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Sample records for neonatal mouse brain

  1. Systemic Stimulation of TLR2 Impairs Neonatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongfu; D'angelo, Barbara; Sun, Yanyan; Zhu, Changlian; Hagberg, Henrik; Levy, Ofer; Mallard, Carina; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation is associated with perinatal brain injury but the underlying mechanisms are not completely characterized. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) through specific agonists induces inflammatory responses that trigger both innate and adaptive immune responses. The impact of engagement of TLR2 signaling pathways on the neonatal brain is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of a TLR2 agonist on neonatal brain development. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) once a day from postnatal day (PND) 3 to PND11 with endotoxin-free saline, a TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 (5 mg/kg) or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.3 mg/kg). Pups were sacrificed at PND12 or PND53 and brain, spleen and liver were collected and weighed. Brain sections were stained for brain injury markers. Long-term effects on memory function were assessed using the Trace Fear Conditioning test at PND50. After 9 days of Pam3CSK4 administration, we found a decreased volume of cerebral gray matter, white matter in the forebrain and cerebellar molecular layer that was accompanied by an increase in spleen and liver weight at PND12. Such effects were not observed in Pam3CSK4-treated TLR 2-deficient mice. Pam3CSK4-treated mice also displayed decreased hippocampus neuronal density, and increased cerebral microglia density, while there was no effect on caspase-3 or general cell proliferation at PND12. Significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-6, KC, and MCP-1 were detected after the first Pam3CSK4 injection in brain homogenates of PND3 mice. Pam3CSK4 administration did not affect long-term memory function nor the volume of gray or white matter. Conclusions/Significance Repeated systemic exposure to the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 can have a short-term negative impact on the neonatal mouse brain. PMID:21573120

  2. Recent Progress in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Embryonic and Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic control mechanisms of mammalian brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool to characterize changes in brain anatomy in mutant mouse strains and injury progression in mouse models of fetal and neonatal brain injury. Progress in the last decade has enabled us to acquire MRI data with increasing anatomical details from the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain. High-resolution ex vivo MRI, especially with advanced diffusion MRI methods, can visualize complex microstructural organizations in the developing mouse brain. In vivo MRI of the embryonic mouse brain, which is critical for tracking anatomical changes longitudinally, has become available. Applications of these techniques may lead to further insights into the complex and dynamic processes of brain development. PMID:26973471

  3. High dose magnesium sulfate exposure induces apoptotic cell death in the developing neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dribben, William H; Creeley, Catherine E; Wang, Hai Hui; Smith, Derek J; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is often used as a treatment for pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and preterm labor, resulting in the exposure of a significant number of neonates to this drug despite a lack of evidence suggesting that it is safe, or effective as a tocolytic. While there is evidence that MgSO4 may be neuroprotective in perinatal brain injury, recent reviews have suggested that the effects are dependent upon dose, and that higher doses may actually increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is a lack of evidence investigating the neurotoxic effects of neonatal magnesium (Mg) exposure on the developing brain, specifically in terms of neurodevelopmental apoptosis, a cell-killing phenomenon known to be potentiated by other drugs with mechanisms of action at Mg-binding sites (i.e. NMDA receptor antagonists such as MK-801, ketamine, and PCP). To investigate the effects of Mg exposure on the neonatal mouse brain at different postnatal ages to determine whether MgSO4 treatment causes significant cell death in the developing mouse brain. C57Bl/6 mice were treated with four doses of MgSO4 (250 mg/kg) on postnatal days 3 (P3), 7 (P7) or 14 (P14). Caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, cupric silver staining, and electron microscopy techniques were used to examine Mg-treated brains for neurotoxic effects. Qualitative evaluation using cupric silver staining revealed widespread damage throughout the brain in P7 animals. Results of electron microscopy confirmed that the cell death process was apoptotic in nature. Quantitative evaluation of damage to the cortex, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum showed that Mg treatment caused significant brain damage in animals treated on P3 and P7, but not P14. Administration of high doses of Mg may be detrimental to the fetal brain, particularly if exposure occurs during critical periods of neurodevelopment. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Intracerebroventricular Viral Injection of the Neonatal Mouse Brain for Persistent and Widespread Neuronal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Levites, Yona; Golde, Todd E.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2014-01-01

    With the pace of scientific advancement accelerating rapidly, new methods are needed for experimental neuroscience to quickly and easily manipulate gene expression in the mouse brain. Here we describe a technique first introduced by Passini and Wolfe for direct intracranial delivery of virally-encoded transgenes into the neonatal mouse brain. In its most basic form, the procedure requires only an ice bucket and a microliter syringe. However, the protocol can also be adapted for use with stereotaxic frames to improve consistency for researchers new to the technique. The method relies on the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to move freely from the cerebral ventricles into the brain parenchyma while the ependymal lining is still immature during the first 12-24 hr after birth. Intraventricular injection of AAV at this age results in widespread transduction of neurons throughout the brain. Expression begins within days of injection and persists for the lifetime of the animal. Viral titer can be adjusted to control the density of transduced neurons, while co-expression of a fluorescent protein provides a vital label of transduced cells. With the rising availability of viral core facilities to provide both off-the-shelf, pre-packaged reagents and custom viral preparation, this approach offers a timely method for manipulating gene expression in the mouse brain that is fast, easy, and far less expensive than traditional germline engineering. PMID:25286085

  5. A microinjection technique for targeting regions of embryonic and neonatal mouse brain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Steve; Truong, Hai; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Giesler, Glenn J

    2009-01-01

    A simple pressure injection technique was developed to deliver substances into specific regions of the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain in vivo. The retrograde tracers Fluorogold and cholera toxin B subunit were used to test the validity of the technique. Injected animals survived the duration of transport (24–48 hrs) and then were sacrificed and perfused with fixative. Small injections (≤ 50 nL) were contained within targeted structures of the perinatal brain and labeled distant cells of origin in several model neural pathways. Traced neural pathways in the perinatal mouse were further examined with immunohistochemical methods to test the feasibility of double labeling experiments during development. Several experimental situations in which this technique would be useful are discussed, for example, to label projection neurons in slice or culture preparations of mouse embryos and neonates. The administration of pharmacological or genetic vectors directly into specific neural targets during development should also be feasible. An examination of the form of neural pathways during early stages of life may lead to insights regarding the functional changes that occur during critical periods of development and provide an anatomic basis for some neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:19840780

  6. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  7. Single Dose Caffeine Protects the Neonatal Mouse Brain against Hypoxia Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Winerdal, Max; Urmaliya, Vijay; Winerdal, Malin E.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2017-01-01

    In this randomized blinded study, we investigated caffeine 5 mg/kg treatment given directly after neonatal brain hypoxia ischemia. Brain morphology, behavior and key brain infiltrating immune populations were examined. Caffeine treatment significantly improves outcome when compared to phosphate buffered saline. Flow cytometric analysis of immune responses revealed no persistent immunological alterations. Given its safety caffeine emerges as a candidate for neuroprotective intervention after neonatal brain injury. PMID:28129361

  8. The CD38-independent ADP-ribosyl cyclase from mouse brain synaptosomes: a comparative study of neonate and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Ceni, Claire; Pochon, Nathalie; Villaz, Michel; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis; Baratier, Julie; De Waard, Michel; Ronjat, Michel; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2006-04-15

    cADPR (cADP-ribose), a metabolite of NAD+, is known to modulate intracellular calcium levels and to be involved in calcium-dependent processes, including synaptic transmission, plasticity and neuronal excitability. However, the enzyme that is responsible for producing cADPR in the cytoplasm of neural cells, and particularly at the synaptic terminals of neurons, remains unknown. In the present study, we show that endogenous concentrations of cADPR are much higher in embryonic and neonate mouse brain compared with the adult tissue. We also demonstrate, by comparing wild-type and Cd38-/- tissues, that brain cADPR content is independent of the presence of CD38 (the best characterized mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase) not only in adult but also in developing tissues. We show that Cd38-/- synaptosome preparations contain high ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities, which are more important in neonates than in adults, in line with the levels of endogenous cyclic nucleotide. By using an HPLC method and adapting the cycling assay developed initially to study endogenous cADPR, we accurately examined the properties of the synaptosomal ADP-ribosyl cyclase. This intracellular enzyme has an estimated K(m) for NAD+ of 21 microM, a broad optimal pH at 6.0-7.0, and the concentration of free calcium has no major effect on its cADPR production. It binds NGD+ (nicotinamide-guanine dinucleotide), which inhibits its NAD+-metabolizing activities (K(i)=24 microM), despite its incapacity to cyclize this analogue. Interestingly, it is fully inhibited by low (micromolar) concentrations of zinc. We propose that this novel mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase regulates the production of cADPR and therefore calcium levels within brain synaptic terminals. In addition, this enzyme might be a potential target of neurotoxic Zn2+.

  9. The Fetal Brain Transcriptome and Neonatal Behavioral Phenotype in the Ts1Cje Mouse Model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Ferres, Millie A.; Graham, Leah C.; Wick, Heather C.; Miczek, Klaus A.; Slonim, Donna K.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2016-01-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3–21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and post-natal neurocognition. PMID:25975229

  10. The fetal brain transcriptome and neonatal behavioral phenotype in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Ferres, Millie A; Graham, Leah C; Wick, Heather C; Miczek, Klaus A; Slonim, Donna K; Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-09-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3-21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and postnatal neurocognition.

  11. Humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brain generated by neonatally engrafted human iPSC-derived primitive neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The creation of a humanized chimeric mouse nervous system permits the study of human neural development and disease pathogenesis using human cells in vivo. Humanized glial chimeric mice with the brain and spinal cord being colonized by human glial cells have been successfully generated. However, generation of humanized chimeric mouse brains repopulated by human neurons to possess a high degree of chimerism have not been well studied. Here we created humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brains by neonatally engrafting the distinct and highly neurogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived rosette-type primitive neural progenitors. These neural progenitors predominantly differentiate to neurons, which disperse widely throughout the mouse brain with infiltration of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 6 and 13 months after transplantation. Building upon the hiPSC technology, we propose that this potentially unique humanized neuronal chimeric mouse model will provide profound opportunities to define the structure, function, and plasticity of neural networks containing human neurons derived from a broad variety of neurological disorders. PMID:27882348

  12. Microarray analysis of high-dose recombinant erythropoietin treatment of unilateral brain injury in neonatal mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Beyer, Richard P; Bammler, Theo K; McPherson, Ronald J; Wilkerson, Jasmine; Farin, Federico M

    2009-05-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rEpo) is neuroprotective in neonatal models of brain injury. Proposed mechanisms of neuroprotection include activation of gene pathways that decrease oxidative injury, inflammation, and apoptosis, while increasing vasculogenesis and neurogenesis. To determine the effects of rEpo on gene expression in 10-d-old BALB-c mice with unilateral brain injury, we compared microarrays from the hippocampi of brain-injured pups treated with saline or rEpo to similarly treated sham animals. Total RNA was extracted 24 h after brain injury and analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. We identified sex-specific differences in hippocampal gene expression after brain injury and after high-dose rEpo treatment using single-gene and gene set analysis. Although high-dose rEpo had minimal effects on hippocampal gene expression in shams, at 24-h post brain injury, high-dose rEpo treatment significantly decreased the proinflammatory and antiapoptotic response noted in saline-treated brain-injured comparison animals.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Cortex Postsynaptic Density following Neonatal Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guo; Wang, Yongqiang; Guan, Shenheng; Burlingame, Alma L; Lu, Fuxin; Knox, Renatta; Ferriero, Donna M; Jiang, Xiangning

    2017-03-18

    Proteomics of the synapses and postsynaptic densities (PSDs) have provided a deep understanding of protein composition and signal networks in the adult brain, which underlie neuronal plasticity and neurodegenerative or psychiatric disorders. However, there is a paucity of knowledge about the architecture and organization of PSDs in the immature brain, and how it is modified by brain injury in an early developing stage. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was performed on PSDs prepared from cortices of postnatal day 9 naïve mice or pups which had suffered hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. 512 proteins of different functional groups were identified from PSDs collected 1 h after HI injury, among which 60 have not been reported previously. Seven newly identified proteins involved in neural development were highlighted. HI injury increased the yield of PSDs at early time points upon reperfusion, and multiple proteins were recruited into PSDs following the insult. Quantitative analysis was performed using spectral counting, and proteins whose relative expression was more than 50% up- or downregulated compared to the sham animals 1 h after HI insult were reported. Validation with Western blotting demonstrated changes in expression and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of a series of postsynaptic protein kinases and dysregulation of scaffold and adaptor proteins in response to neonatal HI insult. This work, along with other recent studies of synaptic protein profiling in the immature brain, builds a foundation for future investigation on the molecular mechanisms underlying developing plasticity. Furthermore, it provides insights into the biochemical changes of PSDs following early brain hypoxia-ischemia, which is helpful for understanding not only the injury mechanisms, but also the process of repair or replenishment of neuronal circuits during recovery from brain damage.

  14. Involvement of ceramide in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hegde, Medha; Ohsie, Jason; Paik, Sun-Mee; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mitsuo

    2010-10-01

    Acute administration of ethanol to 7-day-old mice is known to cause robust apoptotic neurodegeneration in the brain. Our previous studies have shown that such ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is accompanied by increases in lipids, including ceramide, triglyceride (TG), cholesterol ester (ChE), and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) in the brain. In this study, the effects of ethanol on lipid profiles as well as caspase 3 activation were examined in the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and inferior colliculus of the postnatal day 7 mouse brain. We found that the cortex, hippocampus, and inferior colliculus, which showed substantial caspase 3 activation by ethanol, manifested significant elevations in ceramide, TG, and NAPE. In contrast, the cerebellum, with the least caspase 3 activation, failed to show significant changes in ceramide and TG, and exhibits much smaller increases in NAPE than other brain regions. Ethanol-induced increases in ChE were observed in all brain regions tested. Inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase effectively blocked ethanol-induced caspase 3 activation as well as elevations in ceramide, ChE, and NAPE. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the expression of serine palmitoyltransferase was mainly localized in neurons and was enhanced in activated caspase 3-positive neurons generated by ethanol. These results indicate that de novo ceramide synthesis has a vital role in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain.

  15. Transcriptomic analyses of neurotoxic effects in mouse brain after intermittent neonatal administration of thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Qu, Fengqin; Xie, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengli; Liu, Hongmei; Song, Shuhui; Chen, Tingting; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Yun; Guo, Caixia; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Thimerosal is a vaccine antimicrobial preservative which has long been suspected an iatrogenic factor possibly contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. The association between infant vaccine thimerosal exposure and autism remains an open question. Although thimerosal has been removed from mandatory childhood vaccines in the United States, thimerosal-preserved vaccines are still widely used outside of the United States especially in developing countries. Notably, thimerosal-containing vaccines are being given to the newborns within the first 12-24 h after birth in some countries. To examine the possible neurotoxic effects of early neonatal exposure to a higher level of thimerosal, FVB mice were subcutaneously injected with thimerosal-mercury at a dose which is 20× higher than that used for regular Chinese infant immunization during the first 4 months of life. Thimerosal-treated mice exhibited neural development delay, social interaction deficiency, and inclination of depression. Apparent neuropathological changes were also observed in adult mice neonatally treated with thimerosal. High-throughput RNA sequencing of autistic-behaved mice brains revealed the alternation of a number of canonical pathways involving neuronal development, neuronal synaptic function, and the dysregulation of endocrine system. Intriguingly, the elevation of anterior pituitary secreting hormones occurred exclusively in male but not in female thimerosal-treated mice, demonstrating for the first time the gender bias of thimerosal-mercury toxicity with regard to endocrine system. Our results indicate that higher dose of neonatal thimerosal-mercury (20× higher than that used in human) is capable of inducing long-lasting substantial dysregulation of neurodevelopment, synaptic function, and endocrine system, which could be the causal involvements of autistic-like behavior in mice.

  16. Neonatal Brain Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bodeliwala, Shaam; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Daljit

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors in neonatal age group is uncommon comparing with older children and adults. In older children brain tumors are commonly infratentorial, where as in neonates, they are supratentorial. Though extracranial tumors are commoner in neonates, brain tumors cause 5-20% deaths approximately. We are presenting a review on brain tumors in neonates. PMID:28770127

  17. Haematopoietic progenitor cells from adult bone marrow differentiate into cells that express oligodendroglial antigens in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Sonia; Alarcón, Pedro; Villaverde, Ramón; Aparicio, Pedro; Silva, Augusto; Martínez, Salvador

    2002-02-01

    Stem cells are self-renewable, pluripotent cells that, in adult life, proliferate by a characteristic asymmetric division in which one daughter cell is committed to differentiation whereas the other remains a stem cell. These cells are also characterized by their ability to differentiate into various cell types under heterotopic environmental influences. In the present study, we have explored the potential of adult haematopoietic bone marrow cells to differentiate into cells of oligodendroglial lineage under physiological, active myelinating conditions. We present evidence of generation of cells expressing oligodendroglial specific markers from a bone marrow subpopulation enriched on adult haematopoietic progenitor cells (CD117+) in vivo after intracerebral transplantation into the neonatal mouse brain. Our results suggest that adult bone marrow cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation from haematopoietic to oligodendroglial cells and add support the validity of bone marrow transplants as an alternative treatment for demyelinating diseases of the CNS including Multiple Sclerosis.

  18. Apoptotic effects of the 'designer drug' methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) on the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Adám, Agota; Gerecsei, László István; Lepesi, Nikolett; Csillag, András

    2014-09-01

    The designer drug of cathinone family, methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), is a cheap and frequently used psychoactive drug of abuse. However, its mechanism of action, particularly its potential detrimental effect on the developing brain, is largely unknown, despite the fact that pregnant females may occur among the users. The objective of our study was to identify the brain areas sensitive for a possible apoptotic effect of the widely abused MDPV on the developing brain. To this end, we used a mouse model which can be compared with the human fetus of third trimester, considering the developmental stage of the brain. Litters of 7-day-old C57BL/6J mice were treated either with i.p. injection of 10mg/kg b.wt.of MDPV or vehicle (saline), and sacrificed after 24h. Similar dose of MDPV enhanced locomotor activity of pups. The brains were processed for anti-caspase 3 (Casp3) immunohistochemistry and the apoptotic cells were identified and counted. We found prominent increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the piriform cortex, retrosplenial area, hippocampus CA1 and nucleus accumbens, whereas the overall density of cells did not change significantly in these regions. The neurons of the nucleus accumbens appeared to be especially sensitive to MDPV: Casp3-immunoreactive cells marked out the core and shell regions of the accumbens. Highest percentage of apoptotic cells as compared to total cell density was also found in the nucleus accumbens. However, we did not observe the same effect on the brain of adult mice. Thus, MDPV did not seem to increase apoptosis in the mature nervous system. The results are in agreement with the assumption that cathinones (in particular MDPV) may adversely affect neural integrity in the developing CNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive imaging of transgenic GFP expression in neonatal mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhuo, Lang

    2007-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a traditional biomarker for astrocytes of the central nervous system. In this study, non-invasive in vivo imaging of GFAP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in the brain of neonatal transgenic mice is used as a novel method to investigate the relationship between the expression of the transgene at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hr post-treatment in mice subjected to a single administration of 12 mg/kg of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH 3-MPTP). The GFP elevation was found to peak at 6 hr and lasted to at least 8 hr after the toxin treatment. Histological examination of fixed brain sections using immunohistochemistry (IHC) shows an increase in GFP and GFAP signal from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the hippocampus. The results have provided quantitative fluorescence and qualitative histological evidence for the activation of the GFAP-GFP transgene in astrocytes following neurotoxin 2'-CH 3-MPTP administration, suggesting that the model described here could be used to study neuronal degeneration such as Parkinson's disease and in general, developmental neurotoxicity in live animals.

  20. Major remodeling of brain microvessels during neonatal period in the mouse: A proteomic and transcriptomic study.

    PubMed

    Porte, Baptiste; Hardouin, Julie; Zerdoumi, Yasmine; Derambure, Céline; Hauchecorne, Michèle; Dupre, Nicolas; Obry, Antoine; Lequerre, Thierry; Bekri, Soumeya; Gonzalez, Bruno; Flaman, Jean M; Marret, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Leroux, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Preterm infants born before 29 gestation weeks incur major risk of subependymal/intracerebral/intraventricular hemorrhage. In mice, neonate brain endothelial cells are more prone than adult cells to secrete proteases under glutamate challenge, and invalidation of the Serpine 1 gene is accompanied by high brain hemorrhage risk up to five days after birth. We hypothesized that the structural and functional states of microvessels might account for age-dependent vulnerability in mice up to five days after birth and might represent a pertinent paradigm to approach the hemorrhage risk window observed in extreme preterms. Mass spectrometry proteome analyses of forebrain microvessels at days 5, 10 and in adult mice revealed 899 proteins and 36 enriched pathways. Microarray transcriptomic study identified 5873 genes undergoing at least two-fold change between ages and 93 enriched pathways. Both approaches pointed towards extracellular matrix, cell adhesion and junction pathways, indicating delayed microvascular strengthening after P5. Furthermore, glutamate receptors, proteases and their inhibitors exhibited convergent evolutions towards excitatory aminoacid sensitivity and low proteolytic control likely accounting for vascular vulnerability in P5 mice. Thus, age vascular specificities must be considered in future therapeutic interventions in preterms. Data are available on ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD001718) and NCBI Gene-Expression-Omnibus repository (identification GSE67870).

  1. Sevoflurane in combination with propofol, not thiopental, induces a more robust neuroapoptosis than sevoflurane alone in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakuraba, Shigeki; Kimura, Kazushi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Sevoflurane is the most widely used volatile anesthetic of general anesthesia. In children and neonates, it is commonly used alone or in combination with thiopental or propofol. A few recent studies reported that sevoflurane induced neuronal death in the developing rodent brain. We measured the neurotoxicity of these anesthetics at clinical doses, alone and in combination, in the developing mouse brain. Seven-day-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to 6 treatment groups. Three groups were exposed to 3% sevoflurane for 6 h after injection of saline, thiopental (5 mg/kg), or propofol (10 mg/kg), whereas three groups were exposed to room air for 6 h after injection of equal doses of saline, thiopental, or propofol. Apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) and retrosplenial cortex (RC) was assessed using caspase-3 immunostaining. Sevoflurane alone caused significantly higher apoptosis in the CA1 compared with saline plus air (P = 0.04). Sevoflurane in combination with propofol resulted in significantly greater numbers of apoptotic neurons than sevoflurane alone in both the CA1 and the RC (P = 0.04). However, there was no significant difference in apoptotic neuron density in both the regions between the groups treated with sevoflurane alone and in combination with thiopental (P = 0.683). Sevoflurane alone can induce neuronal apoptosis, and this effect is enhanced by propofol. Thiopental did not exacerbate the neurotoxicity of sevoflurane. There is the possibility that the combination of sevoflurane and propofol is a more harmful anesthetic technique than sevoflurane alone in pediatric patients.

  2. Genetic deletion of neuronal pentraxin 1 expression prevents brain injury in a neonatal mouse model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Thatipamula, Shabarish; Al Rahim, Md; Zhang, Jiangyang; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and children for which there is no promising therapy at present. Previously, we reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of the long-pentraxin family, following HI injury in neonatal brain. Here, we report that genetic deletion of NP1 expression prevents HI injury in neonatal brain. Elevated expression of NP1 was observed in neurons, not in astrocytes, of the ipsilateral cortical layers (I-IV) and in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas of WT brains following hypoxia-ischemia; brain areas that developed infarcts (at 24-48 h), showed significantly increased numbers of TUNEL-(+) cells and tissue loss (at 7 days). In contrast, NP1-KO mice showed no evidence of brain infarction and tissue loss after HI. The immunofluorescence staining of brain sections with mitochondrial protein COX IV and subcellular fractionation analysis showed increased accumulation of NP1 in mitochondria, pro-death protein Bax activation and NP1 co-localization with activated caspase-3 in WT, but not in the NP1-KO brains; corroborating NP1 interactions with the mitochondria-derived pro-death pathways. Disruption of NP1 translocation to mitochondria by NP1-siRNA in primary cortical cultures significantly reduced ischemic neuronal death. NP1 was immunoprecipitated with activated Bax [6A7] proteins; HI caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bax, thereby, facilitating Bax translocation to mitochondrial and neuronal death. To further delineate the specificity of NPs, we found that NP1 but not the NP2 induction is specifically involved in brain injury mechanisms and that knockdown of NP1 only results in neuroprotection. Furthermore, live in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fractional anisotropy (FA) mapping showed no sign of delayed brain injury or tissue loss in the NP1-KO mice as compared to the WT at different post-HI periods (4-24 weeks

  3. Genetic deletion of neuronal pentraxin 1 expression prevents brain injury in a neonatal mouse model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Thatipamula, Shabarish; Rahim, Md Al; Zhang, Jiangyang; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and children for which there is no promising therapy at present. Previously, we reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of the long-pentraxin family, following HI injury in neonatal brain. Here, we report that genetic deletion of NP1 expression prevents HI injury in neonatal brain. Elevated expression of NP1 was observed in neurons, not in astrocytes, of the ipsilateral cortical layers (I–IV) and in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas of WT brains following hypoxia-ischemia; brain areas that developed infarcts (at 24–48 h), showed significantly increased numbers of TUNEL-(+) cells and tissue loss (at 7 d). In contrast, NP1-KO mice showed no evidence of brain infarction and tissue loss after HI. The immunofluorescence staining of brain sections with mitochondrial protein COX IV and subcellular fractionation analysis showed increased accumulation of NP1 in mitochondria, pro-death protein Bax activation and NP1 co-localization with activated caspase-3 in WT, but not in the NP1-KO brains; corroborating NP1 interactions with the mitochondria-derived pro-death pathways. Disruption of NP1 translocation to mitochondria by NP1-siRNA in primary cortical cultures significantly reduced ischemic neuronal death. NP1 was immunoprecipitated with activated Bax[6A7] proteins; HI caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bax, thereby, facilitating Bax translocation to mitochondrial and neuronal death. To further delineate the specificity of NPs, we found that NP1 but not the NP2 induction is specifically involved in brain injury mechanisms and that knockdown of NP1 only results in neuroprotection. Furthermore, live in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fractional anisotropy (FA) mapping showed no sign of delayed brain injury or tissue loss in the NP1-KO mice as compared to the WT at different post-HI periods (4–24 weeks

  4. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  5. Assessment of long-term safety and efficacy of intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Donega, Vanessa; Nijboer, Cora H; van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Youssef, Sameh A; de Bruin, Alain; van Bel, Frank; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2015-11-01

    For clinical translation, we assessed whether intranasal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induces neoplasia in the brain or periphery at 14 mo. Furthermore, the long-term effects of MSCs on behavior and lesion size were determined. HI was induced in 9-d-old mice. Pups received an intranasal administration of 0.5 × 10(6) MSCs or vehicle at 10 d post-HI. Full macroscopical and microscopical pathological analysis of 39 organs per mouse was performed. Sensorimotor behavior was assessed in the cylinder-rearing test at 10 d, 28 d, 6 mo, and 9 mo. Cognition was measured with the novel object recognition test at 3 and 14 mo post-HI. Lesion size was determined by analyzing mouse-anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and mouse-anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) staining at 5 wk and 14 mo. At 14 mo post-HI, we did not observe any neoplasia in the nasal turbinates, brain, or other organs of HI mice treated with MSCs. Furthermore, our results show that MSC-induced improvement of sensorimotor and cognitive function is long lasting. In contrast, HI-vehicle mice showed severe behavioral impairment. Recovery of MAP2- and MBP-positive area lasted up to 14 mo following MSC treatment. Our results provide strong evidence of the long-term safety and positive effects of MSC treatment following neonatal HI in mice.

  6. Temporal Characterization of Microglia/Macrophage Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Smith, Peter L. P.; Fleiss, Bobbi; Nair, Syam; Svedin, Pernilla; Wang, Wei; Boström, Martina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Brown, Kelly L.; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells display a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, which may facilitate their participation in both the progression and resolution of injury-induced inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal expression of genes associated with classical and alternative polarization phenotypes described for macrophages and to identify related cell populations in the brain following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). HI was induced in 9-day old mice and brain tissue was collected up to 7 days post-insult to investigate expression of genes associated with macrophage activation. Using cell-markers, CD86 (classic activation) and CD206 (alternative activation), we assessed temporal changes of CD11b+ cell populations in the brain and studied the protein expression of the immunomodulatory factor galectin-3 in these cells. HI induced a rapid regulation (6 h) of genes associated with both classical and alternative polarization phenotypes in the injured hemisphere. FACS analysis showed a marked increase in the number of CD11b+CD86+ cells at 24 h after HI (+3667%), which was coupled with a relative suppression of CD11b+CD206+ cells and cells that did not express neither CD86 nor CD206. The CD11b+CD206+ population was mixed with some cells also expressing CD86. Confocal microscopy confirmed that a subset of cells expressed both CD86 and CD206, particularly in injured gray and white matter. Protein concentration of galectin-3 was markedly increased mainly in the cell population lacking CD86 or CD206 in the injured hemisphere. These cells were predominantly resident microglia as very few galectin-3 positive cells co-localized with infiltrating myeloid cells in Lys-EGFP-ki mice after HI. In summary, HI was characterized by an early mixed gene response, but with a large expansion of mainly the CD86 positive population during the first day. However, the injured hemisphere also contained a subset of cells expressing both CD86 and CD206 and a large population that

  7. A gestational ketogenic diet alters maternal metabolic status as well as offspring physiological growth and brain structure in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Dafna; Ellegood, Jacob; Henkelman, Mark

    2013-10-29

    The use of the ketogenic diet (KD) among women of child-bearing age has been increasing, leading to increased interest in identifying the diet's suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the effect of a gestational KD on offspring growth. Since ketones have been reported to play a role in cerebral lipid and myelin synthesis, it is particularly important to investigate the diet's impact on brain anatomy of the offspring. To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse neonates whose mothers were fed either a standard diet (SD) or a KD prior to and during gestation. Images were collected at postnatal (P) 11.5 and 21.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Maternal metabolic status was also tracked during lactation, by following their body weight, blood glucose, ketone, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations. The KD dams exhibit a significant reduction in maternal fertility and litter size, as well as a high risk of developing fatal ketoacidosis by mid-lactation. To increase survival of the KD dams and offspring, fostering of P2.5 pups (from both KD and SD litters) by SD-foster dams was carried out. This resulted in stabilization of blood ketones of the KD dams, and aversion of the fatal ketoacidosis. We also note a slower and smaller weight loss for the KD compared with the SD dams. The average fostered KD pup exhibits retarded growth by P21.5 compared with the average fostered SD pup. An anatomical comparison of their brains further revealed significant structural differences at P11.5, and particularly at P21.5. The KD brain shows a relative bilateral decrease in the cortex, fimbria, hippocampus, corpus callosum and lateral ventricle, but a relative volumetric enlargement of the hypothalamus and medulla. A gestational ketogenic diet deleteriously affects maternal fertility and increases susceptibility to fatal ketoacidosis during lactation. Prenatal and early postnatal exposure to a ketogenic diet also results in

  8. Intranasal C3a treatment ameliorates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Stokowska, Anna; Walker, Frederik R; Mallard, Carina; Hagberg, Henrik; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal asphyxia-induced brain injury is often associated with irreversible neurological complications such as intellectual disability and cerebral palsy but available therapies are limited. Novel neuroprotective therapies as well as approaches stimulating neural plasticity mechanism that can compensate for cell death after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are urgently needed. We previously reported that single i.c.v. injection of complement-derived peptide C3a 1h after HI induction prevented HI-induced cognitive impairment when mice were tested as adults. Here, we tested the effects of intranasal treatment with C3a on HI-induced cognitive deficit. Using the object recognition test, we found that intranasal C3a treated mice were protected from HI-induced impairment of memory function assessed 6weeks after HI induction. C3a treatment ameliorated HI-induced reactive gliosis in the hippocampus, while it did not affect the extent of hippocampal tissue loss, neuronal cell density, expression of the pan-synaptic marker synapsin I or the expression of growth associated protein 43. In conclusion, our results reveal that brief pharmacological treatment with C3a using a clinically feasible non-invasive mode of administration ameliorates HI-induced cognitive impairment. Intranasal administration is a plausible route to deliver C3a into the brain of asphyxiated infants at high risk of developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  9. Memory in the Neonate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Gómez, David M.; Macagno, Francesco; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Peretz, Isabelle; Mehler, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background The capacity to memorize speech sounds is crucial for language acquisition. Newborn human infants can discriminate phonetic contrasts and extract rhythm, prosodic information, and simple regularities from speech. Yet, there is scarce evidence that infants can recognize common words from the surrounding language before four months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied one hundred and twelve 1-5 day-old infants, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We found that newborns tested with a novel bisyllabic word show greater hemodynamic brain response than newborns tested with a familiar bisyllabic word. We showed that newborns recognize the familiar word after two minutes of silence or after hearing music, but not after hearing a different word. Conclusions/Significance The data show that retroactive interference is an important cause of forgetting in the early stages of language acquisition. Moreover, because neonates forget words in the presence of some –but not all– sounds, the results indicate that the interference phenomenon that causes forgetting is selective. PMID:22087327

  10. Memory in the neonate brain.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Gómez, David M; Macagno, Francesco; Bion, Ricardo A H; Peretz, Isabelle; Mehler, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The capacity to memorize speech sounds is crucial for language acquisition. Newborn human infants can discriminate phonetic contrasts and extract rhythm, prosodic information, and simple regularities from speech. Yet, there is scarce evidence that infants can recognize common words from the surrounding language before four months of age. We studied one hundred and twelve 1-5 day-old infants, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We found that newborns tested with a novel bisyllabic word show greater hemodynamic brain response than newborns tested with a familiar bisyllabic word. We showed that newborns recognize the familiar word after two minutes of silence or after hearing music, but not after hearing a different word. The data show that retroactive interference is an important cause of forgetting in the early stages of language acquisition. Moreover, because neonates forget words in the presence of some--but not all--sounds, the results indicate that the interference phenomenon that causes forgetting is selective.

  11. Isolation and Culture of Neonatal Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Lange, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes have long been used to study myofibrillogenesis and myofibrillar functions. Cultured cardiomyocytes allow for easy investigation and manipulation of biochemical pathways, and their effect on the biomechanical properties of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes. The following 2-day protocol describes the isolation and culture of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. We show how to easily dissect hearts from neonates, dissociate the cardiac tissue and enrich cardiomyocytes from the cardiac cell-population. We discuss the usage of different enzyme mixes for cell-dissociation, and their effects on cell-viability. The isolated cardiomyocytes can be subsequently used for a variety of morphological, electrophysiological, biochemical, cell-biological or biomechanical assays. We optimized the protocol for robustness and reproducibility, by using only commercially available solutions and enzyme mixes that show little lot-to-lot variability. We also address common problems associated with the isolation and culture of cardiomyocytes, and offer a variety of options for the optimization of isolation and culture conditions. PMID:24056408

  12. Euthanasia of mouse fetuses and neonates.

    PubMed

    Klaunberg, Brenda A; O'malley, James; Clark, Terri; Davis, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    We sought to determine whether any of the common methods of euthanasia for adult rodents would lead to an acceptable death for fetuses or neonates. We wanted to identify a method that was rapid, free of signs of pain or distress, reliable, and minimally distressful to the person performing the procedure and that minimized the amount of handling required to perform the procedure. We evaluated six methods of euthanasia, with and without anesthesia, in three age groups of mice: gravid mice (E14-20) and neonatal pups (P1-P7 and P8-P14). Euthanasia methods included: halothane inhalation, carbon dioxide inhalation, intraperitoneal sodium pentobarbital, intravenous potassium chloride, and cervical dislocation with and without anesthesia. Noninvasive echocardiography was used to assess heartbeat during euthanasia. With cardiac arrest as the definition of death, no method of euthanasia killed fetal mice. Halothane inhalation (5% by vaporizer) was not an acceptable method of euthanasia for mice of the age groups tested. Intraperitoneal administration of sodium pentobarbital for euthanasia required a higher dose than the previously established dose, and there is a risk of reduced efficacy in pregnant animals due to potential intrauterine injection. Carbon dioxide asphyxiation was the most efficient method of euthanasia for neonatal mouse pups P1-14. For pregnant adult mice, intravenous potassium chloride under anesthesia, carbon dioxide asphyxiation, and cervical dislocation alone or under anesthesia were excellent methods of euthanasia. Copyright 2004 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

  13. Structural Connectivity Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V.; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  14. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  15. Transmission of mouse parvovirus to neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Compton, Susan R; Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the infection of newborn mice with mouse parvovirus (MPV), a single MPV-infected mouse was added to each of 15 cages, each of which housed an uninfected breeding pair of Swiss Webster mice just before parturition. Seven litters were left with their parents, and the remaining 8 litters were fostered at postpartum day 1. All dams were shedding MPV at 1 and 2 wk after exposure. Soiled-bedding transmission did not differ between cages with and without litters. Half the foster dams but none of the fostered pups seroconverted to MPV. None of the pups left with their birth mothers had MPV DNA in their feces at 3 or 6 wk after exposure, but pups in 6 of 7 litters were MPV seropositive at 6 wk. To investigate MPV infection of older neonatal mice, 9 dams with 7-d-old litters and 9 dams with 14-d-old litters each were exposed to an MPV-infected mouse. At weaning, pups exposed to MPV at 7 or 14 d of age were shedding MPV and were seronegative but became seropositive by 6 wk of age and transmitted the infection to sentinels. In conclusion, fostering of pups had no benefit and may spread infection because the pups may act as fomites, infecting the foster dam. Infection of 7- or 14-d-old mice likely occurred because maternal antibodies had not been transferred to the progeny before they began to ingest MPV-laden feces.

  16. The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Kersbergen, Karina J; de Reus, Marcel A; Keunen, Kristin; Kahn, René S; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-09-01

    The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory. Acquiring diffusion-weighted imaging and resting-state fMRI, we studied connectome formation during the preterm phase of macroscopic connectome genesis. In total, 27 neonates were scanned at week 30 and/or week 40 gestational age (GA). Examining the architecture of the neonatal anatomical brain network revealed a clear presence of a small-world modular organization before term birth. Analysis of neonatal functional connectivity (FC) showed the early formation of resting-state networks, suggesting that functional networks are present in the preterm brain, albeit being in an immature state. Moreover, structural and FC patterns of the neonatal brain network showed strong overlap with connectome architecture of the adult brain (85 and 81%, respectively). Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01). Computational analysis further showed that developmental changes involved an increase in integration capacity of the connectivity network as a whole. Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; de Reus, Marcel A.; Keunen, Kristin; Kahn, René S.; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S.; Benders, Manon J.N.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory. Acquiring diffusion-weighted imaging and resting-state fMRI, we studied connectome formation during the preterm phase of macroscopic connectome genesis. In total, 27 neonates were scanned at week 30 and/or week 40 gestational age (GA). Examining the architecture of the neonatal anatomical brain network revealed a clear presence of a small-world modular organization before term birth. Analysis of neonatal functional connectivity (FC) showed the early formation of resting-state networks, suggesting that functional networks are present in the preterm brain, albeit being in an immature state. Moreover, structural and FC patterns of the neonatal brain network showed strong overlap with connectome architecture of the adult brain (85 and 81%, respectively). Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01). Computational analysis further showed that developmental changes involved an increase in integration capacity of the connectivity network as a whole. Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development. PMID:24833018

  18. Neonatal brain MRI segmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Devi, Chelli N; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Sundararaman, V K; Alex, Zachariah C

    2015-09-01

    This review paper focuses on the neonatal brain segmentation algorithms in the literature. It provides an overview of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the newborn brain and the challenges in automated tissue classification of neonatal brain MRI. It presents a complete survey of the existing segmentation methods and their salient features. The different approaches are categorized into intracranial and brain tissue segmentation algorithms based on their level of tissue classification. Further, the brain tissue segmentation techniques are grouped based on their atlas usage into atlas-based, augmented atlas-based and atlas-free methods. In addition, the research gaps and lacunae in literature are also identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  20. Several rAAV vectors efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and transduce neurons and astrocytes in the neonatal mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Yang, Bin; Mu, Xin; Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Su, Qin; He, Ran; Wang, Hongyan; Mueller, Christian; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Brown, Robert; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping

    2011-08-01

    Noninvasive systemic gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been impeded by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent studies documented widespread CNS gene transfer after intravascular delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9). To investigate alternative and possibly more potent rAAV vectors for systemic gene delivery across the BBB, we systematically evaluated the CNS gene transfer properties of nine different rAAVEGFP vectors after intravascular infusion in neonatal mice. Several rAAVs efficiently transduce neurons, motor neurons, astrocytes, and Purkinje cells; among them, rAAVrh.10 is at least as efficient as rAAV9 in many of the regions examined. Importantly, intravenously delivered rAAVs did not cause abnormal microgliosis in the CNS. The rAAVs that achieve stable widespread gene transfer in the CNS are exceptionally useful platforms for the development of therapeutic approaches for neurological disorders affecting large regions of the CNS as well as convenient biological tools for neuroscience research.

  1. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development.

  2. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero‐Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N.; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno‐Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A. D.; Rutherford, Mary A.; Counsell, Serena J.; Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High‐quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. Methods We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32‐channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI‐compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp‐up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32‐channel head coil. Results The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. Conclusion The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794–804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27643791

  3. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emer J; Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno-Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A D; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High-quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32-channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI-compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp-up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32-channel head coil. The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794-804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Intracerebral Inoculation of Mouse-Passaged Saffold Virus Type 3 Affects Cerebellar Development in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Osamu; Suzuki, Tadaki; Yokoyama, Masaru; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nakajima, Noriko; Sato, Hironori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Saffold virus (SAFV), a human cardiovirus, is occasionally detected in infants with neurological disorders, including meningitis and cerebellitis. We recently reported that SAFV type 3 isolates infect cerebellar glial cells, but not large neurons, in mice. However, the impact of this infection remained unclear. Here, we determined the neuropathogenesis of SAFV type 3 in the cerebella of neonatal ddY mice by using SAFV passaged in the cerebella of neonatal BALB/c mice. The virus titer in the cerebellum increased following the inoculation of each of five passaged strains. The fifth passaged strain harbored amino acid substitutions in the VP2 (H160R and Q239R) and VP3 (K62M) capsid proteins. Molecular modeling of the capsid proteins suggested that the VP2-H160R and VP3-K62M mutations alter the structural dynamics of the receptor binding surface via the formation of a novel hydrophobic interaction between the VP2 puff B and VP3 knob regions. Compared with the original strain, the passaged strain showed altered growth characteristics in human-derived astroglial cell lines and greater replication in the brains of neonatal mice. In addition, the passaged strain was more neurovirulent than the original strain, while both strains infected astroglial and neural progenitor cells in the mouse brain. Intracerebral inoculation of either the original or the passaged strain affected brain Purkinje cell dendrites, and a high titer of the passaged strain induced cerebellar hypoplasia in neonatal mice. Thus, infection by mouse-passaged SAFV affected cerebellar development in neonatal mice. This animal model contributes to the understanding of the neuropathogenicity of SAFV infections in infants. IMPORTANCE Saffold virus (SAFV) is a candidate neuropathogenic agent in infants and children, but the neuropathogenicity of the virus has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we evaluated the pathogenicity of two clinical SAFV isolates in mice. Similar to other neurotropic

  5. Neurodevelopmental impairment following neonatal hyperoxia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Manimaran; van Groen, Thomas; Kadish, Inga; Bulger, Arlene; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2013-02-01

    Extremely premature infants are often exposed to supra-physiologic concentrations of oxygen, and frequently have hypoxemic episodes. These preterm infants are at high risk (~40%) for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) even in the absence of obvious intracranial pathology such as intraventricular hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia. The etiology for NDI has not been determined, and there are no animal models to simulate neurodevelopmental outcomes of prematurity. Our objectives were to develop and characterize a mouse model to determine long-term effects of chronic hypoxia or hyperoxia exposure on neurodevelopment. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were exposed to hypoxia (12% O(2)) or hyperoxia (85% O(2)) from postnatal days 1 to 14 and then returned to air. At 12-14 weeks of age, neurobehavioral assessment (Water Maze test, Novel Object Recognition test, Open Field test, Elevated Plus Maze, and Rotarod test) was performed, followed by MRI and brain histology. Neurobehavioral testing revealed that hyperoxia-exposed mice did poorly on the water maze and novel object recognition tests compared to air-exposed mice. MRI demonstrated smaller hippocampi in hyperoxia- and hypoxia-exposed mice with a greater reduction in hyperoxia-exposed mice, including a smaller cerebellum in hyperoxia-exposed mice. Brain histology showed reduced CA1 and CA3 and increased dentate gyral width in hippocampus. In conclusion, neonatal hyperoxia in mice leads to abnormal neurobehavior, primarily deficits in spatial and recognition memory, associated with smaller hippocampal sizes, similar to findings in ex-preterm infants. This animal model may be useful to determine mechanisms underlying developmental programming of NDI in preterm infants, and for evaluation of therapeutic strategies.

  6. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (less than 32 weeks' gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI. We demonstrated previously that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has an important role in oligodendrocyte development. Here we examine whether enhanced EGFR signalling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioural recovery in the developing brain. Using an established mouse model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin-binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioural deficits on white-matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signalling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and potentially applicable to the treatment of premature children with white matter injury.

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  8. Intracerebral inoculation of mouse-passaged Saffold virus type 3 affects cerebellar development in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Osamu; Suzuki, Tadaki; Yokoyama, Masaru; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nakajima, Noriko; Sato, Hironori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-08-31

    Saffold virus (SAFV), a human cardiovirus, is occasionally detected in infants with neurological disorders, including meningitis and cerebellitis. We recently reported that SAFV type 3 isolates infect cerebellar glial cells, but not large neurons, in mice. However, the impact of this infection remained unclear. Here, we determined the neuropathogenesis of SAFV type 3 in the cerebella of neonatal ddY mice using SAFV passaged in the cerebellum of neonatal BALB/c mice. The virus titer in the cerebellum increased following inoculation of each of five passaged strains. The fifth passaged strain harbored amino acid substitutions in the VP2 (H160R and Q239R) and VP3 (K62M) capsid proteins. Molecular modeling of the capsid proteins suggested that the VP2-H160R and VP3-K62M mutations alter the structural dynamics of the receptor binding surface via formation of a novel hydrophobic interaction between the VP2 puff B and VP3 knob regions. When compared with the original strain, the passaged strain showed altered growth characteristics in human-derived astroglial cell lines and higher replication in the brains of neonatal mice. In addition, the passaged strain was more neurovirulent than the original strain, while both strains infected astroglial and neural progenitor cells in the mouse brain. Intracerebral inoculation of either the original or passaged strain affected brain Purkinje cell dendrites, and a high titer of the passaged strain induced cerebellar hypoplasia in neonatal mice. Thus, infection by mouse-passaged SAFV affected cerebellar development in neonatal mice. This animal model contributes to the understanding of the neuropathogenicity of SAFV infections in infants.

  9. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances, J.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 Tesla. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately two hours. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI based mouse brain atlas. PMID:23769916

  10. [Brain signaling mechanisms during neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Rizzotti, Alina; Aguero, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    The brain and the immune system are the two major adaptive systems of the body. During an immune response the developing neonatal brain and the immune system "cross-talk" and this course of action is essential for maintaining homeostasis. Two pathway are involved in this intercommunication: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This overview focuses on the role of SNS in neuroimmune interactions, an area that has received much less attention than the role of HPA axis. Evidence suggests that norepinephrine (NE) is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in different organs and tissues. Under stimulation, NE is released from the sympathetic nerve terminals in these organs and tissues .Through stimulation of specific receptors, locally released NE, or circulating catecholamines such as epinephrine, affect lymphocyte traffic, circulation, and proliferation, and modulate cytokine production and the functional activity of different lymphoid cells. In addition, recent evidence is discussed that NE and epinephrine, through stimulation of the beta(2)-adrenoreceptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, inhibit the production of type 1/proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma by antigen-presenting cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, whereas they stimulate the production of type 2/anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Thus, the activation of SNS during an immune response might be aimed to localize the inflammatory response.

  11. Power Doppler ultrasound appearances of neonatal ischaemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Steventon, D M; John, P R

    1997-02-01

    Following neonatal ischaemic brain injury, irregular vessels increase in size owing to luxury perfusion. These may be demonstrated by conventional colour flow Doppler (CFD) imaging at the periphery of the infarcted area. We present a case in which power Doppler imaging (PDI) was performed in addition to CFD in a neonate with unexplained seizures and which proved more sensitive than CFD in demonstrating luxury perfusion. Ultrasound appearances were compared with those seen on cranial CT. PDI can be a useful adjunct to conventional CFD examination of the neonatal brain in cerebral infarction.

  12. A Battery of Motor Tests in a Neonatal Mouse Model of Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Feather-Schussler, Danielle N.; Ferguson, Tanya S.

