this approach over the traditionally used spectral approach.

  20. Diffuse periventricular calcification and brain atrophy: A case of neonatal central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas R; Datlow, Mitchell D; Nidecker, Anna E

    2016-10-01

    TORCH refers to the most common congenitally acquired infections: toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus. Neonatal cytomegalovirus infection remains a common cause of congenital infection worldwide with effects ranging from hearing impairment to significant neurological morbidity. We report a case of a term neonate with ventriculomegaly on prenatal ultrasound who presented with low birth weight, small head circumference, hepatosplenomegaly, and purpuric rash on physical exam. Central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection typically shows periventricular calcifications and associated deep white matter damage and ventriculomegaly. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have different roles in the diagnosis of congenital central nervous system cytomegalovirus infection. Many imaging features of congenital cytomegalovirus are distinctive, and can spur a diagnostic work-up as well as help provide a prognosis. PMID:27531861

  1. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  2. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  3. Fine-grained mapping of mouse brain functional connectivity with resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mechling, Anna E; Hübner, Neele S; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Harsan, Laura-Adela

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the intrinsic circuit-level functional organization of the brain has benefited tremendously from the advent of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI). In humans, resting-state functional network has been consistently mapped and its alterations have been shown to correlate with symptomatology of various neurological or psychiatric disorders. To date, deciphering the mouse brain functional connectivity (MBFC) with rsfMRI remains a largely underexplored research area, despite the plethora of human brain disorders that can be modeled in this specie. To pave the way from pre-clinical to clinical investigations we characterized here the intrinsic architecture of mouse brain functional circuitry, based on rsfMRI data acquired at 7T using the Cryoprobe technology. High-dimensional spatial group independent component analysis demonstrated fine-grained segregation of cortical and subcortical networks into functional clusters, overlapping with high specificity onto anatomical structures, down to single gray matter nuclei. These clusters, showing a high level of stability and reliability in their patterning, formed the input elements for computing the MBFC network using partial correlation and graph theory. Its topological architecture conserved the fundamental characteristics described for the human and rat brain, such as small-worldness and partitioning into functional modules. Our results additionally showed inter-modular interactions via "network hubs". Each major functional system (motor, somatosensory, limbic, visual, autonomic) was found to have representative hubs that might play an important input/output role and form a functional core for information integration. Moreover, the rostro-dorsal hippocampus formed the highest number of relevant connections with other brain areas, highlighting its importance as core structure for MBFC.

  4. Comparing 3D Gyrification Index and area-independent curvature-based measures in quantifying neonatal brain folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Mukherjee, P.; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2007-03-01

    In this work we compare 3D Gyrification Index and our recently proposed area-independent curvature-based surface measures [26] for the in-vivo quantification of brain surface folding in clinically acquired neonatal MR image data. A meaningful comparison of gyrification across brains of different sizes and their subregions will only be possible through the quantification of folding with measures that are independent of the area of the region of analysis. This work uses a 3D implementation of the classical Gyrification Index, a 2D measure that quantifies folding based on the ratio of the inner and outer contours of the brain and which has been used to study gyral patterns in adults with schizophrenia, among other conditions. The new surface curvature-based measures and the 3D Gyrification Index were calculated on twelve premature infants (age 28-37 weeks) from which surfaces of cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter (CSF/GM) interface and gray matter/white matter (GM/WM) interface were extracted. Experimental results show that our measures better quantify folding on the CSF/GM interface than Gyrification Index, and perform similarly on the GM/WM interface.

