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Sample records for neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone

  1. Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism by measurement of plasma thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, K D; Virdi, N K; Rayner, P H; Green, A

    1985-01-01

    Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism was introduced in the City of Birmingham in 1980 by measuring concentrations of both thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroxine in plasma. Over two years 30 108 babies were tested. Thirty one babies were recalled because of thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations greater than 40 mU/l, of whom 12 were treated with replacement thyroxine. Six babies were found to have low thyroxine concentrations because of reduced thyroxine binding globulin and five raised thyroxine values because of increased thyroxine binding globulin. As a result of this study screening was continued with measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone only as the primary test for congenital hypothyroidism, the thyroxine value being measured only when the concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone exceeded 20 mU/l. PMID:3926078

  2. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  3. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  4. Perinatal factors associated with neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal newborns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was to evaluate the effect of neonatal, maternal, and delivery factors on neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of healthy newborns. Methods Medical records of 705 healthy infants born through normal vaginal delivery were reviewed. Neonatal TSH levels obtained by neonatal screening tests were analyzed in relation to perinatal factors and any associations with free thyroxine (FT4) and 17-α hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) levels. Results An inverse relationship was found between TSH and sampling time after birth. Twin babies and neonates born by vacuum-assisted delivery had higher TSH levels than controls. First babies had higher TSH levels than subsequent babies. Birth weight, gestational age, maternal age and duration from the rupture of the membrane to birth were not related to neonatal TSH. There were no significant differences in TSH level according to sex, Apgar scores, labor induction, the presence of maternal disease and maternal medications. There was a positive association between TSH and 17OHP level but not between TSH and FT4 level. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that sampling time, mode of delivery, birth order, and 17OHP level were significant factors affecting neonatal TSH level. Conclusion Neonatal TSH levels of healthy normal newborns are related with multiple factors. Acute stress during delivery may influence the neonatal TSH level in early neonatal period. PMID:28164073

  5. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  6. Effect of maternal and neonatal factors on cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Sheetal G.; Sadanandan, Nidhish P.; Mehaboob, A. K.; Gopaliah, Lakshminarayana R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is most common preventable cause of mental retardation in children. Cord blood Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (CBTSH) level is an accepted screening tool for CH. Objectives: To study CBTSH profile in neonates born at tertiary care referral center and to analyze the influence of maternal and neonatal factors on their levels. Design: Cross retrospective sectional study. Methods: Study population included 979 neonates (males = 506 to females = 473). The CBTSH levels were estimated using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on Cobas analyzer. Kit based cut-offs of TSH level were used for analysis. All neonates with abnormal CBSTH levels, were started on levothyroxine supplementation 10 μg/Kg/day and TSH levels were reassessed as per departmental protocol. Results: The mean CBTSH was 7.82 μIU/mL (Range 0.112 to 81.4, SD = 5.48). The mean CBTSH level was significantly higher in first order neonates, neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, delivered at term or preterm, neonates with APGAR score <5 and those needing advanced resuscitation after birth. The CBTSH level >16.10 and <1.0 μIU/mL was found in 4.39 % and 1.02 % neonates respectively. The prevalence rate of CBTSH level >16.1 μIU/mL was significantly higher in neonates delivered by assisted vaginal delivery and normal delivery, term and preterm neonates, APAGR score of <5, presence of fetal distress, need for resuscitation beyond initial steps and in those with birth weight of <1.5 Kg. Three neonates were confirmed to have CH after retesting of TSH level. Conclusions: The CBTSH estimation is an easy, non-invasive method for screening for CH. The cutoff level of CB TSH (μIU/mL) >16.10 and <1.0 led to a recall of 5.41% of neonates which is practicable given the scenario in our Country. The mode of delivery and perinatal stress factors have a significant impact on CBTSH levels and any rise to be seen in the light of these factors. The prevalence

  7. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and psychomotor development at preschool age

    PubMed Central

    Trumpff, Caroline; De Schepper, Jean; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Vercruysse, Nathalie; Van Oyen, Herman; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Tafforeau, Jean; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development. The aim of this study is to assess if high concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) that is below the clinical threshold (5–15 mIU/L) at neonatal screening is linked to psychomotor development impairments in the offspring at preschool age. Design A total of 284 Belgian preschool children 4–6 years old and their mothers were included in the study. The children were randomly selected from the total list of neonates screened in 2008, 2009 and 2010 by the Brussels newborn screening centre. The sampling was stratified by gender and TSH range (0.45–15 mIU/L). Infants with congenital hypothyroidism (>15 mIU/L), low birth weight and/or prematurity were excluded. Psychomotor development was assessed using the Charlop-Atwell scale of motor coordination. The iodine status of children was determined using median urinary iodine concentration. Socioeconomic, parental and child potential confounding factors were measured through a self-administered questionnaire. Results TSH level was not significantly associated with total motor score (average change in z-score per unit increase in TSH is 0.02 (−0.03, 0.07), p=0.351), objective motor score (p=0.794) and subjective motor score (p=0.124). No significant associations were found using multivariate regression model to control confounding factors. Conclusions Mild thyroid dysfunction in the newborn—reflected by an elevation of TSH that is below the clinical threshold (5–15 mIU/L)—was not associated with impaired psychomotor development at preschool age. PMID:27402733

  8. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Concentration at Birth in Belgian Neonates and Cognitive Development at Preschool Age.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; De Schepper, Jean; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Vercruysse, Nathalie; Van Oyen, Herman; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Tafforeau, Jean; Vanderpas, Jean; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2015-11-02

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the effect of MID during late pregnancy, assessed by the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration at neonatal screening, on cognitive development of preschool children. A retrospective cohort study including 311 Belgian preschool children of 4-6 years old was conducted. Children were selected at random from the total list of neonates screened in 2008, 2009, and 2010 by the Brussels new-born screening center. Infants with congenital hypothyroidism, low birth weight, and/or prematurity were excluded from the selection. The selected children were stratified by gender and TSH-range (0.45-15 mIU/L). Cognitive abilities were assessed using Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-third edition. In addition, several socioeconomic, parental, and child confounding factors were assessed. Neonatal TSH concentration-a surrogate marker for MID-was not associated with Full Scale and Performance IQ scores in children. Lower Verbal IQ scores were found in children with neonatal TSH values comprised between 10-15 mIU/L compared to lower TSH levels in univariate analysis but these results did not hold when adjusting for confounding factors. Current levels of iodine deficiency among pregnant Belgian women may not be severe enough to affect the neurodevelopment of preschool children.

  9. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Concentration at Birth in Belgian Neonates and Cognitive Development at Preschool Age

    PubMed Central

    Trumpff, Caroline; De Schepper, Jean; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Vercruysse, Nathalie; Van Oyen, Herman; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Tafforeau, Jean; Vanderpas, Jean; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the effect of MID during late pregnancy, assessed by the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration at neonatal screening, on cognitive development of preschool children. A retrospective cohort study including 311 Belgian preschool children of 4–6 years old was conducted. Children were selected at random from the total list of neonates screened in 2008, 2009, and 2010 by the Brussels new-born screening center. Infants with congenital hypothyroidism, low birth weight, and/or prematurity were excluded from the selection. The selected children were stratified by gender and TSH-range (0.45–15 mIU/L). Cognitive abilities were assessed using Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence—third edition. In addition, several socioeconomic, parental, and child confounding factors were assessed. Neonatal TSH concentration—a surrogate marker for MID—was not associated with Full Scale and Performance IQ scores in children. Lower Verbal IQ scores were found in children with neonatal TSH values comprised between 10–15 mIU/L compared to lower TSH levels in univariate analysis but these results did not hold when adjusting for confounding factors. Current levels of iodine deficiency among pregnant Belgian women may not be severe enough to affect the neurodevelopment of preschool children. PMID:26540070

  10. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  15. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  16. Association of thyroid-stimulating hormone with insulin resistance and androgen parameters in women with PCOS.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ralf; Kajaia, Natia; Cupisti, Susanne; Hoffmann, Inge; Beckmann, Matthias W; Mueller, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    There is a relationship between thyroid function and insulin sensitivity and alterations in lipids and metabolic parameters. Little information is available regarding this relationship in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. However all those pathologies are also described as often affecting women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The association between thyroid-stimulating hormone <2.5 mIU/l and > or =2.5 mIU/l with insulin resistance and endocrine parameters in 103 women with polycystic ovary syndrome was studied. Clinical, metabolic and endocrine parameters were obtained and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed with calculation of insulin resistance indices. Women with thyroid-stimulating hormone > or =2.5 mIU/l had a significantly higher body mass index (P = 0.003), higher fasting insulin concentrations (P = 0.02) and altered insulin resistance indices (P = 0.007), higher total testosterone (P = 0.009) and free androgen indices (P = 0.001) and decreased sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.01) in comparison with women with thyroid-stimulating hormone <2.5 mIU/l. Generally, all of these parameters correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with thyroid-stimulating hormone only in women with thyroid-stimulating hormone > or =2.5 mIU/l. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome and with thyroid-stimulating hormone > or =2.5 mIU/l had significantly altered endocrine and metabolic changes.

  17. Thyroid stimulating hormone increases hepatic gluconeogenesis via CRTC2.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujie; Wang, Laicheng; Zhou, Lingyan; Song, Yongfeng; Ma, Shizhan; Yu, Chunxiao; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Chao; Gao, Ling

    2017-02-15

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is positively correlated with abnormal glucose levels. We previously reported that TSH has direct effects on gluconeogenesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we observed increased fasting blood glucose and glucose production in a mouse model of subclinical hypothyroidism (only elevated TSH levels). TSH acts via the classical cAMP/PKA pathway and CRTC2 regulates glucose homeostasis. Thus, we explore whether CRTC2 is involved in the process of TSH-induced gluconeogenesis. We show that TSH increases CRTC2 expression via the TSHR/cAMP/PKA pathway, which in turn upregulates hepatic gluconeogenic genes. Furthermore, TSH stimulates CRTC2 dephosphorylation and upregulates p-CREB (Ser133) in HepG2 cells. Silencing CRTC2 and CREB decreases the effect of TSH on PEPCK-luciferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Finally, the deletion of TSHR reduces the levels of the CRTC2:CREB complex in mouse livers. This study demonstrates that TSH activates CRTC2 via the TSHR/cAMP/PKA pathway, leading to the formation of a CRTC2:CREB complex and increases hepatic gluconeogenesis.

  18. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting ectopic pituitary adenoma of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Nishiike, Suetaka; Tatsumi, Ke-ita; Shikina, Takashi; Masumura, Chisako; Inohara, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting ectopic pituitary adenoma of the nasopharynx is highly unusual, with only three reported cases in the world literature. We describe the clinical presentation and radiologic findings in one patient with such rare lesions. A 46-year-old male with typical symptoms of Grave's disease was found to have a mass on magnetic resonance imaging. An otolaryngologic examination revealed a nasopharyngeal mass lesion, which was endoscopically resected. The results of immunohistochemical staining for thyroid-stimulating hormone were positive. After the resection, the patient's TSH was within normal limits. The clinical significance of the case and a brief literature review are presented.

  19. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced in the pituitary that stimulates the thyroid gland to grow and produce thyroid hormone (TH). The concentration of TH controls developmental changes that take place in a wide variety of organisms. Many use the metaphoric ch...

  20. Control of pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones during Xenopus metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robin M; Thoemke, Kara R; Korte, Joseph J; Moen, Scott M; Olson, Jessica M; Korte, Lisa; Tietge, Joseph E; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2011-09-15

    We used ex vivo and in vivo experiments with Xenopus laevis tadpoles to examine the hypothesis that the set-point for negative feedback on pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones (THs) increases as metamorphosis progresses to allow for the previously documented concomitant increase in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during this transformative process. First, pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were cultured for up to 96 h to characterize the ability of pituitary explants to synthesize and secrete TSHβ in the absence of hypothalamic and circulating hormones. Next, pituitary explants from tadpoles NF stages 54-66 were exposed to physiologically-relevant concentrations of THs to determine whether stage-specific differences exist in pituitary sensitivity to negative feedback by THs. Finally, in vivo exposures of tadpoles to THs were conducted to confirm the results of the ex vivo experiments. When pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were removed from the influence of endogenous hormones, TSHβ mRNA expression increased late or not at all whereas the rate of TSHβ secreted into media increased dramatically, suggesting that TSH secretion, but not TSH mRNA expression, is under the negative regulation of an endogenous signal during the climactic stages of metamorphosis. Pituitaries from pre- and prometamorphic tadpoles were more sensitive to TH-induced inhibition of TSHβ mRNA expression and secretion than pituitaries from climactic tadpoles. The observed decrease in sensitivity of pituitary TSHβ mRNA expression to negative feedback by THs from premetamorphosis to metamorphic climax was confirmed by in vivo experiments in which tadpoles were reared in water containing THs. Based on the results of this study, a model is proposed to explain the seemingly paradoxical, concurrent rise in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during metamorphosis in larval anurans.

  1. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  2. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, S. W.; Akintola, A. A.; Roelfsema, F.; van der Spoel, E.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Ballieux, B. E.; Egri, P.; Kvarta-Papp, Z.; Gereben, B.; Fekete, C.; Slagboom, P. E.; van der Grond, J.; Demeneix, B. A.; Pijl, H.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism. PMID:26089239

  3. The Synthesis and Evaluation of Dihydroquinazolin-4-ones and Quinazolin-4-ones as Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Erika E.; Neumann, Susanne; Eliseeva, Elena; McCoy, Joshua G.; Titus, Steven; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Shin, Paul; Leister, William; Thomas, Craig J.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2011-01-01

    We herein describe the rapid synthesis of a diverse set of dihydroquinazolin-4-ones and quinazolin-4-ones, their biological evaluation as thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) agonists, and SAR analysis. Among the compounds screened, 8b was 60-fold more potent than the hit compound 1a, which was identified from a high throughput screen of over 73,000 compounds. PMID:22408719

  4. Targeting the thyroid gland with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-nanoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Cosco, Donato; Gaspari, Marco; Celano, Marilena; Wolfram, Joy; Voce, Pasquale; Puxeddu, Efisio; Filetti, Sebastiano; Celia, Christian; Ferrari, Mauro; Russo, Diego; Fresta, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Various tissue-specific antibodies have been attached to nanoparticles to obtain targeted delivery. In particular, nanodelivery systems with selectivity for breast, prostate and cancer tissue have been developed. Here, we have developed a nanodelivery system that targets the thyroid gland. Nanoliposomes have been conjugated to the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which binds to the TSH receptor (TSHr) on the surface of thyrocytes. The results indicate that the intracellular uptake of TSH-nanoliposomes is increased in cells expressing the TSHr. The accumulation of targeted nanoliposomes in the thyroid gland following intravenous injection was 3.5-fold higher in comparison to untargeted nanoliposomes. Furthermore, TSH-nanoliposomes encapsulated with gemcitabine showed improved anticancer efficacy in vitro and in a tumor model of follicular thyroid carcinoma. This drug delivery system could be used for the treatment of a broad spectrum of thyroid diseases to reduce side effects and improve therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  6. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone and Insulin Resistance: Their Association with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome without Overt Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Piccolo, Vanessa Berini; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Garmes, Heraldo

    2017-04-11

    Objective This study analyzed the effectiveness of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) as a predictor of insulin resistance (IR) and its association with the clinical and metabolic parameters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) without overt hypothyroidism. Study Design A cross-sectional study was performed. Women with PCOS and without overt hypothyroidism (n = 168) were included. Methods Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cut-off point for TSH that would maximize sensitivity and specificity for a diagnosis of IR using homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) ≥ 2.71. Clinical and metabolic parameters were compared as a function of the TSH cut-off limit and the presence of IR. Results Thyroid-stimulating hormone ≥ 2.77 mIU/L was associated with a diagnosis of IR, with sensitivity of 47.9% and specificity of 65.3%. There were no differences in clinical, hormonal or metabolic parameters between TSH < 2.77 and TSH of 2.77 - 10 mIU/L. Conclusion In women with PCOS without overt hypothyroidism, TSH ≥ 2.77 mIU/L is associated with IR; however, with poor sensibility, showing TSH to be a poor predictor of IR in this population. No clinical or metabolic alterations were found that would justify a change in clinical management. Thus, the IR should be investigated in all women with PCOS irrespective of TSH level.

  7. Measurement of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins using a novel thyroid stimulating hormone receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein, (GNAS) fusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Pierce, M; Sandrock, R; Gillespie, G; Meikle, A W

    2012-11-01

    Hyperthyroidism, defined by overproduction of thyroid hormones, has a 2-3% prevalence in the population. The most common form of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. A diagnostic biomarker for Graves' disease is the presence of immunoglobulins which bind to, and stimulate, the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). We hypothesized that the ectopically expressed TSHR gene in a thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) assay could be engineered to increase the accumulation of the GPCR pathway second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), the molecule measured in the assay as a marker for pathway activation. An ectopically expressing TSHR-mutant guanine nucleotide-binding protein, (GNAS) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clone was constructed using standard molecular biology techniques. After incubation of the new clone with sera containing various levels of TSI, GPCR pathway activation was then quantified by measuring cAMP accumulation in the clone. The clone, together with a NaCl-free cell assay buffer containing 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG)6000, was tested against 56 Graves' patients, 27 toxic thyroid nodule patients and 119 normal patients. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, when comparing normal with Graves' sera, the assay yielded a sensitivity of 93%, a specificity of 99% and an efficiency of 98%. Total complex precision (within-run, across runs and across days), presented as a percentage coefficient of variation, was found to be 7·8, 8·7 and 7·6% for low, medium and high TSI responding serum, respectively. We conclude that the performance of the new TSI assay provides sensitive detection of TSI, allowing for accurate, early detection of Graves' disease.

  8. Sensitive and specific immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for human thyroid stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Piaditis, G.P.; Hodgkinson, S.C.; McLean, C.; Lowry, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A liquid phase ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) specific for human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH) is described. The assay is based on the simultaneous addition of affinity purified sheep anti hTSH IgG- SVI and rabbit anti hTSH antiserum to standards and unknowns followed by 4h incubation at room temperature. The separation of free labelled sheep IgG- SVI from that bound to hTSH is achieved by the addition of sheep anti-rabbit IgG Fc fragment antiserum. The radiolabelled sheep anti-hTSH IgG- SVI was pretreated with solid phase urinary postmenopausal gonadotropins to remove cross reaction with FSH and LH. The assay is specific for hTSH and no cross reaction with the other anterior pituitary glycoproteins or protein hormones has been found. In addition it is characterized by a wide operating range, rapid equilibration of reactants and high sensitivity. The precision of dose estimates was less than 10% between 0.25-2.5 microU/ml and less than 2.5% over the range 2.5-60 microU/ml.

  9. Thyroid-stimulating hormone, 5-HTTLPR genotype, and antidepressant response in depressed women.

    PubMed

    Gressier, Florence; Trabado, Séverine; Verstuyft, Céline; Bouaziz, Elodie; Hardy, Patrick; Fève, Bruno; Becquemont, Laurent; Corruble, Emmanuelle

    2011-10-01

    Basal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels may predict antidepressant efficacy in patients with major depressive episodes (MDE), but data are inconsistent. As the SS genotype of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism has been associated with a lower antidepressant efficacy in women with MDE, we aimed at assessing the relationship between normal basal TSH, 5-HTTLPR, and antidepressant efficacy in women. A total of 71 women and 28 men, with normal baseline TSH serum levels, hospitalized for a MDE, were assessed for 5-HTTLPR genotypes and prospectively followed for short-term antidepressant efficacy. Women with SS genotype had higher TSH levels (P=0.002) and a worse antidepressant response (P=0.046) than the women with LL/LS genotype, whereas no significant difference was shown in men. In multivariate analyses, antidepressant response in women was explained by TSH and 5-HTTLPR, but not by other variables. Further research is needed to understand the underlying mechanism explaining interactions between sex, TSH, and serotonergic function.

  10. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  11. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increases active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Neil; Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; McCuistion, Caroline Gibbs; Fenton, Mike S; Gin, Eric; Salem, Andrew; Hershman, Jerome M

    2008-04-01

    Perchlorate blocks thyroidal iodide transport in a dose-dependent manner. The human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) has a 30-fold higher affinity for perchlorate than for iodide. However, active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells has not previously been demonstrated by direct measurement techniques. To demonstrate intracellular perchlorate accumulation, we incubated NIS-expressing FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in various concentrations of perchlorate, and we used a sensitive ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to measure perchlorate accumulation in the cells. Perchlorate caused a dose-related inhibition of 125-iodide uptake at 1-10 microM. The perchlorate content from cell lysate was analyzed, showing a higher amount of perchlorate in cells that were incubated in medium with higher perchlorate concentration. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increased perchlorate uptake in a dose-related manner, thus supporting the hypothesis that perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells. Incubation with nonradiolabeled iodide led to a dose-related reduction of intracellular accumulation of perchlorate. To determine potential toxicity of perchlorate, the cells were incubated in 1 nM to 100 microM perchlorate and cell proliferation was measured. Even the highest concentration of perchlorate (100 microM) did not inhibit cell proliferation after 72 h of incubation. In conclusion, perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells and does not inhibit cell proliferation.

  12. Thyroid-stimulating hormone maintains bone mass and strength by suppressing osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Yanling; Liu, Yuantao; Wang, Jie; Gao, Ling; Yu, Chunxiao; Yan, Huili; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Jin

    2014-04-11

    It has been suggested that pituitary hormone might be associated with bone metabolism. To investigate the role of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in bone metabolism, we designed the present study as follows. After weaning, TSH receptor (TSHR) null mice (Tshr(-/-)) were randomly divided into a thyroxine treatment group (n=10) or non-treatment group (n=10); the treatment group received a dose of desiccated thyroid extract at 100 ppm daily for 5 weeks. Age-matched wild-type (Tshr(+/+), n=10) and heterozygote mice (Tshr(+/-), n=10) served as controls. After 5 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the femurs were collected for histomorphometrical and biomechanical analyses. In addition, the effect of TSH on osteoclastogenesis was examined in the RAW264.7 osteoclast cell line. We found that compared with Tshr(+/+) mice, Tshr(-/-) and Tshr(+/-) mice had lower bone strength. The histomorphometric results showed that trabecular bone volume, osteoid surface, osteoid thickness and osteoblast surface were significantly decreased, whereas the osteoclast surface was significantly increased in both Tshr(-/-) and Tshr(+/-) mice compared with Tshr(+/+) mice. Bone resorption and formation in Tshr(-/-) mice were further enhanced by thyroxine replacement. bTSH inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro, as demonstrated by reduced development of TRAP-positive cells and down-regulation of differentiation markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, matrix metallo-proteinase-9 and cathepsin K in RAW264.7 cells. Our results confirm that TSH increased bone volume and improved bone microarchitecture and strength at least partly by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis.

  13. Screening for thyroid disease in a primary care unit with a thyroid stimulating hormone assay with a low detection limit.

    PubMed Central

    Eggertsen, R.; Petersen, K.; Lundberg, P. A.; Nyström, E.; Lindstedt, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a study at a primary care centre in a predominantly rural area of Sweden the records of all patients with established thyroid disease were scrutinised and 2000 consecutive adult patients screened with an immunoenzymometric thyroid stimulating hormone assay. The aims of the study were fourfold: firstly, to assess the total burden of thyroid disease in primary care centres in Sweden; secondly, to assess the efficacy of clinical diagnosis of the disease in unselected populations of patients; thirdly, to assess the efficacy of clinical evaluation of treatment with thyroxine; and, lastly, to see whether a single analysis of the serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration by recent methods would be enough to identify an abnormality of thyroid function. Of the roughly 17,400 adults in the study community, 111 women and 10 men were being treated for thyroid disease. Screening detected 68 patients (3.5%) not receiving thyroxine who had a serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less, all of whom were followed up clinically. Fifty of these patients were also studied biochemically during follow up. Only nine of the 68 patients had thyroid disease (three with thyrotoxicosis requiring treatment), no evidence of the disease being found in the remainder. Sixteen patients had spontaneous hypothyroidism requiring treatment, and neither these nor three patients with thyrotoxicosis had been detected at the preceding clinical examination. Of 35 patients in whom thyroid disease was suspected clinically at screening, none had laboratory evidence of thyroid dysfunction. In this series 1.3% of all women in the study community (2.6% of all 50-59 year olds) and 0.1% of the men were being treated for thyroid disease at the primary care centre, roughly 1.0% of adults subjected to screening were found to have thyroid disease requiring treatment, and most patients with a thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less did not have thyroid dysfunction

  14. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  15. The application of NIR Raman spectroscopy in the assessment of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Gutiérrez, C.; Quintanar, J. Luis; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Sato-Berrú, R.

    2005-01-01

    Serum blood samples of euthyroid and thyroidectomized rats treated with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were analyzed on aluminum substrates using the near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (830 nm). Spectra of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), TRH and prolactin standards were obtained. Differences between Raman spectra profiles of control and Tx+TRH samples groups were found. These differences were confirmed by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), which presents a good classification between groups. It is supposed that these differences are produced by the increment of TSH in the thyroidectomized rats.

  16. The application of NIR Raman spectroscopy in the assessment of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone in rats.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gutiérrez, C; Quintanar, J Luis; Frausto-Reyes, C; Sato-Berrú, R

    2005-01-01

    Serum blood samples of euthyroid and thyroidectomized rats treated with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were analyzed on aluminum substrates using the near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (830 nm). Spectra of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), TRH and prolactin standards were obtained. Differences between Raman spectra profiles of control and Tx + TRH samples groups were found. These differences were confirmed by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), which presents a good classification between groups. It is supposed that these differences are produced by the increment of TSH in the thyroidectomized rats.

  17. Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels in patients with gout treated with inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Atxotegi, Joana; Urionagüena, Irati; Herrero-Beites, Ana Maria; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles

    2015-11-01

    Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels over the upper normal limit has been reported in a small percentage of patients treated with febuxostat in clinical trials, but a mechanistic explanation is not yet available. In an observational parallel longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated changes in TSH levels in patients with gout at baseline and during urate-lowering treatment with febuxostat. Patients to be started on allopurinol who had a measurement of TSH in the 6-month period prior to baseline evaluation were used for comparison. TSH levels and change in TSH levels at 12-month follow-up were compared between groups. Patients with abnormal TSH levels or previous thyroid disease or on amiodarone were not included for analysis. Eighty-eight patients treated with febuxostat and 87 with allopurinol were available for comparisons. Patients to be treated with febuxostat had higher urate levels and TSH levels, more severe gout, and poorer renal function, but were similar regarding other characteristics. A similar rise in TSH levels was observed in both groups (0.4 and 0.5 µUI/mL for febuxostat and allopurinol, respectively); at 12-mo, 7/88 (7.9 %) of patients on febuxostat and 4/87 (3.4 %) of patients on allopurinol showed TSH levels over 0.5 µUI/mL. Doses prescribed (corrected for estimated glomerular filtration rate in the case if patients on allopurinol) and baseline TSH levels were determinants of TSH levels at 12-month follow-up. No impact on free T4 (fT4) levels was observed. Febuxostat, but also allopurinol, increased TSH levels in a dose-dependent way, thus suggesting rather a class effect than a drug effect, but with no apparent impact on either clinical or fT4 levels.

  18. Serum Spot 14 concentration is negatively associated with thyroid-stimulating hormone level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Chen, Pei-Lung; Chi, Yu-Chao; Han, Der-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spot 14 (S14) is a protein involved in fatty acid synthesis and was shown to be induced by thyroid hormone in rat liver. However, the presence of S14 in human serum and its relations with thyroid function status have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to compare serum S14 concentrations in patients with hyperthyroidism or euthyroidism and to evaluate the associations between serum S14 and free thyroxine (fT4) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. We set up an immunoassay for human serum S14 concentrations and compared its levels between hyperthyroid and euthyroid subjects. Twenty-six hyperthyroid patients and 29 euthyroid individuals were recruited. Data of all patients were pooled for the analysis of the associations between the levels of S14 and fT4, TSH, or quartile of TSH. The hyperthyroid patients had significantly higher serum S14 levels than the euthyroid subjects (median [Q1, Q3]: 975 [669, 1612] ng/mL vs 436 [347, 638] ng/mL, P < 0.001). In univariate linear regression, the log-transformed S14 level (logS14) was positively associated with fT4 but negatively associated with creatinine (Cre), total cholesterol (T-C), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and TSH. The positive associations between logS14 and fT4 and the negative associations between logS14 and Cre, TG, T-C, or TSH remained significant after adjustment with sex and age. These associations were prominent in females but not in males. The logS14 levels were negatively associated with the TSH levels grouped by quartile (ß = −0.3020, P < 0.001). The association between logS14 and TSH quartile persisted after adjustment with sex and age (ß = −0.2828, P = 0.001). In stepwise multivariate regression analysis, only TSH grouped by quartile remained significantly associated with logS14 level. We developed an ELISA to measure serum S14 levels in human. Female patients with hyperthyroidism had higher serum S14 levels

  19. Melatonin in the thyroid gland: regulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone and role in thyroglobulin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marin, R; Fernandez-Santos, J M; Morillo-Bernal, J; Gordillo-Martinez, F; Vazquez-Roman, V; Utrilla, J C; Carrillo-Vico, A; Guerrero, J M; Martin-Lacave, I

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine with multiple functions in both plant and animal species. In addition to data in literature describing many other important roles for melatonin, such as antioxidant, circadian rhythm controlling, anti-aging, antiproliferative or immunomodulatory activities, our group recently reported that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin and suggested a paracrine role for this molecule in the regulation of thyroid activity. To discern the role played by melatonin at thyroid level and its involvement in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, in the present study we have analyzed the effect of thyrotropin in the regulation of the enzymatic machinery for melatonin biosynthesis in C cells as well as the effect of melatonin in the regulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis in thyrocytes. Our results show that the key enzymes for melatonin biosynthesis (AANAT and ASMT) are regulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone. Furthermore, exogenous melatonin increases thyroglobulin expression at mRNA and protein levels on cultured thyrocytes and this effect is not strictly mediated by the upregulation of TTF1 or, noteworthy, PAX8 transcription factors. The present data show that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin under thyroid-stimulating hormone control and, consistently with previous data, support the hypothesis of a paracrine role for C-cell-synthesised melatonin within the thyroid gland. Additionally, in the present study we show evidence for the involvement of melatonin in thyroid function by directly-regulating thyroglobulin gene expression in follicular cells.

  20. Near-lethal respiratory failure after recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone use in a patient with metastatic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Thomas; Ioffe, Vladimir; Tuttle, Michael; Bowers, John T; Mason, M Elizabeth

    2003-08-01

    A patient with widely metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer who had been heavily pretreated with (131)I was given recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) prior to (131)I treatment. Clinical and physical data from both this case and the literature suggest that the recombinant hormone, not the (131)I, may have caused a significant portion of the tumor swelling, which in turn was the most likely cause of the patient's symptoms. The potential effect of (131)I-induced tumor swelling and direct radiation effect on the lung is also analyzed. We review the potential hazards associated with rhTSH in patients with metastasis and propose means of minimizing this risk.

  1. Diagnosis and discrimination of autoimmune Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease using thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-containing recombinant proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Hideaki; Imamura, Koji; Morino, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland caused by autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Currently, the diagnostic test for TSHR autoantibodies is based on an indirect competitive binding assay that measures the ability of TSHR autoantibodies to inhibit the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to TSHR. Here, we have developed a specific and direct diagnostic method for autoantibodies in GD that incorporates immobilized TSHR-containing recombinant proteoliposomes into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To reduce non-specific binding of autoantibodies to recombinant proteoliposomes, we investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid on the binding of commercially available anti-TSHR antibodies (aTSHRAb). The incorporation of PEG-lipids into liposomes decreased non-specific binding, as compared to liposomes that did not contain PEG-lipids, and the addition of blocking reagents further decreased non-specific reactivity. aTSHRAb exhibited higher reactivity towards PEG-modified TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes than PEG-modified liposomes without TSHR (bare liposomes). Importantly, serum autoantibodies from patients with GD, which is associated with hyperthyroidism, exhibited remarkably specific binding to TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes. Serum autoantibodies from patients with Hashimoto's disease (HD), which is associated with hypothyroidism, also reacted specifically with proteoliposomal TSHR. These results suggest that immobilized TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes can serve as a direct diagnostic test for GD and HD. Furthermore, given that there is no competition test currently available for detecting autoantibodies in HD, the combination of TSHR recombinant proteoliposome ELISA and indirect competitive TSHR binding assay might be an effective way to discriminate between GD and HD.

  2. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Suppression for Protection Against Hypothyroidism Due to Craniospinal Irradiation for Childhood Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura Gandola, Lorenza; Collini, Paola; Seregni, Ettore; Marchiano, Alfonso; Serra, Annalisa; Pignoli, Emanuele Ph.D.; Spreafico, Filippo; Pallotti, Federica; Terenziani, Monica; Biassoni, Veronica; Bombardieri, Emilio; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Hypothyroidism is one of the earliest endocrine effects of craniospinal irradiation (CSI). The effects of radiation also depend on circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which acts as an indicator of thyrocyte function and is the most sensitive marker of thyroid damage. Hence, our study was launched in 1998 to evaluate the protective effect of TSH suppression during CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Patients and Methods: From Jan 1998 to Feb 2001, a total of 37 euthyroid children scheduled for CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor underwent thyroid ultrasound and free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH evaluation at the beginning and end of CSI. From 14 days before and up to the end of CSI, patients were administered L-thyroxine at suppressive doses; every 3 days, TSH suppression was checked to ensure a value <0.3 {mu}M/ml. During follow-up, blood tests and ultrasound were repeated after 1 year; primary hypothyroidism was considered an increased TSH level greater than normal range. CSI was done using a hyperfractionated accelerated technique with total doses ranging from 20.8-39 Gy; models were used to evaluate doses received by the thyroid bed. Results: Of 37 patients, 25 were alive a median 7 years after CSI. They were well matched for all clinical features, except that eight children underwent adequate TSH suppression during CSI, whereas 17 did not. Hypothyroidism-free survival rates were 70% for the 'adequately TSH-suppressed' group and 20% for the 'inadequately TSH-suppressed' group (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression with L-thyroxine had a protective effect on thyroid function at long-term follow-up. This is the first demonstration that transient endocrine suppression of thyroid activity may protect against radiation-induced functional damage.

  3. [Congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Yanaka, K; Tomono, Y; Kamezaki, T; Kujiraoka, Y; Nose, T

    2001-08-01

    A 42-year-old man and a 31-year-old man with congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma were reported. Heart failure was improved after transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma in each patient. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of TSH causes hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormone acts directly on cardiac muscle to increase the stroke volume. Hyperthyroidism itself reduces the peripheral vascular resistance and an elevated basal metabolism which is the basic physiologic change in hyperthyroidism dilates small vessels and reduces vascular resistance. The reduced vascular resistance contributes to increase stroke volume. Thyroid hormone also acts directly on the cardiac pacemakers to be apt to cause tachycardiac atrial fibrillation. These mechanical changes in hyperthyroidism increase not only the cardiac output but also the venous return. The increased blood volume and the shortened ventricular filling time due to tachycardia result in congestive heart failure. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma is a rare tumor, however heart failure is common disease. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma should be taken into consideration in patients with heart failure. The presented cases were very enlightening to understand the relation between brain tumor and heart disease.

  4. A novel thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit isoform in human pituitary, peripheral blood leukocytes, and thyroid.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy S; Klein, John R

    2009-07-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the anterior pituitary and is used to regulate thyroid hormone output, which in turn controls metabolic activity. Currently, the pituitary is believed to be the only source of TSH used by the thyroid. Recent studies in mice from our laboratory have identified a TSHbeta isoform that is expressed in the pituitary, in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), and in the thyroid. To determine whether a human TSHbeta splice variant exists that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, and whether the pattern of expression of the splice variant is similar to that observed in mice, PCR amplification of RNAs from pituitary, thyroid, PBL, and bone marrow was done by reverse-transcriptase PCR and quantitative realtime PCR. Human pituitary expressed a TSHbeta isoform that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, consisting of a 27 nucleotide portion of intron 2 and all of exon 3, coding for 71.2% of the native human TSHbeta polypeptide. Of particular interest, the TSHbeta splice variant was expressed at significantly higher levels than the native form or TSHbeta in PBL and the thyroid. The TSHalpha gene also was expressed in the pituitary, thyroid, and PBL, but not the BM, suggesting that the TSHbeta polypeptide in the thyroid and PBL may exist as a dimer with TSHalpha. These findings identify an unknown splice variant of human TSHbeta. They also have implications for immune-endocrine interactions in the thyroid and for understanding autoimmune thyroid disease from a new perspective.

  5. Functional Expression of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor on Nano-Sized Bacterial Magnetic Particles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Sugamata, Yasuhiro; Uchiyama, Ryo; Honda, Toru; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of autoantibodies to thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is important for the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease such as Graves’ disease (GD). Although TSHR from porcine thyroid membrane is commonly used for the measurement of TSHR autoantibodies (TRAb), recombinant human TSHR (hTSHR) remains ideal in terms of stable supply and species identity. Here we set out to express recombinant hTSHR on the lipid-bilayer surface of magnetic nanoparticles from a magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Using a tetracycline-inducible expression system, we successfully overexpressed functional hTSHR on bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) in AMB-1 via an anchor protein specific for BacMPs. The overexpressed hTSHR was membrane integrated and possessed both ligand and autoantibody binding activity. Our data suggest that hTSHR-displayed BacMPs have potential as novel tools for ligand-receptor interaction analysis or for TRAb immunoassay in GD patients. PMID:23852019

  6. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information.

  7. Wide-range quantification of human thyroid-stimulating hormone using gold-nanopatterned single-molecule sandwich immunoassay chip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Kang, Seong Ho

    2012-09-15

    We performed wide-range quantification of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (hTSH) using a gold nano-patterned sandwich immunoassay chip. Objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to detect hTSH at the single-molecule level. A gold spot with a diameter of 100 nm on a 10-mm square glass substrate was fabricated by electron beam nanolithography. When hTSH bound to antibodies conjugated to each 100-nm gold spot, there was an increase in the relative fluorescent intensity (RFI). The detection limit of this "TSH-nanoarray chip" was 360 zM (equivalent to five molecules), which demonstrated that a TSH-nanoarray chip could be used for detection at the single-molecule level. A linear response was observed over a wide dynamic range (from 360 zM to 36 pM, R=0.9812) without a fluorescence quenching effect. A significant enhancement in the sensitivity (~12,000-fold) was achieved with the 100-nm gold nano-patterned chip compared with results obtained using a traditional chemiluminescence immunoassay for the evaluation of TSH in human serum.

  8. Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels Are Associated with the Presence of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung Joo; Heo, Jin Young; Yun, Bo Hyon; Jung, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Menopause is a natural aging process causing estrogen deficiency, accelerating atherogenic processes including dyslipidemia. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is also high in postmenopausal women, and it is known to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we are to study on the associations in between serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and prevalence of CVD in postmenopausal women who have normal thyroid function. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 247 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center from January, 2007 to December, 2009. Postmenopausal women with normal serum TSH were included in the study. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results In multiple linear regression analysis, serum TSH was associated with serum triglyceride (TG) (β = 0.146, P = 0.023). In multiple logistic regression analysis, increasing age and serum TSH were associated with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.107 [1.024-1.197], P = 0.011 and OR = 1.303 [1.024-1.658], P = 0.031, respectively). Conclusions It revealed that significant predictor of serum TSH was serum TG, and increasing age and TSH were found to have associations with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women. Screening and assessing risks for CVD in healthy postmenopausal women would be helpful before atherosclerosis develops. PMID:28119894

  9. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level and relation with size of hippocampus in patients with mild cognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Daghighi, Mohammad-Hossein; Poureisa, Masoud; Ahmadi, Pegah; Reshadatjoo, Mahmoud; Golestani, Sahar; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Karkon-Shayan, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive disorders and dementia are common problems, and Alzheimer's disease is one of the major leading causes of death worldwide. Thyroid hormone disorders as a common problem effect on hippocampus size which as a prognostic factor in dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level and the size of hippocampus in patients with mild cognitive disorders. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive-analytical study, 41 patients with symptoms of mild cognitive disorders whom referred to take the brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) in a radiology center under the direction of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Tabriz, Iran) were evaluated. The right and left hippocampal and brain volume was calculated by MRI at coronal T1-weighted. Serum TSH level was also measured in these patients. Correlation between serum TSH level and hippocampal volume size was evaluated. Results: Male to female ratio was 1.05:1 with mean age of 54.09 ± 3.11 years. Mean serum TSH level of patients was 1.55 ± 1.45 uU/ml. The right and left hippocampal volumes were 1.61 ± 0.42 and 1.62 ± 0.39 ml, respectively. There were slight negative correlations between the right and left hippocampal volumes with TSH level (r = −0.133 and r = −0.092, respectively). Correlations between the right and left hippocampal volumes with TSH level were not statistically significant (P = 0.406, P = 0.566, respectively). Conclusion: Based on findings of the present study, there was a weak negative correlation between serum level of TSH with the right and left hippocampal and brain volume ratio, but the correlation was not statistically significant. It seems that controlling of clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism may have a role in slowing of dementia progression and also have a preventive role. PMID:27942104

  10. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) Intron 1 Variants Are Major Risk Factors for Graves' Disease in Three European Caucasian Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Franaszczyk, Maria; Kula, Dorota; Krajewski, Paweł; Karamat, Muhammad A.; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Jarząb, Barbara; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Background The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene is an established susceptibility locus for Graves' disease (GD), with recent studies refining association to two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs179247 and rs12101255, within TSHR intron 1. Methodology and Principal Findings We aimed to validate association of rs179247 and rs12101255 in Polish and UK Caucasian GD case-control subjects, determine the mode of inheritance and to see if association correlates with specific GD clinical manifestations. We investigated three case-control populations; 558 GD patients and 520 controls from Warsaw, Poland, 196 GD patients and 198 controls from Gliwice, Poland and 2504 GD patients from the UK National collection and 2784 controls from the 1958 British Birth cohort. Both rs179247 (P = 1.2×10−2–6.2×10−15, OR = 1.38–1.45) and rs12101255 (P = 1.0×10−4–3.68×10−21, OR = 1.47–1.87) exhibited strong association with GD in all three cohorts. Logistic regression suggested association of rs179247 is secondary to rs12101255 in all cohorts. Inheritance modeling suggested a co-dominant mode of inheritance in all cohorts. Genotype-phenotype correlations provided no clear evidence of association with any specific clinical characteristics. Conclusions We have validated association of TSHR intron 1 SNPs with GD in three independent European cohorts and have demonstrated that the aetiological variant within the TSHR is likely to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12101255. Fine mapping is now required to determine the exact location of the aetiological DNA variants within the TSHR. PMID:21124799

  11. Glutamine and glutamic acid enhance thyroid-stimulating hormone β subunit mRNA expression in the rat pars tuberalis.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-producing cells of the pars tuberalis (PT) display distinct characteristics that differ from those of the pars distalis (PD). The mRNA expression of TSHβ and αGSU in PT has a circadian rhythm and is inhibited by melatonin via melatonin receptor type 1; however, the detailed regulatory mechanism for TSHβ expression in the PT remains unclear. To identify the factors that affect PT, a microarray analysis was performed on laser-captured PT tissue to screen for genes coding for receptors that are abundantly expressed in the PT. In the PT, we found high expression of the KA2, which is an ionotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR). In addition, the amino acid transporter A2 (ATA2), also known as the glutamine transporter, and glutaminase (GLS), as well as GLS2, were highly expressed in the PT compared to the PD. We examined the effects of glutamine and glutamic acid on TSHβ expression and αGSU expression in PT slice cultures. l-Glutamine and l-glutamic acid significantly stimulated TSHβ expression in PT slices after 2- and 4-h treatments, and the effect of l-glutamic acid was stronger than that of l-glutamine. In contrast, treatment with glutamine and glutamic acid did not affect αGSU expression in the PT or the expression of TSHβ or αGSU in the PD. These results strongly suggest that glutamine is taken up by PT cells through ATA2 and that glutamic acid locally converted from glutamine by Gls induces TSHβ expression via the KA2 in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner in the PT.

  12. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene with Graves diseases and Graves ophthalmopathy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haibo; Wu, Mingxing; Yi, Hong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Qian; Nadirshina, Sophia; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Xueqin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is a common thyroid disease, and Graves ophthalmopathy(GO) is the most common extra-thyroidal manifestation of GD. Genetic associations of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene with GD and GO have been studied in different population groups for a long time. We aimed to obtain a more precise estimation of the effects of TSHR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on GD/GO using a meta-analysis. Publications were searched on Pub Med and EMBASE up to December 30, 2015. Eight studies involving three SNPs (rs179247, rs12101255, and rs2268458), which included 4790 cases and 5350 controls, met the selection criteria. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. SNPs rs179247 (dominant model [GG + GA vs. AA]: OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.61–0.73, P = 0.000, I2 = 0%) and rs12101255 (dominant model [TT + TC vs. CC]: OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.53–1.83, P = 0.000, I2 = 0%) were significantly associated with GD in all of the genetic models. TSHR rs12101255 and rs2268458 polymorphisms had no association between GO and GD (GD without GO). The results indicate that rs179247 and rs12101255 are likely to be genetic biomarkers for GD. Further studies with different population groups and larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the genetic associations of the TSHR gene with GD/GO. PMID:27456991

  13. Serum Lipid Transfer Proteins in Hypothyreotic Patients Are Inversely Correlated with Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Levels.