    2016-01-01

    As the sheer number of transgenic mice strains grow and rodent models of pediatric disease increase, there is an expanding need for a comprehensive, standardized battery of neonatal mouse motor tests. These tests can validate injury or disease models, determine treatment efficacy and/or assess motor behaviors in new transgenic strains. This paper presents a series of neonatal motor tests to evaluate general motor function, including ambulation, hindlimb foot angle, surface righting, negative geotaxis, front- and hindlimb suspension, grasping reflex, four limb grip strength and cliff aversion. Mice between the ages of post-natal day 2 to 14 can be used. In addition, these tests can be used for a wide range of neurological and neuromuscular pathologies, including cerebral palsy, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and neuromuscular disorders. These tests can also be used to determine the effects of pharmacological agents, as well as other types of therapeutic interventions. In this paper, motor deficits were evaluated in a novel neonatal mouse model of cerebral palsy that combines hypoxia, ischemia and inflammation. Forty-eight hours after injury, five tests out of the nine showed significant motor deficits: ambulation, hindlimb angle, hindlimb suspension, four limb grip strength, and grasping reflex. These tests revealed weakness in the hindlimbs, as well as fine motor skills such as grasping, which are similar to the motor deficits seen in human cerebral palsy patients. PMID:27842358

  13. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  14. Multi-contrast human neonatal brain atlas: application to normal neonate development analysis.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Donohue, Pamela K; Ernst, Thomas; Anderson, Lynn; Buchthal, Steven; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Miller, Michael I; van Zijl, Peter C M; Chang, Linda

    2011-05-01

    MRI is a sensitive method for detecting subtle anatomic abnormalities in the neonatal brain. To optimize the usefulness for neonatal and pediatric care, systematic research, based on quantitative image analysis and functional correlation, is required. Normalization-based image analysis is one of the most effective methods for image quantification and statistical comparison. However, the application of this methodology to neonatal brain MRI scans is rare. Some of the difficulties are the rapid changes in T1 and T2 contrasts and the lack of contrast between brain structures, which prohibits accurate cross-subject image registration. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which provides rich and quantitative anatomical contrast in neonate brains, is an ideal technology for normalization-based neonatal brain analysis. In this paper, we report the development of neonatal brain atlases with detailed anatomic information derived from DTI and co-registered anatomical MRI. Combined with a diffeomorphic transformation, we were able to normalize neonatal brain images to the atlas space and three-dimensionally parcellate images into 122 regions. The accuracy of the normalization was comparable to the reliability of human raters. This method was then applied to babies of 37-53 post-conceptional weeks to characterize developmental changes of the white matter, which indicated a posterior-to-anterior and a central-to-peripheral direction of maturation. We expect that future applications of this atlas will include investigations of the effect of prenatal events and the effects of preterm birth or low birth weights, as well as clinical applications, such as determining imaging biomarkers for various neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrotyrosine in brain tissue of neonates after perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, F; Lammers, H; Smit, D; Nikkels, P G J

    2006-01-01

    Hypothesis Nitrotyrosine, a reaction product of peroxynitrite and proteins, could be demonstrated in the postmortem examination of brain tissue of full‐term neonates who had severe perinatal asphyxia. Methods The brain tissue of 22 full‐term neonates who died after severe perinatal asphyxia was examined, including cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, brain stem, olives and cerebellum. Median age at death was 52 h. Routine histopathological examination and additional immunohistological staining were carried out with anti‐cysteine protease protein 32 antibodies to detect activated caspase 3, anti‐nitrotyrosine antibodies to detect nitrotyrosine and anti‐CD68 antibodies to detect activated microglia and macrophages, which might be associated with the production of nitric oxide. Staining was scored as none, weak (1–25% positive cells), moderate (26–75% positive cells) or severe (>75% positive cells). Results 14 patients showed global injury, 4 showed injury of the basal ganglia and thalamus, and 4 showed predominantly parasagittal brain injury. One neonate without perinatal asphyxia served as a control. Nitrotyrosine staining of neurones was shown in all neonates with asphyxia, mostly in the thalamus (70%) and inferior olives (68%). Total nitrotyrosine staining tended to be less in the base of the pons and inferior olives of neonates with parasagittal brain injury. Activated caspase 3 was found mostly in the thalamus (60%) and hippocampus (53%). Positive CD68 staining was mainly present in the thalamus (70% positive). Conclusion Nitrotyrosine was found in brain tissue of full‐term neonates, suggesting that nitric oxide toxicity might have a role in hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury at term. This may be relevant for neuroprotective strategies in full‐term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. PMID:16835259

  16. Decreased Na+ influx lowers hippocampal neuronal excitability in a mouse model of neonatal influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoyong; Eun Yu, Ji; Kim, Sungmin; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Chung, ChiHye

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus infection is one of common infectious diseases occurring worldwide. The human influenza virus can infect the central nervous system and cause brain dysfunctions affecting cognition and spatial memory. It has been previously shown that infection with the influenza viral protein within the hippocampus decreases Ca2+ influx and reduces excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, the neuronal properties of animals surviving neonatal infection have not been investigated. Using a mouse model of neonatal influenza infection, we performed thorough electrophysiological analyses of hippocampal neurotransmission. We found that animals surviving the infection exhibited reduced spontaneous transmission with no significant defects in evoked neurotransmission. Interestingly, the hippocampus of the infected group conducted synaptic transmission with less fidelity upon repeated stimulations and failed to generate action potentials faithfully upon step current injections primarily due to reduced Na+ influx. The reversal potential for the Na+ current was hyperpolarized and the activation of Na+ channels was slower in the infected group while the inactivation process was minimally disturbed. Taken together, our observations suggest that neonatally infected offsprings exhibit noticeable deficits at rest and severe failures when higher activity is required. This study provides insight into understanding the cellular mechanisms of influenza infection-associated functional changes in the brain. PMID:26310542

  17. Dual innervation of neonatal Merkel cells in mouse touch domes.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jingwen; Vysochan, Anna; Luo, Wenqin

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell-neurite complexes are specialized mechanosensory end organs that mediate discriminative touch sensation. It is well established that type I slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors, which express neural filament heavy chain (NFH), innervate Merkel cells. It was previously shown that neurotrophic factor NT3 and its receptor TrkC play crucial roles in controlling touch dome Merkel cell innervation of NFH+ fibers. In addition, nerve fibers expressing another neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK), Ret, innervate touch dome Merkel cells as well. However, the relationship between afferents responsive to NT3/TrkC signaling and those expressing Ret is unclear. It is also controversial if these Ret+ fibers belong to the early or late Ret+ DRG neurons, which are defined based on the co-expression and developmental dependence of TrkA. To address these questions, we genetically traced Ret+ and TrkC+ fibers and analyzed their developmental dependence on TrkA. We found that Merkel cells in neonatal mouse touch domes receive innervation of two types of fibers: one group is Ret+, while the other subset expresses TrkC and NFH. In addition, Ret+ fibers depend on TrkA for their survival and normal innervation whereas NFH+ Merkel cell innervating fibers are almost unaltered in TrkA mutant mice, supporting that Ret+ and NFH+/TrkC+ afferents are two distinct groups. Ret signaling, on the other hand, plays a minor role for the innervation of neonatal touch domes. In contrast, Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly contacted by NFH+/TrkC+ afferents. Taken together, our results suggest that neonatal Merkel cells around hair follicles receive dual innervation while Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly innervated by only SAI mechanoreceptors. In addition, our results suggest that neonatal Ret+ Merkel cell innervating fibers most likely belong to the late but not early Ret+ DRG neurons.

  18. The Virtual Mouse Brain: A Computational Neuroinformatics Platform to Study Whole Mouse Brain Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Melozzi, Francesca; Woodman, Marmaduke M; Jirsa, Viktor K; Bernard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Connectome-based modeling of large-scale brain network dynamics enables causal in silico interrogation of the brain's structure-function relationship, necessitating the close integration of diverse neuroinformatics fields. Here we extend the open-source simulation software The Virtual Brain (TVB) to whole mouse brain network modeling based on individual diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI)-based or tracer-based detailed mouse connectomes. We provide practical examples on how to use The Virtual Mouse Brain (TVMB) to simulate brain activity, such as seizure propagation and the switching behavior of the resting state dynamics in health and disease. TVMB enables theoretically driven experimental planning and ways to test predictions in the numerous strains of mice available to study brain function in normal and pathological conditions.

  19. Potential for photoacoustic imaging of the neonatal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Kosik, Ivan; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for imaging neonatal brain injury. Since PAI combines many of the merits of both optical and ultrasound imaging, images with high contrast, high resolution, and a greater penetration depth can be obtained when compared to more traditional optical methods. However, due to the strong attenuation and reflection of photoacoustic pressure waves at the skull bone, PAI of the brain is much more challenging than traditional methods (e.g. near infrared spectroscopy) for optical interrogation of the neonatal brain. To evaluate the potential limits the skull places on 3D PAI of the neonatal brain, we constructed a neonatal skull phantom (1.4-mm thick) with a mixture of epoxy and titanium dioxide powder that provided acoustic insertion loss (1-5MHz) similar to human infant skull bone. The phantom was molded into a realistic infant skull shape by means of a CNCmachined mold that was based upon a 3D CAD model. To evaluate the effect of the skull bone on PAI, a photoacoustic point source was raster scanned within the phantom brain cavity to capture the imaging operator of the 3D PAI system (128 ultrasound transducers in a hemispherical arrangement) with and without the intervening skull phantom. The resultant imaging operators were compared to determine the effect of the skull layer on the PA signals in terms of amplitude loss and time delay.

  20. Stem cells for brain repair in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chicha, L; Smith, T; Guzman, R

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic insults are a significant cause of pediatric encephalopathy, developmental delays, and spastic cerebral palsy. Although the developing brain's plasticity allows for remarkable self-repair, severe disruption of normal myelination and cortical development upon neonatal brain injury are likely to generate life-persisting sensory-motor and cognitive deficits in the growing child. Currently, no treatments are available that can address the long-term consequences. Thus, regenerative medicine appears as a promising avenue to help restore normal developmental processes in affected infants. Stem cell therapy has proven effective in promoting functional recovery in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury and therefore represents a hopeful therapy for this unmet medical condition. Neural stem cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal tissues as well as umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have all shown initial success in improving functional outcomes. However, much still remains to be understood about how those stem cells can safely be administered to infants and what their repair mechanisms in the brain are. In this review, we discuss updated research into pathophysiological mechanisms of neonatal brain injury, the types of stem cell therapies currently being tested in this context, and the potential mechanisms through which exogenous stem cells might interact with and influence the developing brain.

  1. Regional differences in the prostate of the neonatally estrogenized mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Pylkkaenen, L.S.; Santti, R.; Newbold, R.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Neonatal estrogenization of the mouse with diethylstilbestrol resulted in time-of-exposure and dose-dependent inhibition of the growth of the prostatic lobes observed at the age of 2 mon. The critical time was the days 1-6 of postnatal life. In neonatally estrogenized (neoDES) mice, responses to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone in terms of nuclear 3H-thymidine labelling were altered concomitantly with the inhibition of growth and were in accordance with changes in the relative volumes of epithelium, glandular lumina, and interacinar stroma. Secondary estrogen treatment of neoDES mice with 17 beta-estradiol did not increase 3H-thymidine labelling in the prostate of control or neoDES mice. However, it induced squamous epithelial metaplasia in periurethral collecting ducts and proximal parts of coagulating glands of neoDES animals. In control mice only slight epithelial hyperplasia could be observed after similar treatment. Estrogen receptors, located immunocytochemically in nuclei of stromal cell, corresponded with the sites of increased estrogen sensitivity, observed as metaplastic transformation. When the neoDES animals aged, epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia could be observed at distinct prostatic sites, ie, the periurethral collecting ducts and the coagulating glands and periurethral glands, and stromal inflammation become more extensive. Almost identical location of the epithelial changes and the altered estrogen response is suggestive of causal relationship.

  2. Evaluation of Atlas based Mouse Brain Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohwi; Jomier, Julien; Aylward, Stephen; Tyszka, Mike; Moy, Sheryl; Lauder, Jean; Styner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Magentic Reasonance Imaging for mouse phenotype study is one of the important tools to understand human diseases. In this paper, we present a fully automatic pipeline for the process of morphometric mouse brain analysis. The method is based on atlas-based tissue and regional segmentation, which was originally developed for the human brain. To evaluate our method, we conduct a qualitative and quantitative validation study as well as compare of b-spline and fluid registration methods as components in the pipeline. The validation study includes visual inspection, shape and volumetric measurements and stability of the registration methods against various parameter settings in the processing pipeline. The result shows both fluid and b-spline registration methods work well in murine settings, but the fluid registration is more stable. Additionally, we evaluated our segmentation methods by comparing volume differences between Fmr1 FXS in FVB background vs C57BL/6J mouse strains. PMID:20640188

  3. Dexmedetomidine protects against glucocorticoid induced progenitor cell apoptosis in neonatal mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Shawn David; Cabrera, Omar Hoseá; Dougherty, Joseph D; Singh, Sukrit; Swiney, Brant Stephen; Salinas-Contreras, Patricia; Farber, Nuri Bradford; Noguchi, Kevin Kiyoshi

    2017-09-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to improve respiratory mechanics in preterm infants despite clinical evidence linking neonatal GC therapy to cerebellar pathology. In developing mouse cerebellum, the GC dexamethasone (DEX) causes rapid GC-induced neural progenitor cell apoptosis (GINA). Focusing on pharmacological neuroprotection strategies, we investigated whether dexmedetomidine (DMT) protects against GINA. Neonatal mice were pretreated with DMT prior to DEX challenge. Additionally, we tested clonidine and yohimbine in vivo to determine mechanism of DMT neuroprotection. For in vitro studies, cerebellar neural progenitor cells were pretreated with DMT before DEX challenge. In vivo, DMT attenuated GINA at 1 μg/kg and above, p < 0.0001. Clonidine significantly attenuated GINA, p < 0.0001, while yohimbine reversed DMT neuroprotection, p < 0.0001, suggesting DMT neuroprotection is likely mediated via adrenergic signaling. In vitro, DMT neuroprotection was achieved at 10 μM and above, p < 0.001, indicating DMT rescue is cell autonomous. DMT affords dose-dependent neuroprotection from GINA at clinically relevant doses, an effect that is cell autonomous and likely mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor agonism. DMT co-administration with GCs may be an effective strategy to protect the neonatal brain from GINA while retaining the beneficial effects of GCs on respiratory mechanics.

  4. Marine Compound Xyloketal B Reduces Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ai-Jiao; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Baofeng; Liu, Rui; Turlova, Ekaterina; Barszczyk, Andrew; Sun, Christopher Lf; Liu, Ling; Deurloo, Marielle; Wang, Guan-Lei; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes neurodegeneration and brain injury, leading to sensorimotor dysfunction. Xyloketal B is a novel marine compound isolated from a mangrove fungus Xylaria species (no. 2508) with unique antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of xyloketal B on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death in mouse primary cortical culture and on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice in vivo. We found that xyloketal B reduced anoxia-induced neuronal cell death in vitro, as well as infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model in vivo. Furthermore, xyloketal B improved functional behavioral recovery of the animals following hypoxic-ischemic insult. In addition, xyloketal B significantly decreased calcium entry, reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells, reduced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax proteins, and increased the level of Bcl-2 protein after the hypoxic-ischemic injury. Our findings indicate that xyloketal B is effective in models of hypoxia-ischemia and thus has potential as a treatment for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25546517

  5. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A.; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M.; Mortrud, Marty T.; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A.; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E.; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M.; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Phillips, John W.; Hohmann, John G.; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R.; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R.; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain’s wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  6. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor/IL-6 fusion protein (Hyper IL-6) effects on the neonatal mouse brain: possible role for IL-6 trans-signaling in brain development and functional neurobehavioral outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Brunssen, Susan H.; Moy, Sheryl S.; Toews, Arrel D.; McPherson, Christopher A.; Harry, G. Jean

    2013-01-01

    Adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes are linked to perinatal production of inflammatory mediators, including interleukin 6 (IL-6). While a pivotal role for maternal elevation in IL-6 has been established in determining neurobehavioral outcomes in the offspring and considered the primary target mediating the fetal inflammatory response, questions remain as to the specific actions of IL-6 on the developing brain. CD-1 male mice received a subdural injection of the bioactive fusion protein, hyper IL-6 (HIL-6) on postnatal-day (PND)4 and assessed from preweaning until adulthood. Immunohistochemical evaluation of astrocytes and microglia and mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines and host response genes indicated no evidence of an acute neuroinflammatory injury response. HIL-6 accelerated motor development and increased reactivity to stimulation and number of entries in a light/dark chamber, decreased ability to learn to withhold a response in passive avoidance, and effected deficits in social novelty behavior. No changes were observed in motor activity, pre-pulse startle inhibition, or learning and memory in the Morris water maze or radial arm maze, as have been reported for models of more severe developmental neuroinflammation. In young animals, mRNA levels for MBP and PLP/DM20 decreased and less complexity of MBP processes in the cortex was evident by immunohistochemistry. The non-hydroxy cerebroside fraction of cerebral lipids was increased. These results provide evidence for selective effects of IL-6 signaling, particularly trans-signaling, in the developing brain in the absence of a general neuroinflammatory response. These data contribute to our further understanding of the multiple aspects of IL-6 signaling in the developing brain. PMID:22985907

  7. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states.

  8. Short and long-term analysis and comparison of neurodegeneration and inflammatory cell response in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere of the neonatal mouse brain after hypoxia/ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Kalpana; Chertoff, Mariela; Llovera, Gemma; Recasens, Mireia; Acarin, Laia

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic is essential for novel neuroprotective approaches. We describe the neuropathology and glial/inflammatory response, from 3 hours to 100 days, after carotid occlusion and hypoxia (8% O(2), 55 minutes) to the C57/BL6 P7 mouse. Massive tissue injury and atrophy in the ipsilateral (IL) hippocampus, corpus callosum, and caudate-putamen are consistently shown. Astrogliosis peaks at 14 days, but glial scar is still evident at day 100. Microgliosis peaks at 3-7 days and decreases by day 14. Both glial responses start at 3 hours in the corpus callosum and hippocampal fissure, to progressively cover the degenerating CA field. Neutrophils increase in the ventricles and hippocampal vasculature, showing also parenchymal extravasation at 7 days. Remarkably, delayed milder atrophy is also seen in the contralateral (CL) hippocampus and corpus callosum, areas showing astrogliosis and microgliosis during the first 72 hours. This detailed and long-term cellular response characterization of the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere after H/I may help in the design of better therapeutic strategies.

  9. Short and Long-Term Analysis and Comparison of Neurodegeneration and Inflammatory Cell Response in the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Hemisphere of the Neonatal Mouse Brain after Hypoxia/Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Kalpana; Chertoff, Mariela; Llovera, Gemma; Recasens, Mireia; Acarin, Laia

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic is essential for novel neuroprotective approaches. We describe the neuropathology and glial/inflammatory response, from 3 hours to 100 days, after carotid occlusion and hypoxia (8% O2, 55 minutes) to the C57/BL6 P7 mouse. Massive tissue injury and atrophy in the ipsilateral (IL) hippocampus, corpus callosum, and caudate-putamen are consistently shown. Astrogliosis peaks at 14 days, but glial scar is still evident at day 100. Microgliosis peaks at 3–7 days and decreases by day 14. Both glial responses start at 3 hours in the corpus callosum and hippocampal fissure, to progressively cover the degenerating CA field. Neutrophils increase in the ventricles and hippocampal vasculature, showing also parenchymal extravasation at 7 days. Remarkably, delayed milder atrophy is also seen in the contralateral (CL) hippocampus and corpus callosum, areas showing astrogliosis and microgliosis during the first 72 hours. This detailed and long-term cellular response characterization of the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere after H/I may help in the design of better therapeutic strategies. PMID:22701792

  10. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shinoyama, Mizuya; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kida, Hiroyuki; Kajiwara, Koji; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Maeda, Yoshihiko; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) at birth could cause cerebral palsy (CP), mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual's lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs) to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  11. Neonatal brain MRI: how reliable is the radiologist's eye?

    PubMed

    Morel, B; Antoni, G; Teglas, J P; Bloch, I; Adamsbaum, C

    2016-02-01

    White matter (WM) analysis in neonatal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is challenging, as demonstrated by the issue of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). We evaluated the reliability of the radiologist's eye in this context. Three experienced observers graded the WM signal intensity on axial T2-weighted 1.5T images from 60 different premature newborns on 2 occasions 4 weeks apart with a semi-quantitative classification under identical viewing conditions. The intra- and inter-observer correlation coefficients were fair to moderate (Fleiss' kappa between 0.21 and 0.60). This is a serious limitation of which we need to be aware, as it can lead to contradictory conclusions in the challenging context of term-equivalent age brain MRI in premature infants. These results highlight the need for a semiautomatic tool to help in objectively analyzing MRI signal intensity in the neonatal brain.

  12. Cell Source and Mechanism of Hair Cell Regeneration in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    VA 22060-6218 As required, enclosed is the final technical report for Award N00014-13-1-0569, "Cell source and mechanism of hair cell regeneration...IL 62702 C. Award# N00014-13-1-0569 D. Cell source and mechanism of hair cell regeneration in the neonatal mouse cochlea Scientific and Technical...Objectives Specific Aims: Aim 1: To determine the cell source of regenerated hair cells in the neonatal mouse cochlea. Aim 2: To determine the

  13. Isolation and characterization of intact mitochondria from neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, N; Shimizu, K; Payne, M; Busija, D

    2001-12-01

    Poor outcome after neonatal brain injury may be associated with alterations in mitochondrial function. Thus, isolated mitochondria have been a useful tool in understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction. However, isolation and characterization of mitochondria from neonatal rat brain are not fully described. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a rapid method for the isolation and characterization of functional mitochondria from neonatal rat brain. Mitochondria were isolated from 7-day-old rat brain weighing approximately 500 mg using a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Brains were homogenized in 12% Percoll/sucrose buffer and layered onto a 26% Percoll/40% Percoll gradient followed by centrifugation. Four methods were used for assessing mitochondrial integrity and function: (1) electron microscopy to assess the morphology of the mitochondria and to determine the relative purity of the preparation; (2) fluorescence of chloromethyl-X-rosamine (Mito Tracker Red) in mitochondria as an indicator of mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi(m)); (3) state 3 and 4 respiration; and (4) protein import into mitochondria using an in vitro-synthesized mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH). These studies demonstrated that the morphology of mitochondria is maintained with intact outer membranes and well-developed cristae, and Delta psi(m) is preserved. Respiration measurements revealed tightly coupled mitochondria with a respiration control ratio (RCR) of 4.1+/-0.18 (n=6). Import of precursor mMDH into mitochondria increased in a time-dependent manner maximizing at 15 min. The results indicate that neonatal brain mitochondria isolated using this method are well coupled, morphologically intact and are capable of protein import across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes.

  14. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  15. Kyotorphin transport and metabolism in rat and mouse neonatal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianming; Jiang, Huidi; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Keep, Richard F

    2010-08-06

    Neuropeptide inactivation is generally thought to occur via peptidase-mediated degradation. However, a recent study found increased analgesia after L-kyotorphin (L-Tyr-L-Arg; L-KTP) administration in mice lacking an oligopeptide transporter, PEPT2. The current study examines the role of PEPT2 in L-KTP uptake by astrocytes and compares it to astrocytic L-KTP degradation. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was measured in primary cultures of neonatal astrocytes from rats and from Pept2(+/+) and Pept2(-/-) mice. Uptake was further characterized using potential inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP degradation was examined in primary astrocyte cultures from Pept2(-/-) mice by following the formation of L-[(3)H]tyrosine. The uptake of L-[(3)H]KTP in both rat and Pept2(+/+) mouse neonatal astrocytes was inhibited by known PEPT2 inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was also reduced in Pept2(-/-) astrocytes as compared to those from Pept2(+/+) mice. Kinetic analysis indicated the presence of a high affinity (K(m) approximately 50 microM) transporter for L-[(3)H]KTP, identified as Pept2, and a low affinity transporter (K(m) approximately 3-4 mM), inhibited by amastatin, bestatin and tyrosine. Astrocytes also degraded L-KTP through a low affinity peptidase (K(m) approximately 2 mM). Astrocytic clearance of L-KTP occurs via both peptidase activity and transport. These processes occur at similar rates and may be linked. This supports the contention that oligopeptide transport may have an impact on the extracellular clearance (and potentially activity) of certain neuropeptides. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dichloroacetate treatment improves mitochondrial metabolism and reduces brain injury in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cuicui; Zhang, Yaodong; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Xiaoyang; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dichloroacetate (DCA) treatment for brain injury in neonatal mice after hypoxia ischemia (HI) and the possible molecular mechanisms behind this effect. Postnatal day 9 male mouse pups were subjected to unilateral HI, DCA was injected intraperitoneally immediately after HI, and an additional two doses were administered at 24 h intervals. The pups were sacrificed 72 h after HI. Brain injury, as indicated by infarction volume, was reduced by 54.2% from 10.8 ± 1.9 mm3 in the vehicle-only control group to 5.0 ± 1.0 mm3 in the DCA-treated group at 72 h after HI (p = 0.008). DCA treatment also significantly reduced subcortical white matter injury as indicated by myelin basic protein staining (p = 0.018). Apoptotic cell death in the cortex, as indicated by counting the cells that were positive for apoptosis-inducing factor (p = 0.018) and active caspase-3 (p = 0.021), was significantly reduced after DCA treatment. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and the amount of acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was significantly higher after DCA treatment and HI (p = 0.039, p = 0.024). In conclusion, DCA treatment reduced neonatal mouse brain injury after HI, and this appears to be related to the elevated activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and subsequent increase in mitochondrial metabolism as well as reduced apoptotic cell death. PMID:27153546

  17. [An efficient way in mouse brain dissection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhao; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2014-04-25

    Laboratory mice are common experimental animals in biological, medical, pharmacological and psychological researches primarily because they are easy to maintain and reproduce quickly. The protection of the welfare of experimental animals is gaining greater attention during the application of a large number of mice. It's therefore essential to consider how to reduce the unnecessary use of animals and fully exploit each experimental animal. We report, in this article, an efficient way to dissect various brain regions from a mouse for protein immunoblot and/or neuronal culture, providing technical reference information for minimizing the number of animals used in projects, and refining methods and procedures to quick brain dissection.

  18. Neuroprotection by selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 in neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cuicui; Ginet, Vanessa; Sun, Yanyan; Koike, Masato; Zhou, Kai; Li, Tao; Li, Hongfu; Li, Qian; Wang, Xiaoyang; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Truttmann, Anita C.; Kroemer, Guido; Puyal, Julien; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perinatal asphyxia induces neuronal cell death and brain injury, and is often associated with irreversible neurological deficits in children. There is an urgent need to elucidate the neuronal death mechanisms occurring after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We here investigated the selective neuronal deletion of the Atg7 (autophagy related 7) gene on neuronal cell death and brain injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal deletion of Atg7 prevented HI-induced autophagy, resulted in 42% decrease of tissue loss compared to wild-type mice after the insult, and reduced cell death in multiple brain regions, including apoptosis, as shown by decreased caspase-dependent and -independent cell death. Moreover, we investigated the lentiform nucleus of human newborns who died after severe perinatal asphyxia and found increased neuronal autophagy after severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy compared to control uninjured brains, as indicated by the numbers of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3)-, LAMP1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1)-, and CTSD (cathepsin D)-positive cells. These findings reveal that selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 is strongly protective against neuronal death and overall brain injury occurring after HI and suggest that inhibition of HI-enhanced autophagy should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human newborns developing severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26727396

  19. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  20. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  1. Functional photoacoustic tomography for neonatal brain imaging: developments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Ali; Tavakoli, Emytis; Adabi, Saba; Gelovani, Juri; Avanaki, Mohammad R. N.

    2017-03-01

    Transfontanelle ultrasound imaging (TFUSI) is a routine diagnostic brain imaging method in infants who are born prematurely, whose skull bones have not completely fused together and have openings between them, so-called fontanelles. Open fontanelles in neonates provide acoustic windows, allowing the ultrasound beam to freely pass through. TFUSI is used to rule out neurological complications of premature birth including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular (IVH), subependimal (SEPH), subdural (SDH) or intracerebral (ICH) hemorrhages, as well as hypoxic brain injuries. TFUSI is widely used in the clinic owing to its low cost, safety, accessibility, and noninvasive nature. Nevertheless, the accuracy of TFUSI is limited. To address several limitations of current clinical imaging modalities, we develop a novel transfontanelle photoacoustic imaging (TFPAI) probe, which, for the first time, should allow for non-invasive structural and functional imaging of the infant brain. In this study, we test the feasibility of TFPAI for detection of experimentally-induced intra ventricular and Intraparenchymal hemorrhage phantoms in a sheep model with a surgically-induced cranial window which will serve as a model of neonatal fontanelle. This study is towards using the probe we develop for bedside monitoring of neonates with various disease conditions and complications affecting brain perfusion and oxygenation, including apnea, asphyxia, as well as for detection of various types of intracranial hemorrhages (SAH, IVH, SEPH, SDH, ICH).

  2. An Isolation Method for Assessment of Brain Mitochondria Function in Neonatal Mice with Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Caspersen, Casper S.; Sosunov, Alexander; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2010-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a method for the isolation of mitochondria from a single cerebral hemisphere in neonatal mice. Mitochondria from the normal mouse brain hemisphere isolated by the proposed method exhibited a good respiratory control ratio of 6.39 ± 0.53 during glutamate-malate-induced phosphorylating respiration. Electron microscopy showed intact mitochondria. The applicability of this method was tested on mitochondria isolated from naïve mice and their littermates subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insult prior to reperfusion resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of phosphorylating respiration compared to naïve littermates. This was associated with a profound depletion of the ATP content in the ischemic hemisphere. The expression for Mn superoxide dismutase and cytochrome C (markers for the integrity of the mitochondrial matrix and outer membrane) was determined by Western blot to control for mitochondrial integrity and quantity in the compared samples. Thus, we have developed a method for the isolation of the cerebral mitochondria from a single hemisphere adapted to neonatal mice. This method may serve as a valuable tool to study mitochondrial function in a mouse model of immature brain injury. In addition, the suggested method enables us to examine the mitochondrial functional phenotype in immature mice with a targeted genetic alteration. PMID:18349523

  3. Influence of dietary gangliosides on neonatal brain development.

    PubMed

    McJarrow, Paul; Schnell, Nicholas; Jumpsen, Jacqueline; Clandinin, Tom

    2009-08-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids. Gangliosides are found in human milk; understanding of the potential role of gangliosides in infant development is emerging, with suggested roles in the brain and gut. Ganglioside accretion in the developing brain is highest in utero and in early neonatal life, during the periods of dendritic branching and new synapse formation. Further, brain contains the highest relative ganglioside content in the body, particularly in neuronal cell membranes concentrated in the area of the synaptic membrane. Gangliosides are known to play a role in neuronal growth, migration and maturation, neuritogenesis, synaptogenesis, and myelination. In addition to their roles in development and structure of the brain, gangliosides also play a functional role in nerve cell communication. It is less well known whether dietary gangliosides can influence the development of cognitive function. This review summarizes current knowledge on the role gangliosides play in brain development.

  4. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the neonatal brain in high-risk neonates: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Salerno, C C; Pretorius, D H; Hilton, S W; O'Boyle, M K; Hull, A D; James, G M; Riccabona, M; Mannino, F; Craft, A; Nelson, T R

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the utility of three-dimensional ultrasonography versus two-dimensional ultrasonography in imaging the neonatal brain. Thirty patients in the neonatal intensive care unit underwent two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography. The resultant two- and three-dimensional images recorded on film and three-dimensional volumes (reviewed on a workstation) were evaluated independently. Comparable numbers of normal and abnormal studies were diagnosed by each modality. Axial images were considered useful in approximately 50% of three-dimensional cases. Image quality, overall and in the far-field, was rated higher on two-dimensional images. Three-dimensional sonographic acquisition time in the neonatal intensive care unit (1.7 min+/-0.7 standard deviation) was significantly shorter than that for two-dimensional sonography (9.0+/-4.5 min). The total time for evaluation on the three-dimensional workstation (4.4+/-1.1 min) was significantly less than that for two-dimensional images on film (10.6+/-4.7 min). In conclusion, three-dimensional ultrasonography is a promising, diagnostically accurate, and efficient imaging tool for evaluation of the neonatal brain; however, visualization must improve before it can replace two-dimensional ultrasonography.

  5. Spontaneous, synchronous electrical activity in neonatal mouse cortical neurones

    PubMed Central

    Corlew, Rebekah; Bosma, Martha M; Moody, William J

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous [Ca2+]i transients were measured in the mouse neocortex from embryonic day 16 (E16) to postnatal day 6 (P6). On the day of birth (P0), cortical neurones generated widespread, highly synchronous [Ca2+]i transients over large areas. On average, 52% of neurones participated in these transients, and in 20% of slices, an average of 80% participated. These transients were blocked by TTX and nifedipine, indicating that they resulted from Ca2+ influx during electrical activity, and occurred at a mean frequency of 0.91 min−1. The occurrence of this activity was highly centred at P0: at E16 and P2 an average of only 15% and 24% of neurones, respectively, participated in synchronous transients, and they occurred at much lower frequencies at both E16 and P2 than at P0. The overall frequency of [Ca2+]i transients in individual cells did not change between E16 and P2, just the degree of their synchronicity. The onset of this spontaneous, synchronous activity correlated with a large increase in Na+ current density that occurred just before P0, and its cessation with a large decrease in resting resistance that occurred just after P2. This widespread, synchronous activity may serve a variety of functions in the neonatal nervous system. PMID:15297578

  6. Effects of Prenatal Testosterone Exposure on Sexually Dimorphic Gene Expression in the Neonatal Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Armoskus, Chris; Mota, Thomas; Moreira, Debbie; Tsai, Houng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objective Using gene expression microarrays and reverse transcription with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we have recently identified several novel genes that are differentially expressed in the neonatal male versus female mouse cortex/hippocampus (Armoskus et al.). Since perinatal testosterone (T) secreted by the developing testes masculinizes cortical and hippocampal structures and the behaviors regulated by these brain regions, we hypothesized that sexually dimorphic expression of specific selected genes in these areas might be regulated by T during early development. Methods To test our hypothesis, we treated timed pregnant female mice daily with vehicle or testosterone propionate (TP) starting on embryonic day 16 until the day of birth. The cortex/hippocampus was collected from vehicle- and TP-treated, male and female neonatal pups. Total RNA was extracted from these brain tissues, followed by RT-qPCR to measure relative mRNA levels of seven sex chromosome genes and three autosomal genes that have previously showed sex differences. Results The effect of prenatal TP was confirmed as it stimulated Dhcr24 expression in the neonatal mouse cortex/hippocampus and increased the anogenital distance in females. We found a significant effect of sex, but not TP, on expression of three Y-linked (Ddx3y, Eif2s3y, and Kdm5d), four X-linked (Eif2s3x, Kdm6a, Mid1, and Xist), and one autosomal (Klk8) genes in the neonatal mouse cortex/hippocampus. Conclusion Although most of the selected genes are not directly regulated by prenatal T, their sexually dimorphic expression might play an important role in the control of sexually differentiated cognitive and social behaviors as well as in the etiology of sex-biased neurological disorders and mental illnesses. PMID:25411648

  7. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity. PMID:27047695

  8. Inflammatory injury to the neonatal brain - what can we do?

    PubMed

    Ofek-Shlomai, Noa; Berger, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal brain damage is one of the leading causes of life long disability. This damage could be hypoxic-ischemic, inflammatory, or both. This mini-review discusses different interventions aiming at minimizing inflammatory processes in the neonatal brain, both before and after insult. Current options of anti-inflammatory measures for neonates remain quite limited. We describe current anti-inflammatory intervention strategies such as avoiding perinatal infection and inflammation, and reducing exposure to inflammatory processes. We describe the known effects of anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids, antibiotics, and indomethacin, and the possible anti-inflammatory role of other substances such as IL-1 receptor antagonists, erythropoietin, caffeine, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor, and melatonin as well as endogenous protectors, and genetic regulation of inflammation. If successful, these may decrease mortality and long-term morbidity among term and pre-term infants.

  9. Neurogenesis and maturation in neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Natalina; Tomasi, Simone; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of preterm birth is on the rise. The outcome of premature birth can vary widely, spanning completely normal development to severe neurologic deficits, with most children showing mild to moderate cognitive delay and increased incidence of neuropsychiatric conditions such as anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity, and autism spectrum disorders. Several animal models have been employed to study the consequences of prematurity, one of the most promising being chronic perinatal hypoxia in mouse, which recapitulates the cognitive impairments, partial recovery over time and enhanced recovery with environmental enrichment.

  10. Activity-Dependent Callosal Axon Projections in Neonatal Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Hirano, Tomoo

    2012-01-01

    Callosal axon projections are among the major long-range axonal projections in the mammalian brain. They are formed during the prenatal and early postnatal periods in the mouse, and their development relies on both activity-independent and -dependent mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent findings about the roles of neuronal activity in callosal axon projections. In addition to the well-documented role of sensory-driven neuronal activity, recent studies using in utero electroporation demonstrated an essential role of spontaneous neuronal activity generated in neonatal cortical circuits. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal activities are critically involved in the axon development. Studies have begun to reveal intracellular signaling pathway which works downstream of neuronal activity. We also review several distinct patterns of neuronal activity observed in the developing cerebral cortex, which might play roles in activity-dependent circuit construction. Such neuronal activity during the neonatal period can be disrupted by genetic factors, such as mutations in ion channels. It has been speculated that abnormal activity caused by such factors may affect activity-dependent circuit construction, leading to some developmental disorders. We discuss a possibility that genetic mutation in ion channels may impair callosal axon projections through an activity-dependent mechanism. PMID:23213574

  11. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7) rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury. PMID:21933448

  12. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  13. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  14. Neonatal Surgery for Noncardiac Congenital Anomalies: Neonates at Risk of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stolwijk, Lisanne J; Keunen, Kristin; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A; Lemmers, Petra M A; Benders, Manon J N L

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the incidence of brain injury after neonatal surgery for noncardiac congenital anomalies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI was obtained in 101 infants at 7 days [range: 1-115] after neonatal surgery for major noncardiac congenital anomalies. Brain injury was assessed using T1, T2, diffusion weighted imaging, and susceptibility-weighted imaging. Thirty-two preterm infants (<37 weeks of gestation) and 69 full-term infants were included. MRI abnormalities were found in 24 (75%) preterm and 40 (58%) full-term infants. Parenchymal lesions were noted in 23 preterm (72%) and 29 full-term infants (42%). These consisted of punctate white matter lesions (n = 45), punctate cerebellar lesions (n = 17), thalamic infarction (n = 5), and periventricular hemorrhagic infarction (n = 4). Nonparenchymal abnormalities were found in 9 (28%) preterm and 26 (38%) full-term infants. These included supra- and infratentorial subdural hemorrhages (n = 30), intraventricular hemorrhage grade II (n = 7), and asymptomatic sinovenous thrombosis (n = 1). A combination of parenchymal lesions was present in 21 infants. Of infants who had an MRI within 10 days after surgery, punctate white matter lesions were visible on diffusion weighted imaging in 22 (61%), suggestive of recent ischemic origin. Type of congenital anomaly and prematurity were most predictive of brain injury. Infants who have neonatal surgery for noncardiac congenital anomalies are at risk of brain injury, potentially accounting for the neurodevelopmental delay frequently observed in this population. Further research is warranted into potential mechanisms of brain injury and its timing of onset. Long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up is needed in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of sexually dimorphic genes in the neonatal mouse cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Armoskus, Chris; Moreira, Debbie; Bollinger, Kayla; Jimenez, Oliva; Taniguchi, Saori; Tsai, Houng-Wei

    2014-05-08

    The cerebral cortex and hippocampus are important for the control of cognitive functions and social behaviors, many of which are sexually dimorphic and tightly regulated by gonadal steroid hormones via activation of their respective nuclear receptors. As different levels of sex steroid hormones are present between the sexes during early development and their receptors act as transcription factors to regulate gene expression, we hypothesize that sexually dimorphic gene expression in the developing mouse cortex and hippocampus might result in sex differences in brain structures and neural circuits governing distinct behaviors between the sexes as adults. To test our hypothesis, we used gene expression microarrays to identify 90 candidate genes differentially expressed in the neonatal cortex/hippocampus between male and female mice, including 55 male-biased and 35 female-biased genes. Among these genes, sexually dimorphic expression of eight sex chromosome genes was confirmed by reverse transcription with quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), including three located on the X chromosome (Xist, Eif2s3x, and Kdm6a), three on the Y chromosome (Ddx3y, Eif2s3y, and Kdm5d), and two in the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes (Erdr1 and Mid1). In addition, five autosomal genes (Cd151, Dab2, Klk8, Meg3, and Prkdc) were also validated for their sexually dimorphic expression in the neonatal mouse cortex/hippocampus. Gene Ontology annotation analysis suggests that many of these sexually dimorphic genes are involved in histone modifications, cell proliferation/death, androgen/estrogen signaling pathways, and synaptic organization, and these biological processes have been implicated in differential neural development, cognitive function, and neurological diseases between the sexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treating neonatal brain injury - promise and inherent research challenges.

    PubMed

    Sävman, Karin; Brown, Kelly L

    2010-01-01

    In this review we discuss current challenges faced by researchers and clinician-scientists in the pursuit of therapeutics to treat hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury in term infants. At present, there is an absence of neuroprotective drugs that are safe and effective for the protection of neonates from neurological sequels after HI. We discuss secondary neurotoxic processes elicited by HI that may be targets for therapeutic interventions with a specific focus on inflammatory mechanisms. Advances in research to unravel these cellular processes and molecular mechanisms that drive injurious processes after HI have traditionally been plagued by conflicting results when assessing different times for intervention, different models for brain injury, and the adult versus neonate brain. We attribute impeded drug development in part to such disparate results and general difficulties to conduct a stringent, comprehensive analysis of candidate drugs prior to clinical trials. It will be imperative to implement changes in the clinic and laboratory in order for future drug initiatives to achieve success. We also provide a brief discussion on the pursuit of anti-inflammatory molecules and monitoring methods that are the focus of current patents and that, in our opinion, may lead to important new developments in the treatment of HI brain injury in newborn infants.

  18. Structural network analysis of brain development in young preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Colin J; Miller, Steven P; Booth, Brian G; Andrews, Shawn; Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2014-11-01

    Preterm infants develop differently than those born at term and are at higher risk of brain pathology. Thus, an understanding of their development is of particular importance. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of preterm infants offers a window into brain development at a very early age, an age at which that development is not yet fully understood. Recent works have used DTI to analyze structural connectome of the brain scans using network analysis. These studies have shown that, even from infancy, the brain exhibits small-world properties. Here we examine a cohort of 47 normal preterm neonates (i.e., without brain injury and with normal neurodevelopment at 18 months of age) scanned between 27 and 45 weeks post-menstrual age to further the understanding of how the structural connectome develops. We use full-brain tractography to find white matter tracts between the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions defined in the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill neonatal atlas. We then analyze the resulting connectomes and explore the differences between weighting edges by tract count versus fractional anisotropy. We observe that the brain networks in preterm infants, much like infants born at term, show high efficiency and clustering measures across a range of network scales. Further, the development of many individual region-pair connections, particularly in the frontal and occipital lobes, is significantly correlated with age. Finally, we observe that the preterm infant connectome remains highly efficient yet becomes more clustered across this age range, leading to a significant increase in its small-world structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracerebroventricular and Intravascular Injection of Viral Particles and Fluorescent Microbeads into the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Kosugi, Isao; Sakao-Suzuki, Makiko; Meguro, Shiori; Tsutsui, Yoshihiro; Iwashita, Toshihide

    2016-07-24

    In the study on the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis, the infection method is critical. The first of the two main infectious routes to the brain is the hematogenous route, which involves infection of the endothelial cells and pericytes of the brain. The second is the intracerebroventricular (ICV) route. Once within the central nervous system (CNS), viruses may spread to the subarachnoid space, meninges, and choroid plexus via the cerebrospinal fluid. In experimental models, the earliest stages of CNS viral distribution are not well characterized, and it is unclear whether only certain cells are initially infected. Here, we have analyzed the distribution of cytomegalovirus (CMV) particles during the acute phase of infection, termed primary viremia, following ICV or intravascular (IV) injection into the neonatal mouse brain. In the ICV injection model, 5 µl of murine CMV (MCMV) or fluorescent microbeads were injected into the lateral ventricle at the midpoint between the ear and eye using a 10-µl syringe with a 27 G needle. In the IV injection model, a 1-ml syringe with a 35 G needle was used. A transilluminator was used to visualize the superficial temporal (facial) vein of the neonatal mouse. We infused 50 µl of MCMV or fluorescent microbeads into the superficial temporal vein. Brains were harvested at different time points post-injection. MCMV genomes were detected using the in situ hybridization method. Fluorescent microbeads or green fluorescent protein expressing recombinant MCMV particles were observed by fluorescent microscopy. These techniques can be applied to many other pathogens to investigate the pathogenesis of encephalitis.

  20. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  1. Impact of sex and gonadal steroids on neonatal brain structure.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Wang, Jiaping; Zhu, Hongtu; Geng, Xiujuan; Woolson, Sandra; Hamer, Robert M; Konneker, Thomas; Styner, Martin; Gilmore, John H

    2014-10-01

    There are numerous reports of sexual dimorphism in brain structure in children and adults, but data on sex differences in infancy are extremely limited. Our primary goal was to identify sex differences in neonatal brain structure. Our secondary goal was to explore whether brain structure was related to androgen exposure or sensitivity. Two hundred and ninety-three neonates (149 males) received high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Sensitivity to androgen was measured using the number of cytosine, adenine, guanine (CAG) triplets in the androgen receptor gene and the ratio of the second to fourth digit, provided a proxy measure of prenatal androgen exposure. There was a significant sex difference in intracranial volume of 5.87%, which was not related to CAG triplets or digit ratios. Tensor-based morphometry identified extensive areas of local sexual dimorphism. Males had larger volumes in medial temporal cortex and rolandic operculum, and females had larger volumes in dorsolateral prefrontal, motor, and visual cortices. Androgen exposure and sensitivity had minor sex-specific effects on local gray matter volume, but did not appear to be the primary determinant of sexual dimorphism at this age. Comparing our study with the existing literature suggests that sex differences in cortical structure vary in a complex and highly dynamic way across the human lifespan. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. MRI for premature neonatal brain injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Langham, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    This case report aims to extend analytical thinking and clinical reasoning of clinicians and radiographers when presented with diagnosing premature neonatal brain injuries (PNBI). The report considers the uses and merit of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the primary assessment of PNBI. The traditional technique of cranial ultrasound as the first modality of choice can have several limitations, which includes a lower temporal resolution in its ability to differentiate grey-white matter distribution patterns, lower spatial resolution in its ability to accurately map white matter fibre tracts and distribution patterns which are critical in white matter injury pathological events. In this specific case report, MRI was useful for the assessment of haemorrhagic brain injury post partum.Therefore, should MRI be considered, the primary imaging modality in these cases when the concerns about PNBI is presented? This case study explores the current trends in MRI neonatal brain imaging and advancements being made in this field. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  3. Neuroprotection by Caffeine in Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Endesfelder, Stefanie; Weichelt, Ulrike; Strauß, Evelyn; Schlör, Anja; Sifringer, Marco; Scheuer, Till; Bührer, Christoph; Schmitz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Sequelae of prematurity triggered by oxidative stress and free radical-mediated tissue damage have coined the term “oxygen radical disease of prematurity”. Caffeine, a potent free radical scavenger and adenosine receptor antagonist, reduces rates of brain damage in preterm infants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of caffeine on oxidative stress markers, anti-oxidative response, inflammation, redox-sensitive transcription factors, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. The brain of a rat pups at postnatal Day 6 (P6) corresponds to that of a human fetal brain at 28–32 weeks gestation and the neonatal rat is an ideal model in which to investigate effects of oxidative stress and neuroprotection of caffeine on the developing brain. Six-day-old Wistar rats were pre-treated with caffeine and exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 and 48 h. Caffeine reduced oxidative stress marker (heme oxygenase-1, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)), promoted anti-oxidative response (superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 1, and sulfiredoxin 1), down-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, modulated redox-sensitive transcription factor expression (Nrf2/Keap1, and NFκB), reduced pro-apoptotic effectors (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and caspase-3), and diminished extracellular matrix degeneration (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2, and inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1/2). Our study affirms that caffeine is a pleiotropic neuroprotective drug in the developing brain due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties. PMID:28106777

  4. Neuroprotection by Caffeine in Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Endesfelder, Stefanie; Weichelt, Ulrike; Strauß, Evelyn; Schlör, Anja; Sifringer, Marco; Scheuer, Till; Bührer, Christoph; Schmitz, Thomas

    2017-01-18

    Sequelae of prematurity triggered by oxidative stress and free radical-mediated tissue damage have coined the term "oxygen radical disease of prematurity". Caffeine, a potent free radical scavenger and adenosine receptor antagonist, reduces rates of brain damage in preterm infants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of caffeine on oxidative stress markers, anti-oxidative response, inflammation, redox-sensitive transcription factors, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. The brain of a rat pups at postnatal Day 6 (P6) corresponds to that of a human fetal brain at 28-32 weeks gestation and the neonatal rat is an ideal model in which to investigate effects of oxidative stress and neuroprotection of caffeine on the developing brain. Six-day-old Wistar rats were pre-treated with caffeine and exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 and 48 h. Caffeine reduced oxidative stress marker (heme oxygenase-1, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)), promoted anti-oxidative response (superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 1, and sulfiredoxin 1), down-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, modulated redox-sensitive transcription factor expression (Nrf2/Keap1, and NFκB), reduced pro-apoptotic effectors (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and caspase-3), and diminished extracellular matrix degeneration (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2, and inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1/2). Our study affirms that caffeine is a pleiotropic neuroprotective drug in the developing brain due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties.

  5. Leptin targets in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Lachey, Jennifer L; Sternson, Scott M; Lee, Charlotte E; Elias, Carol F; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-06-10

    The central actions of leptin are essential for homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass, glucose metabolism, and many autonomic and neuroendocrine systems. In the brain, leptin acts on numerous different cell types via the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) to elicit its effects. The precise identification of leptin's cellular targets is fundamental to understanding the mechanism of its pleiotropic central actions. We have systematically characterized LepRb distribution in the mouse brain using in situ hybridization in wildtype mice as well as by EYFP immunoreactivity in a novel LepRb-IRES-Cre EYFP reporter mouse line showing high levels of LepRb mRNA/EYFP coexpression. We found substantial LepRb mRNA and EYFP expression in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sites described before, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus, ventral tegmental area, parabrachial nucleus, and the dorsal vagal complex. Expression in insular cortex, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, rostral linear nucleus, and in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus was also observed and had been previously unreported. The LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to chemically characterize a population of leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the midbrain. Tyrosine hydroxylase and Cre reporter were found to be coexpressed in the ventral tegmental area and in other midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, the LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to map the extent of peripheral leptin sensing by central nervous system (CNS) LepRb neurons. Thus, we provide data supporting the use of the LepRb-IRES-Cre line for the assessment of the anatomic and functional characteristics of neurons expressing leptin receptor.

  6. Sirt1 regulates glial progenitor proliferation and regeneration in white matter after neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Beata; Gierdalski, Marcin; Chew, Li-Jin; Hawley, Teresa; Catron, Mackenzie; Lichauco, Arturo; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Yuen, Tracy; Rowitch, David; Gallo, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative processes in brain pathologies require the production of distinct neural cell populations from endogenous progenitor cells. We have previously demonstrated that oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation is crucial for oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxia (HX) that reproduces diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) of premature infants. Here we identify the histone deacetylase Sirt1 as a Cdk2 regulator in OPC proliferation and response to HX. HX enhances Sirt1 and Sirt1/Cdk2 complex formation through HIF1α activation. Sirt1 deacetylates retinoblastoma (Rb) in the Rb/E2F1 complex, leading to dissociation of E2F1 and enhanced OPC proliferation. Sirt1 knockdown in culture and its targeted ablation in vivo suppresses basal and HX-induced OPC proliferation. Inhibition of Sirt1 also promotes OPC differentiation after HX. Our results indicate that Sirt1 is an essential regulator of OPC proliferation and OL regeneration after neonatal brain injury. Therefore, enhancing Sirt1 activity may promote OL recovery after DWMI. PMID:27991597

  7. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. )

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  8. Propofol-induced apoptosis of neurones and oligodendrocytes in fetal and neonatal rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, C; Dikranian, K; Dissen, G; Martin, L; Olney, J; Brambrink, A

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the fetal or neonatal non-human primate (NHP) brain to isoflurane or ketamine for 5 h causes widespread apoptotic degeneration of neurones, and exposure to isoflurane also causes apoptotic degeneration of oligodendrocytes (OLs). The present study explored the apoptogenic potential of propofol in the fetal and neonatal NHP brain. Fetal rhesus macaques at gestational age 120 days were exposed in utero, or postnatal day 6 rhesus neonates were exposed directly for 5 h to propofol anaesthesia (n=4 fetuses; and n=4 neonates) or to no anaesthesia (n=4 fetuses; n=5 neonates), and the brains were systematically evaluated 3 h later for evidence of apoptotic degeneration of neurones or glia. Exposure of fetal or neonatal NHP brain to propofol caused a significant increase in apoptosis of neurones, and of OLs at a stage when OLs were just beginning to myelinate axons. Apoptotic degeneration affected similar brain regions but to a lesser extent than we previously described after isoflurane. The number of OLs affected by propofol was approximately equal to the number of neurones affected at both developmental ages. In the fetus, neuroapoptosis affected particularly subcortical and caudal regions, while in the neonate injury involved neocortical regions in a distinct laminar pattern and caudal brain regions were less affected. Propofol anaesthesia for 5 h caused death of neurones and OLs in both the fetal and neonatal NHP brain. OLs become vulnerable to the apoptogenic action of propofol when they are beginning to achieve myelination competence.

  9. Organization of pontine reticulospinal inputs to motoneurons controlling axial and limb muscles in the neonatal mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Magne S.; Glover, Joel C.