  5. Neuroinformatics for genome-wide 3D gene expression mapping in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Pathak, Sayan D; Kuan, Chihchau; Lau, Chris; Dong, Hongwei; Sodt, Andrew; Dang, Chinh; Avants, Brian; Yushkevich, Paul; Gee, James C; Haynor, David; Lein, Ed; Jones, Allan; Hawrylycz, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit genome-wide searches to discover genes that are uniquely expressed in brain circuits and regions that control behavior. Previous gene expression mapping studies in model organisms have employed situ hybridization (ISH), a technique that uses labeled nucleic acid probes to bind to specific mRNA transcripts in tissue sections. A key requirement for this effort is the development of fast and robust algorithms for anatomically mapping and quantifying gene expression for ISH. We describe a neuroinformatics pipeline for automatically mapping expression profiles of ISH data and its use to produce the first genomic scale 3-D mapping of gene expression in a mammalian brain. The pipeline is fully automated and adaptable to other organisms and tissues. Our automated study of over 20,000 genes indicates that at least 78.8 percent are expressed at some level in the adult C56BL/6J mouse brain. In addition to providing a platform for genomic scale search, high-resolution images and visualization tools for expression analysis are available at the Allen Brain Atlas web site (http://www.brain-map.org).

  6. Morphological maturation of the mouse brain: An in vivo MRI and histology investigation.

    PubMed

    Hammelrath, Luam; Škokić, Siniša; Khmelinskii, Artem; Hess, Andreas; van der Knaap, Noortje; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-01-15

    With the wide access to studies of selected gene expressions in transgenic animals, mice have become the dominant species as cerebral disease models. Many of these studies are performed on animals of not more than eight weeks, declared as adult animals. Based on the earlier reports that full brain maturation requires at least three months in rats, there is a clear need to discern the corresponding minimal animal age to provide an "adult brain" in mice in order to avoid modulation of disease progression/therapy studies by ongoing developmental changes. For this purpose, we have studied anatomical brain alterations of mice during their first six months of age. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, structural and volume changes of the brain were identified and compared with histological analysis of myelination. Mouse brain volume was found to be almost stable already at three weeks, but cortex thickness kept decreasing continuously with maximal changes during the first three months. Myelination is still increasing between three and six months, although most dramatic changes are over by three months. While our results emphasize that mice should be at least three months old when adult animals are needed for brain studies, preferred choice of one particular metric for future investigation goals will result in somewhat varying age windows of stabilization.

  7. Morphological maturation of the mouse brain: An in vivo MRI and histology investigation.

    PubMed

    Hammelrath, Luam; Škokić, Siniša; Khmelinskii, Artem; Hess, Andreas; van der Knaap, Noortje; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-01-15

    With the wide access to studies of selected gene expressions in transgenic animals, mice have become the dominant species as cerebral disease models. Many of these studies are performed on animals of not more than eight weeks, declared as adult animals. Based on the earlier reports that full brain maturation requires at least three months in rats, there is a clear need to discern the corresponding minimal animal age to provide an "adult brain" in mice in order to avoid modulation of disease progression/therapy studies by ongoing developmental changes. For this purpose, we have studied anatomical brain alterations of mice during their first six months of age. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, structural and volume changes of the brain were identified and compared with histological analysis of myelination. Mouse brain volume was found to be almost stable already at three weeks, but cortex thickness kept decreasing continuously with maximal changes during the first three months. Myelination is still increasing between three and six months, although most dramatic changes are over by three months. While our results emphasize that mice should be at least three months old when adult animals are needed for brain studies, preferred choice of one particular metric for future investigation goals will result in somewhat varying age windows of stabilization. PMID:26458518

  8. High Fat Diet Induced Developmental Defects in the Mouse: Oocyte Meiotic Aneuploidy and Fetal Growth Retardation/Brain Defects