    PubMed

    Skoczyńska, Anna; Wojakowska, Anna; Turczyn, Barbara; Zatońska, Katarzyna; Wołyniec, Maria; Rogala, Natalia; Szuba, Andrzej; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna

    2016-11-30

    BACKGROUND Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity is often decreased in patients with hypothyroidism, whereas less is known about the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). We aimed to evaluate simultaneously serum CETP and PLTP activity in patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The selection criteria for control group members (without thyroid dysfunction) in this case to case study were levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides similar to those in study group patients (101 patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism). Serum CETP and PLTP activities were measured by homogenous fluorometric assays using synthetic donor particle substrates. RESULTS Serum CETP and PLTP activities in hypothyreotic patients were lower (p<0.001) compared with those in healthy subjects. This lowering was associated with significant changes in HDL-C subclasses: decrease in HDL2- and increase in HDL3 cholesterol levels. Multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking habits, and alcohol drinking showed a strong association between hypothyroidism and activity of lipid transfer proteins. A linear inverse relationship between thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and CETP (r=-0.21; p<0.01) and between TSH and PLTP (r=-0.24; p<0.001) was shown. There also was a positive correlation (p<0.001) between CETP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.27) and between PLTP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.37). A negative correlation between CETP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=-0.22: p<0.01) and between PLTP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=-0.24; p<0.001) has been demonstrated as well. CONCLUSIONS The decreased HDL2 and increased HDL3 cholesterol levels in subjects with hypothyroidism are consequences of decreased activity of lipid transfer proteins. These changes are early symptoms of lipid disturbances in hypothyroidism.

  14. How well does the capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone test for newborn thyroid screening predict the venous free thyroxine level?

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovska, Tzveta; Jones, Jeremy; Shaikh, M Guftar; Smith, Sarah; Donaldson, Malcolm D C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine, in newborn infants referred with elevated capillary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a threshold below which a frankly subnormal venous free thyroxine (fT4) level of <10 pmol/L is unlikely, so that treatment with levo-thyroxine (L-T4) might be deferred until venous thyroid function tests (TFTs) become available. Subjects and methods All infants referred in Scotland since 1979 with capillary TSH elevation were studied, with particular focus on infants screened using the AutoDELFIA assay between 2002 and 2013. Results Of the 321 infants referred with capillary TSH elevation using AutoDELFIA, 35 were excluded (fT4/TSH unavailable (12), venous sample either preceding or >10 days after capillary sampling (13, 10)), leaving 286 eligible for analysis (208 definite/probable hypothyroidism, 61 transient TSH elevation, 17 of uncertain thyroid status). Capillary TSH and venous T4 were strongly correlated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient −0.707355). The optimal capillary TSH threshold for predicting a venous fT4 of <10 pmol/L was found to be >40 mU/L (90.3% sensitivity and 65.9% specificity compared with 90.25% and 59.1% for >35 mU/L and 88.3% and 68.2% for >45 mU/L). 93 infants (32.5%) had capillary TSH ≤40 mU/L at referral of whom 15 (9.7%) had venous fT4 <10 pmol/L, comprising seven with true congenital hypothyroidism, five with transient TSH elevation and three with uncertain status, two of whom died. Conclusion For infants in whom capillary TSH is ≤40 mU/L, it is reasonable to defer L-T4 treatment until venous TFT results are known provided that the latter become available quickly. PMID:26966265

  15. Serum Lipid Transfer Proteins in Hypothyreotic Patients Are Inversely Correlated with Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Skoczyńska, Anna; Wojakowska, Anna; Turczyn, Barbara; Zatońska, Katarzyna; Wołyniec, Maria; Rogala, Natalia; Szuba, Andrzej; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity is often decreased in patients with hypothyroidism, whereas less is known about the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). We aimed to evaluate simultaneously serum CETP and PLTP activity in patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Material/Methods The selection criteria for control group members (without thyroid dysfunction) in this case to case study were levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides similar to those in study group patients (101 patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism). Serum CETP and PLTP activities were measured by homogenous fluorometric assays using synthetic donor particle substrates. Results Serum CETP and PLTP activities in hypothyreotic patients were lower (p<0.001) compared with those in healthy subjects. This lowering was associated with significant changes in HDL-C subclasses: decrease in HDL2- and increase in HDL3 cholesterol levels. Multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking habits, and alcohol drinking showed a strong association between hypothyroidism and activity of lipid transfer proteins. A linear inverse relationship between thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and CETP (r=−0.21; p<0.01) and between TSH and PLTP (r=−0.24; p<0.001) was shown. There also was a positive correlation (p<0.001) between CETP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.27) and between PLTP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.37). A negative correlation between CETP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=−0.22: p<0.01) and between PLTP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=−0.24; p<0.001) has been demonstrated as well. Conclusions The decreased HDL2 and increased HDL3 cholesterol levels in subjects with hypothyroidism are consequences of decreased activity of lipid transfer proteins. These changes are early symptoms of lipid disturbances in hypothyroidism. PMID:27899788

  16. Purification of bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone by a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, A.J.; van Denderen, J.; Aarden, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against bovine TSH was obtained by hybridoma technology. This antibody was specific for TSH and did not react with bovine LH and FSH. Affinity chromatography of crude TSH was performed on anti-TSH Sepharose. Bovine TSH was purified in a single step to near homogeneity by this technique, as shown by cation exchange chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified TSH. The biological activity of the hormone was not affected during the purification, as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation of the TSH-dependent FRTL5 cell line. The results indicate that affinity purification of TSH by means of a monoclonal antibody is a simple one-step procedure for the production of biologically active, highly purified TSH.

  17. A genome-wide association study of thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine in Danish children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Svendstrup, Mathilde; Ohrt, Johanne Dam; Dahl, Maria; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Hollensted, Mette; Have, Christian Theil; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian; Grarup, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is associated with obesity, and thyroid hormones are involved in the regulation of body composition, including fat mass. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 19 and 6 loci associated with plasma concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (fT4), respectively. Objective This study aimed to identify and characterize genetic variants associated with circulating TSH and fT4 in Danish children and adolescents and to examine whether these variants associate with obesity. Methods Genome-wide association analyses of imputed genotype data with fasting plasma concentrations of TSH and fT4 from a population-based sample of Danish children, adolescents, and young adults, and a group of children, adolescents, and young adults with overweight and obesity were performed (N = 1,764, mean age = 12.0 years [range 2.5−24.7]). Replication was performed in additional comparable samples (N = 2,097, mean age = 11.8 years [1.2−22.8]). Meta-analyses, using linear additive fixed-effect models, were performed on the results of the discovery and replication analyses. Results No novel loci associated with TSH or fT4 were identified. Four loci previously associated with TSH in adults were confirmed in this study population (PDE10A (rs2983511: β = 0.112SD, p = 4.8 ∙ 10−16), FOXE1 (rs7847663: β = 0.223SD, p = 1.5 ∙ 10−20), NR3C2 (rs9968300: β = 0.194SD), p = 2.4 ∙ 10−11), VEGFA (rs2396083: β = 0.088SD, p = 2.2 ∙ 10−10)). Effect sizes of variants known to associate with TSH or fT4 in adults showed a similar direction of effect in our cohort of children and adolescents, 11 of which were associated with TSH or fT4 in our study (p<0.0002). None of the TSH or fT4 associated SNPs were associated with obesity in our cohort, indicating no pleiotropic effects of these variants on obesity. Conclusion In a group of Danish children and adolescents, four loci previously associated with plasma TSH

  18. Evidence for the presence of thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin and their receptors in Eisenia fetida: a multilevel hormonal interface between the nervous system and the peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Márta; Koza, Anna; Engelmann, Péter; Németh, Péter; Csoknya, Mária

    2006-06-01

    The present study describes the localization and distribution of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TGB) and their receptors in Eisenia fetida (Annelida, Oligochaeta) as revealed by immunohistological methods. Immunopositive neuronal and non-neuronal cells are present in both the central nervous system and some peripheral organs (e.g. foregut and coelomocytes). TSH- and TGB-immunopositive neurons in the various ganglia of the central nervous system are differentially distributed. Most of the immunoreactive cells are found in the suboesophageal ganglion. The stained cells also differ in their shapes (round, oval, pear-shaped) and sizes (small, 12-25 microm; medium, 20-35 microm; large, 30-50 microm). In all ganglia of the central nervous system, TSH-positive neurons additionally show gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunopositivity. Non-neuronal cells also take part in hormone secretion and transport. Elongated TSH-positive cells have been detected in the capsule of the central ganglia and bear granules or vacuoles in areas lacking neurons. Many of capillaries show immunoreactivity for all four tested antibodies in the entire central nervous system and foregut. Among the coelomocytes, granulocytes and eleocytes stain for TSH and its receptor and for TGB but not for thyroid hormone receptor. Most of the granulocytes are large (25-50 microm) but a population of small cells (10-25 microm) are also immunoreactive. None of the coelomocytes stain for GABA. We therefore suggest that the members of this hormone system can modify both metabolism and immune functions in Eisenia. Coelomocytes might be able to secrete, transport and eliminate hormones in this system.

  19. Economic Evaluation of Recombinant Human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Stimulation vs. Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal Prior to Radioiodine Ablation for Thyroid Cancer: The Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seo Young; Jang, Hye Won; Cho, Yoon Young; Kim, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) stimulation is an acceptable alternative to thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) when radioiodine remnant ablation is planned for thyroid cancer treatment, based on superior short-term quality of life with non-inferior remnant ablation efficacy. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of radioiodine remnant ablation using rhTSH, compared with the traditional preparation method which renders patients hypothyroid by THW, in Korean perspective. Methods This economic evaluation considered the costs and benefits to the Korean public healthcare system. Clinical experts were surveyed regarding the current practice of radioiodine ablation in Korea and their responses helped inform assumptions used in a cost effectiveness model. Markov modelling with 17 weekly cycles was used to assess the incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) associated with rhTSH. Clinical inputs were based on a multi-center, randomized controlled trial comparing remnant ablation success after rhTSH preparation with THW. The additional costs associated with rhTSH were considered relative to the clinical benefits and cost offsets. Results The additional benefits of rhTSH (0.036 QALY) are achieved with an additional cost of Korean won ₩961,105, equating to cost per QALY of ₩26,697,361. Sensitivity analyses had only a modest impact upon cost-effectiveness, with one-way sensitivity results of approximately ₩33,000,000/QALY. Conclusion The use of rhTSH is a cost-effective alternative to endogenous hypothyroid stimulation prior to radioiodine ablation for patients who have undergone thyroidectomy in Korea. PMID:26394733

  20. Assignment of the gene for the. beta. subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone to the short arm of human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dracopoli, N.C.; Rettig, W.J.; Whitfield, G.K.; Darlington, G.J.; Spengler, B.A.; Biedler, J.L.; Old, L.J.; Kourides, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    The chromosomal locations of the genes for the ..beta.. subunit of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and the glycoprotein hormone ..cap alpha.. subunit have been determined by restriction enzyme analysis of DNA extracted from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA and a cloned 0.9-kilobase (kb) fragment of the human TSH ..beta..-subunit gene were used as hybridization probes in the analysis of Southern blots of DNA extracted from rodent-human hybrid clones. Analysis of the segregation of 5- and 10-kb EcoRI fragments hybridizing to CG ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA confirmed the previous assignment of this gene to chromosome 6. Analysis of the patterns of segregation of a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment containing human TSH ..beta..-subunit sequences permitted the assignment of the TSH ..beta..-subunit gene to human chromosome 1. The subregional assignment of TSH ..beta.. subunit to chromosome 1p22 was made possible by the additional analysis of a set of hybrids containing partially overlapping segments of this chromosome. Human TSH ..beta.. subunit is not syntenic with genes encoding the ..beta.. subunits of CG, luteinizing hormone, or follicle-stimulating hormone and is assigned to a conserved linkage group that also contains the structural genes for the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and the proto-oncogene N-ras (NRAS).

  1. The Effect of a Mutation in the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) on Development, Behaviour and TH Levels in Domesticated Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Svemer, Frida; Eriksson, Jonas; Darras, Veerle M.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) has been suggested to be a “domestication locus” in the chicken, due to a strong selective sweep over the gene found in domesticated chickens, differentiating them from their wild ancestor the Red Junglefowl (RJF). We investigated the effect of the mutation on development (incubation time), behaviour and thyroid hormone levels in intercross chickens homozygous for the mutation (d/d), wild type homozygotes (w/w) or heterozygotes (d/w). This allowed an assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus against a random mix of RJF and WL genotypes throughout the rest of the genome, controlling for family effects. The d/d genotype showed a longer incubation time, less fearful behaviours, lower number of aggressive behaviours and decreased levels of the thyroid hormone T4, in comparison to the w/w genotype. The difference between TSHR genotypes (d/d vs. w/w) in these respects mirrors the differences in development and behaviour between pure domesticated White Leghorns and pure RJF chickens. Higher individual T3 and T4 levels were associated with more aggression. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects typical domestication traits, possibly through modifying plasma levels of thyroid hormones, and may therefore have been important during the evolution of the domestic chicken. PMID:26053744

  2. The Physiological Role of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in the Regulation of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Prolactin Secretion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Arthur R. C.; Christianson, Dana; Smith, M. Susan; Fang, Shih-Lieh; Braverman, Lewis E.; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.

    1978-01-01

    The physiological role of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the regulation of thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) and prolactin (Prl) secretion has been assumed but not proven. Stimulation of their release requires pharmacologic doses of TRH. Lesions of the hypothalamus usually induce an inhibition of TSH secretion and an increase in Prl. To determine whether TRH is essential for TSH and Prl secretion in the rat, 0.1 ml of TRH antiserum (TRH-Ab) or normal rabbit serum was administered to normal, thyroidectomized, cold-exposed, and proestrus rats through indwelling atrial catheter. Serum samples were obtained before and at frequent intervals thereafter. Serum TSH concentrations in normal, thyroidectomized, cold-exposed, and proestrus rats were not depressed in specimens obtained up to 24 h after injection of normal rabbit serum. In contrast, serum TSH was significantly decreased after the administration of TRH-Ab in all normal (basal, 41±8 μU/ml [mean±SE]; 30 min, 6±2; 45 min, 8±3; 75 min, 4±2); thyroidectomized (basal, 642±32 μU/ml; 30 min, 418±32; 60 min, 426±36; 120 min, 516±146); coldstressed (basal, 68±19 μU/ml; 30 min, 4±3; 180 min, 16±8); and proestrus (basal, 11 a.m., 57±10 μU/ml; 1 p.m., 20±3; 3 p.m., 13±4; 5 p.m., 19±3) rats. However, 0.1 ml of TRH-Ab had no effect on basal Prl concentrations in normal or thyroidectomized rats and did not prevent the Prl rise in rats exposed to cold (basal, 68±7 ng/ml; 15 min, 387±121; 30 min, 212±132; 60 min, 154±114), or the Prl surge observed on the afternoon of proestrus (basal 11 a.m., 23±2 ng/ml; 1 p.m., 189±55; 3 p.m., 1,490±260; 5 p.m., 1,570±286). These studies demonstrate that TRH is required for TSH secretion in the normal, cold-exposed and proestrus rat and contributes, at least in part, to TSH secretion in the hypothyroid rat, but is not required for Prl secretion in these states. PMID:413840

  3. Effects of forced swimming stress on thyroid function, pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone and hypothalamus thyrotropin releasing hormone expression in adrenalectomy Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiuyan; Liu, Aihua; Ma, Yanan; Wang, Anyi; Guo, Xinhong; Teng, Weiping; Jiang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the impact that is imposed on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of adrenalectomy male Wistar rats by stress caused by swimming, the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), the expression of TSHβ mRNA at the pituitary and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured. A total of 50 male Wistar rats of 6–8 weeks of age and with an average weight of 190–210 grams were randomly divided into the following two groups: The surgical (without adrenal glands) and non-surgical (adrenalectomy) group. These two groups were then divided into the following five groups, according to the time delay of sacrifice following forced swim (10 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h) and control (not subjected to swimming) groups. A bilateral adrenalectomy animal model was established. Serum TSH in the blood was measurement by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and cerebrum tissue were excised for the measurement of TRH expression using an immunohistochemistry assay. In addition, pituitaries were excised for the extraction of total RNA. Finally, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for quantitation of TSHβ. Following swimming, the serum T3, T4 and TSH, the TSHβ mRNA expression levels in the pituitary and the TRH expression in the PVN of the surgical group were gradually increased. In the non-surgical group, no significant differences were observed in the serum T3, T4 and TSH levels compared with the control group. The TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary showed a similar result. Furthermore, the TRH expression at PVN was gradually increased and stress from swimming could increase the blood T4, T3 and TSH levels, TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary and TRH expression at the PVN in adrenalectomy Wistar rats. Moreover, the index in the surgical group changed significantly compared with the non-surgical group. In conclusion, the

  4. Antenatal management of recurrent fetal goitrous hyperthyroidism associated with fetal cardiac failure in a pregnant woman with persistent high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody after ablative therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tadashi; Miyakoshi, Kei; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Ikenoue, Satoru; Kasuga, Yoshifumi; Kadohira, Ikuko; Sato, Seiji; Momotani, Naoko; Minegishi, Kazuhiro; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2013-01-01

    High titer of maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TRAb) in patients with Graves' disease could cause fetal hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Clinical features of fetal hyperthyroidism include tachycardia, goiter, growth restriction, advanced bone maturation, cardiomegaly, and fetal death. The recognition and treatment of fetal hyperthyroidism are believed to be important to optimize growth and intellectual development in affected fetuses. We herein report a case of fetal treatment in two successive siblings showing in utero hyperthyroid status in a woman with a history of ablative treatment for Graves' disease. The fetuses were considered in hyperthyroid status based on high levels of maternal TRAb, a goiter, and persistent tachycardia. In particular, cardiac failure was observed in the second fetus. With intrauterine treatment using potassium iodine and propylthiouracil, fetal cardiac function improved. A high level of TRAb was detected in the both neonates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the changes of fetal cardiac function in response to fetal treatment in two siblings showing in utero hyperthyroid status. This case report illustrates the impact of prenatal medication via the maternal circulation for fetal hyperthyroidism and cardiac failure.

  5. Thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation between secondary hypothyroidism and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shahin, A A; Mostafa, H; Mahmoud, S

    2002-12-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the serum levels of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in addition to antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies and to investigate the correlation between these hormones and various disease manifestations among Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A group of 45 patients with SLE (43 women and 2 men with a mean age of 27.57 ± 9.89 years) underment assessment of their thyroid hormones. Antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies were assessed in 27 patients. Various disease manifestations were evaluated. A group of 20 normal female volunteers were involved as controls. The mean serum free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls (1.89 ± 1.14 vs. 3.15 ± 0.93 pg/ml; P < 0.05). Patients with a history of intravenous pulsed cyclophosphamide therapy showed significantly decreased levels of FT3 compared to those in other patients (1.17 ± 0.5 vs. 2.05 ± 0.95 pg/ml; P = 0.04). The mean serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels in all patients were significantly less than in the control group (1.24 ± 1.22 vs. 1.4 ± 0.3 mg/dl; P < 0.001). Of the 45 patients, 2 (4.4%) were considered to have primary hypothyroidism. Five of six patients (83.3%) with decreased FT4 levels developed fibromyalgia compared to 7 of 39 (17.9%) patients with normal T4 (P = 0.003). The mean serum TSH levels in all patients were significantly higher than in the controls (4.82 ± 22.2 vs. 2.65 ± 1.18 μIU/ml; P < 0.001). Six patients with decreased TSH levels were considered to have secondary hypothyroidism (13.3%); one of them showed decreased T3 and T4, two had decreased T4 only, and the other three were euthyroid. Comparing patients with and without secondary hypothyroidism, showed acute confusion in four (66.7%) in the former group versus four (10.3%) in the latter group (P = 0.006), anxiety in four (66.7%) in the former group versus six (15

  6. Enhanced response to mouse thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor immunization in TSH receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mami; Mitsutake, Norisato; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Chen, Chun-Rong; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M; Nagayama, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    Graves-like hyperthyroidism is induced in BALB/c mice by immunization with adenovirus expressing the human TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit (amino acids 1-289). However, because of nonidentity between the human and mouse TSHR ( approximately 87% amino acid homology), we compared the responses of mice immunized with adenoviruses expressing either the mouse or the human TSHR A-subunit. Wild-type (wt) BALB/c mice immunized with the mouse A-subunit developed neither TSHR antibodies (measured by flow cytometry) nor thyroid lymphocytic infiltration. However, wt C57BL/6 mice developed sparse intrathyroidal lymphocyte infiltration without antibody production. Depletion of naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells had little effect. These results indicate the inability to break tolerance to the mouse TSHR in wt mice. In contrast, TSHR knockout (KO) BALB/c mice generated mouse TSHR antibodies in response to mouse A-subunit immunization and augmented human TSHR antibody response to human A-subunit immunization. Thyroid-stimulating antibody titers measured in a functional bioassay were comparable in human A-subunit immunized wt mice and in TSHR KO mice immunized with either the mouse or human A-subunit. In conclusion, immune response to the mouse TSHR is readily induced in TSHR KO but not in wt mice. Only in the former does immunization with adenovirus expressing the mouse A-subunit generate antibodies capable of activating the mouse TSHR. TSHR KO mice are, therefore, of value for future studies dissecting the autoimmune response to the mouse TSHR.

  7. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  8. Thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulates increases in inositol phosphates as well as cyclic AMP in the FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J B; Ealey, P A; Marshall, N J; Cockcroft, S

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin), a hormone known to increase cytosol concentrations of cyclic AMP, also stimulates the formation of inositol phosphates in thyroid cells. TSH and noradrenaline both stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate formation in a concentration-dependent manner in the rat thyroid cell line, FRTL-5 cells, which had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol. The threshold concentration of TSH required to stimulate inositol phosphate formation was more than 20 munits/ml, which is approx. 10(3)-fold greater than that required for cyclic AMP accumulation and growth in these cells. We also demonstrate that membranes prepared from FRTL-5 cells possess a guanine nucleotide-activatable polyphosphoinositide phosphodiesterase, which suggests that activation of inositide metabolism in these cells may be coupled to receptors by the G-protein, Gp. Our findings suggest that two second-messenger systems exist to mediate the action of TSH in the thyroid. PMID:2827631

  9. Radioactive body burden measurements in (131)iodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer: effect of recombinant thyroid stimulating hormone in whole body (131)iodine clearance.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al Saadi, Amal; Al Balushi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Protocols in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, recommend adequate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation for radioactive (131)I administrations, both for imaging and subsequent ablations. Commonly followed method is to achieve this by endogenous TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroxine. Numerous studies worldwide have reported comparable results with recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) intervention as conventional thyroxine hormone withdrawal. Radiation safety applications call for the need to understand radioactive (131)I (RA(131)I) clearance pattern to estimate whole body doses when this new methodology is used in our institution. A study of radiation body burden estimation was undertaken in two groups of patients treated with RA(131)I; (a) one group of patients having thyroxine medication suspended for 5 weeks prior to therapy and (b) in the other group retaining thyroxine support with two rhTSH injections prior to therapy with RA(131)I. Sequential exposure rates at 1 m in the air were measured in these patients using a digital auto-ranging beta gamma survey instrument calibrated for measurement of exposure rates. The mean measured exposure rates at 1 m in μSv/h immediately after administration and at 24 h intervals until 3 days are used for calculating of effective ½ time of clearance of administered activity in both groups of patients, 81 patients in conventionally treated group (stop thyroxine) and 22 patients with rhTSH administration. The (131)I activities ranged from 2.6 to 7.9 GBq. The mean administered (131)I activities were 4.24 ± 0.95 GBq (n = 81) in "stop hormone" group and 5.11 ± 1.40 GBq (n = 22) in rhTSH group. The fall of radioactive body burden showed two clearance patterns within observed 72 h. Calculated T½eff values were 16.45 h (stop hormone group) 12.35 h (rhTSH group) for elapsed period of 48 h. Beyond 48 h post administration, clearance of RA(131)I takes place with T½eff> 20 h in both groups

  10. An innovative sample-to-answer polymer lab-on-a-chip with on-chip reservoirs for the POCT of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH).

    PubMed

    Jung, Wooseok; Han, Jungyoup; Kai, Junhai; Lim, Ji-Youn; Sul, Donggeun; Ahn, Chong H

    2013-12-07

    A new sample-to-answer polymer lab-on-a-chip, which can perform immunoassay with minimum user intervention through on-chip reservoirs for reagents and single-channel assay system, has been designed, developed and successfully characterized as a point-of-care testing (POCT) cartridge for the detection of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Test results were obtained within 30 minutes after a sample was dropped into the POCT cartridge. The analyzed results of TSH showed a linear range of up to 55 μIU mL(-1) with the limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 μIU mL(-1) at the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3. The reagents stored in the on-chip reservoirs maintained more than 97% of their initial volume for 120 days of storage time while the detection antibody retained its activity above 98% for 120 days. The sample-to-answer polymer lab-on-a-chip developed in this work using the mass-producible and low-cost polymer is well suited for the point-of-care testing of rapid in vitro diagnostics (IVD) of TSH.

  11. The upper limit of the reference range for thyroid-stimulating hormone should not be confused with a cut-off to define subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Waise, Ahmed; Price, Hermione C

    2009-03-01

    The upper limit of the reference range for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is used to assist in identifying individuals with hypothyroidism. Improvements in TSH assays have led to better definition of the lower limit of the reference range, but the upper limit of the range for a healthy population is currently a topic of some debate. Population studies have improved our understanding of the clinical implications of elevated serum TSH concentrations in terms of future progression to hypothyroidism, but have not yet fully elucidated the correlation of modestly elevated TSH levels with long-term morbidity. This paper will review the current debate including the arguments for and against reducing the upper limit of the TSH range, whether such a level should be based on evidence from epidemiological studies, and the implications of categorizing large numbers of people with subclinical hypothyroidism. The impact of using different methodologies for the measurement of TSH and the inherent variability of results on reference ranges is also discussed. We argue that the reference range for TSH should be assay-specific and be determined by standard techniques in normal populations as recommended by the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry. In contrast, we suggest that a decision level be determined separately from epidemiological studies to identify a population with subclinical hypothyroidism. Serial monitoring of TSH in this population deserves further study as a means of identifying those at risk of progressing to frank hypothyroidism and meriting treatment.

  12. Stimulation of Cultured H9 Human Embryonic Stem Cells with Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Does Not Lead to Formation of Thyroid-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onyshchenko, Mykola I.; Panyutin, Igor G.; Panyutin, Irina V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    The sodium-iodine symporter (NIS) is expressed on the cell membrane of many thyroid cancer cells, and is responsible for the radioactive iodine accumulation. However, treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer is ineffective due to the low expression of NIS on cell membranes of these tumor cells. Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide a potential vehicle to study the mechanisms of NIS expression regulation during differentiation. Human ESCs were maintained on feeder-independent culture conditions. RT-qPCR and immunocytochemistry were used to study differentiation marker expression, 125I uptake to study NIS function. We designed a two-step protocol for human ESC differentiation into thyroid-like cells, as was previously done for mouse embryonic stem cells. First, we obtained definitive endoderm from human ESCs. Second, we directed differentiation of definitive endoderm cells into thyroid-like cells using various factors, with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) as the main differentiating factor. Expression of pluripotency, endoderm and thyroid markers and 125I uptake were monitored throughout the differentiation steps. These approaches did not result in efficient induction of thyroid-like cells. We conclude that differentiation of human ESCs into thyroid cells cannot be induced by TSH media supplementation alone and most likely involves complicated developmental patterns that are yet to be understood. PMID:22619683

  13. Serum leptin, thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels interact to affect cognitive function among US adults: evidence from a large representative survey.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, May A; Beydoun, Hind A; Shroff, Monal R; Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H; Zonderman, Alan B

    2012-08-01

    Neuroanatomical connections point to possible interactions between areas influencing energy homeostasis and those influencing cognition. We assessed whether serum leptin, thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are associated with and interact to influence cognitive performance among US adults. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) were used. Measures included a battery of neuropsychological tests and serum leptin, thyroxine, and TSH levels (20-59-year-old: n = 1114-2665; 60-90-year-old: n = 1365-5519). Among those 20-59-year-old, the middle tertile of leptin (vs. first tertile) was inversely related to the number of errors on the symbol digits substitution test. Increased thyroxine level was associated with a poorer performance on the serial digits test in the 20-59-year-old, but a better performance on the math test in 60-90-year-old group. TSH was associated with poor performance on various tests in the 20-59-year-old, but better performance in the 60-90-year-old group. Significant antagonistic interactions were found in both age groups between thyroxine, TSH, and leptin for a number of tests, including between leptin and thyroxine in the 60-90-year-old group in their association with word recall-correct score. We found significant associations of our main exposures with cognitive function among US adults, going in opposite directions between age groups in the cases of thyroid hormonal levels, as well as some interactive effects between exposures. It is important to conduct prospective cohort studies to provide further insight into potential interventions that would assess interactive effects of various hormonal replacement regimens.

  14. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  15. Two thyroid hormone regulated genes, the beta-subunits of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSHB), are located less than 310 kb apart in both human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Dracopoli, N C; Rose, E; Whitfield, G K; Guidon, P T; Bale, S J; Chance, P A; Kourides, I A; Housman, D E

    1988-08-01

    Two thyroid hormone regulated genes, the beta-subunits of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSHB), have been assigned to mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1p22. We have used the techniques of linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis to determine the proximity of these two antithetically regulated genes in this conserved linkage group. Four novel restriction fragment length polymorphisms were identified at the human TSHB gene. Two-point linkage analysis between TSHB and NGFB in 46 families, including the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) reference panel, demonstrated no recombination (theta = 0.00, Z = 42.8). Analysis of this region by pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that the genes for TSHB and NGFB are located less than 310 kb apart in man and 220 kb in the mouse.

  16. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K.; Bechmann, Lars P.; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C.; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. Methods 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. Results More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity. PMID:26147961

  17. Differential expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone beta subunit in gonads during sex reversal of orange-spotted and red-spotted groupers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Li; Yao, Bo; Li, Chuang-Ju; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2004-05-31

    We have cloned and characterized the full-length cDNA encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunit (TSHbeta) from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides. It contains 913 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding 146 amino acids with a 20 amino acid signal peptide. The grouper mature TSHbeta has 75, 70, 61, 59, 41, 42 and 40% identities to that of rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon, zebrafish, European eel, chicken, mouse and human, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the TSHbeta mRNA was expressed abundantly not only in pituitary but also in gonads. A more interesting finding is to reveal the differential TSHbeta expressions between the ovaries and the transitional gonads or testes in natural individuals of orange-spotted grouper and red-spotted grouper Epinephelus akaara, and in artificial sex reversal individuals of red-spotted grouper induced by MT feeding. In situ hybridization localization provided direct evidence that the TSHbeta was transcribed in the germ cells. In the growing oocytes, the TSHbeta transcripts were concentrated on the ooplasm periphery. In testicular tissues, the intensively expressed TSHbeta cells were found to be spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the spermatogenic cysts. This is the first report of a TSHbeta expressed in the gonads of any vertebrates in addition to the expected expression in the pituitary, and it expresses more transcripts in the gonads during sex reversal or testis than in the ovaries both in E. coioides and E. akaara. Importantly, the TSHbeta identification in germ cells allows us to further investigate the functional roles and the molecular mechanisms in gametogenesis of groupers, especially in sex reversal and in spermatogenesis.

  18. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Reference Range and Prevalence of Thyroid Dysfunction in the Korean Population: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background No nationwide epidemiological study evaluating the prevalence of subclinical and overt forms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism has yet been conducted in Korea. This study aimed to evaluate the reference range of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and the national prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions in Korea. Methods Nation-wide cross-sectional data were analyzed from a representative sample of the civilian, non-institutionalized Korean population (n=6,564) who underwent blood testing for thyroid function and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) as part of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI (2013 to 2015). Results The reference interval of serum TSH in the Korean reference population was 0.62 to 6.68 mIU/L. Based on this reference interval, the prevalence of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism was 0.73% (males 0.40%, females 1.10%) and 3.10% (males 2.26%, females 4.04%), respectively. The prevalence of hypothyroidism increased with age until the age group between 50 to 59 years. Positive TPOAb were found in 7.30% of subjects (males 4.33%, females 10.62%). The prevalence of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism TPOAb-positive subjects was 5.16% and 10.88%, respectively. The prevalence of overt and subclinical hyperthyroidism was 0.54% (males 0.30%, females 0.81%) and 2.98% (males 2.43%, females, 3.59%), respectively. Conclusion The Serum TSH reference levels in the Korean population were higher than the corresponding levels in Western countries. Differences were found in the prevalence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism according to age, sex, and TPOAb positivity. This study provides important baseline information for understanding patterns of thyroid dysfunction and diseases in Korea. PMID:28116874

  19. Effect of metformin on thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid volume in patients with prediabetes: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mozhgan; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Amini, Masoud; Mirfendereski, Taghi; Iraj, Bijan; Feizi, Awat; Norozi, Atsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: The people with prediabetes have insulin resistance (IR). IR may affect thyroid function, size and nodules. We investigated the effects of metformin on the thyroid gland in prediabetic people. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind placebo-control clinical trial, 89 people with prediabetes, aged 18-65 years were studied for 3 months. They were divided into two, metformin (n = 43) and placebo (n = 46) treated groups. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was measured and thyroid nodules and volume was studied by ultrasonography. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the study. Results: Mean of the baseline characteristics in metformin and placebo-treated groups had no statistically significant difference. At the end of the study, serum TSH was not significantly different between the two groups. However, if the TSH range was divided into two low normal (0.3-2.5 μU/ml) and high-normal (2.6-5.5 μU/ml) ranges, significant decrease was observed in metformin-treated group with a high-normal basal serum TSH (P = 0.01). Thyroid volume did not change in metformin-treated group. However, in placebo-treated group, the thyroid was enlarged (P = 0.03). In 53.9% of participants, thyroid nodule was observed. There was just a decrease in the volume of small solid (not mixed) nodules from median of 0.07 ml to 0.04 ml in metformin-treated group (P = 0.01). Conclusion: In prediabetic people, metformin decreases serum TSH, only, in those people with TSH >2.5 μU/ml and reduces the size of small solid thyroid nodules. It also prevents an increase in the thyroid volume. PMID:25657744

  20. Day-night variations in thyroid stimulating hormone and its relation with clinical status and metabolic parameters in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Roni; Ersoy, Reyhan; Demirezer, Aylin Bolat; Akın, Fatma Ebru; Polat, Sefika Burcak; Cakir, Bekir; Ersoy, Osman

    2015-04-01

    To investigate day-night variations in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and its relation with clinical status and metabolic parameters in patients with cirrhosis. Forty-one patients with negative thyroid antibodies and normal thyroid function tests who were diagnosed with cirrhosis were included. Thirty-five age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were included in control group.TSH, fT3, and fT4 levels, which were measured both in the morning and late evening. The difference between nocturnal TSH and morning TSH (ΔTSH) were compared between groups. Relation between Child-Turcotte-Pugh, model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and MELD-Na scores and levels of thyroid hormones, ΔTSH and serum sodium (Na) levels was investigated. Relation between ΔTSH and clinical status and metabolic parameters was also evaluated. The mean morning fT3, nocturnal fT3, nocturnal TSH, and ΔTSH levels were significantly lower, morning and nocturnal fT4 levels were higher in patients with cirrhosis (p<0.001, p<0.001, p=0.004, p<0.001, and p<0.001). As the ROC analysis, day-night variation was detected to be impaired in the event that difference between nocturnal TSH level and morning TSH level was lower than 1 uIU/mL in patients with cirrhosis with a sensitivity of 92.7% and specificity of 71.4% (p<0.001).A significant positive correlation was found between serum Na levels and fT3 in patients with cirrhosis (r=0.479, p=0.001), and a significant negative correlation was found between the severity of clinical status and low levels of fT3 in patients with cirrhosis (p<0.001).Nocturnal TSH increase does not occur in cases of cirrhosis without known thyroid disease and with normal thyroid function tests, which may be an early finding of impaired thyroid functions in patients with cirrhosis.

  1. Genetic Variants Associated with Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Levels in European Americans and African Americans from the eMERGE Network

    PubMed Central

    Malinowski, Jennifer R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Basford, Melissa A.; Bradford, Yuki; Peissig, Peggy L.; Carrell, David; Crosslin, David R.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Rasmussen, Luke; Pacheco, Jennifer; Kho, Abel; Newton, Katherine M.; Li, Rongling; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Chute, Christopher G.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) hormone levels are normally tightly regulated within an individual; thus, relatively small variations may indicate thyroid disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants in PDE8B and FOXE1 that are associated with TSH levels. However, prior studies lacked racial/ethnic diversity, limiting the generalization of these findings to individuals of non-European ethnicities. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network is a collaboration across institutions with biobanks linked to electronic medical records (EMRs). The eMERGE Network uses EMR-derived phenotypes to perform GWAS in diverse populations for a variety of phenotypes. In this report, we identified serum TSH levels from 4,501 European American and 351 African American euthyroid individuals in the eMERGE Network with existing GWAS data. Tests of association were performed using linear regression and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and principal components, assuming an additive genetic model. Our results replicate the known association of PDE8B with serum TSH levels in European Americans (rs2046045 p = 1.85×10−17, β = 0.09). FOXE1 variants, associated with hypothyroidism, were not genome-wide significant (rs10759944: p = 1.08×10−6, β = −0.05). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance in African Americans. However, multiple known associations with TSH levels in European ancestry were nominally significant in African Americans, including PDE8B (rs2046045 p = 0.03, β = −0.09), VEGFA (rs11755845 p = 0.01, β = −0.13), and NFIA (rs334699 p = 1.50×10−3, β = −0.17). We found little evidence that SNPs previously associated with other thyroid-related disorders were associated with serum TSH levels in this study. These results support the previously reported association between PDE8B and serum TSH levels in European Americans and emphasize the need for additional genetic

  2. Genetic variants associated with serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in European Americans and African Americans from the eMERGE Network.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Jennifer R; Denny, Joshua C; Bielinski, Suzette J; Basford, Melissa A; Bradford, Yuki; Peissig, Peggy L; Carrell, David; Crosslin, David R; Pathak, Jyotishman; Rasmussen, Luke; Pacheco, Jennifer; Kho, Abel; Newton, Katherine M; Li, Rongling; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Chute, Christopher G; Chisholm, Rex L; Jarvik, Gail P; Larson, Eric B; McCarty, Catherine A; Masys, Daniel R; Roden, Dan M; de Andrade, Mariza; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Crawford, Dana C

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) hormone levels are normally tightly regulated within an individual; thus, relatively small variations may indicate thyroid disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants in PDE8B and FOXE1 that are associated with TSH levels. However, prior studies lacked racial/ethnic diversity, limiting the generalization of these findings to individuals of non-European ethnicities. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network is a collaboration across institutions with biobanks linked to electronic medical records (EMRs). The eMERGE Network uses EMR-derived phenotypes to perform GWAS in diverse populations for a variety of phenotypes. In this report, we identified serum TSH levels from 4,501 European American and 351 African American euthyroid individuals in the eMERGE Network with existing GWAS data. Tests of association were performed using linear regression and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and principal components, assuming an additive genetic model. Our results replicate the known association of PDE8B with serum TSH levels in European Americans (rs2046045 p = 1.85×10-17, β = 0.09). FOXE1 variants, associated with hypothyroidism, were not genome-wide significant (rs10759944: p = 1.08×10-6, β = -0.05). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance in African Americans. However, multiple known associations with TSH levels in European ancestry were nominally significant in African Americans, including PDE8B (rs2046045 p = 0.03, β = -0.09), VEGFA (rs11755845 p = 0.01, β = -0.13), and NFIA (rs334699 p = 1.50×10-3, β = -0.17). We found little evidence that SNPs previously associated with other thyroid-related disorders were associated with serum TSH levels in this study. These results support the previously reported association between PDE8B and serum TSH levels in European Americans and emphasize the need for additional genetic studies in more

  3. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul

    2016-02-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism has been reported to increase the fracture risk. However, the effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TSH suppression on bone geometry in the hip area of pre- and postmenopausal women with DTC. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 99 women with DTC (25 pre- and 74 postmenopausal) who had received TSH suppressive therapy for at least 3years and 297 control subjects (75 and 222, respectively) matched for sex and age. Bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and hip area and bone geometry at the femoral neck measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were compared between patients and controls. The association between thyroid hormone and bone parameters was investigated. All analyses of bone parameters were adjusted for age, body mass index, and serum calcium levels. In premenopausal subjects, TSH suppressive therapy was not associated with poor bone parameters. In postmenopausal subjects, patients with DTC undergoing TSH suppression showed lower cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cross-sectional area, and section modulus and thinner cortical thickness at the femoral neck than those of control subjects, whereas their femoral neck BMD was comparable with controls. Total hip BMD was lower in postmenopausal patients than in controls. CSMI and section modulus at the femoral neck were independently associated with serum free T4 levels in postmenopausal patients. The difference in femoral neck bone geometry between patients and controls was only apparent in postmenopausal DTC patients with free T4 >1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l), and not in those with free T4 levels ≤1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l). TSH suppression in postmenopausal DTC patients was associated with decreased bone strength by altering bone geometry rather than BMD in the hip area

  4. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Free Thyroxine Levels in Persons with HFE C282Y Homozygosity, a Common Hemochromatosis Genotype: The HEIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Reboussin, David M.; Adams, Paul C.; Acton, Ronald T.; Eckfeldt, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Relationships of thyroid and iron measures in large cohorts are unreported. We evaluated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in white participants of the primary care–based Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Methods We measured serum TSH and free T4 in 176 HFE C282Y homozygotes without previous hemochromatosis diagnoses and in 312 controls without HFE C282Y or H63D who had normal serum iron measures and were matched to C282Y homozygotes for Field Center, age group, and initial screening date. We defined hypothyroidism as having TSH >5.00 mIU/L and free T4 <0.70 ng/dL, and hyperthyroidism as having TSH <0.400 mIU/L and free T4 >1.85 ng/dL. Multivariate analyses were performed using age, sex, Field Center, log10 serum ferritin (SF), HFE genotype, log10 TSH, and log10 free T4. Results Prevalences of hypothyroidism in C282Y homozygotes and controls were 1.7% and 1.3%, respectively, and of hyperthyroidism 0% and 1.0%, respectively. Corresponding prevalences did not differ significantly. Correlations of log10 SF with log10 free T4 were positive (p = 0.2368, C282Y homozygotes; p = 0.0492, controls). Independent predictors of log10 free T4 were log10 TSH (negative association) and age (positive association); positive predictors of log10 SF were age, male sex, and C282Y homozygosity. Proportions of C282Y homozygotes and controls who took medications to supplement or suppress thyroid function did not differ significantly. Conclusions Prevalences of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are similar in C282Y homozygotes without previous hemochromatosis diagnoses and controls. In controls, there is a significant positive association of SF with free T4. We conclude that there is no rationale for routine measurement of TSH or free T4 levels in hemochromatosis or iron overload screening programs. PMID:18651828

  5. Changes in plasma melanocyte-stimulating hormone, ACTH, prolactin, GH, LH, FSH, and thyroid-stimulating hormone in response to injection of sulpiride, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, or vehicle in insulin-sensitive and -insensitive mares.

    PubMed

    Valencia, N Arana; Thompson, D L; Mitcham, P B

    2013-05-01

    Six insulin-sensitive and 6 insulin-insensitive mares were used in a replicated 3 by 3 Latin square design to determine the pituitary hormonal responses (compared with vehicle) to sulpiride and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), 2 compounds commonly used to diagnose pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) in horses. Mares were classified as insulin sensitive or insensitive by their previous glucose responses to direct injection of human recombinant insulin. Treatment days were February 25, 2012, and March 10 and 24, 2012. Treatments were sulpiride (racemic mixture, 0.01 mg/kg BW), TRH (0.002 mg/kg BW), and vehicle (saline, 0.01 mL/kg BW) administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected via jugular catheters at -10, 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min relative to treatment injection. Plasma ACTH concentrations were variable and were not affected by treatment or insulin sensitivity category. Plasma melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) concentrations responded (P < 0.01) to both sulpiride and TRH injection and were greater (P < 0.05) in insulin-insensitive mares than in sensitive mares. Plasma prolactin concentrations responded (P < 0.01) to both sulpiride and TRH injection, and the response was greater (P < 0.05) for sulpiride; no effect of insulin sensitivity was observed. Plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations responded (P < 0.01) to TRH injection only and were higher (P < 0.05) in insulin-sensitive mares in almost all time periods. Plasma LH and FSH concentrations varied with time (P < 0.05), particularly in the first week of the experiment, but were not affected by treatment or insulin sensitivity category. Plasma GH concentrations were affected (P < 0.05) only by day of treatment. The greater MSH responses to sulpiride and TRH in insulin-insensitive mares were similar to, but not as exaggerated as, those observed by others for PPID horses. In addition, the reduced TSH concentrations in insulin-insensitive mares are

  6. A novel hypothesis for the etiology of Graves' disease: TSAb may be thyroid stimulating animal IgG-like hormone and TBAb may be the precursor of TSAb.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yukio; Kajita, Yoshihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Hamaoki, Masaru

    2012-06-01

    spite of no antibody function). There are many reports for co-existence of TSAb and TBAb-IgG in sera of GD. We reported conversion from TBAb (non-thyroid stimulating type IgG) to TSAb by co-incubation of anti-hIgG Ab (containing anti-animal IgG Ab as a cross-reaction) with TBAb-bound porcine thyroid cells. Thus, we suggest that TBAb may be the precursor form of TSAb.