    2014-01-01

    Using optical recording of synaptically mediated calcium transients and selective spinal lesions, we investigated the pattern of activation of spinal motoneurons (MNs) by the pontine reticulospinal projection in isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparations from the neonatal mouse. Stimulation sites throughout the region where the pontine reticulospinal neurons reside reliably activated MNs at cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels. Activation was similar in MNs ipsi- and contralateral to the stimulation site, similar in medial and lateral motor columns that contain trunk and limb MNs, respectively, and similar in the L2 and L5 segments that predominantly contain flexor and extensor MNs, respectively. In nonlesioned preparations, responses in both ipsi- and contralateral MNs followed individual stimuli in stimulus trains nearly one-to-one (with few failures). After unilateral hemisection at C1 on the same side as the stimulation, responses had substantially smaller magnitudes and longer latencies and no longer followed individual stimuli. After unilateral hemisection at C1 on the side opposite to the stimulation, the responses were also smaller, but their latencies were not affected. Thus we distinguish two pontine reticulospinal pathways to spinal MNs, one uncrossed and the other crossed, of which the uncrossed pathway transmits more faithfully and appears to be more direct. PMID:24944221

  10. Brain Maturation in Neonatal Rodents is Impeded by Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Rany; Lee, Hedok; Feng, Tian; Park, June-Hee; Nedergaard, Maiken; Jacob, Zvi; Enikolopov, Grigori; Benveniste, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of data shows neuronal demise after general anesthesia in the very young rodent brain. Here we apply proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), testing the hypothesis that neurotoxic exposure during peak synaptogenesis can be tracked via changes in neuronal metabolites. Methods 1HMRS spectra was acquired in the brain (thalamus) of neonatal rat pups 24- and 48 h after sevoflurane exposure on post-natal day (PND) 7 and 15, and in unexposed, sham controls. A repeated measure ANOVA was performed to examine if changes in metabolites were different between exposed and unexposed groups. Sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity on PND7 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results In unexposed PND7 pups (N=21), concentration of NAA ([NAA]) increased by 16% from PND8 to PND9, whereas in exposed PND7 pups (N=19), [NAA] did not change and concentration of choline compounds ([GPC+PCh]) decreased by 25%. In PND15 rats, [NAA] increased from PND16 to PND17 for both the exposed (N=14) and unexposed (N=16) groups. Two-way ANOVA for PND7 pups demonstrated changes over time observed in [NAA] (p=0.031) and [GPC+PCh] (p=0.024) were different between those two groups. Conclusions We demonstrated that normal [NAA] increase from PND8 to PND9 was impeded in sevoflurane-exposed rats when exposed at PND7; however, not impeded when exposed on PND15. Furthermore, we showed that non-invasive 1HMRS is sufficiently sensitive to detect subtle differences in developmental time trajectory of [NAA]. This is potentially clinically relevant since 1HMRS can be applied across species, and may be useful in providing evidence of neurotoxicity in the human neonatal brain. PMID:26181336

  11. Long-Term Correction of Sandhoff Disease Following Intravenous Delivery of rAAV9 to Mouse Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Altaleb, Naderah; Bello, Alexander; Kruck, Christa; LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hurlbut, David; Hemming, Richard; Kobinger, Gary P; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses are severe neurodegenerative disorders resulting from a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase A activity and lacking effective therapies. Using a Sandhoff disease (SD) mouse model (Hexb−/−) of the GM2 gangliosidoses, we tested the potential of systemically delivered adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) expressing Hexb cDNA to correct the neurological phenotype. Neonatal or adult SD and normal mice were intravenously injected with AAV9-HexB or –LacZ and monitored for serum β-hexosaminidase activity, motor function, and survival. Brain GM2 ganglioside, β-hexosaminidase activity, and inflammation were assessed at experimental week 43, or an earlier humane end point. SD mice injected with AAV9-LacZ died by 17 weeks of age, whereas all neonatal AAV9-HexB–treated SD mice survived until 43 weeks (P < 0.0001) with only three exhibiting neurological dysfunction. SD mice treated as adults with AAV9-HexB died between 17 and 35 weeks. Neonatal SD-HexB–treated mice had a significant increase in brain β-hexosaminidase activity, and a reduction in GM2 ganglioside storage and neuroinflammation compared to adult SD-HexB– and SD-LacZ–treated groups. However, at 43 weeks, 8 of 10 neonatal-HexB injected control and SD mice exhibited liver or lung tumors. This study demonstrates the potential for long-term correction of SD and other GM2 gangliosidoses through early rAAV9 based systemic gene therapy. PMID:25515709

  12. Brain size at birth throughout human evolution: a new method for estimating neonatal brain size in hominins.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, Jeremy M; Lesnik, Julie J

    2008-12-01

    An increase in brain size is a hallmark of human evolution. Questions regarding the evolution of brain development and obstetric constraints in the human lineage can be addressed with accurate estimates of the size of the brain at birth in hominins. Previous estimates of brain size at birth in fossil hominins have been calculated from regressions of neonatal body or brain mass to adult body mass, but this approach is problematic for two reasons: modern humans are outliers for these regressions, and hominin adult body masses are difficult to estimate. To accurately estimate the brain size at birth in extinct human ancestors, an equation is needed for which modern humans fit the anthropoid regression and one in which the hominin variable entered into the regression equation has limited error. Using phylogenetically sensitive statistics, a resampling approach, and brain-mass data from the literature and from National Primate Research Centers on 362 neonates and 2802 adults from eight different anthropoid species, we found that the size of the adult brain can strongly predict the size of the neonatal brain (r2=0.97). This regression predicts human brain size, indicating that humans have precisely the brain size expected as an adult given the size of the brain at birth. We estimated the size of the neonatal brain in fossil hominins from a reduced major axis regression equation using published cranial capacities of 89 adult fossil crania. We suggest that australopiths gave birth to infants with cranial capacities that were on average 180cc (95% CI: 158-205cc), slightly larger than the average neonatal brain size of chimpanzees. Neonatal brain size increased in early Homo to 225cc (95% CI: 198-257cc) and in Homo erectus to approximately 270cc (95% CI: 237-310cc). These results have implications for interpreting the evolution of the birth process and brain development in all hominins from the australopiths and early Homo, through H. erectus, to Homo sapiens.

  13. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia.

    PubMed

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn; Munir, Jared; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-11-26

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiation of the donor cells is influenced by the host environment, such that more donor cells differentiated as oligodendrocytes in the hypomyelinated shiverer brain than in myelin wild-types, in which hGPCs were more likely to remain as progenitors. Yet in each recipient, both the number and relative proportion of mouse GPCs fell as a function of time, concomitant with the mitotic expansion and spread of donor hGPCs. By a year after neonatal xenograft, the forebrain GPC populations of implanted mice were largely, and often entirely, of human origin. Thus, neonatally implanted hGPCs outcompeted and ultimately replaced the host population of mouse GPCs, ultimately generating mice with a humanized glial progenitor population. These human glial chimeric mice should permit us to define the specific contributions of glia to a broad variety of neurological disorders, using human cells in vivo.

  14. Involvement of activin signaling in abnormalities of mouse vagina exposed neonatally to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2011-06-01

    Perinatal exposure to a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), causes cervicovaginal adenosis and permanent hyperplastic cornified vaginal epithelium with keratinization in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of the induction of vaginal abnormalities by DES, we have focused on activin A signaling. We have found that the βA-subunit mRNA is mainly expressed in the neonatal vaginal stroma, whereas activin A receptor type IB is localized in the neonatal vaginal epithelium. SMAD2, the intracellular signaling protein, is phosphorylated in the neonatal vagina. Cell proliferation in the vaginal epithelium grown in vitro is reduced by DES treatment or by activin signaling suppression through inhibin treatment. Thus, activin A (a homodimer of the βA-subunit) in the stroma stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in the neonatal vagina. DES treatment decreases the expression of the βA-subunit and activin receptor IIB but increases the expression of the βB-subunit and inhibin receptor. Neonatal DES treatment inhibits the phosphorylation of SMAD2 in the vaginal epithelium, indicating the inhibition of activin A signaling in the vaginal epithelium by neonatal DES treatment. Treatment with DES or inhibin, a native antagonist of activin, induces adenosis-like structures and keratinization in the vagina grown in vitro. These data suggest that the suppression of activin A signaling by DES is involved in the induction of cervicovaginal adenosis and keratinization in the neonatal mouse vaginal epithelium.

  15. Neuropeptide Y mediates the initial hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to maternal separation in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mathias V; Liebl, Claudia; Sterlemann, Vera; Ganea, Karin; Hartmann, Jakob; Harbich, Daniela; Alam, Stephanie; Müller, Marianne B

    2008-05-01

    The function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of the neonatal mouse or rat is characterized by a period of quiescence, where mild stimuli are unable to elicit a pronounced increase in circulating corticosterone. A disruption of this period by maternal separation has been shown to result in a variety of long-term consequences, including neuroendocrine and behavioral disturbances. We have recently shown that peripheral metabolic markers like glucose or ghrelin are altered by maternal separation and that these changes precede the effects on corticosterone secretion. In the current study, we investigated whether the initial activation of the HPA axis is mediated via neuropeptide Y (NPY). To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of an 8 h maternal separation in NPY-deficient mice. In addition, we compared the effect of the genotype with the previously described pharmacological effect of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. We could show that the peripheral response to maternal separation is decreased in NPY heterozygous and homozygous animals. In addition, maternal separation effects on corticotropin releasing hormone and glucocorticoid receptor expression in the brain were prevented in NPY-deficient pups. These effects were similar to a pharmacological ghrelin receptor blockade. We conclude that metabolic signals via an NPY-mediated pathway play a crucial role in activating the stress system of the neonatal mouse.

  16. Stem cell therapy for neonatal brain injury: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Titomanlio, Luigi; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dalous, Jeremie; Mani, Shyamala; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Heijnen, Cobi; Baud, Olivier; Gressens, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major health problem caused by brain damage during pregnancy, delivery, or the immediate postnatal period. Perinatal stroke, intraventricular hemorrhage, and asphyxia are the most common causes of neonatal brain damage. Periventricular white matter damage (periventricular leukomalacia) is the predominant form in premature infants and the most common antecedent of cerebral palsy. Stem cell treatment has proven effective in restoring injured organs and tissues in animal models. The potential of stem cells for self-renewal and differentiation translates into substantial neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in the animal brain, with minimal risks of rejection and side effects. Stem cell treatments described to date have used neural stem cells, embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Most of these treatments are still experimental. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of stem cell therapy in animal models of cerebral palsy, and discuss potential implications for current and future clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  17. Distribution of Cytoglobin in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Stefan; Wystub, Sylvia; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex (CCo), in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells), in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes), basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum (VP)), and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes) were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei), epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus (SC). The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive (Cygb-IR) fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide (NO)-synthase in neurons, which supports a

  18. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  19. Staining and embedding the whole mouse brain for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Shawn; Binding, Jonas; Denk, Winfried

    2012-12-01

    The development of methods for imaging large contiguous volumes with the electron microscope could allow the complete mapping of a whole mouse brain at the single-axon level. We developed a method based on prolonged immersion that enables staining and embedding of the entire mouse brain with uniform myelin staining and a moderate preservation of the tissue's ultrastructure. We tested the ability to follow myelinated axons using serial block-face electron microscopy.

  20. Effects of birth asphyxia on neonatal hippocampal structure and function in the spiny mouse.

    PubMed

    Fleiss, B; Coleman, H A; Castillo-Melendez, M; Ireland, Z; Walker, D W; Parkington, H C

    2011-11-01

    Studies of human neonates, and in animal experiments, suggest that birth asphyxia results in functional compromise of the hippocampus, even when structural damage is not observable or resolves in early postnatal life. The aim of this study was to determine if changes in hippocampal function occur in a model of birth asphyxia in the precocial spiny mouse where it is reported there is no major lesion or infarct. Further, to assess if, as in human infants, this functional deficit has a sex-dependent component. At 37 days gestation (term=39 days) spiny mice fetuses were either delivered immediately by caesarean section (control group) or exposed to 7.5min of in utero asphyxia causing systemic acidosis and hypoxia. At 5 days of age hippocampal function was assessed ex vivo in brain slices, or brains were collected for examination of structure or protein expression. This model of birth asphyxia did not cause infarct or cystic lesion in the postnatal day 5 (P5) hippocampus, and the number of proliferating or pyknotic cells in the hippocampus was unchanged, although neuronal density in the CA1 and CA3 was increased. Protein expression of synaptophysin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and the inositol trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP(3)R1) were all significantly increased after birth asphyxia, while long-term potentiation (LTP), paired pulse facilitation (PPF), and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) were all reduced at P5 by birth asphyxia. In control P5 pups, PPF and synaptic fatigue were greater in female compared to male pups, and after birth asphyxia PPF and synaptic fatigue were reduced to a greater extent in female vs. male pups. In contrast, the asphyxia-induced increase in synaptophysin expression and neuronal density were greater in male pups. Thus, birth asphyxia in this precocial species causes functional deficits without major structural damage, and there is a sex-dependent effect on the hippocampus. This may be a clinically relevant model for assessing

  1. Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinchao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Fengfang; Lin, Weinian

    2015-01-01

    Damage-activated stem/progenitor cells play important roles in regenerating lost cells and in tissue repair. Previous studies reported that the mouse utricle has limited hair cell regeneration ability after hair cell ablation. However, the potential progenitor cell population regenerating new hair cells remains undiscovered. In this study, we first found that Lgr5, a Wnt target gene that is not usually expressed in the neonatal mouse utricle, can be activated by 24 h neomycin treatment in a sub-population of supporting cells in the striolar region of the neonatal mouse utricle. Lineage tracing demonstrated that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate new hair cells in explant culture. We isolated the damage-activated Lgr5-positive cells with flow cytometry and found that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate hair cells in vitro, and self-renew to form spheres, which maintained the capacity to differentiate into hair cells over seven generations of passages. Our results suggest that damage-activated Lgr5-positive supporting cells act as hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse utricle, which may help to uncover a potential route to regenerate hair cell in mammals. PMID:25883551

  2. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain.

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae brain abscess in neonates: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Agrawal, Sunil; Chacham, Swathi; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Dutta, Sourabh; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-03-01

    Brain abscesses are uncommon in neonates. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a very uncommon microbial agent to cause brain abscess. We report 2 infants with Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis who developed brain abscesses. One infant was a premature neonate who required mechanical ventilation for respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently developed nosocomial sepsis and brain abscess without evidence of preceding meningitis. Another infant was a full-term neonate without risk factors for sepsis who developed seizures on the sixth postnatal day and was found to have meningitis and brain abscess. Both infants had Klebsiella pneumoniae septicemia with multiple relatively large brain abscesses that responded poorly to antimicrobial agents. These infants were managed with transfontanel drainage and prolonged courses of antimicrobial agents. Key message of this report is that Klebsiella pneumoniae brain abscess may occur in the absence of meningitis and even in the absence of any identifiable risk factors.

  4. Viral transduction of the neonatal brain delivers controllable genetic mosaicism for visualizing and manipulating neuronal circuits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yoen; Ash, Ryan T.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Levites, Yona; Golde, Todd E.; Smirnakis, Stelios M.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal intraventricular injection of adeno-associated virus has been shown to transduce neurons widely throughout the brain, but its full potential for experimental neuroscience has not been adequately explored. We report a detailed analysis of the method’s versatility with an emphasis on experimental applications where tools for genetic manipulation are currently lacking. Viral injection into the neonatal mouse brain is fast, easy, and accesses regions of the brain including cerebellum and brain stem that have been difficult to target with other techniques such as electroporation. We show that viral transduction produces an inherently mosaic expression pattern that can be exploited by varying the titer to transduce isolated neurons or densely-packed populations. We demonstrate that expression of virally-encoded proteins is active much sooner than previously believed, allowing genetic perturbation during critical periods of neuronal plasticity, but is also long-lasting and stable, allowing chronic studies of aging. We harness these features to visualize and manipulate neurons in the hindbrain that have been recalcitrant to approaches commonly applied in the cortex. We show that viral labeling aids the analysis of postnatal dendritic maturation in cerebellar Purkinje neurons by allowing individual cells to be readily distinguished, and then demonstrate that the same sparse labeling allows live in vivo imaging of mature Purkinje neurons at resolution sufficient for complete analytical reconstruction. Given the rising availability of viral constructs, packaging services, and genetically modified animals, these techniques should facilitate a wide range of experiments into brain development, function, and degeneration. PMID:23347239

  5. Acid extrusion via blood–brain barrier causes brain alkalosis and seizures after neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Mohamed M.; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Watkins, Paul V.; Voipio, Juha; Kanold, Patrick O.; Kaila, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Birth asphyxia is often associated with a high seizure burden that is predictive of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. The mechanisms underlying birth asphyxia seizures are unknown. Using an animal model of birth asphyxia based on 6-day-old rat pups, we have recently shown that the seizure burden is linked to an increase in brain extracellular pH that consists of the recovery from the asphyxia-induced acidosis, and of a subsequent plateau level well above normal extracellular pH. In the present study, two-photon imaging of intracellular pH in neocortical neurons in vivo showed that pH changes also underwent a biphasic acid–alkaline response, resulting in an alkaline plateau level. The mean alkaline overshoot was strongly suppressed by a graded restoration of normocapnia after asphyxia. The parallel post-asphyxia increase in extra- and intracellular pH levels indicated a net loss of acid equivalents from brain tissue that was not attributable to a disruption of the blood–brain barrier, as demonstrated by a lack of increased sodium fluorescein extravasation into the brain, and by the electrophysiological characteristics of the blood–brain barrier. Indeed, electrode recordings of pH in the brain and trunk demonstrated a net efflux of acid equivalents from the brain across the blood–brain barrier, which was abolished by the Na/H exchange inhibitor, N-methyl-isobutyl amiloride. Pharmacological inhibition of Na/H exchange also suppressed the seizure activity associated with the brain-specific alkalosis. Our findings show that the post-asphyxia seizures are attributable to an enhanced Na/H exchange-dependent net extrusion of acid equivalents across the blood–brain barrier and to consequent brain alkalosis. These results suggest targeting of blood–brain barrier-mediated pH regulation as a novel approach in the prevention and therapy of neonatal seizures. PMID:23125183

  6. Acid extrusion via blood-brain barrier causes brain alkalosis and seizures after neonatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed M; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Watkins, Paul V; Voipio, Juha; Kanold, Patrick O; Kaila, Kai

    2012-11-01

    Birth asphyxia is often associated with a high seizure burden that is predictive of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. The mechanisms underlying birth asphyxia seizures are unknown. Using an animal model of birth asphyxia based on 6-day-old rat pups, we have recently shown that the seizure burden is linked to an increase in brain extracellular pH that consists of the recovery from the asphyxia-induced acidosis, and of a subsequent plateau level well above normal extracellular pH. In the present study, two-photon imaging of intracellular pH in neocortical neurons in vivo showed that pH changes also underwent a biphasic acid-alkaline response, resulting in an alkaline plateau level. The mean alkaline overshoot was strongly suppressed by a graded restoration of normocapnia after asphyxia. The parallel post-asphyxia increase in extra- and intracellular pH levels indicated a net loss of acid equivalents from brain tissue that was not attributable to a disruption of the blood-brain barrier, as demonstrated by a lack of increased sodium fluorescein extravasation into the brain, and by the electrophysiological characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Indeed, electrode recordings of pH in the brain and trunk demonstrated a net efflux of acid equivalents from the brain across the blood-brain barrier, which was abolished by the Na/H exchange inhibitor, N-methyl-isobutyl amiloride. Pharmacological inhibition of Na/H exchange also suppressed the seizure activity associated with the brain-specific alkalosis. Our findings show that the post-asphyxia seizures are attributable to an enhanced Na/H exchange-dependent net extrusion of acid equivalents across the blood-brain barrier and to consequent brain alkalosis. These results suggest targeting of blood-brain barrier-mediated pH regulation as a novel approach in the prevention and therapy of neonatal seizures.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha during neonatal brain development affects anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-15

    A nascent literature suggests that neonatal infection is a risk factor for the development of brain, behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in later life. It has been documented that neonatal infection raises the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in neonate rodents and such infections may result in neonatal brain injury, at least in part, through pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, previous studies have shown that TNF-α is involved in cellular differentiation, neurogenesis and programmed cell death during the development of the central nervous system. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to TNF-α can affect body weight, stress-induced corticosterone (COR), anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult mice. In the present study, neonatal mice were treated to recombinant mouse TNF-α (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 1 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 3 and 5, then adult male and female mice were exposed to different behavioral tests. The results indicated that neonatal TNF-α treatment reduced body weight in neonatal period in both sexes. In addition, this study presents findings indicating that high doses of TNF- increase stress-induced COR levels, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult males, but increase levels of anxiety without significantly influencing depression in adult female mice [corrected]. Our findings suggest that TNF-α exposure during neonatal period can alter brain and behavior development in a dose and sex-dependent manner in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Crawling with Virus: Translational Insights from a Neonatal Mouse Model on the Pathogenesis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Infants.

    PubMed

    You, Dahui; Saravia, Jordy; Siefker, David; Shrestha, Bishwas; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-10-07

    The infant immune response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains incompletely understood. Here we review the use of a neonatal mouse model of RSV infection to mimic severe infection in human infants. We describe numerous age-specific responses, organized by cell type, observed in RSV-infected neonatal mice and draw comparisons (when possible) to human infants.

  9. Effect of different cryoprotectant agents on spermatogenesis efficiency in cryopreserved and grafted neonatal mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Cengiz; Mullen, Brendan; Jarvi, Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Lo, Kirk C

    2013-08-01

    Restoration of male fertility associated with use of the cryopreserved testicular tissue would be a significant advance in human and animal assisted reproductive technology. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of four different cryoprotectant agents (CPA) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in cryopreserved and allotransplanted neonatal mouse testicular tissue. Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) with 5% fetal bovine serum including either 0.7 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 0.7 M propylene glycol (PrOH), 0.7 M ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol was used as the cryoprotectant solution. Donor testes were collected and dissected from neonatal pups of CD-1 mice (one day old). Freezing and seeding of the testicular whole tissues was performed using an automated controlled-rate freezer. Four fresh (non-frozen) or frozen-thawed pieces of testes were subcutaneously grafted onto the hind flank of each castrated male NCr nude recipient mouse and harvested after 3 months. Fresh neonatal testes grafts recovered from transplant sites had the most advanced rate of spermatogenesis with elongated spermatid and spermatozoa in 46.6% of seminiferous tubules and had higher levels of serum testosterone compared to all other frozen-thawed-graft groups (p<0.05). Fresh grafts and frozen-thawed grafts in the DMSO group had the highest rate of tissue survival compared to PrOH, EG, and glycerol after harvesting (p>0.05). The most effective CPA for the freezing and thawing of neonatal mouse testes was DMSO in comparison with EG (p<0.05) in both pre-grafted and post-grafted tissues based on histopathological evaluation. Likewise, the highest level of serum testosterone was obtained from the DMSO CPA group compared to all other cryoprotectants evaluated (p<0.05). The typical damage observed in the frozen-thawed grafts included disruption of the interstitial stroma, intercellular connection ruptures, and detachment of spermatogonia from the basement membrane. These findings

  10. Locomotor-like activity generated by the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bonnot, Agnès; Whelan, Patrick J; Mentis, George Z; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2002-10-01

    This report describes locomotor-like activity generated by the neonatal mouse spinal cord in vitro. We demonstrate that locomotor-like activity can be produced either spontaneously or by a train of stimuli applied to the dorsal roots or in the presence of bath-applied drugs. Calcium imaging of the motoneuron activity generated by a train of dorsal root stimuli revealed a rostrocaudally propagating component of the optical signal in the anterior lumbar (L1-L3) and in the caudal segments (S1-S4). We hypothesize that this spatio-temporal pattern arises from a rostrocaudal gradient of excitability in the relevant segments. Our experiments suggest that left/right reciprocal inhibition and NMDA-mediated oscillations are not essential mechanisms underlying rhythmogenesis in the neonatal mouse cord. Finally, our data are discussed in the context of other models of locomotion in lower and higher vertebrates.

  11. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  12. Evaluation of an automatic brain segmentation method developed for neonates on adult MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Viergever, Max A.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is of clinical relevance in images acquired at all ages. The literature presents a clear distinction between methods developed for MR images of infants, and methods developed for images of adults. The aim of this work is to evaluate a method developed for neonatal images in the segmentation of adult images. The evaluated method employs supervised voxel classification in subsequent stages, exploiting spatial and intensity information. Evaluation was performed using images available within the MRBrainS13 challenge. The obtained average Dice coefficients were 85.77% for grey matter, 88.66% for white matter, 81.08% for cerebrospinal fluid, 95.65% for cerebrum, and 96.92% for intracranial cavity, currently resulting in the best overall ranking. The possibility of applying the same method to neonatal as well as adult images can be of great value in cross-sectional studies that include a wide age range.

  13. Abnormalities of the neonatal brain: MR imaging. Part II. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Richardson, C J; Hayden, C K; Nicholas, D A; Amparo, E G

    1987-05-01

    Eighty-five infants, 82 of whom were 29-44 weeks postconceptional age, were imaged with a 0.6-T magnet. Eight infants had cerebral infarction. In premature neonates with very water, low-intensity white matter on T1-weighted images, ultrasound was better than both computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in depicting parenchymal changes of infarction or edema. However, after 37 weeks gestation, MR imaging was superior. Cerebral atrophy, present in seven infants, was consistent with subarachnoid space widths of 7 mm or more, or subarachnoid space widths of 5-6 mm with ventricular/brain ratios of 0.36 or greater. Delayed myelination was seen in a total of 18 infants with histories of hypoxic-ischemic insult. MR imaging shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of infarcts in full-term infants and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome in infants who have initial delayed myelination.

  14. Prenatal alcohol exposure affects vasculature development in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Jégou, Sylvie; El Ghazi, Faiza; de Lendeu, Pamela Kwetieu; Marret, Stéphane; Laudenbach, Vincent; Uguen, Arnaud; Marcorelles, Pascale; Roy, Vincent; Laquerrière, Annie; Gonzalez, Bruno José

    2012-12-01

    In humans, antenatal alcohol exposure elicits various developmental disorders, in particular in the brain. Numerous studies focus on the deleterious effects of alcohol on neural cells. Although recent studies suggest that alcohol can affect angiogenesis in adults, the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on brain microvasculature remains poorly understood. We used a mouse model to investigate effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cortical microvascular network in vivo and ex vivo and the action of alcohol, glutamate, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) on activity, plasticity, and survival of microvessels. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, immunohistochemistry, calcimetry, and videomicroscopy. We characterized the effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cortical microvascular network in human controls and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)/partial FAS (pFAS) patients at different developmental stages. In mice, prenatal alcohol exposure induced a reduction of cortical vascular density, loss of the radial orientation of microvessels, and altered expression of VEGF receptors. Time-lapse experiments performed on brain slices revealed that ethanol inhibited glutamate-induced calcium mobilization in endothelial cells, affected plasticity, and promoted death of microvessels. These effects were prevented by VEGF. In humans, we evidenced a stage-dependent alteration of the vascular network in the cortices of fetuses with pFAS/FAS. Whereas no modification was observed from gestational week 20 (WG20) to WG22, the radial organization of cortical microvessels was clearly altered in pFAS/FAS patients from WG30 to WG38. Prenatal alcohol exposure affects cortical angiogenesis both in mice and in pFAS/FAS patients, suggesting that vascular defects contribute to alcohol-induced brain abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  15. Systemic G-CSF treatment does not improve long-term outcomes after neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schlager, G W; Griesmaier, E; Wegleiter, K; Neubauer, V; Urbanek, M; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U; Felderhoff-Mueser, U; Keller, M

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) is a major factor in the pathogenesis of developmental brain injury, leading to cognitive deficits and motor disabilities in preterm infants. The haematopoietic growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to exert a neuroprotective activity in rodent models of ischaemic stroke and is currently subject to phase I/II clinical trials in adults. Results of studies examining the effect of G-CSF in perinatal brain damage have been contradictory. We have previously shown that G-CSF increases NMDAR-mediated excitotoxic brain injury in the neonatal mouse brain. In this study, we evaluated the effect of G-CSF on long-term outcomes after HI. On postnatal day 5, mice pubs were first randomly assigned to a sham operation or HI and then divided into four treatment groups: i) G-CSF; ii) phosphate buffered saline (PBS) 1h after injury; iii) G-CSF and iv) PBS 60 h after injury. G-CSF (200 μg/kg BW) was administered five times within a 24h interval. Neuromotor and cognitive outcomes were assessed by open-field, novel object recognition tests and rotarod tests starting on P90, with subsequent histological analyses of brain injury. G-CSF treatment did not improve either neurobehavioural outcomes or brain injuries. Interestingly, the application of PBS and G-CSF in the acute phase increased brain damage in the hippocampus. We could not confirm the neuroprotective properties of G-CSF in neonatal HI brain damage. The exacerbation of injury by the administration of substances in the acute phase might indicate a heightened state of neurological sensitivity that is specific to mechanisms of secondary neurodegeneration and influenced by unidentified external factors possibly associated with the treatment protocol during the acute phase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Interaction between repair, disease, & inflammation."

  16. Vulnerability of premyelinating oligodendrocytes to white-matter damage in neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Bo; Shen, Yan; Plane, Jennifer M; Deng, Wenbin

    2013-04-01

    Premature birth is a significant economic and public health burden, and its incidence is rising. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is the predominant form of brain injury in premature infants and the leading cause of cerebral palsy. PVL is characterized by selective white-matter damage with prominent oligodendroglial injury. The maturation-dependent vulnerability of developing and premyelinating oligodendrocytes to excitotoxic, oxidative, and inflammatory forms of injury is a major factor in the pathogenesis of PVL. Recent studies using mouse models of PVL reveal that synapses between axons and developing oligodendrocytes are quickly and profoundly damaged in immature white matter. Axon-glia synapses are highly vulnerable to white-matter injury in the developing brain, and the loss of synapses between axons and premyelinating oligodendrocytes occurs before any cellular loss in the immature white matter. Microglial activation and astrogliosis play important roles in triggering white-matter injury. Impairment of white-matter development and function in the neonatal period contributes critically to functional and behavioral deficits. Preservation of the integrity of the white matter is likely key in the treatment of PVL and subsequent neurological consequences and disabilities.

  17. Brain transplantation of genetically engineered human neural stem cells globally corrects brain lesions in the mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mouse.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing-Li; Shen, Jin-Song; Ohashi, Toya; Maeda, Hiroshi; Kim, Seung Up; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2003-10-15

    In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of using human neural stem cells (NSCs) in the treatment of diffuse central nervous system (CNS) alterations in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII), a lysosomal storage disease caused by a genetic defect in the beta-glucuronidase gene. An immortalized NSC line derived from human fetal telencephalon was genetically engineered to overexpress beta-glucuronidase and transplanted into the cerebral ventricles of neonatal MPS VII mouse. Transplanted human NSCs were found to integrate and migrate in the host brain and to produce large amount of beta-glucuronidase. Brain contents of the substrates of beta-glucuronidase were reduced to nearly normal levels, and widespread clearing of lysosomal storage was observed in the MPS VII mouse brain at 25 days posttransplantation. The number of engrafted cells decreased markedly after the transplantation, and it appears that the major cause of the cell death was not the immune response of the host but apoptotic cell death of grafted human NSCs. Results showed that human NSCs would serve as a useful gene transfer vehicle for the treatment of diffuse CNS lesions in human lysosomal storage diseases and are potentially applicable in the treatment of patients suffering from neurological disorders.

  18. Xenon preconditioning reduces brain damage from neonatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Daqing; Hossain, Mahmuda; Pettet, Garry K J; Luo, Yan; Lim, Ta; Akimov, Stanislav; Sanders, Robert D; Franks, Nicholas P; Maze, Mervyn

    2006-02-01

    Xenon attenuates on-going neuronal injury in both in vitro and in vivo models of hypoxic-ischaemic injury when administered during and after the insult. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether the neuroprotective efficacy of xenon can be observed when administered before an insult, referred to as 'preconditioning'. In a neuronal-glial cell coculture, preexposure to xenon for 2 h caused a concentration-dependent reduction of lactate dehydrogenase release from cells deprived of oxygen and glucose 24 h later; xenon's preconditioning effect was abolished by cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. Preconditioning with xenon decreased propidium iodide staining in a hippocampal slice culture model subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. In an in vivo model of neonatal asphyxia involving hypoxic-ischaemic injury to 7-day-old rats, preconditioning with xenon reduced infarction size when assessed 7 days after injury. Furthermore, a sustained improvement in neurologic function was also evident 30 days after injury. Phosphorylated cAMP (cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate)-response element binding protein (pCREB) was increased by xenon exposure. Also, the prosurvival proteins Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were upregulated by xenon treatment. These studies provide evidence for xenon's preconditioning effect, which might be caused by a pCREB-regulated synthesis of proteins that promote survival against neuronal injury.

  19. Specialization of Gene Expression during Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Liscovitch, Noa; Chechik, Gal

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome of the brain changes during development, reflecting processes that determine functional specialization of brain regions. We analyzed gene expression, measured using in situ hybridization across the full developing mouse brain, to quantify functional specialization of brain regions. Surprisingly, we found that during the time that the brain becomes anatomically regionalized in early development, transcription specialization actually decreases reaching a low, “neurotypic”, point around birth. This decrease of specialization is brain-wide, and mainly due to biological processes involved in constructing brain circuitry. Regional specialization rises again during post-natal development. This effect is largely due to specialization of plasticity and neural activity processes. Post-natal specialization is particularly significant in the cerebellum, whose expression signature becomes increasingly different from other brain regions. When comparing mouse and human expression patterns, the cerebellar post-natal specialization is also observed in human, but the regionalization of expression in the human Thalamus and Cortex follows a strikingly different profile than in mouse. PMID:24068900

  20. Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J.; Semënov, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  1. Absence of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations in mouse brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kiebish, Michael A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2005-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome occur in numerous tumor types including brain tumors. These mutations are generally found in the hypervariable regions I and II of the displacement loop and unlikely alter mitochondrial function. Two hypervariable regions of mononucleotide repeats occur in the mouse mitochondrial genome, i.e., the origin of replication of the light strand (OL) and the Arg tRNA. Methods In this study we examined the entire mitochondrial genome in a series of chemically induced brain tumors in the C57BL/6J strain and spontaneous brain tumors in the VM mouse strain. The tumor mtDNA was compared to that of mtDNA in brain mitochondrial populations from the corresponding syngeneic mouse host strain. Results Direct sequencing revealed a few homoplasmic base pair insertions, deletions, and substitutions in the tumor cells mainly in regions of mononucleotide repeats. A heteroplasmic mutation in the 16srRNA gene was detected in a spontaneous metastatic VM brain tumor. Conclusion None of the mutations were considered pathogenic, indicating that mtDNA somatic mutations do not likely contribute to the initiation or progression of these diverse mouse brain tumors. PMID:16105171

  2. Maternal obesity leads to increased proliferation and numbers of astrocytes in the developing fetal and neonatal mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Glendining, Kelly A; Grattan, David R; Jasoni, Christine L

    2016-10-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy is associated with chronic maternal, placental, and fetal inflammation; and it elevates the risk for offspring obesity. Changes in the development of the hypothalamus, a brain region that regulates body weight and energy balance, are emerging as important determinants of offspring risk, but such changes are only beginning to be defined. Here we focused on the hypothesis that the pathological exposure of developing hypothalamic astrocytes to cytokines would alter their development. A maternal high-fat diet (mHFD) mouse model was used to investigate changes in hypothalamic astrocytes in the fetus during late gestation and in early neonates by using immunochemistry, confocal microscopy, and qPCR. The number of astrocytes and the proportion of proliferating astrocytes was significantly higher in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus at both ages compared to control offspring from normal weight pregnancies. Supplemental to this we found that cultured fetal hypothalamic astrocytes proliferated significantly in response to IL6 (10ng/ml), one of the cytokines significantly elevated in fetuses of obese dams, via the JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway. Thus, maternal obesity during pregnancy stimulated the proliferation and thereby increased numbers of astrocytes in the fetal as well as early neonatal hypothalamus, which may be driven, during fetal life, by IL6. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Morphology-driven automatic segmentation of MR images of the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Gui, Laura; Lisowski, Radoslaw; Faundez, Tamara; Hüppi, Petra S; Lazeyras, François; Kocher, Michel

    2012-12-01

    The segmentation of MR images of the neonatal brain is an essential step in the study and evaluation of infant brain development. State-of-the-art methods for adult brain MRI segmentation are not applicable to the neonatal brain, due to large differences in structure and tissue properties between newborn and adult brains. Existing newborn brain MRI segmentation methods either rely on manual interaction or require the use of atlases or templates, which unavoidably introduces a bias of the results towards the population that was used to derive the atlases. We propose a different approach for the segmentation of neonatal brain MRI, based on the infusion of high-level brain morphology knowledge, regarding relative tissue location, connectivity and structure. Our method does not require manual interaction, or the use of an atlas, and the generality of its priors makes it applicable to different neonatal populations, while avoiding atlas-related bias. The proposed algorithm segments the brain both globally (intracranial cavity, cerebellum, brainstem and the two hemispheres) and at tissue level (cortical and subcortical gray matter, myelinated and unmyelinated white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). We validate our algorithm through visual inspection by medical experts, as well as by quantitative comparisons that demonstrate good agreement with expert manual segmentations. The algorithm's robustness is verified by testing on variable quality images acquired on different machines, and on subjects with variable anatomy (enlarged ventricles, preterm- vs. term-born).

  4. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinically silent preoperative brain injuries do not worsen with surgery in neonates with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Block, A J; McQuillen, P S; Chau, V; Glass, H; Poskitt, K J; Barkovich, A J; Esch, M; Soulikias, W; Azakie, A; Campbell, A; Miller, S P

    2010-09-01

    Preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke and white matter injury, is common in neonates with congenital heart disease. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of hemorrhage or extension of preoperative brain injury with cardiac surgery. This dual-center prospective cohort study recruited 92 term neonates, 62 with transposition of the great arteries and 30 with single ventricle physiology, from 2 tertiary referral centers. Neonates underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging scans before and after cardiac surgery. Brain injury was identified in 40 (43%) neonates on the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scan (median 5 days after birth): stroke in 23, white matter injury in 21, and intraventricular hemorrhage in 7. None of the brain lesions presented clinically with overt signs or seizures. Preoperative brain injury was associated with balloon atrial septostomy (P = .003) and lowest arterial oxygen saturation (P = .007); in a multivariable model, only the effect of balloon atrial septostomy remained significant when adjusting for lowest arterial oxygen saturation. On postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in 78 neonates (median 21 days after birth), none of the preoperative lesions showed evidence of extension or hemorrhagic transformation (0/40 [95% confidence interval: 0%-7%]). The presence of preoperative brain injury was not a significant risk factor for acquiring new injury on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (P = .8). Clinically silent brain injuries identified preoperatively in neonates with congenital heart disease, including stroke, have a low risk of progression with surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass and should therefore not delay clinically indicated cardiac surgery. In this multicenter cohort, balloon atrial septostomy remains an important risk factor for preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke. 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain ultrasound findings in neonates treated with intrauterine transfusion for fetal anaemia.

    PubMed

    Leijser, Lara M; Vos, Nikki; Walther, Frans J; van Wezel-Meijler, Gerda

    2012-09-01

    The main causes of severe fetal anaemia are red-cell allo-immunization, parvo B19 virus infection and feto-maternal haemorrhage. Treatment consists of intrauterine transfusion (IUT). Neuro-imaging studies in surviving neonates treated with IUT are scarce. To assess if neonates treated with IUT for fetal anaemia are at risk for cerebral injury, report the incidence and severity of brain ultrasound (US) abnormalities and explore the relation between brain US findings and perinatal parameters and neurological outcome. Brain US scans of neonates born alive between 2001 and 2008 with at least one IUT were retrospectively reviewed and classified as normal, mildly or moderately/severely abnormal. Incidences of abnormalities were calculated for full-term and preterm neonates. Presence and severity of abnormalities were related to clinical and IUT related parameters and to neurological outcome around 2 years of age (adverse: moderate or severe disability; favourable: normal or mild disability). A total of 127 neonates (82 born preterm) were included. Median number of IUTs was 3 (range 1-6) and of brain US 2 (1-6). Median gestational age and weight at birth were 36.6 (26.0-41.1) weeks and 2870 (1040-3950)g. In 72/127 (57%) neonates ≥1 abnormality was seen on brain US, classified as moderate/severe in 30/127 (24%). Neurological outcome was adverse in 5 infants. Presence of brain US abnormalities was not significantly related to any of the perinatal parameters or to neurological outcome. Neonates undergoing IUT for fetal anaemia are at high risk of brain injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dry-contact microelectrode membranes for wireless detection of electrical phenotypes in neonatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Cao, Hung; Beebe, Tyler; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chang, Honglong; Scremin, Oscar; Lien, Ching-Ling; Tai, Yu-Chong; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2015-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of aberrant electrical rhythms during heart injury and repair requires prolonged data acquisition. We hereby developed a wearable microelectrode membrane that could be adherent to the chest of neonatal mice for in situ wireless recording of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The novel dry-contact membrane with a meshed parylene-C pad adjacent to the microelectrodes and the expandable meandrous strips allowed for varying size of the neonates. The performance was evaluated at the system level; specifically, the ECG signals (μV) acquired from the microelectrodes underwent two-stage amplification, band-pass filtering, and optical data transmission by an infrared Light Emitting Diode (LED) to the data-receiving unit. The circuitry was prototyped on a printed circuit board (PCB), consuming less than 300 μW, and was completely powered by an inductive coupling link. Distinct P waves, QRS complexes, and T waves of ECG signals were demonstrated from the non-pharmacologically sedated neonates at ~600 beats per minutes. Thus, we demonstrate the feasibility of both real-time and wireless monitoring cardiac rhythms in a neonatal mouse (17-20 mm and <1 g) via dry-contact microelectrode membrane; thus, providing a basis for diagnosing aberrant electrical conduction in animal models of cardiac injury and repair.

  8. Structure and function of neonatal social communication in a genetic mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Okabe, S; Broin, P Ó; Nishi, A; Ye, K; Beckert, M V; Izumi, T; Machida, A; Kang, G; Abe, S; Pena, J L; Golden, A; Kikusui, T; Hiroi, N

    2016-09-01

    A critical step toward understanding autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is to identify both genetic and environmental risk factors. A number of rare copy number variants (CNVs) have emerged as robust genetic risk factors for ASD, but not all CNV carriers exhibit ASD and the severity of ASD symptoms varies among CNV carriers. Although evidence exists that various environmental factors modulate symptomatic severity, the precise mechanisms by which these factors determine the ultimate severity of ASD are still poorly understood. Here, using a mouse heterozygous for Tbx1 (a gene encoded in 22q11.2 CNV), we demonstrate that a genetically triggered neonatal phenotype in vocalization generates a negative environmental loop in pup-mother social communication. Wild-type pups used individually diverse sequences of simple and complicated call types, but heterozygous pups used individually invariable call sequences with less complicated call types. When played back, representative wild-type call sequences elicited maternal approach, but heterozygous call sequences were ineffective. When the representative wild-type call sequences were randomized, they were ineffective in eliciting vigorous maternal approach behavior. These data demonstrate that an ASD risk gene alters the neonatal call sequence of its carriers and this pup phenotype in turn diminishes maternal care through atypical social communication. Thus, an ASD risk gene induces, through atypical neonatal call sequences, less than optimal maternal care as a negative neonatal environmental factor.

  9. Structure and function of neonatal social communication in a genetic mouse model of autism

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomohisa; Okabe, Shota; Ó Broin, Pilib; Nishi, Akira; Ye, Kenny; Beckert, Michael V.; Izumi, Takeshi; Machida, Akihiro; Kang, Gina; Abe, Seiji; Pena, Jose L.; Golden, Aaron; Kikusui, Takefumi; Hiroi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    A critical step toward understanding autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is to identify both genetic and environmental risk factors. A number of rare copy number variants (CNVs) have emerged as robust genetic risk factors for ASD, but not all CNV carriers exhibit ASD and the severity of ASD symptoms varies among CNV carriers. Although evidence exists that various environmental factors modulate symptomatic severity, the precise mechanisms by which these factors determine the ultimate severity of ASD are still poorly understood. Here, using a mouse heterozygous for Tbx1 (a gene encoded in 22q11.2 CNV), we demonstrate that a genetically-triggered neonatal phenotype in vocalization generates a negative environmental loop in pup-mother social communication. Wild-type pups used individually diverse sequences of simple and complicated call types, but heterozygous pups used individually invariable call sequences with less complicated call types. When played back, representative wild-type call sequences elicited maternal approach, but heterozygous call sequences were ineffective. When the representative wild-type call sequences were randomized, they were ineffective in eliciting vigorous maternal approach behavior. These data demonstrate that an ASD risk gene alters the neonatal call sequence of its carriers and this pup phenotype in turn diminishes maternal care through atypical social communication. Thus, an ASD risk gene induces, through atypical neonatal call sequences, less than optimal maternal care as a negative neonatal environmental factor. PMID:26666205

  10. Progesterone Inhibits Uterine Gland Development in the Neonatal Mouse Uterus1

    PubMed Central

    Filant, Justyna; Zhou, Huaijun; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uterine glands and their secretions are required for conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated placenta) survival and development. In most mammals, uterine gland morphogenesis or adenogenesis is a uniquely postnatal event; however, little is known about the mechanisms governing the developmental event. In sheep, progestin treatment of neonatal ewes permanently ablated differentiation of the endometrial glands. Similarly, progesterone (P4) inhibits adenogenesis in neonatal mouse uterus. Thus, P4 can be used as a tool to discover mechanisms regulating endometrial adenogenesis. Female pups were treated with sesame vehicle alone as a control or P4 from Postnatal Day 2 (PD 2) to PD 10, and reproductive tracts were examined on PD 5, 10, or 20. Endometrial glands were fully developed in control mice by PD 20 but not in P4-treated mice. All other uterine cell types appeared normal. Treatment with P4 stimulated proliferation of the stroma but suppressed proliferation of the luminal epithelium. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of genes were reduced (Car2, Fgf7, Fgfr2, Foxa2, Fzd10, Met, Mmp7, Msx1, Msx2, Wnt4, Wnt7a, Wnt16) and increased (Hgf, Ihh, Wnt11) by P4 in the neonatal uterus. These results support the idea that P4 inhibits endometrial adenogenesis in the developing neonatal uterus by altering expression of morphoregulatory genes and consequently disrupting normal patterns of cell proliferation and development. PMID:22238285

  11. Population Differences in Brain Morphology and Microstructure among Chinese, Malay, and Indian Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jordan; Abdul-Rahman, Muhammad Farid; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Fortier, Marielle V.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2012-01-01

    We studied a sample of 75 Chinese, 73 Malay, and 29 Indian healthy neonates taking part in a cohort study to examine potential differences in neonatal brain morphology and white matter microstructure as a function of ethnicity using both structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We first examined the differences in global size and morphology of the brain among the three groups. We then constructed the T2-weighted MRI and DTI atlases and employed voxel-based analysis to investigate ethnic differences in morphological shape of the brain from the T2-weighted MRI, and white matter microstructure measured by fractional anisotropy derived from DTI. Compared with Malay neonates, the brains of Indian neonates’ tended to be more elongated in anterior and posterior axis relative to the superior-inferior axis of the brain even though the total brain volume was similar among the three groups. Although most anatomical regions of the brain were similar among Chinese, Malay, and Indian neonates, there were anatomical variations in the spinal-cerebellar and cortical-striatal-thalamic neural circuits among the three populations. The population-related brain regions highlighted in our study are key anatomical substrates associated with sensorimotor functions. PMID:23112850

  12. Cortical Enhanced Tissue Segmentation of Neonatal Brain MR Images Acquired by a Dedicated Phased Array Coil.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Fan, Yong; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Wald, Lawrence L; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-01-01

    The acquisition of high quality MR images of neonatal brains is largely hampered by their characteristically small head size and low tissue contrast. As a result, subsequent image processing and analysis, especially for brain tissue segmentation, are often hindered. To overcome this problem, a dedicated phased array neonatal head coil is utilized to improve MR image quality by effectively combing images obtained from 8 coil elements without lengthening data acquisition time. In addition, a subject-specific atlas based tissue segmentation algorithm is specifically developed for the delineation of fine structures in the acquired neonatal brain MR images. The proposed tissue segmentation method first enhances the sheet-like cortical gray matter (GM) structures in neonatal images with a Hessian filter for generation of cortical GM prior. Then, the prior is combined with our neonatal population atlas to form a cortical enhanced hybrid atlas, which we refer to as the subject-specific atlas. Various experiments are conducted to compare the proposed method with manual segmentation results, as well as with additional two population atlas based segmentation methods. Results show that the proposed method is capable of segmenting the neonatal brain with the highest accuracy, compared to other two methods.

  13. Reflection mode photoacoustic imaging through infant skull toward noninvasive imaging of neonatal brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Chamberland, David L.; Xi, Guohua; Carson, Paul L.

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of transcranial imaging of neonatal brains with reflection mode photoacoustic technology has been explored. By using unembalmed infant skulls and fresh canine brains, experiments have been conducted to examine the ultrasound and light attenuation in the skull bone as well as consequent photoacoustic images through the skull. Mapping of blood vessels in a transcranial manner has been successfully achieved by employing the raster scan of a single-element transducer or a 2D PVDF array transducer. Experimental results indicate that noninvasive photoacoustic imaging of neonatal brain with a depth of 2 cm or more beneath the skull is feasible when working with near-infrared light. This study suggests that the emerging photoacoustic technology may become a powerful tool in the future for noninvasive diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of disorders in prenatal or neonatal brains.

  14. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  15. Herpes simplex virus serotype and entry receptor availability alter CNS disease in a mouse model of neonatal HSV.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Sarah J; Ranaivo, Hantamalala R; Wilcox, Douglas R; Karaba, Andrew H; Wainwright, Mark S; Muller, William J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes of neonates with herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis are worse after infection with HSV-2 when compared with HSV-1. The proteins herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1 mediate HSV entry into susceptible cells. Prior studies have shown receptor-dependent differences in pathogenesis that depend on route of inoculation and host developmental age. We investigated serotype-related differences in HSV disease and their relationship to entry receptor availability in a mouse model of encephalitis. Mortality was attenuated in 7-d-old, wild-type (WT) mice inoculated with HSV-1(F) when compared with HSV-2(333). No serotype-specific differences were seen after inoculation of adult mice. HSV-1 pathogenesis was also attenuated relative to HSV-2 in newborn but not adult mice lacking HVEM or nectin-1. HSV-2 requires nectin-1 for encephalitis in adult but not newborn mice; in contrast, nectin-1 was important for HSV-1 pathogenesis in both age groups. Early viral replication was independent of age, viral serotype, or mouse genotype, suggesting host responses influence outcomes. In this regard, significantly greater amounts of inflammatory mediators were detected in brain homogenates from WT newborns 2 d after infection compared with adults and receptor-knockout newborns. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses induced by infection may influence the severity of HSV encephalitis.

  16. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of paraquat accumulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Tarasewicz, Elizabeth; Mathew, Jason; Ohman Strickland, Pamela A.; Buckley, Brian; Richardson, Jason R.; Richfield, Eric K.