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Scott H.; Chi, Maggie; Jimenez, Patricia T.; Grindler, Natalia; Schedl, Tim; Moley, Kelle H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal obesity is associated with poor outcomes across the reproductive spectrum including infertility, increased time to pregnancy, early pregnancy loss, fetal loss, congenital abnormalities and neonatal conditions. Furthermore, the proportion of reproductive-aged woman that are obese in the population is increasing sharply. From current studies it is not clear if the origin of the reproductive complications is attributable to problems that arise in the oocyte or the uterine environment. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the developmental basis of the reproductive phenotypes in obese animals by employing a high fat diet mouse model of obesity. We analyzed very early embryonic and fetal phenotypes, which can be parsed into three abnormal developmental processes that occur in obese mothers. The first is oocyte meiotic aneuploidy that then leads to early embryonic loss. The second is an abnormal process distinct from meiotic aneuploidy that also leads to early embryonic loss. The third is fetal growth retardation and brain developmental abnormalities, which based on embryo transfer experiments are not due to the obese uterine environment but instead must be from a defect that arises prior to the blastocyst stage. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that reproductive complications in obese females are, at least in part, from oocyte maternal effects. This conclusion is consistent with IVF studies where the increased pregnancy failure rate in obese women returns to the normal rate if donor oocytes are used instead of autologous oocytes. We postulate that preconceptional weight gain adversely affects pregnancy outcomes and fetal development. In light of our findings, preconceptional counseling may be indicated as the preferable, earlier target for intervention in obese women desiring pregnancy and healthy outcomes. PMID:23152876

  9. Proteomic analysis of the mouse brain after repetitive exposure to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Can; Zhou, Tao; Li, Jingyi; Wang, Hong; Li, Xiaorong; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Pingxiang; Xue, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) is known to have a protective effect against hypoxic damage; however, the precise mechanisms involved remain unknown. In this study, an acute and repetitive hypoxia mouse model, two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS), and Western blot experiments were used to identify the differential expression of key proteins in the mouse brain during HPC. Approximately 2100 2D-DIGE spots were observed following gel imaging and spot detection. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the expression of 66 proteins were observed between the 3× HPC treatment group and the control group, 45 proteins were observed between the 6× HPC treatment group and the control group, and 70 proteins were observed between the 3× HPC treatment group and the 6× HPC group. Consistent results among Western blot, 2D-DIGE and MS methods were observed for the proteins, ATP synthase subunit alpha, malate dehydrogenase, guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-1 and proteasome subunit alpha type-2. The proteins associated with ATP synthesis and the citric acid cycle were down-regulated, while those linked to glycolysis and oxygen-binding were up-regulated. This proteomic analysis of the mouse brain after HPC furthers understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the protective effect of HPC and these findings provide new insight into the mechanisms of hypoxia and HPC. PMID:25937538

  10. Protective effect of enterovirus‑71 (EV71) virus‑like particle vaccine against lethal EV71 infection in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Mao, Fengfeng; Pang, Zheng; Yi, Yao; Qiu, Feng; Tian, Ruiguang; Meng, Qingling; Jia, Zhiyuan; Bi, Shengli

    2015-08-01

    Enterovirus-71 (EV71) is a viral pathogen that causes severe cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among young children, with significant mortality. Effective vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Several EV71 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were found to be protective in the neonatal mouse EV71 challenge model. However, to what extent the VLP vaccine protects susceptible organs against EV71 infection in vivo has remained elusive. In the present study, the comprehensive immunogenicity of a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on VLPs was evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Despite lower levels of neutralizing antibodies to EV71 in the sera of VLP-immunized mice compared with those in mice vaccinated with inactivated EV71, the VLP-based vaccine was shown to be able to induce immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA memory-associated cellular immune responses to EV71. Of note, the EV71 VLP vaccine candidate was capable of inhibiting viral proliferation in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, lung and intestine of immunized mice and provided effective protection against the pathological damage caused by viral attack. In particular, the VLP vaccine was able to inhibit the transportation of EV71 from the central nervous system to the muscle tissue and greatly protected muscle tissue from infection, along with recovery from the viral infection. This led to nearly 100% immunoprotective efficacy, enabling neonatal mice delivered by VLP-immunized female adult mice to survive and grow with good health. The present study provided valuable additional knowledge of the specific protective efficacy of the EV71 VLP vaccine in vivo, which also indicated that it is a promising potential candidate for being developed into an EV71 vaccine.