  7. Effects of sub-lethal heroin administration on thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyroid gland of Mus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Bhoir, Kaminidevi K; Suryawanshi, S A; Pandey, A K

    2009-11-01

    Serum TSH level of control Mus norvegicus fluctuated between 498.20 +/- 21.92 and 506.80 +/- 22.35 ng ml(-1), thyroxine (T4) between 68.17 +/- 3.46 and 69.03 +/- 4.12 microg dl(-1) and triiodothyronine (T3) between 4.76 +/- 0.52 and 5.00 +/- 0.66 microg dl(-1). Sub-lethal heroin administration induced a significant decline in the levels of all the three hormones at 24 hr and 15 days post-administration. Decline in the levels of these hormones registered the lowest values (p<0.001) by day 30 of the treatment. Thyroid gland of control rat consisted of spherical, round follicles lined with low cuboidal and columnar epithelial cells and lumina filled with eosinophilic colloid. Ultrastructurally, the thyroid follicular cells showed the presence of round nuclei, polymorphic mitochondria, Golgi complex as well as lysosomes located on the apical side of the nucleus and cytoplasm with different sizes of lipid droplets and smooth along with rough endoplasmic reticulum. Basal lamina of the follicular cells was often in association with the endothelium of the capillaries. Sub-lethal heroin administration for 30 days elicited degenerative changes in the follicular epithelial cells as evident by the vacuolization of cytoplasm, pycnotic nuclei and reduced colloidal content. Ultrastructurally, the thyroid follicular cells showed indented nuclei with heavy deposition of chromatin material on the inner membrane of nucleus and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum. Along with RBC infiltration, vesiculated mitochondria owing to the loss of cristae were also seen. Diffused electron-dense material was seen at the periphery of the cell body. Heroin treatment caused cellular necrosis as revealed by the fragmentation of cytoplasmic materials in follicular epithelial cells of the gland.

  8. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-directed induction of the CREM gene in the thyroid gland participates in the long-term desensitization of the TSH receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, E; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1995-01-01

    Thyroid gland function is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis via the secretion of TSH, according to environmental, developmental, and circadian stimuli. TSH modulates both the secretion of thyroid hormone and gland trophism through interaction with a specific guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor (TSH receptor; TSH-R), which elicits the activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway. After TSH stimulation, the levels of TSH-R RNA are known to decrease dramatically within a few hours. This phenomenon ultimately leads to homologous long-term desensitization of the TSH-R. Here we show that TSH drives the induction of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) isoform of the cAMP response element (CRE) modulator gene both in rat thyroid gland and in the differentiated thyroid cell line FRTL-5. The kinetics of ICER protein induction mirrors the down-regulation of TSH-R mRNA. ICER binds to a CRE-like sequence in the TSH-R promoter and represses its expression. Thus, ICER induction by TSH in the thyroid gland represents a paradigm of the molecular mechanism by which pituitary hormones elicit homologous long-term desensitization. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7568187

  9. Fast determination of thyroid stimulating hormone in human blood serum without chemical preprocessing by using infrared spectroscopy and least squares support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Mello, Cesar; Marangoni, Antônio; Poppi, Ronei; Noda, Isao

    2011-06-24

    The least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) was used to model infrared spectral data for TSH hormone secreted by thyroid, which regulates the basal metabolic rate. This model was used for direct estimation of the content of TSH in blood serum samples, and the results were comparable with those obtained with the conventional analytical method based on chemoluminescence methodology. Excellent agreement was observed between the conventional method and the newly developed calibration model based in analysis of spectral data with LS-SVM. The latter has clear advantages, because it is fast and requires no reagent once the measurements were done directly in the serum by using a simple mid-infrared spectrometer in the ATR mode. An important advantage observed in this calibration method based on LS-SVM is the remarkable capacity to avoid overfitting in the model-building step, that is, the developed method is highly robust.

  10. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  11. TSH (Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a thyroid disorder , including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism . TSH is produced by the pituitary gland , a ... thyroid Monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism Monitor anti-thyroid treatment in people with hyperthyroidism ...

  12. Assays of thyroid-stimulating antibody

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.M.; Zakarija, M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the two major assay methods of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease. The basic procedures involve: (1) some index of thyroid stimulation, usually in vitro, using TSAb to indicate its activity; and (2) indirect recognition by assessment of the inhibition of binding of radioiodinated thyrotropin (TSH) to a preparation of its receptor, i.e., TSH-binding inhibition or TBI. There is potential for misinterpretation of data acquired by testing patients' sera by one or the other basic procedure.

  13. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis caused by maternal autoimmune hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Miguel Fragata; Maria, Ana Teresa; Prado, Sara; Limbert, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal immune hyperthyroidism is a rare but potentially fatal condition. It occurs in 1–5% of infants born to women with Graves’ disease (GD). In most of the cases it is due to maternal antibodies transferred from the mother into the fetal compartment, stimulating the fetal thyroid by binding thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor. We present a case of neonatal thyrotoxicosis due to maternal GD detected at 25 days of age and discuss the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis. PMID:25750228

  14. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  15. Neonatal detection of generalized resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Balzano, S.; Scherberg, N.H.; Refetoff, S. )

    1990-11-07

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is an inherited disease that is usually suspected when elevated serum thyroid hormone levels are associated with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. Often these test results are obtained because of short stature, decreased intelligence, and/or hyperactivity with learning disability noted in childhood and adolescence, or because of goiter in adulthood. The authors detected GRTH at birth by analysis of blood obtained during routine neonatal screening. The proposita, born to a mother with GRTH, had a thyrotropin level of 26 mU/L and a corresponding thyroxine concentration of 656 nmol/L. Administration of thyroid hormone in doses eightfold to 10-fold above replacement levels were required to reduce serum thyrotropin to normal levels without induction of hypermetabolism. This case, and the retrospective finding of high thyroxine levels in five newborns subsequently diagnosed as having GRTH, suggest that measurement of thyroxine at birth, in conjunction with thyrotropin, could allow the early detection of GRTH.

  16. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  17. Thyroid stimulating antibody: an index of thyroid stimulation in Graves' disease?

    PubMed

    Baldet, L; Madec, A M; Papachristou, C; Stefanutti, A; Orgiazzi, J; Jaffiol, C

    1987-09-01

    Early (20 min) thyroid radio-iodine uptake (ERU) and thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSab) were determined in 27 untreated unselected patients with Graves' disease at the time of diagnosis. In 21 subjects the same tests were further performed in parallel during combined carbimazole-L-T3 therapy (mean duration of follow-up: 10.8 +/- 5.8 months; mean +/- SD). TSab was determined by a cAMP-human thyrocyte culture stimulation assay and expressed in microliter-equivalent of a TSab standard/ml (microliter-eq/ml). Before treatment, ERU, ranging from 15 to 54% of the injected dose (normal less than or equal to 8% dose) correlated with serum T3 (r: 0.54; P less than 0.01); TSab, ranging from 6 to 85 microliter-eq/ml was detected in 21/27 patients. There was a significant correlation between ERU and TSab (Spearman rank test: r: 0.57; P less than 0.01). During the first months of treatment, 5 of the 21 patients sequentially studied had undetectable TSab levels throughout the study and in these patients ERU decreased by 57% of its initial value; the remaining 16 subjects were divided into two groups according to ERU changes: in group A (9 patients), initial ERU decreased by 50% or more or the absolute value became less than 20% of the dose and TSab decreased from 10.9 +/- 4.8 microliter-eq/ml to 5.3 +/- 1.6 microliter-eq/ml (P less than 0.01); in group B (7 patients), the fall of ERU was less than 50% or the absolute value remained greater than 20% of the dose and TSab values remained unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A patient with Graves’ disease showing only psychiatric symptoms and negativity for both TSH receptor autoantibody and thyroid stimulating antibody

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) negative Graves’s disease (GD) is extremely rare. Here we present such a patient. Case presentation The patient was a 76-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having schizophrenia forty years ago. She did not show characteristic symptoms for hyperthyroidism, such as swelling of thyroid, exophthalmos, tachycardia and tremor, however, she showed only psychomotor agitation. Serum free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels were elevated and TSH level was suppressed, suggesting the existence of hyperthyroidism. However, both the first generation TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb1) and the thyroid stimulating autoantibody (TSAb) were negative. Slightly increased blood flow and swelling was detected by thyroid echography. Thyroid scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse and remarkably elevated uptake of 123I uptake. Finally, we diagnosed her as having GD. She was treated by using methimazole, and hyperthyroidism and her psychiatric symptoms were promptly ameliorated. Discussion We experienced a patient with GD who did not show characteristic symptoms except for psychiatric symptoms, and also showed negativity for both TRAb1 and TSAb. Thyroid autoantibody-negative GD is extremely rare. Thyroid scintigraphy was useful to diagnose such a patient. PMID:23206540

  19. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes.

  20. Genetic differences in the production of male neonates in Daphnia magna exposed to juvenile hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Watanabe, Hajime; Morita, Masatoshi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2006-06-01

    We studied the susceptibility of three genetically different strains of the cyclical parthenogen Daphnia magna (Cladocera, Crustacea) in producing male neonates following exposure to juvenile hormone analogs. In experiment 1, NIES, Clone A, and Belgium A strains were exposed to the insect growth regulators (IGRs) fenoxycarb or epofenonane in a 21-day reproduction experiment. Fenoxycarb exposure decreased the total number of neonates and increased production of male neonates in a concentration-dependent manner in the NIES strain. The decrease in the total number of neonates was so great in Clone A following fenoxycarb exposure that male neonates were not observed, even at the highest concentration, where the total number of neonates was only 2% of the control. In the Belgium A strain, male neonates were observed at a rate of about 20% following exposure to the highest fenoxycarb concentration, but the total number observed was small. Epofenonane did not decrease reproduction in the NIES and Belgium A strains as dramatically as did fenoxycarb, but the neonatal sex ratio changed in a concentration-dependent manner. Although the ratio of males was as low as about 10%, induction of male neonates was also observed in Clone A following epofenonane exposure. In experiment 2, gravid females were exposed to high concentrations (5 or 10 microg/l) of fenoxycarb or pyriproxyfen for 12h. These treatments induced the production of male neonates in all strains, with a small decrease in the total number of neonates. Although induction of male neonates by juvenile hormones and their analogs was universal among genetically different strains, care is needed in interpreting the results of the 21-day reproduction tests, because decreased numbers of neonates at higher concentrations could obscure the presence of male neonates.

  1. Production of male neonates in Daphnia magna (Cladocera, Crustacea) exposed to juvenile hormones and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Watanabe, Hajime; Morita, Masatoshi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2005-12-01

    We exposed the water flea Daphnia magna (Cladocera, Crustacea) to either juvenile hormone I (JH I), juvenile hormone II (JH II), or the juvenile hormone-mimicking insecticides kinoprene, hydroprene, epofenonane, or fenoxycarb. By 21-day reproduction tests, we investigated the effects on the number of neonates born per female and the offspring sex ratio. All six chemicals induced D. magna to produce male neonates; the male sex ratio of the offspring increased as the chemical concentration increased. EC50 values for production of male neonates were estimated as 400 (JH I), 410 (JH II), 190 (kinoprene), 2.9 (hydroprene), 64 (epofenonane), and 0.92 (fenoxycarb) microg/l. The number of neonates produced was reduced with all chemicals at the concentrations investigated. At the EC50 for male production, five of the six chemicals reduced the reproductive rate to less than 50%; the exception was epofenonane, which caused only a slight reduction in reproductive rate. These results were similar to those obtained for five juvenoids studied previously, one of which was studied here again. There are now 10 chemical substances--all juvenile hormones or their analogs-that are known to induce D. magna to produce male neonates. This suggests that juvenile hormone is involved in initiating male production followed by sexual reproduction in D. magna, and probably in most cladocerans that exhibit cyclic parthenogenesis.

  2. Production of male neonates in four cladoceran species exposed to a juvenile hormone analog, fenoxycarb.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Watanabe, Hajime; Morita, Masatoshi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies have found that exposure of a cyclic parthenogen, the water flea Daphnia magna (Cladocera, Crustacea), to juvenile hormones and their analogs results in the production of neonates of male sex at concentration-dependent rates. We conducted reproduction experiments in four different species (Moina macrocopa, M. micrura, Ceriodaphnia dubia and C. reticulata) of cladoceran to test for the first time whether the occurrence of this phenomenon after exposure of the parent to such hormones is a generalized phenomenon. In the presence of a juvenile hormone analog, fenoxycarb, all four species produced male neonates and showed reduced rates of reproduction. The estimated median effective concentration (EC50) for the production of male neonates varied with species, ranging from 0.60 x 10(3) to 9.3 x 10(3) ng/l. Although there was a wide range of sensitivity to fenoxycarb, the production of male neonates in all four species demonstrates that this phenomenon is a common response to juvenile hormone analogs and further suggests that these hormones are capable of initiating sexual reproduction in cladocerans, most of which exhibit cyclic parthenogenesis.

  3. Stimulation of thyroid hormone secretion by thyrotropin in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed Central

    St Aubin, D J

    1987-01-01

    Bovine thyroid stimulating hormone administered to three beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, was effective in producing an increase in circulating levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine. A single dose of 10 I.U. of thyroid stimulating hormone resulted in a 145% increase in triiodothyronine and a 35% increase in thyroxine after nine hours in a whale tested within two hours after capture. The response was less pronounced in an animal tested with the same does on two occasions after four and eight weeks in captivity. In the third whale, 10 I.U. of thyroid stimulating hormone given on each of three consecutive days produced a marked increase in triiodothyronine and thyroxine. The elevation of thyroxine concentration persisted for at least two days after the last injection of thyroid stimulating hormone. A subsequent decrease in thyroxine to levels below baseline signalled the suppression of endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone. This preliminary study helps to establish a protocol for testing thyroid function in cetaceans. PMID:3651900

  4. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON THYROID HORMONE STATUS IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RATS. M.N. Logan1, J.R. Thibodeaux2, R.G. Hanson2, C. Lau2. 1North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC, 2Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Perfluor...

  5. Hormone levels in neonatal hair reflect prior maternal stress exposure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele R; Ziegler, Toni E; Coe, Christopher L

    2016-04-01

    Hormones present in hair provide summative information about endocrine activity while the hair was growing. Therefore, it can be collected from an infant after birth and still provide retrospective information about hormone exposure during prenatal development. We employed this approach to determine whether a delimited period of maternal stress during pregnancy affected the concentrations of glucocorticoids and gonadal hormones in the hair of neonatal rhesus monkeys. Hair from 22 infant monkeys exposed to 5 weeks of gestational disturbance was compared to specimens from 13 infants from undisturbed control pregnancies. Using an LC/MS/MS based technique, which permitted seven steroid hormones to be quantified simultaneously, we found 2 hormones were significantly different in infants from disturbed pregnancies. Cortisol and testosterone levels were lower in the hair of both male and female neonates. Maternal hair hormone levels collected on the same day after delivery no longer showed effects of the disturbance earlier during pregnancy. This study documents that a period of acute stress, lasting for 20% of gestation, has sustained effects on the hormones to which a developing fetus is exposed.

  6. Diagnosis of Pediatric Hyperthyroidism: Technetium 99 Uptake Versus Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Levitsky, Lynne L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment with antithyroid drugs is effective in conditions of increased thyroid hormone production (mostly Graves' Disease; GD), but not in subacute thyroiditis (SAT) or autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT). Positive thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) make GD likely. However, not all children with GD have increased TSI. Uptake studies with 123I or 99Tc (99mTc) provide accurate and rapid diagnosis but are expensive and involve radiation exposure. Our objective was to compare TSI with 99mTc uptake for diagnosis of pediatric hyperthyroidism. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of hyperthyroid children who had both TSI estimation and 99mTc uptake assessment at presentation. Based on subsequent laboratory studies and follow-up, 37 had GD and 10 had non-GD thyroiditis. The TSI index was considered positive (TSI+) when it was above the upper limit of normal. 99mTc uptake was considered positive (Tc+) for any uptake >0.4% and negative (and low) (Tc-) for uptake ≤0.4%. Results: Forty-seven youth (83% females), aged 12.3±4.6 years, presented with a suppressed thyrotropin (TSH) and elevated free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine. All 37 patients with GD were Tc+ (100% sensitivity and specificity). The sensitivity of TSI for diagnosing GD was 84%, and the specificity was 100%. Six patients with GD were discordant with Tc+ but TSI–. Elevated TSI correlated with Tc+ (p=0.01) with a degree of agreement (kappa) of 0.69. Conclusion: 99mTc has excellent specificity and sensitivity in diagnosing GD. Given additional costs of 99mTc (two and a half times as much as TSI), it is reasonable to reserve 99mTc uptake assessment for hyperthyroidism of unclear etiology and negative TSI. PMID:25257665

  7. Roles of thyroid hormones in follicular development in the ovary of neonatal and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Fedail, Jaafar Sulieman; Zheng, Kaizhi; Wei, Quanwei; Kong, Lingfa; Shi, Fangxiong

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play a critical role in ovarian follicular development, maturation and the maintenance of various endocrine functions. However, whether TH can affect ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of TH on ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats. Thirty female post-lactation mothers of Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperthyroid (hyper), and hypothyroid (hypo). On postnatal days (PND) 10 and 21, body weights, serum hormones, ovarian histologic changes, and immunohistochemistry of thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 (TRα1) and nitric oxide synthase types (NOS), and NOS activities, were determined. The data showed that body weights significantly decreased in both hyper and hypo groups compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the hyper group had increased serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2; whereas the hypo group manifested reduced serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2 on PND 10 and 21. The hyper and hypo groups showed significantly reduced total number of primordial, primary and secondary follicles on PND 10 and 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Similarly, antral follicle numbers in the hyper and hypo groups were significantly decreased on PND 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Immunostaining indicated that TRα1 and NOS were expressed in ovarian surface epithelium and oocytes of growing and antral follicles, with strong staining of the granulosa and theca cells of follicles. NOS activities were significantly augmented in the hyper, but diminished in the hypo groups on PND 10 and 21. In summary, our findings suggest that TH play important roles in ovarian functions and in the regulation of NOS activity. Our results also indicate that a relationship exists between the TH and NO signaling pathways during the process of ovarian follicular

  8. Growth hormone release induced by growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide is not mediated by thyrotropin-releasing hormone in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Kacsóh, B; Kacsóh, G; Guzzardo, M B; Black, A C; Bisat, T

    1997-02-01

    GH-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and nursing stimulate GH secretion in rat pups via GH-releasing factors (GRFs: distinct from GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). It was determined whether GH secretion induced by GHRP-6 or nursing was mediated by TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) in 2-d-old rats. In vitro. GHRP-6 and TRH stimulated GH secretion of neonatal pituitary glands. At their maximally effective doses, GHRP-6 and TRH evoked approximately equal GH responses. Treatment with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH resulted in a GH response comparable to that evoked by either treatment alone. GHRP-6 in vivo induced a greater GH response than did TRH. Treatment in vivo with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH synergistically increased serum GH levels. Unlike GHRP-6 TRH was an effective stimulus of prolactin secretion either in vitro or in vivo. Nursing was an effective stimulus for GH secretion, but only marginally increased serum prolactin levels. The effects of either of the peptides and nursing on GH secretion were additive. These results suggest that GHRP-6 stimulates GH secretion both by acting directly on the pituitary gland and indirectly via a hypothalamic GRF. The indirect effect appears to be greater. The alternative GRFs released by GHRP-6 or nursing are distinct from each other and from TRH. These findings suggest that alternative GRFs play a significant role in the regulation of GH secretion in neonatal rats.

  9. [Hypothyroidism Associated to TSH Hormone-Receptor Autoantibodies with Blocking Activity Assessed In Vitro].

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro; Chikh, Karim; Charrié, Anne; Pina, Rosa; Bugalho, Maria João; Lopes, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies normally causes hyperthyroidism. However, they might have blocking activity causing hypothyroidism. A 11-year-old girl followed due to type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease and euthyroid lymphocytic thyroiditis at diagnosis. Two years after the initial evaluation, thyroid-stimulating hormone was suppressed with normal free T4; nine months later, a biochemical evolution to hypothyroidism with thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies elevation was seen; the patient remained always asymptomatic. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone -receptor, and then exposed to the patient's serum; it was estimated a 'moderate' blocking activity of these thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, and concomitantly excluded stimulating action. In this case, the acknowledgment of the blocking activity of the serum thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, supported the hypothesis of a multifactorial aetiology of the hypothyroidism, which in the absence of the in vitro tests, we would consider only as a consequence of the destructive process associated to lymphocytic thyroiditis.

  10. Neonatal thyroid function: prematurity, prenatal steroids, and respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Purdie, G L; O'Grady, C M

    1986-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 97 preterm infants at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Triiodothyronine uptake, free thyroxine index, thyroxine, free thyroxine, triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, and thyroxine binding globulin values at birth correlated with gestational age, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone values did not. Treatment with steroids prenatally had no apparent effect on thyroid function at birth or postnatally. Infants developing respiratory distress syndrome had normal values for all indices at birth. These infants had significantly lower thyroxine, free thyroxine index, free thyroxine, and triiodothyronine values at 5 days of age, while thyroid stimulating hormone values remained normal. This alteration in thyroid function was interpreted as being secondary to respiratory distress syndrome. Gestational maturity and respiratory distress syndrome, if present, must be taken into account when evaluating thyroxine variables in preterm infants, whereas measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone as the screen for congenital hypothyroidism circumvents these considerations. PMID:3729529

  11. Release of Multiple Hormones by a Direct Action of Interleukin-1 on Pituitary Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    monolayer culture was investigated. Recombinant human IL-I beta stimulated the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone, luteinizing hormone, growth ... hormone , and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Prolactin secretion by the monolayers was inhibited by similar doses. These concentrations of IL-I are within

  12. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Is Increased in Hypertensive Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heizhati, Mulalibieke; Sun, Chao; Abulikemu, Suofeiya; Shao, Liang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Wang, Yingchun; Hong, Jing; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate alteration in serum TSH in hypertensives with OSA and its relation with cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods. 517 hypertensives were cross-sectionally studied. OSA was determined by polysomnography and thyroid function by standard methods. Results. OSA was diagnosed in 373 hypertensives (72.15%). Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was significantly higher in OSA hypertensives than in non-OSA ones (15.0% versus 6.9%, P = 0.014). Serum LnTSH in hypertensives with severe OSA was significantly higher (0.99 ± 0.81 versus 0.74 ± 0.77 μIU/mL, P < 0.05) than in those without OSA. AHI, LSaO2, ODI3, and ODI4 were independently associated with serum TSH for those aged 30–65 years. Dividing subjects into four groups as TSH < 1.0 μIU/mL, 1.0 ≤ THS ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL, 1.91 ≤ TSH < 4.5 μIU/mL, and TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL, only 26.3% of OSA subjects exhibited TSH between 1.0 and 1.9 μIU/mL, significantly less than non-OSA subjects (26.3% versus 38.2%, P = 0.01). DBP and serum LDL-c elevated with TSH increasing and were only significantly higher in TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL group than in 1.0 ≤ TSH ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL group (96.32 ± 14.19 versus 92.31 ± 12.86 mmHg; P = 0.040; 0.99 ± 0.60 versus 0.87 ± 0.34 mmol/L, P = 0.023). Conclusion. OSA might be a risk factor for increased TSH even within reference range in hypertensive population. PMID:27882050

  13. Harmonization protocols for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) immunoassays: different approaches based on the consensus mean value.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Ripoli, Andrea; Zucchelli, Gian Carlo; Plebani, Mario

    2015-02-01

    The lack of interchangeable laboratory results and consensus in current practices has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. In the area of method standardization and harmonization, there is considerable debate about how best to achieve comparability of measurement for immunoassays, and in particular heterogeneous proteins. The term standardization should be used only when comparable results among measurement procedures are based on calibration traceability to the International System of Units (SI unit) using a reference measurement procedure (RMP). Recently, it has been promoted the harmonization of methods for many immunoassays, and in particular for thyreotropin (TSH), as accepted RMPs are not available. In a recent paper published in this journal, a group of well-recognized authors used a complex statistical approach in order to reduce variability between the results observed with the 14 TSH immunoassay methods tested in their study. Here we provide data demonstrating that data from an external quality assessment (EQA) study allow similar results to those obtained using the reported statistical approach.

  14. Localization of cells producting thyroid stimulating hormone in the pituitary gland of the domestic drake.

    PubMed

    Sharp, P J; Chiasson, R B; El Tounsy, M M; Klandorf, H; Radke, W J

    1979-04-30

    Cells binding anti-bovine TASH beta serum were found exclusively in the rostral lobe of the adenohypophysis of the drake using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase complex unlabelled antibody method. The specificity of the binding of the anti-serum to TSH cells was established by relating the morphology and relative abundance of immunochemically stained cells to the TSH content of the adenohypophysis after experimentally altering the activity of the pituitary-thyroid axis. The TSH activity of the adenohypophysis was assessed indirectly, by the weight of the thyroid glands, and directly, by bioassay. As determined by bioassay, the TSH content of the rostral lobe of the adenohypophysis was much greater than that of the caudal lobe. Compared with control drakes, immunochemically stained cells in birds fed a goitrogen, methimazole, seemed to be enlarged and were closer together, while the stained cells in drakes injected with thyroxine were shrunken and less intensely stained. The TSH content of the adenohypophysis was increased in drakes fed methimazole. Castration did not alter the TSH content of the adenohypophysis or change the morphology of immunochemically stained cells. These observations suggest that in the drake: 1) anti-bovine TSH beta serum binds specifically to TSH cells; 2) the TSH cells occur in the rostral and not in the caudal lobe of the adenohypophysis; and 3) the activity of TSH cells is not inhibited by the feedback effects of gonadal steroids.

  15. Analysis of serum Calcium, Magnesium, and Parathyroid Hormone in neonates delivered following preeclampsia treatment.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, S; Zaman, M; Farzan, B

    2016-12-30

    Due to the approximate clinical and biochemical manifestations of calcium and magnesium disturbances, with regard to the regulatory effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH), this present study is designed to analyze serum calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and (PTH) at the time of birth, 24 hours afterwards in newborns after the mother has been treated with Mg-sulfate. We registered 86 term and preterm neonates (43 in each group) using simple census method delivered through vagina to preeclampsia pregnant women treated with Mg-sulfate immediately before birth in Khoramabad Asali Hospital, Iran. The first specimen was obtained from umbilical cord blood at birth, followed by the second sample of 2cc peripherally obtained from blood 24 hours after birth. The mean serum Mg level was higher than normal for both specimens in both term and preterm groups with no significant difference. The mean serum Ca level was higher in term group at both occasions, which turned out to be statistically significant (P<0.000) and (P=0.001) for the first and second specimens respectively. The mean PTH level was also in normal range for both groups at both times with no statistical significance. On the other hand, magnesium level showed a significant decline at 24 hours (P = 0.005) while PTH increased significantly (p<0.000) and (p=0.005) for term and preterm groups respectively. In contrast, Ca changes were not significantly different between the two specimens. Treatment with Mg-sulfate immediately before vaginal delivery increases Mg in both term and preterm neonates with no effect on Ca and PTH levels.

  16. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  17. Hormone replacement with 17β-estradiol plus dihydrotestosterone restores male sexual behavior in rats treated neonatally with clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Limón-Morales, Ofelia; Soria-Fregozo, Cesar; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; González, Marisela Hernández; Vázquez-Palacios, Gonzalo; Bonilla-Jaime, Herlinda

    2014-11-01

    Male sexual behavior (MSB) in rodents, in both its consummatory and motivational components, is regulated by hormones such as testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone. In experiments, neonatal treatment with clomipramine (CMI; a serotonin reuptake inhibitor) reproduces some of the signs of depression in adult age, including reduced sexual behavior manifested in a lower percentage of subjects that mount, intromit and ejaculate, although their testosterone levels were not altered. However, the effect of this treatment on estrogen levels and the consequences of hormone substitution using 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone on the expression of male sexual behavior are still unknown. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to analyze the effect of neonatal treatment with CMI on plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol levels, and the role of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone in altering the consummatory and motivational components of sexual behavior in male rats. To this end, it analyzed the copulatory parameters and sexual incentive motivation (SIM) of rats treated with CMI under two conditions: basal and post-hormone replacements. Neonatal treatment with CMI did not affect plasma testosterone or 17β-estradiol concentrations, but did decrease both the consummatory component and sexual motivation according to the results of the SIM test. These aspects were recovered after administering 17β-estradiol +5-α-dihydrotestosterone, but not testosterone.

  18. Developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency reduces expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in adults but not in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Gilbert, M E

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expression of BDNF in a number of brain regions. The present study examined the impact of modest levels of developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency on BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum in the neonatal and adult offspring of rat dams treated throughout pregnancy and lactation. Graded levels of hormone insufficiency were induced by adding propylthiouracil (PTU, 0, 1, 2, 3 and 10 ppm) to the drinking water of pregnant dams from early gestation (gestational day 6) until weaning of the pups. Pups were sacrificed on postnatal days (PN) 14 and 21, and -PN100, and trunk blood collected for thyroid hormone analysis. Hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum were separated from dissected brains and assessed for BDNF protein. Dose-dependent reductions in serum hormones in dams and pups were produced by PTU. Consistent with previous findings, age and regional differences in BDNF concentrations were observed. However, no differences in BDNF expression were detected in the preweanling animals as a function of PTU exposure; yet dose-dependent alterations emerged in adulthood despite the return of thyroid hormone levels to control values. Males were more affected by PTU than females, BDNF levels in hippocampus and cortex were altered but not those in cerebellum, and biphasic dose-response functions were detected in both sexes. These findings indicate that BDNF may mediate some of the adverse effects accompanying developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency, and reflect the potential for delayed impact of modest reductions in thyroid hormones during critical periods of brain development on a protein important for normal synaptic function.

  19. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) challenges and characterize the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress...number. 1. REPORT DATE 2012 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress

  20. The Relationship between Perchlorate in Drinking Water and Cord Blood Thyroid Hormones: First Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Ashraf; Rafiei, Nasim; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Taghian, Zahra; Mofateh, Samaneh; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation) of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10) μg/l, 7.81 (4.14) mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85) mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53) mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low (<5 μg/l) and high level of drinking ground water perchlorate (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates. PMID:25789149

  1. Foetal and neonatal thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Radetti, G; Zavallone, A; Gentili, L; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bona, G

    2002-10-01

    recently identified are represented by TSH receptor mutations leading to constitutively activated TSH receptor. Infants born to mothers with Graves' history may develop neonatal thyrotoxicosis. Foetal/neonatal disease is due to transplacental thyrotrophin receptor stimulating antibodies (TRAb) passage. It's extremely important recognizing and treating Graves' disease in mothers as soon as possible, because a thyrotoxic state may have adverse effects on the outcome of pregnancy and both on the foetus and newborn. Thyrotoxic foetuses may develop goitre, tachycardia, hydrops associated with heart failure, growth retardation, craniosynostosis, increased foetal motility and accelerated bone maturation. Neonatal Graves' disease tends to resolve spontaneously within 3-12 weeks as maternal thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins are cleared from the circulation but subsequent development may be impaired by perceptual motor difficulties. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a very common autoimmune thyroid disease. In presence of maternal Hashimoto's thyroiditis, there are usually no consequences on foetal thyroid, even if antiTPO and antiTg antibodies can be found in the newborn due to transplacental passage. However there are some literature reports describing foetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism in the affected mothers' offspring.

  2. Sexual differentiation of oxytocin stress responsiveness: effect of neonatal androgenization, castration and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Carter, D A; Saridaki, E; Lightman, S L

    1988-04-01

    The plasma OT increment following stress in rats is sexually dimorphic, females exhibiting greater responses than males. We have investigated the role of neonatal androgen secretion in determining the sex-typical level of response. Castration of male pups either surgically or functionally (GnRH antagonist treatment) within either 2 h or 5 days of birth did not elevate the OT responses of adult males. In contrast, androgenization of female pups (testosterone, 1.25 mg/pup) within 5 days of birth markedly reduced the OT stress responses of adults to a level insignificantly different to males. The results show that neonatal androgens can exert organizational effects on OT regulatory mechanisms. Since neonatal castration was ineffective it would appear that a prenatal defeminization or masculinization event determines OT stress responsiveness in males.

  3. Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone is not Required for Thyrotropin Secretion in the Perinatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Theodor; Braverman, Lewis E.; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.

    1979-01-01

    To determine the role of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion in the perinatal period, a physiological approach of neutralizing circulating TRH in the fetal and early neonatal rat was employed. TRH-antiserum (TRH-AS) raised in rabbits and administered daily to low iodine-propylthiouracil (LID-PTU)-fed pregnant rats from days 12 to 19 of gestation markedly impaired the rise in serum TSH to LID-PTU when compared with normal rabbit serum-treated controls. In contrast, fetal serum TSH was unaffected by TRH-AS. The binding capacity of TRH-AS in the fetal serum (111 ng/ml) far exceeded circulating TRH in the fetus. Similarly, acute TRH-AS administration to the pregnant rat fed LID-PTU markedly decreased the serum TSH concentration in the mother, but not in the fetus, 60 min after TRH-AS administration. Chronic TRH-AS administration to neonatal rats whose nursing mothers were fed LID-PTU was in-effective in decreasing the elevated serum TSH in the neonate through day 8 of life, whereas a slight but significant decrease in serum TSH was observed on day 10. Chronic daily TRH-AS administration to neonatal rats through day 10 of life had no effect on the later development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. These findings suggest that TRH does not participate in TSH regulation during the perinatal life in the rat and that thyroid hormones are probably the main regulators of TSH secretion during this period. Placental TRH is not important in regulating TSH secretion in the fetal rat. Furthermore, TRH “deprivation” during neonatal life does not prevent normal later development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. PMID:108290

  4. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  5. Thyrotoxicosis in a neonate of a mother with no history of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, D S; McCandless, A E; Smith, C S

    1976-04-01

    A newborn infant had rectal prolapse, congenital lactase deficiency, and temporary neonatal thyrotoxicosis. The thyrotoxicosis was associated with a raised long-acting thyroid stimulator index in a mother with no personal or family history of thyroid or related autoimmune disease. The parents were first cousins.

  6. Neonatal hormone changes and growth in lambs born to dams receiving differing nutritional intakes and selenium supplementation during gestation.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Leticia E; Meyer, Allison M; Neville, Tammi L; Hammer, Carolyn J; Redmer, Dale A; Reynolds, Lawrence P; Caton, Joel S; Vonnahme, Kimberly A

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of maternal selenium (Se) supplementation and nutritional intake during gestation on hormone changes, percentage body weight (BW) change, and organ mass in neonatal lambs, ewes were allocated to differing Se levels (adequate Se (ASe, 11.5 μg/kg BW) or high Se (HSe, 77.0 μg/kg BW)) initiated at breeding and nutritional intake (60% (RES), 100% (CON), or 140% (HIGH) of NRC requirements) initiated at day 40 of gestation. At parturition, all lambs were removed from dams, fed common diets, and BW and blood samples were collected until day 19. There was a Se × nutritional intake × day interaction for percentage BW change from birth. Lambs born to ASe-HIGH ewes tended to have decreased BW change compared with ASe-CON and ASe-RES groups on day 7. Lambs from HSe-HIGH ewes tended to have increased BW change compared with HSe-RES and HSe-CON groups from days 7 to 19. At birth, there was a Se × sex of offspring interaction, in which male lambs from HSe ewes had decreased cortisol concentrations compared with all other lambs. By 24 h, lambs from RES ewes had decreased cortisol compared with those from HIGH ewes, with lambs from CON ewes being intermediate. Lambs from RES- and CON-fed ewes had greater thyroxine than HIGH ewes at 24 h. Organ masses on day 19 were mainly impacted by maternal nutritional intake and sex of the offspring. Birth weight alone did not predict growth performance during neonatal life. Moreover, despite a similar postnatal diet, maternal nutritional plane and Se status did impact neonatal endocrine profiles. Exact mechanisms of how neonatal endocrine status can influence later growth and development need to be determined.

  7. Unlike thyrotropin, thyroid-stimulating antibodies do not activate phospholipase C in human thyroid slices.

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, E; Van Sande, J; Ludgate, M; Corvilain, B; Rocmans, P; Dumont, J E; Mockel, J

    1991-01-01

    The effects of thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAb) and of thyrotropin (TSH) were compared, on the generation of cyclic AMP and inositol phosphates (InsP), in human thyroid slices incubated in vitro, and on the Rapoport cyclic AMP bioassay. The TSAb positive sera were obtained from 19 patients with Graves' disease. In 14 experiments with the slices system, TSH significantly increased cyclic AMP accumulation (TSH, 0.03-10 mU/ml) as well as the cyclic AMP-independent inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) generation (TSH, 1-10 mU/ml). In the same 14 experiments, TSAb (0.10-28 mg/ml) enhanced cyclic AMP intracellular levels as expected while they did not induce any InsP accumulation. Even when TSAb increased cyclic AMP levels to the same or higher values as those obtained with TSH concentrations allowing InsP3 generation. TSAb were still unable to activate the phosphatidylinositol-Ca2+ cascade. The patterns of the response curves of TSAb and TSH on cyclic AMP accumulation were different, suggesting that different mechanisms may be involved. In addition, unlike TSH, TSAb were not able to stimulate H2O2 generation, which in human tissue mainly depends on the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-Ca2+ cascade. Immunoglobulins from six additional Graves' patients lacking measurable cyclic AMP-stimulating activity in both slices and cells systems did not activate phospholipase C either. In conclusion, our results show that TSAb do not share all the metabolic actions of TSH on human thyroid tissue. The data provide support for the concept that the pathogenesis of Graves' disease can be fully accounted for by the ability of TSAb to stimulate adenylate cyclase. This work also confirms that TSH activates the cyclic AMP and the phosphatidylinositol cascade by independent pathways in the human thyroid. PMID:1673689

  8. Value of thyroid stimulating antibody in the diagnosis of thyroid associated ophthalmopathy of euthyroid patients

    PubMed Central

    Kazuo, K.; Fujikado, T.; Ohmi, G.; Hosohata, J.; Tano, Y.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) of euthyroid patients is difficult to diagnose because clinical findings overlap with other conditions, and no confirmatory diagnostic tests are available. Recently, it was reported that TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) are sensitive markers of TAO. The sensitivity of these antibodies in the detection of TAO were therefore studied to determine if they could be a useful criterion in the diagnosis of TAO of euthyroid patients.
METHODS—Serum values of TBII and TSAb of 35 patients with euthyroid TAO (group A) were compared with those of 27 patients with Graves' disease and TAO (group B). The relation between the serum value of TSAb and the eye symptoms of patients with euthyroid TAO were also examined by multiple linear regression analysis.
RESULTS—In group A, TBII was positive in 10 cases (28.6%) and TSAb was positive in 29 cases (82.9%). In group B, both TBII and TSAb were positive in all cases (100%). The titre of serum TBII in group A (15.6% (SD 18.0%)) was significantly lower (p<0.0001) than in group B (57.9% (21.5%)). The titre of serum TSAb in group A (1400.9% (2163.9%)) was significantly lower (p=0.0026) than in group B (2243.9% (1472.8%)). Among the eye findings of patients with euthyroid TAO, keratopathy was significantly (p=0.034) related to the value of TSAb.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that the activity of TSAb is a more sensitive marker of euthyroid TAO than is TBII, and could be a useful criterion in the diagnosis of TAO of euthyroid patients.

 PMID:9497469

  9. [Oxytocin and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic neonatal hormone. Case report of early severe hyponatremia and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aldana-Valenzuela, Carlos; Prieto-Pantoja, José Alfredo; Hernández-Acevedo, Angélica

    2010-12-01

    This is a clinical case presentation of a full term newborn infant who suffered severe hyponatremia and early seizures, associated with maternal fluid overload with electrolyte free solutions and high doses of oxytocin for labor augmentation. Although this condition has been recognized since the 1960's with isolated reports, this particular case has features that needs further investigation, not only for the unsually severe hyponatremia, but most importantly we think, for the prominent signs of fluid retention, the infant had, that suggest excessive antidiuretic activity probably due to oxytocin. These findings are consistent with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Although until now there is no proof that oxytocin by itself produces this syndrome. We think the association is possible in certain clinical circumstances, such as those found in this case. We also, briefly discussed the pathophysiology of perinatal hyponatremia, the neonatal treatment of this condition and the current guidelines for the women in labor. Hyponatremia should not be considered a benign condition, since in the neonate, it may affect brain function.

  10. Thyroxine binding globulin excess detected by neonatal screening

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) disorder can be identified incidentally or through neonatal screening test. TBG excess is characterized by high levels of thyroxine (T4) but normal level of free T4 (fT4), while TBG deficiency presents with low T4 levels and normal fT4 levels. A 27-day-old newborn was brought to the hospital because of hyperthyroxinemia detected by neonatal screening. His T4 level was 18.83 µg/dL (normal range, 5.9–16.0 µg/dL). His mother had no history of any thyroid disease. His fT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were 1.99 ng/dL (normal range, 0.8–2.1 ng/dL) and 4.54 mIU/L (normal range, 0.5–6.5 mIU/L), respectively. His serum total triiodothyronine (T3) level was 322.5 ng/dL (normal range, 105.0–245.0 ng/dL). His TBG level was 68.27 mg/L (normal range, 16.0–36.0 mg/L) at the age of 3 months. At 6 months and 12 months of age, his TBG levels were 48.77 mg/L (normal range, 16.0–36.0 mg/L) and 50.20 mg/L (normal range, 14.0–28.0 mg/L), respectively, which were 2 to 3 times higher than normal values. Hormonal studies showed consistently elevated T3 and T4 levels and upper normal levels of fT4 and free T3 with normal TSH levels. His growth and development were normal. TBG excess should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for hyperthyroxinemia and especially high T3 levels with normal TSH concentration. PMID:27462589

  11. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis treated with exchange transfusion and Lugol's iodine.

    PubMed

    Wit, J M; Gerards, L J; Vermeulen-Meiners, C; Bruinse, H W

    1985-03-01

    An infant with neonatal thyrotoxicosis was born to a mother who had become euthyroid after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. Exchange transfusion resulted in a 50% decrease of serum thyroxine levels and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. After 10 days mild thyrotoxic signs reappeared with high serum thyroxine levels, which were treated successfully with Lugol's iodine for 4 weeks. TSI was undetectable at 7 weeks of age. TSI was present in breast milk.

  12. Effects of prenatal phthalate exposure on thyroid hormone levels, mental and psychomotor development of infants: The Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Minatoya, Machiko; Naka Jima, Sonomi; Sasaki, Seiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Ikeno, Tamiko; Nakajima, Tamie; Goto, Yuko; Kishi, Reiko

    2016-09-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is commonly used phthalates and concerns of adverse effects of prenatal DEHP exposure on neonatal thyroid hormone (TH) and neurodevelopment are increasing. However, there is no report regarding association between prenatal DEHP exposure and infant neurodevelopment including TH levels in Japanese population. Thus the aim of present study was to evaluate the associations between prenatal DEHP exposure and mental and psychomotor development of infants 6 and 18months along with investigating influence on neonatal free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in the prospective birth cohort study. Maternal blood samples collected between 23 and 41weeks of gestation was analyzed for mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), metabolite of DEHP levels. Neonatal FT4 and TSH were obtained from mass screening data. Infant neurodevelopment was assessed by Bayley Scale of Infant Development second edition at 6 and 18month of age. For the final analysis, 328 participants were included. The median levels of maternal MEHP was 10.6ng/ml, neonatal TSH and FT4 was 2.20 μU/ml and 2.03ng/ml, respectively. We did not find any associations between prenatal DEHP exposure and neonatal TH levels or infant mental and psychomotor development at 6 and 18month. In this study, prenatal DEHP exposure did not show adverse effects on infant TH levels or mental and psychomotor development in early life stage. However, our previous study revealed negative effects of prenatal DEHP exposure on sex hormone levels, continuous investigation on neurodevelopment in later life in association with prenatal DEHP exposure is necessary.

  13. Evaluation of thyroid hormones in children receiving carbamazepine or valproate: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, İhsan; Kılıç, Betül Aydın; Arapoglu, Mujde; Yalçın, Koray; Dalgıç, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the alterations in thyroid function during carbamazepine or valproate monotherapy in a prospective study. Forty patients treated with valproate, 33 patients treated with carbamazepine, and 36 control patients, all aged between 2 and 18 years, were enrolled in our study. Serum levels of thyroid hormones were measured before the beginning of the antiepileptic therapy and at 6 and 12 months of treatment. Carbamazepine-treated patients showed mean serum thyroid hormone levels significantly lower than baseline evaluation and the control group. Thyroid-stimulating hormone levels at 6 and 12 months were not significantly different in carbamazepine treated patients. Serum hormone levels did not change during valproate treatment. Thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were significantly higher at the 12th month of valproate treatment. Our data suggest that although carbamazepine causes significant alterations in thyroid hormone levels, these changes do not lead to clinical symptoms at the follow-up period of 12 months.

  14. Regulation of Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Release from the Pituitary by Thyroxine during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally-relevant chemicals such as perchlorate have the ability to disrupt the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of exposed individuals. Larval anurans are a particularly suitable model species for studying the effects of thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) becaus...