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a potential human neurotoxicant and is used in models of oxidative stress. We determined the toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in adult mouse brain following repeated or prolonged PQ exposure. PQ accumulated in different brain regions and reached a plateau after ~18 i.p. (10 mg/kg) doses and resulted in modest morbidity and mortality unpredictably associated with dose interval and number. PQ had divergent effects on horizontal locomotor behavior depending on the number of doses. PQ decreased striatal dopamine levels after the 18th to 36th i.p. dose (10 mg/kg) and reduced the striatal level of tyrosine hydroxylase. Drinking water exposure to PQ (0.03– 0.05 mg/ml) did not result in any mortality and resulted in concentration and time dependent levels in the brain. The brain half-life of PQ varied with mouse strain. PQ accumulates and may saturate a site in mouse brain resulting in complex PQ level and duration-related consequences. These findings should alter our risk assessment of this compound and demonstrate a useful, but complex dynamic model for understanding the consequences of PQ in the brain. PMID:19084006

  17. Application of hairless mouse strain to bioluminescence imaging of Arc expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hironori; Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Hisashi

    2017-01-23

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a powerful technique for monitoring the temporal and spatial dynamics of gene expression in the mouse brain. However, the black fur, skin pigmentation and hair regrowth after depilation of mouse interfere with BLI during developmental and daily examination. The aim of this study was to extend the application of Arc-Luc transgenic (Tg) mice to the BLI of neuronal activity in the mouse brain by introducing the hairless (HL) gene and to examine Arc-Luc expression at various developmental stages without interference from black fur, skin pigmentation, and hair regrowth. The Arc-Luc Tg HL mice were established by crossing the Tg C57BL/6 mouse strain with the HL mouse strain. Under physiological and pathological conditions, BLI was performed to detect the signal intensity changes at various developmental stages and at an interval of <7 days. The established Arc-Luc Tg HL mice exhibited clear and stable photon signals from the brain without interference during development. After surgical monocular deprivation during visual-critical period, large signal intensity changes in bioluminescence were observed in the mouse visual cortex. Exposure of mice to a novel object changed the photon distribution in the caudal and rostral cerebral areas. The temporal pattern of kainic-acid-induced Arc-Luc expression showed biphasic changes in signal intensity over 24 h. This study showed the advantages of using the mutant HL gene in BLI of Arc expression in the mouse brain at various developmental stages. Thus, the use of the Arc-Luc Tg HL mice enabled the tracking of neuronal-activity-dependent processes over a wide range from a focal area to the entire brain area with various time windows.

  18. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet radiation-induced pyrimidine dimers in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ananthaswamy, H N; Fisher, M S

    1981-05-01

    The numbers of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of neonatal BALB/c mouse skin were measured by assessing the sensitivity of the DNA to Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease. Irradiation of neonatal BALB/c mice with FS40 sunlamps caused a dose-dependent induction of endonuclease-sensitive sites (pyrimidine dimers) in DNA extracted from back skin. Exposure of these UV-irradiated neonatal mice to photoreactivating (PR) light ("cool white" fluorescent lamp and incandescent lamp) caused a reduction in the number of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA, as revealed by a shift in low-molecular-weight DNA to high-molecular-weight DNA. In contrast, DNA profiles of the skin of either UV-irradiated mice or UV-irradiated mice kept in the dark for the same duration as those exposed to PR light did not show a loss of UV-induced endonuclease-sensitive sites. Furthermore, reversing the order of treatment, i.e., administering PR light first and then UV, did not produce a reduction in pyrimidine dimers. These results demonstrate that PR or UV-induced pyrimidine dimers occurs in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin. The optimal wavelength range for in vivo PR appears to be in the visible region of the spectrum (greater than 400 nm). Although dimer formation could be detected in both dermis and epidermis, PR occurred only in the dermis. Furthermore, the PR phenomenon could not be detected in the skin of adult mice from the same inbred strain.

  19. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet radiation-induced pyrimidine dimers in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthaswamy, H.N.; Fisher, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    The numbers of ultraviolet light (uv)-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of neonatal BALB/c mouse skin were measured by assessing the sensitivity of the DNA to Micrococcus luteus uv endonuclease. Irradiation of neonatal BALB/c mice with FS40 sunlamps caused a dose-dependent induction of endonuclease-sensitive sites (pyrimidine dimers) in DNA extracted from back skin. Exposure of these uv-irradiated neonatal mice to photoreactivating (PR) light (cool white fluorescent lamp and incandescent lamp) caused a reduction in the number of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA, as revealed by a shift in low-molecular-weight DNA to high-molecular-weight DNA. In contrast, DNA profiles of the skin of either uv-irradiated mice or uv-irradiated mice kept in the dark for the same duration as those exposed to PR light did not show a loss of uv-induced endonuclease-sensitive sites. Furthermore, reversing the order of treatment, i.e., administering PR light first and then uv, did not produce a reduction in pyrimidine dimers. These results demonstrate that PR or uv-induced pyrimidine dimers occurs in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin. The optimal wavelength range for in vivo PR appears to be in the visible region of the spectrum (greater than 400 nm). Although dimer formation could be detected in both dermis and epidermis, PR occurred only in the dermis. Furthermore, the PR phenomenon could not be detected in the skin of adult mice from the same inbred strain.

  20. Oxytocin receptor binding sites in the periphery of the neonatal mouse

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a pleiotropic regulator of physiology and behavior. An emerging body of evidence demonstrates a role for OXT in the transition to postnatal life of the infant. To identify potential sites of OXT action via the OXT receptor (OXTR) in the newborn mouse, we performed receptor autoradiography on 20 μm sagittal sections of whole postnatal day 0 male and female mice on a C57BL/6J background using the 125iodinated ornithine vasotocin analog ([125I]-OVTA) radioligand. A competitive binding assay on both wild-type (WT) and OXTR knockout (OXTR KO) tissue was used to assess the selectivity of [125I]-OVTA for neonatal OXTR. Radioactive ligand (0.05 nM [125I]-OVTA) was competed against concentrations of 0 nM, 10 nM, and 1000 nM excess unlabeled OXT. Autoradiographs demonstrated the high selectivity of the radioligand for infant peripheral OXTR. Specific ligand binding activity for OXTR was observed in the oronasal cavity, the eye, whisker pads, adrenal gland, and anogenital region in the neonatal OXTR WT mouse, but was absent in neonatal OXTR KO. Nonspecific binding was observed in areas with a high lipid content such as the scapular brown adipose tissue and the liver: in these regions, binding was present in both OXTR WT and KO mice, and could not be competed away with OXT in either WT or KO mice. Collectively, these data confirm novel OXT targets in the periphery of the neonate. These peripheral OXTR sites, coupled with the immaturity of the neonate’s own OXT system, suggest a role for exogenous OXT in modulating peripheral physiology and development. PMID:28235051

  1. Neonatal brain abnormalities and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years in children born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Omizzolo, Cristina; Scratch, Shannon E; Stargatt, Robyn; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; Cheong, Jeanie; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie E; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Using prospective longitudinal data from 198 very preterm and 70 full term children, this study characterised the memory and learning abilities of very preterm children at 7 years of age in both verbal and visual domains. The relationship between the extent of brain abnormalities on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years of age in very preterm children was also investigated. Neonatal MRI scans were qualitatively assessed for global, white-matter, cortical grey-matter, deep grey-matter, and cerebellar abnormalities. Very preterm children performed less well on measures of immediate memory, working memory, long-term memory, and learning compared with term-born controls. Neonatal brain abnormalities, and in particular deep grey-matter abnormality, were associated with poorer memory and learning performance at 7 years in very preterm children. Findings support the importance of cerebral neonatal pathology for predicting later memory and learning function.

  2. Effects of heavy ion to the primary culture of mouse brain cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Kohno, Yukio; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    To investigate effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to CNS system, we adopted mouse neonatal brain cells in culture being exposed to heavy ions by HIMAC at NIRS and NSRL at BNL. The applied dose varied from 0.05 Gy up to 2.0 Gy. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and neuron survival focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains, SCID, B6, B6C3F1, C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to particle radiation as evaluated by 10% apoptotic criterion. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID and B6 cells exposing to different ions (H, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed in the high LET (55-200 keV/micrometers) and low dose (<0.5 Gy) regions. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. In this report, a result of memory and learning function to adult mice after whole-body and brain local irradiation at carbon ion and iron ion.

  3. Effects of heavy ion to the primary culture of mouse brain cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Kohno, Yukio; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    To investigate effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to CNS system, we adopted mouse neonatal brain cells in culture being exposed to heavy ions by HIMAC at NIRS and NSRL at BNL. The applied dose varied from 0.05 Gy up to 2.0 Gy. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and neuron survival focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains, SCID, B6, B6C3F1, C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to particle radiation as evaluated by 10% apoptotic criterion. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID and B6 cells exposing to different ions (H, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed in the high LET (55-200 keV/micrometers) and low dose (<0.5 Gy) regions. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. In this report, a result of memory and learning function to adult mice after whole-body and brain local irradiation at carbon ion and iron ion.

  4. A versatile new technique to clear mouse and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Large volumes imaging with microscopic resolution is limited by light scattering. In the last few years based on refractive index matching, different clearing approaches have been developed. Organic solvents and water-based optical clearing agents have been used for optical clearing of entire mouse brain. Although these methods guarantee high transparency and preservation of the fluorescence, though present other non-negligible limitations. Tissue transformation by CLARITY allows high transparency, whole brain immunolabelling and structural and molecular preservation. This method however requires a highly expensive refractive index matching solution limiting practical applicability. In this work we investigate the effectiveness of a water-soluble clearing agent, the 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) to clear mouse and human brain. TDE does not quench the fluorescence signal, is compatible with immunostaining and does not introduce any deformation at sub-cellular level. The not viscous nature of the TDE make it a suitable agent to perform brain slicing during serial two-photon (STP) tomography. In fact, by improving penetration depth it reduces tissue slicing, decreasing the acquisition time and cutting artefacts. TDE can also be used as a refractive index medium for CLARITY. The potential of this method has been explored by imaging a whole transgenic mouse brain with the light sheet microscope. Moreover we apply this technique also on blocks of dysplastic human brain tissue transformed with CLARITY and labeled with different antibody. This clearing approach significantly expands the application of single and two-photon imaging, providing a new useful method for quantitative morphological analysis of structure in mouse and human brain.

  5. Biotransformation of the insecticide parathion by mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Soranno, T M; Sultatos, L G

    1992-01-01

    The acute toxicity of organothiophosphate insecticides like parathion results from their metabolic activation by cytochromes P450. The present study is directed towards the characterization of cytochrome-P450-dependent metabolism of parathion by various mouse brain regions. Intraperitoneal administration of [35S]parathion to mice led to covalently bound [35S]sulfur in various tissues, indicating their capacity to oxidatively desulfurate this insecticide. Liver contained the greatest amount of covalently bound sulfur, and brain the least. Among individual brain regions the olfactory bulb and hypothalamus possessed the highest levels of sulfur binding when expressed on a per milligram tissue basis. However, when expressed on a per brain region basis, sulfur binding was greatest within the cortex as a result of the large mass of this region, compared to the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. Incubation of the 78,000 x g fraction of mouse brain with parathion resulted in formation of p-nitrophenol, although paraoxon could not be detected. However, given the current understanding of parathion metabolism by cytochromes P450, and given that paraoxon can rapidly disappear through phosphorylation of serine hydroxyl groups, it is reasonable to assume that at least some paraoxon was formed. Production of p-nitrophenol required NADPH and was inhibited by carbon monoxide. In vitro incubations of parathion with the 78,000 x g fraction of mouse brain indicated that the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb had the greatest capacity to produce p-nitrophenol. These results demonstrate that various mouse brain regions possess different capacities to metabolize parathion.

  6. Mouse brain magnetic resonance microscopy: Applications in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Fu, Zhenrong; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Shuicai

    2015-05-01

    Over the past two decades, various Alzheimer's disease (AD) trangenetic mice models harboring genes with mutation known to cause familial AD have been created. Today, high-resolution magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) technology is being widely used in the study of AD mouse models. It has greatly facilitated and advanced our knowledge of AD. In this review, most of the attention is paid to fundamental of MRM, the construction of standard mouse MRM brain template and atlas, the detection of amyloid plaques, following up on brain atrophy and the future applications of MRM in transgenic AD mice. It is believed that future testing of potential drugs in mouse models with MRM will greatly improve the predictability of drug effect in preclinical trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Selective brain uptake and behavioral effects of the cyanobacterial toxin BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) following neonatal administration to rodents.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Lindquist, Nils Gunnar; Brittebo, Eva B; Roman, Erika

    2009-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are extensively distributed in terrestrial and aquatic environments all over the world. Most cyanobacteria can produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), which has been detected in several water systems and could accumulate in food chains. The aim of the study was to investigate the transfer of BMAA to fetal and neonatal brains and the effects of BMAA on the development of behavioral characteristics during the brain growth spurt (BGS) in rodents. Pregnant and neonatal mice were given an injection of (3)H-BMAA on gestational day 14 and postnatal day (PND) 10, respectively, and processed for tape-section autoradiography. The study revealed transplacental transfer of (3)H-BMAA and a significant uptake in fetal mouse brain. The radioactivity was specifically located in the hippocampus, striatum, brainstem, spinal cord and cerebellum of 10-day-old mice. The effect of repeated BMAA treatment (200 or 600 mg/kg s.c.) during BGS on rat behavior was also studied. BMAA treatment on PND 9-10 induced acute alterations, such as impaired locomotor ability and hyperactivity, in the behavior of neonatal rats. Furthermore, rats given the high dose of BMAA failed to habituate to the test environment when tested at juvenile age. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that BMAA was transferred to the neonatal brain and induced significant changes in the behavior of neonatal rats following administration during BGS. The observed behavioral changes suggest possible cognitive impairment. Increased information on the long-term effects of BMAA on cognitive function following fetal and neonatal exposure is required for assessment of the risk to children's health.

  8. Abnormal development of NG2+PDGFRα+ neural progenitor cells leads to neonatal hydrocephalus in a ciliopathy mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Calvin S.; Vogel, Timothy W.; Zhang, Qihong; Seo, Seongjin; Swiderski, Ruth E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Cassell, Martin D.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Nopoulos, Peggy; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Searby, Charles C.; Bugge, Kevin; Sheffield, Val C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological disorder leading to expansion of the cerebral ventricles and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most neonatal cases are of unknown etiology and are likely to display complex inheritance involving multiple genes and environmental factors. Identifying molecular mechanisms for neonatal hydrocephalus and developing non-invasive treatment modalities are high priorities. Here we employ a hydrocephalic mouse model of the human ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) and identify a role for neural progenitors in the pathogenesis of neonatal hydrocephalus. We found that hydrocephalus in this mouse model is caused by aberrant PDGFRα signaling, resulting in increased apoptosis and impaired proliferation of NG2+PDGFRα+ neural progenitors. Targeting this pathway with lithium treatment rescued NG2+PDGFRα+ progenitor cell proliferation in BBS mutant mice, reducing ventricular volume. Our findings demonstrate that neural progenitors are critical in the pathogenesis of neonatal hydrocephalus and we identify novel therapeutic targets for this common neurological disorder. PMID:23160237

  9. Contribution of mast cells to injury mechanisms in a mouse model of pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Raffaella; Chhor, Vibol; Bettati, Donatella; Banino, Elena; De Lucia, Silvana; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Schwendimann, Leslie; Pansiot, Julien; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Degos, Vincent; Titomanlio, Luigi; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2016-12-01

    The cognitive and behavioral deficits caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) to the immature brain are more severe and persistent than injuries to the adult brain. Understanding this developmental sensitivity is critical because children under 4 years of age of sustain TBI more frequently than any other age group. One of the first events after TBI is the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells (MCs) in the brain, releasing a range of immunomodulatory substances; inhibition of these cells is neuroprotective in other types of neonatal brain injury. This study investigates for the first time the role of MCs in mediating injury in a P7 mouse model of pediatric contusion-induced TBI. We show that various neural cell types express histamine receptors and that histamine exacerbates excitotoxic cell death in primary cultured neurons. Cromoglycate, an inhibitor of MC degranulation, altered the inflammatory phenotype of microglia activated by TBI, reversing several changes but accentuating others, when administered before TBI. However, without regard to the time of cromoglycate administration, inhibiting MC degranulation did not affect cell loss, as evaluated by ventricular dilatation or cleaved caspase-3 labeling, or the density of activated microglia, neurons, or myelin. In double-heterozygous cKit mutant mice lacking MCs, this overall lack of effect was confirmed. These results suggest that the role of MCs in this model of pediatric TBI is restricted to subtle effects and that they are unlikely to be viable neurotherapeutic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Long term creatine monohydrate supplementation, following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, improves neuromuscular coordination and spatial learning in male albino mouse.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-04-07

    Creatine is known to rescue animals following brain damage. Present study was designed to demonstrate the effect of long term (15 week) supplementation of 2% creatine monohydrate (Cr), following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, on learning and memory formation in male albino mouse. Albino mice pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by 8% hypoxia for 25 minutes. Following weaning, animals were separated and grouped on the basis of dietry supplementation for 15 weeks followed by a battery of neurological tests including Morris water maze, open field and rota rod. It was observed that HI mice fed on 2% Cr for 15 weeks performed better than their littermates mice on normal rodent diet during water maze (learning and memory) and rotating rod (neuro-muscular coordination and balance) test while the results of open field test remained unaffected. It was also observed that Cr treated animals had a reduced brain infarct volume than untreated but this difference did not reached statistical significance. We have also observed an overall increase in body weight in Cr treated mice during the study. Over all our results are indicating that long term Cr supplementation is beneficial for male albino following hypoxic ischemic insult.

  11. Multi-Coil Shimming of the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Brown, Peter B.; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    MR imaging and spectroscopy allow the non-invasive measurement of brain function and physiology, but excellent magnetic field homogeneity is required for meaningful results. The homogenization of the magnetic field distribution in the mouse brain (i.e. shimming) is a difficult task due to complex susceptibility-induced field distortions combined with the small size of the object. To date, the achievement of satisfactory whole brain shimming in the mouse remains a major challenge. The magnetic fields generated by a set of 48 circular coils (diameter 13 mm) that were arranged in a cylinder-shaped pattern of 32 mm diameter and driven with individual dynamic current ranges of ±1 A are shown to be capable of substantially reducing the field distortions encountered in the mouse brain at 9.4 Tesla. Static multi-coil shim fields allowed the reduction of the standard deviation of Larmor frequencies by 31% compared to second order spherical harmonics shimming and a 66% narrowing was achieved with the slice-specific application of the multi-coil shimming with a dynamic approach. For gradient echo imaging, multi-coil shimming minimized shim-related signal voids in the brain periphery and allowed overall signal gains of up to 51% compared to spherical harmonics shimming. PMID:21442653

  12. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Neonatal Brain Temperature Using a Zero-Heat-Flux Sensor Matrix.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Louis; Bongers, Edwin; Lamichhane, Bishal; Bambang-Oetomo, Sidarto

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of preterm neonates must be maintained within a narrow window to ensure their survival. Continuously measuring their core temperature provides an optimal means of monitoring their thermoregulation and their response to environmental changes. However, existing methods of measuring core temperature can be very obtrusive, such as rectal probes, or inaccurate/lagging, such as skin temperature sensors and spot-checks using tympanic temperature sensors. This study investigates an unobtrusive method of measuring brain temperature continuously using an embedded zero-heat-flux (ZHF) sensor matrix placed under the head of the neonate. The measured temperature profile is used to segment areas of motion and incorrect positioning, where the neonate's head is not above the sensors. We compare our measurements during low motion/stable periods to esophageal temperatures for 12 preterm neonates, measured for an average of 5 h per neonate. The method we propose shows good correlation with the reference temperature for most of the neonates. The unobtrusive embedding of the matrix in the neonate's environment poses no harm or disturbance to the care work-flow, while measuring core temperature. To address the effect of motion on the ZHF measurements in the current embodiment, we recommend a more ergonomic embedding ensuring the sensors are continuously placed under the neonate's head.

  13. The role of different strain backgrounds in bacterial endotoxin-mediated sensitization to neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, E.; Phillips, E.; Francesch-Domenech, E.; Thei, L.; Peebles, D.M.; Raivich, G.; Hristova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic background is known to influence the outcome in mouse models of human disease, and previous experimental studies have shown strain variability in the neonatal mouse model of hypoxia–ischemia. To further map out this variability, we compared five commonly used mouse strains: C57BL/6, 129SVJ, BALB/c, CD1 and FVB in a pure hypoxic–ischemic setup and following pre-sensitization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Postnatal day 7 pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by continuous 30 min 8% oxygen exposure at 36 °C. Twelve hours prior, a third of the pups received a single intraperitoneal LPS (0.6 μg/g) or a saline (vehicle) administration, respectively; a further third underwent hypoxia–ischemia alone without preceding injection. Both C57BL/6 and 129SVJ strains showed minimal response to 30 min hypoxia–ischemia alone, BALB/c demonstrated a moderate response, and both CD1 and FVB revealed the highest brain damage. LPS pre-sensitization led to substantial increase in overall brain infarction, microglial and astrocyte response and cell death in four of the five strains, with exception of BALB/c that only showed a significant effect with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Saline administration prior to hypoxia–ischemia resulted in an increase in inflammatory-associated markers, particularly in the astroglial activation of C57BL/6 mice, and in combined microglial activation and neuronal cell loss in FVB mice. Finally, two of the four strongly affected strains – C57BL/6 and CD1 – revealed pronounced contralateral astrogliosis with a neuroanatomical localization similar to that observed on the occluded hemisphere. Overall, the current findings demonstrate strain differences in response to hypoxia–ischemia alone, to stress associated with vehicle injection, and to LPS-mediated pre-sensitization, which partially explains the high variability seen in the neonatal mouse models of hypoxia

  14. Resveratrol post-treatment protects against neonatal brain injury after hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yanlong; Jiang, Huai; Fang, Mingchu; Li, Zhengmao; Xu, Kebin; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Zhenlang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Preventive treatment with resveratrol has indicated to be well tolerated and has lower toxicity in both experimental models and human patients. However, whether resveratrol administration post-hypoxic-ischemic protects against neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury is not known. Here we reported that post-treatment with resveratrol significantly reduced brain damage at 7-day after the injury. We found that resveratrol reduced the expression levels of key inflammatory factors at the mRNA and protein levels, and at least partially via inhibiting microglia activation. Moreover, resveratrol exerted an anti-apoptotic effect, as assessed by TUNEL staining, and altered the expression of the apoptosis-related genes Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase3. Our data indicate that post-treatment with resveratrol protects against neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and suggest a promising therapeutic strategy to this disease. PMID:27811363

  15. Neonatal Brain MRI and Motor Outcome at School Age in Children with Neonatal Encephalopathy: A Review of Personal Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Barnett, Anna L.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review (i) the spectrum of neuromotor function at school age in children who had been born full-term and presented with neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and low Apgar scores and (ii) the relation between the presence/absence of such difficulties and neonatal brain MRI. Motor outcome appears to be mainly related to the severity of basal ganglia and internal capsule involvement. Severe basal ganglia lesions were always associated with the most severe outcome, microcephaly, tetraplegia, and severe global delay, whereas more discrete basal ganglia lesions were associated with athetoid cerebral palsy, with normal cognitive development or minor neuro-motor abnormalities. White matter lesions were associated with abnormal motor outcome only if the internal capsule was involved. Children with moderate white matter changes but normal internal capsule, had normal motor outcome at school age. PMID:14640307

  16. Aquaporin7 expression during perinatal development of mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Incheol; Kim, Hyun J; Lee, Jae E; Gye, Myung C

    2006-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that brain aquaporins (AQPs) play important roles in the dynamic regulation of brain water homeostasis and the production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under normal, as well as pathological, conditions. To date, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of AQP1, 4, and 9 have been elucidated in brain tissues. However, the expression of AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin associated with brain development, has not been shown. In the present study, we examined expression of AQP7 during perinatal and adult brain development in the mouse. Throughout brain development, the immunoreactivity of AQP7 was largely found in the choroid plexus (CP). AQP7 immunoreactivity in ependyma (Ep), pia, and blood vessels (BV) was increased during perinatal to postnatal development. Cells in the different layers of cerebral cortex became a little positive for AQP7 immunoreactivity during postnatal development. Optimized semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that AQP7 mRNA and protein levels increased during perinatal development of brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the pattern of AQP7 expression in brain tissues. These results suggest that AQP7 is an important structural element in the choroid plexus and is possibly involved in the production of CSF during brain development in mice.

  17. Selective effects of neonatal handling on rat brain N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, A; Toutountzi, E; Fragioudaki, K; Kouvelas, E D; Stylianopoulou, F; Mitsacos, A

    2009-12-29

    Neonatal handling, an experimental model of early life experiences, is known to affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function thus increasing adaptability, coping with stress, cognitive abilities and in general brain plasticity-related processes. A molecule that plays a most critical role in such processes is the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a tetramer consisting of two obligatory, channel forming NR1 subunits and two regulatory subunits, usually a combination of NR2A and NR2B. Since the subunit composition of the NMDA receptor affects brain plasticity, in the present study we investigated the effect of neonatal handling on NR1, NR2A and NR2B mRNA levels using in situ hybridization, and on NR2B binding sites, using autoradiography of in vitro binding of [(3)H]-ifenprodil, in adult rat limbic brain areas. We found that neonatal handling specifically increased NR2B mRNA and binding sites, while it had no effect on the NR1 and NR2A subunits. More specifically, neonatally handled animals, both males and females, had higher NR2B mRNA and binding sites in the dorsal CA1 hippocampal area, as well as the prelimbic, the anterior cingulate and the somatosensory cortex, compared to the non-handled. Moreover NR2B binding sites were increased in the dorsal CA3 area of handled animals of both sexes. Furthermore, neonatal handling had a sexually dimorphic effect, increasing NR2B mRNA and binding sites in the central and medial amygdaloid nuclei only of the females. The neonatal handling-induced increase in the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor could underlie the higher brain plasticity, which neonatally handled animals exhibit.

  18. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development. PMID:21466694

  19. Mechanisms of Mouse Neural Precursor Expansion after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Krista D.; Goodus, Matthew T.; Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Jiang, Yuhui; Loporchio, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) is the leading cause of brain damage resulting from birth complications. Studies in neonatal rats have shown that H-I acutely expands the numbers of neural precursors (NPs) within the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of these studies was to establish which NPs expand after H-I and to determine how leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) insufficiency affects their response. During recovery from H-I, the number of Ki67+ cells in the medial SVZ of the injured hemisphere increased. Similarly, the number and size of primary neurospheres produced from the injured SVZ increased approximately twofold versus controls, and, upon differentiation, more than twice as many neurospheres from the damaged brain were tripotential, suggesting an increase in neural stem cells (NSCs). However, multimarker flow cytometry for CD133/LeX/NG2/CD140a combined with EdU incorporation revealed that NSC frequency diminished after H-I, whereas that of two multipotential progenitors and three unique glial-restricted precursors expanded, attributable to changes in their proliferation. By quantitative PCR, interleukin-6, LIF, and CNTF mRNA increased but with significantly different time courses, with LIF expression correlating best with NP expansion. Therefore, we evaluated the NP response to H-I in LIF-haplodeficient mice. Flow cytometry revealed that one subset of multipotential and bipotential intermediate progenitors did not increase after H-I, whereas another subset was amplified. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that neonatal H-I alters the composition of the SVZ and that LIF is a key regulator for a subset of intermediate progenitors that expand during acute recovery from neonatal H-I. PMID:26063918

  20. Sexually dimorphic brain and behavioral asymmetries in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D A; Glick, S D; Meibach, R C

    1981-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-D-glucose method was used to study asymmetries in cerebral metabolic activity in neonatal rats. Left-right asymmetries in 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake were observed in hippocampus, diencephalon, cortex, and medulla-pons: 2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation was greater in right hippocampus, right diencephalon, left cortex, and left medulla-pons. These asymmetries occurred only in females. We also observed neonatal asymmetries in tail position that, in both sexes, were predictive of adult turning preferences; females had right-sided biases in both neonatal and adult characteristics. Collectively these data indicate that cerebral lateralization is sexually dimorphic and is present at birth. Images PMID:6940200

  1. Maternal low protein diet decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the brains of the neonatal rat offspring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prenatal exposure to a maternal low protein diet has been known to cause cognitive impairment, learning and memory deficits. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. Herein, we demonstrate that a maternal low protein (LP) diet causes, in the brains of the neonatal rat offspring, ...

  2. A new neonatal cortical and subcortical brain atlas: the Melbourne Children's Regional Infant Brain (M-CRIB) atlas.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Bonnie; Murray, Andrea L; Loh, Wai Yen; Matthews, Lillian G; Adamson, Chris; Beare, Richard; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E; Rees, Sandra; Warfield, Simon K; Anderson, Peter J; Doyle, Lex W; Spittle, Alicia J; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Seal, Marc L; Thompson, Deanne K

    2017-02-15

    Investigating neonatal brain structure and function can offer valuable insights into behaviour and cognition in healthy and clinical populations; both at term age, and longitudinally in comparison with later time points. Parcellated brain atlases for adult populations are readily available, however warping infant data to adult template space is not ideal due to morphological and tissue differences between these groups. Several parcellated neonatal atlases have been developed, although there remains strong demand for manually parcellated ground truth data with detailed cortical definition. Additionally, compatibility with existing adult atlases is favourable for use in longitudinal investigations. We aimed to address these needs by replicating the widely-used Desikan-Killiany (2006) adult cortical atlas in neonates. We also aimed to extend brain coverage by complementing this cortical scheme with basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum and other subcortical segmentations. Thus, we have manually parcellated these areas volumetrically using high-resolution neonatal T2-weighted MRI scans, and initial automated and manually edited tissue classification, providing 100 regions in all. Linear and nonlinear T2-weighted structural templates were also generated. In this paper we provide manual parcellation protocols, and present the parcellated probability maps and structural templates together as the Melbourne Children's Regional Infant Brain (M-CRIB) atlas.

  3. Neonatal exposure to PFOS and PFOA in mice results in changes in proteins which are important for neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Niclas; Eriksson, Per; Viberg, Henrik

    2009-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) belong to the family of perfluorinated compounds. They are used in industrial and consumer applications, e.g., clothing fabrics, carpets, and food packaging. PFOS and PFOA are present in the environment and are found in dust and human milk, which implies that newborns and toddlers can be directly exposed to these agents during brain development. Recently, we reported that PFOS and PFOA can cause neurobehavioral defects and changes in the cholinergic system, in the adult animal, when given directly to neonatal mice, and thereby showing similarities with other investigated persistent organic pollutants, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethan, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In recent studies, we have also seen that highly brominated PBDEs can affect the levels of proteins that are important for neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the neonatal mouse brain. The present study shows that a single oral dose of either 21 micromol PFOS or PFOA/kg body weight (11.3 or 8.70 mg), given directly to the neonatal mice on postnatal day 10, significantly increased the levels of CaMKII, GAP-43, and synaptophysin in the hippocampus of the neonatal mouse. Both compounds significantly increased the levels of synaptophysin and tau in cerebral cortex, and PFOA also increased the levels of tau in hippocampus. These proteins are important for normal brain development, and altered levels of these proteins during a critical period of the brain growth spurts could be one of the mechanisms behind earlier reported behavioral defects.

  4. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level.

  5. Poor Brain Growth in Extremely Preterm Neonates Long Before the Onset of Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nelly; Eklöf, Eva; Mårtensson, Gustaf E; Bölte, Sven; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Ådén, Ulrika

    2015-12-21

    Preterm infants face an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The relationship between autism during childhood and early brain development remains unexplored. We studied 84 preterm children born at <27 weeks of gestation, who underwent neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term and were screened for ASD at 6.5 years. Full-scale intelligence quotient was measured and neonatal morbidities were recorded. Structural brain morphometric studies were performed in 33 infants with high-quality MRI and no evidence of focal brain lesions. Twenty-three (27.4%) of the children tested ASD positive and 61 (72.6%) tested ASD negative. The ASD-positive group had a significantly higher frequency of neonatal complications than the ASD-negative group. In the subgroup of 33 children, the ASD infants had reduced volumes in the temporal, occipital, insular, and limbic regions and in the brain areas involved in social/behavior and salience integration. This study shows that the neonatal MRI scans of extremely preterm children, subsequently diagnosed with ASD at 6.5 years, showed brain structural alterations, localized in the regions that play a key role in the core features of autism. Early detection of these structural alterations may allow the early identification and intervention of children at risk of ASD.

  6. Sodium Pyruvate Reduced Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury to Neonatal Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rui; Rong, Zhihui; She, Yun; Cao, Yuan; Chang, Li-Wen; Lee, Wei-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) remains a major cause of severe brain damage and is often associated with high mortality and lifelong disability. Immature brains are extremely sensitive to hypoxia-ischemia, shown as prolonged mitochondrial neuronal death. Sodium pyruvate (SP), a substrate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and an extracellular antioxidant, has been considered as a potential treatment for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), but its effects have not been evaluated in appropriate animal models for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Methods This investigation employed primary cortical neuron cultures derived from neonatal rats subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and a well-established neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Results HI caused brain tissue loss and impaired sensorimotor function and spatial memory while SP significantly reduced brain damage and improved neurological performance. These neuroprotective effects of SP are likely the result of improved cerebral metabolism as demonstrated by maintaining ATP levels and preventing an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. SP treatment also decreased levels of Bax, a death signal for immature neurons, blocked caspases-3 activation, and activated a key survival signaling kinase, Akt, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion SP protected neonatal brain from hypoxic-ischemic injury through maintaining cerebral metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:22885415

  7. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level. PMID:27885356

  8. Brain Glucose Transporter (Glut3) Haploinsufficiency Does Not Impair Mouse Brain Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Ross, Ian R.; Howell, Mary E. A.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Wood, Thomas G.; Ceci, Jeffrey D.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Mouse brain expresses three principle glucose transporters. Glut1 is an endothelial marker and is the principal glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier. Glut3 and Glut6 are expressed in glial cells and neural cells. A mouse line with a null allele for Glut3 has been developed. The Glut3−/− genotype is intrauterine lethal by seven days post-coitis, but the heterozygous (Glut3+/−) littermate survives, exhibiting rapid post-natal weight gain, but no seizures or other behavioral aberrations. At twelve weeks of age, brain uptake of tail vein-injected 3H-2-deoxy glucose in Glut3+/− mice was not different from Glut3+/+ littermates, despite 50% less Glut3 protein expression in the brain. The brain uptake of injected 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose was similarly not different from Glut3+/− littermates in the total amount, time course, or brain imaging in the Glut3+/− mice. Glut1 and Glut6 protein expressions evaluated by immunoblots were not affected by the diminished Glut3 expression in the Glut3+/− mice. We conclude that a 50% decrease in Glut3 is not limiting for the uptake of glucose into the mouse brain, since Glut3 haploinsufficiency does not impair brain glucose uptake or utilization. PMID:21316350

  9. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  10. Altered resting-state whole-brain functional networks of neonates with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Batalle, Dafnis; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Tornador, Cristian; Bargallo, Nuria; Deco, Gustavo; Eixarch, Elisenda; Gratacos, Eduard

    2016-04-01

    The feasibility to use functional MRI (fMRI) during natural sleep to assess low-frequency basal brain activity fluctuations in human neonates has been demonstrated, although its potential to characterise pathologies of prenatal origin has not yet been exploited. In the present study, we used intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) as a model of altered neurodevelopment due to prenatal condition to show the suitability of brain networks to characterise functional brain organisation at neonatal age. Particularly, we analysed resting-state fMRI signal of 20 neonates with IUGR and 13 controls, obtaining whole-brain functional networks based on correlations of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in 90 grey matter regions of an anatomical atlas (AAL). Characterisation of the networks obtained with graph theoretical features showed increased network infrastructure and raw efficiencies but reduced efficiency after normalisation, demonstrating hyper-connected but sub-optimally organised IUGR functional brain networks. Significant association of network features with neurobehavioral scores was also found. Further assessment of spatiotemporal dynamics displayed alterations into features associated to frontal, cingulate and lingual cortices. These findings show the capacity of functional brain networks to characterise brain reorganisation from an early age, and their potential to develop biomarkers of altered neurodevelopment.

  11. Doppler velocimetry of ductus venous in preterm fetuses with brain sparing effect: neonatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cosmo, Ynesmara Coelho; Júnior, Edward Araujo; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; de Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Nassar; Mattar, Rosiane; Lopes, Laudelino Marques; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Souza, Eduardo; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective to evaluate the relationship between ductus venous (DV) and Doppler velocimetry in neonatal outcome in severe compromised preterm fetuses. Methods the study was designed as an observational and cross-sectional study with 52 premature neonates with brain sparing effect. The criteria of neonatal severe morbidity were: severe intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 3 or 4), retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4), cystic periventricular leukomalatia, bronchopneumo dysplasia and neonatal mortality. The fetuses were divided in two groups: group 0 - all the fetuses with ventricular systole/atrial contraction (S/A) in DV ratio values less them 3.4; group 1 - fetuses with values of S/A ratio greater than 3.4. Results 42% of fetuses showed abnormal S/A ratio in DV and 48% showed birth weight below percentile 3 for gestational age. There was no statistical significance comparing the 02 groups according to bronchopneumo dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4) and intraventricular hemorrhage (grade 3 or 4). Only one fetus presented cystic periventricular leukomalatia. We found statistically significant association between abnormal DV S/A ratio and neonatal mortality (CI 95%, 1.28 –38.22, p< 0.002). Conclusions our results suggest that abnormal DV blood flow detected by Doppler examination isn’t associated with severe neonatal morbidity but with neonatal mortality. PMID:23181172

  12. Doppler velocimetry of ductus venous in preterm fetuses with brain sparing effect: neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Cosmo, Ynesmara Coelho; Araujo Júnior, Edward; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; de Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Nassar; Mattar, Rosiane; Lopes, Laudelino Marques; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Souza, Eduardo; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-07-01

    to evaluate the relationship between ductus venous (DV) and Doppler velocimetry in neonatal outcome in severe compromised preterm fetuses. the study was designed as an observational and cross-sectional study with 52 premature neonates with brain sparing effect. The criteria of neonatal severe morbidity were: severe intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 3 or 4), retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4), cystic periventricular leukomalatia, bronchopneumo dysplasia and neonatal mortality. The fetuses were divided in two groups: group 0 - all the fetuses with ventricular systole/atrial contraction (S/A) in DV ratio values less them 3.4; group 1 - fetuses with values of S/A ratio greater than 3.4. 42% of fetuses showed abnormal S/A ratio in DV and 48% showed birth weight below percentile 3 for gestational age. There was no statistical significance comparing the 02 groups according to bronchopneumo dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4) and intraventricular hemorrhage (grade 3 or 4). Only one fetus presented cystic periventricular leukomalatia. We found statistically significant association between abnormal DV S/A ratio and neonatal mortality (CI 95%, 1.28 -38.22, p< 0.002). our results suggest that abnormal DV blood flow detected by Doppler examination isn't associated with severe neonatal morbidity but with neonatal mortality.

  13. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  14. Accurate resistivity mouse brain mapping using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Delattre, Vincent; Fraering, Patrick C; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-10-15

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed in post-mortem mice brains using a flexible probe with an embedded micrometric electrode array. Combined with a peak resistance frequency method this allowed obtaining intrinsic resistivity values of brain tissues and structures with submillimetric resolution. Reproducible resistivity measurements are reported, which allows the resistivity in the cortex, ventricle, fiber tracts, thalamus and basal ganglia to be differentiated. Measurements of brain slices revealed resistivity profiles correlated with the local density of cell bodies hence allowing to discriminate between the different cortical layers. Finally, impedance measurements were performed on a model of cauterized mouse brain evidencing the possibility to measure the spatial extent and the degree of the tissue denaturation due to the cauterization.

  15. Systemic inflammation combined with neonatal cerebellar haemorrhage aggravates long-term structural and functional outcomes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Sophie; Pai, Alex; Richter, Lindsay; Vafaei, Rod; Potluri, Praneetha; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2017-07-27

    Despite the increased recognition of cerebellar injury in survivors of preterm birth, the neurodevelopmental consequences of isolated cerebellar injury have been largely unexplored and our current understanding of the functional deficits requires further attention in order to translate knowledge to best practices. Preterm infants are exposed to multiple stressors during their postnatal development including perinatal cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) and postnatal infection, two major risk factors for neurodevelopmental impairments. We developed a translational mouse model of CBH and/or inflammation to measure the short- and long-term outcomes in cerebellar structure and function. Mice exposed to early combined insults of CBH and early inflammatory state (EIS) have a delay in grasping acquisition, neonatal motor deficits and deficient long-term memory. CBH combined with late inflammatory state (LIS) does not induce neonatal motor problems but leads to poor fine motor function and long-term memory deficits at adulthood. Early combined insults result in poor cerebellar growth from postnatal day 15 until adulthood shown by MRI, which are reflected in diminished volumes of cerebellar structures. There are also decreases in volumes of gray matter and hippocampus. Cerebellar microgliosis appears 24h after the combined insults and persists until postnatal day 15 in the cerebellar molecular layer and cerebellar nuclei in association with a disrupted patterning of myelin deposition, a delay of oligodendrocyte maturation and reduced white matter cerebellar volume. Together, these findings reveal poor outcomes in developing brains exposed to combined cerebellar perinatal insults in association with cerebellar hypoplasia, persistence of microgliosis and alterations of cerebellar white matter maturation and growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of maternal administration of allopregnanolone before birth asphyxia on neonatal hippocampal function in the spiny mouse.

    PubMed

    Fleiss, Bobbi; Parkington, Helena C; Coleman, Harold A; Dickinson, Hayley; Yawno, Tamara; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Hirst, Jon J; Walker, David W

    2012-01-18

    Clinically, treatment options where fetal distress is anticipated or identified are limited. Allopregnanolone is an endogenous steroid, that positively modulates the GABA(A) receptor, and that has anti-apoptotic and anti-excitotoxic actions, reducing brain damage in adult animal models of brain injury. We sought to determine if prophylactic treatment of the pregnant female with a single dose of this steroid could reduce birth asphyxia-induced losses in hippocampal function at 5 days of age (P5) in spiny mouse neonates (Acomys cahirinus). At 37 days gestation (term=39 days) and 1h before inducing birth asphyxia, spiny mice dams were injected subcutaneously (0.2 ml) with either 3mg/kg allopregnanolone or 20% w/v β-cyclodextrin vehicle. One hour later, fetuses were either delivered immediately by caesarean section (control group) or exposed to 7.5 min of in utero asphyxia, causing acidosis and hypoxia. At P5, ex vivo hippocampal plasticity was assessed, or brains collected to determine cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen; PCNA) or calcium channel expression (inositol trisphosphate receptor type 1; IP(3)R1) using immunohistochemistry. Allopregnanolone partially prevented the decrease in long term potentiation at P5, and the asphyxia-induced increase in IP(3)R1 expression in CA1 pyramidal neurons. There was no effect of allopregnanolone on the asphyxia induced impairment of the input/output (I/O) curve and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF). In control birth pups, maternal allopregnanolone treatment caused significant changes in short term post-synaptic plasticity and also reduced hippocampal proliferation at P5. These findings show that allopregnanolone can modulate hippocampal development and synaptic function in a normoxic or hypoxic environment, possibly by modifying calcium metabolism. Best practice for treatment dose and timing of treatment will need to be carefully considered.

  17. Neural localization of addicsin in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Akiduki, Saori; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Ikemoto, Mitsushi J

    2007-10-22

    Addicsin is a member of the prenylated Rab acceptor (PRA) 1 domain family and a murine homolog of the rat glutamate-transporter-associated protein 3-18 (GTRAP3-18). This protein is considered to function as a modulator of the neural glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1). However, its molecular functions remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the regional and cellular localization of addicsin in the central nervous system (CNS) by using a newly generated antibody specific for the protein. Distribution analysis by Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the protein was widely distributed in various regions of the mature CNS, including the olfactory bulbs, cerebral cortex, amygdala, hippocampus CA1-3 fields, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that addicsin was expressed in the somata of principal neurons in the CNS such as the pyramidal cells and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons scattered in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the protein showed pre-synaptic localization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 field of the hippocampal formation. Subcellular localization analysis of highly purified synaptic fractions prepared from mouse forebrain supported the cytoplasmic and pre-synaptic distribution of addicsin. These results suggest that addicsin has neural expression and may play crucial roles in the basic physiological functions of the mature CNS.

  18. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  19. Complement inhibition and statins prevent fetal brain cortical abnormalities in a mouse model of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Silvia M A; Gonzalez, Juan M; Wade, Jean; Jansen, Maurits A; Serio, Andrea; Marshall, Ian; Lennen, Ross J; Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are particularly vulnerable to brain injury. In this study we focus on cortical brain damage associated with long-term cognitive, behavioral, attentional or socialization deficits in children born preterm. Using a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB), we demonstrated that complement component C5a contributes to fetal cortical brain injury. Disruption of cortical dendritic and axonal cytoarchitecture was observed in PTB-mice. Fetuses deficient in C5aR (-/-) did not show cortical brain damage. Treatment with antibody anti-C5, that prevents generation of C5a, also prevented cortical fetal brain injury in PTB-mice. C5a also showed a detrimental effect on fetal cortical neuron development and survival in vitro. Increased glutamate release was observed in cortical neurons in culture exposed to C5a. Blockade of C5aR prevented glutamate increase and restored neurons dendritic and axonal growth and survival. Similarly, increased glutamate levels - measured by (1)HMRS - were observed in vivo in PTB-fetuses compared to age-matched controls. The blockade of glutamate receptors prevented C5a-induced abnormal growth and increased cell death in isolated fetal cortical neurons. Simvastatin and pravastatin prevented cortical fetal brain developmental and metabolic abnormalities -in vivo and in vitro. Neuroprotective effects of statins were mediated by Akt/PKB signaling pathways. This study shows that complement activation plays a crucial role in cortical fetal brain injury in PTL and suggests that complement inhibitors and statins might be good therapeutic options to improve neonatal outcomes in preterm birth. © 2013.

  20. Efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Emily; Ditzler, Sally; Lee, Donghoon; Richards, Andrew; Yagle, Kevin; Park, Joshua; Eslamy, Hedieh; Bobilev, Dmitri; Vrignaud, Patricia; Olson, James

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an unmet need in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors for chemotherapy that is efficacious, avoids damage to the developing brain, and crosses the blood-brain barrier. These experiments evaluated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors. Methods The antitumor activity of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were compared in flank and orthotopic xenograft models of patient-derived atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), medulloblastoma, and central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET). Efficacy of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were also assessed in the Smo/Smo spontaneous mouse medulloblastoma tumor model. Results This study observed significant tumor growth inhibition in pediatric patient-derived flank xenograft tumor models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET after treatment with either cabazitaxel or docetaxel. Cabazitaxel, but not docetaxel, treatment resulted in sustained tumor growth inhibition in the ATRT and medulloblastoma flank xenograft models. Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET showed significantly improved survival with treatment of cabazitaxel. Conclusion These data support further testing of cabazitaxel as a therapy for treating human pediatric brain tumors. PMID:25140037

  1. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  2. Antenatal exposure to antidepressants is associated with altered brain development in very preterm-born neonates.

    PubMed

    Podrebarac, Samantha K; Duerden, Emma G; Chau, Vann; Grunau, Ruth E; Synnes, Anne; Oberlander, Tim F; Miller, Steven P

    2017-02-07

    Antenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with an enhanced risk of preterm birth. Very preterm-born neonates (<32weeks' gestation) antenatally-exposed to SSRIs may show altered brain development. To examine whether antenatal-SSRI exposure was associated with adverse neonatal brain microstructural and metabolic development using diffusion tensor and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Of 177 neonates enrolled, 14 (8%) were antenatally exposed to SSRIs. Neonates were scanned twice (median week 32; interquartile range [IQR]: 30.4-33.6) and again at term-equivalent age (40.1, IQR: 38.6-42.1). Using a region-of-interest approach, N-acetylaspartate to choline ratios (NAA/Cho), lactate to choline ratios, white and gray matter fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) values were extracted from white and gray matter subcortical regions. Neurodevelopment was assessed at 18 months, corrected age. SSRI-exposed neonates exhibited increased FA and decreased MD, AD and RD values in the superior white matter (p<0.05). FA values in the basal ganglia and thalamus were significantly lower in neonates antenatally exposed to SSRIs, compared to non-exposed (p=0.004). Lower NAA/Cho values (p=0.04) and higher Lactate/Cho values (p=0.004) in posterior gray matter were evident in neonates exposed to SSRIs. No association with antenatal-SSRI exposure and neurodevelopment was evident. Given the importance of treating depression in mothers at risk for preterm delivery, the impact of antenatal-SSRIs on early brain development requires further attention. Future research is directed at determining the mechanism of this relationship and the contribution of maternal mood. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  4. Dynamic reorganization of intrinsic functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Preti, Maria Giulia; Bolton, Thomas A W; Buerge, Michaela; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rudin, Markus

    2017-03-14

    Functional connectivity (FC) derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) allows for the integrative study of neuronal processes at a macroscopic level. The majority of studies to date have assumed stationary interactions between brain regions, without considering the dynamic aspects of network organization. Only recently has the latter received increased attention, predominantly in human studies. Applying dynamic FC (dFC) analysis to mice is attractive given the relative simplicity of the mouse brain and the possibility to explore mechanisms underlying network dynamics using pharmacological, environmental or genetic interventions. Therefore, we have evaluated the feasibility and research potential of mouse dFC using the interventions of social stress or anesthesia duration as two case-study examples. By combining a sliding-window correlation approach with dictionary learning, several dynamic functional states (dFS) with a complex organization were identified, exhibiting highly dynamic inter- and intra-modular interactions. Each dFS displayed a high degree of reproducibility upon changes in analytical parameters and across datasets. They fluctuated at different degrees as a function of anesthetic depth, and were sensitive indicators of pathology as shown for the chronic psychosocial stress mouse model of depression. Dynamic functional states are proposed to make a major contribution to information integration and processing in the healthy and diseased brain.

  5. Lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA is critical for neonatal lethality in Prader-Willi syndrome mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feng; Prints, Yelena; Dhar, Madhu; Johnson, Dabney K; Garnacho-Montero, Carmen; Nicholls, Robert; Francke, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by the lack of paternal expression of imprinted genes in the human chromosome region 15q11-13. Recent studies of rare human translocation patients narrowed the PWS critical genes to a 121-kb region containing PWCR1/HBII-85 and HBII-438 snoRNA genes. The existing mouse models of PWS that lack the expression of multiple genes, including Snrpn, Ube3a, and many intronic snoRNA genes, are characterized by 80%-100% neonatal lethality. To define the candidate region for PWS-like phenotypes in mice,we analyzed the expression of several genetic elements in mice carrying the large radiation-induced p30PUb deletion that includes the p locus. Mice having inherited this deletion from either parent develop normally into adulthood. By Northern blot and RTPCR assays of brain tissue, we found that Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNAs are expressed normally, while MBII-52 snoRNAs are not expressed when the deletion is paternally inherited. Mapping of the distal deletion breakpoint indicated that the p30PUb deletion includes the entire MBII-52 snoRNA gene cluster and three previously unmapped EST sequences. The lack of expression of these elements in mice with a paternal p30PUb deletion indicates that they are not critical for the neonatal lethality observed in PWS mouse models. In addition, we identified MBII-436, the mouse homolog of the HBII-436 snoRNA, confirmed its imprinting status, and mapped it outside of the p30PUb deletion. Taking together all available data, we conclude that the lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA expression is the most likely cause for the neonatal lethality in PWS model mice.

  6. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrés F.

    2012-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination.—Bortolussi, G., Zentilin, L., Baj, G., Giraudi, P., Bellarosa, C., Giacca, M., Tiribelli, C., Muro, A. F. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer. PMID:22094718

  7. Effect of neonatal body temperature on postanoxic, potentially neurotoxic iron accumulation in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Justyna; Danielisova, Viera; Caputa, Michał

    2006-01-30

    In asphyxiated newborns iron, released from heme and ferritin and deposited in the brain, contributes to neurodegeneration. Because hypothermia provides neuroprotection, newborn mammals, showing spontaneously reduced body temperature, might avoid the iron-mediated neurotoxicity. Therefore, we decided to study the effects of body temperature and chelation of iron with deferoxamine on iron accumulation in the brain of three weeks old rats exposed neonatally to a critical anoxia. At the age of two days, newborn rats were exposed to anoxia in 100% nitrogen atmosphere. Rectal temperature was kept at 33 degrees C (typical of the rat neonates), or elevated to a level typical of febrile (39 degrees C) adults. Control rats were exposed to atmospheric air in the respective thermal conditions. Half of the rats exposed to anoxia under hyperthermic conditions were injected with deferoxamine (DF), immediately after anoxia and 24 h later. Regional changes in cerebral iron deposition were examined in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the striatum, using iron histochemistry, when the rats reached the age of three weeks. Increased iron staining was found in neurons of each of the three cerebral regions in rats exposed to neonatal anoxia under hyperthermic conditions and the iron accumulation was prevented by postanoxic DF injection. In conclusion, febrile body temperature amplifies cerebral hyperferremia, which might induce neurodegenerative disturbances in the brain. On the other hand, a protection against the brain hyperferremia can be achieved by both the reduced physiological neonatal body temperature and by postasphyxic DF administration.