  11. The exposure to nicotine affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang

    2015-02-01

    In the current study effect of nicotine on expression of neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) has been studied in hippocampus and frontal cortex during development of brain in rats. Neurotrophins are factors that help in development of brain among which BDNF and NGF are very important, expressed at different stages during the developmental process. Different sedatives are reported to alter the expression of these factors. In this study, three groups of neonate rats (1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 days age) were used each having 20 rats. Ten were subjected to a dose of 66 μg of nicotine while other ten received the same amount of saline at the same time interval. Then expression of the BDNF and NGF was observed in hippocampus and frontal cortex tissue using immunoassay. Western blotting was used to observe the presence of BDNF in hippocampus as well as frontal cortex. In all groups there was a significant decrease in concentration of neurotrophic factors where nicotine was applied as compared to control. The highest expression of BDNF and NGF in hippocampus and frontal cortex was observed in 10-15 days group (G3) and in 5-10 group (G2) as compared to the control, P < 0.01. It was concluded that exposure of neonate rats to nicotine causes a decrease in the expression of NGF and BDNF and it effects the development of brain in neonates that can further impair brain functions.

  12. Developmental changes in choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activity in various regions of the brain of the male, female, and neonatally androgenized female rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, R; Brooksbank, B W

    1979-04-01

    In attempt to discern effects of sex hormones on the development of neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) have been measured at postnatal days 8, 12, 25, and 60 in five regions (amygdala, anterior hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, and cerebral cortex) of the brains of normal male, normal female, and neonatally androgen-treated female rats. Essentially no association between sex or of neonatal "androgenization" on either enzymol were found. The data, however, provide new information on the relative rates of development of ChAT and GAD in five regions of the rat brain which supplement the limited information already available in the literature. ChAT activity was highest in amygdala and hypothalamus, but developed most rapidly in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The relative activities and patterns of development of GAD activity were similar to those of ChAT.

  13. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  14. Comparison of extraction methods for peptidomics analysis of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, Annemie; Hayakawa, Eisuke; Landuyt, Bart; Baggerman, Geert; Van Dam, Debby; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2011-04-30

    The peptidome encompasses all the peptides present in a particular cell, tissue or organism at a particular point in time. Neuropeptidomics studies the peptidome of the nervous system and will become increasingly important in neuroscience research. Novel peptides can be discovered and, when applied to disease models, key players in pathophysiological mechanisms will be identified. That way, they can serve as drug targets or biomarkers. Presently, different extraction protocols are in use, but no consensus has been reached on what fixation and extraction protocol is best suited for brain tissue. Therefore, in this article we compare different methods for quenching of proteolytic activity (snap-freezing of whole mouse in liquid nitrogen immediately after cervical dislocation, freezing of the dissected brain in 2-methyl-butane and heat denaturation of the tissue by microwave treatment) in combination with different extraction methods. The protocol that combines submersion in liquid nitrogen with extraction in 0.25% acetic acid results in the highest number of unique identifications, a high conservation of posttranslational modifications, the best reproducibility between duplicate samples and the best comparison with former studies on mouse brain peptides. For these reasons, we recommend the use of this protocol in future neuropeptidomics studies. PMID:21376080

  15. Brain immune cell composition and functional outcome after cerebral ischemia: comparison of two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Whittle, Stephanie C.; Lee, Seyoung; Chu, Hannah X.; Zhang, Shenpeng R.; Wei, Zihui; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Vinh, Anthony; Drummond, Grant R.; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to secondary brain injury following cerebral ischemia. The C57Bl/6 mouse strain is known to exhibit a T helper 1-prone, pro-inflammatory type response to injury, whereas the FVB strain is relatively T helper 2-prone, or anti-inflammatory, in its immune response. We tested whether stroke outcome is more severe in C57Bl/6 than FVB mice. Male mice of each strain underwent sham surgery or 1 h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Despite no difference in infarct size, C57Bl/6 mice displayed markedly greater functional deficits than FVB mice after stroke, as assessed by neurological scoring and hanging wire test. Total numbers of CD45+ leukocytes tended to be larger in the brains of C57Bl/6 than FVB mice after stroke, but there were marked differences in leukocyte composition between the two mouse strains. The inflammatory response in C57Bl/6 mice primarily involved T and B lymphocytes, whereas neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages were more prominent in FVB mice. Our data are consistent with the concept that functional outcome after stroke is dependent on the immune cell composition which develops following ischemic brain injury. PMID:25477780