  15. Sialadenitis following low dose I-131 diagnostic thyroid scan with Thyrogen® (recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone - thyrotropin alfa)

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Marta E; Muttikkal, Thomas Jose Eluvathingal; Rehm, Patrice K

    2015-01-01

    Salivary dysfunction and sialadenitis are well known complications of radioiodine treatment for thyroid cancer. The parotid gland is more frequently affected and the salivary gland injury is dose related. The symptoms may develop shortly after therapeutic Iodine 131(I-131) administration or months later and progress with time. The development of unilateral parotiditis following a low dose, diagnostic I-131 scan performed following Thyrogen stimulation in a patient without prior history of sialadenitis is rare in our experience, and has not been reported in the medical literature. PMID:26622936

  16. Partial prediction of postpartum Graves' thyrotoxicosis by sensitive bioassay for thyroid-stimulating antibody measured in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ide, Akane; Amino, Nobuyuki; Nishihara, Eijun; Kudo, Takumi; Ito, Mitsuru; Kimura, Yukiko; Tatsumi, Nobuya; Yamazaki, Mineo; Miyauchi, Akira

    2016-10-29

    Graves' disease often occurs after delivery. However, it has been difficult to predict who will develop Graves' hyperthyroidism. We attempted to predict postpartum onset of Graves' disease by measuring anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) and thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAb) in early pregnancy. TRAb was measured by a third generation assay and TSAb was measured by a newly developed sensitive bioassay. In 690 early pregnant women, 2 showed borderline TRAb positive reactions. However, none of them developed Graves' disease after delivery. Thirty-eight of 690 pregnant women were positive for anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) and 4 were positive for TSAb. Two of these 4 women developed postpartum Graves' hyperthyroidism. These findings indicate that the third generation TRAb assay was not useful, but that the sensitive TSAb bioassay was moderately useful for predicting the postpartum onset of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

  17. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  18. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level.

    PubMed

    Kwakkel, J; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2011-05-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback regulation. Recent studies have made clear that during NTIS differential changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur in various tissues, the net effect of which may be either activation or inhibition of thyroid hormone action. In this review we discuss systemic and local changes in thyroid hormone metabolism during illness, highlighting their physiological implications in terms of disease course.

  19. Artificial feeding synchronizes behavioral, hormonal, metabolic and neural parameters in mother-deprived neonatal rabbit pups

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Elvira; Juárez, Claudia; Melo, Angel I.; Domínguez, Belisario; Lehman, Michael N.; Escobar, Carolina; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Nursing in the rabbit is under circadian control, and pups have a daily anticipatory behavioral arousal synchronized to this unique event, but it is not known which signal is the main entraining cue. In the present study we hypothesized that food is the main entraining signal. Using mother-deprived pups we tested the effects of artificial feeding on the synchronization of locomotor behavior, plasma glucose, corticosterone, FOS and PER1 protein rhythms in suprachiasmatic, supraoptic, paraventricular and tuberomammillary nuclei. At postnatal day 1 an intragastric tube was placed by gastrostomy. The next day and for the rest of the experiment pups were fed with a milk formula through the cannula at either 02:00 or 10:00 h (feeding time = zeitgeber time (ZT) 0). At postnatal days 5–7 pups exhibited behavioral arousal with a significant increase in locomotor behavior 60 min before feeding. Glucose levels increased after feeding, peaking at ZT4–ZT12 and then declining. Corticosterone was highest around the time of feeding then decreased to trough concentrations at ZT12–ZT16, increasing again in anticipation of next feeding bout. In the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus had a rhythm of FOS and PER1 that was not significantly affected by the feeding schedule. Conversely, the supraoptic, paraventricular and tuberomammillary nuclei had rhythms of both FOS and PER1 induced by the time of scheduled feeding. We conclude that the nursing rabbit pup is a natural model of food entrainment, since food, in this case milk formula, is a strong synchronizing signal for behavioral, hormonal, metabolic and neural parameters. PMID:22098455

  20. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  1. Effects of prenatal exposure to organochlorines on thyroid hormone status in newborns from two remote coastal regions in Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, Renee; Dewailly, Eric Ayotte, Pierre; Muckle, Gina; Laliberte, Claire; Bruneau, Suzanne

    2008-11-15

    Background: Several prospective studies have revealed that prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other organochlorine compounds (OCs) affect neurodevelopment during infancy. One of the mechanisms by which PCBs might interfere with neurodevelopment is a deficit in thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. Objectives: We investigated the potential impact of transplacental exposure to PCBs and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on TH concentrations in neonates from two remote coastal populations exposed to OCs through the consumption of seafood products. Methods: Blood samples were collected at birth from the umbilical cord of neonates from Nunavik (n=410) and the Lower North Shore of the St. Lawrence River (n=260) (Quebec, Canada) for thyroid parameters [thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T{sub 4} (fT{sub 4}), total T{sub 3} (tT{sub 3}), and thyroxine-binding globuline (TBG)] and contaminants analyses. Results: In multivariate models, umbilical cord plasma concentrations of PCB 153, the predominant PCB congener, were not associated with TH and TSH levels in both populations. Prenatal exposure to HCB was positively associated with fT{sub 4} levels at birth in both populations (Nunavik, {beta}=0.12, p=0.04; St. Lawrence, {beta}=0.19, p<0.01), whereas TBG concentrations were negatively associated with PCB 153 concentrations ({beta}=-0.13, p=0.05) in the St. Lawrence cohort. Conclusion: OCs levels were not associated to a reduction in THs in neonates from our two populations. Essential nutrients derived from seafood such as iodine may have prevented the negative effects of OCs on the thyroid economy during fetal development.

  2. Thyroid hormone resistance and its management

    PubMed Central

    Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of impaired sensitivity to thyroid hormone, also known as syndrome of thyroid hormone resistance, is an inherited condition that occurs in 1 of 40,000 live births characterized by a reduced responsiveness of target tissues to thyroid hormone due to mutations on the thyroid hormone receptor. Patients can present with symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. They usually have elevated thyroid hormones and a normal or elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Due to their nonspecific symptomatic presentation, these patients can be misdiagnosed if the primary care physician is not familiar with the condition. This can result in frustration for the patient and sometimes unnecessary invasive treatment such as radioactive iodine ablation, as in the case presented herein. PMID:27034574

  3. The role of thyroid hormone in sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Carlos; Andersen, Mônica Levy

    2014-03-01

    Sleep deprivation is a stressful condition, as the subject experiences feelings of inadequate well-being and exhibits impairments in his/her functioning. However, in some circumstances sleep deprivation may be crucial for survival of the individual. Most likely, complex neural circuits and hormones play a role in allowing sleep deprivation to occur. For instance, thyroid hormone activity sharply increases when an individual is in a state of sleep deprivation. We believe that this increase is central to sleep deprivation physiology. During sleep deprivation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis initially increases as a consequence of increased release of thyroid stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Subsequently, as sleep deprivation continues, the sympathetic nervous system is recruited through its anatomical connection with the thyroid gland. While thyroid stimulating hormone levels markedly increase during sleep deprivation, it has been suggested that these increases are secondary to sleep deprivation. However, there is little evidence to support this assumption. We believe that the physiology of the thyroid axis during sleep deprivation and the actions of the effector hormone thyroid hormone suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits sleep and not the contrary. To our knowledge, few studies have addressed the possible neural functions that enable sleep deprivation. In this article, we discuss the hypothesis that an augmentation in the thyroid hormone axis is central to a subject's ability to curtail sleep.

  4. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  5. Programming of Dopaminergic Neurons by Neonatal Sex Hormone Exposure: Effects on Dopamine Content and Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Pedro; Silva, Roxana A.; Sanguinetti, Nicole K.; Venegas, Francisca C.; Riquelme, Raul; González, Luis F.; Cruz, Gonzalo; Renard, Georgina M.; Moya, Pablo R.; Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the long-term changes produced by neonatal sex hormone administration on the functioning of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in adult male rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously at postnatal day 1 and were assigned to the following experimental groups: TP (testosterone propionate of 1.0 mg/50 μL); DHT (dihydrotestosterone of 1.0 mg/50 μL); EV (estradiol valerate of 0.1 mg/50 μL); and control (sesame oil of 50 μL). At postnatal day 60, neurochemical studies were performed to determine dopamine content in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area and dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Molecular (mRNA expression of tyrosine hydroxylase) and cellular (tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity) studies were also performed. We found increased dopamine content in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area of TP and EV rats, in addition to increased dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. However, neonatal exposure to DHT, a nonaromatizable androgen, did not affect midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Correspondingly, compared to control rats, levels of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein were significantly increased in TP and EV rats but not in DHT rats, as determined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results suggest an estrogenic mechanism involving increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression, either by direct estrogenic action or by aromatization of testosterone to estradiol in substantia nigra-ventral tegmental area. PMID:26904299

  6. Resistance to growth hormone releasing hormone and gonadotropins in Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteo-dystrophy (AHO). Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action (pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia [PHP-Ia), recent studies have provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad and pituitary. Accordingly, patients with PHP-Ia display variable degrees of resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone (GHRH). Although the incidence and the clinical and biochemical characteristics of PTH and TSH resistance have been widely investigated and described, the cause and significance of the reproductive dysfunction in AHO is still poorly understood. The clinical finding of alterations of GH secretion in these patients was described for the first time only 2 years ago. The present report briefly reviews the literature focusing on the actual knowledge about these last two subjects.

  7. Resistance to Thyroid Hormone Complicated with Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiomyopathy in a Patient with a TRβ Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wakasaki, Hisao; Matsumoto, Miyuki; Tamaki, Shinya; Miyata, Kaori; Yamamoto, Shohei; Minaga, Takamasa; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Komukai, Kenichi; Imanishi, Toshio; Yamaoka, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Shohei; Nishi, Masahiro; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a genetic disorder characterized by reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. We herein describe a 60-year old man who presented with the clinical features of cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus and elevated thyroid hormones with unsuppressed thyroid stimulating hormone. A genetic analysis of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) revealed a missense mutation (A268D) in the TRβ gene. Clinical manifestations of RTH may be variable due to different tissue distributions of TR subtypes and different actions of mutant receptors. The current case demonstrates that patients with a TRβ mutation may have impaired his glucose metabolism and a reduced cardiac function, although patients appear clinically euthyroid. PMID:27853072

  8. The Role of Interleukin-6 and C-Reactive Protein in Non-Thyroidal Illness in Premature Infants Followed in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Dilmen, Uğur

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in non-thyroidal illness (NTI) in premature infants. Methods: Serum levels of IL-6 and CRP, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total thyroxine (T4), free T4 (fT4), total triiodothyronine (T3), and free T3 (fT3) were determined at the 1st, 2nd and 4th weeks of postnatal life in 148 premature infants born before 33 weeks of gestation. Results: At the 1st week, serum T3 was negatively correlated with IL-6(r= -0.33, p= 0.001) and CRP (r= -0.17, p= 0.03). Serum T3 was negatively and more strongly correlated with IL-6 (r= -0.49, p= 0.001) and CRP (r=- 0.33,p= 0.03) at the 2nd week, at which time sepsis frequency and low T3 rates were the highest. At the 4th week, mortality rate was higher among infants with lower T3 levels. Conclusions: High IL-6 and CRP values related to neonatal sepsis might have a significant role in the pathogenesis of NTI in premature infants. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22672862

  9. Potential influence of hormones in the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Papavasiliou, Kyriakos A; Kirkos, John M; Kapetanos, George A; Pournaras, John

    2007-01-01

    The potential influence of hormonal imbalance on the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis was assessed through a prospective clinical study. The serum levels of T3, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, human growth hormone, adrenal cortex hormone and cortisol were evaluated in seven boys and seven girls. Forty-three out of 154 hormonal determinations (27.9%) were abnormal. The results showed increased incidence of pathological values mainly in the levels of follicle-stimulating-hormone, luteinizing-hormone and testosterone. No patient had clinical findings of endocrinopathy. A (possibly) temporary hormonal disorder may play a potentially significant role in the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

  10. Prolonged weightlessness effect on postflight plasma thyroid hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1977-01-01

    Blood drawn before and after spaceflight from the nine Skylab astronauts showed a statistically significant increase in mean plasma thyroxine (T-4) of 1.4 micro g/dl and in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of 4 microunits ml. Concurrent triiodothyronine (T-3) levels decreased 27 ng/dl indicating inhibited conversion of T-4 to T-3. The T-3 decrease is postulated to be a result of the increased cortisol levels noted during and following each mission. These results confirm the thyroidal changes noted after the shorter Apollo flights and show that thyroid hormone levels change during spaceflight.

  11. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  12. Biochemical Hyperthyroidism in a Newborn Baby Caused by Assay Interaction from Biotin Intake

    PubMed Central

    Bülow Pedersen, Inge; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of biochemical neonatal thyrotoxicosis caused by biotin supplementation. Biotin may interact with thyroid function testing to imitate thyrotoxicosis with low thyroid-stimulating hormone and elevated triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels. PMID:27843813

  13. Thyroid hormone regulates Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum during neonatal development of fast skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, G C; Simonides, W S; van Hardeveld, C

    1992-12-01

    In gastrocnemius muscle from newborn rats the mRNA for the fast sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform (SERCA1) comprised over 90% of total SR Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA content and increased 5-fold between day 5 and 20 after birth, whereas in hypothyroid muscle the SERCA1 message level remained constant. Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of 2-day-old euthyroid rats induced a precocious stimulation of SERCA1 mRNA levels, indicating that T3 is the determining factor in the stimulation of SERCA1 message levels and that this stimulation underlies the previously reported effect of the thyroid status on the neonatal development of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. The low mRNA level for the slow SR Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform (SERCA2) was constant in both euthyroid and hypothyroid muscle development. Nevertheless, T3 treatment of hypothyroid neonates induced a transient stimulation of SERCA2 message levels, indicating that SERCA2 is responsive to higher levels of T3.

  14. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormones: pathophysiology and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoru; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Inaba, Hidefumi; Takei, Masahiro; Takeda, Teiji; Komatsu, Mitsuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormone secretion suppresses the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), both of which are strictly controlled by a negative feedback loop between the hypothalamus-pituitary and thyroid. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone (PRTH) is defined as resistance to the action of thyroid hormone that is more severe in the pituitary than at the peripheral tissue level. Although the molecular basis of PRTH is not well understood, the clinical issue mainly involves imbalance between the hypothalamus-pituitary and peripheral thyroid hormone responsivity, which may induce peripheral thyrotoxic phenomena. Here, we review the pathogenesis and molecular aspects of PRTH, present a single case with inappropriate TSH secretion suffering from thyrotoxicosis treated with PTU, and discuss the possible choice of therapeutic options to correct the imbalance of thyroid hormone responsivity in both the hypothalamus-pituitary and peripheral tissues.

  15. Neonatal immunisation against a novel gonadotrophin-releasing hormone construct delays the onset of gonadal growth and puberty in bull calves.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Medrano, J H; Williams, R W; Peters, A R; Hannant, D; Campbell, B K; Webb, R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the neonatal immunisation of bull calves against a novel gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) construct, comprised of GnRH coupled to the glycoprotein D subunit of the bovine herpes virus-1 (GnRH-BHV1 gD), on endocrine status, reproductive organ development and carcass quality. Eighteen bull calves received either GnRH construct (n=9) or saline (control; n=9) at 2, 6 and 13.5 weeks of age. Blood samples were taken to determine antibody titres against GnRH, FSH and testosterone (T) concentrations and LH pulse characteristics, with testicular circumference monitored monthly. Immunisation reduced LH pulse amplitude (P<0.05) and T concentrations (P<0.05), particularly at the peak in anti-GnRH titres after the second booster at 16 weeks of age (P<0.001), but not when titres fell. Despite antibody titres decreasing after 16 weeks, immunisation reduced testicular size between 16 to 57 weeks of age (P<0.05), provoking an 8-week delay in puberty onset, defined as testicular circumference ≥14 cm. In conclusion, neonatal immunisation induced a significant immune response against GnRH, provoking a temporary endocrine disturbance that had a long-term effect on testicular development, delaying the onset of puberty. These results support the hypothesis that a developmental window exists during testicular development, such that disturbance of the endocrine drive to the gonads during this period results in a longer-term impairment of gonadal function.

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Ellen R.; Sherwood, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15–28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups. PMID:28346489

  18. MicroRNA-27a Regulates Beta Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression by Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor β1 in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hitoo; Ono, Koh; Horie, Takahiro; Nagao, Kazuya; Kinoshita, Minako; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Watanabe, Shin; Takaya, Tomohide; Tamaki, Yodo; Takanabe-Mori, Rieko; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, are negative regulators of gene expression and play important roles in gene regulation in the heart. To examine the role of miRNAs in the expression of the two isoforms of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, α- and β-MHC, which regulate cardiac contractility, endogenous miRNAs were downregulated in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) using lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Dicer, an essential enzyme for miRNA biosynthesis, and MHC expression levels were examined. As a result, Dicer siRNA could downregulate endogenous miRNAs simultaneously and the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC, which implied that specific miRNAs could upregulate the β-MHC gene. Among 19 selected miRNAs, miR-27a was found to most strongly upregulate the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC. Moreover, β-MHC protein was downregulated by silencing of endogenous miR-27a. Through a bioinformatics screening using TargetScan, we identified thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1), which negatively regulates β-MHC transcription, as a target of miR-27a. Moreover, miR-27a was demonstrated to modulate β-MHC gene regulation via thyroid hormone signaling and to be upregulated during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells or in hypertrophic hearts in association with β-MHC gene upregulation. These findings suggested that miR-27a regulates β-MHC gene expression by targeting TRβ1 in cardiomyocytes. PMID:21149577

  19. Endocrine and metabolic changes in neonatal calves in response to growth hormone and long-R3-insulin-like growth factor-I administration.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H; Blum, J W

    1998-01-01

    Postnatal growth is primarily controlled by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). We have studied effects of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) and Long-R3-insulin-like growth factor-I (Long-R3-IGF-I) on metabolic and endocrine characteristics of neonatal calves. Group GrC (control) was fed colostrum as first meal and then milk replacer up to day 7. Groups GrIGFf, GrIGFi and GrGH were fed as GrC. In group GrIGFf, Long-R3-IGF-I (50 micrograms/[kg x day], twice daily for 7 days) was fed together with colostrum or milk replacer and in group GrIGFi, Long-R3-IGF-I (50 micrograms/[kg x day], twice daily for 7 days) was injected subcutaneously at times of feeding. Calves of group GrGH were injected rbGH (1 mg/[kg x day, s.c.], twice daily for 7 days) at times of feeding. While orally administered Long-R3-IGF-I had no effects, subcutaneously administered Long-R3-IGF-I lowered plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (p < 0.05). In group GrGH, day-2 postprandial plasma insulin concentrations were increased more than in Long-R3-IGF-I-treated groups (p < 0.05) and day-2 postprandial prolactin responses were greater in group GrGH than in controls (p < 0.05). Other traits (lactic acid, nonesterified fatty acids, glucagon, cortisol, thyroxine and 3.5.3'-triiodothyronine) exhibited age-dependent changes, but were not significantly affected by rbGH or Long-R3-IGF-I. The study shows, that parenteral, but not oral, Long-R3-IGF-I affects plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and that rbGH transiently influences plasma prolactin concentrations in neonatal calves.

  20. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  1. The somatotropic axis in neonatal calves can be modulated by nutrition, growth hormone, and Long-R3-IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H; Blum, J W

    1997-07-01

    Effects on the somatotropic axis [plasma levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) I and II, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), and growth hormone (GH)] of feeding different amounts of colostrum or milk replacer, of Long-R3-IGF-I (administered subcutaneously or orally; 50 micrograms.kg body wt-1.day-1 for 7 days), and of subcutaneously injected recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 1 mg.kg body wt-1.day-1 for 7 days) were evaluated in calves during the 1st wk of life. Plasma Long-R3-IGF-I increased after subcutaneous application but not with the oral dose. Endogenous IGF-I was higher in calves fed colostrum six times compared with those fed only milk replacer. Native IGF-I was highest in rbGH-injected calves but was lowered by the subcutaneous injection of Long-R3-IGF-I. IGF-II concentrations were not modified by any of the treatments. IGFBP-2 increased in calves fed only milk replacer and those receiving subcutaneous Long-R3-IGF-I. GH was not modulated by differences in nutrition but increased after rbGH administration and similarly in all groups after intravenous injection of GH-releasing factor analog GRF-(1-29). Parenteral administration of Long-R3-IGF-I decreased GH concentration but did not affect the secretory pattern. The data demonstrate that the somatotrophic axis is basically functioning in neonatal calves and is influenced by nutrition, GH, and Long-R3-IGF-I.

  2. Combined growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment is more effective than GH or IGF-I alone at enhancing recovery from neonatal malnutrition in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Donovan, S M

    1995-11-01

    The effect of hormonal therapy on enhancing recovery from neonatal malnutrition was assessed in rats. Malnutrition was induced by maternal food restriction (60% control intake) during lactation. On d 16 postpartum, restricted pups were refed by cross-fostering to control dams and were subcutaneously administered growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), GH + IGF-I or saline. At d 21, pups were weaned and continued hormonal treatments until d 39 postpartum. By d 39, body weight of GH (96% control) and GH + IGF-I- (98%) treated animals were normal, whereas IGF-I (88%) and saline- (85%) treated animals were still stunted. Hormone effectiveness was age dependent, with growth rates of GH + IGF-I-, IGF-I- and GH-treated pups being greatest between d 16 and 30, d 16 and 21 and after d 30, respectively. Protein accretion by d 39 was higher (P < 0.01) in GH and GH + IGF-I groups than saline- or IGF-I-treated groups. On d 39, serum IGF-I concentrations were as follows: GH + IGF-I > IGF-I > GH = saline (placebo), indicating that an elevated serum IGF-I was not required for GH-stimulated growth. Of the three hormonal treatments, GH + IGF-I therapy was most efficacious at promoting rapid and complete body weight recovery and supporting lean body mass accretion.

  3. Screening of Undiagnosed Hypothyroidism in Elderly Persons with Diabetes according to Age-Specific Reference Intervals for Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone and the Impact of Antidiabetes Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Patricia de Fatima dos Santos; Vaisman, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background. Studies have suggested that hypothyroidism is more frequent in the elderly with diabetes mellitus. However, an adaptation of TSH levels to age should be considered in this assessment. Some antidiabetes drugs reportedly interfere with TSH levels. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed hypothyroidism in patients with diabetes and the influence of antidiabetes drugs. Material and Methods. 1160 subjects, 60 years and older (751 with diabetes), were studied; results were compared according to diabetes treatment and with persons without diabetes. TSH, FT4, antithyroperoxidase, fasting glucose, and HbA1c were measured. Results and Discussion. 6.4% of patients with diabetes had hypothyroidism, a higher prevalence compared with persons without diabetes (5.1%), but lower than observed in many studies. The use of age-specific TSH reference interval (RI) could explain this difference. Patients taking metformin (MTF) had TSH (showed in medians) slightly lower (2.8 mU/L) than those not on MTF (3.3 mU/L), p < 0.05. MTF doses influenced TSH levels. Conclusions. The use of specific TSH RI could avoid the misdiagnosis of hypothyroidism in elderly with diabetes. Patients in use of MTF as single drug had lower TSH than those using other medications and persons without diabetes. PMID:27403442

  4. Comparison of FT4 with log TSH on the Abbott Architect ci8200: Pediatric reference intervals for free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Steven J; Cheng, Luke L; Lam, Lisa Y; Werner, Alice; Le, Alexander D; Soldin, Offie P

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated the clinical validity of serum FT4 measurements by assessing its correlation with log TSH. To provide pediatric reference intervals (representative ranges) for FT4, and TSH on the Architect ci8200 integrated system. Methods This population-based study encompassed 6023 children (3369 females and 2654 males). The percentile and Hoffmann approaches for obtaining reference intervals on these analytes were also compared. Results: FT4 correlation with log TSH was poor ( r=0.010 for males and 0.050 for females). Reference intervals were established. TSH and FT4 did not show a significant sex difference; moreover, the intervals decreased with age for FT4 and TSH. Conclusions Whereas in a previous study ultrafiltration tandem mass spectrometry yielded a correlation of r=0.90 for FT4 vs. log TSH this present study reveals a poor FT4 vs. log TSH correlation in the pediatric population studied and indicates the FT4 immunoassay conducted on the Abbott Architect ci8200 is less useful clinically than might have been expected. Reference intervals using the Hoffmann approach for pediatric in- and out-patients compare well with previously published results utilizing the percentile approach. PMID:19931524

  5. [Efficacy of quinagolide in the treatment of a patient with hypophyseal resistance to thyroid hormones].

    PubMed

    De Luis, D A; Lahera, M; Botella, J I; Valero, M A; Varela, C

    2001-05-01

    The pituitary resistance to thyroid hormones (PRTH) is not very frequent and well-known entity, their treatment it continues being topic of controversy. In this work we have evaluated the quinagolida effectiveness in the treatment of it unites patient with (PRTH). The relationship among thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) it was used as marker of the thyroid resistance and of the response to the treatment. The concentrations of TSH and FT3 were normalized after adding quinagolida to methimazole. These results suggest that the quinagolida could be an useful drug in the treatment of this pathology, next to the classic treatments.

  6. Twenty-four hour profiles of four hormones under constant routine.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M; Ishibashi, K; Enomoto, T; Nakajima, T; Shibui, K; Hirokawa, G; Okawa, M

    1998-04-01

    We studied the circadian features of melatonin, cortisol, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and growth hormone (GH) together with rectal temperature during 36 h continuous forced wakefulness without physical exercise under dim light condition (constant routine). Subjects consisted of four healthy men aged 22-24 years. Blood sampling was conducted hourly, and food and water were supplied bi-hourly during the constant routine. Melatonin, TSH and cortisol displayed clear circadian rhythms under constant routine condition. While GH secretion was unlikely to be driven solely by the circadian pacemaker, its suppression round BT nadir may indicate that GH secretion was modulated to some extent by circadian rhythm.

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of anterior pituitary hormones in S-100 protein-positive cells in the rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yatabe, Megumi; Tando, Yukiko; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In the anterior and intermediate lobes of the rat pituitary gland, non-hormone-producing cells that express S-100 protein coexist with various types of hormone-producing cells and are believed to function as phagocytes, supporting and paracrine-controlling cells of hormone-producing cells and stem cells, among other functions; however, their cytological characteristics are not yet fully understood. Using a transgenic rat that expresses green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the S100β protein gene, we immunohistochemically detected expression of the luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and proopiomelanocortin by S-100 protein-positive cells located between clusters of hormone-producing cells in the intermediate lobe. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that S-100 protein-positive cells are capable of differentiating into hormone-producing cells in the adult rat pituitary gland.

  8. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  9. Purification and characterization of chicken follicle-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, K A; Proudman, J A; Bahr, J M

    1992-05-01

    1. Highly purified chicken follicle-stimulating hormone (cFSH) was isolated from chicken pituitaries by differential extraction, sequential chromatography on HPLC cation and anion exchange columns, and gel filtration chromatography. 2. Purified cFSH (USDA-cFSH-K-1) had a potency of 77.44 units/mg in a chicken testes radioreceptor assay, and was biologically active in stimulating the secretion of progesterone by chicken granulosa cells. 3. Purified cFSH contained negligible luteinizing hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone activity. 4. The apparent molecular weight of cFSH was 38,000 Da and a single band on isoelectric focusing had a pI of 4.65.

  10. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  11. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  12. Differential action of glycoprotein hormones: significance in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Arya, Swathy V; Rao, A J

    2014-02-01

    Growth of multicellular organisms depends on maintenance of proper balance between proliferation and differentiation. Any disturbance in this balance in animal cells can lead to cancer. Experimental evidence is provided to conclude with special reference to the action of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on Sertoli cells, and luteinizing hormone (LH) on Leydig cells that these hormones exert a differential action on their target cells, i.e., stimulate proliferation when the cells are in an undifferentiated state which is the situation with cancer cells and promote only functional parameters when the cell are fully differentiated. Hormones and growth factors play a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. There is a growing body of evidence that various tumors express some hormones at high levels as well as their cognate receptors indicating the possibility of a role in progression of cancer. Hormones such as LH, FSH, and thyroid-stimulating hormone have been reported to stimulate cell proliferation and act as tumor promoter in a variety of hormone-dependent cancers including gonads, lung, thyroid, uterus, breast, prostate, etc. This review summarizes evidence to conclude that these hormones are produced by some cancer tissues to promote their own growth. Also an attempt is made to explain the significance of the differential action of hormones in progression of cancer with special reference to prostate cancer.

  13. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins as measured in a reporter bioassay are not detected in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and ophthalmopathy or isolated upper eyelid retraction.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jack R; Lahooti, Hooshang; El Kochairi, Ilhem; Lytton, Simon D; Champion, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Although ophthalmopathy is mainly associated with Graves' hyperthyroidism, milder eye changes are also found in about 25% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The recent finding of negative thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies, as measured in the Thyretain™ thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) reporter bioassay, in patients with euthyroid Graves' disease raises the possibility that TSHR antibodies are not the cause of ophthalmopathy in all situations. Here, we have tested serum from patients with HT with and without ophthalmopathy or isolated upper eyelid retraction (UER) for TSHR antibodies, using the TSI reporter bioassay and collagen XIII as a marker of autoimmunity against the orbital fibroblast. Study groups were 23 patients with HT with ophthalmopathy, isolated UER, or both eye features and 17 patients without eye signs. Thyretain™ TSI results were expressed as a percentage of the sample-to-reference ratio, with a positive test being taken as a sample-to-reference ratio of more than 140%. Serum collagen XIII antibodies were measured in standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TSI tests were positive in 22% of patients with HT with no eye signs but in no patient with eye signs. In contrast, TSI tests were positive in 94% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Tests were negative in all normal subjects tested. Collagen XIII antibodies were detected in 83% of patients with ophthalmopathy, UER, or both eye features, but in only 30% of patients with no eye signs. Our findings suggest that TSHR antibodies do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of ophthalmopathy or isolated UER in patients with HT. Moreover, the role of TSHR antibodies in the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves' disease remains to be proven. In contrast, collagen XIII antibodies appear to be a good marker of eye disease in patients with HT.

  14. Neonatal treatment with capsaicin influences hormonal regulation of blood pressure in adult, water-deprived Long-Evans but not Brattleboro rats.

    PubMed

    Bennett, T; Gardiner, S M

    1986-01-16

    Conscious, adult, water-deprived Brattleboro rats treated neonatally with capsaicin or vehicle showed similar hypotensive responses to sequential inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (with captopril) and antagonism of ganglionic transmission (with pentolinium). Following a comparable experimental protocol, Long-Evans rats treated neonatally with capsaicin showed a more marked hypotensive response to captopril administration than did vehicle-injected animals. Furthermore, following administration of captopril and pentolinium, the capsaicin-treated animals showed marked impairment of the vasopressin-dependent recovery of blood pressure. These results indicate that the greater hypotensive response to captopril in water-deprived. Long-Evans rats treated neonatally with capsaicin may be due to less effective compensation for inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system when vasopressin release is impaired.

  15. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones.

  16. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  17. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  18. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  19. Individuality and stability of nocturnal secretion patterns for eight hormones in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Pierre; Curtin, François; Steimer, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    The concentration of hormones in the bloodstream shows oscillations, reflecting the fact that endocrine physiology is structured over time. In many cases, these oscillations have an ultradian configuration that can be superimposed on a circadian rhythm. Secretion of hormones can be linked to the phases of sleep, as is the case with growth hormone (GH); can depend strongly on the circadian pacemaker, as in the case of cortisol; or be under the influence of both, as seen for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Thus, the temporal pattern of secretion of several hormones, and the resulting plasma concentration (also influenced by hormone tissue distribution and clearance), depends on impulses from biological clocks and is influenced by endogenous and exogenous masking factors. The extent of interindividual differences in the phenotypes of temporal patterns of hormone secretion is not well known. In this study, a series of eight hormones were measured over one night, and these measurements were repeated over another night. The study had two goals. The first was to explore the extent of inter individual differences in nocturnal and ultradian rhythms of these hormones. The second was to see how stable the individual patterns of nocturnal hormone secretion could be. Our results indicate that the temporal organization of hormone secretion into the blood is highly individual, and that these intraindividual patterns are conserved over time. This is relevant in view of the changes in secretion of several hormones that have been described in biological psychiatry research.

  20. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  1. Emergence of an Ancestral Glycoprotein Hormone in the Pituitary of the Sea Lamprey, a Basal Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Decatur, Wayne A; Hausken, Krist N; Marquis, Timothy J; Barton, Shannon L; Gargan, James; Freamat, Mihael; Wilmot, Michael; Hollander, Lian; Hall, Jeffrey A; Nozaki, Masumi; Shpilman, Michal; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2015-08-01

    The gnathostome (jawed vertebrates) classical pituitary glycoprotein hormones, FSH, LH, and TSH, consist of a common α-subunit (GpA1) and unique β-subunits (Gpβ1, -2, and -3), whereas a recently identified pituitary glycoprotein hormone, thyrostimulin, consists of GpA2 and GpB5. This paper reports the identification, expression, and function of an ancestral, nonclassical, pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone (GpH) consisting of the thyrostimulin A2 subunit with the classical β-subunit in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, a jawless basal vertebrate. Lamprey (l) GpA2, and lGpHβ were shown to form a heterodimer by coimmunoprecipitation of lGpA2 with FLAG-tagged lGpHβ after the overexpression in transiently transfected COS7 cells using a bipromoter vector. Dual-label fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed the coexpression of individual subunits in the proximal pars distalis of the pituitary. GnRH-III (1μΜ) significantly increased the expression of lGpHβ and lGpA2 in in vitro pituitary culture. Recombinant lamprey GpH was constructed by tethering the N terminal of lGpA2 to the C terminal of lGpHβ with a linker region composed of six histidine residues followed by three glycine-serine repeats. This recombinant lamprey GpH activated the lamprey glycoprotein hormone receptor I as measured by increased cAMP/luciferase activity. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, unique glycoprotein heterodimer that is not found in any other vertebrate. These data suggest an intermediate stage of the structure-function of the gonadotropin/thyroid-stimulating hormone in a basal vertebrate, leading to the emergence of the highly specialized gonadotropin hormones and thyroid stimulating hormones in gnathostomes.

  2. Effects of Long-Term In Vivo Exposure to Di-2-Ethylhexylphthalate on Thyroid Hormones and the TSH/TSHR Signaling Pathways in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinwen; Dong, Jin; Zhao, Yue; Guo, Jipeng; Wang, Zhanju; Liu, Mingqi; Zhang, Yunbo; Na, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was a widely used chemical with human toxicity. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies suggested that DEHP-exposure may be associated with altered serum thyroid hormones (THs) levels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms were largely unknown. To explore the possible molecular mechanisms, 128 Wistar rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg/day for 3 months (M) and 6 M, respectively. After exposure, expression of genes and proteins in the thyroid, pituitary, and hypothalamus tissues of rats were analyzed by Q-PCR and western blot, while the sera and urine samples were assayed by radioimmunoassay and ELISA. Results showed that serum THs levels were suppressed by DEHP on the whole. DEHP treatment influenced the levels of rats’ thyrotropin releasing hormone receptor (TRHr), Deiodinases 1 (D1), thyroid stimulating hormone beta (TSHβ), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHr), thyroperoxidase (TPO), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), and thyroglobulin (TG) mRNA/protein expression in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and decreased urine iodine. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones via disturbing the HPT axis, and the activated TSH/TSHR pathway is required to regulate thyroid function via altering TRHr, TSHβ, NIS, TSHr, TPO, TTF-1 and TG mRNA/protein expression of the HPT axis. PMID:28054989

  3. Discovery of substituted benzamides as follicle stimulating hormone receptor allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Henry N; Richardson, Thomas E; Nataraja, Selva; Fischer, David J; Sriraman, Venkataraman; Jiang, Xuliang; Bharathi, Pandi; Foglesong, Robert J; Haxell, Thomas F N; Heasley, Brian H; Jenks, Mathew; Li, Jane; Dugas, Melanie S; Collis, Regina; Tian, Hui; Palmer, Stephen; Goutopoulos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), acting on its receptor (FSHR), plays a pivotal role in the stimulation of follicular development and maturation. Multiple injections of protein formulations are used during clinical protocols for ovulation induction and for in vitro fertilization that are followed by a selection of assisted reproductive technologies. In order to increase patient convenience and compliance several research groups have searched for orally bioavailable FSH mimetics for innovative fertility medicines. We report here the discovery of a series of substituted benzamides as positive allosteric modulators (PAM) targeting FSHR. Optimization of this series has led to enhanced activity in primary rat granulosa cells, as well as remarkable selectivity against the closely related luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Two modulators, 9j and 9k, showed promising in vitro and pharmacokinetic profiles.

  4. External quality control results for hormones, tumor markers and CRP testing.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, N; Kawano, K; Takubo, T; Nakamura, H; Tsuda, I

    1999-01-01

    Most hormones, tumor markers, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor (RF) are measured immunologically. Immunological methods based on the antigen-antibody reaction have certain specific problems, including their principle of determination, character of antibodies used, reaction conditions, and others. Free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), as well as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate antigen, carcinoantigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), and CA 125 are very commonly measured in the routine medical laboratory. Authentic materials can be obtained for hormones and CRP, and efforts to improve quality control and standardization have been made for years. Results of surveillance for FT4, TSH, and AFP were not poor, but inter-laboratory differences for CEA, CA 19-9, and RF were not insignificant.

  5. The MCT8 thyroid hormone transporter and Allan--Herndon--Dudley syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Charles E.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    2007-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the proper development and function of the brain. The active form of thyroid hormone is T3, which binds to nuclear receptors. Recently, a transporter specific for T3, MCT8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8) was identified. MCT8 is highly expressed in liver and brain. The gene is located in Xq13 and mutations in MCT8 are responsible for an X-linked condition, Allan--Herndon--Dudley syndrome (AHDS). This syndrome is characterized by congenital hypotonia that progresses to spasticity with severe psychomotor delays. Affected males also present with muscle hypoplasia, generalized muscle weakness, and limited speech. Importantly, these patients have elevated serum levels of free T3, low to below normal serum levels of free T4, and levels of thyroid stimulating hormone that are within the normal range. This constellation of measurements of thyroid function enables quick screening for AHDS in males presenting with mental retardation, congenital hypotonia, and generalized muscle weakness. PMID:17574010

  6. The MCT8 thyroid hormone transporter and Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the proper development and function of the brain. The active form of thyroid hormone is T(3), which binds to nuclear receptors. Recently, a transporter specific for T(3), MCT8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8) was identified. MCT8 is highly expressed in liver and brain. The gene is located in Xq13 and mutations in MCT8 are responsible for an X-linked condition, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS). This syndrome is characterized by congenital hypotonia that progresses to spasticity with severe psychomotor delays. Affected males also present with muscle hypoplasia, generalized muscle weakness, and limited speech. Importantly, these patients have elevated serum levels of free T(3), low to below normal serum levels of free T(4), and levels of thyroid stimulating hormone that are within the normal range. This constellation of measurements of thyroid function enables quick screening for AHDS in males presenting with cognitive impairment, congenital hypotonia, and generalized muscle weakness.

  7. Neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice lasting greater than 2 weeks should be investigated. Pale stools and dark or yellow urine are evidence of liver disease, which should be urgently investigated. The neonatal hepatitis syndrome has many causes, and a structured approach to investigation is mandatory. It should be possible to confirm or exclude biliary atresia within one week, so that definitive surgery is not delayed unnecessarily. Babies with the neonatal hepatitis syndrome should have vigorous fat-soluble vitamin supplementation, including parenteral vitamin K if coagulation is abnormal. The prognosis for infants with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and multifactorial cholestasis is excellent.

  8. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  9. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-07-12

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems.

  10. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  11. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Ji Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups.

  12. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  13. Influence of electromagnetic fields emitted by GSM-900 cellular telephones on the circadian patterns of gonadal, adrenal and pituitary hormones in men.

    PubMed

    Djeridane, Yasmina; Touitou, Yvan; de Seze, René

    2008-03-01

    The potential health risks of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted by mobile phones are currently of considerable public interest. The present study investigated the effect of exposure to 900 MHz GSM radiofrequency radiation on steroid (cortisol and testosterone) and pituitary (thyroid-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, prolactin and adrenocorticotropin) hormone levels in 20 healthy male volunteers. Each subject was exposed to RF EMFs through the use of a cellular phone for 2 h/day, 5 days/ week, for 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected hourly during the night and every 3 h during the day. Four sampling sessions were performed at 15-day intervals: before the beginning of the exposure period, at the middle and the end of the exposure period, and 15 days later. Parameters evaluated included the maximum serum concentration, the time of this maximum, and the area under the curve for hormone circadian patterns. Each individual's pre-exposure hormone concentration was used as his control. All hormone concentrations remained within normal physiological ranges. The circadian profiles of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropin and testosterone were not disrupted by RF EMFs emitted by mobile phones. For growth hormone and cortisol, there were significant decreases of about 28% and 12%, respectively, in the maximum levels when comparing the 2-week (for growth hormone and cortisol) and 4-week (for growth hormone) exposure periods to the pre-exposure period, but no difference persisted in the postexposure period. Our data show that the 900 MHz EMF exposure, at least under our experimental conditions, does not appear to affect endocrine functions in men.

  14. Neonatal medications.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert M; Stiers, Justin; Buchi, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is reaching epidemic proportions related to perinatal use of opioids. There are many approaches to assess and manage NAS, including one we have outlined. A standardized approach is likely to reduce length of stay and variability in practice. Circumcision is a frequent, painful procedure performed in the neonatal period. The rationale for providing analgesia is presented as well as a review of methods. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have expanded our understanding of diseases and their drug therapy. Some applications of pharmacogenomics to the neonatal period are presented, along with pediatric challenges of developmental expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  15. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  16. Modulating the function of the immune system by thyroid hormones and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Jara, Evelyn L; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Llanos, Carolina; Fardella, Carlos; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Riedel, Claudia A

    2017-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a close bidirectional communication and regulation between the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Thyroid hormones (THs) can exert responses in various immune cells, e.g., monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes, affecting several inflammation-related processes (such as, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species generation, and cytokines production). The interactions between the endocrine and immune systems have been shown to contribute to pathophysiological conditions, including sepsis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and viral infections. Under these conditions, TH therapy could contribute to restoring normal physiological functions. Here we discuss the effects of THs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on the immune system and the contribution to inflammation and pathogen clearance, as well as the consequences of thyroid pathologies over the function of the immune system.

  17. Diagnostic Dilemma in Discordant Thyroid Function Tests Due to Thyroid Hormone Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Srichomkwun, Panudda; Scherberg, Neal H.; Jakšić, Jasminka; Refetoff, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assay interference could be the cause of abnormal thyroid function tests. Early recognition prevents inappropriate patient management. The objective of this report is to present a case with discordant thyroid function tests in different thyroid assay platforms due to thyroid autoantibodies. Methods We present a case her family, laboratory data and methods that investigate immunoassay interference. Results A 21-year-old woman with autoimmune thyroid disease was treated for hypothyroidism with levothyroxine and noted to have elevated total and free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine but normal thyroid-stimulating hormone. Repeat thyroid function tests using different platforms revealed discrepant results. Further investigation showed that the patient had positive thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAAbs). Conclusion We demonstrates abnormal thyroid function tests caused by THAAbs. The latter were the cause of interference with assays resulting in discrepant test results inconsistent with the clinical presentation. Early recognition would prevent inappropriate patient management. PMID:28078322

  18. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  19. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  20. Chronic exposure to pentachlorophenol alters thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone pathway mRNAs in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Qin; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Feng, Min; Wen, Wu; Li, Kun; Zhang, Pan-Wei; Peng, Xi; Huo, Wei-Jie; Zhou, Huai-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is frequently detected in the aquatic environment and has been implicated as an endocrine disruptor in fish. In the present study, 4-month-old zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 1 of 4 concentrations of PCP (0.1, 1, 9, and 27 µg/L) for 70 d. The effects of PCP exposure on plasma thyroid hormone levels, and the expression levels of selected genes, were measured in the brain and liver. The PCP exposure at 27 µg/L resulted in elevated plasma thyroxine concentrations in male and female zebrafish and depressed 3, 5, 3'-triiodothyronine concentrations in males only. In both sexes, PCP exposure resulted in decreased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone β-subunit (tshβ) and thyroid hormone receptor β (trβ) in the brain, as well as increased liver levels of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (ugt1ab) and decreased deiodinase 1 (dio1). The authors also identified several sex-specific effects of PCP exposure, including changes in mRNA levels for deiodinase 2 (dio2), cytosolic sulfotransferase (sult1 st5), and transthyretin (ttr) genes in the liver. Environmental PCP exposure also caused an increased malformation rate in offspring that received maternal exposure to PCP. The present study demonstrates that chronic exposure to environmental levels of PCP alters plasma thyroid hormone levels, as well as the expression of genes associated with thyroid hormone signaling and metabolism in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and liver, resulting in abnormal zebrafish development.

  1. Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis is extensive, and a step-wise approach based on the initial history and physical examination is useful to rapidly identify the underlying etiology. Early recognition of neonatal cholestasis is essential to ensure timely treatment and optimal prognosis. Even when specific treatment is not available, infants who have cholestasis benefit from early medical management and optimization of nutrition. Future studies are necessary to determine the most reliable and cost-effective method of universal screening for neonatal cholestasis. PMID:24244109

  2. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  3. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Lattoya J.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G.; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  4. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  5. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  6. JNK pathway decreases thyroid hormones via TRH receptor: a novel mechanism for disturbance of thyroid hormone homeostasis by PCB153.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Ha, Mei; Cui, Yushan; Wang, Chengmin; Yan, Maosheng; Fu, Wenjuan; Quan, Chao; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Kedi

    2012-12-08

    PCBs, widespread and well-characterized endocrine disruptors, cause the disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis in humans and animals. In order to verify the hypotheses that MAPK pathways would play roles in disturbance of TH levels caused by PCBs, and that TH-associated receptors could function in certain MAPK pathway, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with PCB153 intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 0, 4, 16 and 32mg/kg for 5 consecutive days, and Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with PCB153 (0, 1, 5, 10μM) for 30min. Results showed that after the treatment with PCB153, serum total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), total triiodothyronine (TT3) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were decreased, whereas free triiodothyronine (FT3) and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were not altered. In vivo and in vitro studies indicated that JNK pathway was activated after PCB153 exposure. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was suppressed after the activation of JNK pathway and was elevated after the inhibition of JNK pathway, but TSH receptor (TSHr) level was not affected by the status of JNK pathway though it was reduced after PCB153 treatment. The activated signs of ERK and P38 pathways were not observed in this study. Taken together, observed effects suggested that JNK pathway could decrease TH levels via TRHr, and that would be one novel mechanism of PCB153-mediated disruption of THs.