  8. HIF-1α inhibition ameliorates neonatal brain injury in a rat pup hypoxic-ischemic model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Jadhav, Vikram; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been considered as a regulator of both prosurvival and prodeath pathways in the nervous system. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of HIF-1α in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. Rice-Vannucci model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury was used in seven-day-old rats, by subjecting unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2h of hypoxia (8% O2 at 37°C). HIF-1α activity was inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) and enhanced by dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). Results showed that 2ME2 exhibited dose-dependent neuroprotection by decreasing infarct volume and reducing brain edema at 48 h post HI. The neuroprotection was lost when 2ME2 was administered 3 h post HI. HIF-1α upregulation by DMOG increased the permeability of the BBB and brain edema compared with HI group. 2ME2 attenuated the increase in HIF-1α and VEGF 24 h after HI. 2ME2 also had a long-term effect of protecting against the loss of brain tissue. The study showed that the early inhibition of HIF-1α acutely after injury provided neuroprotection after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia which was associated with preservation of BBB integrity, attenuation of brain edema, and neuronal death. PMID:18602008

  9. Enhanced brain stem 5HT₂A receptor function under neonatal hypoxic insult: role of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Korah, P K; Jayanarayanan, S; Paulose, C S

    2011-08-01

    Molecular processes regulating brain stem serotonergic receptors play an important role in the control of respiration. We evaluated 5-HT(2A) receptor alterations in the brain stem of neonatal rats exposed to hypoxic insult and the effect of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation in ameliorating these alterations. Hypoxic stress increased the total 5-HT and 5-HT(2A) receptor number along with an up regulation of 5-HT Transporter and 5-HT(2A) receptor gene in the brain stem of neonates. These serotonergic alterations were reversed by glucose supplementation alone and along with oxygen to hypoxic neonates. The enhanced brain stem 5-HT(2A) receptors act as a modulator of ventilatory response to hypoxia, which can in turn result in pulmonary vasoconstriction and cognitive dysfunction. The adverse effects of 100% oxygenation and epinephrine administration to hypoxic neonates were also reported. This has immense clinical significance in neonatal care.

  10. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A symmetrical Waxholm canonical mouse brain for NeuroMaps

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Douglas M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Zaborsky, Laszlo; Green, William D.K.; Moore, Eider; Badea, Alexandra; Dubach, Mark F.; Bookstein, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    NeuroMaps (2009) is a web-based application that enables investigators to map data from macaque studies to a canonical atlas of the macaque brain. It includes an image processor enabling one to create figures suitable for publication. Eventually it will enable investigators studying several species to analyze overlap between their data and multimodality data mapped by others. The purpose of this project was to incorporate the Waxholm canonical mouse brain (Hawrylycz, 2009) into NeuroMaps. An enhanced gradient echo (T2*) magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the Waxholm brain (Johnson et al., 2010) was warped to bring the irregular biological midplane of the MRI into line with the mathematically flat midsagittal plane of Waxholm space. The left hemisphere was deleted and the right reflected to produce a symmetrical 3D MRI. The symmetrical T2* image was imported into NeuroMaps. The map executing the warp was applied to four other voxellated volumes based on the same specimen and maintained at the Center for In-Vitro Microscopy (CIVM): a T2-weighted MRI, a T1 weighted MRI, a segmented image and an image reconstructed from Nissl-stained histological sections. Symmetric versions of those images were submitted to the CIVM repository where they are available to other laboratories. Utility of the symmetric atlas was demonstrated by mapping and comparing a cortical areas illustrated in three conventional mouse brain atlases. The symmetric Waxholm mouse brain atlas is now accessible in NeuroMaps. Investigators can map image data to standard templates over the Web and process them for publication, presentation and archival purposes: http://braininfo.rprc.washington.edu/MapViewData.aspx. PMID:21163300

  12. L-Ornithine is a potential acute satiety signal in the brain of neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong V; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Do, Phong H; Bahry, Mohammad A; Yang, Hui; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we observed that neonatal chicks exhibit feeding behavior characterized by frequent food intake and short resting intervals, with changes detected in the brain amino acid and monoamine concentrations. In this study, we aimed to clarify further the relationship between the appetite of neonatal chicks and brain amino acid metabolism. In Experiment 1, changes were investigated in free amino acids in the brain under conditions of regulated appetite induced by fasting and subsequent short-term re-feeding. Chicks (5 days old) were distributed into four treatment groups--namely, fasting for 3h, and fasting for 3h followed by re-feeding for 10, 20 or 30 min. Brain samples were collected after treatment to analyze free amino acid concentrations. Amino adipic acid and proline in all brain parts as well as arginine and ornithine in all brain parts--except mesencephalic arginine and cerebellar ornithine--were increased in a time-dependent manner following re-feeding. In Experiment 2, we further examined the effect of exogenous administration of some amino acids altered in association with feeding behavior in Experiment 1. We chose L-arginine and its functional metabolite, L-ornithine, to analyze their effects on food intake in chicks. Intracerebroventricular injection (2 μmol) of L-ornithine, but not L-arginine, significantly inhibited food intake in neonatal chicks. In Experiment 3, we found that central injection of L-ornithine (2, 4, and 6 μmol) dose-dependently suppressed food intake in chicks. These results suggested that L-ornithine may have an important role in the control of food intake as an acute satiety signal in the neonatal chick brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Omics analysis of mouse brain models of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Loriod, Béatrice; Villard, Claude; Buee, Luc; Blum, David; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Cho, Yoon H; Gory-Faure, Sylvie; Mansour, Elodie; Gharbi, Ali; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2017-02-05

    The identification of common gene/protein profiles related to brain alterations, if they exist, may indicate the convergence of the pathogenic mechanisms driving brain disorders. Six genetically engineered mouse lines modelling neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders were considered. Omics approaches, including transcriptomic and proteomic methods, were used. The gene/protein lists were used for inter-disease comparisons and further functional and network investigations. When the inter-disease comparison was performed using the gene symbol identifiers, the number of genes/proteins involved in multiple diseases decreased rapidly. Thus, no genes/proteins were shared by all 6 mouse models. Only one gene/protein (Gfap) was shared among 4 disorders, providing strong evidence that a common molecular signature does not exist among brain diseases. The inter-disease comparison of functional processes showed the involvement of a few major biological processes indicating that brain diseases of diverse aetiologies might utilize common biological pathways in the nervous system, without necessarily involving similar molecules.

  14. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior–posterior, dorsal–ventral and medial– lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. Database URL: http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. PMID:25145340

  15. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial- lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Determinants of neonatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and association with child development.

    PubMed

    Ghassabian, Akhgar; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Chahal, Nikhita; McLain, Alexander C; Bell, Erin; Lawrence, David A; Yeung, Edwina H

    2017-10-01

    Using a population-based birth cohort in upstate New York (2008-2010), we examined the determinants of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) measured in newborn dried blood spots (n = 2,637). We also examined the association between neonatal BDNF and children's development. The cohort was initially designed to examine the influence of infertility treatment on child development but found no impact. Mothers rated children's development in five domains repeatedly through age 3 years. Socioeconomic and maternal lifestyle determinants of BDNF were examined using multivariable linear regression models. Generalized linear mixed models estimated odds ratios for neonatal BDNF in relation to failing a developmental domain. Smoking and drinking in pregnancy, nulliparity, non-White ethnicity/race, and prepregnancy obesity were associated with lower neonatal BDNF. Neonatal BDNF was not associated with failure for developmental domains; however, there was an interaction between BDNF and preterm birth. In preterm infants, a higher BDNF was associated with lower odds of failing any developmental domains, after adjusting for confounders and infertility treatment. This result was particularly significant for failure in communication. Our findings suggest that BDNF levels in neonates may be impacted by maternal lifestyle characteristics. More specifically, lower neonatal BDNF might be an early marker of aberrant neurodevelopment in preterm infants.

  17. Increased Excitability and Excitatory Synaptic Transmission During in Vitro Ischemia in the Neonatal Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Santina Zanelli, A; Karthik Rajasekaran, K; Denise Grosenbaugh, K; Kapur, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study tested the hypothesis that exposure to in vitro hypoxia-ischemia alters membrane properties and excitability as well as excitatory synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the neonatal mouse. Methods Experiments were conducted in hippocampal slices in P7-P9 C57Bl/6 mice using whole-cell patch clamp in current- and voltage-clamp mode. Passive (membrane potential Vm, input resistance (Rin) and active (action potential (AP) threshold and amplitude) membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons were assessed at baseline, during 10 min in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)) and during reoxygenation. Spontaneous and miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (s and mEPSCs) were studied under similar conditions. Results OGD caused significant depolarization of CA1 pyramidal neurons as well as decrease in AP threshold and increase in AP amplitude. These changes were blocked by the application of tetrodotoxin, indicating Na+ channels involvement. Following 10 min of reoxygenation, significant membrane hyperpolarization was noted and it was associated with a decrease in Rin. AP threshold and amplitude returned to baseline during that stage. sEPSC and mEPSC frequency increased during both OGD and reoxygenation but their amplitude remained unchanged. Additionally, we found that OGD decreases Ih (hyperpolarization activated depolarizing current) in CA1 neurons from neonatal mice and this effect persists during reoxygenation. Significance These results indicate that in vitro ischemia leads to changes in membrane excitability mediated by sodium and potassium channels. Further, it results in enhanced neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. These changes are likely to represent one of the mechanisms of hypoxia/ischemia-mediated seizures in the neonatal period. PMID:26404876

  18. Lgr5+ cells regenerate hair cells via proliferation and direct transdifferentiation in damaged neonatal mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Chai, Renjie; Kim, Grace S; Pham, Nicole; Jansson, Lina; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Kuo, Bryan; May, Lindsey A; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, Lisa L; Cheng, Alan G

    2015-04-07

    Recruitment of endogenous progenitors is critical during tissue repair. The inner ear utricle requires mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) to detect linear acceleration. After damage, non-mammalian utricles regenerate HCs via both proliferation and direct transdifferentiation. In adult mammals, limited transdifferentiation from unidentified progenitors occurs to regenerate extrastriolar Type II HCs. Here we show that HC damage in neonatal mouse utricle activates the Wnt target gene Lgr5 in striolar supporting cells. Lineage tracing and time-lapse microscopy reveal that Lgr5+ cells transdifferentiate into HC-like cells in vitro. In contrast to adults, HC ablation in neonatal utricles in vivo recruits Lgr5+ cells to regenerate striolar HCs through mitotic and transdifferentiation pathways. Both Type I and II HCs are regenerated, and regenerated HCs display stereocilia and synapses. Lastly, stabilized ß-catenin in Lgr5+ cells enhances mitotic activity and HC regeneration. Thus Lgr5 marks Wnt-regulated, damage-activated HC progenitors and may help uncover factors driving mammalian HC regeneration.

  19. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  20. Serotonin modulates the properties of ascending commissural interneurons in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guisheng; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2006-03-01

    The interneuron populations that constitute the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in the mammalian spinal cord are not well understood. We studied the properties of a set of commissural interneurons whose axons cross and ascend in the contralateral cord (aCINs) in the neonatal mouse. During N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and 5-HT-induced fictive locomotion, a majority of lumbar (L2) aCINs examined were rhythmically active; most of them fired in phase with the ipsilateral motoneuron pool, but some fired in phase with contralateral motoneurons. 5-HT plays a critical role in enabling the locomotor CPG to function. We found that 5-HT increased the excitability of aCINs by depolarizing the membrane potential, reducing the postspike afterhyperpolarization amplitude, broadening the action potential, and decreasing the action potential threshold. Serotonin had no significant effect on the input resistance and sag amplitude of aCINs. These results support the hypothesis that aCINs play important roles in coordinating left-right movements during fictive locomotion and thus may be component neurons in the locomotor CPG in neonatal mice.

  1. Albumin administration prevents neurological damage and death in a mouse model of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Vodret, Simone; Bortolussi, Giulia; Schreuder, Andrea B.; Jašprová, Jana; Vitek, Libor; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Muro, Andrés F.

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to prevent severe neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus are phototherapy and, in unresponsive cases, exchange transfusion, which has significant morbidity and mortality risks. Neurotoxicity is caused by the fraction of unconjugated bilirubin not bound to albumin (free bilirubin, Bf). Human serum albumin (HSA) administration was suggested to increase plasma bilirubin-binding capacity. However, its clinical use is infrequent due to difficulties to address its potential preventive and curative benefits, and to the absence of reliable markers to monitor bilirubin neurotoxicity risk. We used a genetic mouse model of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia showing severe neurological impairment and neonatal lethality. We treated mutant pups with repeated HSA administration since birth, without phototherapy application. Daily intraperitoneal HSA administration completely rescued neurological damage and lethality, depending on dosage and administration frequency. Albumin infusion increased plasma bilirubin-binding capacity, mobilizing bilirubin from tissues to plasma. This resulted in reduced plasma Bf, forebrain and cerebellum bilirubin levels. We showed that, in our experimental model, Bf is the best marker to determine the risk of developing neurological damage. These results support the potential use of albumin administration in severe acute hyperbilirubinemia conditions to prevent or treat bilirubin neurotoxicity in situations in which exchange transfusion may be required. PMID:26541892

  2. Neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity: alternative to the chronic rodent bioassay.

    PubMed

    Flammang, T J; Tungeln, L S; Kadlubar, F F; Fu, P P

    1997-10-01

    The chronic rodent bioassay for tumors has been utilized systematically for 25 years to identify chemicals with carcinogenic potential in man. In general, those chemicals exhibiting tumorigenicity at multiple sites in both mice and rats have been regarded as possessing strong carcinogenic potential in humans. In comparison, the value of data collected for those test chemicals exhibiting more sporadic tumorigenicity results (e.g., single species/single sex or dose-independent) has been questioned. As knowledge of the carcinogenic process has increased, several alternative test systems, usually faster and less expensive than the 2-year bioassay, have been suggested for identification of the strongly acting, transspecies carcinogens. The International Conference on Harmonization for Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use has proposed an international standard that allows for the use of one long-term rodent carcinogenicity study, plus one supplementary study to identify potential human pharmaceutical carcinogens. The neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity has been used since 1959; however, relative to other alternate tests, little has been written about this system. It is clear that this assay system successfully identifies transspecies carcinogens from numerous chemical classes, thus recommending itself as a strong candidate for a supplementary study to identify potential human carcinogens. In contrast, there are decidedly less data available from this assay in response to pharmaceuticals shown to exhibit weak and/or conflicting results in the 2-year bioassay, knowledge invaluable to the regulatory process. This paper reviews the historical development and our experience with the neonatal mouse assay and includes suggestions for a standardized protocol and strategies to document its response to "weak" and/or "nongenotoxic" carcinogens.

  3. Label-free structural photoacoustic tomography of intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Capitalizing on endogenous hemoglobin contrast, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a deep-tissue highresolution imaging modality, has drawn increasing interest in neuro-imaging. However, most existing studies are limited to functional imaging on the cortical surface, and the deep-brain structural imaging capability of PACT has never been demonstrated. Here, we explicitly studied the limiting factors of deep-brain PACT imaging. We found that the skull distorted the acoustic signal and blood suppressed the structural contrast from other chromophores. When the two effects are mitigated, PACT can provide high-resolution label-free structural imaging through the entire mouse brain. With 100 μm in-plane resolution, we can clearly identify major structures of the brain, and the image quality is comparable to that of magnetic resonance microscopy. Spectral PACT studies indicate that structural contrasts mainly originate from cytochrome and lipid. The feasibility of imaging the structure of the brain in vivo has also been discussed. Our results demonstrate that PACT is a promising modality for both structural and functional brain imaging.

  4. Sildenafil Improves Brain Injury Recovery following Term Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Male Rat Pups.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Armin; Khoja, Zehra; Johnstone, Aaron; Dale, Laura; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Term asphyxiated newborns remain at risk of developing brain injury despite available neuropreventive therapies such as hypothermia. Neurorestorative treatments may be an alternative. This study investigated the effect of sildenafil on brain injury induced by neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) at term-equivalent age. Neonatal HI was induced in male Long-Evans rat pups at postnatal day 10 (P10) by left common carotid ligation followed by a 2-hour exposure to 8% oxygen; sham-operated rat pups served as the control. Both groups were randomized to oral sildenafil or vehicle twice daily for 7 consecutive days. Gait analysis was performed on P27. At P30, the rats were sacrificed, and their brains were extracted. The surfaces of both hemispheres were measured on hematoxylin and eosin-stained brain sections. Mature neurons and endothelial cells were quantified near the infarct boundary zone using immunohistochemistry. HI caused significant gait impairment and a reduction in the size of the left hemisphere. Treatment with sildenafil led to an improvement in the neurological deficits as measured by gait analysis, as well as an improvement in the size of the left hemisphere. Sildenafil, especially at higher doses, also caused a significant increase in the number of neurons near the infarct boundary zone. In conclusion, sildenafil administered after neonatal HI may improve brain injury recovery by promoting neuronal populations.

  5. On the edge of language acquisition: inherent constraints on encoding multisyllabic sequences in the neonate brain.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Alissa L; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables - tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences. After familiarization with a six-syllable sequence, the neonate brain responded to the change (as shown by an increase in oxy-hemoglobin) when the two edge syllables switched positions but not when two middle syllables switched positions (Experiment 1), indicating that they encoded the syllables at the edges of sequences better than those in the middle. Moreover, when a 25 ms pause was inserted between the middle syllables as a segmentation cue, neonates' brains were sensitive to the change (Experiment 2), indicating that subtle cues in speech can signal a boundary, with enhanced encoding of the syllables located at the edges of that boundary. These findings suggest that neonates' brains can encode information from multisyllabic sequences and that this encoding is constrained. Moreover, subtle segmentation cues in a sequence of syllables provide a mechanism with which to accurately encode positional information from longer sequences. Tracking the order of syllables is necessary to understand language and our results suggest that the foundations for this encoding are present at birth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Vertically acquired neonatal citrobacter brain abscess - case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2005-02-01

    Vertically acquired citrobacter meningitis in the neonate is very rare and carries a very high mortality and morbidity. Overall, approximately 30% of neonates with Citrobacter meningitis die and 50% sustain some damage to the CNS. The authors describe a case of a newborn with Citrobacter koseri meningitis with multiple brain abscesses, with a successful outcome following multiple burr-hole aspirations and prolonged antibiotic therapy. An aggressive surgical approach combined with intravenous antibiotics (including imipenems, to which the organism is very sensitive) for a minimum of 4 weeks appears to improve the outcome of infection with this virulent organism.

  7. Neonatal Brain Hemorrhage (NBH) of Prematurity: Translational Mechanisms of the Vascular-Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; Poblete, Roy; Krafft, Paul R.; Rolland, William B.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain hemorrhage (NBH) of prematurity is an unfortunate consequence of preterm birth. Complications result in shunt dependence and long-term structural changes such as post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, gliosis, and neurological dysfunction. Several animal models are available to study this condition, and many basic mechanisms, etiological factors, and outcome consequences, are becoming understood. NBH is an important clinical condition, of which treatment may potentially circumvent shunt complication, and improve functional recovery (cerebral palsy, and cognitive impairments). This review highlights key pathophysiological findings of the neonatal vascular-neural network in the context of molecular mechanisms targeting the post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus affecting this vulnerable infant population. PMID:25620100

  8. The magnetism responsive gene Ntan1 in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuaki; Taniura, Hideo; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hirai, Takao; Sanada, Noriko; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    We have previously identified Ntan1 as a magnetism response gene by differential display screening in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Ntan1 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all the mouse tissues examined but relatively abundant in brain, retina and testis. Ntan1 mRNA expression was detectable in the embryonic 12-day mouse brain and gradually increased with ageing. In situ hybridization analysis showed high localization of Ntan1 mRNA in pyramidal cell layer of CA region and granular cell layer of dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, and Purkinje and granular cell layers in the cerebellum, respectively. Ntan1 mRNA expression was significantly increased about two-fold 12 h after brief exposure for 15 min to magnetism at 100 mT with a gradual decrease thereafter in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When embryonic 12-day-old or newborn mice were successively exposed to magnetic fields at 100 mT for 2 h, four times per day until the postnatal seventh day, Ntan1 mRNA was significantly increased about 1.5-2-fold in the hippocampus in vivo. The mice exposed to magnetic fields under the same condition showed significantly decreased locomotor activity. These results suggest that magnetic exposure affects higher order neural functions through modulation of genes expression.

  9. Sesamin attenuates neurotoxicity in mouse model of ischemic brain stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Haque, Rizwanul; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Ishrat, Tauheed; Shah, Zahoor A; Khan, Mohammad M; Ali, Mehboob; Jamal, Arshad; Katare, Deepshikha Pande; Liou, Gregory I; Bhatia, Kanchan

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a severe neurological disorder characterized by the abrupt loss of blood circulation into the brain resulting into wide ranging brain and behavior abnormalities. The present study was designed to evaluate molecular mechanism by which sesamin (SES) induces neuroprotection in mouse model of ischemic stroke. The results of this study demonstrate that SES treatment (30 mg/kg bwt) significantly reduced infarction volume, lipid per-oxidation, cleaved-caspase-3 activation, and increased GSH activity following MCAO in adult male mouse. SES treatment also diminished iNOS and COX-2 protein expression, and significantly restored SOD activity and protein expression level in the ischemic cortex of the MCAO animals. Furthermore, SES treatment also significantly reduced inflammatory and oxidative stress markers including Iba1, Nox-2, Cox-2, peroxynitrite compared to placebo MCAO animals. Superoxide radical production, as studied by DHE staining method, was also significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SES treated compared to placebo MCAO animals. Likewise, downstream effects of superoxide free radicals i.e. MAPK/ERK and P38 activation was also significantly attenuated in SES treated compared to placebo MCAO animals. In conclusion, these results suggest that SES induces significant neuroprotection, by ameliorating many signaling pathways activated/deactivated following cerebral ischemia in adult mouse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphological features of the neonatal brain support development of subsequent cognitive, language, and motor abilities.

    PubMed

    Spann, Marisa N; Bansal, Ravi; Rosen, Tove S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the role of brain maturation in the development of cognitive abilities derives primarily from studies of school-age children to adults. Little is known about the morphological features of the neonatal brain that support the subsequent development of abilities in early childhood, when maturation of the brain and these abilities are the most dynamic. The goal of our study was to determine whether brain morphology during the neonatal period supports early cognitive development through 2 years of age. We correlated morphological features of the cerebral surface assessed using deformation-based measures (surface distances) of high-resolution MRI scans for 33 healthy neonates, scanned between the first to sixth week of postmenstrual life, with subsequent measures of their motor, language, and cognitive abilities at ages 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We found that morphological features of the cerebral surface of the frontal, mesial prefrontal, temporal, and occipital regions correlated with subsequent motor scores, posterior parietal regions correlated with subsequent language scores, and temporal and occipital regions correlated with subsequent cognitive scores. Measures of the anterior and middle portions of the cingulate gyrus correlated with scores across all three domains of ability. Most of the significant findings were inverse correlations located bilaterally in the brain. The inverse correlations may suggest either that a more protracted morphological maturation or smaller local volumes of neonatal brain tissue supports better performance on measures of subsequent motor, language, and cognitive abilities throughout the first 2 years of postnatal life. The correlations of morphological measures of the cingulate with measures of performance across all domains of ability suggest that the cingulate supports a broad range of skills in infancy and early childhood, similar to its functions in older children and adults. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Significant utilization of dietary arachidonic acid is for brain adrenic acid in baboon neonates.

    PubMed

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Lawrence, Peter; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Boehm, G; Nathanielsz, P W; Brenna, J T

    2002-05-01

    Dietary arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) utilization in-vivo for carbon recycling into de-novo lipogenesis and conversion to n-6 long chain polyunsaturates was investigated in baboon neonates using [U-(13)C]20:4n-6. Neonates consuming a formula typical of human milk received a single oral dose of [(13)C]arachidonic acid in sn-2 position of either triglyceride or phosphatidylcholine at 18-19 days of postnatal life. Neonate brain, retina, liver, and plasma were obtained 10 days later (28-29 days of life). Low isotopic enrichment (0.27-1.0%Total label) was detected in dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3n-6) in all tissues, but label incorporation into saturates or monounsaturates was not detected. In neonate brain and retina, 16% and 11% of total label was recovered in 22:4n-6, respectively. The relative contribution of dietary fatty acids to postnatal brain 22:4n-6 accretion can be estimated for dietary 20:4n-6 and preformed 22:4n-6 as 17% and 8%, respectively, corresponding to efficiencies of 0.48% and 0.54% of dietary levels, respectively. These results demonstrate in term baboon neonates that in vivo 1) 20:4n-6 was retroconverted to 20:3n-6, 2) 20:4n-6 did not contribute significantly to de novo lipogenesis of saturates and monounsaturates, and 3) the preformed 20:4n-6 contribution to brain 22:4n-6 accumulation was quantitatively a significant metabolic fate for dietary 20:4n-6.

  12. Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Melissa A; Farrell, Kristen E; Graham, Brett A; Brichta, Alan M; Callister, Robert J

    2015-03-28

    Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (≥P21) SDH neurons. Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between -60 and -50 mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

  13. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  14. Copper deficiency in neonatal mice alters brain catecholamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.R.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper (Cu) deficiency was investigated in Swiss albino mice to develop a model that alters brain catecholamine metabolism without serious growth impairment. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding a diet low in Cu to dams beginning either 7 days (d) prior, 4d prior, 4d after, or on the day of parturition. All 4-week-old male Cu-deficient ({minus}Cu) offspring were anemic and exhibited biochemical characteristics of Cu deficiency when compared to their respective +Cu control mice. However, the best model, which resulted in altered catecholamine metabolism characterized by elevation of dopamine (DA) and depression in norepinephrine (NE) in brain, heart, and spleen, was when treatment began 4d prior to birth. Body and brain weight were not altered. However, levels of Cu in brain and liver of {minus}Cu mice were markedly reduced to 21% and 31% of those measured in +Cu controls, respectively. Furthermore, brain NE and DA concentrations of {minus}Cu mice were 72% and 132% of those quantified in +Cu offspring, respectively. A plausible explanation is that dietary Cu deficiency results in lower activity of brain dopamine-{beta}-monooxygenase, the Cu dependent enzyme that catalyzes conversion of DA to NE. It is not yet known if these changes in Ne and DA pool size altered the quantity or characteristics of the neuronal catecholamine receptors, and more importantly, whether or not the observed changes are reversible by nutritional intervention.

  15. [Resveratrol did not prevent sevoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in the neonatal mice brain].

    PubMed

    Satomoto, Maiko; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Atsujiro; Makita, Koshi

    2013-10-01

    In an animal model, neonatal exposure to sevoflurane induces neuroapoptosis, leading to memory deficits in adulthood. A recent study showed that resveratrol (20 mg x kg(-1)) prevent alcohol-induced cognitive deficits and neural apotosis in rat pups postnatally exposed to ethanol. We investigated if resveratorol prevent sevoflurane induced neuroapotosis. Six-day-old mice were divided into two groups: resveratorol and control groups. Pups were given resveratrol orally 24h and 1h before sevoflurane anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained for 6h. After anesthesia, apotosis was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining for activated caspase-3. Western blot analysis for cleaved poly-(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase was performed to examine apotosis. Neonatal exposure to sevoflurane induced severe neuroapotosis. There were no differences between control groups and resveratrol groups with regards to immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. Resveratrol did not prevent sevoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in the neonatal mice brain.

  16. Properties of rhythmic activity generated by the isolated spinal cord of the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Whelan, P; Bonnot, A; O'Donovan, M J

    2000-12-01

    We examined the ability of the isolated lumbosacral spinal cord of the neonatal mouse (P0-7) to generate rhythmic motor activity under several different conditions. In the absence of electrical or pharmacological stimulation, we recorded several patterns of spontaneous ventral root depolarization and discharge. Spontaneous, alternating discharge between contralateral ventral roots could occur two to three times over a 10-min interval. We also observed other patterns, including left-right synchrony and rhythmic activity restricted to one side of the cord. Trains of stimuli delivered to the lumbar/coccygeal dorsal roots or the sural nerve reliably evoked episodes of rhythmic activity. During these evoked episodes, rhythmic ventral root discharges could occur on one side of the cord or could alternate from side to side. Bath application of a combination of N-methyl-D,L-aspartate (NMA), serotonin, and dopamine produced rhythmic activity that could last for several hours. Under these conditions, the discharge recorded from the left and right L(1)-L(3) ventral roots alternated. In the L(4)-L(5) segments, the discharge had two peaks in each cycle, coincident with discharge of the ipsilateral and contralateral L(1)-L(3) roots. The L(6) ventral root discharge alternated with that recorded from the ipsilateral L(1)-L(3) roots. We established that the drug-induced rhythm was locomotor-like by recording an alternating pattern of discharge between ipsilateral flexor and extensor hindlimb muscle nerves. In addition, by recording simultaneously from ventral roots and muscle nerves, we established that ankle flexor discharge was in phase with ipsilateral L(1)/L(2) ventral root discharge, while extensor discharge was in phase with ipsilateral L(6) ventral root discharge. Rhythmic patterns of ventral root discharge were preserved following mid-sagittal section of the spinal cord, demonstrating that reciprocal inhibitory connections between the left and right sides of the cord are

  17. Behaviour and hippocampus-specific changes in spiny mouse neonates after treatment of the mother with the viral-mimetic Poly I:C at mid-pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Udani; Quinn, Tracey A; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Dickinson, Hayley; Walker, David W

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a link between prenatal exposure to bacterial or viral infections and subsequent development of mental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Animal models to study the prenatal origin of such outcomes of pregnancy have largely used conventional rodents which are immature at birth compared to the human neonate, and doses of the infective agent (i.e., lipopolysaccharide, Poly I:C) have been large enough to cause sickness behaviour in the mother. In this study we have used the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) whose offspring have completed organogenesis at birth, and a single subcutaneous injection of a low (0.5mg/kg) dose of polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C) at mid gestation (20 days, term is 39 days). The treatment had no effect on maternal, fetal or neonatal survival, or postnatal growth of the offspring. However, offspring showed significant impairments in non-spatial memory and learning tasks, and motor activity. Brain histology examined at 1 and 100 days of age revealed significant decreases in reelin, increased GFAP expression, and increased numbers of activated microglia, specifically in the hippocampus. This study provides evidence that a prenatal subclinical infection can have profound effects on brain development that are long-lasting.

  18. Chemoselective imaging of mouse brain tissue via multiplex CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohling, Christoph; Buckup, Tiago; Pagenstecher, Axel; Motzkus, Marcus

    2011-08-01

    The fast and reliable characterization of pathological tissue is a debated topic in the application of vibrational spectroscopy in medicine. In the present work we apply multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) to the investigation of fresh mouse brain tissue. The combination of imaginary part extraction followed by principal component analysis led to color contrast between grey and white matter as well as layers of granule and Purkinje cells. Additional quantitative information was obtained by using a decomposition algorithm. The results perfectly agree with HE stained references slides prepared separately making multiplex CARS an ideal approach for chemoselective imaging.

  19. Inhibition of miRNA-210 reverses nicotine-induced brain hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Ke, Jun; Li, Yong; Ma, Qinyi; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lubo; Xiao, DaLiao

    2017-01-01

    Maternal tobacco use in pregnancy increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and neurobehavioral deficits in postnatal life. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine exposure exacerbated brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal rats through up-regulation of miR-210 expression in the developing brain. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. Experiments of HI brain injury were performed in 10-day-old pups. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly decreased neonatal body and brain weights, but increased the brain to body weight ratio. Perinatal nicotine exposure caused a significant increase in HI brain infarct size in the neonates. In addition, nicotine enhanced miR-210 expression and significantly attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase isoform B (TrkB) protein abundance in the brain. Of importance, intracerebroventricular administration of a miR-210 inhibitor (miR-210-LNA) significantly decreased HI-induced brain infarct size and reversed the nicotine-increased vulnerability to brain HI injury in the neonate. Furthermore, miR-210-LNA treatment also reversed nicotine-mediated down-regulation of BDNF and TrkB protein expression in the neonatal brains. These findings provide novel evidence that the increased miR-210 plays a causal role in perinatal nicotine-induced developmental programming of ischemic sensitive phenotype in the brain. It represents a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of brain hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in the neonate-induced by fetal stress. PMID:28123348

  20. Brain injury following trial of hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Barnes, Patrick D; Hintz, Susan R; Laptook, Abbott R; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M; McDonald, Scott A; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Walsh, Michele C; Tyson, Jon E; Donovan, Edward F; Goldberg, Ronald N; Bara, Rebecca; Das, Abhik; Finer, Neil N; Sanchez, Pablo J; Poindexter, Brenda B; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Carlo, Waldemar A; Stoll, Barbara J; Duara, Shahnaz; Guillet, Ronnie; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to examine the relationship between brain injury and outcome following neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Design and patients Neonatal MRI scans were evaluated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) randomised controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia and each infant was categorised based upon the pattern of brain injury on the MRI findings. Brain injury patterns were assessed as a marker of death or disability at 18–22 months of age. Results Scans were obtained on 136 of 208 trial participants (65%); 73 in the hypothermia and 63 in the control group. Normal scans were noted in 38 of 73 infants (52%) in the hypothermia group and 22 of 63 infants (35%) in the control group. Infants in the hypothermia group had fewer areas of infarction (12%) compared to infants in the control group (22%). Fifty-one of the 136 infants died or had moderate or severe disability at 18 months. The brain injury pattern correlated with outcome of death or disability and with disability among survivors. Each point increase in the severity of the pattern of brain injury was independently associated with a twofold increase in the odds of death or disability. Conclusions Fewer areas of infarction and a trend towards more normal scans were noted in brain MRI following whole-body hypothermia. Presence of the NICHD pattern of brain injury is a marker of death or moderate or severe disability at 18–22 months following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:23080477

  1. Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress in four functional brain areas of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Higher aluminum (Al) content in infant formula and its effects on neonatal brain development are a cause for concern. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution and concentration of Al in neonatal rat brain following Al treatment, and oxidative stress in brain tissues induced by Al overload. Methods Postnatal day 3 (PND 3) rat pups (n =46) received intraperitoneal injection of aluminum chloride (AlCl3), at dosages of 0, 7, and 35 mg/kg body wt (control, low Al (LA), and high Al (HA), respectively), over 14 d. Results Aluminum concentrations were significantly higher in the hippocampus (751.0 ± 225.8 ng/g v.s. 294.9 ± 180.8 ng/g; p < 0.05), diencephalon (79.6 ± 20.7 ng/g v.s. 20.4 ± 9.6 ng/g; p < 0.05), and cerebellum (144.8 ± 36.2 ng/g v.s. 83.1 ± 15.2 ng/g; p < 0.05) in the HA group compared to the control. The hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem of HA animals displayed significantly higher levels of lipid peroxidative products (TBARS) than the same regions in the controls. However, the average superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem were lower in the HA group compared to the control. The HA animals demonstrated increased catalase activity in the diencephalon, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem, compared to controls. Conclusion Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress (H2O2) in the hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem in neonatal rats. PMID:22613782

  2. Decreased connexin 43 in astrocytes inhibits the neuroinflammatory reaction in an acute mouse model of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jing; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Zilong; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Cheng, Guo-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal sepsis is common in neonatal intensive care units, often complicated by injury to the immature brain. Previous studies have shown that the expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in the brain decreases when stimulated by neuro-inflammatory drugs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we showed that partial deletion of Cx43 in astrocytes resulted in weakened inflammatory responses. The up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly reduced in mice with partial deletion of Cx43 in astrocytes compared with wild-type littermates after systemic LPS injection. Moreover, microglial activation was inhibited in mice with partial deletion of Cx43. These results showed that Cx43 in astrocytes plays a critical role in neuro-inflammatory responses. This work provides a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting neuro-inflammatory responses in neonatal sepsis.

  3. Developmental features of the neonatal brain: MR imaging. Part II. Ventricular size and extracerebral space.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Richardson, C J; Nicholas, D A; Mirfakhraee, M; Hayden, C K; Amparo, E G

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a 0.6-T magnet was performed on 51 neonates, aged 29-42 weeks postconception. In 45 neonates, the ventricular/brain ratio (V/B) at the level of the frontal horns and midbody of the lateral ventricles ranged from 0.26 to 0.34. In six other infants a V/B of 0.36 or greater was associated with either cerebral atrophy or obstructive hydrocephalus. The width of the extracerebral space measured along specified points varied little in the neonatal period and ranged from 0 to 4 mm in 48 infants. Extracerebral space widths of 5-6 mm were seen in three other infants with severe asphyxia. Prominence of the subarachnoid space overlying the posterior parietal lobes is normal in neonates and should not be confused with cerebral atrophy. The authors conclude that V/B ratios of 0.26-0.34 and extracerebral space widths of 0-4 mm represent the normal range, and that neonates whose measurements exceed these values should be followed up.

  4. Neonatal Brain Abnormalities and Memory and Learning Outcomes at 7 Years in Children Born Very Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Omizzolo, Cristina; Scratch, Shannon E; Stargatt, Robyn; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; Cheong, Jeanie; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie E; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Using prospective longitudinal data from 198 very preterm and 70 full term children, this study characterised the memory and learning abilities of very preterm children at 7 years of age in both verbal and visual domains. The relationship between the extent of brain abnormalities on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years of age in very preterm children was also investigated. Neonatal MRI scans were qualitatively assessed for global, white-matter, cortical grey-matter, deep grey-matter, and cerebellar abnormalities. Very preterm children performed less well on measures of immediate memory, working memory, long-term memory, and learning compared with term born controls. Neonatal brain abnormalities, and in particular deep grey matter abnormality, were associated with poorer memory and learning performance at 7 years in very preterm children, especially global, white-matter, grey-matter and cerebellar abnormalities. Findings support the importance of cerebral neonatal pathology for predicting later memory and learning function. PMID:23805915

  5. Gut microbiota, the immune system, and diet influence the neonatal gut-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael P; Zaghouani, Habib; Niklas, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual framework for a gut-brain axis has existed for decades. The Human Microbiome Project is responsible for establishing intestinal dysbiosis as a mediator of inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and neurodevelopmental disorders in adults. Recent advances in metagenomics implicate gut microbiota and diet as key modulators of the bidirectional signaling pathways between the gut and brain that underlie neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders in adults. Evidence linking intestinal dysbiosis to neurodevelopmental disease outcomes in preterm infants is emerging. Recent clinical studies show that intestinal dysbiosis precedes late-onset neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in intensive care nurseries. Moreover, strong epidemiologic evidence links late-onset neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in long-term psychomotor disabilities of very-low-birth-weight infants. The notion of the gut-brain axis thereby supports that intestinal microbiota can indirectly harm the brain of preterm infants. In this review, we highlight the anatomy and physiology of the gut-brain axis and describe transmission of stress signals caused by immune-microbial dysfunction in the gut. These messengers initiate neurologic disease in preterm infants. Understanding neural and humoral signaling through the gut-brain axis will offer insight into therapeutic and dietary approaches that may improve the outcomes of very-low-birth-weight infants.

  6. Treatment with carnosine reduces hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huizhen; Guo, Shang; Zhang, Linlin; Jia, Liting; Zhang, Zhan; Duan, Hongbao; Zhang, Jingbin; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-03-15

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates, and there is currently no effective therapy for HIBD. Carnosine plays a neuroprotective role in adult brain damage. We have previously demonstrated that carnosine pretreatment protects against HIBD in a neonatal rat model. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with carnosine would also have neuroprotective effects. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal days 7-9 (P7-9). Carnosine was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 250mg/kg at 0h, 24h, and 48h after hypoxia-ischemia was induced. The biochemical markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated at 72h after hypoxia-ischemia was induced, Brain learning and memory function performance were observed using the Morris water maze test on postnatal days 28-33 (P28-33). Treatment with carnosine post-HIBD significantly reduced the concentration of 8-iso-prostaglandinF2alpha in brain tissue and decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells in the hippocampus CA1 region and cortex as well as the mitochondria caspase-3 protein expression. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the cognitive function of P28-33 rats, whose cognitive function decline was due to HIBD. These results demonstrate that carnosine treatment after HIBD can reduce the brain injury, improving brain function. Carnosine could be an attractive candidate for treating HIBD.

  7. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation.

  8. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia.

  9. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  10. Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; Park, Jinkyu; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of labile low-molecular-mass (LMM, defined as < 10 kDa) metal complexes in cells and super-cellular structures such as the brain has been inferred from chelation studies, but direct evidence is lacking. To evaluate the presence of LMM metal complexes in the brain, supernatant fractions of fresh mouse brain homogenates were passed through a 10 kDa cutoff membrane and subjected to size-exclusion liquid chromatography under anaerobic refrigerated conditions. Fractions were monitored for Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, S and P using an on-line ICP-MS. At least 30 different LMM metal complexes were detected along with numerous P- and S- containing species. Reproducibility was assessed by performing the experiment 13 times, using different buffers, and by examining whether complexes changed with time. Eleven Co, 2 Cu, 5 Mn, 4 Mo, 3 Fe and 2 Zn complexes with molecular masses < 4 kDa were detected. One LMM Mo complex comigrated with the molybdopterin cofactor. Most Cu and Zn complexes appeared to be protein-bound with masses ranging from 4 – 20 kDa. Co was the only metal for which the “free” or aqueous complex was reproducibly observed. Aqueous Co may be sufficiently stable in this environment due to its relatively slow water-exchange kinetics. Attempts were made to assign some of these complexes, but further efforts will be required to identify them unambiguously and to determine their functions. This is among the first studies to detect low-molecular-mass transition metal complexes in the mouse brain using LC-ICP-MS. PMID:23443205

  11. Effects of pre- and neonatal exposure to bisphenol A on murine brain development.

    PubMed

    Tando, So; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Ikeda, Jun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fushiki, Shinji

    2007-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), known as an environmental endocrine disrupter, is widely used in industry and dentistry. We investigated the effects of fetal and neonatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) on the brain development of mice. The density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in substantia nigra was significantly decreased in BPA-exposed female mice (3 microg/g powder food), but not in the male mice, as compared with that of the control mice. The densities of calbindin D-28 K-, calretinin- and parvalbumin-IR neurons in the cerebral cortex were not different between BPA-exposed and the control mice. The present study indicates that chronic exposure of BPA during prenatal and neonatal periods causes a decrease of TH-positive neurons in substantia nigra only in female mice brain.

  12. Enhanced Neonatal Brain Responses To Sung Streams Predict Vocabulary Outcomes By Age 18 Months.

    PubMed

    François, Clément; Teixidó, Maria; Takerkart, Sylvain; Agut, Thaïs; Bosch, Laura; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2017-09-29

    Words and melodies are some of the basic elements infants are able to extract early in life from the auditory input. Whether melodic cues contained in songs can facilitate word-form extraction immediately after birth remained unexplored. Here, we provided converging neural and computational evidence of the early benefit of melodies for language acquisition. Twenty-eight neonates were tested on their ability to extract word-forms from continuous flows of sung and spoken syllabic sequences. We found different brain dynamics for sung and spoken streams and observed successful detection of word-form violations in the sung condition only. Furthermore, neonatal brain responses for sung streams predicted expressive vocabulary at 18 months as demonstrated by multiple regression and cross-validation analyses. These findings suggest that early neural individual differences in prosodic speech processing might be a good indicator of later language outcomes and could be considered as a relevant factor in the development of infants' language skills.

  13. Divergent and nonuniform gene expression patterns in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John A.; Royall, Joshua J.; Bertagnolli, Darren; Boe, Andrew F.; Burnell, Josh J.; Byrnes, Emi J.; Copeland, Cathy; Desta, Tsega; Fischer, Shanna R.; Goldy, Jeff; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Kidney, Jolene M.; Lemon, Tracy; Orta, Geralyn J.; Parry, Sheana E.; Pathak, Sayan D.; Pearson, Owen C.; Reding, Melissa; Shapouri, Sheila; Smith, Kimberly A.; Soden, Chad; Solan, Beth M.; Weller, John; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding variations in gene sequence and expression level associated with phenotype, yet how genetic diversity translates into complex phenotypic differences remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the relationship between genetic background and spatial patterns of gene expression across seven strains of mice, providing the most extensive cellular-resolution comparative analysis of gene expression in the mammalian brain to date. Using comprehensive brainwide anatomic coverage (more than 200 brain regions), we applied in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial expression patterns of 49 genes encoding well-known pharmaceutical drug targets. Remarkably, over 50% of the genes examined showed interstrain expression variation. In addition, the variability was nonuniformly distributed across strain and neuroanatomic region, suggesting certain organizing principles. First, the degree of expression variance among strains mirrors genealogic relationships. Second, expression pattern differences were concentrated in higher-order brain regions such as the cortex and hippocampus. Divergence in gene expression patterns across the brain could contribute significantly to variations in behavior and responses to neuroactive drugs in laboratory mouse strains and may help to explain individual differences in human responsiveness to neuroactive drugs. PMID:20956311

  14. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  15. Probiotics stimulate enterocyte migration and microbial diversity in the neonatal mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Saulnier, Delphine M.; Blutt, Sarah E.; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Riehle, Kevin P.; Major, Angela M.; Venable, Susan F.; Finegold, Milton J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Conner, Margaret E.; Versalovic, James

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial microbes and probiotics show promise for the treatment of pediatric gastrointestinal diseases. However, basic mechanisms of probiosis are not well understood, and most investigations have been performed in germ-free or microbiome-depleted animals. We sought to functionally characterize probiotic-host interactions in the context of normal early development. Outbred CD1 neonatal mice were orally gavaged with one of two strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri or an equal volume of vehicle. Transcriptome analysis was performed on enterocyte RNA isolated by laser-capture microdissection. Enterocyte migration and proliferation were assessed by labeling cells with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, and fecal microbial community composition was determined by 16S metagenomic sequencing. Probiotic ingestion altered gene expression in multiple canonical pathways involving cell motility. L. reuteri strain DSM 17938 dramatically increased enterocyte migration (3-fold), proliferation (34%), and crypt height (29%) compared to vehicle-treated mice, whereas strain ATCC PTA 6475 increased cell migration (2-fold) without affecting crypt proliferative activity. In addition, both probiotic strains increased the phylogenetic diversity and evenness between taxa of the fecal microbiome 24 h after a single probiotic gavage. These experiments identify two targets of probiosis in early development, the intestinal epithelium and the gut microbiome, and suggest novel mechanisms for probiotic strain-specific effects.—Preidis, G. A., Saulnier, D. M., Blutt, S. E., Mistretta,T.-A., Riehle, K. P., Major, A. M., Venable, S. F., Finegold, M. J., Petrosino, J. F., Conner, M. E., Versalovic, J. Probiotics stimulate enterocyte migration and microbial diversity in the neonatal mouse intestine. PMID:22267340

  16. Pleiotropic effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lavandera, Jimena; Rodríguez, Jorge; Ruspini, Silvina; Meiss, Roberto; Zuccoli, Johanna Romina; Martínez, María Del Carmen; Gerez, Esther; Batlle, Alcira; Buzaleh, Ana María

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) seems to be responsible for the neuropsychiatric manifestations of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Our aim was to study the effect of ALA on the different metabolic pathways in the mouse brain to enhance our knowledge about the action of this heme precursor on the central nervous system. Heme metabolism, the cholinergic system, the defense enzyme system, and nitric oxide metabolism were evaluated in the encephalon of CF-1 mice receiving a single (40 mg/kg body mass) or multiple doses of ALA (40 mg/kg, every 48 h for 14 days). We subsequently found ALA accumulation in the encephalon of the mice. ALA also altered the brain cholinergic system. After one dose of ALA, a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity and a reduction in glutathione levels were detected, whereas malondialdehyde levels and catalase activity were increased. Heme oxygenase was also increased as an antioxidant response to protect the encephalon against injury. All nitric oxide synthase isoforms were induced by ALA, these changes were more significant for the inducible isoform in glial cells. In conclusion, ALA affected several metabolic pathways in mouse encephalon. Data indicate that a rapid response to oxidative stress was developed; however, with long-term intoxication, the redox balance was probably restored, thereby minimizing oxidative damage.

  17. Comparative mouse brain tractography of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Moldrich, Randal X; Pannek, Kerstin; Hoch, Renee; Rubenstein, John L; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Richards, Linda J

    2010-07-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography can be employed to simultaneously analyze three-dimensional white matter tracts in the brain. Numerous methods have been proposed to model diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance data for tractography, and we have explored the functionality of some of these for studying white and grey matter pathways in ex vivo mouse brain. Using various deterministic and probabilistic algorithms across a range of regions of interest we found that probabilistic tractography provides a more robust means of visualizing both white and grey matter pathways than deterministic tractography. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of probabilistic tractography profiles to streamline number, step size, curvature, fiber orientation distribution threshold, and wholebrain versus region of interest seeding. Using anatomically well-defined corticothalamic pathways, we show how projection maps can permit the topographical assessment of probabilistic tractography. Finally, we show how different tractography approaches can impact on dMRI assessment of tract changes in a mouse deficient for the frontal cortex morphogen, fibroblast growth factor 17. In conclusion, probabilistic tractography can elucidate the phenotypes of mice with neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders in a quantitative manner.

  18. Effects of cannabinoids on the activities of mouse brain lipases.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Burstein, S; Renzulli, L

    1986-09-01

    Cannabinoids were found to augment phospholipase activities and modify lipid levels of mouse brain synaptosomes, myelin and mitochondria. Delta-1-tetra-hydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) and several of its metabolites induced a dose-dependent (0.32-16 microM) stimulation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity resulting in the increased release of free arachidonic acid from exogenous [1-14C]phosphatidylcholine (PC). The potencies of the cannabinoids in modulating PLA2 activity were approximately of the order: 7-OH-delta 1-THC greater than delta 1-THC greater than 7-oxo-delta 1-THC greater than delta 1-THC-7-oic acid = 6 alpha OH-delta 1-THC much greater than 6 beta-OH-delta 1-THC. The hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) by synaptosomal phospholipase C (PLC) was enhanced significantly by delta 1-THC and promoted diacylglyceride levels by greater than 100 percent compared to control values. In contrast, arachidonate was the major product resulting from phospholipase activities of a 20,000 g pellet. Synaptosomal diacylglyceride lipase activity was inhibited by delta 1-THC. [1-14C]Arachidonic acid was readily incorporated into subcellular membrane phospholipids and after exposure to cannabinoids led to diminished phosphoglyceride levels and concomitant increases in released neutral lipid products. These data suggest that cannabinoids control phospholipid turnover and metabolism in mouse brain preparations by the activation of phospholipases and, through this mechanism, may exert some of their effects.