  16. Cell-type-specific neuroanatomy of cliques of autism-related genes in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Grange, Pascal; Menashe, Idan; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two cliques of genes identified computationally for their high co-expression in the mouse brain according to the Allen Brain Atlas, and for their enrichment in genes related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have recently been shown to be highly co-expressed in the cerebellar cortex, compared to what could be expected by chance. Moreover, the expression of these cliques of genes is not homogeneous across the cerebellar cortex, and it has been noted that their expression pattern seems to highlight the granular layer. However, this observation was only made by eye, and recent advances in computational neuroanatomy allow to rank cell types in the mouse brain (characterized by their transcriptome profiles) according to the similarity between their spatial density profiles and the spatial expression profiles of the cliques. We establish by Monte Carlo simulation that with probability at least 99%, the expression profiles of the two cliques are more similar to the density profile of granule cells than 99% of the expression of cliques containing the same number of genes (Purkinje cells also score above 99% in one of the cliques). Thresholding the expression profiles shows that the signal is more intense in the granular layer. Finally, we work out pairs of cell types whose combined expression profiles are more similar to the expression profiles of the cliques than any single cell type. These pairs predominantly consist of one cortical pyramidal cell and one cerebellar cell (which can be either a granule cell or a Purkinje cell). PMID:26074809

  17. FMR1 transcript isoforms: association with polyribosomes; regional and developmental expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Brackett, David M; Qing, Feng; Amieux, Paul S; Sellers, Drew L; Horner, Philip J; Morris, David R

    2013-01-01

    The primary transcript of the mammalian Fragile X Mental Retardation-1 gene (Fmr1), like many transcripts in the central nervous system, is alternatively spliced to yield mRNAs encoding multiple proteins, which can possess quite different biochemical properties. Despite the fact that the relative levels of the 12 Fmr1 transcript isoforms examined here vary by as much as two orders of magnitude amongst themselves in both adult and embryonic mouse brain, all are associated with polyribosomes, consistent with translation into the corresponding isoforms of the protein product, FMRP (Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein). Employing the RiboTag methodology developed in our laboratory, the relative proportions of the 7 most abundant transcript isoforms were measured specifically in neurons and found to be similar to those identified in whole brain. Measurements of isoform profiles across 11 regions of adult brain yielded similar distributions, with the exceptions of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb. These two regions differ from most of the brain in relative amounts of transcripts encoding an alternate form of one of the KH RNA binding domains. A possible relationship between patterns of expression in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb and the presence of neuroblasts in these two regions is suggested by the isoform patterns in early embryonic brain and in cultured neural progenitor cells. These results demonstrate that the relative levels of the Fmr1 isoforms are modulated according to developmental stage, highlighting the complex ramifications of losing all the protein isoforms in individuals with Fragile X Syndrome. It should also be noted that, of the eight most prominent FMRP isoforms (1-3, 6-9 and 12) in mouse, only two have the major site of phosphorylation at Ser-499, which is thought to be involved in some of the regulatory interactions of this protein.

  18. Characterizing social behavior in genetically targeted mouse models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Emma L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the leading inherited cause of mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders worldwide, is caused by a tandem repeat expansion in the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene. It presents with a distinct behavioral phenotype which overlaps significantly with that of autism. Emerging evidence suggests that tandem repeat polymorphisms (TRPs) might also play a key role in modulating disease susceptibility for a range of common polygenic disorders, including the broader autism spectrum of disorders (ASD) and other forms of psychiatric illness such as schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder [1]. In order to understand how TRPs and associated gene mutations mediate pathogenesis, various mouse models have been generated. A crucial step in such functional genomics is high-quality behavioral and cognitive phenotyping. This chapter presents a basic behavioral battery for standardized tests for assaying social phenotypes in mouse models of brain disorders, with a