  7. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  8. Association of thyroid hormones with obesity and metabolic syndrome in Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yukako; Takaya, Ryuzo; Takitani, Kimitaka; Ishiro, Manabu; Okasora, Keisuke; Niegawa, Tomomi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with health consequences, and thyroid dysfunction may be an adaption to the increased energy expenditure in obesity. With the rising prevalence of obesity in childhood, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome may also increase. In the current study, we have shown gender differences in the association of thyroid hormones with obesity, and attempted to elucidate the relationship between thyroid hormones and anthropometric parameters and biochemical data in obese Japanese children. We analyzed anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, body composition, thyroid hormones, and lipid profiles in 283 obese children. The association between thyroid hormones and several parameters differed by gender. The free T3 to free T4 ratio (fT3/fT4) in boys was negatively associated with the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, whereas in girls, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were positively correlated with levels of glucose, diastolic blood pressure, and non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and fT3/fT4 was positively correlated with uric acid levels. FT3/fT4 in boys with metabolic syndrome was relatively higher than in those without metabolic syndrome. The cause of gender differences is unknown. Therefore, further studies with larger sample sizes and a long-term follow-up period are needed to address the influence of thyroid hormones on various parameters.

  9. Association of thyroid hormones with obesity and metabolic syndrome in Japanese children

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yukako; Takaya, Ryuzo; Takitani, Kimitaka; Ishiro, Manabu; Okasora, Keisuke; Niegawa, Tomomi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with health consequences, and thyroid dysfunction may be an adaption to the increased energy expenditure in obesity. With the rising prevalence of obesity in childhood, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome may also increase. In the current study, we have shown gender differences in the association of thyroid hormones with obesity, and attempted to elucidate the relationship between thyroid hormones and anthropometric parameters and biochemical data in obese Japanese children. We analyzed anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, body composition, thyroid hormones, and lipid profiles in 283 obese children. The association between thyroid hormones and several parameters differed by gender. The free T3 to free T4 ratio (fT3/fT4) in boys was negatively associated with the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, whereas in girls, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were positively correlated with levels of glucose, diastolic blood pressure, and non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and fT3/fT4 was positively correlated with uric acid levels. FT3/fT4 in boys with metabolic syndrome was relatively higher than in those without metabolic syndrome. The cause of gender differences is unknown. Therefore, further studies with larger sample sizes and a long-term follow-up period are needed to address the influence of thyroid hormones on various parameters. PMID:26388669

  10. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Atassi, M.Z.; Manshouri, T. ); Sakata, Shigeki )

    1991-05-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated {alpha} and {beta} subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-stimulating hormone. The human TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 exhibited remarkable binding activity to human, bovine, and ovine TSH and to the {beta} chain of hTSH. Lower binding activity resided in the adjacent overlapping peptides, probably due to the contribution of the shared overlap to the binding. The specificity of TSH binding to these peptides was confirmed by their inability to bind human luteinizing hormone, human follicle-stimulating hormone, and the {alpha} chain of hTSH. Thyrotropins did not bind to bovine serum albumin or to peptide controls unrelated to the TSHR system. It is concluded that the binding of TSH to its receptor involves extensive contacts and that the TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 contain specific binding regions for TSH that might be either independent sites or two faces (subsites) within a large binding site.

  11. Factors related to endocrine changes and hormone substitution treatment during pre- and post-operation stages in craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fenglei; Sun, Xintang; Du, Xiaolong; Xing, Hongshun; Yang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Factors related to endocrine changes and hormone substitution treatment during pre- and post-operation periods in craniopharyngioma cases were examined. Twenty patients who underwent tumor resection from January 2012 to January 2015 were included in the study. We monitored factors related to endocrine changes and hormone substitution treatment during pre- and post-operation periods. Blood thyroid-stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and cortisol levels were measured in the patients. Urinary volume and urine specific gravity were also measured before and after the operation. After the operation, we observed diabetes insipidus and a decrease in TSH and gonadal hormone levels more frequently compared to pre-operation. However, incidence of high prolactin was markedly reduced following surgery. The number of hypothyroidism cases before and after surgery had no statistical significance. In conclusion, surgery for craniopharyngioma aggravated endocrine dysfunction. Craniotomy and total tumor resection had considerable effects on the endocrine system. Routine hormone therapy as an alternative treatment was necessary after operation. Alternative treatment of adrenal cortex hormones reduced the incidence on low blood cortisol. PMID:28123549

  12. Functional role of the heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, GPA2/GPB5, and its receptor, LGR1: An invertebrate perspective.

    PubMed

    Rocco, David A; Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), chorionic gonadotropin (CG) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are glycoprotein hormones that play central roles in metabolism, reproduction and development. Recently, a novel heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, called GPA2/GPB5, was discovered in humans; however, contrary to its vertebrate glycoprotein hormone relatives, the physiological role of GPA2/GPB5 has not yet been fully elucidated in any vertebrate or invertebrate. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether GPA2/GPB5 functions as a heterodimer or as individual GPA2 and GPB5 monomers in these organisms. GPA2- and GPB5-like subunits have been identified or predicted in a wide array of animal phyla including the nematodes, chordates, hemichordates, arthropods, molluscs, echinoderms and annelids. So far, molecular studies on transcript expression of the GPA2/GPB5 subunits and its putative receptor, the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 1 (LGR1), suggests this glycoprotein hormone system plays a developmental role and may also function in hydromineral balance in invertebrates. This mini-review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the physiological actions and activity of this evolutionarily ancient heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone with a particular focus on its known functions in the invertebrates.

  13. Recessive resistance to thyroid hormone in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor beta: evidence for tissue-specific modulation of receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hanebuth, E; Smeyne, R J; Everds, N; Stewart, C L; Wehner, J M; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The diverse functions of thyroid hormone (T3) are presumed to be mediated by two genes encoding the related receptors, TRalpha and TRbeta. However, the in vivo functions of TRalpha and TRbeta are undefined. Here, we report that targeted inactivation of the mouse TRbeta gene results in goitre and elevated levels of thyroid hormone. Also, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which is released by pituitary thyrotropes and which is normally suppressed by increased levels of thyroid hormone, was present at elevated levels in homozygous mutant (Thrb-/-) mice. These findings suggest a unique role for TRbeta that cannot be substituted by TRalpha in the T3-dependent feedback regulation of TSH transcription. Thrb-/- mice provide a recessive model for the human syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) that exhibits a similar endocrine disorder but which is typically caused by dominant TRbeta mutants that are transcriptional inhibitors. It is unknown whether TRalpha, TRbeta or other receptors are targets for inhibition in dominant RTH; however, the analysis of Thrb-/- mice suggests that antagonism of TRbeta-mediated pathways underlies the disorder of the pituitary-thyroid axis. Interestingly, in the brain, the absence of TRbeta may not mimic the defects often associated with dominant RTH, since no overt behavioural or neuroanatomical abnormalities were detected in Thrb-/- mice. These data define in vivo functions for TRbeta and indicate that specificity in T3 signalling is conferred by distinct receptor genes. Images PMID:8670802

  14. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests.

  15. [Neonatal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, J L

    2015-01-13

    Intussusception in infants and young children is a relatively common entity with a well defined clinical picture and a favorable outcome in most cases.The neonatal intussusceptions is extremely rare and does not have a well-defined clinical picture since its clinical manifestations vary according to the gestational time it occurs, the response of the injured intestine and the gestational age of the child concerned. Two new cases of neonatal intussusceptions are presented and a review of the world literature is performed. Given the stage of intussusceptions (pre- or postnatal) occurs and gestational age of the affected infant (preterm or term), there are three entities with clinical characteristics, topography and evolution rather different: prenatal or intrauterine intussusception, postnatal intussusception in the preterm and postnatal intussusception in the term infant.

  16. Neonatal hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Whitington, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as "self" and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies.

  17. A vital region for human glycoprotein hormone trafficking revealed by an LHB mutation.

    PubMed

    Potorac, Iulia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Pralong, Francois; Hafidi, Aicha; Thiry, Albert; Ménagé, Jean-Jacques; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Beckers, Albert; Daly, Adrian F

    2016-12-01

    Glycoprotein hormones are complex hormonally active macromolecules. Luteinizing hormone (LH) is essential for the postnatal development and maturation of the male gonad. Inactivating Luteinizing hormone beta (LHB) gene mutations are exceptionally rare and lead to hypogonadism that is particularly severe in males. We describe a family with selective LH deficiency and hypogonadism in two brothers. DNA sequencing of LHB was performed and the effects of genetic variants on hormone function and secretion were characterized by mutagenesis studies, confocal microscopy and functional assays. A 20-year-old male from a consanguineous family had pubertal delay, hypogonadism and undetectable LH. A homozygous c.118_120del (p.Lys40del) mutation was identified in the patient and his brother, who subsequently had the same phenotype. Treatment with hCG led to pubertal development, increased circulating testosterone and spermatogenesis. Experiments in HeLa cells revealed that the mutant LH is retained intracellularly and showed diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. The mutated LHB heterodimerizes with the common alpha-subunit and can activate its receptor. Deletion of flanking glutamic acid residues at positions 39 and 41 impair LH to a similar extent as deletion of Lys40. This region is functionally important across all heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, because deletion of the corresponding residues in hCG, follicle-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunits also led to intracellular hormone retention. This novel LHB mutation results in hypogonadism due to intracellular sequestration of the hormone and reveals a discrete region in the protein that is crucial for normal secretion of all human glycoprotein hormones.

  18. Thyrotropic activity of salmon pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Hawaiian parrotfish thyroid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P; Grau, E G; Helms, L M; Dickhoff, W W

    1988-02-01

    The thyrotropic activities of salmon pituitary extract, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (GTH), and glycoprotein fractions obtained during purification of salmon TSH and GTH were measured using the parrotfish thyroid culture system. Purified salmon TSH was approximately 1,000 times more potent than bovine TSH in stimulating thyroxine release into the culture medium. Most of the forms of salmon GTH had no thyrotropic activity. One of the forms of salmon GTH (GTH-F) and three chromatofocusing fractions (CF-B, -C, and -E) that were devoid of activity in the coho salmon in vivo had some thyrotropic activity in the parrotfish thyroid culture. Whether the activity of these fractions was due to contamination with TSH, less potent forms of TSH, or inherent thyrotropic activity of a form of GTH is discussed. These results indicate that the parrotfish thyroid culture system can be used to detect thyrotropic activity of fractions obtained during the purification of teleost TSH.

  19. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Carlos; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Lins Pessoa, Hugo de

    2010-05-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  20. Analysis of the correlation between lipotoxicity and pituitary-thyroid axis hormone levels in men and male rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianmei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xu; Hu, Jianting; Gao, Ling; Song, Yongfeng; Yu, Chunxiao; Shao, Shanshan; Yuan, Zhongshang; Sun, Yan; Yan, Huili; Li, Guimei; Zhao, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Lipotoxicity seriously harms human health, but it is unclear whether lipotoxicity is detrimental to the pituitary. We investigated the correlation between serum triglyceride and pituitary axis hormone levels in epidemiological and animal studies. In the epidemiological study, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were greater in male patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia than in controls, whereas adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels were lower in the patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Pituitary hormone levels correlated with triglyceride levels, even after adjustment for potential confounders. In the animal study, male rats were fed a high-fat or control diet for 28 weeks. As the duration of high-fat feeding increased, the serum and pituitary triglyceride concentrations increased. At early times, the high-fat diet elevated serum TSH and triiodothyronine. At later times, much higher serum TSH levels coupled with reduced thyroxine were observed in the high-fat group. Serum levels of pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-adrenal axis hormones were not affected by the diet. The mRNA and protein expression of Tshβ were greater in the high-fat group than in the control group, whereas expression of Fshβ, Lhβ and Acth had no difference between the groups. Overall, serum triglyceride levels were associated with pituitary-thyroid axis hormone levels. PMID:27322428

  1. Correlation between ovarian morphology and biochemical and hormonal parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Cihan; Karadag, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the biochemical and hormonal differences in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients with and without polycystic ovary (PCO) morphology and to evaluate the outcomes resulting from those differences. Methods: The study included a total of 83 patients with PCOS; 43 of them had PCO morphology (Group-I) and 40 did not (Group-II). Serum LDL, HDL, total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), total testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), 17b-estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), glucose and insulin levels were determined. Homoeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to BMI. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements of Group-I were significantly lower (p<0.01). Serum mean level of LH (p=0.026) and the mean LH/FSH (p=0.001) level of Group-I were significantly higher than Group-II. The total cholesterol and triglyceride levels of Group-I were significantly lower (p<0.05, p<0.01). The mean HOMA-IR level of Group-I was significantly lower than Group-II (p=0.004). Conclusions: The group without PCO morphology had a higher risk than the other group in terms of increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases due to effects of hyperandrogenism. PMID:27375725

  2. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: structural elucidation of the sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The authors have elucidated the structures of the anionic asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (luteinizing hormone), follitropin (follicle-stimulating hormone), and thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Purified hormones, isolated from bovine, ovine, and human pituitaries, were digested with N-glycanase, and the released oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB(/sup 3/H)/sub 4/. The /sup 3/H-labeled oligosaccharides from each hormone were then fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into populations differing in the number of sulfate and/or sialic acid moieties. The sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures, which together comprised 67-90% of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones, were highly heterogeneous and displayed hormone- as well as animal species-specific features. A previously uncharacterized dibranched oligosaccharide, bearing one residue each of sulfate and sialic acid, was found on all of the hormones except bovine lutropin. In this study, they describe the purification and detailed structural characterizations of the sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated oligosaccharides found on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin from several animal species.

  3. Insulin Plant (Costus pictus) Extract Restores Thyroid Hormone Levels in Experimental Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ashwini, S.; Bobby, Zachariah; Sridhar, M. G.; Cleetus, C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups with ten rats in each group: Control (C), hypothyroid (H), control+extract (C+E), and hypothyroid+extract (H+E). Rats in C group did not receive any intervention throughout the experimental period. The rats in the C+E and H+E groups received pretreatment with C. pictus leaf extract for 4 weeks. Subsequently, for the next 6 weeks, rats in the H group received 0.05% propylthiouracil in drinking water while C+E group received C. pictus leaf extract and H+E group received propyl thiouracil and C. pictus leaf extract. Results: Hypothyroid group rats exhibited dramatic increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels with concomitant depletion in the levels of thyroid hormones. Treatment with the extract resulted in remarkable improvement in thyroid profile. Extract produced 10.59-fold increase in plasma free T3, 8.65-fold increase in free T4, and 3.59-fold decrease in TSH levels in H+E group in comparison with H group. Treatment with the extract ameliorated hypercholesterolemia, decreased levels of plasma C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suppressed tissue oxidative stress and prevented hepatic and renal damage caused due to thyroid hormone depletion in the H+E group. Pentacyclic triterpenes alpha and beta amyrins were identified and quantified in the extract. Conclusions: This is the first study to reveal that C. pictus extract has therapeutic potential to restore thyroid hormone levels and prevent the biochemical complications due to thyroid hormone insufficiency in the animal model of experimental hypothyroidism. SUMMARY The preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism was evaluated in the present study.Hypothyroidism was induced in the experimental animals by giving 0

  4. Impairing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) signaling in vivo: targeted disruption of the FSH receptor leads to aberrant gametogenesis and hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Dierich, A; Sairam, M R; Monaco, L; Fimia, G M; Gansmuller, A; LeMeur, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1998-11-10

    Pituitary gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone stimulate the gonads by regulating germ cell proliferation and differentiation. FSH receptors (FSH-Rs) are localized to testicular Sertoli cells and ovarian granulosa cells and are coupled to activation of the adenylyl cyclase and other signaling pathways. Activation of FSH-Rs is considered essential for folliculogenesis in the female and spermatogenesis in the male. We have generated mice lacking FSH-R by homologous recombination. FSH-R-deficient males are fertile but display small testes and partial spermatogenic failure. Thus, although FSH signaling is not essential for initiating spermatogenesis, it appears to be required for adequate viability and motility of the sperms. FSH-R-deficient females display thin uteri and small ovaries and are sterile because of a block in folliculogenesis before antral follicle formation. Although the expression of marker genes is only moderately altered in FSH-R -/- mice, drastic sex-specific changes are observed in the levels of various hormones. The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland in females is enlarged and reveals a larger number of FSH- and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-positive cells. The phenotype of FSH-R -/- mice is reminiscent of human hypergonadotropic ovarian dysgenesis and infertility.

  5. Adverse effects of thyroid hormone preparations and antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, L; Bogazzi, F; Martino, E

    1996-07-01

    Thyroid hormone preparations, especially thyroxine, are widely used either at replacement doses to correct hypothyroidism or at suppressive doses to abolish thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secretion in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy or with diffuse/ nodular nontoxic goitre. In order to suppress thyrotropin secretion, it is necessary to administer slightly supraphysiological doses of thyroxine. Possible adverse effects of this therapy include cardiovascular changes (shortening of systolic time intervals, increased frequency of atrial premature beats and, possibly, left ventricular hypertrophy) and bone changes (reduced bone density and bone mass), but the risk of these adverse effects can be minimised by carefully monitoring serum free thyroxine and free liothyronine (triiodothyronine) measurements and adjusting the dosage accordingly. Thionamides [thiamazole (methimazole), carbimazole, propylthiouracil] are the most widely used antithyroid drugs. They are given for long periods of time and cause adverse effects in 3 to 5% of patients. In most cases, adverse effects are minor and transient (e.g. skin rash, itching, mild leucopenia). The most dangerous effect is agranulocytosis, which occurs in 0.1 to 0.5% of patients. This life-threatening condition can now be effectively treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. Other major adverse effects (aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, vasculitis) are exceedingly rare.

  6. Prader-Willi syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Zehra; Baş, Veysel Nijat

    2014-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder demonstrating great variability with changing clinical features during patient's life. It is characterized by severe hypotonia with poor sucking and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity in later infancy or early childhood. The phenotype is most probably due to hypothalamic dysfunction which is also responsible for growth hormone (GH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies, central adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. The multidimensional problems of patients with PWS can be managed with multidisciplinary approach. Reduced GH secretion, low peak GH response to stimulation, decreased spontaneous GH secretion and low serum IGF-1 levels in PWS patients have been documented in many studies. GH therapy has multiple beneficial effects on growth and body composition, motor and mental development in PWS patients. The recommended dosage for GH is 0.5-1 mg/m2/day. GH therapy should not be started in the presence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, severe obesity and diabetes mellitus. GH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental and life-style measures.

  7. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  8. Effect of hypothyroidism on female reproductive hormones

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sanjay; Gupta, Bharti Sona; Philip, Rajeev; Singh, Kumar Sanjeev; Bende, Sureshrao Anoop; Agroiya, Puspalata; Agrawal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Objective was to evaluate reproductive hormones levels in hypothyroid women and impact of treatment on their levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism were included in this prospective study. Venous blood was taken at baseline and after euthyroidism was achieved for measuring serum free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), prolactin (PRL), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), and thyroid peroxidase antibody. Thirty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any hormonal disturbances served as controls. The statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 20 ([SPSS] IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: On an average at diagnosis cases have more serum TSH (mean [M] = 77.85; standard error [SE] = 11.72), PRL (M = 39.65; SE = 4.13) and less serum E2 (M = 50.00; SE = 2.25) and T (M = 35.40; SE = 2.31) than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 1.74; SE = 0.73), (M = 16.04; SE = 0.84), (M = 76.25; SE = 2.60), and (M = 40.29; SE = 2.27), respectively. This difference was statistically significant t (58) = 6.48, P <0.05; t (58) = 6.49, P < 0.05; t (58) = 12.47; P < 0.05; and t (58) = 2.04, P < 0.05; respectively. Although average serum FSH (M = 12.14; SE = 0.40) and LH (M = 5.89; SE = 0.27) were lower in cases at diagnosis than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 12.70; SE = 0.40), (M = 6.22; SE = 0.25), respectively, but these differences were statistically insignificant t (58) = 1.61, P = 0.11; t (58) = 1.11, P = 0.27, respectively. Conclusion: The study has demonstrated low E2 and T levels in hypothyroid women which were increased after achieving euthyroidism. Although average serum FSH and LH were increased in hypothyroid women after achieving euthyroidism but this difference was statistically

  9. Effects of oral chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on plasma concentrations of growth hormone and thyroid hormones in beef steers before and after challenge with a combination of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, T S; McLeod, K; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Baldwin, R L

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a subtherapeutic level of chlortetracycline (CTC) fed to growing beef steers under conditions of limited and adequate dietary protein on plasma concentrations of GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones before and after an injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) + GHRH. Young beef steers (n = 32; average BW = 285 kg) were assigned to a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments of either a 10 or 13% crude protein diet (70% concentrate, 15% wheat straw, and 15% cottonseed hulls) and either a corn meal carrier or carrier + 350 mg of CTC daily top dressed on the diet. Steers were fed ad libitum amounts of diet for 56 d, and a jugular catheter was then placed in each steer in four groups (two steers from each treatment combination per group) during four consecutive days (one group per day). Each steer was injected via the jugular catheter with 1.0 microg/kg BW TRH + .1 microg/kg BW GHRH in 10 mL of saline at 0800. Blood samples were collected at -30, -15, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, and 360 min after releasing hormone injection. Plasma samples were analyzed for GH, TSH, thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3). After 84 d on trial, the steers were slaughtered and the pituitary and samples of liver were collected and analyzed for 5'-deiodinase activity. Feeding CTC attenuated the GH response to releasing hormone challenge by 26% for both area under the response curve (P<.03) and peak response (P<.10). Likewise, CTC attenuated the TSH response to releasing hormone challenge for area under the response curve by 16% (P<.10) and peak response by 33% (P<.02), and attenuated the T4 response for area under the curve by 12% (P<.08) and peak response by 14% (P<.04). Type II deiodinase activity in the pituitary was 36% less (P<.02) in CTC-fed steers than in steers not fed CTC. The results of this study are interpreted to suggest that feeding subtherapeutic levels of CTC to young

  10. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen , a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle . Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such ... two hormones—estrogen and progesterone —control your menstrual cycle. These hormones are made by the ovaries . Estrogen ...

  12. Association of obesity with hormonal imbalance in infertility: a cross-sectional study in north Indian women.

    PubMed

    Seth, Bhavna; Arora, Sarika; Singh, Ritu

    2013-10-01

    Hormones play an important role in the development and regulation of reproductive function and the menstrual cycle of women. Extremes of body weight tend to affect the homeostasis of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. This cross-sectional study was carried out in 113 women (57 with primary infertility and 56 with secondary infertility) in the age group 20-35 years, presenting for hormonal evaluation of infertility in a tertiary care hospital. After preliminary clinical evaluation, anthropometric indices (height, weight, BMI, waist circumference and waist hip ratio) were measured in all subjects. Fasting blood sample drawn on second/third day of menstrual cycle was analysed for serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Serum FSH levels showed a significant positive correlation with indicators of central obesity (waist circumference and waist hip ratio in both the study groups). In primary infertility, significant positive correlation was also observed between serum FSH levels and other markers of obesity like body weight, hip circumference and BMI. In secondary infertility, serum prolactin and serum TSH levels demonstrated a significant positive correlation with body weight and BMI. Obesity is associated with hormonal derangements which are responsible for infertility. In overweight women with infertility, weight loss should be considered as a first line treatment.

  13. Liver X receptor β: new player in the regulatory network of thyroid hormone and 'browning' of white fat.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yifei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ke

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type II diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of UCP1 in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyrotropin releasing hormone positive neurons in the paraventricular area of the hypothalamus, and thus stimulated secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Consequently production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. One unexpected finding of our study is that LXRs are indispensable in the thyroid hormone negative feedback loop at the level of the hypothalamus. LXRs maintain expression of thyroid receptors in the brain and when they are inactivated there is no negative feedback of thyroid hormone in the hypothalamus. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knock-out mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity.

  14. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  15. The Effect of Central Injection of Ghrelin and Bombesin on Mean Plasma Thyroid Hormones Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Mohsennezhad, Fatemeh; Khazali, Homayoun; Ehtesham, Haleh

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin increases food intakes and body weight. Bombesin decreases food intakes and inhibits the stimulatory effect of Ghrelin on food intakes. Thyroid hormones have a crucial role in the regulation of body weight and yet the effect of bombesin on thyroid axis activity is not fully clear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of Ghrelin or bombesin on mean plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxin (T4) concentration and also, the effect of interaction between Ghrelin and bombesin on thyroid axis activity. Forty-nine rats in seven groups received saline or different doses of Ghrelin (4, 10 or 15 nmol) and bombesin ( 2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) and forty-two rats in six groups received simultaneous injection of Ghrelin (10 or 15 nmol) and different doses of bombesin (2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) via lateral cerebral ventricle. Blood samples were collected via decapitation 20 min after the injection and plasma was assayed for plasma TSH, T3 and T4 concentration by Radioimmunoassay (RIA). Ghrelin significantly decreased the concentration of mean plasma thyroid hormones compared to saline. Bombesin did not significantly increase thyroid hormones concentration compared to saline but bombesin blocked the inhibitory effect of Ghrelin on thyroid axis activity. Bombesin may be the antagonist of Ghrelin action. PMID:24250396

  16. Role of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in prolactin-producing cell models.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Mijiddorj, Tselmeg; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a hypothalamic hypophysiotropic neuropeptide that was named for its ability to stimulate the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone in mammals. It later became apparent that it exerts a number of species-dependent hypophysiotropic activities that regulate other pituitary hormones. TRH also regulates the synthesis and release of prolactin, although whether it is a physiological regulator of prolactin that remains unclear. Occupation of the Gq protein-coupled TRH receptor in the prolactin-producing lactotroph increases the turnover of inositol, which in turn activates the protein kinase C pathway and the release of Ca(2+) from storage sites. TRH-induced signaling events also include the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of MAP kinase phosphatase, an inactivator of activated ERK. TRH stimulates prolactin synthesis through the activation of ERK, whereas prolactin release occurs via elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). We have been investigating the role of TRH in a pituitary prolactin-producing cell model. Rat pituitary somatolactotroph GH3 cells, which produce and release both prolactin and growth hormone (GH), are widely used as a model for the study of prolactin- and GH-secreting cells. In this review, we describe the general action of TRH as a hypophysiotropic factor in vertebrates and focus on the role of TRH in prolactin synthesis using GH3 cells.

  17. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = −0.261 to −0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = −0.229 to −0.165 for T3; r = −0.293 to −0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans. PMID:26898235

  18. The heterochronic gene Lin28 regulates amphibian metamorphosis through disturbance of thyroid hormone function.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Gundermann, Daniel G; Muñoz, Rosana; Bruno, Renzo; Larraín, Juan

    2017-03-28

    Metamorphosis is a classic example of developmental transition, which involves important morphological and physiological changes that prepare the organism for the adult life. It has been very well established that amphibian metamorphosis is mainly controlled by Thyroid Hormone (TH). Here, we show that the heterochronic gene Lin28 is downregulated during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. Lin28 overexpression before activation of TH signaling delays metamorphosis and inhibits the expression of TH target genes. The delay in metamorphosis is rescued by incubation with exogenous TH, indicating that Lin28 works upstream or parallel to TH. High-throughput analyses performed before any delay on metamorphosis or change in TH signaling showed that overexpression of Lin28 reduces transcript levels of several hormones secreted by the pituitary, including the Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH), and regulates the expression of proteins involved in TH transport, metabolism and signaling, showing that Lin28 disrupts TH function at different levels. Our data demonstrates that the role of Lin28 in controlling developmental transitions is evolutionary conserved and establishes a functional interaction between Lin28 and thyroid hormone function introducing a new regulatory step in perinatal development with implications for our understanding of endocrine disorders.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Indices in Computer Workers with Emphasis on the Role of Zinc Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Hegazy, Noha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Hammouda, Hamdy A. A.; Shaban, Eman Essam

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate the effects of computer monitor-emitted radiation on thyroid hormones and the possible protective role of zinc supplementation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included three groups. The first group (group B) consisted of 42 computer workers. This group was given Zinc supplementation in the form of one tablet daily for eight weeks. The second group (group A) comprised the same 42 computer workers after zinc supplementation. A group of 63 subjects whose job does not entail computer use was recruited as a control Group (Group C). All participants filled a questionnaire including detailed medical and occupational histories. They were subjected to full clinical examination. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and zinc levels were measured in all participants. RESULTS: TSH, FT3, FT4 and zinc concentrations were decreased significantly in group B relative to group C. In group A, all tested parameters were improved when compared with group B. The obtained results revealed that radiation emitted from computers led to changes in TSH and thyroid hormones (FT3 and FT4) in the workers. CONCLUSION: Improvement after supplementation suggests that zinc can ameliorate hazards of such radiation on thyroid hormone indices. PMID:27335605

  20. Effects of thyroid hormone on serum glycated albumin levels: study on non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Koga, M; Murai, J; Saito, H; Matsumoto, S; Kasayama, S

    2009-05-01

    Glycated albumin (GA) is used alongside glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1C)) as an indicator of glycemic control. Although serum GA levels are affected mainly by plasma glucose, they are also influenced by serum albumin metabolism. Thyroid hormone is known to promote albumin catabolism, and it is thus thought to affect serum GA levels. In the present study, the effects of thyroid hormone on serum GA measurements were investigated in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Six patients with untreated hypothyroidism and 17 patients with untreated thyrotoxicosis were investigated. Patients who had anemia or diabetes were excluded. A total of 25 non-diabetic, euthyroid individuals were enrolled as controls. HbA(1C), serum GA, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (T(3)), and free thyroxine (T(4)) levels were measured in all these subjects, and their relationships were examined. Although no intergroup differences were observed for HbA(1C), serum GA was significantly higher among patients with hypothyroidism than controls, and significantly lower among patients with thyrotoxicosis. Serum GA had a significant positive correlation with serum TSH and significant inverse correlations with free T(3) and free T(4). Thyroid hormone levels are inversely associated with serum GA levels. Cautions are necessary when evaluating serum GA levels in patients with thyroid dysfunction.

  1. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P < 0.001). The median ratios of major PFASs concentrations in fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = ‑0.261 to ‑0.170, all P < 0.05). Maternal triiodothyronin (T3) and free T3 (FT3) showed negative correlations with most fetal PFASs (r = ‑0.229 to ‑0.165 for T3; r = ‑0.293 to ‑0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans.

  2. Gestational urinary bisphenol A and maternal and newborn thyroid hormone concentrations: The HOME Study

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Megan E.; Webster, Glenys M.; Vuong, Ann M.; Thomas Zoeller, R.; Chen, Aimin; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Yolton, Kimberly; Lanphear, Bruce P.; Braun, Joseph M.

    2015-04-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor used in consumer products, may perturb thyroid function. Prenatal BPA exposure may have sex-specific effects on thyroid hormones (THs). Our objectives were to investigate whether maternal urinary BPA concentrations during pregnancy were associated with THs in maternal or cord serum, and whether these associations differed by newborn sex or maternal iodine status. We measured urinary BPA concentrations at 16 and 26 weeks gestation among pregnant women in the HOME Study (2003–2006, Cincinnati, Ohio). Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free and total thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) were measured in maternal serum at 16 weeks (n=181) and cord serum at delivery (n=249). Associations between BPA concentrations and maternal or cord serum TH levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Mean maternal urinary BPA was not associated with cord THs in all newborns, but a 10-fold increase in mean BPA was associated with lower cord TSH in girls (percent change=−36.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −58.4, −1.7%), but not boys (7.8%; 95% CI: −28.5, 62.7%; p-for-effect modification=0.09). We observed no significant associations between 16-week BPA and THs in maternal or cord serum, but 26-week maternal BPA was inversely associated with TSH in girls (−42.9%; 95% CI: −59.9, −18.5%), but not boys (7.6%; 95% CI: −17.3, 40.2%; p-for-effect modification=0.005) at birth. The inverse BPA–TSH relation among girls was stronger, but less precise, among iodine deficient versus sufficient mothers. Prenatal BPA exposure may reduce TSH among newborn girls, particularly when exposure occurs later in gestation. - Highlights: • Examined associations of BPA with thyroid hormones in pregnant women and newborns. • Assessed effect modification of BPA–thyroid hormone associations by newborn sex. • Greater BPA related to decreased thyroid stimulating hormone in girls' cord serum. • Results may

  3. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl exposure, diabetes and endogenous hormones: a cross-sectional study in men previously employed at a capacitor manufacturing plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have shown associations of diabetes and endogenous hormones with exposure to a wide variety of organochlorines. We have previously reported positive associations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and inverse associations of selected steroid hormones with diabetes in postmenopausal women previously employed in a capacitor manufacturing plant. Methods This paper examines associations of PCBs with diabetes and endogenous hormones in 63 men previously employed at the same plant who in 1996 underwent surveys of their exposure and medical history and collection of bloods and urine for measurements of PCBs, lipids, liver function, hematologic markers and endogenous hormones. Results PCB exposure was positively associated with diabetes and age and inversely associated with thyroid stimulating hormone and triiodothyronine-uptake. History of diabetes was significantly related to total PCBs and all PCB functional groupings, but not to quarters worked and job score, after control for potential confounders. None of the exposures were related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in non-diabetic men. Conclusions Associations of PCBs with specific endogenous hormones differ in some respects from previous findings in postmenopausal women employed at the capacitor plant. Results from this study, however, do confirm previous reports relating PCB exposure to diabetes and suggest that these associations are not mediated by measured endogenous hormones. PMID:22931295

  5. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:26504234

  6. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  7. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  8. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  9. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  10. Diurnal hormone variation in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McCain, G A; Tilbe, K S

    1989-11-01

    Twenty patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were assessed as outpatients over a 3 day period with respect to peak and trough levels of plasma cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, ACTH and thyroid stimulating hormone. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome had loss of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol (trough levels 347.3 +/- 254.7 vs 232.8 +/- 70.0 nmol/l, p less than 0.001) compared with RA patients. Thirty-five percent (7/20) of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and only 5 percent (1/20) of those with RA exhibited abnormal dexamethasone suppression tests (p less than 0.001). No differences were noted in the diurnal variation of other hormones tested. Beck Depression Inventory scores were similar in both groups and no patient exhibited clinical evidence of depression. These data suggest alteration in the pituitary hypothalamic axis with respect to cortisol secretion in fibromyalgia syndrome, perhaps as a consequence of chronic pain.

  11. Evaluation of oxidative stress and thyroid hormone status in hemodialysis patients in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Velayeti, Javad; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Mojerloo, Mohammad; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study focused on serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in hemodialysis patients and compared with control groups. Materials and Methods: Forty-five hemodialyzed patients and 45 control groups recruited in this study. Serum creatinine and urea, thyroid hormones (THs) levels and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were determined. Results: Hemodialysis (HD) patients showed higher levels of MDA than control groups (P < 0.01), but the levels of thyroxin (T3), free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxin (fT4), SOD and CAT were low in HD patients (P < 0.01). Serum T3, fT3, and fT4 levels were significantly negative correlated with MDA (P < 0.01). Conclusion: It is concluded that serum lipid peroxidation is markedly increased in HD patients. This means that elevated reactive oxygen species may interact with the lipid molecules in HD patients. HD may cause significant changes in TH levels. Thyroid-stimulating hormone level in HD patients is slightly similar to that of control groups. This suggests that thyroid is able to resynthesize for hormonal urinary losses. PMID:27186552

  12. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a factor in normal fish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Danks, J A; Devlin, A J; Ho, P M; Diefenbach-Jagger, H; Power, D M; Canario, A; Martin, T J; Ingleton, P M

    1993-11-01

    Using antibodies to the amino-terminal region of human parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) we have demonstrated PTHrP immunoreactivity in pituitaries and plasma of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). Pituitary cells at two distinct locations contained immunodetectable PTHrP; an anterior group in the rostral pars distalis which also contained immunoreactive thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and a posterior group lying at the border of the pars intermedia and proximal pars distalis between cells which stained with antibody to human corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide. By Western blot analysis pituitary extracts contained two immunoreactive isoforms of PTHrP, one of 29 kDa and the other of 26 kDa. Media of pituitaries incubated for up to 14 days in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate also had several isoforms of immunodetectable PTHrP, two of them corresponding to the 29- and 26-kDa molecular forms but there were in addition both larger and smaller molecules. The concentration of PTHrP in sea bream plasma was comparable with levels observed in human subjects with humoral hypercalcaemia of malignancy. There was no reaction between pituitary cells or pituitary extracts and antibody to human parathyroid hormone. Thus sea bream pituitary contains immunoreactive PTHrP, which appears to be released into medium during in vitro incubation and which may be a significant source of plasma immunoreactive PTHrP in vivo.

  13. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiujun; Wang, Zhiming; Zhou, Hui; Zhong, Ailing; Jin, Kai; Ruan, Lunliang; Yang, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas.

  14. Ovulation induction with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or gonadotropins in a case of hypothalamic amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, N A; Markou, K B; Pappas, A P; Protonatariou, A; Vagenakis, G A; Sykiotis, G P; Dimopoulos, P A; Tzingounis, V A

    2001-12-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a treatable cause of infertility. Our patient was presented with secondary amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus. Cortisol and prolactin responded normally to a combined insulin tolerance test (ITT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenge, while thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to TRH was diminished, and no response of growth hormone to ITT was detected. Both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. No response of LH to clomiphene citrate challenge was detected. Magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated a midline mass occupying the inferior hypothalamus, with posterior lobe not visible and thickened pituitary stalk. Ovulation induction was carried out first with combined human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG/LH/FSH) (150 IU/day) and afterwards with pulsatile GnRH (150 ng/kg/pulse). Ovulation was achieved with both pulsatile GnRH and combine gonadotropin therapy. Slightly better results were achieved with the pulsatile GnRH treatment.

  15. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  16. Replacement therapy: arginine vasopressin (AVP), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, thyroxine, testosterone and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D H; Owens, B

    1996-06-01

    Replacement therapy is routinely used to treat hormone deficiencies of patients who have had surgery or radiation therapy that damages the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. Hormones commonly replaced include: arginine vasopressin (AVP), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, thyroxine (T4), testosterone and estrogen. AVP, synthesized in the hypothalamus, is stored in and released by the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. GH is synthesized and released by the anterior pituitary gland. The other hormones are produced and released by target glands each of which is stimulated by a specific anterior pituitary hormone, which in turn is controlled by release of a specific hypothalamic hormone. Feedback control by a high circulating concentration of the target gland's hormone regulates hypothalamic hormone release. Deficiency of AVP, important for water balance in the body, is restored with the synthetic analogue, 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP); it is given as a nasal spray or by injection. GH is required for normal growth in the developing child; recombinant GH, produced in bacteria, is injected subcutaneously. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) controls release of cortisol which is produced by the adrenal cortex and enables the body to cope with stress; cortisol is replaced with prednisolone given orally. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) controls release of the thyroid hormones, T4 and triiodothyronine (T3), which promote growth and development, and regulate energy metabolism; for replacement of T4, oral synthetic L-thyroxine is given. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) control release of testosterone, which promotes maturation of sperm and development of male sexual characteristics; replacement testosterone is administered intramuscularly. In females, FSH and LH control release of estrogens and progesterone which prepare the reproductive tract for release of the ovum, fertilization, implantation and development of the embryo

  17. Circadian rhythm of hormones is extinguished during prolonged physical stress, sleep and energy deficiency in young men.

    PubMed

    Opstad, K

    1994-07-01

    The circadian rhythm of hormones (N = 10) and mental performance (N = 18) was investigated in male cadets during a 5-day military training course with continuous heavy physical activities corresponding to 35% of the maximal oxygen uptake, with almost total lack of food and sleep. The 24-h means for androstenedione, dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone and thyroid-stimulating hormone decreased strongly during the course, and the circadian rhythm was extinguished below the minimum levels measured during the control experiment. The 24-h means for cortisol, dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and progesterone increased during the course, and the circadian rhythm was abolished above the maximum levels of the control experiment. A gradual increase was found in thyroxine, free thyroxine and triiodothyronine during the first 12 h of activities, followed by a constant decrease for the rest of the course. Mental performance decreased during the course and the amplitude of its circadian rhythm increased from +/- 10% to +/- 30% of the 24-h mean. The circadian rhythms investigated were almost normalized after 4-5 days of rest. However, the nocturnal rise for cortisol, androstenedione and DHEA appeared earlier, and the plasma levels of thyroid hormones, estradiol and DHEA-S were lower during the recovery experiment than in the control experiment. The responses to stress of the circadian rhythm for mental performance and steroid hormones during the course indicate a differential regulation.

  18. Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and levels of thyroid hormones in children.

    PubMed Central

    Osius, N; Karmaus, W; Kruse, H; Witten, J

    1999-01-01

    As part of an epidemiologic study on exposure to a toxic waste incineration plant we investigated whether blood concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and cadmium, as well as concentration of mercury in 24-hr urine samples were associated with thyroid hormone status. As an indication of status, we determined levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT(4)), and free triiodothyronine (FT(3)) in children living in households where [less than/equal to] 10 cigarettes were smoked per day. Eight PCB congeners (PCBs 101, 118, 138, 153, 170, 180, 183, and 187) were measured in whole blood samples. Of these, seven congeners (PCB 101 was not detected in any sample) and the sum of all PCB congeners were analyzed as predictors for thyroid hormone status in separate linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. In addition, the possible effects of cadmium, lead, and mercury on levels of thyroid hormones were examined. Blood concentrations and information on questionnaire data were available for 320 children 7-10 years of age. We found a statistically significant positive association between the mono-ortho congener PCB 118 and TSH as well as statistically significant negative relationships of PCBs 138, 153, 180, 183, and 187 to FT(3). There was no association for the PCB congeners and FT(4). Blood cadmium concentration was associated with increasing TSH and diminishing FT(4). Blood lead and urine concentration of mercury were of no importance to thyroid hormone levels. The results stress the need for future studies on the possible influences of PCB and cadmium exposure on thyroid hormones, particularly in children. These studies should also take neurologic development into account. PMID:10504153

  19. Thyroid hormone transporters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Abe, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in proper mammalian development of the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Lack of sufficient thyroid hormone results in abnormal development of virtually all organ systems, a syndrome termed cretinism. In particular, hypothyroidism in the neonatal period causes serious damage to neural cells and leads to mental retardation. Although thyroxine is the major product secreted by the thyroid follicular cells, the action of thyroid hormone is mediated mainly through the deiodination of T(4) to the biologically active form 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine, followed by the binding of T(3) to a specific nuclear receptor. Before reaching the intracellular targets, thyroid hormone must cross the plasma membrane. Because of the lipophilic nature of thyroid hormone, it was thought that they traversed the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. However, in the past decade, a membrane transport system for thyroid hormone has been postulated to exist in various tissues. Several classes of transporters, organic anion transporter polypeptide (oatp) family, Na(+)/Taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) and amino acid transporters have been reported to transport thyroid hormones. Monocarboxylate transporter8 (MCT8) has recently been identified as an active and specific thyroid hormone transporter. Mutations in MCT8 are associated with severe X-linked psycomotor retardation and strongly elevated serum T3 levels in young male patients. Several other molecules should be contributed to exert the role of thyroid hormone in the central nervous system.

  20. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT REDUCES PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND INHIBITORY FUNCTION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  1. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  2. Hormonal responses to training and its tapering off in competitive swimmers: relationships with performance.

    PubMed

    Mujika, I; Chatard, J C; Padilla, S; Guezennec, C Y; Geyssant, A

    1996-01-01

    During a winter training season, the effects of 12 weeks of intense training and 4 weeks of tapering off (taper) on plasma hormone concentrations and competition performance were investigated in a group of highly trained swimmers (n = 8). Blood samples were collected and the swimmers performed their speciality in competition at weeks 10 (mid-season), 22 (pre-taper) and 26 (post-taper). No statistically significant changes were observed in the concentrations of total testosterone (TT), non-sex hormone binding globulin-bound-testosterone (NSBT), cortisol (C), luteinising hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine plasma catecholamines, creatine kinase and ammonia during training and taper. Mid-season NSBT: C ratio and the amount of training were statistically related (r = 0.82, P < 0.05). Competition performance slightly declined during intense training [0.52 (SD 2.51)%, NS] and improved during taper [2.32 (SD 1.69)%, P < 0.01]. Changes in performance during training and taper correlated with changes in ratios TT: C (r = 0.86, P < 0.01 and r = 0.81, P < 0.05, respectively) and NSBT: C (r = 0.77, P < 0.05 and r = 0.76, P < 0.05, respectively). In summary, these results showed that the monitored plasma hormones and metabolic indices were unaltered by 12 weeks of intense training and 4 weeks of taper. The TT: C and NSBT: C ratios, however, appeared to be effective markers of the swimmers' performance capacities throughout the training season.

  3. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped.