  19. Glucocorticoids Protect Neonatal Rat Brain in Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE)

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Benjamin; Conception, Katherine; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) resulting from asphyxia in the peripartum period is the most common cause of neonatal brain damage and can result in significant neurologic sequelae, including cerebral palsy. Currently therapeutic hypothermia is the only accepted treatment in addition to supportive care for infants with HIE, however, many additional neuroprotective therapies have been investigated. Of these, glucocorticoids have previously been shown to have neuroprotective effects. HIE is also frequently compounded by infectious inflammatory processes (sepsis) and as such, the infants may be more amenable to treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent. Thus, the present study investigated dexamethasone and hydrocortisone treatment given after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult in neonatal rats via intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection and intranasal administration. In addition, we examined the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in HIE after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization in a model of HIE and sepsis. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced rat brain infarction size when given after HI treatment via ICV injection; however it did not demonstrate any neuroprotective effects when given intranasally. Hydrocortisone after HI insult also significantly reduced brain infarction size when given via ICV injection; and the intranasal administration showed to be protective of brain injury in male rats at a dose of 300 µg. LPS sensitization did significantly increase the brain infarction size compared to controls, and hydrocortisone treatment after LPS sensitization showed a significant decrease in brain infarction size when given via ICV injection, as well as intranasal administration in both genders at a dose of 300 µg. To conclude, these results show that glucocorticoids have significant neuroprotective effects when given after HI injury and that these effects may be even more pronounced when given in circumstances of additional inflammatory injury, such

  20. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0 ± 0.9 x 10-6 cm/s to 2.9 ± 1.0 x 10-6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10-6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  1. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P.; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B.; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0±0.9 x 10−6 cm/s to 2.9±1.0 x 10−6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10−6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  2. Relationship of EEG sources of neonatal seizures to acute perinatal brain lesions seen on MRI: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, Ivana; Cherian, Perumpillichira J; De Vos, Maarten; Hallez, Hans; Deburchgraeve, Wouter; Govaert, Paul; Lequin, Maarten; Visser, Gerhard H; Swarte, Renate M; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Van Huffel, Sabine; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-10-01

    Even though it is known that neonatal seizures are associated with acute brain lesions, the relationship of electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures to acute perinatal brain lesions visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been objectively studied. EEG source localization is successfully used for this purpose in adults, but it has not been sufficiently explored in neonates. Therefore, we developed an integrated method for ictal EEG dipole source localization based on a realistic head model to investigate the utility of EEG source imaging in neonates with postasphyxial seizures. We describe here our method and compare the dipole seizure localization results with acute perinatal lesions seen on brain MRI in 10 full-term infants with neonatal encephalopathy. Through experimental studies, we also explore the sensitivity of our method to the electrode positioning errors and the variations in neonatal skull geometry and conductivity. The localization results of 45 focal seizures from 10 neonates are compared with the visual analysis of EEG and MRI data, scored by expert physicians. In 9 of 10 neonates, dipole locations showed good relationship with MRI lesions and clinical data. Our experimental results also suggest that the variations in the used values for skull conductivity or thickness have little effect on the dipole localization, whereas inaccurate electrode positioning can reduce the accuracy of source estimates. The performance of our fused method indicates that ictal EEG source imaging is feasible in neonates and with further validation studies, this technique can become a useful diagnostic tool.

  3. Distinct expression of Cbln family mRNAs in developing and adult mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Miura, Eriko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Cbln1 belongs to the C1q and tumour necrosis factor superfamily, and plays crucial roles as a cerebellar granule cell-derived transneuronal regulator for synapse integrity and plasticity in Purkinje cells. Although Cbln2-Cbln4 are also expressed in the brain and could form heteromeric complexes with Cbln1, their precise expressions remain unclear. Here, we investigated gene expression of the Cbln family in developing and adult C57BL mouse brains by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blot, and high-resolution in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses. In the adult brain, spatial patterns of mRNA expression were highly differential depending on Cbln subtypes. Notably, particularly high levels of Cbln mRNAs were expressed in some nuclei and neurons, whereas their postsynaptic targets often lacked or were low for any Cbln mRNAs, as seen for cerebellar granule cells/Purkinje cells, entorhinal cortex/hippocampus, intralaminar group of thalamic nuclei/caudate-putamen, and dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus/central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. In the developing brain, Cbln1, 2, and 4 mRNAs appeared as early as embryonic day 10-13, and exhibited transient up-regulation during the late embryonic and neonatal periods. For example, Cbln2 mRNA was expressed in the cortical plate of the developing neocortex, displaying a high rostromedial to low caudolateral gradient. In contrast, Cbln3 mRNA was selective to cerebellar granule cells throughout development, and its onset was as late as postnatal day 7-10. These results will provide a molecular-anatomical basis for future studies that characterize roles played by the Cbln family.

  4. Prenatal Drug Exposure Affects Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala–frontal, insula–frontal, and insula–sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala–frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  5. Temporally-Patterned Deep Brain Stimulation in a Mouse Model of Multiple Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tabansky, Inna; Quinkert, Amy Wells; Rahman, Nadera; Muller, Salomon Zev; Löfgren, Jesper; Rudling, Johan; Goodman, Alyssa; Wang, Yingping; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    We report that mice with closed-head multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) show a decrease in the motoric aspects of generalized arousal, as measured by automated, quantitative behavioral assays. Further, we found that temporally-patterned deep brain stimulation (DBS) can increase generalized arousal and spontaneous motor activity in this mouse model of TBI. This arousal increase is input-pattern-dependent, as changing the temporal pattern of DBS can modulate its effect on motor activity. Finally, an extensive examination of mouse behavioral capacities, looking for deficits in this model of TBI, suggest that the strongest effects of TBI in this model are found in the initiation of any kind of movement. PMID:25072520

  6. Brain Ultrasonography Findings in Neonatal Seizure; a Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Saeed; Partovi, Parinaz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Screening of newborns with seizure, who have curable pathologic brain findings, might be able to improve their final outcome by accelerating treatment intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the brain ultrasonography findings of newborns hospitalized with complaint of seizure. Methods: The present cross-sectional study designed to evaluate brain ultrasonography findings of hospitalized newborns complaining seizure. Neonatal seizure was defined as presence of tonic, clonic, myoclonic, and subtle attacks in 1 - 28 day old newborns. Results: 100 newborns with the mean age of 5.82 ± 6.29 days were evaluated (58% male). Most newborns were in the < 10 days age range (76%), term (83%) and with normal birth weight (81%). 22 (22%) of the ultrasonography examinations showed a pathologic finding. A correlation was only found between birth age and probability of the presence of a pathologic problem in the brain as the frequency of these problems was significantly higher in pre-term newborns (p = 0.023). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, frequency of pathologic findings in neonatal brain ultrasonography was 22%. Hemorrhage (12%) and hydrocephaly (7%) were the most common findings. The only factor correlating with increased probability of positive findings was the newborns being pre-term. PMID:28286848

  7. Targeting neonatal ischemic brain injury with a pentapeptide-based irreversible caspase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chauvier, D; Renolleau, S; Holifanjaniaina, S; Ankri, S; Bezault, M; Schwendimann, L; Rousset, C; Casimir, R; Hoebeke, J; Smirnova, M; Debret, G; Trichet, A-P; Carlsson, Y; Wang, X; Bernard, E; Hébert, M; Rauzier, J-M; Matecki, S; Lacampagne, A; Rustin, P; Mariani, J; Hagberg, H; Gressens, P; Charriaut-Marlangue, C; Jacotot, E

    2011-01-01

    Brain protection of the newborn remains a challenging priority and represents a totally unmet medical need. Pharmacological inhibition of caspases appears as a promising strategy for neuroprotection. In a translational perspective, we have developed a pentapeptide-based group II caspase inhibitor, TRP601/ORPHA133563, which reaches the brain, and inhibits caspases activation, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, and apoptosis in vivo. Single administration of TRP601 protects newborn rodent brain against excitotoxicity, hypoxia–ischemia, and perinatal arterial stroke with a 6-h therapeutic time window, and has no adverse effects on physiological parameters. Safety pharmacology investigations, and toxicology studies in rodent and canine neonates, suggest that TRP601 is a lead compound for further drug development to treat ischemic brain damage in human newborns. PMID:21881605

  8. Functional brain asymmetry in adult novelty response: on fluidity of neonatal novelty exposure effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Akaysha C; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany; Yang, Zhen

    2011-08-01

    Novelty and surprises differentially modify the left and right sides of the brain. Here we show that repeated brief exposures to the novelty of a non-home environment during infancy and early adulthood lead to long-lasting changes in adulthood in the global bi-lateralization organization of the brain as indexed by a transiently detectable right-sided orientating bias upon the initial encounter with the novel environment. Most surprisingly, we show that in the same individuals, the short-term effect of the combined neonatal and adulthood novelty exposures on functional brain asymmetry measured at young adulthood (5 months of age) is distinctively different from the long-term effect measured at late adulthood (15 months of age). These results suggest that long-lasting, cumulative effects of early life experience on brain and behavior organization are not necessarily permanent, but continue to unfold, presumably via interactions with a multitude of unmonitored intervening life events.

  9. Neonatal hypoxic insult-mediated cholinergic disturbances in the brain stem: effect of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Naijil, G; Shilpa, J; Roshni, T; Paulose, C S

    2013-03-01

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under neonatal hypoxia. The present study evaluates neonatal hypoxic insult-mediated cholinergic alterations and the protective role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine resuscitation. The changes in total muscarinic, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism--cholineacetyl transferase and acetylcholine easterase in the brain stem were analyzed. Hypoxic stress decreased total muscarinic receptors along with a reduction in muscarinic M1, M2 and M3 receptor genes in the brain stem. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the down regulated cholineacetyl transferase and up regulated acetylcholine easterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances in the brain stem were reversed by glucose resuscitation to hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration were also reported. This has immense clinical significance in establishing a proper resuscitation for the management of neonatal hypoxia.

  10. MiR-125b Regulates Primordial Follicle Assembly by Targeting Activin Receptor Type 2a in Neonatal Mouse Ovary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shufen; Liu, Jiali; Li, Xinqiang; Ji, Xiaowen; Zhang, Jianfang; Wang, Yue; Cui, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The establishment of the primordial follicle pool is crucial for fertility in mammalian females, and the interruption of overall micro-RNA production byDicer1conditional knockout in the female reproductive system results in infertility. However, there are few reports about the functions of individual micro-RNA in regulating primordial follicle assembly. The present study aimed to investigate the function of miR-125b, which is conserved and preferentially expressed in mammalian ovary during primordial follicle assembly. Detection of miR-125b in the developing mouse ovaries by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization showed that it was highly expressed perinatally and specifically located in the ovarian somatic cells. MiR-125b overexpression blocked the process of primordial follicle assembly in cultured newborn mouse ovaries, while its knockdown promoted this process. Further studies showed that miR-125b regulated the activin/Smad2 signaling in neonatal mouse ovary by directly targeting the 3'-untranslated region of activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a). Overexpression of miR-125b in neonatal mouse ovary suppressed theAcvr2aprotein level, attenuating activin/Smad2 signaling, while knockdown of miR-125b showed the opposite effects. In addition, recombinant human activin A (rh-ActA) down-regulated miR-125b in the neonatal mouse ovary. Overexpression of miR-125b attenuated the promoting effects of rh-ActA on primordial follicle assembly. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-125b blocks the process of primordial follicle assembly, and miR-125b may play this role by regulating the expression ofAcvr2ain the activin/Smad2 signaling pathway. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Affects Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; Michalski, Stephanie; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proven to enhance neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, various groups have reported contradictory results on whether TBI increases neurogenesis, partially due to a wide range in the severities of injuries seen with different TBI models. To address whether the severity of TBI affects neurogenesis in the injured brain, we assessed neurogenesis in mouse brains receiving different severities of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with the same injury device. The mice were subjected to mild, moderate, or severe TBI by a CCI device. The effects of TBI severity on neurogenesis were evaluated at three stages: NSC proliferation, immature neurons, and newly-generated mature neurons. The results showed that mild TBI did not affect neurogenesis at any of the three stages. Moderate TBI promoted NSC proliferation without increasing neurogenesis. Severe TBI increased neurogenesis at all three stages. Our data suggest that the severity of injury affects adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and thus it may partially explain the inconsistent results of different groups regarding neurogenesis following TBI. Further understanding the mechanism of TBI-induced neurogenesis may provide a potential approach for using endogenous NSCs to protect against neuronal loss after trauma.

  12. Brain Biomarkers in Familial Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Kuttner-Hirshler, Yafit; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Apolinario, Joan; Bonds, Jacqueline; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Lazarov, Orly

    2017-09-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognitive deterioration. It is thought that the onset of the disease takes place several decades before memory deficits are apparent. Reliable biomarkers for the diagnosis or prognostication of the disease are highly desirable. Neural stem cells (NSC) exist in the adult brain throughout life and give rise to neural progenitor cells (NPC), which differentiate into neurons or glia. The level of NPC proliferation and new neuron formation is significantly compromised in mouse models of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). These deficits are readily detected in young adults, at 2-3 months of age, preceding amyloid deposition and cognitive impairments, which may indicate that impaired neurogenesis can be an early biomarker for cognitive deficits in AD. Recent studies suggest that NSC can be detected in live rodents, noninvasively, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 1.28 ppm signal. Here we examined the use of 1H-MRS for determining the extent of neurogenesis in the brains of FAD mice. We observed that the reduction in neurogenesis in the FAD mice as observed by immunohistochemistry, was not manifested by a reduction in the 1.28 ppm signal, suggesting that this marker is either not specific for neurogenesis or not sensitive enough for the detection of alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis in the brains of FAD mice.

  13. The proteome of mouse brain microvessel membranes and basal lamina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyun Bae; Scott, Michael; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Baird, Andrew; Yates, John; Torbett, Bruce E; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a multicellular vascular structure separating blood from the brain parenchyma that is composed of endothelial cells with tight intercellular junctions, surrounded by a basal lamina, astrocytes, and pericytes. Previous studies have generated detailed databases of the microvessel transcriptome; however, less information is available on the BBB at the protein level. In this study, we specifically focused on characterization of the membrane fraction of cells within the BBB to generate a more complete understanding of membrane transporters, tight junction proteins, and associated extracellular matrix proteins that are functional hallmarks of the BBB. We used Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology to identify a total of 1,143 proteins in mouse brain microvessels, of which 53% were determined to be membrane associated. Analyses of specific classes of BBB-associated proteins in the context of recent transcriptome reports provide a unique database to assess the relative contribution of genes at the level of both RNA and protein in the maintenance of normal BBB integrity. PMID:21792245

  14. Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 channels (TRPM2) mediate neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sammen; Turlova, Ekaterina; Li, Feiya; Bao, Mei-Hua; Szeto, Vivian; Wong, Raymond; Abussaud, Ahmed; Wang, Haitao; Zhu, Shuzhen; Gao, Xinzheng; Mori, Yasuo; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2017-10-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2), a calcium-permeable non-selective cation channel, is reported to mediate brain damage following ischemic insults in adult mice. However, the role of TRPM2 channels in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury remains unknown. We hypothesize that TRPM2(+/-) and TRPM2(-/-) neonatal mice have reduced hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. To study the effect of TRPM2 on neonatal brain damage, we used 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess the infarct volume and whole brain imaging to assess morphological changes in the brain. In addition, we also evaluated neurobehavioral outcomes for sensorimotor function 7days following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We report that the infarct volumes were significantly smaller and behavioral outcomes were improved in both TRPM2(+/-) and TRPM2(-/-) mice compared to that of wildtype mice. Next, we found that TRPM2-null mice showed reduced dephosphorylation of GSK-3β following hypoxic ischemic injury unlike sham mice. TRPM2(+/-) and TRPM2(-/-) mice also had reduced activation of astrocytes and microglia in ipsilateral hemispheres, compared to wildtype mice. These findings suggest that TRPM2 channels play an essential role in mediating hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice. Genetically eliminating TRPM2 channels can provide neuroprotection against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and this effect is elicited in part through regulation of GSK-3β. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Examination of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) Integrity In A Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan; Savant, Sanjot D.; Bachmeier, Corbin. J.; Hatch, Grant M.; Miller, Donald W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluates, both functionally and biochemically, brain tumor-induced alterations in brain capillary endothelial cells. Brain tumors were induced in Balb/c mice via intracranial injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (3LL) cells into the right hemisphere of the mouse brain using stereotaxic apparatus. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was assessed at various stages of tumor development, using both radiolabeled tracer permeability and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate contrast enhancement (Gad-DTPA). The expression of the drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), in the BBB at various stages of tumor development was also evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Median mouse survival following tumor cell injection was 17 days. The permeability of the BBB to 3H-mannitol was similar in both brain hemispheres at 7 and 10 days post-injection. By day 15, there was a 2-fold increase in 3H-mannitol permeability in the tumor bearing hemispheres compared to the non-tumor hemispheres. Examination of BBB permeability with Gad-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI indicated cerebral vascular permeability changes were confined to the tumor area. The permeability increase observed at the later stages of tumor development correlated with an increase in cerebral vascular volume suggesting angiogenesis within the tumor bearing hemisphere. Furthermore, the Gad-DPTA enhancement observed within the tumor area was significantly less than Gad-DPTA enhancement within the circumventricular organs not protected by the BBB. Expression of P-gp in both the tumor bearing and non-tumor bearing portions of the brain appeared similar at all time points examined. These studies suggest that although BBB integrity is altered within the tumor site at later stages of development, the BBB is still functional and limiting in terms of solute and drug permeability in and around the tumor. PMID:23184143

  16. Resveratrol protects the loss of connexin 43 induced by ethanol exposure in neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tu, Su; Cao, Fu-Tao; Fan, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Cheng-Jian

    2017-06-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption provides risk to cardiomyopathy with unknown mechanisms. Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, is widely reported for its cardiovascular benefits, while its effect on alcohol-induced impairments in cardiomyocytes largely remains unknown. Effects of resveratrol on the cardiomyocytes under ethanol insult were studied in vitro. Ethanol exposure in mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes increased cell death and induced a specific loss of tight junction protein, connexin 43. In spite of adverse effects at higher concentrations, resveratrol at 10 μM improved cell viability of cardiomyocytes in the presence of a deleterious dose of ethanol. Importantly, the co-treatment of resveratrol with ethanol exhibited the restoration of connexin 43 protein. Further assays showed that these effects were likely associated with the antioxidative actions of resveratrol, and correlated with the alleviation of MAP kinase activation in cultured cardiomyocytes in response to ethanol. Our data suggests a novel mechanism of cardiomyocyte cell loss under ethanol exposure and provides new evidence of protective effects of resveratrol in the cardiomyocytes.

  17. Efficacy of Pyrvinium Pamoate against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection In Vitro and in a Neonatal Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Autumn S.; Chong, Curtis R.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Sullivan, David J.

    2008-01-01

    No effective approved drug therapy exists for Cryptosporidium infection of immunocompromised patients. Here we investigated the nonabsorbed anthelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate for inhibition of the growth of the intestinal protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. The concentration of pyrvinium that effected 50% growth inhibition in human enterocytic HCT-8 cells by a quantitative alkaline phosphatase immunoassay was 354 nM. For comparison, in the same assay, 50% growth inhibition was obtained with 711 μM paromomycin or 27 μM chloroquine. We used a neonatal mouse model to measure the anti-Cryptosporidium activity of pyrvinium pamoate in vivo. Beginning 3 days after infection, pyrvinium at 5 or 12.5 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to the treatment group mice for 4 or 6 consecutive days. Nine days after infection, the mice were sacrificed, and drug efficacy was determined by comparing the numbers of oocysts in the fecal smears of treated versus untreated mice. The intensities of trophozoite infection in the ileocecal intestinal regions were also compared using hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histological slides. We observed a >90% reduction in infection intensity in pyrvinium-treated mice relative to that in untreated controls, along with a substantial reduction in tissue pathology. Based on these results, pyrvinium pamoate is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. PMID:18591280

  18. Low expression of SEMA6C accelerates the primordial follicle activation in the neonatal mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yan, Wei; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Jing; Xi, Yueyue; Yuan, Suzhen; Fu, Fangfang; Ding, Ting; Luo, Aiyue; Wang, Shixuan

    2017-09-07

    The primordial follicle assembly, activation and the subsequent development are critical processes for female reproduction. A limited number of primordial follicles are activated to enter the growing follicle pool each wave, and the primordial follicle pool progressively diminishes over a woman's life-time. The number of remaining primordial follicles represents the ovarian reserve. Identification and functional investigation of the factors involved in follicular initial recruitment will be of great significance to the understanding of the female reproduction process and ovarian ageing. In this study, we aimed to study whether and how semaphorin 6C (Sema6c) regulated the primordial follicle activation in the neonatal mouse ovary. The attenuation of SEMA6C expression by SiRNA accelerated the primordial follicle activation in the in vitro ovary culture system. PI3K-AKT-rpS6 pathway was activated when SEMA6C expression was down-regulated. And the LY294002 could reverse the effect of low SEMA6C expression on primordial follicle activation. Our findings revealed that Sema6c was involved in the activation of primordial follicles, and the down-regulation of SEMA6C led to massive primordial follicle activation by interacting with the PI3K-AKT-rpS6 pathway, which might also provide valuable information for understanding premature ovarian failure and ovarian ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment and blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela; Ureña-Guerrero, Monica E; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo I; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    It is likely that monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the excitotoxin that has been most commonly employed to characterize the process of excitotoxicity and to improve understanding of the ways that this process is related to several pathological conditions of the central nervous system. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal MSG treatment produces a significant pathophysiological impact on adulthood, which could be due to modifications in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and vice versa. This mini-review analyzes this topic through brief descriptions about excitotoxicity, BBB structure and function, role of the BBB in the regulation of Glu extracellular levels, conditions that promote breakdown of the BBB, and modifications induced by neonatal MSG treatment that could alter the behavior of the BBB. In conclusion, additional studies to better characterize the effects of neonatal MSG treatment on excitatory amino acids transporters, ionic exchangers, and efflux transporters, as well as the role of the signaling pathways mediated by erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor in the cellular elements of the BBB, should be performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the increase in neurovascular permeability associated with excitotoxicity observed in several diseases and studied using neonatal MSG treatment.

  20. A combined manifold learning analysis of shape and appearance to characterize neonatal brain development.

    PubMed

    Aljabar, P; Wolz, R; Srinivasan, L; Counsell, S J; Rutherford, M A; Edwards, A D; Hajnal, J V; Rueckert, D

    2011-12-01

    Large medical image datasets form a rich source of anatomical descriptions for research into pathology and clinical biomarkers. Many features may be extracted from data such as MR images to provide, through manifold learning methods, new representations of the population's anatomy. However, the ability of any individual feature to fully capture all aspects morphology is limited. We propose a framework for deriving a representation from multiple features or measures which can be chosen to suit the application and are processed using separate manifold-learning steps. The results are then combined to give a single set of embedding coordinates for the data. We illustrate the framework in a population study of neonatal brain MR images and show how consistent representations, correlating well with clinical data, are given by measures of shape and of appearance. These particular measures were chosen as the developing neonatal brain undergoes rapid changes in shape and MR appearance and were derived from extracted cortical surfaces, nonrigid deformations, and image similarities. Combined single embeddings show improved correlations demonstrating their benefit for further studies such as identifying patterns in the trajectories of brain development. The results also suggest a lasting effect of age at birth on brain morphology, coinciding with previous clinical studies.

  1. Infant brain atlases from neonates to 1- and 2-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Jia, Hongjun; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-04-14

    Studies for infants are usually hindered by the insufficient image contrast, especially for neonates. Prior knowledge, in the form of atlas, can provide additional guidance for the data processing such as spatial normalization, label propagation, and tissue segmentation. Although it is highly desired, there is currently no such infant atlas which caters for all these applications. The reason may be largely due to the dramatic early brain development, image processing difficulties, and the need of a large sample size. To this end, after several years of subject recruitment and data acquisition, we have collected a unique longitudinal dataset, involving 95 normal infants (56 males and 39 females) with MRI scanned at 3 ages, i.e., neonate, 1-year-old, and 2-year-old. State-of-the-art MR image segmentation and registration techniques were employed, to construct which include the templates (grayscale average images), tissue probability maps (TPMs), and brain parcellation maps (i.e., meaningful anatomical regions of interest) for each age group. In addition, the longitudinal correspondences between age-specific atlases were also obtained. Experiments of typical infant applications validated that the proposed atlas outperformed other atlases and is hence very useful for infant-related studies. We expect that the proposed infant 0-1-2 brain atlases would be significantly conducive to structural and functional studies of the infant brains. These atlases are publicly available in our website, http://bric.unc.edu/ideagroup/free-softwares/.

  2. Infant Brain Atlases from Neonates to 1- and 2-Year-Olds

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Jia, Hongjun; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies for infants are usually hindered by the insufficient image contrast, especially for neonates. Prior knowledge, in the form of atlas, can provide additional guidance for the data processing such as spatial normalization, label propagation, and tissue segmentation. Although it is highly desired, there is currently no such infant atlas which caters for all these applications. The reason may be largely due to the dramatic early brain development, image processing difficulties, and the need of a large sample size. Methodology To this end, after several years of subject recruitment and data acquisition, we have collected a unique longitudinal dataset, involving 95 normal infants (56 males and 39 females) with MRI scanned at 3 ages, i.e., neonate, 1-year-old, and 2-year-old. State-of-the-art MR image segmentation and registration techniques were employed, to construct which include the templates (grayscale average images), tissue probability maps (TPMs), and brain parcellation maps (i.e., meaningful anatomical regions of interest) for each age group. In addition, the longitudinal correspondences between age-specific atlases were also obtained. Experiments of typical infant applications validated that the proposed atlas outperformed other atlases and is hence very useful for infant-related studies. Conclusions We expect that the proposed infant 0–1–2 brain atlases would be significantly conducive to structural and functional studies of the infant brains. These atlases are publicly available in our website, http://bric.unc.edu/ideagroup/free-softwares/. PMID:21533194

  3. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  4. Optical clearing of the mouse brain and light attenuation quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Esposito, Angela; Nikitichev, Daniil; Desjardins, Adrien; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    Optical clearing allows the reduction of light scattering in biological tissue, enabling 3D morphological information to be obtained deep within tissue using techniques such as optical projection tomography and light sheet microscopy. However, the extent of the clearing is dependent on the technique that is used. There is therefore a need for methods to quantify the quality of the clearing process and thereby to compare clearing techniques. In this study, we developed such a method using a custom spectroscopy system and applied it to compare three techniques that were applied to mouse brain: BABB (Murray's clear), pBABB (a modification of BABB which includes the use of hydrogen peroxide), and passive CLARITY.

  5. Hypothermia and amiloride preserve energetics in a neonatal brain slice model.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nicola J; Bhakoo, Kishore; Puri, Basant K; Edwards, A David; Cox, I Jane

    2005-08-01

    A period of secondary energy failure consisting of a decline in phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), a rise in brain lactate, and alkaline intracellular pH (pH(i)) has been described in infants with neonatal encephalopathy. Strategies that ameliorate this energy failure may be neuroprotective. We hypothesized that a neonatal rat brain slice model undergoes a progressive decline in energetics, which can be ameliorated with hypothermia or amiloride. Interleaved phosphorus ((31)P) and proton ((1)H) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra were obtained from 350 microm neonatal rat brain slices over 8 h in a bicarbonate buffer at 37 degrees C and at 32 degrees C in 7- and 14-d models. (31)P MR spectra were obtained with amiloride in a bicarbonate-free buffer at 37 degrees C in the 14-d model. Findings were similar in 7- and 14-d models. In the 14-d model, there was a Pi doublet structure corresponding to alkaline pH(i) values of 7.50 +/- 0.02 and 7.21 +/- 0.04. Compared with the stabilized baseline of 100, at 5 h PCr/Pi was 65 +/- 6.3 and lactate/NAA was 187 +/- 3 at 37 degrees C, but PCr/Pi and lactate/NAA were not significantly different from baseline at 32 degrees C. Nucleotide triphosphate (NTP)/phosphomonoester (PME) was 0.93 +/- 0.23 at 37 degrees C and 1.81 +/- 0.21 at 32 degrees C at 5 h. With amiloride exposure in the 14-d model, baseline pH(i) values were 7.25 +/- 0.09 and 6.98 +/- 0.02 and NTP/PME was 1.81 +/- 0.05; these parameters were not significantly different at 5 h. Our interpretation of these findings is that the brain slice model underwent secondary energy failure, which was delayed with hypothermia or amiloride.

  6. Machine-learning to characterise neonatal functional connectivity in the preterm brain

    PubMed Central

    Ball, G.; Aljabar, P.; Arichi, T.; Tusor, N.; Cox, D.; Merchant, N.; Nongena, P.; Hajnal, J.V.; Edwards, A.D.; Counsell, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is adversely affected by preterm birth. Magnetic resonance image analysis has revealed a complex fusion of structural alterations across all tissue compartments that are apparent by term-equivalent age, persistent into adolescence and adulthood, and associated with wide-ranging neurodevelopment disorders. Although functional MRI has revealed the relatively advanced organisational state of the neonatal brain, the full extent and nature of functional disruptions following preterm birth remain unclear. In this study, we apply machine-learning methods to compare whole-brain functional connectivity in preterm infants at term-equivalent age and healthy term-born neonates in order to test the hypothesis that preterm birth results in specific alterations to functional connectivity by term-equivalent age. Functional connectivity networks were estimated in 105 preterm infants and 26 term controls using group-independent component analysis and a graphical lasso model. A random forest–based feature selection method was used to identify discriminative edges within each network and a nonlinear support vector machine was used to classify subjects based on functional connectivity alone. We achieved 80% cross-validated classification accuracy informed by a small set of discriminative edges. These edges connected a number of functional nodes in subcortical and cortical grey matter, and most were stronger in term neonates compared to those born preterm. Half of the discriminative edges connected one or more nodes within the basal ganglia. These results demonstrate that functional connectivity in the preterm brain is significantly altered by term-equivalent age, confirming previous reports of altered connectivity between subcortical structures and higher-level association cortex following preterm birth. PMID:26341027

  7. Machine-learning to characterise neonatal functional connectivity in the preterm brain.

    PubMed

    Ball, G; Aljabar, P; Arichi, T; Tusor, N; Cox, D; Merchant, N; Nongena, P; Hajnal, J V; Edwards, A D; Counsell, S J

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is adversely affected by preterm birth. Magnetic resonance image analysis has revealed a complex fusion of structural alterations across all tissue compartments that are apparent by term-equivalent age, persistent into adolescence and adulthood, and associated with wide-ranging neurodevelopment disorders. Although functional MRI has revealed the relatively advanced organisational state of the neonatal brain, the full extent and nature of functional disruptions following preterm birth remain unclear. In this study, we apply machine-learning methods to compare whole-brain functional connectivity in preterm infants at term-equivalent age and healthy term-born neonates in order to test the hypothesis that preterm birth results in specific alterations to functional connectivity by term-equivalent age. Functional connectivity networks were estimated in 105 preterm infants and 26 term controls using group-independent component analysis and a graphical lasso model. A random forest-based feature selection method was used to identify discriminative edges within each network and a nonlinear support vector machine was used to classify subjects based on functional connectivity alone. We achieved 80% cross-validated classification accuracy informed by a small set of discriminative edges. These edges connected a number of functional nodes in subcortical and cortical grey matter, and most were stronger in term neonates compared to those born preterm. Half of the discriminative edges connected one or more nodes within the basal ganglia. These results demonstrate that functional connectivity in the preterm brain is significantly altered by term-equivalent age, confirming previous reports of altered connectivity between subcortical structures and higher-level association cortex following preterm birth.

  8. Electrophysiological Properties of Subventricular Zone Cells in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bin; Mao, Xiao Ou; Xie, Lin; Chang, Su-Youne; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is a principal site of adult neurogenesis and appears to participate in the brain’s response to injury. Thus, measures that enhance SVZ neurogenesis may have a role in treatment of neurological disease. To better characterize SVZ cells and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention, we studied electrophysiological properties of SVZ cells in adult mouse brain slices using patch-clamp techniques. Electrophysiology was correlated with immunohistochemical phenotype by injecting cells with lucifer yellow and by studying transgenic mice carrying green fluorescent protein under control of the doublecortin (DCX) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. We identified five types of cells in the adult mouse SVZ: type 1 cells, with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)/tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive and CdCl2-sensitive inward currents; type 2 cells, with Ca2+-sensitive K+ and both 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive currents; type 3 cells, with 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive and small Na+ currents; type 4 cells, with slowly activating, large linear outward current and sustained outward current without fast-inactivating component; and type 5 cells, with a large outward rectifying current with a fast inactivating component. Type 2 and 3 cells expressed DCX, types 4 and 5 cells expressed GFAP, and type 1 cells expressed neither. We propose that SVZ neurogenesis involves a progression of electrophysiological cell phenotypes from types 4 and 5 cells (astrocytes) to type 1 cells (neuronal progenitors) to types 2 and 3 cells (nascent neurons), and that drugs acting on. ion channels expressed during neurogenesis might promote therapeutic neurogenesis in the injured brain. PMID:20434436

  9. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  10. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  11. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  12. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  13. Neonatal Parathion Exposure Disrupts Serotonin and Dopamine Synaptic Function in Rat Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Wrench, Nicola; Ryde, Ian T.; Lassiter, T. Leon; Levin, Edward D.; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of exposure to developmental neurotoxicants are influenced by environmental factors. In the present study, we examined the role of dietary fat intake. We administered parathion to neonatal rats and then evaluated whether a high-fat diet begun in adulthood could modulate the persistent effects on 5HT and DA systems. Neonatal rats received parathion on postnatal days 1-4 at 0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day, straddling the cholinesterase inhibition threshold. In adulthood, half the animals in each exposure group were given a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. We assessed 5HT and DA concentrations and turnover in brain regions containing their respective cell bodies and projections. In addition, we monitored 5HT1A and 5HT2 receptor binding and the concentration of 5HT presynaptic transporters. Neonatal parathion exposure evoked widespread increases in neurotransmitter turnover, indicative of presynaptic hyperactivity, further augmented by 5HT receptor upregulation. In control rats, consumption of a high-fat diet recapitulated many of the changes seen with neonatal parathion exposure; the effects represented convergent mechanisms, since the high-fat diet often obtunded further increases caused by parathion. Neonatal parathion exposure causes lasting hyperactivity of 5HT and DA systems accompanied by 5HT receptor upregulation, consistent with “miswiring” of neuronal projections. A high-fat diet obtunds the effect of parathion, in part by eliciting similar changes itself. Thus, dietary factors may produce similar synaptic changes as do developmental neurotoxicants, potentially contributing to the increasing incidence in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:19616088

  14. Citrobacter koseri brain abscess in the neonatal rat: survival and replication within human and rat macrophages.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Stacy M; Pollack, Harvey A; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Badger, Julie L

    2003-10-01

    A unique feature of Citrobacter koseri is the extremely high propensity to initiate brain abscesses during neonatal meningitis. Previous clinical reports and studies on infant rats have documented many Citrobacter-filled macrophages within the ventricles and brain abscesses. It has been hypothesized that intracellular survival and replication within macrophages may be a mechanism by which C. koseri subverts the host response and elicits chronic infection, resulting in brain abscess formation. In this study, we showed that C. koseri causes meningitis and brain abscesses in the neonatal rat model, and we utilized histology and magnetic resonance imaging technology to visualize brain abscess formation. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that macrophages (and not fibroblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or neurons) were the primary target for long-term C. koseri infection. To better understand C. koseri pathogenesis, we have characterized the interactions of C. koseri with human macrophages. We found that C. koseri survives and replicates within macrophages in vitro and that uptake of C. koseri increases in the presence of human pooled serum in a dose-dependent manner. EM studies lend support to the hypothesis that C. koseri uses morphologically different methods of uptake to enter macrophages. FcgammaRI blocking experiments show that this receptor primarily facilitates the entry of opsonized C. koseri into macrophages. Further, confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that C. koseri survives phagolysosomal fusion and that more than 90% of intracellular C. koseri organisms are colocalized within phagolysosomes. The ability of C. koseri to survive phagolysosome fusion and replicate within macrophages may contribute to the establishment of chronic central nervous system infection including brain abscesses.

  15. Stimulation of immature lung macrophages with intranasal interferon gamma in a novel neonatal mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Empey, Kerry M; Orend, Jacob G; Peebles, R Stokes; Egaña, Loreto; Norris, Karen A; Oury, Tim D; Kolls, Jay K

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and viral death in infants. Reduced CD8 T-cells and negligible interferon gamma (IFNγ) in the airway are associated with severe infant RSV disease, yet there is an abundance of alveolar macrophages (AM) and neutrophils. However, it is unclear, based on our current understanding of macrophage functional heterogeneity, if immature AM improve viral clearance or contribute to inflammation and airway obstruction in the IFNγ-deficient neonatal lung environment. The aim of the current study was to define the age-dependent AM phenotype during neonatal RSV infection and investigate their differentiation to classically activated macrophages (CAM) using i.n. IFNγ in the context of improving viral clearance. Neonatal and adult BALB/cJ mice were infected with 1×10(6) plaque forming units (PFU)/gram (g) RSV line 19 and their AM responses compared. Adult mice showed a rapid and robust CAM response, indicated by increases in major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD86, CCR7, and a reduction in mannose receptor (MR). Neonatal mice showed a delayed and reduced CAM response, likely due to undetectable IFNγ production. Intranasal (i.n.) treatment with recombinant mouse IFNγ (rIFNγ) increased the expression of CAM markers on neonatal AM, reduced viral lung titers, and improved weight gain compared to untreated controls with no detectable increase in CD4 or CD8 T-cell infiltration. In vitro infection of J774A.1 macrophages with RSV induced an alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) phenotype however, when macrophages were first primed with IFNγ, a CAM phenotype was induced and RSV spread to adjacent Hep-2 cells was reduced. These studies demonstrate that the neonatal AM response to RSV infection is abundant and immature, but can be exogenously stimulated to express the antimicrobial phenotype, CAM, with i.n. rIFNγ.

  16. Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Price, John C.; Guan, Shenheng; Burlingame, Alma; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2010-01-01

    Advances in systems biology have allowed for global analyses of mRNA and protein expression, but large-scale studies of protein dynamics and turnover have not been conducted in vivo. Protein turnover is an important metabolic and regulatory mechanism in establishing proteome homeostasis, impacting many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we have used organism-wide isotopic labeling to measure the turnover rates of ~2,500 proteins in multiple mouse tissues, spanning four orders of magnitude. Through comparison of the brain with the liver and blood, we show that within the respective tissues, proteins performing similar functions often have similar turnover rates. Proteins in the brain have significantly slower turnover (average lifetime of 9.0 d) compared with those of the liver (3.0 d) and blood (3.5 d). Within some organelles (such as mitochondria), proteins have a narrow range of lifetimes, suggesting a synchronized turnover mechanism. Protein subunits within complexes of variable composition have a wide range of lifetimes, whereas those within well-defined complexes turn over in a coordinated manner. Together, the data represent the most comprehensive in vivo analysis of mammalian proteome turnover to date. The developed methodology can be adapted to assess in vivo proteome homeostasis in any model organism that will tolerate a labeled diet and may be particularly useful in the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases in vivo. PMID:20699386

  17. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype. PMID:28400715

  18. Neuroprotective actions of pterostilbene on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Song, Tingting; Yang, Lin; Wang, Xueying; Yang, Changhong; Jiang, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage causes acute mortality and morbidity in newborns and long-term neurological disorders in the survivors. Pterostilbene (PTE) is a natural compound possessing various biological and pharmacological activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of PTE on neonatal HI brain damagein P7 rat model and to explore the possible mechanisms. Neonatal HI brain damage was induced in rat pups (P7). Prior to the induction of HI injury, PTE was injected with or without zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). ZnPP was used to test whether abnormal changes of HO-1 expression were involved in the effect of PTE. The results showed that PTE exhibited excellent neuroprotective effects against neonatal HI brain injury, as evidenced by the decrease of brain infarct volume, brain edema, neurological score, and improvement in motor coordination motor deficit and working memory deficit. PTE pretreatment decreased the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and key transcription factor p65 NF-κB, and reduced the number of TUNEL-stained neurons, indicating the inhibition of inflammation and programmed cell death. Moreover, PTE pretreatment decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, increased superoxide dismutase activity and decreased reactive oxygen species level, indicating that PTE played an important antioxidant role. Furthermore, ZnPP was able to inhibit PTE-induced suppression of oxidative stress, programmed cell death, inflammation and brain damage. In conclusion, PTE pretreatment prevented HI-induced brain injury in newborns through HO-1-mediated reduction of oxidative stress, programmed cell death, and inflammation, and final improvement of histological and functional injury. Overall, the data that obtained in rat model provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of neonatal HI brain injury and may be translational to human

  19. Brain Penetration and Efficacy of Different Mebendazole Polymorphs in a Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Wanjiku, Teresia; Rudek, Michelle A; Joshi, Avadhut; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mebendazole (MBZ), first used as an antiparasitic drug, shows preclinical efficacy in models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Three different MBZ polymorphs (A, B and C) exist and a detailed assessment of the brain penetration, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor properties of each individual MBZ polymorph is necessary to improve mebendazole-based brain cancer therapy. Experimental Design and Results In this study, various marketed and custom-formulated MBZ tablets were analyzed for their polymorph content by IR spectroscopy and subsequently tested in orthotopic GL261 mouse glioma model for efficacy and tolerability. The pharmacokinetics and brain concentration of MBZ polymorphs and two main metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. We found that polymorph B and C both increased survival in a GL261 glioma model, as B exhibited greater toxicity. Polymorph A showed no benefit. Both, polymorph B and C, reached concentrations in the brain that exceeded the IC50 in GL261 cells 29-fold. In addition, polymorph C demonstrated an AUC0-24h brain-to-plasma (B/P) ratio of 0.82, whereas B showed higher plasma AUC and lower B/P ratio. In contrast, polymorph A presented markedly lower levels in the plasma and brain. Furthermore, the combination with elacridar was able to significantly improve the efficacy of polymorph C in GL261 glioma and D425 medulloblastoma models in mice. Conclusion Among MBZ polymorphs, C reaches therapeutically effective concentrations in the brain tissue and tumor with less side effects and is the better choice for brain cancer therapy. Its efficacy can be further enhanced by combination with elacridar. PMID:25862759

  20. An MRI-based Atlas and Database of the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J.; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I.; W.Toga, Arthur; Sidman, Richard L.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2010-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases. PMID:20656042

  1. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-28

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia-ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia-ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances.

  2. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia–ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia–ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances. PMID:28134843

  3. An ISO-surface folding analysis method applied to premature neonatal brain development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Rousseau, Francois; Iordanova, Bistra; Glenn, Orit; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we describe the application of folding measures to tracking in vivo cortical brain development in premature neonatal brain anatomy. The outer gray matter and the gray-white matter interface surfaces were extracted from semi-interactively segmented high-resolution T1 MRI data. Nine curvature- and geometric descriptor-based folding measures were applied to six premature infants, aged 28-37 weeks, using a direct voxelwise iso-surface representation. We have shown that using such an approach it is feasible to extract meaningful surfaces of adequate quality from typical clinically acquired neonatal MRI data. We have shown that most of the folding measures, including a new proposed measure, are sensitive to changes in age and therefore applicable in developing a model that tracks development in premature infants. For the first time gyrification measures have been computed on the gray-white matter interface and on cases whose age is representative of a period of intense brain development.

  4. Morphological features of the neonatal brain following exposure to regional anesthesia during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Spann, Marisa N; Serino, Dana; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Nati, Giancarlo; Toth, Zachary; Walsh, Kirwan; Chiang, I-Chin; Sanchez-Peña, Juan; Liu, Jun; Kangarlu, Alayar; Liu, Feng; Duan, Yunsuo; Shova, Satie; Fried, Jane; Tau, Gregory Z; Rosen, Tove S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2015-02-01

    Recent animal and human epidemiological studies suggest that early childhood exposure to anesthesia may have adverse effects on brain development. As more than 50% of pregnant women in the United States and one-third in the United Kingdom receive regional anesthesia during labor and delivery, understanding the effects of perinatal anesthesia on postnatal brain development has important public health relevance. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the effects of regional anesthesia during labor and delivery as part of a larger study of perinatal exposures on the morphological features of the neonatal brain. We mapped morphological features of the cortical surface in 37 healthy infants, 24 exposed and 13 unexposed to regional anesthesia at delivery, who were scanned within the first 6 weeks of life. Infants exposed to maternal anesthesia compared with unexposed infants had greater local volumes in portions of the frontal and occipital lobes bilaterally and right posterior portion of the cingulate gyrus. Longer durations of exposure to anesthesia correlated positively with local volumes in the occipital lobe. Anesthesia exposure during labor and delivery was associated with larger volumes in portions of the frontal and occipital lobes and cingulate gyrus in neonates. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to determine whether these morphological effects of anesthesia persist and what their consequences on cognition and behavior may be. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex-related differences in effects of progesterone following neonatal hypoxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Bethany L; Won, Soonmi; Geddes, Rastafa I; Sayeed, Iqbal; Stein, Donald G

    2015-06-01

    There is no satisfactory therapeutic intervention for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy. Progesterone is known to be effective in treating traumatic brain injury in adult animals but its effects in neonatal brains have not been reported. Brain injuries were induced by a unilateral common carotid artery ligation plus hypoxia exposure. Progesterone was administered immediately after hypoxia and daily for 5 days at 8 mg/kg, followed by a tapered dose for two days. At six weeks post-injury, lesion size and inflammatory factors were evaluated. Progesterone-treated, HI-injured male animals, but not females, showed significant long-term tissue protection compared to vehicle, suggesting an important sex difference in neuroprotection. Progesterone-treated, HI-injured male rats had fewer activated microglia in the cortex and hippocampus compared to controls. The rats were tested for neurological reflexes, motor asymmetry, and cognitive performance at multiple time points. The injured animals exhibited few detectable motor deficits, suggesting a high level of age- and injury-related neuroplasticity. There were substantial sex differences on several behavioral tests, indicating that immature males and females should be analyzed separately. Progesterone-treated animals showed modest beneficial effects in both sexes compared to vehicle-treated injured animals. Sham animals given progesterone did not behave differently from vehicle-treated sham animals on any measures.

  6. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  7. Beneficial effects of interleukin-6 in neonatal mouse models of group B streptococcal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, G; Tomasello, F; Migliardo, M; Delfino, D; Cochran, J; Cook, J A; Teti, G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a pathophysiologic role in sepsis induced in rat pups by group B streptococci (GBS). In this model, TNF-alpha is also partially responsible for the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6). The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of IL-6 in neonatal BALB/c mice infected with type III GBS. The effect of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and recombinant IL-6 on lethality and TNF-alpha production was investigated. In mouse pups infected with GBS strain COH1, plasma IL-6 reached levels of 3,067 +/- 955 and 1,923 +/- 891 U/ml when measured at 22 and 48 h, respectively (P < 0.05 compared with uninfected controls). Pretreatment with 25 micrograms of anti-IL-6 antibodies totally prevented the increase in circulating IL-6 bioactivity at both 22 and 48 h after infection (P < 0.05). Treatment with anti-IL-6 also induced a moderate decrease in survival time of mice infected with lethal doses of strains COH1 and COH31, as evidenced by increased lethality (P < 0.05) at 24 to 48 h but not at 96 h. Mouse recombinant IL-6 (12,500 U) given 6 h before challenge with strains COH1 and COH31 consistently increased survival time, as evidenced by decreased (P < 0.05) lethality at 48 to 72 h but not at 96 h. The effects of IL-6 pretreatment were dose dependent, since no protection was observed with doses lower than 12,500 U. In addition, no effects on lethality were noted when IL-6 was given at the time of challenge or at later times. TNF-alpha elevations (P < 0.05 compared with uninfected controls) were measured at 12, 22, and 48 h after challenge with strain COH1 (68 +/- 28, 233 +/- 98, and 98 +/- 34 U, respectively). Pretreatment with IL-6 significantly (P < 0.05) decreased plasma TNF-alpha levels at 12 and 22 h, with 55 and 69% inhibitions, respectively. Anti-IL-6 had an opposite effect, as evidenced by a 145% increase (P < 0.05) in TNF-alpha levels at 48 h after challenge. Collectively, our data are

  8. Brain inflammation and oxidative stress in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer-like brain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuemang; Chinnici, Cinzia; Tang, Hanguan; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia MY; Praticò, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence implicates both brain inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relevance of their interaction in vivo, however, is unknown. Previously, we have shown that separate pharmacological targeting of these two components results in amelioration of the amyloidogenic phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of AD-like brain amyloidosis (Tg2576). Methods In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of a combination of an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin, and a natural anti-oxidant, vitamin E, in the Tg2576 mice. For this reason, animals were treated continuously from 8 (prior to Aβ deposition) through 15 (when Aβ deposits are abundant) months of age. Results At the end of the study, these therapeutic interventions suppressed brain inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in the mice. This effect was accompanied by significant reductions of soluble and insoluble Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in neocortex and hippocampus, wherein the burden of Aβ deposits also was significantly decreased. Conclusions The results of the present study support the concept that brain oxidative stress and inflammation coexist in this animal model of AD-like brain amyloidosis, but they represent two distinct therapeutic targets in the disease pathogenesis. We propose that a combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant drugs may be a useful strategy for treating AD. PMID:15500684

  9. A Bayesian approach to the creation of a study-customized neonatal brain atlas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yajing; Chang, Linda; Ceritoglu, Can; Skranes, Jon; Ernst, Thomas; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I.; Oishi, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Atlas-based image analysis (ABA), in which an anatomical “parcellation map” is used for parcel-by-parcel image quantification, is widely used to analyze anatomical and functional changes related to brain development, aging, and various diseases. The parcellation maps are often created based on common MRI templates, which allow users to transform the template to target images, or vice versa, to perform parcel-by-parcel statistics, and report the scientific findings based on common anatomical parcels. The use of a study-specific template, which represents the anatomical features of the study population better than common templates, is preferable for accurate anatomical labeling; however, the creation of a parcellation map for a study-specific template is extremely labor intensive, and the definitions of anatomical boundaries are not necessarily compatible with those of the common template. In this study, we employed a Volume-based Template Estimation (VTE) method to create a neonatal brain template customized to a study population, while keeping the anatomical parcellation identical to that of a common MRI atlas. The VTE was used to morph the standardized parcellation map of the JHU-neonate-SS atlas to capture the anatomical features of a study population. The resultant “study-customized” T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) template, with three-dimensional anatomical parcellation that defined 122 brain regions, was compared with the JHU-neonate-SS atlas, in terms of the registration accuracy. A pronounced increase in the accuracy of cortical parcellation and superior tensor alignment were observed when the customized template was used. With the customized atlas-based analysis, the fractional anisotropy (FA) detected closely approximated the manual measurements. This tool provides a solution for achieving normalization-based measurements with increased accuracy, while reporting scientific findings in a consistent framework. PMID:25026155

  10. A Bayesian approach to the creation of a study-customized neonatal brain atlas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajing; Chang, Linda; Ceritoglu, Can; Skranes, Jon; Ernst, Thomas; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I; Oishi, Kenichi

    2014-11-01

    Atlas-based image analysis (ABA), in which an anatomical "parcellation map" is used for parcel-by-parcel image quantification, is widely used to analyze anatomical and functional changes related to brain development, aging, and various diseases. The parcellation maps are often created based on common MRI templates, which allow users to transform the template to target images, or vice versa, to perform parcel-by-parcel statistics, and report the scientific findings based on common anatomical parcels. The use of a study-specific template, which represents the anatomical features of the study population better than common templates, is preferable for accurate anatomical labeling; however, the creation of a parcellation map for a study-specific template is extremely labor intensive, and the definitions of anatomical boundaries are not necessarily compatible with those of the common template. In this study, we employed a volume-based template estimation (VTE) method to create a neonatal brain template customized to a study population, while keeping the anatomical parcellation identical to that of a common MRI atlas. The VTE was used to morph the standardized parcellation map of the JHU-neonate-SS atlas to capture the anatomical features of a study population. The resultant "study-customized" T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) template, with three-dimensional anatomical parcellation that defined 122 brain regions, was compared with the JHU-neonate-SS atlas, in terms of the registration accuracy. A pronounced increase in the accuracy of cortical parcellation and superior tensor alignment were observed when the customized template was used. With the customized atlas-based analysis, the fractional anisotropy (FA) detected closely approximated the manual measurements. This tool provides a solution for achieving normalization-based measurements with increased accuracy, while reporting scientific findings in a consistent framework.