  4. Thyroid hormones and adult interpersonal violence among women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sinai, Cave; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter; Nilsonne, Åsa; Wilczek, Alexander; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-06-30

    Elevated T3 levels have been reported in men with antisocial behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between thyroid hormones and expressed adult interpersonal violence in female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Furthermore, expressed adult interpersonal violence in female BPD patients was compared to healthy female controls. A total of 92 clinically euthyroid women with BPD and 57 healthy women were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scales (KIVS). Baseline thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma free and bound triiodothyronine (FT3 and T3), thyroxine (FT4 and T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with immunoassays in patients. Plasma cortisol was also measured. Among females with BPD, expressed interpersonal violence as an adult showed a significant positive correlation with the T3 levels. The mean expression of interpersonal violence as an adult was significantly higher in BPD patients as compared to healthy controls. The multiple regression model indicated that two independent predictors of KIVS expressed interpersonal violence as an adult: T3 and comorbid diagnosis of alcohol abuse. Association between T3 levels and violent/aggressive behavior earlier reported exclusively in male samples may be valid also in females with BPD.

  5. Thyroxine modifies the effects of growth hormone in Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Do, Andrew; Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Gesing, Adam; Wiesenborn, Denise S.; Spong, Adam; Sun, Liou; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    Ames dwarf (df/df) mice lack growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone and prolactin. Treatment of juvenile df/df mice with GH alone stimulates somatic growth, reduces insulin sensitivity and shortens lifespan. Early‐life treatment with thyroxine (T4) alone produces modest growth stimulation but does not affect longevity. In this study, we examined the effects of treatment of juvenile Ames dwarf mice with a combination of GH + T4 and compared them to the effects of GH alone. Treatment of female and male dwarfs with GH + T4 between the ages of 2 and 8 weeks rescued somatic growth yet did not reduce lifespan to match normal controls, thus contrasting with the previously reported effects of GH alone. While the male dwarf GH + T4 treatment group had no significant effect on lifespan, the female dwarfs undergoing treatment showed a decrease in maximal longevity. Expression of genes related to GH and insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT) of female dwarfs was differentially affected by treatment with GH + T4 vs. GH alone. Differences in the effects of GH + T4 vs. GH alone on insulin target tissues may contribute to the differential effects of these treatments on longevity. PMID:25935838

  6. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  7. Thyroid hormone level is associated with the frequency and severity of acute transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yiyun; Lin, Huiyue; Ye, Xiaoxian; Xie, Dewei; Chen, Zhibo; Zheng, Juzeng; Su, Zhongqian; Xie, Hongli; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiang

    2017-03-22

    Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is a progressive and autoimmune disease with inflammatory cell infiltrates into the spinal cord, and thyroid hormone (TH) level is associated with the oxidative and antioxidant status. Variations in oxidative stress and antioxidant levels are related to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Our study aimed to investigate the possible correlation between ATM and TH levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and FT4/FT3. We measured serum concentrations of TSH, FT4, and FT3 in 205 individuals, including 42 ATM patients, 49 multiple sclerosis patients, and 114 healthy controls. Our findings show that ATM patients had lower levels of TSH and FT3 and higher levels of FT4 and FT4/FT3 compared with healthy controls, whether male or female. Moreover, levels of TSH and FT3 in patients with ATM were inversely correlated with disease severity measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Variations in TH level may represent the oxidative status and are surrogate biomarkers of the incidence and severity of ATM.

  8. Thyroid hormone balance in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas: dynamics after capture and influence of thyrotropin.

    PubMed Central

    St Aubin, D J; Geraci, J R

    1992-01-01

    Ten beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, were captured in the Churchill River, Manitoba, held for up to five days, and then released. Blood samples were obtained immediately after capture and at 6-7 h intervals thereafter to monitor changes in circulating levels of thyroid hormones (TH). In six of the whales, total and free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) declined steadily, whereas reverse-T3 (rT3) showed a transient increase during the first 24-36 h, followed by a decrease to below initial values. The changes in TH may have been due to glucocorticoid-mediated reduction in endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and inhibition of 5'-monodeiodinase in peripheral tissue. Two whales were given 10 IU of bovine TSH immediately after capture, and again one and two days later, resulting in successive increases in all TH, which remained elevated for at least 24 h after the last injection. Thereafter, circulating levels declined as in the untreated whales. Two whales receiving a single TSH injection on the fourth day responded with an increase in plasma TH comparable to that observed following the first TSH injection in the other two animals. Average (+/- SD) circulating level of rT3 at capture was 6.3 +/- 3.1 nmol/L, which is higher than reported for any other mammal and was significantly correlated with the naturally elevated levels of T4 that occur in belugas occupying estuaries during the summer. PMID:1586888

  9. Menstrual disturbances and hormonal changes in women workers exposed to a mixture of organic solvents in a pharmaceutical company

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Somayeh; Namvar, Mohamad; Ghoreishvandi, Maryam; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Golabadi, Majid; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Khodarahmian, Mahshad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemicals are among risk factors that can affect women's reproductive system. This study is aimed to investigate the association of occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents with menstruation disturbances and hormonal changes among female workers. Methods: Female workers of a pharmaceutical company were divided into three groups of non-exposed, lowexposed and highly-exposed to a mixture of organic solvents (formaldehyde, phenol, N-hexane, and chloroform) based on workplace measurements. Menstrual disturbances (in terms of short cycles, long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods) and mean of hormone levels (including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, estrogen and progesterone levels) were compared between these three groups. For investigating associations, logistic regression was performed. Results: Our study showed that mean length of cycles, duration of bleeding, and amount of flow and also prevalence of long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods were higher in exposed groups (p≤0.05). Odds ratio for prevalence of menstrual disturbances in the low exposure group and high exposure group were 9.69 (p=0.001) and 3.40 (p=0.002) respectively compared to the reference group. Estrogen and progesterone levels were not affected (p> 0.05), but other hormones levels were significantly disturbed in the exposed groups compared with the non-exposed group (p=0.001). Conclusion: Occupational exposure to the mixture of organic solvents may be associated with the increase of menstrual disorders and hormonal changes in female workers. Based on our findings, periodic evaluation of reproductive system of female workers in pharmaceutical companies is recommended. PMID:25695014

  10. Management of Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is common and often fatal in extremely premature neonates. In the last decade, the therapeutic armamentarium for IC has markedly expanded; however, the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of most antifungal agents in premature neonates are unknown. We will review the major systemic antifungal agents in clinical use. PMID:9849983

  11. Effect of KiFAY on Performance, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1, and Thyroid Hormones in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Amit; Fernandes, Custan; Suryawanshi, Dayaram

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study was performed to investigate the efficacy of KiFAY as a feed additive on performance parameters, thyroid, and pancreatic hormone levels in broilers. Ninety birds (Vencobb 400) were randomly divided into three groups viz., Control (no DL-methionine supplementation), Treatment1 (containing added DL-methionine) and Treatment 2 (containing KiFAY and without DL-methionine supplementation). The performance parameters (weekly body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, and feed consumption ratio) were recorded and calculated during the whole study of 4 weeks. Analyses of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF 1), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were performed at the end of the study. The results show that birds on supplementation of KiFAY performed significantly (p<0.001) better than other treatments. The weekly body weight, body weight gain, feed in-take and feed consumption ratio improved in KiFAY treated birds. The study found an increase in insulin and IGF1 levels (p<0.001) in KiFAY compared with the other treatments. Serum T3, T4, and TSH levels in the Treatment 2 were higher than other treatments (p<0.001). The KiFAY supplementation was able to improve performance with associated responses at a hormonal level in broilers. PMID:27221245

  12. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in diabetic kidney disease and effect of thyroid hormone replacement on estimate glomerular filtration rate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sarita; Purwar, Naincy; Gupta, Arvind; Gupta, Poonam; Srivastava, Anubha

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To determine the prevalence of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and effect of thyroid hormone replacement on progression of DKD. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study on 41 adult DKD patients who were screened for hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid DKD patients were started on levothyroxine replacement and were reviewed after 3 and 6 months. Results: Of the total population, 14 (34.1%) cases were hypothyroid, among whom 12 (29.3%) cases were subclinical, and 2 (4.8%) were overt hypothyroidism. Prevalence of hypothyroidism and mean thyroid stimulating hormone levels increased with increasing severity of DKD. There were 2 (14.3%) hypothyroid cases in stage 3b, 4 (28.5%) cases in stage 4, and 8 (57.2%) in stage 5 DKD. The mean estimate glomerular filtration rate (ml/min/1.73 m2) at baseline was 13.6 ± 13.3 which increased to 16.4 ± 14.5 and 21.2 ± 15.3 after 3 and 6 months of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT), respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with DKD. Prevalence of hypothyroidism increased with declining renal function. THRT significantly improved renal function in DKD patients with hypothyroidism after 3 and 6 months of therapy. PMID:27867882

  13. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  14. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  15. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  16. A thyrotropin-secreting macroadenoma with positive growth hormone and prolactin immunostaining: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, F; Bayraktaroğlu, T; Zor, F; G N, B D; Salihoğlu, Y S; Kalaycı, M

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH]) secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHoma) are rare adenomas presenting with hyperthyroidism due to impaired negative feedback of thyroid hormone on the pituitary and inappropriate TSH secretion. This article presents a case of TSH-secreting macroadenoma without any clinical hyperthyroidism symptoms accompanying immunoreaction with growth hormone (GH) and prolactin. A 36-year-old female patient was admitted with complaints of irregular menses and blurred vision. On physical exam, she had bitemporal hemianopsia defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation showed suprasellar macroadenoma measuring 33 mm × 26 mm × 28 mm was detected on pituitary MRI. She had no hyperthyroidism symptoms clinically. Although free T4 and free T3 levels were elevated, TSH level was inappropriately within the upper limit of normal. Response to T3 suppression and thyrotropin releasing hormone-stimulation test was inadequate. Other pituitary hormones were normal. Transsphenoidal adenomectomy was performed due to parasellar compression findings. Immunohistochemically widespread reaction was observed with TSH, GH and prolactin in the adenoma. The patient underwent a second surgical procedure 2 months later due to macroscopic residual tumor, bitemporal hemianopsia and a suprasellar homogenous uptake with regular borders on indium-111 octreotide scintigraphy. After second surgery; due to ongoing symptoms and residual tumor, she was managed with octreotide and cabergoline treatment. On her follow-up with medical treatment, TSH and free T4 values were within normal limits. Although silent TSHomas are rare, they may arise with compression symptoms as in our case. The differential diagnosis of secondary hyperthyroidism should include TSHomas and thyroid hormone receptor resistance syndrome.

  17. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  18. Antioxidant status and hormonal profile reflected by experimental feeding of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Magdy A; Moselhy, Said S

    2016-04-01

    Excessive production of free radicals can result in tissue damage, which mainly involves generation of hydroxyl radical and other oxidants. Such free radical-induced cell damage appears to play a major role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Probiotics have been used therapeutically to modulate immunity, improve digestive processes, lower cholesterol, treat rheumatoid arthritis, and prevent cancer. The proposed research was designed to evaluate the changes in oxidative and antioxidative profile in addition to metabolic-related hormones of living animal model, which may generally affect the health status. Two groups of rabbits (10 animals each) were allocated in hygienic cages of controlled animal house. Control group received standard diet, and the other group received the same diet containing one probiotic for 30 days. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in leukocytes, blood glucose, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were estimated in different tissues. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total proteins were also determined in different tissues. Certain hormones related to metabolism and growth were also evaluated. Leukocytic LDH activity was significantly increased along with nonsignificant increase of blood glucose in probiotics-fed animals. Results showed significant decreases in the levels of triiodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone but showed significant elevations in thyroxine, insulin, growth hormone, and testosterone levels in animals fed with probiotics. Total proteins content was highly significantly elevated in liver, kidneys, and muscles of probiotic-administered animals. Microsomal GSH level was significantly decreased only in skeletal muscles of probiotic-treated animals. MDA was significantly lowered in animal tissues fed with probiotics. GSH-Px activity was elevated in hepatic and muscular microsomes of probiotic-supplemented animals while it was nonsignificantly increased in renal

  19. Growth hormone deficiency following radiation therapy of primary brain tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Kanev, P M; Lefebvre, J F; Mauseth, R S; Berger, M S

    1991-05-01

    The medical records of 123 patients treated for brain tumors at Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, between 1985 and 1987 were reviewed. The endocrinological complications of radiation therapy and the effectiveness of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy were assessed. These were the first 2 years after synthetic GH became available. The disease pathology was confirmed at craniotomy or biopsy in 108 patients. Ninety-five children completed radiation therapy and 65 of these were alive at the time of review; these 65 children represent the study population. The most common tumor types were medulloblastoma, craniopharyngioma, and ependymoma. Endocrine evaluation was initiated with changes in the patients' growth velocity. Patient workup included skeletal x-ray films for determination of bone and analysis of thyroxin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and somatomedin-C levels. Following 1-dopa and clonidine stimulation, provocative studies of GH levels were performed. Growth hormone failure and short stature were observed in 26 children, most commonly in the 2nd year after tumor treatment. Eight patients with GH failure were also hypothyroid. Hormone replacement therapy was initiated with recombinant GH, 0.05 mg/kg/day, and all children so treated showed an increase in height, with eight patients experiencing catch-up growth. There were no complications of therapy or tumor recurrence. Studies of baseline bone age and somatomedin-C levels on completion of radiation therapy are recommended. Comprehensive endocrine studies should follow changes in the patients' growth velocity. With early GH replacement, catch-up growth is possible and normal adult heights may be achieved.

  20. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  1. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  2. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  3. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sandra E.; Pet, Gillian C.

    2015-01-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This chapter will explore some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury will be discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  4. Neonatal tactile stimulation alleviates the negative effects of neonatal isolation on novel object recognition, sociability and neuroendocrine levels in male adult mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus).

    PubMed

    Wei, Bin; Tai, Fadao; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Leige; Yang, Xiangping; Jia, Rui; Zhang, Xia

    2013-03-15

    Neonatal isolation results in long-lasting negative alterations to the brain and behavior. Some of these changes include effects on non-spatial learning and memory, sociability and neuroendocrine levels. Theoretically, neonatal tactile stimulation should reverse the impacts of neonatal isolation; however, this remains unknown for changes relating to learning, memory, sociability and hormones in social animals. Using socially monogamous mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus), the long-lasting effects of these early manipulations on anxiety-like behavior, novel object recognition, sociability, and neuroendocrine levels were investigated. Compared with neonatal-isolated males, males subjected to the same manipulation but accompanied with tactile stimulation had heavier body weights across PND4-18 and displayed significantly less anxiety-like behavior in an open field test. In addition, tactile stimulation increased the preference index for novel object recognition reduced by neonatal isolation. Compared with control males, neonatal-isolated males engaged in less body contact with unfamiliar same-sex individuals and this effect was reversed by neonatal tactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation enhanced aggressive behavior in neonatal-isolated males and increased the levels of AVP and OT in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) which were decreased by neonatal isolation. This early manipulation also reduced serum CORT levels that were significantly up-regulated by neonatal isolation in both neonatal and adult offspring. These results indicate that adequate tactile stimulation in early life plays an important role in the prevention of behavioral disturbances induced by neonatal isolation, possibly through the alteration of central OT, AVP and the serum corticosterone levels.

  5. Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis.

  6. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. Objectives: We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Methods: Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000–2003, a period when much of the area’s water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. Results: The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. population. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = –0.70; 95% CI: –1.06, –0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = –0.053; 95% CI: –0.092, –0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). Conclusions: These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Citation: Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC

  7. The human neuroendocrine thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor promoter is activated by the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb.

    PubMed Central

    Matre, Vilborg; Høvring, Per I; Fjeldheim, Ase-Karine; Helgeland, Lars; Orvain, Christophe; Andersson, Kristin B; Gautvik, Kaare M; Gabrielsen, Odd S

    2003-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor (TRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor playing a crucial role in the anterior pituitary where it controls the synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Its widespread presence not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral tissues, including thymus, indicates other important, but unknown, functions. One hypothesis is that the neuropeptide TRH could play a role in the immune system. We report here that the human TRHR promoter contains 11 putative response elements for the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb and is highly Myb-responsive in transfection assays. Analysis of Myb binding to putative response elements revealed one preferred binding site in intron 1 of the receptor gene. Transfection studies of promoter deletions confirmed that this high-affinity element is necessary for efficient Myb-dependent transactivation of reporter plasmids in CV-1 cells. The Myb-dependent activation of the TRHR promoter was strongly suppressed by expression of a dominant negative Myb-Engrailed fusion. In line with these observations, reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of rat tissues showed that the TRHR gene is expressed both in thymocytes and bone marrow. Furthermore, specific, high-affinity TRH agonist binding to cell-surface receptors was demonstrated in thymocytes and a haematopoietic cell line. Our findings imply a novel functional link between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems at the level of promoter regulation. PMID:12628004

  8. Effects of aging on thermoregulatory responses and hormonal changes in humans during the four seasons in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Sugenoya, Junichi; Inukai, Yoko; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    Physiological functions are impaired in various organs in aged people, as manifest by, e.g., renal and cardiac dysfunction and muscle atrophy. The elderly are also at increased risk of both hypothermia and hyperthermia in extreme temperatures. The majority of those over 65 years old have elevated serum osmolality. Our hypothesis is that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control in different seasons compared to the young. Eight healthy young men and six healthy older men participated in this study. The experiments were performed during spring, summer, autumn and winter in Japan, with average atmospheric temperatures of 15-20°C in spring, 25-30°C in summer, 15-23°C in autumn and 5-10°C in winter. Each subject immersed his lower legs in warm water at 40°C for 30 min. Core (tympanic) temperature and sweat rate at chest were recorded continuously. Blood was taken pre-immersion to measure the concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, serum osmolality, plasma renin activity, angiotensin II, aldosterone, leptin, thyroid stimulating hormone, fT3 and fT4. The results suggested that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control compared to the young; osmolality was especially elevated in winter compared to the summer in elderly subjects. Therefore, particularly in the elderly, balancing fluid by drinking water should be encouraged to maintain euhydration status in winter.

  9. IGF-1 receptor deficiency in thyrocytes impairs thyroid hormone secretion and completely inhibits TSH-stimulated goiter.

    PubMed

    Ock, Sangmi; Ahn, Jihyun; Lee, Seok Hong; Kang, Hyun; Offermanns, Stefan; Ahn, Hwa Young; Jo, Young Suk; Shong, Minho; Cho, Bo Youn; Jo, Daewoong; Abel, E Dale; Lee, Tae Jin; Park, Woo Jin; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Jaetaek

    2013-12-01

    Although thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is known to be a major regulator of thyroid hormone biosynthesis and thyroid growth, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is required for mediating thyrocyte growth in concert with TSH in vitro. We generated mice with thyrocyte-selective ablation of IGF-1 receptor (TIGF1RKO) to explore the role of IGF-1 receptor signaling on thyroid function and growth. In 5-wk-old TIGF1RKO mice, serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were decreased by 30% in concert with a 43% down-regulation of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), which is involved in T4 secretion. Despite a 3.5-fold increase in circulating concentrations of TSH, thyroid architecture and size were normal. Furthermore, thyrocyte area was increased by 40% in WT thyroids after 10 d TSH injection, but this effect was absent in TSH-injected TIGF1RKO mice. WT mice treated with methimazole and sodium perchlorate for 2 or 6 wk exhibited pronounced goiter development (2.0 and 5.4-fold, respectively), but in TIGF1RKO mice, goiter development was completely abrogated. These data reveal an essential role for IGF-1 receptor signaling in the regulation of thyroid function and TSH-stimulated goitrogenesis.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 21 in breast milk controls neonatal intestine function

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Hondares, Elayne; Giralt, Marta; Mampel, Teresa; Iglesias, Roser; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    FGF21 is a hormonal factor with important functions in the control of metabolism. FGF21 is found in rodent and human milk. Radiolabeled FGF21 administered to lactating dams accumulates in milk and is transferred to neonatal gut. The small intestine of neonatal (but not adult) mice highly expresses β-Klotho in the luminal area. FGF21-KO pups fed by FGF21-KO dams showed decreased expression and circulating levels of incretins (GIP and GLP-1), reduced gene expression of intestinal lactase and maltase-glucoamylase, and low levels of galactose in plasma, all associated with a mild decrease in body weight. When FGF21-KO pups were nursed by wild-type dams (expressing FGF21 in milk), intestinal peptides and digestive enzymes were up-regulated, lactase enzymatic activity was induced, and galactose levels and body weight were normalized. Neonatal intestine explants were sensitive to FGF21, as evidenced by enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Oral infusion of FGF21 into neonatal pups induced expression of intestinal hormone factors and digestive enzymes, lactase activity and lactose absorption. These findings reveal a novel role of FGF21 as a hormonal factor contributing to neonatal intestinal function via its presence in maternal milk. Appropriate signaling of FGF21 to neonate is necessary to ensure optimal digestive and endocrine function in developing intestine. PMID:26329882

  11. Neonatal McCune-Albright syndrome with survival beyond two years.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Melinda; Scottoline, Brian

    2016-11-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disease resulting from a somatic, mosaic mutation of GNAS1 encoding the Gs α subunit of the G-protein coupled membrane receptor responsible for multiple hormonal signaling cascades. We present a patient with neonatal MAS who initially presented with neonatal diabetes and concern for congenital cardiac disease, and subsequently was found to have significant ACTH-independent neonatal Cushing syndrome. Her course included multi-system organ involvement, although she initially did not have obvious findings consistent with the MAS classic triad of café-au-lait macules, fibrous dysplasia, or peripheral precocious puberty. After medical and surgical treatment, she remains the only reported survivor of neonatal MAS. This clinical report alerts clinicians to the possibility of this disease in neonates with non-classical endocrine and non-endocrine manifestations of MAS, and demonstrates that this very early presentation is potentially survivable. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  13. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  14. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  15. Photoperiod-dependent negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones in Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.L.; Stetson, M.H.

    1985-05-01

    In Fundulus heteroclitus, an annual cycle in the response of the thyroid to ovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (oTSH) is characterized by maximal thyroxin (T4) secretion in mid-winter and minimal T4 secretion in summer. Four daily injections of oTSH, given in winter caused serum T4 to plateau at elevated levels for several days, while in summer fish similar treatment resulted in far more fluctuating titers of serum T4; maximum levels were similar in both groups. The difference in sustenance rather than magnitude of Peak T4 led to an examination of the negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones as they might relate to these seasonal changes. Radioiodine uptake by thyroid follicles served as a simple, but effective bioassay for endogenous TSH. Fish collected in summer were more sensitive to negative feedback of T3 than those collected in winter; feedback effects of T4 in the two groups were not significantly different. The effects of specific photoperiods on negative feedback sensitivity to T3 and T4 were also tested. Exposure of winter fish for one month to long days (LD 14:10) enhanced the degree of reduction of iodine uptake caused by T4 in the aquarium water (10 micrograms/100 ml). Negative feedback in short-day (LD 8:16) winter fish was not demonstrated. It is concluded that long days increase and short days diminish the negative feedback sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis to thyroid hormones in F. heteroclitus. Such photoperiodically induced changes may act to aid in the year-round maintenance of T4 levels necessary for seasonal adaptation and survival.

  16. Synergism between exposure to mercury and use of iodine supplements on thyroid hormones in pregnant women

    SciTech Connect

    Llop, Sabrina; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Murcia, Mario; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Vioque, Jesús; Aguinagalde, Xabier; Julvez, Jordi; and others

    2015-04-15

    Objective: To evaluate the association between mercury exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total triiodothyronine (TT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels during pregnancy as well as to explore if there is any synergic action between mercury and intake of iodine from different sources. Methods: The study population was 1407 pregnant women participating in the Spanish INMA birth cohort study. Total mercury concentrations were analyzed in cord blood. Thyroid hormones (THs) were measured in serum samples collected at 13.2±1.5 weeks of gestation. The association between mercury and TH levels was evaluated with multivariate linear regression models. Effect modification caused by iodine intake from supplements and diet was also evaluated. Results: The geometric means of TSH, TT3, FT4 and mercury were 1.1 μU/L, 2.4 nmol/L, 10.5 pmol/L and 7.7 μg/L, respectively. Mercury levels were marginally significantly associated with TT3 (β: −0.05; 95%CI: −0.10, 0.01), but were neither associated with TSH nor FT4. The inverse association between mercury and TT3 levels was stronger among the iodine supplement consumers (−0.08; 95%CI: −0.15, −0.02, interaction p-value=0.07). The association with FT4 followed the same pattern, albeit not significant. Conclusion: Prenatal mercury exposure was inversely associated with TT3 levels among women who took iodine supplements during pregnancy. These results could be of public health concern, although further research is needed. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between mercury and thyroid hormones among pregnant. • Mercury was marginally significantly associated with TT3, but not with TSH or FT4. • This association was stronger among the iodine supplement. • These results could be of public health concern, but further research is needed.

  17. A comparative study of fluoride ingestion levels, serum thyroid hormone & TSH level derangements, dental fluorosis status among school children from endemic and non-endemic fluorosis areas.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Verma, Pradhuman; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Sachdeva, Suresh

    2014-01-03

    The study was undertaken to determine serum/urinary fluoride status and comparison of free T4, free T3 and thyroid stimulating hormone levels of 8 to 15 years old children with and without dental fluorosis living in an endemic and non-endemic fluorosis area. A sample group of 60 male and female school children, with or without dental fluorosis, consuming fluoride-contaminated water in endemic fluoride area of Udaipur district, Rajasthan were selected through a school dental fluorosis survey. The sample of 10 children of same age and socio-economic status residing in non endemic areas who did not have dental fluorosis form controls. Fluoride determination in drinking water, urine and blood was done with Ion 85 Ion Analyzer Radiometer with Hall et al. method. The thyroid gland functional test was done by Immonu Chemiluminiscence Micropartical Assay with Bayer Centaur Autoanalyzer. The significantly altered FT3, FT4 and TSH hormones level in both group1A and 1B school children were noted. The serum and urine fluoride levels were found to be increased in both the groups. A significant relationship of water fluoride to urine and serum fluoride concentration was seen. The serum fluoride concentration also had significant relationship with thyroid hormone (FT3/FT4) and TSH concentrations. The testing of drinking water and body fluids for fluoride content, along with FT3, FT4, and TSH in children with dental fluorosis is desirable for recognizing underlying thyroid derangements and its impact on fluorosis.

  18. Enteroviral Meningitis in Neonates and Children of Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghabouli Shahroodi, Mohammad Javad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Sadeghi, Reza; Sasan, Mohammad Saeed

    2016-01-01

    final diagnosis of severe asphyxia. The MLOS for children with pure EVM was 1.6 days (one to four days); they didn't have any sign of brain damage or mortality. Qualitative c-reactive protein (CRP) of serum was negative in 72.7% and 37.5% of EV positive neonates and children, respectively. The mean white blood cell count and PMN percentage in the peripheral blood was 11416/mm3 and 60.8% for EV positive neonates, and 14500/mm3 and 77.1% for EV positive children, respectively. Hyponatremia, due to possible syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), was seen in 30% of neonates and 57% of children with EVM. Conclusions Enteroviruses were a common cause (> 30%) of meningitis in our study group. Concomitant bacterial infection is not rare in neonates and children with EVM. Many of the neonates (50%) and almost all of the children with EVM did not require prolonged hospitalization. Both normal CSF and PMN dominancy of CSF was common in neonates and children with EVM. Positive qualitative CRP of serum (up to two plus) was common especially in children with EVM. Non-symptomatic mild hyponatremia/SIADH was common in early life EVM. PMID:27478556

  19. Neonatal brucellosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alnemri, Abdul Rahman M; Hadid, Adnan; Hussain, Shaik Asfaq; Somily, Ali M; Sobaih, Badr H; Alrabiaah, Abdulkarim; Alanazi, Awad; Shakoor, Zahid; AlSubaie, Sarah; Meriki, Naema; Kambal, Abdelmageed M

    2017-02-28

    Although brucellosis is not uncommon in Saudi Arabia, neonatal brucellosis has been infrequently reported. In this case of neonatal brucellosis, Brucella abortus was isolated by blood culture from both the mother and the neonate. Serology was positive only in the mother.

  20. Organized for sex – steroid hormones and the developing hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2017-01-01

    Steroid hormones of gonadal origin act on the neonatal brain, particularly the hypothalamus, to produce sex differences that underlie copulatory behavior. Neuroanatomical sex differences include regional volume, cell number, connectivity, morphology, physiology, neurotransmitter phenotype and molecular signaling, all of which are determined by the action of steroid hormones, particularly by estradiol in males, and are established by diverse downstream effects. Sex differences in distinct hypothalamic regions can be organized by the same steroid hormone, but the direction of a sex difference is often specific to one region or cell type, illustrating the wide range of effects that steroid hormones have on the developing brain. Substantial progress has been made in elucidating the downstream mechanisms through which gonadal hormones sexually differentiate the brain, but gaps remain in establishing the precise relationship between changes in neuronal morphology and behavior. A complete understanding of sexual differentiation will require integrating the diverse mechanisms across multiple brain regions into a functional network that regulates behavioral output. PMID:21143664

  1. The heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, GPA2/GPB5, regulates ion transport across the hindgut of the adult mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Jean-Paul; Vanderveken, Mark; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A family of evolutionarily old hormones is the glycoprotein cysteine knot-forming heterodimers consisting of alpha- (GPA) and beta-subunits (GPB), which assemble by noncovalent bonds. In mammals, a common glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPA1) pairs with unique beta-subunits that establish receptor specificity, forming thyroid stimulating hormone (GPA1/TSHβ) and the gonadotropins luteinizing hormone (GPA1/LHβ), follicle stimulating hormone (GPA1/FSHβ), choriogonadotropin (GPA1/CGβ). A novel glycoprotein heterodimer was identified in vertebrates by genome analysis, called thyrostimulin, composed of two novel subunits, GPA2 and GPB5, and homologs occur in arthropods, nematodes and cnidarians, implying that this neurohormone system existed prior to the emergence of bilateral metazoans. In order to discern possible physiological roles of this hormonal signaling system in mosquitoes, we have isolated the glycoprotein hormone genes producing the alpha- and beta-subunits (AedaeGPA2 and AedaeGPB5) and assessed their temporal expression profiles in the yellow and dengue-fever vector, Aedes aegypti. We have also isolated a putative receptor for this novel mosquito hormone, AedaeLGR1, which contains features conserved with other glycoprotein leucine-rich repeating containing G protein-coupled receptors. AedaeLGR1 is expressed in tissues of the alimentary canal such as the midgut, Malpighian tubules and hindgut, suggesting that this novel mosquito glycoprotein hormone may regulate ionic and osmotic balance. Focusing on the hindgut in adult stage A. aegypti, where AedaeLGR1 was highly enriched, we utilized the Scanning Ion-selective Electrode Technique (SIET) to determine if AedaeGPA2/GPB5 modulated cation transport across this epithelial tissue. Our results suggest that AedaeGPA2/GPB5 does indeed participate in ionic and osmotic balance, since it appears to inhibit natriuresis and promote kaliuresis. Taken together, our findings imply this hormone may play an important

  2. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  3. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse.

  4. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin–GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  5. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)-induced alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone concentrations in the rat during lactation and early postnatal development

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G.; Cherr, Gary N.; Hanna, Lynn A.; Keen, Carl L. . E-mail: clkeen@ucdavis.edu

    2006-09-01

    In experimental animals fed standard laboratory diets, penta-BDE mixtures can decrease circulating thyroid hormone and liver vitamin A concentrations. A substantial number of pregnant women and their children have marginal vitamin A status, potentially increasing their risk of adverse effects to penta-BDE exposure. The current study investigated the effects of maternal gestational and lactational penta-BDE exposure on thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis in rats of sufficient vitamin A (VAS) or marginal vitamin A (VAM) status and their offspring. Dams were administered daily oral doses of 18 mg/kg DE-71 (a penta-BDE mixture) or a corn oil vehicle from gestation day 6 through lactation day (LD) 18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis were assessed in plasma and tissues of LD 19 dams and postnatal day (PND) 12, 18, and 31 pups. DE-71 exposure induced hepatomegaly in VAS and VAM pups at all timepoints and increased testes weights at PND 31. While liver vitamin A concentrations were low in DE-71 treated dams and pups, plasma retinol concentrations and plasma retinol binding protein levels were only low in VAM animals exposed to DE-71. DE-71 exposure lowered plasma thyroxine concentrations in VAS and VAM dams and pups. Plasma thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations were high in VAM dams exposed to DE-71, suggesting that marginal vitamin A status enhances the susceptibility to thyroid hormone axis disruption by DE-71. These results support the concept that marginal vitamin A status in pregnant women may increase the risk for PBDE-induced disruptions in vitamin A and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  7. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  8. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  9. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  11. Food restriction in young Japanese quails: effects on growth, metabolism, plasma thyroid hormones and mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rønning, Bernt; Mortensen, Anne S; Moe, Børge; Chastel, Olivier; Arukwe, Augustine; Bech, Claus

    2009-10-01

    Young birds, in their post-natal growth period, may reduce their growth and metabolism when facing a food shortage. To examine how such responses can be mediated by endocrine-related factors, we exposed Japanese quail chicks to food restriction for either 2 days (age 6-8 days) or 5 days (age 6-11 days). We then measured growth and resting metabolic rate (RMR), and circulating 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) levels as well as expression patterns of genes involved in growth (insulin-like growth factor-I: IGF-I) and thyroid hormone signalling (thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta: TSHbeta, type II iodothyronine deiodinase: D2, thyroid hormone receptors isoforms: TRalpha and TRbeta). The food-restricted chicks receiving a weight-maintenance diet showed reductions in structural growth and RMR. Plasma levels of both T3 and T4 were reduced in the food-restricted birds, and within the 5 days food-restricted group there was a positive correlation between RMR and T3. IGF-I mRNA showed significantly higher abundance in the liver of ad libitum fed birds at day 8 compared with food-restricted birds. In the brain, TSHbeta mRNA level tended to be lower in food-restricted quails on day 8 compared with controls. Furthermore, TRalpha expression was lower in the brain of food-restricted birds at day 8 compared with birds fed ad libitum. Interestingly, brain D2 mRNA was negatively correlated with plasma T3 levels, tending to increase with the length of food restriction. Overall, our results show that food restriction produced significant effects on circulating thyroid hormones and differentially affected mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway. Thus, we conclude that the effects of food restriction observed on growth and metabolism were partly mediated by changes in the endocrine-related factors investigated.

  12. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death.

  13. Thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism: US national assessment

    PubMed Central

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Mwangi, Raphael; Yao, Xiaoxi; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Singh Ospina, Naykky M; O’Keeffe, Derek T; De Ycaza, Ana E Espinosa; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Coddington, Charles C; Stan, Marius N; Brito, Juan P; Montori, Victor M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effectiveness and safety of thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Large US administrative database between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. Participants 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as untreated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration 2.5-10 mIU/L. Exposure Thyroid hormone therapy. Main outcome measure Pregnancy loss and other pre-specified maternal and fetal pregnancy related adverse outcomes. Results Among 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, 843 with a mean pre-treatment TSH concentration of 4.8 (SD 1.7) mIU/L were treated with thyroid hormone and 4562 with a mean baseline TSH concentration of 3.3 (SD 0.9) mIU/L were not treated (P<0.01). Pregnancy loss was significantly less common among treated women (n=89; 10.6%) than among untreated women (n=614; 13.5%) (P<0.01). Compared with the untreated group, treated women had lower adjusted odds of pregnancy loss (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.82) but higher odds of preterm delivery (1.60, 1.14 to 2.24), gestational diabetes (1.37, 1.05 to 1.79), and pre-eclampsia (1.61, 1.10 to 2.37); other pregnancy related adverse outcomes were similar between the two groups. The adjusted odds of pregnancy loss were lower in treated women than in untreated women if their pre-treatment TSH concentration was 4.1-10 mIU/L (odds ratio 0.45, 0.30 to 0.65) but not if it was 2.5-4.0 mIU/L (0.91, 0.65 to 1.23) (P<0.01). Conclusion Thyroid hormone treatment was associated with decreased risk of pregnancy loss among women with subclinical hypothyroidism, especially those with pre-treatment TSH concentrations of 4.1-10 mIU/L. However, the increased risk of other pregnancy related adverse outcomes calls for additional studies evaluating the safety of thyroid hormone treatment in this patient population. PMID:28122781

  14. Hypopituitarism in a neonate with hyperbilirubinemia and decreased level of consciousness: a case report study.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Hadi; Bakhtiyari, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Decreased level of consciousness in neonates may result from different etiologies, including rare metabolic and hormonal disorder due to anterior pituitary insufficiency. In this case report, a five-day-old newborn boy was referred to the neonatal intensive care unit of Mustafa Khomeini hospital of Ilam, Iran. He had an open anterior fontanel with no history of prenatal and familial diseases. Clinical examination showed decreased level of consciousness so that this patient responded only to painful stimuli. Furthermore, unconsciousness, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypotonia were fully evident. Given the clinical findings and decreased level of consciousness, hormonal diagnostic tests and brain CT scan were performed for any evidence of hypopituitarism. Clinical and experimental findings were consistent with the generalized edema and pituitary insufficiency secondary to central hypothyroidism and cortisol deficiency. Based on the findings, the neonate was put on the hormonal replacement therapy and, as the result, all of the abnormal clinical symptoms disappeared. In conclusion, fatal neonatal diseases may be mistaken with unimportant clinical findings at the first examination. Therefore, comprehensive attention to all potential causes of such symptoms in the neonates should be given for early diagnosis and treatment, and to prevent any fatal and irreversible complications.

  15. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  16. DOSE-DEPENDENT REDUCTIONS IN SPATIAL LEARING AND SYNAPTIC FUNCTION IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF ADULT RATS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  17. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  18. Insulin resistance and normal thyroid hormone levels: prospective study and metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, Ele; Iervasi, Giorgio; Cobb, Jeff; Ndreu, Rudina; Nannipieri, Monica

    2017-02-28

    While hyper/hypothyroidism causes dysglycemia, the relationship between thyroid hormone levels within the normal range and insulin resistance (IR) is unclear. In 940 participants with strictly normal serum concentrations of free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)) followed up for 3 years, we measured insulin sensitivity (by the insulin clamp technique) and a panel of 35 circulating metabolites. At baseline, across quartiles of increasing fT3 levels (or fT3/fT4 ratio) there emerged most features of IR (male sex, higher BMI, waist circumference, heart rate, blood pressure, fatty liver index, free fatty acids, and triglycerides levels, reduced insulin-mediated glucose disposal and ß-cell glucose sensitivity). In multiadjusted analyses, fT3 was reciprocally related to insulin sensitivity and, in a subset of 303 subjects, directly related to endogenous glucose production. In multiple regression models adjusting for sex, age, BMI and baseline value of insulin sensitivity, higher baseline fT3 levels were significant predictors of the decreases in insulin sensitivity. Moreover, baseline fT3 predicted follow-up increases in glycemia independently of sex, age, BMI, insulin sensitivity, ß-cell glucose sensitivity and baseline glycemia. Serum tyrosine levels were higher in IR and were directly associated with fT3; higher α-hydroxybutyrate levels signaled enhanced oxidative stress impairing tyrosine degradation. In 25 morbidly obese patients, surgery-induced weight loss improved IR and consensually lowered fT3 High-normal fT3 levels are associated with IR both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, and predict deterioration of glucose tolerance. This association is supported by a metabolite pattern that points at increased oxidative stress as part of the IR syndrome.

  19. Expression of growth hormone and its transcription factor, Pit-1, in early bovine development.

    PubMed

    Joudrey, E M; Lechniak, D; Petrik, J; King, W A

    2003-03-01

    During bovine embryogenesis, bovine growth hormone (bGH) contributes to proliferation, differentiation, and modulation of embryo metabolism. Pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) is a transcription factor that binds to promoters of GH, prolactin (PRL), and thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta (TSHbeta) encoding genes. A polymorphism in the fifth exon of the bGH gene resulting in a leucine (Leu) to valine (Val) substitution provides an Alu I restriction site when the Leu allele is present. To determine the onset of embryonic expression of the bGH gene, oocytes derived from ovaries homozygous for Leu alleles were fertilized in vitro with spermatozoa obtained from a Val homozygote. For each developmental stage examined, three separate pools of embryos composed of approximately 100 cell samples underwent RNA isolation, reverse transcription to cDNA, and amplification by nested PCR (nPCR). Bovine GH gene transcripts were identified at 2- to 4-cell (n = 162), 8- to 16-cell (n = 73), morulae (n = 51), and blastocyst (n = 15) stages. Likewise, transcripts for Pit-1 were detected at 2-cell (n = 125), 4-cell (n = 114), 8-cell (n = 56), 12-to-32-cell (n = 32), morulae (n = 68), and blastocyst (n = 14) stages. After digestion with Alu1, bGH cDNA was genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Bovine GH mRNA was present in all pools of stages examined. Both Leu and Val alleles (maternal and paternal) were only detected in pools of embryos that had reached 8- to 16-cell stage. Results suggest that transcription of the bGH gene begins at the 8- to 16-cell stage in bovine embryos, possibly under control of the transcription factor, Pit-1, and that RFLP analysis of the bGH gene can be used to determine parental origin of transcripts in early embryonic development.

  20. Association Between Thyroid Hormones, Lipids and Oxidative Stress Markers in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Wu, Gui-Rong; Ntazinda, Arsene; Shi, Yong-Hui; Shen, Li-Ye; Le, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases. It is recognized in overt hypothyroidism while its existence in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is not well established. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was increased oxidation of lipids and proteins in SCH, and examine their association with lipids and thyroid hormones. Methods Male adults (35–59 years) with SCH (n=467) and euthyroid controls (n=190) were studied. Anthropometric measurements, plasma lipids, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde (MDA), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and dityrosine concentrations were measured. Results Plasma concentrations of MDA were significantly higher (p<0.05) in SCH (8.11±1.39 nmol/mL) compared with euthyroid controls (7.34±1.31 nmol/mL) while AOPP, dityrosine and T-AOC levels were not different. MDA was not associated with TSH (β=−0.019, P=0.759), FT4 (β=−0.062, P=0.323) and FT3 (β=−0.018, P=0.780) in SCH while levels increased with elevated total cholesterol (β=0.229, P=0.001), LDL (β=0.203, P=0.009) and triglycerides (β=0.159, P=0.036) after adjustment for age and body mass index. T-AOC reduced (β=−0.327, P=0.030) with increased MDA in euthyroid controls and not in SCH (β=−0.068, P=0.349), while levels increased with elevated triglycerides in both groups. Conclusions Oxidative stress was increased in subclinical hypothyroidism as evidenced by the elevated lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, while protein oxidation was absent. Thus, reduction of oxidative stress may be beneficial in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:28356843

  1. [Familial congenital hypomagnesemia revealed by neonatal convulsions].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Dehanin, T; Sow, A-D; Sène, M-S; Basse, A-M; Fall, A-L; Seck, L-B; Touré, K; Diop, A-G; Sow, H-D; Ndiaye, M-M

    2013-11-01

    Congenital hypomagnesemia is a rare disease, with an impact on cognitive and neurological development. We report on three familial cases of congenital hypomagnesemia, two boys and one girl who belong to the same consanguineous family. They all presented neonatal seizures and a psychomotor developmental delay. Cerebral computed tomography showed cerebral atrophy and calcifications in one case and magnetic resonance imaging found predominant cerebellar atrophy in the two other cases. All three patients also had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphoremia, and hypomagnesemia. The parathyroid hormone blood level was low in two cases and normal in the third. One 7-month old patient died. The others received a supplementation of calcium and magnesium, which normalized calcemia, phosphatemia but not magnesemia, which remained low despite high doses. They have both developed cognitive and behavioral impairments.

  2. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  3. Neonatal hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Purves, Erica

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex subspecialty of pediatric hematology, combining the unique aspects of the maternal/fetal relationship, the delicate balance of coagulation factors, and the distinctive physiologic conditions of the newborn period. The objective of this article is to briefly review specific hematologic disorders that commonly present in the newborn period. Alloimmune cytopenias, polycythemia, thrombosis and bleeding associated with vitamin K deficiency will be discussed through a focus on pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, current treatment strategies, and implications for nursing care.

  4. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  5. Training-overtraining: performance, and hormone levels, after a defined increase in training volume versus intensity in experienced middle- and long-distance runners.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M; Gastmann, U; Petersen, K G; Bachl, N; Seidel, A; Khalaf, A N; Fischer, S; Keul, J

    1992-12-01

    Performance and hormones were determined in eight middle- and nine long-distance runners after an increase in training volume (ITV, February 1989) or intensity (ITI, February 1990). Seven runners participated in both studies. The objective was to cause an overtraining syndrome. The mean training volume of 85.9 km week-1 increased within 3 weeks to 176.6 km week-1 during ITV and 96-98% of training volume was performed as long-distance runs at mean(s.d.) 67(8)% of maximum capacity. Speed endurance, high-speed and interval runs averaging 9 km week-1 increased within 3 weeks to 22.7 km during ITI, and the total volume increased from 61.6 to 84.7 km. A plateau in endurance performance and decrease in maximum performance occurred during ITV, probably due to overtraining, with performance incompetence over months. Nocturnal catecholamine excretion decreased markedly (47-53%), contrary to exercise-related plasma catecholamine responses, which increased. Resting and exercise-related cortisol and aldosterone levels decreased. Improvement in endurance and maximum performance occurred during ITI indicating a failure to cause an overtraining syndrome in ITI. Decrease in noctural catecholamine excretion was clearly lower (9-26%), exercise-related catecholamine responses showed a significant decrease, cortisol and aldosterone levels remained almost constant, exercise-related prolactin levels decreased slightly. There were no differences in insulin, C-peptide, free testosterone, somatotropic hormone (STH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The decrease in nocturnal catecholamine excretion during ITV might indicate a decrease in intrinsic sympathetic activity in exhausted sportsmen. But it remains open whether this reflected a central nervous system incompetence.

  6. On the role of gallbladder emptying and incretin hormones for nutrient-mediated TSH suppression in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Lund, Asger; Faber, Jens; Holst, Jens J; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2014-12-01

    Bile acids are possible candidate agents in newly identified pathways through which energy expenditure may be regulated. Preclinical studies suggest that bile acids activate the enzyme type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase, which deiodinates thyroxine (T4) to the biologically active triiodothyronine (T3). We aimed to evaluate the influence of bile acid exposure and incretin hormones on thyroid function parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones (total T3 and free T4) were measured in plasma from two human studies: i) 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and three isocaloric (500 kcal) and isovolaemic (350 ml) liquid meals with increasing fat content with concomitant ultrasonographic evaluation of gallbladder emptying in 15 patients with type 2 diabetes and 15 healthy age, gender and BMI-matched controls (meal-study) and ii) 50 g-OGTT and isoglycaemic intravenous glucose infusions (IIGI) alone or in combination with glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) and/or GLP2, in ten patients with type 2 diabetes (IIGI-study). In both studies, TSH levels declined (P<0.01) similarly following all meal and infusion stimuli. T3 and T4 concentrations did not change in response to any of the applied stimuli. TSH levels declined independently of the degree of gallbladder emptying (meal-study), route of nutrient administration and infusion of gut hormones. In conclusion, intestinal bile flow and i.v. infusions of the gut hormones, GIP, GLP1 and/or GLP2, do not seem to affect thyroid function parameters. Thus, the presence of a 'gut-thyroid-pituitary' axis seems questionable.

  7. [Neonatal lupus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Solano-Fiesco, Liborio; Romero-Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Olivera-Solórzano, Florisela; Alonso-Pérez, Nancy Carmencita; Marcos-Cabrera, Liliana; González-Martínez, Rosa Ana

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus has a rare incidence, distinct from systemic lupus erythematosus. This is an acquired autoimmune disease associated with maternal antibodies to proteins Ro / La (SSA /SSB), transferred by the placenta; it represents the prototype of passive transfer of antibodies from mother to child. The disease can affect the skin, heart, and rarely, the hepatobiliary or hematologic systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most severe form of neonatal lupus. In clinical practice it is important to distinguish in utero a complete from an incomplete atrioventricular block (AV) in order to render prompt care. We present the case of a new born female, who was diagnosed with an atrio-ventricular block at 26 weeksí gestation. When the baby was delivered at 38 weeksí gestation, she presented bradycardia (54 xí). On the suspicion of neonatal lupus, we required antinuclear antibodies, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B, which were positive. A bicameral pacemaker was placed uneventfully.

  8. Residue profiles of organohalogen compounds in human serum from e-waste recycling sites in North Vietnam: Association with thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Minh Tue, Nguyen; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Hung Viet, Pham; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrated the contamination levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs), and their relationships with thyroid hormones (THs), in the serum of human donors from an e-waste recycling site and a rural site in Hung Yen province, Vietnam. Occupationally related exposure was indicated by significantly higher residue levels of PCBs, OH-PCBs, PBDEs, and BPhs in the serum of donors from the e-waste recycling site (median: 420, 160, 290, and 300pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than those in the serum of donors from the rural site (median: 290, 82, 230, and 200pgg(-)(1) wet wt, respectively). On the other hand, levels of OH-/MeO-PBDEs were significantly higher in serum of donors from the reference site (median: 160 and 20pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than in those from the e-waste recycling site (median: 43 and 0.52pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively). In addition, we implemented stepwise generalized linear models to assess the association between the levels of TH and PCBs, PBDEs, and their related compounds. In females, we found positive associations of PCBs and OH-PCB concentrations with total thyroxine, free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, and free triiodothyronine, and a negative association with thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations.

  9. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization.

  10. Restrictive management of neonatal polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Morag, Iris; Strauss, Tzipora; Lubin, Daniel; Schushan-Eisen, Irit; Kenet, Gili; Kuint, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Partial exchange transfusion (PET) is traditionally suggested as treatment for neonates diagnosed with polycythemia. Nevertheless, justification of this treatment is controversial. We evaluated the risk for short-term complications associated with a restrictive treatment protocol for neonatal polycythemia. A retrospective cross-sectional analytical study was conducted. Three treatment groups were defined and managed according to their degree of polycythemia, defined by capillary tube filled with venous blood and manually centrifuged hematocrit: group 1, hematocrit 65 to 69% and no special treatment was recommended; group 2, hematocrit 70 to 75% and intravenous fluids were given and feedings were withheld until hematocrit decreased to < 70%; and group 3, hematocrit ≥ 76% or symptomatic neonates and PET was recommended. During the study period, 190 neonates were diagnosed with polycythemia. The overall rate of short-term complications was 15% (28 neonates). Seizures, proven necrotizing enterocolitis, or thrombosis did not occur in any participating neonates. PET was performed in 31 (16%) neonates. The groups did not differ in their rate of early neonatal morbidities or length of hospitalization. Restrictive treatment for neonatal asymptomatic polycythemia is not associated with an increased risk of short-term complications.

  11. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  12. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  13. The PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways elevate thyroid hormone receptor β1 and TRH receptor to decrease thyroid hormones after exposure to PCB153 and p,p'-DDE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Li, Lianbing; Ha, Mei; Qi, Suqin; Duan, Peng; Yang, Kedi

    2015-01-01

    PCBs and DDT cause the disturbance of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis in humans and animals. To test the hypothesis that the PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways would play significant roles in TH imbalance caused by PCBs and DDT, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with PCB153 and p,p'-DDE intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days, and human thyroid follicular epithelial (Nthy-ori 3-1 cell line) were treated with PCB153 and p,p'-DDE for different time. Results showed that serum total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), total triiodothyronine (TT3) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were decreased, whereas serum free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were not changed. The PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways were activated in vivo and in vitro after the treatment with PCB153 and p,p'-DDE. Moreover, TH receptor β1 (TRβ1) was elevated after the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and was depressed after the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway; TRH receptor (TRHr) was increased after the activation of the ERK pathway and was decreased after the inhibition of the ERK pathway. Though TH receptor α1 (TRα1) level was increased in the hypothalamus, TRα1 and TSHr were not influenced by the status of signaling pathways in in vitro study. Taken together, after exposure to PCB153 and p,p'-DDE, activated PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis via TRβ1 and TRHr and then decrease TH levels, and that would be a potential mechanism by which PCBs and DDT disturb TH homeostasis.

  14. Influences of maternal caffeine on the neonatal rat brains vary with the nutritional states.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1983-11-21

    The potential effect of maternal caffeine ingestion upon total brain protein and the concentration of two prototype neuropeptides, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and its derivative, cyclo (His-Pro) in neonates was examined during the nursing period in the context of variable maternal protein intake. Maternal caffeine intake (2 mg/100 g body weight) significantly increased the total brain protein of neonates derived from dams fed a 6% casein diet, but not from dams fed a 12%- or 20%-casein diet. Maternal caffeine consumption significantly increased the amount of cyclo (His-Pro) in the neonatal brains in all groups. The percent increments in pups from dams fed 6%, 12%, and 20% casein diets were respectively 137%, 131%, and 120%. By contrast, no significant alterations were observed in TRH concentrations between caffeine and control groups. It is concluded that maternal caffeine can influence neonatal brain protein and cyclo (His-Pro) during nursing under conditions of protein-energy malnutrition.

  15. Elevated Serum Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Alteration of Thyroid Hormones in Children from Guiyu, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Liu, Junxiao; Zeng, Xiang; Lu, Fangfang; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Informal electronic waste (e-waste) recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metals. This study explored whether there is an association between PBDEs, heavy metal and key growth- and development-related hormones in children from Guiyu, an e-waste area in southern China. We quantified eight PBDE congeners using gas chromatographic mass spectrometry, lead and cadmium utilizing graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, three thyroids with radioimmunoassay and two types of growth hormones by an enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) in 162 children, 4 to 6 years old, from Guiyu. In blood, median total PBDE was 189.99 ng/g lipid. Lead and cadmium concentrations in blood averaged 14.53±4.85 µg dL−1 and 0.77±0.35 µg L−1, respectively. Spearman partial correlation analysis illustrated that lead was positively correlated with BDE153 and BDE183. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was positively correlated with almost all PBDE congeners and negatively correlated with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), whereas free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) were negatively correlated with BDE154. However, no correlation between the hormones and blood lead or cadmium levels was found in this study. Adjusted multiple linear regression analysis showed that total PBDEs was negatively associated with FT3 and positively associated with TSH. Notably, FT4 was positively correlated with FT3, house functions as a workshop, and father's work involved in e-waste recycling and negatively correlated with vitamin consumptions. TSH was negatively related with FT4, paternal residence time in Guiyu, working hours of mother, and child bean products intake. IGFBP-3 was positively correlated with IGF-1 and house close to an e-waste dump. These results suggest that elevated PBDEs and heavy metals related to e-waste in Guiyu may be important risk factors for hormone alterations in children

  16. TSH test

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotropin; Thyroid stimulating hormone; Hypothyroidism - TSH; Hyperthyroidism - TSH; Goiter - TSH ... most often due to an underactive thyroid gland ( hypothyroidism ). There are many causes of this problem. A ...

  17. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  18. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... to hormones! Download our Free App! Understand the endocrine system and its related conditions with our 3D Patient ...

  19. Growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  20. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Hormones and Obesity Fact Sheet Hormones and Obesity March, 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Caroline Apovian, MD Judith Korner, MD, PhD What is obesity? Obesity is a chronic (long-term) medical problem ...

  1. Effects of Neonatal Dexamethasone Exposure on Adult Neuropsychiatric Traits in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Donald; Rodger, Jennifer; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of early life stress in utero or in neonates has long-term consequences on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis function and neurodevelopment. These effects extend into adulthood and may underpin a variety of mental illnesses and be related to various developmental and cognitive changes. We examined the potential role of neonatal HPA axis activation on adult psychopathology and dopamine sensitivity in the mature rat using neonatal exposure to the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist and stress hormone, dexamethasone. We utilized a comprehensive battery of assessments for behaviour, brain function and gene expression to determine if elevated early life HPA activation is associated with adult-onset neuropsychiatric traits. Dexamethasone exposure increased startle reactivity under all conditions tested, but decreased sensitivity of sensorimotor gating to dopaminergic disruption–contrasting with what is observed in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Under certain conditions there also appeared to be mild long-term changes in stress and anxiety-related behaviours with neonatal dexamethasone exposure. Electrophysiology revealed that there were no consistent neuropsychiatric abnormalities in auditory processing or resting state brain function with dexamethasone exposure. However, neonatal dexamethasone altered auditory cortex glucocorticoid activation, and auditory cortex synchronization. Our results indicate that neonatal HPA axis activation by dexamethasone alters several aspects of adult brain function and behaviour and may induce long-term changes in emotional stress-reactivity. However, neonatal dexamethasone exposure is not specifically related to any particular neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:27936175

  2. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  3. Neonatal overfeeding disrupts pituitary ghrelin signalling in female rats long-term; Implications for the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Ziko, Ilvana; Spencer, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to psychological stress are exacerbated in adult female but not male rats made obese due to overfeeding in early life. Ghrelin, traditionally known for its role in energy homeostasis, has been recently recognised for its role in coordinating the HPA responses to stress, particularly by acting directly at the anterior pituitary where the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), the receptor for acyl ghrelin, is abundantly expressed. We therefore hypothesised that neonatal overfeeding in female rats would compromise pituitary responsiveness to ghrelin, contributing to a hyperactive central stress responsiveness. Unlike in males where hypothalamic ghrelin signalling is compromised by neonatal overfeeding, there was no effect of early life diet on circulating ghrelin or hypothalamic ghrelin signalling in females, indicating hypothalamic feeding and metabolic ghrelin circuitry remains intact. However, neonatal overfeeding did lead to long-term alterations in the pituitary ghrelin system. The neonatally overfed females had increased neonatal and reduced adult expression of GHSR and ghrelin-O-acyl transferase (GOAT) in the pituitary as well as reduced pituitary responsiveness to exogenous acyl ghrelin-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in vitro. These data suggest that neonatal overfeeding dysregulates pituitary ghrelin signalling long-term in females, potentially accounting for the hyper-responsive HPA axis in these animals. These findings have implications for how females may respond to stress throughout life, suggesting the way ghrelin modifies the stress response at the level of the pituitary may be less efficient in the neonatally overfed. PMID:28282447

  4. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  5. Gender Differences in Respiratory Morbidity and Mortality of Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Townsel, Courtney Denise; Emmer, Sawyer F.; Campbell, Winston A.; Hussain, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    For the past century, researchers have underscored the “disadvantage” observed in respiratory morbidity and mortality of male newborns. In this contemporary review, we examine gender differences in preterm infant respiratory morbidity and mortality specifically appraising differences in the very low birth weight (VLBW) population as well as the late preterm (LPT) population. In the era of postnatal surfactant and antenatal corticosteroids, the gender gap in neonatal outcomes has not narrowed. Structural, physiologic, and hormonal sex differences may be at the root of this disparity. Further exploration into the origin of gender differences in respiratory morbidity and neonatal mortality will shape future therapies. These therapies may need to be gender specific to close the gender gap. PMID:28194395

  6. Sodium Intake Requirements for Preterm Neonates: Review and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Adrianne R; Tomlinson, Christopher; Belik, Jaques

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that sodium is an essential nutritional electrolyte and its deficiency is associated with neurological sequelae and poor growth. The provision of an adequate sodium intake to preterm neonates is hampered by the technical difficulty in clinically assessing total body sodium content. As addressed in this review, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of hyponatremia early in life, but there is no evidence that it should deviate from the widely accepted normative data for adult subjects. A low urinary sodium content is accepted by many as reflecting total body sodium deficiency, yet spot urinary sodium measurements are of questionable clinical value. The hormonal regulation of sodium homeostasis is here reviewed and the mechanism accounting for sodium deficiency-induced growth impairment in preterm infants addressed. Lastly, we provide evidence-based gestational and postnatal age-dependent recommendations for the provision of adequate sodium intake to preterm neonates.

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Helps keep muscle and bone healthy. Prolactin Starts breast milk production after childbirth; can affect sex hormones. TSH (thyroid- Tells the thyroid gland to make thyroid stimulating hormone) hormones. What hormone ...

  8. Amenorrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prolactin , a hormone that stimulates the production of breast milk after childbirth —— TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), a hormone that regulates hormone production by the thyroid gland • Thyroid gland: a gland in the neck that ...

  9. Neonatal screening: ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hermerén, G

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the ethical issues raised by neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis and to propose a structure for the ethical analysis of these issues. The structure is based on an analysis of some of the most common shortcomings of ethical analyses. The structure needs to be supplemented by facts about the present state of the art concerning effects and costs of the various screening and treatment alternatives. Such information is provided by other contributions to these proceedings.

  10. Eye pathologies in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nyaish; Mansoor, Tihami; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, newborn assessment incorporates a screening eye examination for any structural abnormalities, observation of neonate's visual behaviour and direct ophthalmoscopy examination looking for red reflex. Early identification and immediate management of eye related pathologies should commence soon after birth as early diagnosis and prompt intervention may have significant impact on the prognosis for many potentially blinding but treatable disorders such as congenital cataracts and retinoblastoma. If left undetected and untreated, such problems may potentially lead to irreversible damage to the vision which persists into adulthood resulting in lack of self-confidence together with difficulties in educational attainment and job opportunities. PMID:28003988

  11. Neonatal drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Mark L; Tan, Rosemarie C

    2012-02-01

    Maternal use of certain drugs during pregnancy can result in transient neonatal signs consistent with withdrawal or acute toxicity or cause sustained signs consistent with a lasting drug effect. In addition, hospitalized infants who are treated with opioids or benzodiazepines to provide analgesia or sedation may be at risk for manifesting signs of withdrawal. This statement updates information about the clinical presentation of infants exposed to intrauterine drugs and the therapeutic options for treatment of withdrawal and is expanded to include evidence-based approaches to the management of the hospitalized infant who requires weaning from analgesics or sedatives.

  12. Lactation Biology Symposium: role of colostrum and colostrum components on glucose metabolism in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H M; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Flor, J; Schönhusen, U; Metges, C C

    2013-02-01

    In neonatal calves, nutrient intake shifts from continuous glucose supply via the placenta to discontinuous colostrum and milk intake with lactose and fat as main energy sources. Calves are often born hypoglycemic and have to establish endogenous glucose production (eGP) and gluconeogenesis, because lactose intake by colostrum and milk does not meet glucose demands. Besides establishing a passive immunity, colostrum intake stimulates maturation and function of the neonatal gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Nutrients and nonnutritive factors, such as hormones and growth factors, which are present in high amounts in colostrum of first milking after parturition, affect intestinal growth and function and enhance the absorptive capacity of the GIT. Likely as a consequence of that, colostrum feeding improves the glucose status in neonatal calves by increasing glucose absorption, which results in elevated postprandial plasma glucose concentrations. Hepatic glycogen concentrations rise much greater when colostrum instead of a milk-based colostrum replacer (formula with same nutrient composition as colostrum but almost no biologically active substances, such as hormones and growth factors) is fed. In contrast, first-pass glucose uptake in the splanchnic tissue tended to be greater in calves fed formula. The greater plasma glucose rise and improved energy status in neonatal calves after colostrum intake lead to greater insulin secretion and accelerated stimulation of anabolic processes indicated by enhanced maturation of the postnatal somatotropic axis in neonatal calves. Hormones involved in stimulation of eGP, such as glucagon and cortisol, depend on neonatal diet, but their effects on eGP stimulation seem to be impaired. Although colostrum feeding affects systemic insulin, IGF-I, and leptin concentrations, evidence for systemic action of colostral insulin, IGF-I, and leptin in neonatal calves is weak. Studies so far indicate no absorption of insulin, IGF-I, and leptin from

  13. Nationwide Evaluation of Congenital Hypothyroidism Screening during Neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Leeuwen, Lisette; van Heijst, Arno F.J.; Vijfhuize, Sanne; Beurskens, Leonardus W.J.E.; Weijman, Gert; Tibboel, Dick; van den Akker, Erica L.T.; IJsselstijn, Hanneke

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone concentrations may deviate from normal values during critical illness. This condition is known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), and it can influence the results of screening for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Objectives To determine the incidence of aberrant CH screening results in ECMO-treated neonates, to identify possible determinants, and to follow up patients with abnormal thyroid hormone concentrations. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we included 168 ECMO-treated neonates admitted from 2004 to 2014 and screened by protocol and divided them into the following 3 groups: group 1 (screened during ECMO, n = 107), group 2 (screened shortly before ECMO, n = 26), and group 3 (screened shortly after ECMO, n = 35). Results CH screening results were aberrant in 67.3% (72/107) of the neonates screened during ECMO, in 73.1% (19/26) of the neonates screened before ECMO, and in 31.4% (11/35) of the neonates screened after ECMO (p < 0.001). Of the neonates with an aberrant screening result, all but 2 (i.e. 98%) had a low thyroxine concentration with a normal thyrotropin concentration at screening, as is seen in NTIS. None was diagnosed with CH. Mortality did not significantly differ between neonates with an aberrant screening result (32.4%) and neonates with a normal screening result (22.7%; p = 0.18). Screening before ECMO (OR 5.92; 95% CI 1.93-18.20), screening during ECMO (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.98-10.19), and a higher Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 score (OR 1.31; 95% CI 1.04-1.66) were associated with an aberrant screening result. Conclusions Aberrant CH screening results were found in most ECMO-treated neonates screened before or during ECMO, which is likely due to NTIS. Follow-up of thyroid hormone concentrations is best started after recovery from critical illness. Our results suggest that thyroxine therapy is not required during ECMO. PMID:27639769

  14. Hypernatremia in the Neonate: Neonatal Hypernatremia and Hypernatremic Dehydration in Neonates Receiving Exclusive Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Mujawar, Nilofer Salim; Jaiswal, Archana Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration in neonates receiving exclusive breastfeeding. Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia is a serious condition in the newborn period. We present infants with hypernatremic dehydration due to breast milk (BM) hypernatremia. Hypernatremic dehydration in breast-fed newborns is usually secondary to insufficient lactation. We present the neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration encountered between January and December, 2012, its causes and treatment. Methodology: This was a retrospective study. We analyzed records of babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit who were investigated and found to have hypernatremia and whose mother's BM sodium (BM Na) was done. Inclusion Criteria: (1) Babies with serum Na >145 meq/l, (2) euglycemia, (3) normocalcemic, (4) no clinical and lab evidence of sepsis, (5) exclusive breast feeds. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates not satisfying any mentioned criterion. Results: BM Na correlated strongly with neonatal hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed babies who did not otherwise have any risk factor. Conclusion: Elevated BM Na is an important etiological factor in neonatal hypernatremia. PMID:28197048

  15. Weight-of-evidence analysis of human exposures to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and associations with thyroid hormone levels during early development.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Kerper, Laura E; Boyce, Catherine Petito; Prueitt, Robyn L; Rhomberg, Lorenz R

    2010-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the proper development of brain function and cell growth. Several epidemiological studies have been conducted to assess potential associations between pre- and post-natal exposure to dioxins or dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones during early development. Dioxins and DLCs include chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, chlorinated dibenzofurans, and mono- and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We identified a total of 23 relevant epidemiological studies (21 cohort studies and 1 case-control study) that measured exposures to various types of dioxins and DLCs as well as markers of thyroid function, such as thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total thyroxine (T4), free T4, total triiodothyroxine (T3), free T3, and thyroid-binding globulin concentrations in cord blood or circulation. While some of the studies reported associations between concentrations of dioxins and/or DLCs and some biomarkers of thyroid function, the majority of the observed associations were not statistically significant. Moreover, there were no clear and consistent effects across studies for any of the hormone levels examined, and while a number of studies showed a statistically significant association with exposure for a given marker of thyroid function, other studies showed either no change or changes in the opposite direction for the same thyroid function marker. Similarly, when the results were analyzed considering developmental stage, there generally were no clear and consistent effects at any age from birth through 12 years of age. The absence of a clear correlation between background exposures to dioxins and DLCs and thyroid function biomarkers during development is not consistent with the hypothesis that background exposures to these chemicals cause effects on thyroid function during development.

  16. The pituitary-thyroid axis during the parr-smolt transformation of Coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch: quantification of TSH β mRNA, TSH, and thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Donald A; Swanson, Penny; Dickhoff, Walton W

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this investigation was to quantify pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) β mRNA, pituitary and plasma TSH and plasma thyroid hormone levels during the parr-smolt transformation of Coho salmon that occurs in spring from February to May. The status of the pituitary-thyroid axis was assessed using an RNase protection assay for pituitary TSH β mRNA and radioimmunoassays for salmon pituitary and plasma TSH and thyroid hormones. TSH β mRNA was highest during late winter (February) (4.9 pg/μg DNA) and gradually declined during spring (2.3 pg/μg DNA). In contrast, pituitary and plasma TSH levels showed a small, but statistically non-significant change during smoltification. Despite minimal change in plasma TSH levels, characteristically large increases in plasma T4 (January-3.3 ng/ml to April-10.2 ng/ml) and significant, but modest increases in plasma T3 (February-2.4 ng/ml to April-5.8 ng/ml) were observed. Regression analysis showed a significant positive relationship between plasma T4 and T3 and negative relationship between plasma T3 and pituitary TSH β mRNA. However, all other relations were not significant. These data suggest a significant role for peripheral regulation (i.e. T4-T3 conversion, change in tissue sensitivity, hormone degradation rate) as well as evidence of central regulation via negative feedback at the level of the pituitary gland in regulation of thyroid activity in salmon. Furthermore, the increased thyroid sensitivity to TSH (shown previously), in the face of relatively constant plasma TSH levels, may be the major factor responsible for the increased thyroid activity observed during smoltification.

  17. Neonatal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B; Treharne, L

    2016-01-01

    A term neonate was born with a grossly swollen and discoloured left hand and forearm. He was transferred from the local hospital to the plastic surgical unit, where a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent emergency forearm fasciotomies at six hours of age. Following serial debridements of necrotic tissue, he underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the resultant defects of his forearm, hand and digits. At the clinic follow-up appointment two months after the procedure, he was found to have developed severe flexion contractures despite regular outpatient hand therapy and splintage. He has had further reconstruction with contracture release, use of artificial dermal matrix, and K-wire fixation of the thumb and wrist. Despite this, the long term outcome is likely to be an arm with poor function. The key learning point from this case is that despite prompt transfer, diagnosis and appropriate surgical management, the outcome for neonatal compartment syndrome may still be poor. PMID:27138850

  18. Hormonal and echocardiographic abnormalities in adult patients with sickle-cell anemia in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Garadah, Taysir S; Jaradat, Ahmed A; Alalawi, Mohammed E; Hassan, Adla B

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenal, thyroid, and parathyroid gland hormonal changes are recognized in children with homozygous (HbSS) sickle-cell anemia (SCA), but are not clear in adult patients with SCA. Aim To assess the metabolic and endocrine abnormalities in adult patients with SCA and evaluate left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions compared with patients with no SCA and further study the relationship between serum levels of cortisol, free thyroxine (T4), and testosterone with serum ferritin. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 82 patients with adult HbSS SCA compared with a sex- and age-matched control group. The serum levels of cortisol, parathyroid hormone (PTH), testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free T4 were compared. Blood levels of hemoglobin, reticulocyte count, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), vitamin D3, and ferritin were also compared. Pulsed Doppler echo was performed to evaluate the LV mass, wall thickness, and cavity dimensions with diastolic filling velocities of early (E) and atria (A) waves. Biometric data were analyzed as mean ± standard deviation between the two groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed between serum levels of ferritin as independent variable and testosterone, cortisol, and thyroid hormones. Results A total of 82 adult patients with HbSS SCA were enrolled who had a mean age of 21±5.7 years, with 51 males (62%). Patients with SCA compared with the control group had significantly lower hemoglobin, body mass index, cortisol, vitamin D3, testosterone, and T4. Furthermore, there were significantly high levels of reticulocyte count, PTH, TSH, ferritin, LDH, ALP, and uric acid. The incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency was 7% and 4.8%, respectively, with hypogonadism 9.8% and vitamin D3 deficiency 61%. There were inverse relationships between ferritin as independent variable and serum levels of testosterone, T4, and cortisol

  19. Diurnal secretion profiles of growth hormone, thyrotrophin and prolactin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Aziz, N A; Pijl, H; Frölich, M; Roelfsema, F; Roos, R A C

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a massive loss of both hypocretin and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurones was found in the hypothalamus of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Because both hypocretin and MCH play a key role in the regulation of sleep, energy homeostasis and autonomic function, partly by modulation of the somatotrophic, thyrotrophic and lactotrophic axes, neuroendocrine dysregulation may contribute to some of the non-motor features of PD. In eight de novo, medication-free PD patients and eight age-, sex- and body mass index-matched controls, we measured serum levels of growth hormone (GH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin every 10 min for 24 h. Auto-deconvolution, cosinor and approximate entropy analysis were applied to quantify GH, TSH and prolactin secretion rates, diurnal rhythmicity, as well as regularity of hormone release. Sleep was polygraphically-recorded throughout the night. Total 24-h secretion of GH (191 ± 31 versus 130 ± 39 mU/l/24 h), TSH (38 ± 9 versus 36 ± 2 mU/l/24 h) and prolactin (102 ± 14 versus 116 ± 17 μg/l/24 h), as well as their diurnal rhythmicity and regularity of release, were not significantly different between PD patients and controls (all P ≥ 0.12). Fasting levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 were also unaltered in PD patients. However, free thyroxine (T(4) ) levels were significantly higher in PD patients compared to controls (16.19 ± 0.80 versus 13.88 ± 0.40 pmol/l; P = 0.031). In PD patients, prolactin levels were related to disease duration (r = 0.76, P = 0.028), whereas both GH (r = -0.91, P = 0.002) and free T(4) (r = -0.71, P = 0.050) levels correlated inversely with body fat content. Apart from a mild increase in free T(4) levels, we found no indications for altered somatotrophic, thyrotrophic and lactotrophic axes activity in early-stage PD patients.

  20. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  1. The ontogenesis of human fetal hormones. III. Prolactin.

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, M J; Grumbach, M M; Kaplan, S L

    1975-01-01

    The synthesis and release of human prolactin (hPRL) in the human fetus was assessed by radioimmunoassay analysis of the content and concentration of hPRL in 82 pituitary glands and the concentration of serum hPRL in 47 fetuses of gestational age 68 days to term. Fetal hPRL exhibited parallelism with the reference standard (Lewis 203-1). hPRL was detected by 68 days of gestation (10 wk), the earliest fetal pituitary gland studied; 8 out of 33 pituitaries had a prolactin (PRL) content above 2.0 ng between 10-15 wk gestation. The mean ocntent of PRL in the pituitary gland increased sharply from 14.8 plus or minus 4.6 ng at 15-19 wk to 405 plus or minus 142 ng at 20-24 wk and 542 plus or minus ng at 25-29 wk gestation. By term, the mean content was 2,039 plus or minus 459 (range 493-3,689) and the mean concentration 15.9 plus or minus 2.4 ng/mg (range 7-20). There was a significant positive correlation (P less than 0.001) between the hPRL and human growth hormone (hGH) content of fetal pituitary glands; at term the hPRL/hGH ratio was 1/290. The concentration of serum hPRL between 12 and 24 wk ranged from 2.9 to 67 ng/ml, mean 19.5 plus or minus 2.5 ng/ml )n = 21); by 26 wk fetal serum hPRL increased sharply and attained levels of 300-500 ng/ml in late gestation. At delivery, the mean plasma concentration of hPRL was 167 plus or minus 14.2 ng/ml in 36 umbilical venous specimens and 111.8 plus or minus 12.3 ng/ml in the matched maternal venous specimens. No correlation between serum hPRL and the pituitary content or concentration of hPRL was demonstrable in 12 matched fetal specimens. In five anencephalic infants, umbilical venous hPRL levels were between 65 and 283 ng/ml. In two anencephalic infants, thyrotropin releasing factor (TRF) (200 mug IV) evoked a rise in serum hPRL in one patient from 43 to 156 ng/ml at 30 min, and in the other from 65 to 404 ng/ml at 120 min. In both patients, plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rose from undetectable base-line levels to

  2. Perinatal exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide alters the thyrotrophic axis and causes thyroid hormone homeostasis imbalance in male rats.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Janaina Sena; Kizys, Marina Malta Letro; da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Glebocki, Gabriel; Romano, Renata Marino; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria; Giannocco, Gisele; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Dias da Silva, Magnus Regios; Romano, Marco Aurélio; Chiamolera, Maria Izabel

    2017-02-15

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are widely used in agriculture. Recently, several animal and epidemiological studies have been conducted to understand the effects of these chemicals as an endocrine disruptor for the gonadal system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether GBHs could also disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Female pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to a solution containing GBH Roundup(®)Transorb (Monsanto). The animals were divided into three groups (control, 5mg/kg/day or 50mg/kg/day) and exposed from gestation day 18 (GD18) to post-natal day 5 (PND5). Male offspring were euthanized at PND 90, and blood and tissues samples from the hypothalamus, pituitary, liver and heart were collected for hormonal evaluation (TSH-Thyroid stimulating hormone, T3-triiodothyronine and T4-thyroxine), metabolomic and mRNA analyses of genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism and function. The hormonal profiles showed decreased concentrations of TSH in the exposed groups, with no variation in the levels of the thyroid hormones (THs) T3 and T4 between the groups. Hypothalamus gene expression analysis of the exposed groups revealed a reduction in the expression of genes encoding deiodinases 2 (Dio2) and 3 (Dio3) and TH transporters Slco1c1 (former Oatp1c1) and Slc16a2 (former Mct8). In the pituitary, Dio2, thyroid hormone receptor genes (Thra1 and Thrb1), and Slc16a2 showed higher expression levels in the exposed groups than in the control group. Interestingly, Tshb gene expression did not show any difference in expression profile between the control and exposed groups. Liver Thra1 and Thrb1 showed increased mRNA expression in both GBH-exposed groups, and in the heart, Dio2, Mb, Myh6 (former Mhca) and Slc2a4 (former Glut4) showed higher mRNA expression in the exposed groups. Additionally, correlation analysis between gene expression and metabolomic data showed similar alterations as detected in hypothyroid rats. Perinatal exposure to

  3. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  4. Continuous electroencephalography monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Shellhaas, Renée A

    2012-08-01

    As more critically ill term and premature neonates are surviving their acute illness, their long-term neurodevelopmental morbidity is being recognized. Continuous monitoring of cerebral function, with electroencephalography or derived digital trends, can provide key information regarding seizures and background patterns, with direct treatment and prognostic implications. Conventional video-electroencephalography remains the gold standard for neonatal seizure diagnosis and quantification, but can be supplemented by digital trending modalities. Both conventional and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography can provide valuable data regarding the background trends. This review describes indications and methods for continuous electroencephalography monitoring in high-risk neonates.

  5. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  6. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  7. [Courses in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    The optimal management of newborns with asphyxia is closely associated with improved survival and a better quality of life without neuromotor handicaps. Therefore, the training of health professionals who are present at the time of birth in neonatal resuscitation should be a priority. In the present article, we present a program of training courses in neonatal resuscitation. This program has been designed for the training of health care providers and instructors in technical aspects of neonatal resuscitation. The type of courses, their contents and methodology are described.

  8. Thyroid hormones states and brain development interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osama M; El-Gareib, A W; El-Bakry, A M; Abd El-Tawab, S M; Ahmed, R G

    2008-04-01

    The action of thyroid hormones (THs) in the brain is strictly regulated, since these hormones play a crucial role in the development and physiological functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). Disorders of the thyroid gland are among the most common endocrine maladies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify in broad terms the interactions between thyroid hormone states or actions and brain development. THs regulate the neuronal cytoarchitecture, neuronal growth and synaptogenesis, and their receptors are widely distributed in the CNS. Any deficiency or increase of them (hypo- or hyperthyroidism) during these periods may result in an irreversible impairment, morphological and cytoarchitecture abnormalities, disorganization, maldevelopment and physical retardation. This includes abnormal neuronal proliferation, migration, decreased dendritic densities and dendritic arborizations. This drastic effect may be responsible for the loss of neurons vital functions and may lead, in turn, to the biochemical dysfunctions. This could explain the physiological and behavioral changes observed in the animals or human during thyroid dysfunction. It can be hypothesized that the sensitive to the thyroid hormones is not only remarked in the neonatal period but also prior to birth, and THs change during the development may lead to the brain damage if not corrected shortly after the birth. Thus, the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental abnormalities might be related to the thyroid hormones is plausible. Taken together, the alterations of neurotransmitters and disturbance in the GABA, adenosine and pro/antioxidant systems in CNS due to the thyroid dysfunction may retard the neurogenesis and CNS growth and the reverse is true. In general, THs disorder during early life may lead to distortions rather than synchronized shifts in the relative development of several central transmitter systems that leads to a multitude of irreversible morphological and biochemical

  9. Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Bryan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    An explosion of work over the last decade has produced insight into the multiple hereditary causes of a nonimmunological form of diabetes diagnosed most frequently within the first 6 months of life. These studies are providing increased understanding of genes involved in the entire chain of steps that control glucose homeostasis. Neonatal diabetes is now understood to arise from mutations in genes that play critical roles in the development of the pancreas, of β-cell apoptosis and insulin processing, as well as the regulation of insulin release. For the basic researcher, this work is providing novel tools to explore fundamental molecular and cellular processes. For the clinician, these studies underscore the need to identify the genetic cause underlying each case. It is increasingly clear that the prognosis, therapeutic approach, and genetic counseling a physician provides must be tailored to a specific gene in order to provide the best medical care. PMID:18436707

  10. Thyroid Hormone Levels in Obese Children and Adolescents with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torun, Emel; Özgen, İlker Tolga; Gökçe, Selim; Aydın, Sinem; Cesur, Yaşar

    2014-01-01

    Ob­jec­ti­ve: We aimed to determine the association of thyroid functions with the components of metabolic syndrome (MS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in pediatric obese patients. Methods: The study included 109 obese children (aged 9-15 years) and a control group of 44 healthy age and gender-matched children of normal weight. NAFLD was diagnosed by conventional ultrasound examination. We assessed the anthropometric data and serum biochemical parameters including lipid profile, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), fasting glucose and insulin levels and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4) and free triiodothyronine (fT3) levels. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as a measure of IR. Results: The mean age and gender distributions in the groups were similar (p=0.23). The mean body mass index (BMI) z-scores of obese children with grade 2-3 NAFLD were significantly higher than those of the obese children without hepatic steatosis (p<0.001). Mean ALT, triglyceride (TG) and LDL cholesterol increased and HDL-cholesterol significantly decreased as the hepatic steatosis increased (p<0.05). HOMA-IR levels in obese subjects with grade 2-3 NAFLD were significantly higher than those in both obese children without NAFLD and grade 1 NADFL (p=0.05 and 0.001, respectively). In the obese subjects, TSH levels were increased significantly as the degree of steatosis increased (p=0.04) but fT3 and fT4 levels were not different. In correlation analysis, TSH was significantly correlated with ALT, BMI SDS and the degree of steatosis. Conclusions: Obese children demonstrate an increase in TSH levels as the degree of steatosis increased. PMID:24637308

  11. Establishment of Trimester-Specific Reference Intervals for Thyroid Hormones in Korean Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee-Won; Chung, Hee-Jung; Park, Chul-Min; Hur, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background Establishment of trimester- and assay-specific reference intervals for every population is recommended. The aim of this study was to establish a trimester- and assay-specific reference interval for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) in Korean pregnant women. Methods From April 2012 to December 2012, 531 pregnant women receiving prenatal care and 238 age-matched, non-pregnant women were enrolled in this study. After excluding patients with pregnancy-associated complications or thyroid-specific autoantibody, 465 pregnant and 206 non-pregnant women were included. Non-parametric analysis (2.5-97.5th percentile) was performed to determine the reference interval. Levels of TSH and FT4 were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (Elecsys thyroid tests, Roche Diagnostics, Germany). Results The TSH reference intervals were 0.01-4.10, 0.01-4.26, and 0.15-4.57 mIU/L for the first, second, and third trimester, respectively. From the first trimester to the third trimester, the median TSH levels showed a significantly increasing trend (P<0.0001). The FT4 reference intervals were 0.83-1.65, 0.71-1.22, and 0.65-1.13 ng/dL for the first, second, and third trimester, respectively, showing a significantly decreasing trend (P<0.0001). Conclusions Establishing trimester-specific reference intervals in pregnant women is essential for accurate assessment of thyroid function. Our population-specific and method-specific reference intervals will be useful for screening Korean pregnant women for thyroid disease. PMID:25729721

  12. Effect of fatty acid administration on plasma thyroid hormones in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Chua Teco, G N; Chopra, I J

    1988-06-01

    In birds a severe stress is associated with a reduction in concentrations of plasma thyroxine. Studies in man and the rat have demonstrated that severe illness is associated with an increase in serum concentrations of free fatty acids, notably oleic acid, and that they are associated with a reduction in concentrations of serum thyroxine (T4) and/or triiodothyronine (T3). Since stress is associated with increased fatty acids in birds, we have, in the present study, examined the role of oleic acid and another polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, on thyroid function tests (plasma thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and T3 resin uptake (RT3U) index) and on the thyroidal response to exogenous thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the domestic fowl. In the first study we observed that the iv administration of arachidonic (10 mg/kg) or oleic acid (15 mg/kg) to groups of 10-week-old cockerels (six per group) was associated with a significant reduction in concentrations of plasma T4, whereas there was little change in saline-injected controls. However, administration of fatty acids to chickens was not associated with a significant change in RT3U index or in the levels of plasma T3. In the second study, groups of animals (n = 6) were injected with bovine TSH (0.5 IU/kg, im) or saline 2.5 hr after the fatty acid injection and blood samples were obtained at -2.5 to 24 hr after the TSH injection. A similar progressive increase in serum T4 was observed for the three groups studied whereas there was little change in the concentrations of plasma T3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Induction of chronic growth hormone deficiency by anti-GH serum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Smith, A. T.; Ellis, S.; Evans, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The observations reported indicate that the growth rate of neonatal rats can be specifically inhibited for at least 78 days following the administration of antisera against growth hormone (GH) for only four days after birth. The inhibition can be correlated with a marked deficit of tibial growth promoting activity in the pituitary but not with the plasma concentrations of immuno-reactive GH.

  14. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  15. Lactational exposure to atypical antipsychotic drugs disrupts the pituitary-testicular axis in mice neonates during post-natal development.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akash C; Mohanty, Banalata

    2010-07-01

    Olanzapine (OLNZ) and risperidone (RISP), two widely prescribed drugs for post-partum psychosis, transfer through milk to the neonates. Hence, neonates are susceptible to their adverse side effects. In the present study, the pituitary-testicular axis of lactationally exposed mice neonates (PND 28) was examined to evaluate the reproductive adverse effects. Testicular histopathology, immunocytochemistry and morphometric analysis of pituitary PRL (prolactin) and LH (luteinizing hormone) cells and plasma hormonal (PRL, LH and testosterone) levels were the various end points studied. Significantly regressed testes, reduced seminiferous tubules with disrupted germ-cell alignment, spermatogonial exfoliation into the tubule lumens and sparse sperms in the lumens were observed. PRL-immunointensity and plasma levels were elevated, whereas immunoreactivity and plasma levels of LH were decreased. Plasma testosterone levels were also decreased. The hypogonadism thus observed might be mediated by drug-induced hyperprolactinemia, which further inhibited secretions of LH and testosterone. Age may be the factor which made the neonates vulnerable to the PRL elevation by OLNZ which otherwise causes transient elevation in adults and is considered safe. The adverse impact was persistent until adulthood with higher doses of both of the drugs as evident by the analysis of testicular weight, histology and hormonal profiles of post-pubertal mice (PND 63) lactationally exposed as neonates.

  16. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance.

  17. Growth Hormone Alters the Glutathione S-Transferase and Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Systems in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH’s actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. PMID:24285747

  18. Parent Experience of Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the parent experience of caring for an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. In this mixed-methods study, we performed semistructured interviews with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parent experience of caring for a child with neonatal encephalopathy was characterized by 3 principal themes. Theme 1: Many families described cumulative loss and grief throughout the perinatal crisis, critical neonatal course, and subsequent missed developmental milestones. Theme 2: Families experienced entangled infant and broader family interests. Theme 3: Parents evolved into and found meaning in their role as an advocate. These data offer insight into the lived experience of parenting an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. Primary data from parents can serve as a useful framework to guide the development and interpretation of parent-centered outcomes.

  19. Serum immunoglobulins in Nigerian neonates.

    PubMed

    Akinwolere, O A; Akinkugbe, F M; Oyewole, A I; Salimonu, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins G, M and A levels were studied in 187 Nigerian neonates. Estimations were done by the radial immunodifusion method of Mancini. Immunoglobulin G shows a fall in value in the first few days of life to about 62% of the value in the last days of the neonatal period. There is however a gradual increase in the level of IgM to about double at the end of the neonatal period. IgA level remained relatively constantly low throughout this period. The effect of maternal education on the levels of immunoglobulins of their neonates was also investigated. This had a positive influence at the secondary educational level, affecting only the IgG and IgA.

  20. Thyroid hormone dysfunction during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Aynadis; Terefe, Betelihem; Abebe, Molla; Biadgo, Belete

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Epidemiological data have shown the significant role of maternal thyroid hormone in fetal neurologic development and maternal health. It has been suggested that the deleterious effects of thyroid dysfunction can also extend beyond pregnancy and delivery to affect neuro-intellectual development in the early life of the child. Pregnancy poses an important challenge to the maternal thyroid gland as hormone requirements are increased during gestation as a result of an increase in thyroid- binding globulin, the stimulatory effect of HCG on TSH receptors, and increased peripheral thyroid hormone requirements. Maternal thyroid dysfunction is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery, neonatal morbidity and other obstetrical complications. Early diagnosis for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women and treatment of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is important and cost effective to avoid both fetal and maternal complications secondary to thyroid dysfunction. Therefore the aim of this review was to assess the thyroid function changes occurring during pregnancy, the different disorders with their maternal and fetal implications, the laboratory diagnosis and the best ways of management of these conditions. PMID:27981252

  1. Hormones and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackstein, Martin Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal therapy is the first systemic therapy to have been used successfully in the treatment of cancer. Developments in steroid hormone receptor assays in the last decade have resulted in the first predictable assays for cancer therapy. The role of hormones, in both the development and treatment of breast, prostate and uterine cancer, is reviewed. Because hormonal therapy is generally a less toxic palliative treatment than other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation), it has been used for malignancies such as malignant melanoma, hypernephroma, and carcinoid. PMID:21278945

  2. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  3. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    PubMed

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  4. Sensorimotor development in neonatal progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Willing, Jari; Wagner, Christine K

    2014-01-01

    Early exposure to steroid hormones can permanently and dramatically alter neural development. This is best understood in the organizational effects of hormones during development of brain regions involved in reproductive behaviors or neuroendocrine function. However, recent evidence strongly suggests that steroid hormones play a vital role in shaping brain regions involved in cognitive behavior such as the cerebral cortex. The most abundantly expressed steroid hormone receptor in the developing rodent cortex is the progesterone receptor (PR). In the rat, PR is initially expressed in the developmentally-critical subplate at E18, and subsequently in laminas V and II/III through the first three postnatal weeks (Quadros et al. [2007] J Comp Neurol 504:42-56; Lopez & Wagner [2009]: J Comp Neurol 512:124-139), coinciding with significant periods of dendritic maturation, the arrival of afferents and synaptogenesis. In the present study, we investigated PR expression in the neonatal mouse somatosensory cortex. Additionally, to investigate the potential role of PR in developing cortex, we examined sensorimotor function in the first two postnatal weeks in PR knockout mice and their wildtype (WT) and heterozygous (HZ) counterparts. While the three genotypes were similar in most regards, PRKO and HZ mice lost the rooting reflex 2-3 days earlier than WT mice. These studies represent the first developmental behavioral assessment of PRKO mice and suggest PR expression may play an important role in the maturation of cortical connectivity and sensorimotor integration.