  11. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Sravan; Hong, Peter; Tran, Michelle A; Bráz, Joao M; Colarusso, Pina; Basbaum, Allan I; Whelan, Patrick J

    2013-08-15

    Compared to proprioceptive afferent collateral projections, less is known about the anatomical, neurochemical, and functional basis of nociceptive collateral projections modulating lumbar central pattern generators (CPG). Quick response times are critical to ensure rapid escape from aversive stimuli. Furthermore, sensitization of nociceptive afferent pathways can contribute to a pathological activation of motor circuits. We investigated the extent and role of collaterals of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive sacrocaudal afferent (nSCA) nerves that directly ascend several spinal segments in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column and regulate motor activity. Anterograde tracing demonstrated direct multisegmental projections of the sacral dorsal root 4 (S4) afferent collaterals in Lissauer's tract and in the dorsal column. Subsets of the traced S4 afferent collaterals expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which transduces a nociceptive response to capsaicin. Electrophysiological data revealed that S4 dorsal root stimulation could evoke regular rhythmic bursting activity, and our data suggested that capsaicin-sensitive collaterals contribute to CPG activation across multiple segments. Capsaicin's effect on S4-evoked locomotor activity was potent until the lumbar 5 (L5) segments, and diminished in rostral segments. Using calcium imaging we found elevated calcium transients within Lissauer's tract and dorsal column at L5 segments when compared to the calcium transients only within the dorsal column at the lumbar 2 (L2) segments, which were desensitized by capsaicin. We conclude that lumbar locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord are targets for modulation by direct multisegmental nSCA, subsets of which express TRPV1 in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2870-2887, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Stable, Covalent Attachment of Laminin to Microposts Improves the Contractility of Mouse Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical output of contracting cardiomyocytes, the muscle cells of the heart, relates to healthy and disease states of the heart. Culturing cardiomyocytes on arrays of elastomeric microposts can enable inexpensive and high-throughput studies of heart disease at the single-cell level. However, cardiomyocytes weakly adhere to these microposts, which limits the possibility of using biomechanical assays of single cardiomyocytes to study heart disease. We hypothesized that a stable covalent attachment of laminin to the surface of microposts improves cardiomyocyte contractility. We cultured cells on polydimethylsiloxane microposts with laminin covalently bonded with the organosilanes 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. We measured displacement of microposts induced by the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, which attach better than mature cardiomyocytes to substrates. We observed time-dependent changes in contractile parameters such as micropost deformation, contractility rates, contraction and relaxation speeds, and the times of contractions. These parameters were affected by the density of laminin on microposts and by the stability of laminin binding to micropost surfaces. Organosilane-mediated binding resulted in higher laminin surface density and laminin binding stability. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane provided the highest laminin density but did not provide stable protein binding with time. Higher surface protein binding stability and strength were observed with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. In cultured cardiomyocytes, contractility rate, contraction speeds, and contraction time increased with higher laminin stability. Given these variations in contractile function, we conclude that binding of laminin to microposts via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde improves contractility observed by an increase in beating rate and contraction speed as it occurs during the

  13. Stable, covalent attachment of laminin to microposts improves the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Zaleta-Rivera, Kathia; Ashley, Euan A; Pruitt, Beth L

    2014-09-10

    The mechanical output of contracting cardiomyocytes, the muscle cells of the heart, relates to healthy and disease states of the heart. Culturing cardiomyocytes on arrays of elastomeric microposts can enable inexpensive and high-throughput studies of heart disease at the single-cell level. However, cardiomyocytes weakly adhere to these microposts, which limits the possibility of using biomechanical assays of single cardiomyocytes to study heart disease. We hypothesized that a stable covalent attachment of laminin to the surface of microposts improves cardiomyocyte contractility. We cultured cells on polydimethylsiloxane microposts with laminin covalently bonded with the organosilanes 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. We measured displacement of microposts induced by the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, which attach better than mature cardiomyocytes to substrates. We observed time-dependent changes in contractile parameters such as micropost deformation, contractility rates, contraction and relaxation speeds, and the times of contractions. These parameters were affected by the density of laminin on microposts and by the stability of laminin binding to micropost surfaces. Organosilane-mediated binding resulted in higher laminin surface density and laminin binding stability. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane provided the highest laminin density but did not provide stable protein binding with time. Higher surface protein binding stability and strength were observed with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. In cultured cardiomyocytes, contractility rate, contraction speeds, and contraction time increased with higher laminin stability. Given these variations in contractile function, we conclude that binding of laminin to microposts via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde improves contractility observed by an increase in beating rate and contraction speed as it occurs during the

  14. Pontine Reticulospinal Projections in the Neonatal Mouse: Internal Organization and Axon Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Magne S.; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    We recently characterized physiologically a pontine reticulospinal (pRS) projection in the neonatal mouse that mediates synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons via parallel uncrossed and crossed pathways (Sivertsen et al. [2014] J Neurophysiol 112:1628–1643). Here we characterize the origins, anatomical organization, and supraspinal axon trajectories of these pathways via retrograde tracing from the high cervical spinal cord. The two pathways derive from segregated populations of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting pRS neurons with characteristic locations within the pontine reticular formation (PRF). We obtained estimates of relative neuron numbers by counting from sections, digitally generated neuron position maps, and 3D reconstructions. Ipsilateral pRS neurons outnumber contralateral pRS neurons by threefold and are distributed about equally in rostral and caudal regions of the PRF, whereas contralateral pRS neurons are concentrated in the rostral PRF. Ipsilateral pRS neuron somata are on average larger than contralateral. No pRS neurons are positive in transgenic mice that report the expression of GAD, suggesting that they are predominantly excitatory. Putative GABAergic interneurons are interspersed among the pRS neurons, however. Ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons have distinctly different trajectories within the brainstem. Their initial spinal funicular trajectories also differ, with ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons more highly concentrated medially and laterally, respectively. The larger size and greater number of ipsilateral vs. contralateral pRS neurons is compatible with our previous finding that the uncrossed projection transmits more reliably to spinal motoneurons. The information about supraspinal and initial spinal pRS axon trajectories should facilitate future physiological assessment of synaptic connections between pRS neurons and spinal neurons. PMID:26400815

  15. High-resolution magnetic resonance histology of the embryonic and neonatal mouse: a 4D atlas and morphologic database.

    PubMed

    Petiet, Alexandra E; Kaufman, Matthew H; Goddeeris, Matthew M; Brandenburg, Jeffrey; Elmore, Susan A; Johnson, G Allan

    2008-08-26

    Engineered mice play an ever-increasing role in defining connections between genotype and phenotypic expression. The potential of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) for morphologic phenotyping in the mouse has previously been demonstrated; however, applications have been limited by long scan times, availability of the technology, and a foundation of normative data. This article describes an integrated environment for high-resolution study of normal, transgenic, and mutant mouse models at embryonic and neonatal stages. Three-dimensional images are shown at an isotropic resolution of 19.5 microm (voxel volumes of 8 pL), acquired in 3 h at embryonic days 10.5-19.5 (10 stages) and postnatal days 0-32 (6 stages). A web-accessible atlas encompassing this data was developed, and for critical stages of embryonic development (prenatal days 14.5-18.5), >200 anatomical structures have been identified and labeled. Also, matching optical histology and analysis tools are provided to compare multiple specimens at multiple developmental stages. The utility of the approach is demonstrated in characterizing cardiac septal defects in conditional mutant embryos lacking the Smoothened receptor gene. Finally, a collaborative paradigm is presented that allows sharing of data across the scientific community. This work makes magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse embryo and neonate broadly available with carefully annotated normative data and an extensive environment for collaborations.

  16. Lasting effects of preterm birth and neonatal brain hemorrhage at 12 years of age.

    PubMed

    Luu, Thuy Mai; Ment, Laura R; Schneider, Karen C; Katz, Karol H; Allan, Walter C; Vohr, Betty R

    2009-03-01

    Our goals were to compare cognitive, language, behavioral, and educational outcomes of preterm children to term controls and to evaluate the impact of neonatal brain injury, indomethacin, and environmental risk factors on intellectual function at 12 years of age. A total of 375 children born in 1989-1992 with birth weights of 600 to 1250 g enrolled in the Indomethacin Intraventricular Hemorrhage Prevention Trial and 111 controls were evaluated. Neuropsychometric testing, neurologic examination, and interviews on educational needs were completed. Severe brain injury was defined as the presence of grade 3 to 4 indomethacin intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, or severe ventriculomegaly on cranial ultrasound. On the Wechsler Scales of Intelligence for Children, the preterm cohort obtained a full-scale IQ of 87.9 +/- 18.3, verbal IQ of 90.8 +/- 18.9, and performance IQ of 86.8 +/- 17.9. Preterm children obtained scores 6 to 14 points lower than term controls on all psychometric tests after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. On the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (test of basic language skills), 22% to 24% of preterm children scored in the abnormal ranges (<70) as opposed to 2% to 4% of controls. Preterm children with and without brain injury required more school services (76% and 44% vs 16%), and support in reading (44% and 28% vs 9%), writing (44% and 20% vs 4%), and mathematics (47% and 30% vs 6%) compared with controls. Preterm children also displayed more behavior problems than their term counterparts. Severe neonatal brain injury was the strongest predictor of poor intelligence. Antenatal steroids, higher maternal education, and 2-parent family were associated with better cognition, whereas minority status incurred a disadvantage. Indomethacin did not affect intellectual function among preterm children. Preterm children born in the early 1990s, especially those with severe brain injury, demonstrate serious deficits in their

  17. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R(-/-)) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction size evaluated. Flow cytometry was performed on brain-infiltrating cells, and semi-automated analysis of flow cytometric data was applied. A1R(-/-) mice displayed larger infarctions (+33%, p < 0.05) and performed worse in beam walking tests (44% more mistakes, p < 0.05) than wild-type (WT) mice. Myeloid cell activation after injury was enhanced in A1R(-/-) versus WT brains. Activated B lymphocytes expressing IL-10 infiltrated the brain after HI in WT, but were less activated and did not increase in relative frequency in A1R(-/-). Also, A1R(-/-) B lymphocytes expressed less IL-10 than their WT counterparts, the A1R antagonist DPCPX decreased IL-10 expression whereas the A1R agonist CPA increased it. CD4(+) T lymphocytes including FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells, were unaffected by genotype, whereas CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses were smaller in A1R(-/-) mice. Using PCA to characterize the immune profile, we could discriminate the A1R(-/-) and WT genotypes as well as sham operated from HI-subjected animals. We conclude that A1R signaling modulates IL-10 expression by immune cells, influences the activation of these cells in vivo, and affects outcome after HI.

  18. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Regulates Primordial Follicle Assembly by Promoting Apoptosis of Oocytes in Fetal and Neonatal Mouse Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huan; Ma, Tieliang; Zheng, Wei; Sun, Rui; Shen, Wei; Sha, Jiahao; Cooke, Howard J.; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Primordial follicles, providing all the oocytes available to a female throughout her reproductive life, assemble in perinatal ovaries with individual oocytes surrounded by granulosa cells. In mammals including the mouse, most oocytes die by apoptosis during primordial follicle assembly, but factors that regulate oocyte death remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a key regulator in many essential cellular processes, was shown to be differentially expressed during these processes in mouse ovaries using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF methodology. A V-shaped expression pattern of PCNA in both oocytes and somatic cells was observed during the development of fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries, decreasing from 13.5 to 18.5 dpc and increasing from 18.5 dpc to 5 dpp. This was closely correlated with the meiotic prophase I progression from pre-leptotene to pachytene and from pachytene to diplotene when primordial follicles started to assemble. Inhibition of the increase of PCNA expression by RNA interference in cultured 18.5 dpc mouse ovaries strikingly reduced the apoptosis of oocytes, accompanied by down-regulation of known pro-apoptotic genes, e.g. Bax, caspase-3, and TNFα and TNFR2, and up-regulation of Bcl-2, a known anti-apoptotic gene. Moreover, reduced expression of PCNA was observed to significantly increase primordial follicle assembly, but these primordial follicles contained fewer guanulosa cells. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation by RNA interference of Ing1b, a PCNA-binding protein in the UV-induced apoptosis regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries. PMID:21253613

  19. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pattern of Brain Injury as a Biomarker of Childhood Outcomes following a Trial of Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A; Laptook, Abbot R; Hintz, Susan R; Barnes, Patrick D; Das, Abhik; Pappas, Athina; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-11-01

    To examine the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of neonatal brain injury defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network to predict death or IQ at 6-7 years of age following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. Out of 208 participants, 124 had MRI and primary outcome (death or IQ <70) data. The relationship between injury pattern and outcome was assessed. Death or IQ <70 occurred in 4 of 50 (8%) of children with pattern 0 (normal MRI), 1 of 6 (17%) with 1A (minimal cerebral lesions), 1 of 4 (25%) with 1B (extensive cerebral lesions), 3 of 8 (38%) with 2A (basal ganglia thalamic, anterior or posterior limb of internal capsule, or watershed infarction), 32 of 49 (65%) with 2B (2A with cerebral lesions), and 7 of 7 (100%) with pattern 3 (hemispheric devastation), P < .001; this association was also seen within hypothermia and control subgroups. IQ was 90 ± 13 among the 46 children with a normal MRI and 69 ± 25 among the 50 children with an abnormal MRI. In childhood, for a normal outcome, a normal neonatal MRI had a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 92%, and a negative predictive value of 59%; for death or IQ <70, the 2B and 3 pattern combined had a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 78%, positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87%. The Neonatal Research Network MRI pattern of neonatal brain injury is a biomarker of neurodevelopmental outcome at 6-7 years of age. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00005772. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  1. Regional Gray Matter Growth, Sexual Dimorphism, and Cerebral Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Prastawa, Marcel W.; Looney, Christopher B.; Vetsa, Y. Sampath K.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Evans, Dianne D.; Smith, J. Keith; Hamer, Robert M.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Gerig, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Although there has been recent interest in the study of childhood and adolescent brain development, very little is known about normal brain development in the first few months of life. In older children, there are regional differences in cortical gray matter development, whereas cortical gray and white matter growth after birth has not been studied to a great extent. The adult human brain is also characterized by cerebral asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms, although very little is known about how these asymmetries and dimorphisms develop. We used magnetic resonance imaging and an automatic segmentation methodology to study brain structure in 74 neonates in the first few weeks after birth. We found robust cortical gray matter growth compared with white matter growth, with occipital regions growing much faster than prefrontal regions. Sexual dimorphism is present at birth, with males having larger total brain cortical gray and white matter volumes than females. In contrast to adults and older children, the left hemisphere is larger than the right hemisphere, and the normal pattern of fronto-occipital asymmetry described in older children and adults is not present. Regional differences in cortical gray matter growth are likely related to differential maturation of sensory and motor systems compared with prefrontal executive function after birth. These findings also indicate that whereas some adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and cerebral asymmetries are present at birth, others develop after birth. PMID:17287499

  2. Automatic tissue segmentation of neonate brain MR Images with subject-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule.

  3. Rat umbilical cord blood cells attenuate hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Keiko; Sato, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Yuka; Ito, Miharu; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Higashi, Yujiro

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCBC) have a favorable effect on hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury. However, the efficacy of using hUCBCs to treat this injury has been variable and the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigated its effectiveness using stereological analysis in an allogeneic system to examine whether intraperitoneal injection of cells derived from UCBCs of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats could ameliorate brain injury in neonatal rats. Three weeks after the HI event, the estimated residual brain volume was larger and motor function improved more in the cell-injected rats than in the control (PBS-treated) rats. The GFP-positive cells were hardly detectable in the brain (0.0057% of injected cells) 9 days after injection. Although 60% of GFP-positive cells in the brain were Iba1-positive, none of these were positive for NeuroD or DCX. While the number of proliferating cells increased in the hippocampus, that of activated microglia/macrophages decreased and a proportion of M2 microglia/macrophages increased in the ipsilateral hemisphere of cell-injected rats. These results suggest that intraperitoneal injection of cells derived from UCBCs could ameliorate HI injury, possibly through an endogenous response and not by supplying differentiated neurons derived from the injected stem cells. PMID:28281676

  4. Reduced Inflammatory Phenotype in Microglia Derived from Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord versus Brain

    PubMed Central

    Baskar Jesudasan, Sam Joshva; Todd, Kathryn G.; Winship, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Membrane bound sensors on their processes monitor the extracellular environment and respond to perturbations of the CNS such as injury or infection. Once activated, microglia play a crucial role in determining neuronal survival. Recent studies suggest that microglial functional response properties vary across different regions of the CNS. However, the activation profiles of microglia derived from the spinal cord have not been evaluated against brain microglia in vitro. Here, we studied the morphological properties and secretion of inflammatory and trophic effectors by microglia derived from the brain or spinal cord of neonatal rats under basal culture conditions and after activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that spinal microglia assume a less inflammatory phenotype after LPS activation, with reduced release of the inflammatory effectors tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and nitric oxide, a less amoeboid morphology, and reduced phagocytosis relative to brain-derived microglia. Phenotypic differences between brain and spinal microglia are an important consideration when evaluating anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory therapies for brain versus spinal injury. PMID:24914808

  5. Brain barrier properties and cerebral blood flow in neonatal mice exposed to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Baburamani, Ana A; Lehner, Christine; Leverin, Anna-Lena; Smith, Peter LP; Nilsson, Holger; Svedin, Pernilla; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Insults to the developing brain often result in irreparable damage resulting in long-term deficits in motor and cognitive functions. The only treatment today for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns is hypothermia, which has limited clinical benefit. We have studied changes to the blood–brain barriers (BBB) as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a neonatal model of HIE to further understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Nine-day old mice pups, brain roughly equivalent to the near-term human fetus, were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Hypoxia-ischemia increased BBB permeability to small and large molecules within hours after the insult, which normalized in the following days. The opening of the BBB was associated with changes to BBB protein expression whereas gene transcript levels were increased showing direct molecular damage to the BBB but also suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Brain pathology was closely related to reductions in rCBF during the hypoxia as well as the areas with compromised BBB showing that these are intimately linked. The transient opening of the BBB after the insult is likely to contribute to the pathology but at the same time provides an opportunity for therapeutics to better reach the infarcted areas in the brain. PMID:25627141

  6. Regional gray matter growth, sexual dimorphism, and cerebral asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Prastawa, Marcel W; Looney, Christopher B; Vetsa, Y Sampath K; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Evans, Dianne D; Smith, J Keith; Hamer, Robert M; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Gerig, Guido

    2007-02-07

    Although there has been recent interest in the study of childhood and adolescent brain development, very little is known about normal brain development in the first few months of life. In older children, there are regional differences in cortical gray matter development, whereas cortical gray and white matter growth after birth has not been studied to a great extent. The adult human brain is also characterized by cerebral asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms, although very little is known about how these asymmetries and dimorphisms develop. We used magnetic resonance imaging and an automatic segmentation methodology to study brain structure in 74 neonates in the first few weeks after birth. We found robust cortical gray matter growth compared with white matter growth, with occipital regions growing much faster than prefrontal regions. Sexual dimorphism is present at birth, with males having larger total brain cortical gray and white matter volumes than females. In contrast to adults and older children, the left hemisphere is larger than the right hemisphere, and the normal pattern of fronto-occipital asymmetry described in older children and adults is not present. Regional differences in cortical gray matter growth are likely related to differential maturation of sensory and motor systems compared with prefrontal executive function after birth. These findings also indicate that whereas some adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and cerebral asymmetries are present at birth, others develop after birth.

  7. Bax inhibiting peptide reduces apoptosis in neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-Ya; Cui, Kai-Jie; Yu, Mao-Min; Zhang, Hui; Peng, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) has been reported to induce apoptosis in neonates. We, therefore, analyzed the ability of Bax-inhibiting peptide (BIP) to provide neuroprotective effects during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Seven-day-old wistar rat pups (n = 198) were randomly divided into a sham-operated group (Group S, n = 18), saline group (Group C, n = 90) and BIP group (Group B, n = 90). Pathological changes in the cerebral tissues of rat pups were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, TUNEL and Western blot. The expression of cytochrome c and caspase-3 was determined using western blot technique. Rat pups demonstrated neurobehavioral alteration in Groups C and B. TUNEL-positive cells in the left hippocampus were significantly increased in Group C and Group B after HIBD (P < 0.01) when compared with Group S. There was a marked reduction in TUNEL positive cells in subgroups B1 through B4 when compared with the respective subgroups C1 through C5. Compared with Group S, the expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c was significantly increased in Groups C and B (P < 0.01). The difference in expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c between subgroups B1 through B4 and C1 through C4 was significant (P < 0.01). In conclusions, the neuro-protective effect of BIP was due to a reduction of nerve cell apoptosis in our neonatal HIE rat model. We propose that BIP has potential as a neuro-protective drug in neonatal HIE cases. PMID:26823794

  8. Residual brain injury after early discontinuation of cooling therapy in mild neonatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lally, Peter J; Montaldo, Paolo; Oliveira, Vânia; Swamy, Ravi Shankar; Soe, Aung; Shankaran, Seetha; Thayyil, Sudhin

    2017-09-21

    We examined the brain injury and neurodevelopmental outcomes in a prospective cohort of 10 babies with mild encephalopathy who had early cessation of cooling therapy. All babies had MRI and spectroscopy within 2 weeks after birth and neurodevelopmental assessment at 2 years. Cooling was prematurely discontinued at a median age of 9 hours (IQR 5-13) due to rapid clinical improvement. Five (50%) had injury on MRI or spectroscopy, and two (20%) had an abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years. Premature cessation of cooling therapy in babies with mild neonatal encephalopathy does not exclude residual brain injury and adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. This study refers to babies recruited into the MARBLE study (NCT01309711, pre-results stage). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. A high resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carol L.; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M.; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Wakeman, Wayne B.; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J.; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Mike; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, in situ hybridization data were generated for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at 7 developmental stages for ~2100 genes, processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, 7 reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore co-expression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (developingmouse.brain-map.org). PMID:24952961

  10. A high-resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carol L; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L R; Wakeman, Wayne B; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R

    2014-07-16

    To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, we generated in situ hybridization data for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at seven developmental stages for ∼2,100 genes, which were processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, seven reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore coexpression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (http://developingmouse.brain-map.org).

  11. Sulfurtransferases and cyanide detoxification in mouse liver, kidney, and brain.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, M; Jurkowska, H; Sliwa, L; Srebro, Z

    2004-01-01

    The activity of rhodanese, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) and cystathionase in mouse liver, kidney, and four brain regions: tele-, meso-, di- and rhombencephalon was studied 30 min and 2 h following a sublethal dose of cyanide (4 mg/ kg body weight) intraperitoneal injection. Simultaneously, sulfane sulfur levels and total sulfur content, a direct or indirect source of sulfur for CN(-) conversion to SCN(-), were also investigated in these tissues. In the liver this dose of cyanide seemed to impair the process of cyanide detoxification by MPST, as well as rhodanese inhibition. The effects of cyanide administration to mice proved to be totally different in the liver and kidney. In the kidney, a significant increase in the rhodanese activity was observed as early as 30 min following cyanide intoxication, and an elevated cystathionase activity after 2 h was detected. This suggests the involvement of cystathionase in cyanide detoxification in the kidney. The activity of MPST remained at the same level as in the control group. In the rhombencephalon, similarly as in the kidney, L-cysteine desulfuration pathways, which generate sulfane sulfur and sulfurtransferases that transfer sulfane sulfur atoms to CN(-), seemed to play an important role as a defense system against cyanide. The stable level of sulfane sulfur and total sulfur content was accompanied in the rhombencephalon by an increased activity of MPST, cystathionase and rhodanese. In other brain regions the role of these three sulfurtransferases was not so clear and it seemed that in the telencephalon, where the total sulfur content, but not the sulfane sulfur level, was significantly increased, some sulfur-containing compounds, such as GSH and/or cysteine, appeared in response to cyanide.

  12. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Bouslama, Myriam; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Bollen, Bieke; Brissaud, Olivier; Matrot, Boris; Gressens, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group), a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group), and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group). Exposure to moderate IH (8% O2) consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine whether in

  13. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Bouslama, Myriam; Adla-Biassette, Homa; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Bollen, Bieke; Brissaud, Olivier; Matrot, Boris; Gressens, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group), a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group), and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group). Exposure to moderate IH (8% O2) consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine whether in

  14. Near infrared optical technologies to illuminate the status of the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Liao, Steve M; Culver, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of at-risk infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is concerning despite steady improvement in the survival rate of these infants. Our current management is often complicated by delayed realization of cerebral deficits due to late manifestation and lack of effective screening tools and neuroimaging/monitoring techniques that are suitable for sick neonates at the bedside. Near infrared specstrocopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive, safe, and portable technique providing a wide range of cerebral hemodynamic contrasts for evaluating the brain. The current state of NIRS technology can be devided into three generations. The first generation represents conventional trend monitoring oximeters that are currently the most widely used in the clinical settings, while the second generation focuses on improving the quantitive accuracy of NIRS measurements by advanced optical techniques. The emergence of diffuse optical imaging (DOI) represents a third generation which opens up more potential clinical applications by providing regional comparisons of brain oximetry and functions either at rest or in response to interventions. Successful integration of NIRS/DOI into the clinical setting requires matching the different capabilities of each instrument to specific clinical goals.

  15. Bilateral molecular changes in a neonatal rat model of unilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    van den Tweel, Evelyn R W; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Lombardi, Maria Stella; Nijboer, Cora H A; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2006-03-01

    Perinatal hypoxia ischemia (HI) is a frequent cause of neonatal brain injury. This study aimed at describing molecular changes during the first 48 h after exposure of the neonatal rat brain to HI. Twelve-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion and 90 min of 8% O2, leading to neuronal damage in the ipsilateral hemisphere only. Phosphorylated-Akt levels were decreased from 0.5 to 6 h post-HI, whereas the level of phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK)1/2 increased during this time frame. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha protein increased with a peak at 3 h after HI. mRNA expression for IL-beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha and -beta started to increase at 6 h with a peak at 24 h post-HI. Expression of heat shock protein 70 was increased from 12 h after HI onwards in the ipsilateral hemisphere only. Surprisingly, HI changed the expression of cytokines, HIF1-alpha ,and P-Akt to the same extent in both the ipsi- as well as the contralateral hemisphere, although neuronal damage was unilateral. Exposure of animals to hypoxia without carotid artery occlusion induced similar changes in cytokines, HIF-1alpha, and P-Akt. We conclude that during HI, hypoxia is sufficient to regulate multiple molecular mediators that may contribute, but are not sufficient, to induce long-term neuronal damage.

  16. Alteration of PFK subunit protein, synthesis, and mRNA during neonatal brain development.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Y; Dunaway, G A

    1995-03-16

    During neonatal maturation of rat brain, a similar biphasic relationship exists between the previously reported pattern of glucose utilization and levels of each type of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) subunit protein, relative synthesis, and mRNA. The increasing amounts of each subunit isoform generally correlated with elevated protein synthesis which was promoted by greater amounts of each type of subunit mRNA. For each parameter, the early phase, 1 to 10 days after birth, was characterized by small increases, and the subsequent period from ten to thirty days postpartum was characterized by a much greater rate of increase. By 30 days after birth, adult values were observed. The apparent efficiency of translation of each type of PFK subunit mRNA in brain suggests that the M-type subunit mRNA is the most efficient and that the L-type subunit mRNA is the least. The greatest relative increases in subunit protein, mRNA, and synthesis were observed for the C-type subunit. Since enhanced translation apparently makes little, if any, contribution, a possible explanation of these phenomena could be increased transcription of the PFK genes. These neonatal changes could involve age-dependent alteration of methylation of the PFK gene promotor(s) and/or activity of effectors of the transcription of the PFK genes.

  17. Dopaminergic neuronal injury in the adult rat brain following neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide and the silent neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Pang, Yi; Lin, Rick C. S.; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Ma, Tangeng; Rhodes, Philip G.; Cai, Zhengwei

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal injury in the juvenile rat brain. To further examine whether neonatal LPS exposure has persisting effects in adult rats, motor behaviors were examined from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P70 and brain injury was determined in P70 rats following an intracerebral injection of LPS (1 mg/kg) in P5 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Although neonatal LPS exposure resulted in hyperactivity in locomotion and stereotyped tasks, and other disturbances of motor behaviors, the impaired motor functions were spontaneously recovered by P70. On the other hand, neonatal LPS-induced injury to the dopaminergic system such as the loss of dendrites and reduced tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra persisted in P70 rats. Neonatal LPS exposure also resulted in sustained inflammatory responses in the P70 rat brain, as indicated by an increased number of activated microglia and elevation of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 content in the rat brain. In addition, when challenged with methamphetamine (METH, 0.5 mg/kg) subcutaneously, rats with neonatal LPS exposure had significantly increased responses in METH-induced locomotion and stereotypy behaviors as compared to those without LPS exposure. These results indicate that although neonatal LPS-induced neurobehavioral impairment is spontaneously recoverable, the LPS exposure-induced persistent injury to the dopaminergic system and the chronic inflammation may represent the existence of silent neurotoxicity. Our data further suggest that the compromised dendritic mitochondrial function might contribute, at least partially, to the silent neurotoxicity. PMID:20875849

  18. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    PubMed

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ).

  19. Quantification of light attenuation in optically cleared mouse brains

    PubMed Central

    d’Esposito, Angela; Nikitichev, Daniil; Desjardins, Adrien; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clearing, in combination with recently developed optical imaging techniques, enables visualization and acquisition of high resolution, three-dimensional images of biological structures deep within tissue. Many different approaches can be used to reduce light absorption and scattering within the tissue, but there is a paucity of research on the quantification of clearing efficacy. With the use of a custom-made spectroscopy system, we developed a way to quantify the quality of clearing in biological tissue, and applied it to the mouse brain. Three clearing techniques were compared: BABB (Murray’s clear), pBABB (a modification of BABB which includes the use of hydrogen peroxide) and passive CLARITY. Despite being limited to autofluorescence studies, we found that pBABB produced the highest degree of optical clearing. Furthermore, the approach allows regional measurement of light attenuation to be performed, and. our results show that light is most attenuated in regions with high lipid content. This work provides a way to choose between the multiple clearing protocols available, and it could prove useful for evaluating images that are acquired with cleared tissues. PMID:26277988

  20. Isolation and Functional Assessment of Mitochondria from Small Amounts of Mouse Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F.; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7–12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format. PMID:21913109

  1. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  2. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkova, Natalia N.; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50–70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200–2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  3. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction.

  4. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  5. Virus-Neuron Interactions in the Mouse Brain Infected with Japanese Encephalitis Virus,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Immi mi i WRPO" T TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE At 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Virus -neuron interactions in the mouse brain infected with Japanese encephalitis...rows of ribosomes surrounding irregular-shaped, membrane-unbounded custernae and resembled that observed in JE- virus - infected PC12 cells, were also...encephalitis virus - Mouse brain neuron - Rough endoplasmic’reticulum - Viral infection ’ 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CIASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY

  6. Measuring Complexity of Mouse Brain Morphological Changes Using GeoEntropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-fiqi, Heba Z.; Pham, Tuan D.; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Crane, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on research into human neurodegenerative diseases, an effective computing approach for the analysis of complex brain morphological changes would represent a significant technological innovation. The availability of mouse models of such disorders provides an experimental system to test novel approaches to brain image analysis. Here we utilize a mouse model of a neurodegenerative disorder to model changes to cerebellar morphology during the postnatal period, and have applied the GeoEntropy algorithm to measure the complexity of morphological changes.

  7. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-02-15

    Mitochondrial function in the brain is traditionally assessed through analysing respiration in isolated mitochondria, a technique that possesses significant tissue and time requirements while also disrupting the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum. We permeabilized brain tissue in situ to permit analysis of mitochondrial respiration with the native mitochondrial morphology intact, removing the need for isolation time and minimizing tissue requirements to ∼2 mg wet weight. The permeabilized brain technique was validated against the traditional method of isolated mitochondria and was then further applied to assess regional variation in the mouse brain with ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. A transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria was applied to show the contribution of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries in different brain regions. This technique enhances the accessibility of addressing physiological questions in small brain regions and in applying transgenic mouse models to assess mechanisms regulating mitochondrial function in health and disease. Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits

  8. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  9. Development of a novel cysteine sulfinic Acid decarboxylase knockout mouse: dietary taurine reduces neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkyue; Park, Seung Yong; Dobkin, Carl; Schuller-Levis, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    We engineered a CSAD KO mouse to investigate the physiological roles of taurine. The disruption of the CSAD gene was verified by Southern, Northern, and Western blotting. HPLC indicated an 83% decrease of taurine concentration in the plasma of CSAD(-/-). Although CSAD(-/-) generation (G)1 and G2 survived, offspring from G2 CSAD(-/-) had low brain and liver taurine concentrations and most died within 24 hrs of birth. Taurine concentrations in G3 CSAD(-/-) born from G2 CSAD(-/-) treated with taurine in the drinking water were restored and survival rates of G3 CSAD(-/-) increased from 15% to 92%. The mRNA expression of CDO, ADO, and TauT was not different in CSAD(-/-) compared to WT and CSAD mRNA was not expressed in CSAD(-/-). Expression of Gpx 1 and 3 was increased significantly in CSAD(-/-) and restored to normal levels with taurine supplementation. Lactoferrin and the prolactin receptor were significantly decreased in CSAD(-/-). The prolactin receptor was restored with taurine supplementation. These data indicated that CSAD KO is a good model for studying the effects of taurine deficiency and its treatment with taurine supplementation.

  10. The Mouse Murr1 Gene Is Imprinted in the Adult Brain, Presumably Due to Transcriptional Interference by the Antisense-Oriented U2af1-rs1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youdong; Joh, Keiichiro; Masuko, Sadahiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Soejima, Hidenobu; Nabetani, Akira; Beechey, Colin V.; Okinami, Satoshi; Mukai, Tsunehiro

    2004-01-01

    The mouse Murr1 gene contains an imprinted gene, U2af1-rs1, in its first intron. U2af1-rs1 shows paternal allele-specific expression and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the Murr1 gene. In contrast to a previous report of biallelic expression of Murr1 in neonatal mice, we have found that the maternal allele is expressed predominantly in the adult brain and also preferentially in other adult tissues. This maternal-predominant expression is not observed in embryonic and neonatal brains. In situ hybridization experiments that used the adult brain indicated that Murr1 gene was maternally expressed in neuronal cells in all regions of the brain. We analyzed the developmental change in the expression levels of both Murr1 and U2af1-rs1 in the brain and liver, and we propose that the maternal-predominant expression of Murr1 results from transcriptional interference of the gene by U2af1-rs1 through the Murr1 promoter region. PMID:14673161

  11. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency but not copper deficiency increases vascular complexity in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Santarriaga, Stephanie; Nguyen, Thu An; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2015-01-01

    Anemia caused by nutritional deficiencies, such as iron and copper deficiencies, is a global health problem. Iron and copper deficiencies have their most profound effect on the developing fetus/infant, leading to brain development deficits and poor cognitive outcomes. Tissue iron depletion or chronic anemia can induce cellular hypoxic signaling. In mice, chronic hypoxia induces a compensatory increase in brain blood vessel outgrowth. We hypothesized that developmental anemia, due to iron or copper deficiencies, induces angiogenesis/vasculogenesis in the neonatal brain. To test our hypothesis, three independent experiments were performed where pregnant rats were fed iron- or copper-deficient diets from gestational day 2 through mid-lactation. Effects on the neonatal brain vasculature were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess mRNA levels of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis-associated genes and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry to assess brain blood vessel density and complexity. Iron deficiency, but not copper deficiency, increased mRNA expression of brain endothelial cell- and angiogenesis/vasculogenesis-associated genes (i.e. Glut1, Vwf, Vegfa, Ang2, Cxcl12, and Flk1) in the neonatal brain, suggesting increased cerebrovascular density. Iron deficiency also increased hippocampal and cerebral cortical blood vessel branching by 62 and 78%, respectively. This study demonstrates increased blood vessel complexity in the neonatal iron-deficient brain, which is likely due to elevated angiogenic/vasculogenic signaling. At least initially, this is probably an adaptive response to maintain metabolic substrate homeostasis in the developing iron-deficient brain. However, this may also contribute to long-term neurodevelopmental deficits.

  12. Complement Component C1q Mediates Mitochondria-Driven Oxidative Stress in Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ten, Vadim S.; Yao, Jun; Ratner, Veniamin; Sosunov, Sergey; Fraser, Deborah A.; Botto, Marina; Baalasubramanian, Sivasankar; Morgan, B. Paul; Silverstein, Samuel; Stark, Raymond; Polin, Richard; Vannucci, Susan J.; Pinsky, David; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury in infants is a leading cause of lifelong disability. We report a novel pathway mediating oxidative brain injury after hypoxia–ischemia in which C1q plays a central role. Neonatal mice incapable of classical or terminal complement activation because of C1q or C6 deficiency or pharmacologically inhibited assembly of membrane attack complex were subjected to hypoxia–ischemia. Only C1q−/− mice exhibited neuroprotection coupled with attenuated oxidative brain injury. This was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C1q−/− brain mitochondria and preserved activity of the respiratory chain. Compared with C1q+/+ neurons, cortical C1q−/− neurons exhibited resistance to oxygen– glucose deprivation. However, postischemic exposure to exogenous C1q increased both mitochondrial ROS production and mortality of C1q−/− neurons. This C1q toxicity was abolished by coexposure to antioxidant Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid). Thus, the C1q component of complement, accelerating mitochondrial ROS emission, exacerbates oxidative injury in the developing HI brain. The terminal complement complex is activated in the HI neonatal brain but appeared to be nonpathogenic. These findings have important implications for design of the proper therapeutic interventions against HI neonatal brain injury by highlighting a pathogenic priority of C1q-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress over the C1q deposition-triggered terminal complement activation. PMID:20147536

  13. Complement component c1q mediates mitochondria-driven oxidative stress in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ten, Vadim S; Yao, Jun; Ratner, Veniamin; Sosunov, Sergey; Fraser, Deborah A; Botto, Marina; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Morgan, B Paul; Silverstein, Samuel; Stark, Raymond; Polin, Richard; Vannucci, Susan J; Pinsky, David; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2010-02-10

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury in infants is a leading cause of lifelong disability. We report a novel pathway mediating oxidative brain injury after hypoxia-ischemia in which C1q plays a central role. Neonatal mice incapable of classical or terminal complement activation because of C1q or C6 deficiency or pharmacologically inhibited assembly of membrane attack complex were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. Only C1q(-/-) mice exhibited neuroprotection coupled with attenuated oxidative brain injury. This was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C1q(-/-) brain mitochondria and preserved activity of the respiratory chain. Compared with C1q(+/+) neurons, cortical C1q(-/-) neurons exhibited resistance to oxygen-glucose deprivation. However, postischemic exposure to exogenous C1q increased both mitochondrial ROS production and mortality of C1q(-/-) neurons. This C1q toxicity was abolished by coexposure to antioxidant Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid). Thus, the C1q component of complement, accelerating mitochondrial ROS emission, exacerbates oxidative injury in the developing HI brain. The terminal complement complex is activated in the HI neonatal brain but appeared to be nonpathogenic. These findings have important implications for design of the proper therapeutic interventions against HI neonatal brain injury by highlighting a pathogenic priority of C1q-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress over the C1q deposition-triggered terminal complement activation.

  14. Relationship between opioid therapy, tissue-damaging procedures, and brain metabolites as measured by proton MRS in asphyxiated term neonates.

    PubMed

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Ashwal, Stephen; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Ebner, Charlotte; Fayard, Elba; Sowers, Lawrence; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effects of opioid and tissue-damaging procedures (TDPs) [i.e. procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) known to result in pain, stress, and tissue damage] on brain metabolites, we reviewed the medical records of 28 asphyxiated term neonates (eight opioid-treated, 20 non-opioid treated) who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within the first month of life as well as eight newborns with no clinical findings of asphyxial injury. We found that lower creatine (Cr), myoinositol (Ins), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) (p < or = 0.03) and higher Cho/Cr and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) Cr (p < or = 0.02) correlated with increased TDP incidence in the first 2 d of life (DOL). We also found that occipital gray matter (OGM) NAA/Cr was decreased (p = 0.03) and lactate (Lac) was present in a significantly higher amount (40%; p = 0.03) in non-opioid-treated neonates compared with opioid-treated neonates. Compared with controls, untreated neonates showed larger changes in more metabolites in basal ganglia (BG), thalami (TH), and OGM with greater significance than treated neonates. Our data suggest that TDPs affect spectral metabolites and that opioids do not cause harm in asphyxiated term neonates exposed to repetitive TDPs in the first 2-4 DOL and may provide a degree of neuroprotection.

  15. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  17. Energy metabolism in rat brain: inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation by 3-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Booth, R F; Clark, J B

    1981-07-01

    The effect of 3-hydroxybutyrate on pyruvate decarboxylation by neonatal rat brain mitochondria and synaptosomes was investigated. The rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation (1 mM final concentration) by brain synaptosomes derived from 8-day-old rats was inhibited by 10% in the presence of 2 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate and by more than 20% in the presence of 20 mM D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate. The presence of 2 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate did not affect the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation (1 mM final concentration) by brain mitochondria; however, at a concentration of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate, a marked inhibition was seen in preparations from both 8-hydroxybutyrate, a marked inhibition was seen in preparations from both 8-day-old (35% inhibition) and 21-day-old (24% inhibition) but not in those from adult rats. Although the presence of 100 mM-K+ in the incubation medium stimulated the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation by approximately 50% compared with the rate in presence of 1 mM-K+, the presence of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate still caused a marked inhibition in both media (1 and 100 mM-K+). The presence of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate during the incubation caused an approximately 20% decrease in the level of the active form of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in brain mitochondria from 8-day-old rats. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, NAD+, NADH, acetyl CoA, and CoA were measured in brain mitochondria from 8-day-old rats incubated in the presence of 1 mM-pyruvate alone or 1 mM-pyruvate plus 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate. Neither the APT/ADP nor the NADH/NAD+ ratio showed significant changes. The acetyl CoA/CoA ratio was significantly increased by more than twofold in the presence of 3-hydroxybutyrate. The possible mechanisms and physiological significance of 3-hydroxybutyrate inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation in neonatal rat brain rat mitochondria are discussed.

  18. Establishment and identification of a hypoxia-ischemia brain damage model in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; ZHANG, WEIRAN; HE, XUE; WANG, JINHU; JIANG, KEWEN; ZHAO, ZHENGYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to set up a reliable model of severe hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and several methods were used to identify whether the model was successful. A total of 40 healthy 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: The sham-surgery group (n=18) and the HIBD model group (n=22). The HIBD model was produced according to the traditional Rice method. The rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether. The left common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed, ligated and cut. Following this, the rats were exposed to hypoxia in a normobaric chamber filled with 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 2 h. In the sham-surgery group, the left CCA was exposed but was not ligated, cut or exposed to hypoxia. The neurobehavioral changes of the rats were observed in the 24 h after HIBD. The brains were collected after 72 h to observe the pathological morphological changes of the brain tissue. The behavioral ability and neurobehavioral changes were studied in each group. The water maze test was used for evaluating the learning-memory ability when the rats were 28 days old. Compared with the sham-surgery group, all the HIBD model rats had a lag of motor development. The rats had evident changes in anatomy and Nissl staining, and cognitive impairment was shown through the result of the water maze. Therefore, the model of HIBD in neonatal rats is feasible and provides a reliable model for subsequent studies. PMID:27073628

  19. Effect of combined therapy with ephedrine and hyperbaric oxygen on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Xiao, Nong; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2009-11-13

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) is a major cause of brain injury in the newborn, and there is a lack of effective therapies to reduce injury-related disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of ephedrine and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into sham operation, HI, ephedrine, HBO, and combined group. The ephedrine group was intraperitoneally injected with ephedrine, HBO group was treated for 2h at 2.5 absolute atmosphere (ATA) per day, the combined group received both ephedrine and HBO treatments, the sham operation and HI groups were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline. Rat brains at 7 days after HI, were collected to determine histopathological damage and the expression levels of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A. Four weeks after insult, animals were challenged with Morris water maze test. The expressions of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A were reduced in treating groups compared to those in HI group (P<0.01). Compared with the single treatment groups, the expression levels of Caspase-3 and Nogo-A were significantly reduced in the combined group (P<0.01). Compared with the single treatment groups, the average time of escape latency was significantly shorter (P<0.01) and the number of platform location crossing was more (P<0.05) in combined group. These findings indicate that the combination of ephedrine and HBO can enhance the neuroprotective effect in the neonatal rat HI model partially mediated by inhibiting Caspase-3 and Nogo-A pathways.

  20. Evaluation of five diffeomorphic image registration algorithms for mouse brain magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenrong; Lin, Lan; Tian, Miao; Wang, Jingxuan; Zhang, Baiwen; Chu, Pingping; Li, Shaowu; Pathan, Muhammad Mohsin; Deng, Yulin; Wu, Shuicai

    2017-06-14

    The development of genetically engineered mouse models for neuronal diseases and behavioural disorders have generated a growing need for small animal imaging. High-resolution magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides powerful capabilities for noninvasive studies of mouse brains, while avoiding some limits associated with the histological procedures. Quantitative comparison of structural images is a critical step in brain imaging analysis, which highly relies on the performance of image registration techniques. Nowadays, there is a mushrooming growth of human brain registration algorithms, while fine-tuning of those algorithms for mouse brain MRMs is rarely addressed. Because of their topology preservation property and outstanding performance in human studies, diffeomorphic transformations have become popular in computational anatomy. In this study, we specially tuned five diffeomorphic image registration algorithms [DARTEL, geodesic shooting, diffeo-demons, SyN (Greedy-SyN and geodesic-SyN)] for mouse brain MRMs and evaluated their performance using three measures [volume overlap percentage (VOP), residual intensity error (RIE) and surface concordance ratio (SCR)]. Geodesic-SyN performed significantly better than the other methods according to all three different measures. These findings are important for the studies on structural brain changes that may occur in wild-type and transgenic mouse brains. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Hedgehog signaling plays roles in epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal mouse uterus and vagina.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2012-04-01

    Both the uterus and vagina develop from the Müllerian duct but are quite distinct in morphology and function. To investigate factors controlling epithelial differentiation and cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina, we focused on Hedgehog (HH) signaling. In neonatal mice, Sonic hh (Shh) was localized in the vaginal epithelium and Indian hh (Ihh) was slightly expressed in the uterus and vagina, whereas all Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) genes were mainly expressed in the stroma. The expression of target genes of HH signaling was high in the neonatal vagina and in the uterus, it increased with growth. Thus, in neonatal mice, Shh in the vaginal epithelium and Ihh in the uterus and vagina activated HH signaling in the stroma. Tissue recombinants showed that vaginal Shh expression was inhibited by the vaginal stroma and uterine Ihh expression was stimulated by the uterine stroma. Addition of a HH signaling inhibitor decreased epithelial cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus and vagina and increased stromal cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus. However, it did not affect epithelial differentiation or the expression of growth factors in organ-cultured uterus and vagina. Thus, activated HH signaling stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina but inhibits stromal cell proliferation in neonatal uterus.

  2. The Specific Protein Kinase R (PKR) Inhibitor C16 Protects Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Brain Damages by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in a Neonatal Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinglei; Tan, Yongchang; Li, Yinjiao; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Brain injuries induced by hypoxia-ischemia in neonates contribute to increased mortality and lifelong neurological dysfunction. The specific PKR inhibitor C16 has been previously demonstrated to exert a neuroprotective role in adult brain injuries. However, there is no recent study available concerning its protective role in hypoxia-ischemia-induced immature brain damage. Therefore, we investigated whether C16 protects against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia injuries in a neonatal rat model. Material/Methods Postnatal day 7 (P7) rats were used to establish classical hypoxia-ischemia animal models, and C16 postconditioning with 100 ug/kg was performed immediately after hypoxia. Western blot analysis was performed to quantify the phosphorylation of the PKR at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and phosphorylation of NF-κB 24h after hypoxia exposure. The TTC stain for infarction area and TUNEL stain for apoptotic cells were assayed 24 h after the brain hypoxia. Gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α was performed at 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h. Results The level of PKR autophosphorylation was increased dramatically, especially at 3 h (C16 group vs. HI group, P<0.01). Intraperitoneal C16 administration reduced the infarct volume and apoptosis ratio after this insult (C16 group vs. HI group<0.01), and C16 reduced proinflammatory cytokines mRNA expression, partly through inhibiting NF-κB activation (C16 group vs. HI group<0.05). Conclusions C16 can protect immature rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by modulating neuroinflammation. PMID:28008894

  3. Early Supplementation of Phospholipids and Gangliosides Affects Brain and Cognitive Development in Neonatal Piglets123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongnan; Radlowski, Emily C; Conrad, Matthew S; Li, Yao; Dilger, Ryan N; Johnson, Rodney W

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because human breast milk is a rich source of phospholipids and gangliosides and breastfed infants have improved learning compared with formula-fed infants, the importance of dietary phospholipids and gangliosides for brain development is of interest. Objective: We sought to determine the effects of phospholipids and gangliosides on brain and cognitive development. Methods: Male and female piglets from multiple litters were artificially reared and fed formula containing 0% (control), 0.8%, or 2.5% Lacprodan PL-20 (PL-20; Arla Foods Ingredients), a phospholipid/ganglioside supplement, from postnatal day (PD) 2 to PD28. Beginning on PD14, performance in a spatial T-maze task was assessed. At PD28, brain MRI data were acquired and piglets were killed to obtain hippocampal tissue for metabolic profiling. Results: Diet affected maze performance, with piglets that were fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 making fewer errors than control piglets (80% vs. 75% correct on average; P < 0.05) and taking less time to make a choice (3 vs. 5 s/trial; P < 0.01). Mean brain weight was 5% higher for piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 (P < 0.05) than control piglets, and voxel-based morphometry revealed multiple brain areas with greater volumes and more gray and white matter in piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 than in control piglets. Metabolic profiling of hippocampal tissue revealed that multiple phosphatidylcholine-related metabolites were altered by diet. Conclusion: In summary, dietary phospholipids and gangliosides improved spatial learning and affected brain growth and composition in neonatal piglets. PMID:25411030

  4. Effects of neonatal and peripubertal ethanol treatment on various aspects of adult rat behavior and brain anatomy.

    PubMed

    Röskam, Stephan; Koch, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to ethanol during critical stages of brain development and maturation has adverse effects on behavioral and cognitive functions. So far, most animal models focused on the effects of either pre- or early postnatal ethanol treatment on behavior. We here used a multiple crossover design to investigate the effects of neonatal (postnatal day 7) ethanol treatment (2.5 g/kg b.i.d., dissolved in saline), subchronic peripubertal (postnatal days 40-65) ethanol treatment (1.0 g/kg, dissolved in saline) and the combination of both on the performance of adult Wistar rats in a variety of behavioral tasks. We also assessed anatomical changes in limbic and cortical brain areas. No effects of either single or combined neonatal and pubertal ethanol treatment was found on prepulse inhibition of startle (PPI, a measure of sensorimotor gating), or on the acoustic startle response in the absence of prepulses. Peripubertal ethanol treatment reduced the explorative behavior in the open field. The breakpoint in a progressive ratio operant response task was increased in those rats that had received both neonatal and pubertal ethanol treatment, while the preference for palatable food used as reinforcer in this task was not affected. No treatment effects were found on object recognition memory. No treatment effects on anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze were found, however, the anxiolytic effect of the prototypical benzodiazepine diazepam was enhanced in rats that had received peripubertal ethanol treatment. Additive effects of neonatal and pubertal ethanol treatments were found on behaviors related to spontaneous locomotor activity. Combined neonatal and pubertal ethanol treatment lead to a reduction of myelin sheaths in the prefrontal cortex, and the neonatal ethanol treatment lead to a reduced number of parvalbumine-immunoreactive cells in the dorsal hippocampus. These findings suggest that neonatal ethanol exposure increases the risk of some but not all adverse

  5. Use of High Resolution 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Study Brain White Matter Development in Live Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yu; McMurray, Matthew S.; Oguz, Ipek; Yuan, Hong; Styner, Martin A.; Lin, Weili; Johns, Josephine M.; An, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5) and PND14, using only 3 h of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D rapid acquisition relaxation enhancement DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild-to-moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in magnetic resonance images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild-to-moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. fractional anisotropy values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment. PMID:22013426

  6. Ontogenetic Change in the Regional Distribution of Dehydroepiandrosterone-Synthesizing Enzyme and the Glucocorticoid Receptor in the Brain of the Spiny Mouse (Acomys cahirinus).

    PubMed

    Quinn, Tracey A; Ratnayake, Udani; Dickinson, Hayley; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Walker, David W

    2016-01-01

    The androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has trophic and anti-glucocorticoid actions on brain growth. The adrenal gland of the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) synthesizes DHEA. The aim of this study was to determine whether the brain of this precocial species is also able to produce DHEA de novo during fetal, neonatal and adult life. The expression of P450c17 and cytochrome b5 (Cytb5), the enzyme and accessory protein responsible for the synthesis of DHEA, was determined in fetal, neonatal and adult brains by immunocytochemistry, and P450c17 bioactivity was determined by the conversion of pregnenolone to DHEA. Homogenates of fetal brain produced significantly more DHEA after 48 h in culture (22.46 ± 2.0 ng/mg tissue) than adult brain homogenates (5.04 ± 2.0 ng/mg tissue; p < 0.0001). P450c17 and Cytb5 were co-expressed in fetal neurons but predominantly in oligodendrocytes and white matter tracts in the adult brain. Because DHEA modulates glucocorticoids actions, the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was also determined. In the brainstem, medulla, midbrain, and cerebellum, the predominant GR localization changed from neurons in the fetal brain to oligodendrocytes and white matter tracts in the adult brain. The change of expression of P450c17, Cytb5 and GR proteins with cell type, brain region and developmental age indicates that DHEA is an endogenous neurosteroid in this species that may have important trophic and stress-modifying actions during both prenatal and postnatal life.

  7. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  8. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Bastin, Mark E; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39(+5) weeks, range 37(+2)-41(+6)). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development.

  9. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  10. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  11. Parcellation of the Healthy Neonatal Brain into 107 Regions Using Atlas Propagation through Intermediate Time Points in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Manuel; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G.; Anblagan, Devasuda; Telford, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Bastin, Mark E.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2–41+6). An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO) was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database), with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33) constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization (SyGN) method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modeling brain growth during development. PMID:27242423

  12. A computational approach towards the microscale mouse brain connectome from the mesoscale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tielin; Zeng, Yi; Xu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The wiring diagram of the mouse brain presents an indispensable foundation for the research on basic and applied neurobiology. It is also essential as a structural foundation for computational simulation of the brain. Different scales of the connectome give us different hints and clues to understand the functions of the nervous system and how they process information. However, compared to the macroscale and most recent mesoscale mouse brain connectome studies, there is no complete whole brain microscale connectome available because of the scalability and accuracy of automatic recognition techniques. Different scales of the connectivity data are comprehensive descriptions of the whole brain at different levels of details. Hence connectivity results from a neighborhood scale may help to predict each other. Here we report a computational approach to bring the mesoscale connectome a step forward towards the microscale from the perspective of neuron, synapse and network motifs distribution by the connectivity data at the mesoscale and some facts from the anatomical experiments at the microscale. These attempts make a step forward towards the efforts of microscale mouse brain connectome given the fact that the detailed microscale connectome results are still far to be produced due to the limitation of current nano-scale 3-D reconstruction techniques. The generated microscale mouse brain will play a key role on the understanding of the behavioral and cognitive processes of the mouse brain. In this paper, the conversion method which could get the approximate number of neurons and synapses in microscale is proposed and tested in sub-regions of Hippocampal Formation (HF), and is generalized to the whole brain. As a step forward towards understanding the microscale connectome, we propose a microscale motif prediction model to generate understanding on the microscale structure of different brain region from network motif perspective. Correlation analysis shows that the

  13. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Wilkinson, A G; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2016-03-24

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases 'uniformly' distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  14. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; MacNaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  15. Electrophysiological characterization of V2a interneurons and their locomotor-related activity in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guisheng; Droho, Steven; Crone, Steven A; Dietz, Shelby; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Sharma, Kamal; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2010-01-06

    The V2a class of Chx10-expressing interneurons has been implicated in frequency-dependent control of left-right phase during locomotion in the mouse. We have used the Chx10::CFP mouse line to further investigate the properties and locomotion-related activity of V2a interneurons in the isolated neonatal spinal cord. V2a interneurons can be divided into three classes, based on their tonic, phasic, or delayed-onset responses to step depolarization. Electrical coupling is found only between neurons of same class and helps to synchronize neuronal activity within the class. Serotonin (5-HT) excites isolated tonic V2a interneurons by depolarizing the neurons and increasing their membrane input resistance, with no significant effects on action potential properties, a mechanism distinct from 5-HT excitation of commissural interneurons. During NMDA-/5-HT-induced locomotor-like activity, patch-clamp recordings and two-photon calcium imaging experiments show that approximately half of V2a interneurons fire rhythmically with ventral root-recorded motor activity; the rhythmic V2a interneurons fired during one half of the cycle, in phase with either the ipsilateral or the contralateral L2 ventral root bursts. The percentage of rhythmically firing V2a interneurons increases during higher-frequency fictive locomotion, and they become significantly more rhythmic in their firing during the locomotor cycle; this may help to explain the frequency-dependent shift in left-right coupling in Chx10::DTA mice, which lack these neurons. Our results together with data from the accompanying paper (Dougherty and Kiehn, 2009) reinforce earlier proposals that the V2a interneurons are components of the hindlimb central pattern generator, helping to organize left-right locomotor coordination in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

  16. A new view of the neonatal brain: clinical utility of supplemental neurologic US imaging windows.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, D N

    2001-01-01

    Anterior fontanelle imaging has traditionally been the mainstay of neonatal cranial ultrasonography (US). However, this traditional approach has limited diagnostic accuracy, which has led to increasing use of two alternate neurologic US imaging techniques: posterior fontanelle imaging and mastoid fontanelle imaging. These alternate techniques can help detect pathologic conditions and structural malformations in the neonatal brain. Posterior fontanelle imaging allows improved detection of intraventricular hemorrhage. This technique better demonstrates subtle differences in echogenicity between clot and a choroid glomus and depicts clot extending into the occipital and temporal horns. Mastoid fontanelle imaging is particularly useful in detecting hemorrhage involving the brainstem, cerebellum, and subarachnoid cisterns. It greatly facilitates clot detection in the fourth ventricle and cisterna magna because the tissues surrounding these structures are normally echogenic. Mastoid fontanelle imaging can also help distinguish holoprosencephaly from aqueductal stenosis and identify small malformations of the posterior fossa. Color Doppler US may help identify normal variants such as calcar avis and lobular choroid plexus, and adjunct magnetic resonance imaging can help distinguish normal structures from a true Dandy-Walker variant. Use of posterior fontanelle imaging and mastoid fontanelle imaging can significantly augment the diagnostic power of neurologic US.

  17. Systemic glycerol decreases neonatal rabbit brain and cerebellar growth independent of intraventricular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M; McPherson, Ron J; Studholme, Colin; Millen, Kathleen J; Juul, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebellar hypoplasia is common problem for preterm infants, and infants that suffer intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). To evaluate the effects of IVH on cerebellar growth and development, we used a neonatal rabbit model of systemic glycerol to produce IVH. Methods New Zealand White rabbit kits were surgically delivered 2 d preterm, and treated with i.p. glycerol (3.25 to 6.5 g/kg). Controls were born at term. IVH was documented by ultrasound. Brain MRI volumes, cerebellar foliation, proliferation (Ki-67) and Purkinje cell density were done at two weeks of life. Tissue glycerol and glutathione concentrations were measured. Results Glycerol increased IVH, subarachnoid hemorrhages and mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Total cerebellar volumes, cerebellar foliation and cerebellar proliferation were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Glycerol accumulated rapidly in blood, brain and liver and was associated with increased glutathione concentration. All of these results were independent of IVH status. Conclusions Cerebellar hypoplasia was induced after glycerol administration in a dose-dependent manner. Given rapid tissue accumulation of glycerol, dose dependent decreased brain growth and lack of IVH effect on measured outcomes we question the validity of this model as glycerol toxicity cannot be ruled out. A more physiologic model of IVH is needed. PMID:24346111

  18. Brain maturity in regard to the auditory brainstem response in small-for-date neonates.

    PubMed

    Saintonge, J; Lavoie, A; Lachapelle, J; Côté, R

    1986-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response has been used in neonates at risk of hearing impairment or as a functional measurement of brain maturity. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the auditory brainstem response in small-for-date newborns, in relation to changes observed with fetal maturity in a control group. Compared to controls with similar maturity, a significant delay for the appearance of waves III and V, and between waves I-V was observed in the small-for-date newborns, suggesting an alteration of the auditory pathway within the brainstem rather than an impairment of the peripheral auditive apparatus. Indeed, small-for-date newborns reacted to the test in a similar manner as premature babies in whom such a delay was also observed. Our data would suggest a functional brain immaturity in small-for-date newborns, during the first days of life, in regard to the auditive evoked potential, which may be related to some alterations in brain development reported with fetal malnutrition.

  19. In utero nicotine exposure promotes M2 activation in neonatal mouse alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakool, Cherry; Grooms, Kora; Ping, Xiao-Du; Rivera, Hilda; Ward, Janine; Roser-Page, Susanne; Roman, Jesse; Brown, Lou Ann S; Gauthier, Theresa W

    2012-08-01

    Maternal smoking in utero has been associated with adverse health outcomes including lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children, but the mechanisms underlying these associations continue to be investigated. We hypothesized that nicotine plays a significant role in mediating the effects of maternal tobacco smoke on the function of the neonatal alveolar macrophage (AM), the resident immune cell in the neonatal lung. Primary AMs were isolated at postnatal day 7 from a murine model of in utero nicotine exposure. The murine AM cell line MH-S was used for additional in vitro studies. In utero nicotine increased interleukin-13 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) in the neonatal lung. Nicotine-exposed AMs demonstrated increased TGFβ1 and increased markers of alternative activation with diminished phagocytic function. However, AMs from mice deficient in the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) had less TGFβ1, reduced alternative activation, and improved phagocytic functioning despite similar in utero nicotine exposure. In utero nicotine exposure, mediated in part via the α7 nAChR, may increase the risk of lower respiratory tract infections in neonates by changing the resting state of AM toward alternative activation. These findings have important implications for immune responses in the nicotine-exposed neonatal lung.

  20. Characterization of benzodiazepine receptors in primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Barker, J L; Paul, S M; Moncada, V; Skolnick, P

    1980-05-26

    Primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord were examined for the presence of binding sites for [3H]diazepam. Both brain and spinal cord cultures contain high affinity binding sites which resemble benzodiazepine receptors found in mammalian CNS with respect to both pharmacologic profile and response to exogenously applied GABA. These observations, coupled with the electrophysiologic properties of these cells suggest that primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord may be valid models for studying the role and regulation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  1. Resveratrol ameliorates hypoxia/ischemia-induced brain injury in the neonatal rat via the miR-96/Bax axis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongen; Shan, Haijun; Chen, Tuanying

    2017-07-18

    This study was aimed to investigate the mechanism of resveratrol on amelioration of hypoxia/ischemia (H/I)-induced brain injury. The RT-PCR and western blot were used to detect the mRNA and protein expressions, respectively. The PC12 cell induced by OGD/R was as in vitro H/I brain injury model. The luciferase reporter assay was used to prove the relationship between Bax and miR-96, and the cell apoptosis was detected by MTT assay. The loss of MBP+ area in neonatal rats analyzed by immunohistochemistry was to evaluate the extent of brain injury. The miR-96 expression was decreased in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of neonatal rats with H/I brain injury and the oxygenglucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced PC12 cell, while Bax expression was opposite. And then the H/I rats and OGD/R-induced PC12 cell were treated with resveratrol (RSV); the results showed that the RSV could reverse the miR-96 and Bax expressions. Next, the luciferase reporter assay proved that Bax was a target of miR-96. We used the miR-96 inhibitor to suppress miR-96 expression in OGD/R-induced PC12 cell, and found that RSV regulated Bax expression and prevented OGD/R-induced PC12 cell apoptosis via miR-96. In addition, the immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the loss of MBP+ area in neonatal rats, and the result showed that the RSV significantly reduced the brain damage, increased miR-96 expression, and decreased Bax expression, while inhibition of miR-96 aggravated the brain damage and reversed the effect of RSV. Resveratrol ameliorates hypoxia/ischemia-induced brain injury in neonatal rat via the miR-96/ Bax axis.

  2. Functions of Maternally-Derived Taurine in Fetal and Neonatal Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Tochitani, Shiro

    2017-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is a sulfur-containing organic acid, which has various physiological functions, including membrane stabilization, cell-volume regulation, mitochondrial protein translocation, anti-oxidative activity, neuroprotection against neurotoxicity and modulation of intracellular calcium levels. Taurine also activates GABAA receptors and glycine receptors. Mammalian fetuses and infants are dependent on taurine delivered from their mothers via either the placenta or their mother's milk. Taurine is a molecule that links mother-fetus or mother-infant bonding.This review describes the functions of taurine and the mechanisms of action of taurine in fetal and brain development. Taurine is involved in regulating the proliferation of neural progenitors, migration of newly-generated neurons, and the synapse formation of neurons after migration during fetal and neonatal development. In this review, we also discuss the environmental factors that might influence the functional roles of taurine in neural development.

  3. Abnormal endogenous amino acid release in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R

    1991-01-02

    The basal and potassium-evoked efflux of glutamate, glycine, taurine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was measured in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted and sufficient 14-day-old rats. The results indicate a reduced level of basal glutamate, taurine, and GABA efflux in hippocampal slices and taurine and GABA in cortical slices from vitamin B-6 restricted animals. In the presence of depolarizing potassium concentrations, there was a reduced level of GABA efflux in hippocampal and cortical slices, and a marked reduction in the release of glutamate in cortical slices from B-6 restricted rats. The abnormalities in the secretion process of these neuroactive amino acids may be related to the neurological sequelae associated with neonatal vitamin B-6 restriction.

  4. Sex differences in outcome and associations with neonatal brain morphology in extremely preterm children.

    PubMed

    Skiöld, Béatrice; Alexandrou, Georgios; Padilla, Nelly; Blennow, Mats; Vollmer, Brigitte; Adén, Ulrika

    2014-05-01

    To investigate sex differences in neurologic and developmental outcomes in extremely preterm (EPT) children and explore associations with neonatal brain morphology. A population-based cohort of infants born at <27 weeks gestation underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term equivalent age (n = 107). Voxel-based morphometry (n = 27) and tract-based spatial statistics (n = 29) were performed in infants with normal MRI findings. Neurologic and developmental assessment (using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition [BSITD-III]) was performed at 30 months corrected age (n = 91). EPT boys had lower mean cognitive composite scores (P = .03) and lower mean language composite scores (P = .04) compared with EPT girls. Rates of cerebral palsy were similar in the 2 sexes. No perinatal factor explained the variance in outcomes. Visual inspection of T1- and T2-weighted MRI images found that delayed myelination was found more frequently in boys, whereas cerebellar abnormalities were more common in girls. In the subgroup of children with normal MRI findings (n = 27), boys had poorer cognitive function (P = .015) and language function (P = .008), despite larger volumes of cerebellar tissue (P = .029). In boys, cerebellar volume was positively correlated with BSITD-III cognitive and motor scores (P = .04 for both). In girls, white matter volume (P = .02) and cortical gray matter volume (P = .03) were positively correlated with BSITD-III language score. At the regional level, significant correlations with outcomes were found only in girls. Cognitive and language outcomes at age 30 months were poorer in boys. Sex-related differences were observed on neonatal structural MRI, including differences in the patterns of correlations between brain volumes and developmental scores at both global and regional levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of Na+/H+ Exchanger Isoform 1 Is Neuroprotective in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, Neil; Uluc, Kutluay; Kendigelen, Pinar; Hagemann, Tracy; Akture, Erinc; Messing, Albee; Ferrazzano, Peter; Sun, Dandan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in neonatal hypoxia/ischemia (HI). HI was induced by unilateral ligation of the left common carotid artery in postnatal day 9 (P9) mice, and subsequent exposure of animals to 8% O2 for 55 min. A pre/posttreatment group received a selective and potent NHE-1 inhibitor HOE 642 (0.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 5 min before HI, then at 24 and 48 h after HI. A posttreatment group received HOE 642 (0.5 mg/kg) at 10 min, 24 h, and 48 h after HI. Saline injections were used as vehicle controls. The vehicle-control brains at 72 h after HI exhibited neuronal degeneration in the ipsilateral hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus, as identified with Fluoro-Jade C positive staining and loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) expression. NHE-1 protein was upregulated in glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive reactive astrocytes. In HOE 642–treated brains, the morphologic hippocampal structures were better preserved and displayed less neurodegeneration and a higher level of MAP2 expression. Motor-learning deficit was detected at 4 weeks of age after HI in the vehicle control group. Inhibition of NHE-1 in P9 mice not only reduced neurodegeneration during the acute stage of HI but also improved the striatum-dependent motor learning and spatial learning at 8 weeks of age after HI. These findings suggest that NHE-1–mediated disruption of ionic homeostasis contributes to striatal and CA1 pyramidal neuronal injury after neonatal HI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1803–1813. PMID:20712402

  6. Intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain damage: long-term cognitive and sensorimotor improvement.

    PubMed

    Donega, Vanessa; van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Nijboer, Cora H; van Bel, Frank; Kas, Martien J H; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration via the intranasal route could become an effective therapy to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. We analyzed long-term effects of intranasal MSC treatment on lesion size, sensorimotor and cognitive behavior, and determined the therapeutic window and dose response relationships. Furthermore, the appearance of MSCs at the lesion site in relation to the therapeutic window was examined. Nine-day-old mice were subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion and hypoxia. MSCs were administered intranasally at 3, 10 or 17 days after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Motor, cognitive and histological outcome was investigated. PKH-26 labeled cells were used to localize MSCs in the brain. We identified 0.5 × 10(6) MSCs as the minimal effective dose with a therapeutic window of at least 10 days but less than 17 days post-HI. A single dose was sufficient for a marked beneficial effect. MSCs reach the lesion site within 24 h when given 3 or 10 days after injury. However, no MSCs were detected in the lesion when administered 17 days following HI. We also show for the first time that intranasal MSC treatment after HI improves cognitive function. Improvement of sensorimotor function and histological outcome was maintained until at least 9 weeks post-HI. The capacity of MSCs to reach the lesion site within 24 h after intranasal administration at 10 days but not at 17 days post-HI indicates a therapeutic window of at least 10 days. Our data strongly indicate that intranasal MSC treatment may become a promising non-invasive therapeutic tool to effectively reduce neonatal encephalopathy.

  7. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    John, Sebastian; Mishra, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galectins, a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside binding proteins is involved in several brain disorders; however, no systematic knowledge on the normal neuroanatomical distribution and functions of galectins exits. Hence, the major purpose of this study was to understand spatial distribution and predict functions of galectins in brain and also compare the degree of conservation vs. divergence between mouse and human species. The latter objective was required to determine the relevance and appropriateness of studying galectins in mouse brain which may ultimately enable us to extrapolate the findings to human brain physiology and pathologies. Results: In order to fill this crucial gap in our understanding of brain galectins, we analyzed the in situ hybridization and microarray data of adult mouse and human brain respectively, from the Allen Brain Atlas, to resolve each galectin-subtype’s spatial distribution across brain distinct cytoarchitecture. Next, transcription factors (TFs) that may regulate galectins were identified using TRANSFAC software and the list obtained was further curated to sort TFs on their confirmed transcript expression in the adult brain. Galectin-TF cluster analysis, gene-ontology annotations and co-expression networks were then extrapolated to predict distinct functional relevance of each galectin in the neuronal processes. Data shows that galectins have highly heterogeneous expression within and across brain sub-structures and are predicted to be the crucial targets of brain enriched TFs. Lgals9 had maximal spatial distribution across mouse brain with inferred predominant roles in neurogenesis while LGALS1 was ubiquitously expressed in human. Limbic region associated with learning, memory and emotions and substantia nigra associated with motor movements showed strikingly high expression of LGALS1 and LGALS8 in human vs. mouse brain. The overall expression profile of galectin-8 was most preserved across both these

  8. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain.

    PubMed

    John, Sebastian; Mishra, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galectins, a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside binding proteins is involved in several brain disorders; however, no systematic knowledge on the normal neuroanatomical distribution and functions of galectins exits. Hence, the major purpose of this study was to understand spatial distribution and predict functions of galectins in brain and also compare the degree of conservation vs. divergence between mouse and human species. The latter objective was required to determine the relevance and appropriateness of studying galectins in mouse brain which may ultimately enable us to extrapolate the findings to human brain physiology and pathologies. Results: In order to fill this crucial gap in our understanding of brain galectins, we analyzed the in situ hybridization and microarray data of adult mouse and human brain respectively, from the Allen Brain Atlas, to resolve each galectin-subtype's spatial distribution across brain distinct cytoarchitecture. Next, transcription factors (TFs) that may regulate galectins were identified using TRANSFAC software and the list obtained was further curated to sort TFs on their confirmed transcript expression in the adult brain. Galectin-TF cluster analysis, gene-ontology annotations and co-expression networks were then extrapolated to predict distinct functional relevance of each galectin in the neuronal processes. Data shows that galectins have highly heterogeneous expression within and across brain sub-structures and are predicted to be the crucial targets of brain enriched TFs. Lgals9 had maximal spatial distribution across mouse brain with inferred predominant roles in neurogenesis while LGALS1 was ubiquitously expressed in human. Limbic region associated with learning, memory and emotions and substantia nigra associated with motor movements showed strikingly high expression of LGALS1 and LGALS8 in human vs. mouse brain. The overall expression profile of galectin-8 was most preserved across both these

  9. Evaluation of automatic neonatal brain segmentation algorithms: the NeoBrainS12 challenge.

    PubMed

    Išgum, Ivana; Benders, Manon J N L; Avants, Brian; Cardoso, M Jorge; Counsell, Serena J; Gomez, Elda Fischi; Gui, Laura; Hűppi, Petra S; Kersbergen, Karina J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Melbourne, Andrew; Moeskops, Pim; Mol, Christian P; Kuklisova-Murgasova, Maria; Rueckert, Daniel; Schnabel, Julia A; Srhoj-Egekher, Vedran; Wu, Jue; Wang, Siying; de Vries, Linda S; Viergever, Max A

    2015-02-01

    A number of algorithms for brain segmentation in preterm born infants have been published, but a reliable comparison of their performance is lacking. The NeoBrainS12 study (http://neobrains12.isi.uu.nl), providing three different image sets of preterm born infants, was set up to provide such a comparison. These sets are (i) axial scans acquired at 40 weeks corrected age, (ii) coronal scans acquired at 30 weeks corrected age and (iii) coronal scans acquired at 40 weeks corrected age. Each of these three sets consists of three T1- and T2-weighted MR images of the brain acquired with a 3T MRI scanner. The task was to segment cortical grey matter, non-myelinated and myelinated white matter, brainstem, basal ganglia and thalami, cerebellum, and cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles and in the extracerebral space separately. Any team could upload the results and all segmentations were evaluated in the same way. This paper presents the results of eight participating teams. The results demonstrate that the participating methods were able to segment all tissue classes well, except myelinated white matter.

  10. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  11. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  12. Intranasal basic fibroblast growth factor attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress and brain injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenlang; Hu, Yingying; Wang, Zhouguang; Pan, Shulin; Zhang, Hao; Ye, Libing; Zhang, Hongyu; Fang, Mingchu; Jiang, Huai; Ye, Junming; Xiao, Jian; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Brain injury secondary to birth asphyxia is the major cause of death and long-term disability in newborns. Intranasal drug administration enables agents to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the brain directly. In this study, we determined whether intranasal basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) could exert neuroprotective effects in neonatal rats after hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) brain injury and assessed whether attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was associated with these neuroprotective effects. Rats were subjected to HI brain injury via unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia and then treated with intranasal bFGF or vehicle immediately after HI injury. We found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) was strongly activated after HI injury and that bFGF significantly reduced the levels of the ER stress signalling proteins GRP78 and PDI. bFGF also decreased brain infarction volumes and conferred long-term neuroprotective effects against brain atrophy and neuron loss after HI brain injury. Taken together, our results suggest that intranasal bFGF provides neuroprotection function partly by inhibiting HI injury-induced ER stress. bFGF may have potential as a therapy for human neonates after birth asphyxia. PMID:28337259

  13. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  14. IgG-assisted age-dependent clearance of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide by the blood-brain barrier neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay; Hamm, Katie; Parisi, Margaret; LaRue, Barbra; Guo, Huang; Wu, Zhenhua; Holtzman, David M; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2005-12-14

    The role of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport in clearance of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) by Abeta immunotherapy is not fully understood. To address this issue, we studied the effects of peripherally and centrally administered Abeta-specific IgG on BBB influx of circulating Abeta and efflux of brain-derived Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice, a model that develops Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology, and wild-type mice. Our data show that anti-Abeta IgG blocks the BBB influx of circulating Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice and penetrates into the brain to sequester brain Abeta. In young mice, Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes were cleared from brain to blood by transcytosis across the BBB via the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), whereas in older mice, there was an age-dependent increase in FcRn-mediated IgG-assisted Abeta BBB efflux and a decrease in LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes. Inhibition of the FcRn pathway in older APPsw(+/-) mice blocked clearance of endogenous Abeta40/42 by centrally administered Abeta immunotherapy. Moreover, deletion of the FcRn gene in wild-type mice inhibited clearance of endogenous mouse Abeta40/42 by systemically administered anti-Abeta. Our data suggest that the FcRn pathway at the BBB plays a crucial role in IgG-assisted Abeta removal from the aging brain.

  15. In vivo measure of neonate brain optical properties and hemodynamic parameters by time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Lorenzo; Zucchelli, Lucia; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Mehler, Jacques; Fló, Ana; Ferry, Alissa L; Filippin, Luca; Macagno, Francesco; Cattarossi, Luigi; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    By exploiting a multichannel portable instrument for time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS), we characterized healthy neonates' brains in term of optical properties and hemodynamic parameters. In particular, we assessed the absolute values of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at two wavelengths, together with oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, and the blood oxygen saturation of the neonates' brains. In this study, 33 healthy full-term neonates were tested, obtaining the following median values: 0.28 and [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] at 690 and 820 nm, respectively; 5.8 and [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] at 690 and 820 nm, respectively; [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]; 72% for [Formula: see text]. In general, the agreement of these values with the sparse existing literature appears not always consistent. These findings demonstrate the first measurements of optical properties of the healthy neonate brain using TD-NIRS and show the need for clarification of optical properties across methods and populations.

  16. Brain stem serotonin protects blood pressure in neonatal rats exposed to episodic anoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiao T; Cummings, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    In neonatal rodents, a loss of brain stem serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] in utero or at birth compromises anoxia-induced gasping and the recovery of heart rate (HR) and breathing with reoxygenation (i.e., autoresuscitation). How mean arterial pressure (MAP) is influenced after an acute loss of brain stem 5-HT content is unknown. We hypothesized that a loss of 5-HT for ∼1 day would compromise MAP during episodic anoxia. We injected 6-fluorotryptophan (20 mg/kg ip) into rat pups (postnatal days 9-10 or 11-13, n = 22 treated, 24 control), causing a ∼70% loss of brain stem 5-HT. Pups were exposed to a maximum of 15 anoxic episodes, separated by 5 min of room air to allow autoresuscitation. In younger pups, we measured breathing frequency and tidal volume using "head-out" plethysmography and HR from the electrocardiogram. In older pups, we used whole body plethysmography to detect gasping, while monitoring MAP. Gasp latency and the time required for respiratory, HR, and MAP recovery following each episode were determined. Despite normal gasp latency, breathing frequency and a larger tidal volume (P < 0.001), 5-HT-deficient pups survived one-half the number of episodes as controls (P < 0.001). The anoxia-induced decrease in MAP experienced by 5-HT-deficient pups was double that of controls (P = 0.017), despite the same drop in HR (P = 0.48). MAP recovery was delayed ∼10 s by 5-HT deficiency (P = 0.001). Our data suggest a loss of brain stem 5-HT leads to a pronounced, premature loss of MAP in response to episodic anoxia. These data may help explain why some sudden infant death syndrome cases die from what appears to be cardiovascular collapse during apparent severe hypoxia.

  17. Effects of caffeine on neuronal apoptosis in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kilicdag, Hasan; Daglioglu, Yusuf Kenan; Erdogan, Seyda; Zorludemir, Suzan

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in rat pups leads to strong activation of apoptosis, and apoptosis contributes significantly to cerebral damage in the perinatal period. Caffeine displays a broad array of actions on the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on neuronal apoptosis in a hypoxic-ischemic neonatal model. Twenty-four seven-day-old Wistar rat pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation and hypoxia for 2 h. Sham group (n = 8) had a median neck incision, but the rats were not subjected to ligation or hypoxia. The pups were treated with 20 mg/kg/day caffeine citrate (n = 8) or saline (n = 8) immediately before HI and at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-hypoxia. Neuronal apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and caspase-3 in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of both hemispheres. The numbers of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus and parietal cortex were significantly higher in the saline group than they were in the sham group (p < 0.0001). The number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus (p < 0.0001) and parietal cortex (p < 0.0001, TUNEL and p = 0.001, caspase-3) were higher in the caffeine-treated group than they were in the sham group, but the number of apoptotic cells decreased significantly in the caffeine-treated group compared with the saline group in the hippocampus (p < 0.0001, TUNEL and p = 0.001, caspase-3) and parietal cortex (p = 0.001, TUNEL and p = 0.002, caspase-3). We show that caffeine administration in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury reduces neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain. We suggest that caffeine may be effective in reducing brain injury.

  18. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  19. The fetal/neonatal mouse liver exhibits transcriptional features of the adult pancreas.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics through the expression of xenobiotic metabolism enxymes (XME). The fetus and neonate have been hypothesized to exhibit increased sensitivity to xenobiotic toxicity. T...

  20. An Anatomically Resolved Mouse Brain Proteome Reveals Parkinson Disease-relevant Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Yun; Choi, Jong Min; Rousseaux, Maxime W C; Malovannaya, Anna; Kim, Jean J; Kutzera, Joachim; Wang, Yi; Huang, Yin; Zhu, Weimin; Maity, Suman; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya; Qin, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present a mouse brain protein atlas that covers 17 surgically distinct neuroanatomical regions of the adult mouse brain, each less than 1 mm(3) in size. The protein expression levels are determined for 6,500 to 7,500 gene protein products from each region and over 12,000 gene protein products for the entire brain, documenting the physiological repertoire of mouse brain proteins in an anatomically resolved and comprehensive manner. We explored the utility of our spatially defined protein profiling methods in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. We compared the proteome from a vulnerable region (substantia nigra pars compacta) of wild type and parkinsonian mice with that of an adjacent, less vulnerable, region (ventral tegmental area) and identified several proteins that exhibited both spatiotemporal- and genotype-restricted changes. We validated the most robustly altered proteins using an alternative profiling method and found that these modifications may highlight potential new pathways for future studies. This proteomic atlas is a valuable resource that offers a practical framework for investigating the molecular intricacies of normal brain function as well as regional vulnerability in neurological diseases. All of the mouse regional proteome profiling data are published on line at http://mbpa.bprc.ac.cn/. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) reduces neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Mariya; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Fontana, Xavier; Thei, Laura; Buckle, Rheanan; Christou, Melina; Hompoonsup, Supanida; Gostelow, Naomi; Raivich, Gennadij; Peebles, Donald

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy and cognitive disabilities. Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) strongly up-regulates Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) in the immature brain. Our aim was to establish whether STAT3 up-regulation is associated with neonatal HI-brain damage and evaluate the phosphorylated STAT3-contribution from different cell types in eliciting damage. We subjected postnatal day seven mice to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 60 min hypoxia. Neuronal STAT3-deletion reduced cell death, tissue loss, microglial and astroglial activation in all brain regions. Astroglia-specific STAT3-deletion also reduced cell death, tissue loss and microglial activation, although not as strongly as the deletion in neurons. Systemic pre-insult STAT3-blockade at tyrosine 705 (Y705) with JAK2-inhibitor WP1066 reduced microglial and astroglial activation to a more moderate degree, but in a pattern similar to the one produced by the cell-specific deletions. Our results suggest that STAT3 is a crucial factor in neonatal HI-brain damage and its removal in neurons or astrocytes, and, to some extent, inhibition of its phosphorylation via JAK2-blockade reduces inflammation and tissue loss. Overall, the protective effects of STAT3 inactivation make it a possible target for a therapeutic strategy in neonatal HI. Current data show that neuronal and astroglial STAT3 molecules are involved in the pathways underlying cell death, tissue loss and gliosis following neonatal hypoxia-ischaemia, but differ with respect to the target of their effect. Y705-phosphorylation contributes to hypoxic-ischaemic histopathology. Protective effects of STAT3 inactivation make it a possible target for a therapeutic strategy in neonatal hypoxia-ischaemia. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for

  2. Effects of inter-alpha inhibitor proteins on neonatal brain injury: Age, task and treatment dependent neurobehavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Threlkeld, Steven W; Gaudet, Cynthia M; La Rue, Molly E; Dugas, Ethan; Hill, Courtney A; Lim, Yow-Pin; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is frequently associated with premature and/or full term birth related complications. HI injury often results in learning and processing deficits that reflect widespread damage to an extensive range of cortical and sub-cortical brain structures. Further, inflammation has been implicated in the long-term progression and severity of HI injury. Recently, inter-alpha inhibitor proteins (IAIPs) have been shown to attenuate inflammation in models of systemic infection. Importantly, preclinical studies of neonatal HI injury and neuroprotection often focus on single time windows of assessment or single behavioral domains. This approach limits translational validity, given evidence for a diverse spectrum of neurobehavioral deficits that may change across developmental windows following neonatal brain injury. Therefore, the aims of this research were to assess the effects of human IAIPs on early neocortical cell death (72h post-insult), adult regional brain volume measurements (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, corpus callosum) and long-term behavioral outcomes in juvenile (P38-50) and adult (P80+) periods across two independent learning domains (spatial and non-spatial learning), after postnatal day 7 HI injury in rats. Here, for the first time, we show that IAIPs reduce acute neocortical neuronal cell death and improve brain weight outcome 72h following HI injury in the neonatal rat. Further, these longitudinal studies are the first to show age, task and treatment dependent improvements in behavioral outcome for both spatial and non-spatial learning following systemic administration of IAIPs in neonatal HI injured rats. Finally, results also show sparing of brain regions critical for spatial and non-spatial learning in adult animals treated with IAIPs at the time of injury onset. These data support the proposal that inter-alpha inhibitor proteins may serve as novel therapeutics for brain injury associated with premature birth and

  3. Effects of Inter-Alpha Inhibitor Proteins on Neonatal Brain Injury: Age, Task and Treatment Dependent Neurobehavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Threlkeld, Steven W.; Gaudet, Cynthia M.; La Rue, Molly E.; Dugas, Ethan; Hill, Courtney A.; Lim, Yow-Pin; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is frequently associated with premature and/or full term birth related complications. HI injury often results in learning and processing deficits that reflect widespread damage to an extensive range of cortical and sub-cortical brain structures. Further, inflammation has been implicated in the long-term progression and severity of HI injury. Recently, Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins (IAIPs) have been shown to attenuate inflammation in models of systemic infection. Importantly, preclinical studies of neonatal HI injury and neuroprotection often focus on single time windows of assessment or single behavioral domains. This approach limits translational validity, given evidence for a diverse spectrum of neurobehavioral deficits that may change across developmental windows following neonatal brain injury. Therefore, the aims of this research were to assess the effects of human IAIPs on early neocortical cell death (72 hours post insult), adult regional brain volume measurements (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, corpus callosum) and long-term behavioral outcomes in juvenile (P38-50) and adult (P80+) periods across two independent learning domains (spatial and non-spatial learning), after postnatal day 7 HI injury in rats. Here, for the first time, we show that IAIPs reduce acute neocortical neuronal cell death and improve brain weight outcome 72 hours following HI injury in the neonatal rat. Further, these longitudinal studies are the first to show age, task and treatment dependent improvements in behavioral outcome for both spatial and non-spatial learning following systemic administration of IAIPs in neonatal HI injured rats. Finally, results also show sparing of brain regions critical for spatial and non-spatial learning in adult animals treated with IAIPs at the time of injury onset. These data support the proposal that Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins may serve as novel therapeutics for brain injury associated with premature

  4. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  5. OAT3-mediated extrusion of the 99mTc-ECD metabolite in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Okada, Maki; Odaka, Kenichi; Yui, Joji; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-01-01

    After administration of the 99mTc complex with N,N'-1,2-ethylenediylbis-L-cysteine diethyl ester (99mTc-ECD), a brain perfusion imaging agent, the radioactive metabolite is trapped in primate brain, but not in mouse and rat. Here, we investigate the involvement of metabolite extrusion by organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), which is highly expressed at the blood–brain barrier in mice, in this species difference. The efflux rate of radioactivity in the cerebrum of Oat3−/− mice at later phase was 20% of that of control mice. Thus, organic anion transporters in mouse brain would be involved in the low brain retention of radioactivity after 99mTc-ECD administration. PMID:24496177

  6. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains. PMID:23820224

  7. Micron-scale Resolution Optical Tomography of Entire Mouse Brains with Confocal Light Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Bria, Alessandro; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Peng, Hanchuan; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the architecture of mammalian brain at single-cell resolution is one of the key issues of neuroscience. However, mapping neuronal soma and projections throughout the whole brain is still challenging for imaging and data management technologies. Indeed, macroscopic volumes need to be reconstructed with high resolution and contrast in a reasonable time, producing datasets in the TeraByte range. We recently demonstrated an optical method (confocal light sheet microscopy, CLSM) capable of obtaining micron-scale reconstruction of entire mouse brains labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Combining light sheet illumination and confocal detection, CLSM allows deep imaging inside macroscopic cleared specimens with high contrast and speed. Here we describe the complete experimental pipeline to obtain comprehensive and human-readable images of entire mouse brains labeled with fluorescent proteins. The clearing and the mounting procedures are described, together with the steps to perform an optical tomography on its whole volume by acquiring many parallel adjacent stacks. We showed the usage of open-source custom-made software tools enabling stitching of the multiple stacks and multi-resolution data navigation. Finally, we illustrated some example of brain maps: the cerebellum from an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are selectively labeled, and the whole brain from a thy1-GFP-M mouse, characterized by a random sparse neuronal labeling. PMID:24145191

  8. Lycopene Protects against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury by Alleviating ER Stress Induced Apoptosis in Neonatal Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqian; Hu, Houxiang; Chen, Bin; Yue, Rongchuan; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Shuang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Huan; Yu, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced apoptosis plays a pivotal role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-injury. Inhibiting ER stress is a major therapeutic target/strategy in treating cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies revealed that lycopene exhibits great pharmacological potential in protecting against the I/R-injury in vitro and vivo, but whether attenuation of ER stress (and) or ER stress-induced apoptosis contributes to the effects remains unclear. In the present study, using neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to establish an in vitro model of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) to mimic myocardium I/R in vivo, we aimed to explore the hypothesis that lycopene could alleviate the ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis in H/R-injury. We observed that lycopene alleviated the H/R injury as revealed by improving cell viability and reducing apoptosis, suppressed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and improved the phosphorylated AMPK expression, attenuated ER stress as evidenced by decreasing the expression of GRP78, ATF6 mRNA, sXbp-1 mRNA, eIF2α mRNA and eIF2α phosphorylation, alleviated ER stress-induced apoptosis as manifested by reducing CHOP/GADD153 expression, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, caspase-12 and caspase-3 activity in H/R-treated cardiomyocytes. Thapsigargin (TG) is a potent ER stress inducer and used to elicit ER stress of cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that lycopene was able to prevent TG-induced ER stress as reflected by attenuating the protein expression of GRP78 and CHOP/GADD153 compared to TG group, significantly improve TG-caused a loss of cell viability and decrease apoptosis in TG-treated cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that the protective effects of lycopene on H/R-injury are, at least in part, through alleviating ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis in neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. PMID:26291709

  9. Learning and combining image neighborhoods using random forests for neonatal brain disease classification.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Veronika A; Glocker, Ben; Hahner, Nadine; Eixarch, Elisenda; Sanroma, Gerard; Gratacós, Eduard; Rueckert, Daniel; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel; Piella, Gemma

    2017-08-09

    It is challenging to characterize and classify normal and abnormal brain development during early childhood. To reduce the complexity of heterogeneous data population, manifold learning techniques are increasingly applied, which find a low-dimensional representation of the data, while preserving all relevant information. The neighborhood definition used for constructing manifold representations of the population is crucial for preserving the similarity structure and it is highly application dependent. The recently proposed neighborhood approximation forests learn a neighborhood structure in a dataset based on a user-defined distance. We propose a framework to learn multiple pairwise distances in a population of brain images and to combine them in an unsupervised manner optimally in a manifold learning step. Unlike other methods that only use a univariate distance measure, our method allows for a natural combination of multiple distances from heterogeneous sources. As a result, it yields a representation of the population that preserves the multiple distances. Furthermore, our method also selects the most predictive features associated with the distances. We evaluate our method in neonatal magnetic resonance images of three groups (term controls, patients affected by intrauterine growth restriction and mild isolated ventriculomegaly). We show that combining multiple distances related to the condition improves the overall characterization and classification of the three clinical groups compared to the use of single distances and classical unsupervised manifold learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  11. Deep convolutional neural networks for annotating gene expression patterns in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Rongjian; Mukkamala, Ravi; Ye, Jieping; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-05-07

    Profiling gene expression in brain structures at various spatial and temporal scales is essential to understanding how genes regulate the development of brain structures. The Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas provides high-resolution 3-D in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression patterns in multiple developing stages of the mouse brain. Currently, the ISH images are annotated with anatomical terms manually. In this paper, we propose a computational approach to annotate gene expression pattern images in the mouse brain at various structural levels over the course of development. We applied deep convolutional neural network that was trained on a large set of natural images to extract features from the ISH images of developing mouse brain. As a baseline representation, we applied invariant image feature descriptors to capture local statistics from ISH images and used the bag-of-words approach to build image-level representations. Both types of features from multiple ISH image sections of the entire brain were then combined to build 3-D, brain-wide gene expression representations. We employed regularized learning methods for discriminating gene expression patterns in different brain structures. Results show that our approach of using convolutional model as feature extractors achieved superior performance in annotating gene expression patterns at multiple levels of brain structures throughout four developing ages. Overall, we achieved average AUC of 0.894 ± 0.014, as compared with 0.820 ± 0.046 yielded by the bag-of-words approach. Deep convolutional neural network model trained on natural image sets and applied to gene expression pattern annotation tasks yielded superior performance, demonstrating its transfer learning property is applicable to such biological image sets.

  12. Aquaporin-4 expression contributes to decreases in brain water content during mouse postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumiao; Gao, Junying; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    The water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is implicated to facilitate water efflux from the brain parenchyma into the blood and CSF, playing a critical role in maintaining brain water homeostasis. Nevertheless, its contribution to decreases in brain water content during postnatal development remains unknown. A quantitative Western blot analysis was performed to investigate developmental expression of AQP4 in the whole mouse brain and showed that AQP4 expression level in 1 week-old brain was only 21.3% of that in the adult brain, but significantly increased to 67.4% of the adult level by 2 weeks after birth. Statistical analysis demonstrated that increased AQP4 expression partially relates to decreased brain water content in postnatal mice (r(2)=0.92 and P=0.002). Moreover, AQP4 null mice had greater brain water content than littermate controls from 2 weeks up to adult age. Consistently, mature pattern of AQP4 localization at the brain-blood and brain-CSF interfaces were completed at approximately at 2 weeks after birth. In addition, AQP4 expression in the brain stem and hypothalamus was earlier than that in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, suggesting a brain regional variation in developmental expression of AQP4. These results characterize the developmental feature of AQP4 expression in the postnatal brain and provide direct evidence for a role of AQP4 in postnatal brain water uptake.

  13. Developmental features of the neonatal brain: MR imaging. Part I. Gray-white matter differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Richardson, C J; Nicholas, D A; Mirfakhraee, M; Hayden, C K; Amparo, E G

    1987-01-01

    To establish the normal appearance of the neonatal brain, 51 neonates, 29-42 weeks postconception, underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a 0.6-T magnet in a prospective study. T1-weighted images were used to devise stages for the appearance of gray-white matter differentiation and extent of myelination. The results show that from 29 to 42 weeks postconception, changes in gray-white matter differentiation and myelination follow the stages in an orderly and predictable fashion. Changes in white matter intensity appear related to progressive decrease in brain water content. Myelination progresses cephalad from the brain stem at 29 weeks to reach the centrum semiovale by 42 weeks. Delayed myelination, defined as the absence of myelin in the corona radiata by 37 weeks, was seen in nine infants with complicated perinatal courses. Awareness of these developmental features should help to minimize misinterpretation of normal changes in the neonatal brain and lead to earlier detection of pathologic conditions, both with MR imaging and computed tomography.

  14. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  15. In vivo three-photon microscopy of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Nicholas G.; Wang, Ke; Kobat, Demirhan; Clark, Catharine G.; Wise, Frank W.; Schaffer, Chris B.; Xu, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy enables scientists in various fields including neuroscience, embryology and oncology to visualize in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissue. However, tissue scattering limits the maximum imaging depth of two-photon fluorescence microscopy to the cortical layer within mouse brain, and imaging subcortical structures currently requires the removal of overlying brain tissue or the insertion of optical probes. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive, high-resolution, in vivo imaging of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain using three-photon fluorescence microscopy at a spectral excitation window of 1,700 nm. Vascular structures as well as red fluorescent protein-labelled neurons within the mouse hippocampus are imaged. The combination of the long excitation wavelength and the higher-order nonlinear excitation overcomes the limitations of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, enabling biological investigations to take place at a greater depth within tissue.

  16. Long-term effect of neonatal inhibition of APP gamma-secretase on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Raspanti, Alessandra; Giacomini, Andrea; Guidi, Sandra; Emili, Marco; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giuliani, Alessandro; Bighinati, Andrea; Calzà, Laura; Magistretti, Jacopo; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2017-03-28

    Neurogenesis impairment is considered a major determinant of the intellectual disability that characterizes Down syndrome (DS), a genetic condition caused by triplication of chromosome 21. Previous evidence obtained in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS showed that the triplicated gene APP (amyloid precursor protein) is critically involved in neurogenesis alterations. In particular, excessive levels of AICD (amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain) resulting from APP cleavage by gamma-secretase increase the transcription of Ptch1, a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor that keeps the mitogenic Shh pathway repressed. Previous evidence showed that neonatal treatment with ELND006, an inhibitor of gamma-secretase, reinstates the Shh pathway and fully restores neurogenesis in Ts65Dn pups. In the framework of potential therapies for DS, it is extremely important to establish whether the positive effects of early intervention are retained after treatment cessation. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to establish whether early treatment with ELND006 leaves an enduring trace in the brain of Ts65Dn mice. Ts65Dn and euploid pups were treated with ELND006 in the postnatal period P3-P15 and the outcome of treatment was examined at ~one month after treatment cessation. We found that in treated Ts65Dn mice the pool of proliferating cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and total number of granule neurons were still restored as was the number of pre- and postsynaptic terminals in the stratum lucidum of CA3, the site of termination of the mossy fibers from the DG. Accordingly, patch-clamp recording from field CA3 showed functional normalization of the input to CA3. Unlike in field CA3, the number of pre- and postsynaptic terminals in the DG of treated Ts65Dn mice was no longer fully restored. The finding that many of the positive effects of neonatal treatment were retained after treatment cessation provides proof of principle demonstration of the efficacy of early

  17. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-10-26

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA.

  18. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  19. Bilateral changes after neonatal ischemia in the P7 rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Maria; Villapol, Sonia; Biran, Valérie; Goyenvalle, Catherine; Mariani, Jean; Renolleau, Sylvain; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane

    2007-06-01

    Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the rodent subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) and increases in the adult after brain injury. In this study, postnatal day 7 rats underwent middle cerebral artery electrocoagulation and transient homolateral common carotid artery occlusion, a lesioning protocol that resulted in ipsilateral (IL) forebrain ischemic injury, leading to a cortical cavity 3 weeks later. The effects of neonatal ischemia on hemispheric damage, cell death, cell proliferation, and neurogenesis were examined 4 hours to 6 weeks later by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay and immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 in proliferating cells and of doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein expressed only by immature neurons. Neonatal ischemic injury resulted in persistent reduced IL and transient reduced contralateral (CL) hemispheric areas, a consequence of sustained and transient cell death in the IL and CL areas, respectively. Ki-67 immunostaining revealed 3 peaks of newly generated cells in the dorsal SVZ and SGZ in the IL side and also in the CL side at 48 hours and 7 and 28 days after ischemia. Double immunofluorescence revealed that most of the Ki-67-positive cells were astrocytes at 48 hours. Ischemic injury also stimulated SVZ neurogenesis, based on increased doublecortin immunostaining in both SVZs at 7 to 14 days after injury. Doublecortin-positive neurons remained visible around the lesion at 21 days but displayed an immature shape in discrete chains or clusters. Although unilateral ischemic damage was produced, results indicate successful regenerative changes in the CL hemisphere, allowing anatomical recovery.

  20. Neonatal tissue injury reduces the intrinsic excitability of adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Baccei, M L

    2014-01-03

    Tissue damage during the neonatal period evokes long-lasting changes in nociceptive processing within the adult spinal cord which contribute to persistent alterations in pain sensitivity. However, it remains unclear if the observed modifications in neuronal activity within the mature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) following early injury reflect shifts in the intrinsic membrane properties of these cells. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to identify the effects of neonatal surgical injury on the intrinsic excitability of both GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic neurons within lamina II of the adult SDH using in vitro patch clamp recordings from spinal cord slices prepared from glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (Gad-GFP) mice. The results demonstrate that hindpaw surgical incision at postnatal day (P) 3 altered the passive membrane properties of both Gad-GFP and adjacent, non-GFP neurons in the mature SDH, as evidenced by decreased membrane resistance and more negative resting potentials in comparison to naïve littermate controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in the prevalence of spontaneous activity within the GABAergic population. Both Gad-GFP and non-GFP neurons displayed a significant elevation in rheobase and decreased instantaneous firing frequency after incision, suggesting that early tissue damage lowers the intrinsic membrane excitability of adult SDH neurons. Isolation of inward-rectifying K(+) (K(ir)) currents revealed that neonatal incision significantly increased K(ir) conductance near physiological membrane potentials in GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, lamina II neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that neonatal tissue injury causes a long-term dampening of intrinsic firing across the general population of lamina II interneurons, but the underlying ionic mechanisms may be cell-type specific. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.