  5. Relationship of Urinary Phthalate Metabolites with Serum Thyroid Hormones in Pregnant Women and Their Newborns: A Prospective Birth Cohort in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Fu-Chen; Su, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Chia-Fang; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Shiea, Jentaie; Chen, Bai-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of phthalates exposure with thyroid function in pregnant women and their newborns. Methods One hundred and forty-eight Taiwanese maternal and infant pairs were recruited from E-Da hospital in southern Taiwan between 2009 and 2010 for analysis. One-spot urine samples and blood samples in the third trimester of pregnant women and their cord blood samples at delivery were collected. Nine phthalate metabolites in urine were determined by triple quadrupole liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, whereas serum from pregnant women and their cord blood were used to measure thyroid profiles (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], thyroxine, free thyroxine, and triiodothyronine) by radioimmunoassay. Results Median levels of urinary mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-ethyl phthalate, and mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (μg/g creatinine) were the three highest phthalate metabolites, which were 37.81, 34.51, and 21.73, respectively. Using Bonferroni correction at a significance of < 0.006, we found that urinary mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP) levels were significantly and negatively associated with serum TSH in cord blood (β = -2.644, p = 0.003). Conclusions Maternal urinary MBzP, of which the parental compound is butylbenzyl phthalate, may affect TSH activity in newborns. The alteration of thyroid homeostasis by certain phthalates in the early life, a critical period for neurodevelopment, is an urgent concern. PMID:26042594

  6. Relation between glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid and thyroid hormone among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    Karar, Tarig; Alhammad, Rayan Ibrahim S.; Fattah, Mohamed Abdel; Alanazi, Abdullah; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main objectives of this study were to: (1) Evaluate the levels of thyroid hormones and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among patients, (2) correlate between thyroid hormones and HbA1c and different types of lipids and HbA1c among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review study was conducted at Department of Clinical Chemistry, King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the period from August 2014 to December 2014, including 100 male and female patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 and excluding patients with DM type 1. These patients were admitted to the hospital in 2013. Biochemical laboratory results were retrieved from biochemistry laboratory database while age and sex of patients were retrieved from patient files. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software conducting frequency analysis and correlation test. Results: The result showed increased mean levels of HbA1c (8.4%) and normal level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (4.5 mlU/L) and T4 (14.1 pmol/L). The results also showed a weak positive correlation between HbA1c and TSH (r = 0.212, P = 0.034) and insignificant correlation with thyroxin T4 (r = −0.018, P = 0.855). There was a weak positive correlation between HbA1c and total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (r = 0.258, P = 0.001), (r = 0.297, P = 0.003), respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that increased blood glucose could trigger anterior pituitary gland to increase secretion of TSH, whereas there was no direct correlation between increased glycemic index and the rate of thyroxine secretion. Furthermore, it is concluded that there is an association between blood glucose and some lipid markers. PMID:26604625

  7. Impact of Smoking and Thiocyanate on Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Associations in the 2001–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Miller, Mark D.; Howd, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Findings from a recent large study suggest that perchlorate at commonly occurring exposure concentrations may decrease thyroid hormone levels in some women. Decreases in thyroid hormone seen with perchlorate exposure could be even greater in people with concomitant exposure to agents such as thiocyanate that may affect the thyroid by mechanisms similar to those of perchlorate. Objectives and methods We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to assess the impact of smoking and thiocyanate on the relationship between urinary per-chlorate and serum thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Results In women with urinary iodine levels < 100 μg/L, the association between the logarithm of perchlorate and decreased T4 was greater in smokers [regression coefficient (β) = −1.66, p = 0.0005] than in nonsmokers (β = −0.54, p = 0.04). In subjects with high, medium, and low cotinine levels, these regression coefficients were −1.47 (p = 0.0002), −0.57 (p = 0.03), and −0.16 (p = 0.59). For high, medium, and low thiocyanate tertiles they were −1.67 (p = 0.0009), −0.68 (p = 0.09), and −0.49 (p = 0.11). Clear interactions between perchlorate and smoking were not seen with TSH or with T4 in women with urinary iodine levels ≥ 100 μg/L or in men. Conclusions These results suggest that thiocyanate in tobacco smoke and perchlorate interact in affecting thyroid function, and this effect can take place at commonly occurring perchlorate exposures. Agents other than tobacco smoke might cause similar interactions, and further research on these agents could help identify people who are particularly susceptible to perchlorate. PMID:17805424

  8. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes.

  9. Comparisons of thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and quality of life in children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Wei; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Xue-Mei; Fan, Xian-Liang; Tian, Yu-Dong; Jia, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and quality of life (QoL) of children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy. Method. A total of 35 OSAHS children (21 males and 14 females with a mean age of 6.81 ± 1.08 years) were included in this study for analyzing the levels of thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and QoL. There were 22 children underwent endoscopic adenoidectomy with bilateral tonsillectomy (BT), while the other 13 children who underwent endoscopic adenoidectomy without bilateral tonsillectomy without BT. Results. Our results revealed no significant difference in serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in OSAHS children before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy (all P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences in full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) (92.45 ± 5.88 versus 106.23 ± 7.39, P < 0.001), verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ) (94.17 ± 15.01 versus 103.91 ± 9.74, P = 0.006), and performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) (94.12 ± 11.04 versus 104.31 ± 10.05, P = 0.001), attention (98.48 ± 8.74 versus 106.87 ± 8.58, P < 0.001), and total OSA-18 scores (87.62 ± 17.15 versus 46.61 ± 10.15, P < 0.001) between before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy in OSAHS children. Conclusion. Our findings provided evidence that the intelligence, attention, and QoL of OSAHS children may be significantly improved after endoscopic adenoidectomy.

  10. A role for magnesium in neonatal parathyroid gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Loughead, J.L.; Mimouni, F.; Tsang, R.C.; Khoury, J.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Little is known of the factors regulating parathyroid function in the neonatal period. Twenty-seven term infants born after uncomplicated pregnancies, labors, and deliveries were studied to test the hypothesis that in normal newborns the amplitude of parathyroid hormone (PTH) response to decreasing serum ionized calcium (iCa) correlates with serum magnesium (Mg) concentrations. Serum iCa (ion selective electrode, Radiometer ICA 1), PTH (1-84 intact molecules, radioimmunoassay) and Mg (atomic absorption) were measured at birth (cord blood) and 24 hours of age. Repeated measures analysis of covariance showed decreasing serum iCa (p less than 0.01) and increasing serum Mg (p less than 0.01) and PTH (p less than 0.01) over time. The change in PTH over the first 24 hours was directly correlated with cord blood (r = 0.38, p less than 0.05) and 24-hr Mg concentrations (r = 0.53, p less than 0.01). We conclude that the ability of the parathyroid gland to respond to decreasing serum iCa after birth is directly related to Mg status. We speculate that neonatal hypomagnesemia may lead to a blunted PTH secretory response, thus contributing to early neonatal hypocalcemia.

  11. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  12. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  13. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  14. Neonatal invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Stronati, M; Decembrino, L

    2006-12-01

    Over the last two decades, systemic fungal infections have emerged to play a primary role in hospital-acquired infections. C. albicans is involved in 75% of neonatal candidiasis; however, the incidence of infection from C. parapsilosis is also increasing significantly. The higher incidence observed in the high-risk group of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants is linked to their special physical characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures they undergo. Colonization is a relevant risk factor depending on the colonized site , the fungal species and the type of colonization. Serological tests have a low specificity and sensitivity; in many cases, they do not distinguish between colonization and infection. Blood culture, although the best diagnostic test for determining systemic infection, can result negative, even in cases of deep organ involvement. In addition, fungi grow more slowly than bacteria in cultures. So, the difficulty in diagnosing systemic candidiasis and its aspecific clinical features may make empirical therapy appropriate. Amphotericin B (AmB) alone or combined with 5-fluorocytosine remains the drug of choice. Fluconazole represents a valid alternative. Recently developed new formulations of amphotericin incapsulated in liposomes can avoid possible adverse effects. Prognosis depends on the specific micro-organism involved; mortality is higher in the presence of C. albicans. As prognosis is associated with high mortality, prevention measures to reduce risk factors are of critical importance.

  15. Goiter

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid function: Free thyroxine ( T4 ) Thyroid stimulating hormone ( TSH ) Tests to look for abnormal and possibly cancerous ... hormone on its own. This can cause high levels of thyroid hormone, a condition called hyperthyroidism . When ...

  16. Neonatal stress affects the aging trajectory of female rats on the endocrine, temperature, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Sébastien; Gulemetova, Roumiana; Baldy, Cécile; Joseph, Vincent; Kinkead, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Human and animal studies on sleep-disordered breathing and respiratory regulation show that the effects of sex hormones are heterogeneous. Because neonatal stress results in sex-specific disruption of the respiratory control in adult rats, we postulate that it might affect respiratory control modulation induced by ovarian steroids in female rats. The hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) of adult female rats exposed to neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is ∼30% smaller than controls (24), but consequences of NMS on respiratory control in aging female rats are unknown. To address this issue, whole body plethysmography was used to evaluate the impact of NMS on the HVR (12% O2, 20 min) of middle-aged (MA; ∼57 wk old) female rats. Pups subjected to NMS were placed in an incubator 3 h/day for 10 consecutive days (P3 to P12). Controls were undisturbed. To determine whether the effects were related to sexual hormone decline or aging per se, experiments were repeated on bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) young (∼12 wk old) adult female rats. OVX and MA both reduced the HVR significantly in control rats but had little effect on the HVR of NMS females. OVX (but not aging) reduced the anapyrexic response in both control and NMS animals. These results show that hormonal decline decreases the HVR of control animals, while leaving that of NMS female animals unaffected. This suggests that neonatal stress alters the interaction between sex hormone regulation and the development of body temperature, hormonal, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

  17. In situ hybridization analysis of anterior pituitary hormone gene expression during fetal mouse development.

    PubMed

    Japón, M A; Rubinstein, M; Low, M J

    1994-08-01

    We used 35S-labeled oligonucleotides and cRNAs (riboprobes) to detect the temporal order and spatial pattern of anterior pituitary hormone gene expression in (B6CBF1 x B6CBF1)F2 fetal mice from embryonic Day 9.5 (E9.5) to postnatal Day 1 (P1). Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA was expressed in the basal diencephalon on Day E10.5, in the ventromedial zone of the pars distalis on Day E12.5, and in the pars intermedia on Day E14.5. The common alpha-glycoprotein subunit (alpha-GSU) mRNA first appeared in the anterior wall of Rathke's pouch on Day E11.5 and extended to the pars tuberalis and ventromedial zone of the pars distalis on Day E12.5. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta (TSH beta) subunit mRNA was expressed initially in both the pas tuberalis and ventromedial pars distalis on Day E14.5, with an identical spatial distribution to alpha-GSU at the time. In contrast, luteinizing hormone-beta (LH beta) subunit and follicle-stimulating hormone beta (FSH beta) subunit mRNAs were detected initially only in the ventromedial pars distalis on Days E16.5 and E17.5, respectively, in an identical distribution to each other. POMC-, alpha-GSU-, TSH beta, LH beta-, and FSH beta-positive cells within the pars distalis all increased in number and autoradiographic signal with differing degrees of spatial expansion posteriorly, laterally, and dorsally up to Day P1. POMC expression was typically the most intense and extended circumferentially to include the entire lateral and dorsal surfaces of the pars distalis. The expression of both growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) started coincidentally on Day E15.5. However PRL cells localized in the ventromedial area similarly to POMC and the glycoprotein hormone subunits, whereas GH cells were found initially in a more lateral and central distribution within the lobes of the pars distalis. Somatotrophs increased dramatically in number and autoradiographic signal, extending throughout the pars distalis except for the most peripheral layer

  18. Association of PCB, PBDE and PCDD/F body burdens with hormone levels for children in an e-waste dismantling area of Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiwei; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Gangqiang; Shen, Haitao; Wu, Lizhi; Chen, Zhijian; Han, Jianlong; Han, Guangen; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-11-15

    Increased electronic waste (e-waste) has raised public concerns regarding exposure to numerous toxic contaminants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). In China, the body burdens of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs are associated with thyroid hormones in populations from e-waste dismantling sites; however, it is unclear whether this association occurs in children. In this study, we determined the serum levels of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs and the endocrine hormones including free triiodothyronine (FT3), total triiodothyronine (TT3), free thyroxine (FT4), total thyroxine (TT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and growth hormone (GH) in 21 children from an e-waste dismantling area and 24 children from a control area. The results showed that the mean levels of ∑PCBs and ∑PBDEs in the exposure group were significantly higher than in the control group (40.56 and 32.09 ng g(-1) lipid vs. 20.69 and 8.43 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, p<0.01 for each), and the mean level of ∑PCDD/Fs in the exposure group was higher than in the control group, but the difference was not significant (206.17 vs. 160.27 pg g(-1) lipid, p>0.05). For the endocrine hormones, we did not find significant differences between the exposed and control groups, although the mean levels of FT3, TT3, TT4, ACTH, cortisol and GH were higher, whereas the mean levels of FT4 and TSH were lower in the exposed group. The mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with the mean levels of ∑PCBs (r=0.60, p<0.05) and ∑PCDD/Fs (r=0.61, p<0.05). Furthermore, the mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with ACTH (r=0.61, p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggested that exposure to e-waste dismantling environment increased the body burdens of PCBs and PBDEs in local children and that these contaminants released from the e-waste might contribute to

  19. Neonatal porcine pancreatic cell clusters as a potential source for transplantation in humans: characterization of proliferation, apoptosis, xenoantigen expression and gene delivery with recombinant AAV.

    PubMed

    Vizzardelli, Caterina; Molano, R Damaris; Pileggi, Antonello; Berney, Thierry; Cattan, Pierre; Fenjves, Elizabeth S; Peel, Alyson; Fraker, Chris; Ricordi, Camillo; Inverardi, Luca

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal porcine islets are characterized by reproducible isolation success and high yields, sizable advantages over adult islets. In this work we have analyzed selected phenotypic and functional characteristics of porcine neonatal islets relevant to their possible use for transplant in humans. We show that porcine islet cells proliferate in culture, and synthesize and store islet-specific hormones. Proliferating beta cells can be easily identified. Implant of cultured neonatal islets in immunodeficient rodents results in the reversal of diabetes, albeit with delay. We also show that measurable apoptosis occurs in cultured neonatal porcine islets. Further, antigens recognized by human natural antibodies are expressed in a dynamic fashion over the culture period analyzed and are not limited to the alpha-Gal epitope. Lastly, we demonstrate that a recombinant Adeno-Associated virus can be used to efficiently deliver a reporter gene in porcine islets. This characterization might be helpful in the definition of the potential use of neonatal porcine islets for human transplantation.

  20. Dietary calcium restriction affects mesenchymal stem cell activity and bone development in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Avanika; Alexander, Lindsey S; Seabolt, Brynn S; Catrambone, Daniel E; McClung, James P; Odle, Jack; Pfeiler, T Wayne; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Stahl, Chad H

    2011-03-01

    The effects of dietary calcium (Ca) deficiency on skeletal integrity are well characterized in growing and mature mammals; however, less is known about Ca nutrition during the neonatal period. In this study, we examined the effects of neonatal Ca nutrition on bone integrity, endocrine hormones, and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) activity. Neonatal pigs (24 ± 6 h of age) received either a Ca-adequate (1.2 g/100 g) or an ~40% Ca-deficient diet for 18 d. Ca deficiency reduced (P < 0.05) bone flexural strength and bone mineral density without major differences in plasma indicators of Ca status. There were no meaningful differences in plasma Ca, phosphate (PO(4)), parathyroid hormone, or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol due to Ca nutrition throughout the study. Calcium deficiency also reduced (P < 0.05) the in vivo proliferation of MSC by ~50%. In vitro studies utilizing homologous sera demonstrated that MSC activity was affected (P < 0.05) by both the Ca status of the pig and the sera as well as by their interaction. The results indicate that neonatal Ca nutrition is crucial for bone integrity and suggest that early-life Ca restriction may have long-term effects on bone integrity via programming of MSC.

  1. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  2. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P

    1994-09-01

    Neonatal lupus continues to generate considerable interest despite its rarity; more than 15 original contributions were made to the literature in the past year. Diverse aspects of this "syndrome" of passively acquired autoimmunity have been covered. Experiments using a rabbit model provided insights into the pathogenicity of maternal anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B antibodies. Perfusion of rabbit hearts with anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B sera resulted in conduction abnormalities in whole adult rabbit hearts and induced a reduction in the peak slow inward current in patch-clamp experiments of isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, suggesting involvement of calcium channels. Clinical investigations are moving away from case reports, and recent studies now include substantial entries. Assuming that patients reported from the United States, Finland, and England are all separate, sera from at least 100 different mothers of infants with congenital heart block have been studied. Although there is apparently no serologic profile that is unique to mothers of affected children, compared with mothers of healthy children, anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies (anti-52-kD antibodies are more prevalent by immunoblot in congenital heart block, although all these sera are likely to have anti-60-kD antibodies by immunoprecipitation) are usually of high titer and associated with anti-La/SS-B antibodies. To date, the only maternal autoantibodies that have been associated with congenital heart block recognize Ro/SS-A or La/SS-B antigens. Mothers of affected infants are often asymptomatic, and when symptomatic, the clinical features are frequently characteristic of Sjögren's syndrome. Although treatment of affected fetuses with dexamethasone has successfully diminished associated effusions, there has been no report of reversal of established third-degree heart block.

  3. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %.

  4. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  5. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  6. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  7. Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) levels and TH-regulated gene expression by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and hydroxylated PCBs in e-waste recycling workers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; He, Chun-Tao; Chen, She-Jun; Yan, Xiao; Guo, Mi-Na; Wang, Mei-Huan; Yu, Yun-Jiang; Yang, Zhong-Yi; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2017-02-25

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the primary toxicants released by electronic waste (e-waste) recycling, but their adverse effects on people working in e-waste recycling or living near e-waste sites have not been studied well. In the present study, the serum concentrations of PBDEs, PCBs, and hydroxylated PCBs, the circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs), and the mRNA levels of seven TH-regulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes of e-waste recycling workers were analyzed. The associations of the hormone levels and gene expression with the exposure to these contaminants were examined using multiple linear regression models. There were nearly no associations of the TH levels with PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs, whereas elevated hormone (T4 and T3) levels were associated with certain lower-brominated BDEs. While not statistically significant, we did observe a negative association between highly brominated PBDE congeners and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in the e-waste workers. The TH-regulated gene expression was more significantly associated with the organohalogen compounds (OHCs) than the TH levels in these workers. The TH-regulated gene expression was significantly associated with certain PCB and hydroxylated PCB congeners. However, the expression of most target genes was suppressed by PBDEs (mostly highly brominated congeners). This is the first evidence of alterations in TH-regulated gene expression in humans exposed to OHCs. Our findings indicated that OHCs may interfere with TH signaling and/or exert TH-like effects, leading to alterations in related gene expression in humans. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms of action and associated biological consequences of the gene expression disruption by OHCs.

  8. Neurophysiological aspects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) has been increasingly used and proved useful in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for the management of neonatal seizures. It does not replace, but is supplementary to standard EEG. This article reviews some of findings obtained with standard EEGs, and tries to interpret them with recent findings in the field of basic science. Seizures mainly occur in active-REM sleep in neonates. This is in sharp contrast to those in older children and adults, in whom epileptic seizures occur mainly in NREM sleep. This may be explained by neurotransmitter effects on sleep mechanisms of the neonatal brain that are different from those of older individuals. When all clinical seizures have no electrical correlates, they are non-epileptic, but when the correlation between clinical seizures and frequent electrical discharges are inconsistent, they should rather be considered epileptic, reflecting progression of status epilepticus causing electro-clinical dissociation. Electro-clinical dissociation is not a characteristic of neonatal seizures per se, but a feature of prolonged status epilepticus in adults as well as children. It occurs when prolonged status epilepticus itself causes a progressively severe encephalopathy, or when status occurs in the presence of a severe underlying encephalopathy. In neonates without pre-existing brain damage, frequent seizures per se may cause mild depression characterized by the loss of high voltage slow patterns, an important constituent of slow wave sleep reflecting cortico-cortical connectivity. Mild depression only in the acute stage is not associated with neurological sequelae, but previously damaged brain may be more vulnerable than normal brain.

  9. Congenital Hypothyroidism with Neurological and Respiratory Alterations: A Case Detected Using a Variable Diagnostic Threshold for TSH

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Jesús; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M.Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22155464

  10. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality.

  11. Reduction in the level of antibodies against heat shock proteins 60 during different hormonal protocols in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kacalska-Janssen, Olga; Zmaczyński, Andrzej; Wyroba, Jakub; Tomczyk, Rita; Wiatr, Joanna; Gałuszka-Bednarczyk, Anna; Bereza, Tomasz; Milewicz, Tomasz; Krzysiek, Józef

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In current literature, the immune-inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis is widely discussed. The role of how heat shock proteins 60 (HSP60) lead to the development of the atheromatous plaque is especially underlined. The aim of the study is to estimate the influence of three hormonal protocols on behavior of antibodies against HSP60. It determines the state of endothelium in postmenopausal women. Material and methods The study was carried out on 90 women between 2007 and 2012. All the women were in their menopausal age (51 ± 3 years), from the south region of Poland, with a follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) level above 25 mIU/ml, and with menopausal symptoms disturbing their normal daily activity. The study was done for a period of 6 months. Three groups of 30 randomized patients were formed. In the first group we used transdermal estrogen therapy in a 37.5 µg/24 h dose combined with a 10 mg dose of dydrogesterone. In the second group we applied transdermal estrogen therapy in a 50 µg/24 h dose with 2.5 mg of oral medroxyprogesterone. In both these groups, gestagens were administered continuously. In the third group, we prescribed continuous, oral, low-dose combined estrogen-gestagen therapy with 1 mg of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5 mg of norethisterone acetate. The control group consisted of 30 volunteers who were also from the south region of Poland, in good health, with menopausal symptoms, no menstrual period for the last 12 months, selected considering their age and weight, with an FSH level above 25 mIU/ml and with normal levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin. All patients treated and in the control group were seronegative to Chlamydia pneumonia for the entire duration of the study. In the analysis conducted, nonparametric tests were used (Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test – ANOVA). Results After 6 months of hormonal therapy, we found that all schemes of treatment promote a significant reduction in

  12. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  13. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  14. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the participating organizations that have assisted in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  15. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. DUB is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause. DUB is unpredictable. The bleeding may be very heavy or light and can occur often or randomly.

  16. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin) Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names GH test Images Growth hormone stimulation test - series References Ali O. Hyperpituitarism, tall stature, and overgrowth ...

  17. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  18. Neonatal immune challenge affects the regulation of estrus cyclicity and feeding behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Murakami, Masahiro; Kinouchi, Riyo; Shimizu, Fumi; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    A single immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the neonatal period has a long-lasting influence on immune response. Using female Sprague-Dawley rats, we examined whether neonatal LPS challenge influences the life-long neuroendocrine sensitivity of reproductive function and feeding behavior to LPS, and whether stress-related neuropeptides and their receptors are involved in neonatal LPS-induced physiological change. On day 10 after birth, all pups were injected with LPS (100 microg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Then, in Experiment 1, LPS (100 microg/kg, i.p.) or saline was injected at diestrous in adulthood, and the length of the estrous cycle, 24h food intake and body weight change were recorded. In Experiment 2, the mRNA expression levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), urocortin (UCN), urocortin 2 (UCN2), CRH receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) and CRH receptor type 2 (CRH-R2) in the hypothalamus were measured using real-time PCR. LPS injection in adulthood prolonged the estrous cycle in neonatal LPS-injected rats. LPS injection in adulthood decreased food intake and body weight in both neonatal LPS- and saline-injected rats, more so in the latter. Basal expressions of UCN2 and CRH-R2 mRNA were higher in neonatal LPS-injected rats than in saline-injected rats. These findings indicate that neonatal immune challenge influences the anti-stress regulation of the estrous cycle and feeding behavior in adulthood. Increased expression of UCN2 and CRH-R2 might enhance the sensitivity of the estrous cycle in suppressing the effects of LPS.

  19. Effects of doxylamine succinate on thyroid hormone balance and enzyme induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Bookstaff, R C; Murphy, V A; Skare, J A; Minnema, D; Sanzgiri, U; Parkinson, A

    1996-12-01

    The effects of doxylamine (as the succinate salt) on microsomal enzyme activity and serum thyroid hormone levels were examined in B6C3F1 mice following dietary exposure for 7 or 15 days (0, 40, 375, 750, or 1500 ppm in diet, expressed as free base doxylamine). In addition, the hepatic P450 enzyme inducer sodium phenobarbital (375 ppm, expressed as free acid phenobarbital) was used as a positive control for CYP2B induction. Exposure of mice to doxylamine produced dose-related increases in liver weight at both time points. Liver weights were also increased in the phenobarbital-treated mice. Doxylamine treatment caused a dose-dependent increase (up to 2.6-fold) in liver microsomal cytochrome P450 in both male and female mice, at both time points. Analyses of the activities of various hepatic microsomal cytochromes P450 indicated that doxylamine caused a marked induction of CYP2B enzymes. This was demonstrated by a large increase in the O-dealkylation of 7-pentoxyresorufin (up to 38-fold) and the 16beta-hydroxylation of testosterone (up to 6.9-fold), both of which are indicative of CYP2B induction. In addition, like phenobarbital, doxylamine treatment resulted in a modest induction of CYP3A and CYP2A enzymes and approximately a 50% increase in thyroxine-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Doxylamine did not appear to induce P450 enzymes in the CYP1A, CYP2E, or CYP4A enzyme subfamilies. None of the enzyme-inducing effects of doxylamine could be distinguished from those of phenobarbital. These results suggest that doxylamine is a phenobarbital-type inducer of liver microsomal cytochrome P450 in B6C3F1 mice. Exposure to either doxylamine or phenobarbital also resulted in decreases in serum thyroxine (T4) levels (approximately 80% of control) with compensatory increases in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (approximately 4-fold). No clear changes in serum triiodothyronine levels were apparent. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that doxylamine increases

  20. Hyperplasia in glands with hormone excess.

    PubMed

    Marx, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Five syndromes share predominantly hyperplastic glands with a primary excess of hormones: neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism, from homozygous mutated CASR, begins severely in utero; congenital non-autoimmune thyrotoxicosis, from mutated TSHR, varies from severe with fetal onset to mild with adult onset; familial male-limited precocious puberty, from mutated LHR, expresses testosterone oversecretion in young boys; hereditary ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, from mutated FSHR, expresses symptomatic systemic vascular permeabilities during pregnancy; and familial hyperaldosteronism type IIIA, from mutated KCNJ5, presents in young children with hypertension and hypokalemia. The grouping of these five syndromes highlights predominant hyperplasia as a stable tissue endpoint and as their tissue stage for all of the hormone excess. Comparisons were made among this and two other groups of syndromes, forming a continuum of gland staging: predominant oversecretions express little or no hyperplasia; predominant hyperplasias express little or no neoplasia; and predominant neoplasias express nodules, adenomas, or cancers. Hyperplasias may progress (5 of 5) to neoplastic stages while predominant oversecretions rarely do (1 of 6; frequencies differ P<0.02). Hyperplasias do not show tumor multiplicity (0 of 5) unlike neoplasias that do (13 of 19; P<0.02). Hyperplasias express mutation of a plasma membrane-bound sensor (5 of 5), while neoplasias rarely do (3 of 14; P<0.002). In conclusion, the multiple distinguishing themes within the hyperplasias establish a robust pathophysiology. It has the shared and novel feature of mutant sensors in the plasma membrane, suggesting that these are major contributors to hyperplasia.

  1. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  2. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  3. Type V hyperlipoproteinaemia in neonates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G N; Knight, A J; Craig, I H; Bresson, J L

    1987-09-01

    A boy investigated for neonatal jaundice was noted to have lipaemic serum and was subsequently shown to have type V hyperlipoproteinaemia. Dietary treatment was maintained for five years and he followed a typical clinical course. Circumstantial evidence suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.

  4. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  5. The effect of TSH change per year on the risk of incident chronic kidney disease in euthyroid subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Young; Jee, Jae Hwan; Jun, Ji Eun; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Jin, Sang-Man; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the predictive values of baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone and the rate of thyroid-stimulating hormone change within the euthyroid state on the development of chronic kidney disease. We conducted a longitudinal study in 17,067 Korean adults with normal thyroid function and no history of thyroid disease. Incident chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The rate of thyroid-stimulating hormone change was determined by subtracting the baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone level from the thyroid-stimulating hormone level measured at the last visit prior to the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease or at the final visit in subjects without chronic kidney disease, divided by the observation period (years). Subjects were stratified into quintiles according to rates of thyroid-stimulating hormone change. During 86,583 person-years of follow-up (median follow-up 5.2 years), there were 561 incident cases of chronic kidney disease. The risk of incident chronic kidney disease was significantly higher in subjects with rapid increases (quintile 5) or decreases (quintile 1) in thyroid-stimulating hormone levels compared to the reference group (quintile 3). In fully adjusted models, the hazard ratios of quintiles 1 and 5 were 3.15 (95 % confidence interval 2.34 to 4.24; p < 0.001) and 3.37 (95 % confidence interval 2.52 to 4.51; p < 0.001), respectively. However, there was no significant association between baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone and risk of incident chronic kidney disease. The development of chronic kidney disease is associated with the rate of changes in thyroid-stimulating hormone level rather than with baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone levels.

  6. Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ≥ 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ≥ 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

  7. Neonatal hypoglycaemia: learning from claims

    PubMed Central

    Hawdon, Jane M; Beer, Jeanette; Sharp, Deborah; Upton, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a potential cause of neonatal morbidity, and on rare but tragic occasions causes long-term neurodevelopmental harm with consequent emotional and practical costs for the family. The organisational cost to the NHS includes the cost of successful litigation claims. The purpose of the review was to identify themes that could alert clinicians to common pitfalls and thus improve patient safety. Design The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) Claims Management System was reviewed to identify and review 30 claims for injury secondary to neonatal hypoglycaemia, which were notified to the NHS LA between 2002 and 2011. Setting NHS LA. Patients Anonymised documentation relating to 30 neonates for whom claims were made relating to neonatal hypoglycaemia. Dates of birth were between 1995 and 2010. Interventions Review of documentation held on the NHS LA database. Main outcome measures Identifiable risk factors for hypoglycaemia, presenting clinical signs, possible deficits in care, financial costs of litigation. Results All claims related to babies of at least 36 weeks’ gestation. The most common risk factor for hypoglycaemia was low birth weight or borderline low birth weight, and the most common reported presenting sign was abnormal feeding behaviour. A number of likely deficits in care were reported, all of which were avoidable. In this 10-year reporting period, there were 25 claims for which damages were paid, with a total financial cost of claims to the NHS of £162 166 677. Conclusions Acknowledging that these are likely to be the most rare but most seriously affected cases, the clinical themes arising from these cases should be used for further development of training and guidance to reduce harm and redivert NHS funds from litigation to direct care. PMID:27553590

  8. Postnatal exposure to a high-carbohydrate diet interferes epigenetically with thyroid hormone receptor induction of the adult male rat skeletal muscle glucose transporter isoform 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Nupur; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Srinivasan, Malathi; Mahmood, Saleh; Patel, Mulchand S; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2014-10-01

    Early life nutritional intervention causes adult-onset insulin resistance and obesity in rats. Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), in turn, transcriptionally enhances skeletal muscle Glut4 expression. We tested the hypothesis that reduced circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone and T4 concentrations encountered in postnatal (PN4-PN24) high-carbohydrate (HC) milk formula-fed versus the mother-fed controls (MF) would epigenetically interfere with TR induction of adult (100 days) male rat skeletal muscle Glut4 expression, thereby providing a molecular mechanism mediating insulin resistance. We observed increased DNA methylation of the CpG island with enhanced recruitment of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and MeCP2 in the glut4 promoter region along with reduced acetylation of histone (H)2A.Z and H4 particularly at the H4.lysine (K)16 residue, which was predominantly mediated by histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). This was followed by enhanced recruitment of heterochromatin protein 1β to the glut4 promoter with increased Suv39H1 methylase concentrations. These changes reduced TR binding of the T3 response element of the glut4 gene (TREs; -473 to -450 bp) detected qualitatively in vivo (electromobility shift assay) and quantified ex vivo (chromatin immunoprecipitation). In addition, the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator and CREB-binding protein to the glut4 promoter-protein complex was reduced. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the interaction between TR and CBP to be reduced and HDAC4 to be enhanced in HC versus MF groups. These molecular changes were associated with diminished skeletal muscle Glut4 mRNA and protein concentrations. We conclude that early postnatal exposure to HC diet epigenetically reduced TR induction of adult male skeletal muscle Glut4 expression, uncovering novel molecular mechanisms contributing to adult insulin resistance and obesity.

  9. Essential Role of GATA2 in the Negative Regulation of Type 2 Deiodinase Gene by Liganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor β2 in Thyrotroph

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Suzuki, Shingo; Matsushita, Akio; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Hiroko Misawa; Hirahara, Naoko; Kuroda, Go; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Kenji; Morita, Hiroshi; Oki, Yutaka; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone; TSH) by thyroid hormone (T3) and its receptor (TR) is the central mechanism of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Two transcription factors, GATA2 and Pit-1, determine thyrotroph differentiation and maintain the expression of the β subunit of TSH (TSHβ). We previously reported that T3-dependent repression of the TSHβ gene is mediated by GATA2 but not by the reported negative T3-responsive element (nTRE). In thyrotrophs, T3 also represses mRNA of the type-2 deiodinase (D2) gene, where no nTRE has been identified. Here, the human D2 promoter fused to the CAT or modified Renilla luciferase gene was co-transfected with Pit-1 and/or GATA2 expression plasmids into cell lines including CV1 and thyrotroph-derived TαT1. GATA2 but not Pit-1 activated the D2 promoter. Two GATA responsive elements (GATA-REs) were identified close to cAMP responsive element. The protein kinase A activator, forskolin, synergistically enhanced GATA2-dependent activity. Gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with TαT1 cells indicated that GATA2 binds to these GATA-REs. T3 repressed the GATA2-induced activity of the D2 promoter in the presence of the pituitary-specific TR, TRβ2. The inhibition by T3-bound TRβ2 was dominant over the synergism between GATA2 and forskolin. The D2 promoter is also stimulated by GATA4, the major GATA in cardiomyocytes, and this activity was repressed by T3 in the presence of TRα1. These data indicate that the GATA-induced activity of the D2 promoter is suppressed by T3-bound TRs via a tethering mechanism, as in the case of the TSHβ gene. PMID:26571013

  10. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  11. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  12. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  13. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  14. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  15. Hormonal and metabolic changes in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Mayor, F; Cuezva, J M

    1985-01-01

    A review of some hormonal and metabolic changes occurring during the four stages of the perinatal period is presented. Glucocorticoids and insulin are the hormones that mediate liver glycogen accumulation during late fetal stage. In the presuckling period, muscle glycogenolysis supplies the lactate moieties that are oxidized by the neonatal tissues, representing the alternative substrate until glucose and ketone bodies become available. The postnatal increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations and the decrease in the insulin/glucagon ratio triggers liver glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, and hence postnatal hypoglycemia is reversed. In the suckling period, the oxidation of fatty acids, ketone bodies utilization and active gluconeogenesis supply the bulk of the energy and carbon components required to support the rapid growth rate of this period. The increase in the insulin/glucagon ratio that occurs with the change to a carbohydrate-rich diet starts the induction of lipogenesis at weaning.

  16. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  17. [Hormonal perturbations in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Perrin, A E; Grunenberger, F; Goichot, B

    2001-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain and fatigue without biological detectable disturbances. The mechanisms of this disease are unknown. It has been postulated that it can be the consequence of a chronic stress mediated mainly through the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. These fields have been extensively studied. Results were scattered and non convincing. A reduction of growth hormone and IGF-1 levels described in a third of patients has led to a double blind random clinical trial with biogenetic growth hormone. Results were equivocal . Other hormonal systems are grossly normals and circadian rhythms are unaltered. Despite some arguments in favour of a CRH neurons hyperactivity, these results are not able to consolide a particular physiopathological mechanism and to argument for a new therapeutic approach. Many of the abnormalities may be the consequence of psychological disturbances.

  18. Hormones in Infant Hair at Birth Provide a Window into the Fetal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele; Hedman, Curtis; Ziegler, Toni E.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is established that maternal parity can affect infant growth and risk for several disorders, but the prenatal endocrine milieu that contributes to these outcomes is still largely unknown. Recently, it has been shown that hormones deposited in hair can provide a retrospective reflection of hormone levels while the hair was growing. Taking advantage of this finding, our study utilized hair at birth to investigate if maternal parity affected fetal hormone exposure during late gestation. Methods Hair was collected from primiparous and multiparous mother and infant monkeys at birth and used to determine steroid hormones embedded in hair while the infant was in utero. An LC/MS/MS technique was refined, which enabled the simultaneous measurement of 8 hormones. Results Hormone concentrations were dramatically higher in neonatal compared to maternal hair, reflecting extended fetal exposure as the first hair was growing. Further, hair cortisone was higher in primiparous mothers and infants when compared to the multiparous dyads. Conclusion This research demonstrates that infant hair can be used to track fetal hormone exposure and a panel of steroid hormones can be quantified from hair specimens. Given the utility in nonhuman primates, this approach can be translated to a clinical setting with human infants. PMID:24418932

  19. [Heart surgery in neonates (experience with surgery in 420 neonates)].

    PubMed

    Hucín, B; Tláskal, T; Horváth, P; Kostelka, M; Kucera, V; Tax, P; Reich, O; Chaloupecký, V; Skovránek, J; Kopecká, L

    1994-03-01

    In the child cardiocentre in Prague 5-Motol in 1977-1993 a total of 420 neonates with critical inborn heart disease were operated. Obstructive defects of the left heart were found in 178 children, obstructive defects of the right heart in 87, defects with a left-right shunt with pulmonary hypertension in 75, conotruncal malformations in 73 and various operations were made in 7 children. Complete repair of the defect was achieved in 281 neonates, incl. 104 where extracorporeal circulation was used. Palliative operations were made in 139 children. Early mortality during the entire period was 26%, whereby a decrease from 40% to 16% was recorded during the last three years. At present it is possible to repair permanently critical inborn heart disease in the majority of neonates. This is made possible in particular by early non-invasive diagnosis, treatment with prostaglandins E in duct-dependent critical heart disease, optimal time for and selection of most suitable surgery, microsurgical technique, miniaturization of extracorporeal circulation and the method of deep hypothermia.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Isolated growth hormone deficiency Educational Resources (10 links) Boston Children's Hospital CLIMB: Growth Hormone Deficiency Information Sheet (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Isolated growth hormone deficiency ...

  1. Neonatal testosterone suppresses a neuroendocrine pulse generator required for reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Le Masson, Gwendal; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    The pituitary gland releases hormones in a pulsatile fashion guaranteeing signalling efficiency. The determinants of pulsatility are poorly circumscribed. Here we show in magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal oxytocin (OT) neurons that the bursting activity underlying the neurohormonal pulses necessary for parturition and the milk-ejection reflex is entirely driven by a female-specific central pattern generator (CPG). Surprisingly, this CPG is active in both male and female neonates, but is inactivated in males after the first week of life. CPG activity can be restored in males by orchidectomy or silenced in females by exogenous testosterone. This steroid effect is aromatase and caspase dependent, and is mediated via oestrogen receptor-α. This indicates the apoptosis of the CPG network during hypothalamic sexual differentiation, explaining why OT neurons do not burst in adult males. This supports the view that stereotypic neuroendocrine pulsatility is governed by CPGs, some of which are subjected to gender-specific perinatal programming.

  2. Neonatal testosterone suppresses a neuroendocrine pulse generator required for reproduction.

    PubMed

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Le Masson, Gwendal; Oliet, Stéphane H; Ciofi, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland releases hormones in a pulsatile fashion guaranteeing signalling efficiency. The determinants of pulsatility are poorly circumscribed. Here we show in magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal oxytocin (OT) neurons that the bursting activity underlying the neurohormonal pulses necessary for parturition and the milk-ejection reflex is entirely driven by a female-specific central pattern generator (CPG). Surprisingly, this CPG is active in both male and female neonates, but is inactivated in males after the first week of life. CPG activity can be restored in males by orchidectomy or silenced in females by exogenous testosterone. This steroid effect is aromatase and caspase dependent, and is mediated via oestrogen receptor-α. This indicates the apoptosis of the CPG network during hypothalamic sexual differentiation, explaining why OT neurons do not burst in adult males. This supports the view that stereotypic neuroendocrine pulsatility is governed by CPGs, some of which are subjected to gender-specific perinatal programming.

  3. Neonatal management and long-term sequelae.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Henry L

    2009-12-01

    Intrauterine or fetal growth restriction is best defined by using customised birth weight percentiles based upon the growth potential for an individual infant. Growth restriction in utero may be classified as asymmetric or symmetric depending upon the duration of the process. Asymmetric growth restriction is caused by placental insufficiency, maternal hypertensive conditions, long-standing maternal diabetes, smoking, living at altitude or multiple gestation. Symmetric growth restriction may be due to congenital infections, chromosomal or other abnormalities, fetal alcohol syndrome, low socioeconomic status or be constitutional. The underlying cause of growth restriction often predicts the potential adverse effects on the foetus and newborn and later effects in childhood and adulthood. With placental insufficiency, there may be chronic or acute on chronic fetal hypoxia with birth asphyxia and hypothermia, neonatal hypoglycaemia, polycythaemia and coagulopathy. Management is directed at prevention or early treatment of these conditions. In contrast, symmetrically growth-restricted infants should be examined carefully to look for congenital infections and malformations that may need specific interventions. Infants with constitutional short stature generally do not need any specific management. Feeding of growth-restricted infants is important to overcome deficiencies incurred in utero. Most infants show catch-up growth although about 10% do not. Those with excessive catch-up growth may be at greatest risk of developing insulin resistance in adulthood leading to diabetes, obesity and heart disease. The so-called fetal origins of disease may actually have a postnatal onset related more to excessive weight gain in infancy. There is still controversy over the indications for growth hormone treatment in growth-restricted infants who remain of short stature in early childhood. Intrauterine growth restriction is also associated with a five- to seven-fold increased risk of

  4. Neonatal Pustular Dermatosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions. PMID:25814724

  5. Treatment Effects on Neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rawad; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-10-01

    Conventional EEG and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography are used in neonates to assess prognosis and significant changes in brain activity. Neuroactive medications and hypothermia can influence brain activity and therefore alter EEG interpretation. There are limited studies on the effect of these therapies on neonatal EEG background activity. Medication effects on the EEG or amplitude-integrated electroencephalography include increased interburst interval duration, voltage suppression, and sleep disruption. The effect is transient in term newborns but can be persistent in premature newborns. Although therapeutic hypothermia does not produce significant changes in EEG activity, it does change the time point at which EEG can accurately predict neurodevelopmental outcome. It is important to account for these effects on the EEG to avoid inaccurate interpretation that may affect prognostication.

  6. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  7. Pituitary transplantation: Part 1. Successful reconstitution of pituitary-dependent hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N B; Zacur, H A; Allen, G S

    1985-03-01

    Neonatal or adult pituitary glands were transplanted to the median eminence of adult rats of the same or a histoincompatible inbred strain. The hormonal status of 39 transplanted rats and of control animals was evaluated by serial determination of serum prolactin and thyroxine. Grafts of neonatal tissue to adults of the same strain resulted in normal postoperative hormone levels. This indicates not only that pituitary grafts had survived, but also that the transplants were under hypothalamic control. Grafts of adult tissue were less successful. The prolactin value was lower, but still within the normal range, whereas the thyroxine value was lower than normal, suggesting that viable pituitary tissue had survived but was not under hypothalamic control. Transplantation across a histocompatibility barrier was uniformly unsuccessful. Postoperative prolactin levels were low and thyroxine levels were not significantly different from those in hypophysectomized controls.

  8. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  9. Burkholderia cepacia sepsis among neonates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saikat; Bhat Y, Ramesh; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Purakayastha, Jayashree; Sivaramaraju, V Vamsi; Kalwaje E, Vandana; Mishra, Swathi

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a rare cause of sepsis in newborns and its transmission involves human contact with heavily contaminated medical devices and disinfectants. The authors aimed to determine epidemiology, clinical features, antibiotic sensitivity pattern, complications and outcome of blood culture proven B. cepacia infections in 12 neonates. All neonates were outborn, 5 preterm and 7 term. B. cepacia was isolated from blood in all and concurrently from CSF in three neonates. Lethargy and respiratory distress (41.7 %) were major presenting features. Five newborns (41.7 %) required mechanical ventilation for 3-7 d. Highest bacterial susceptibility was observed for meropenem (100 %), followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (all 83 %), ceftazidime (75 %) and ciprofloxacin (42 %). Piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole either singly or in combination led to complete recovery of 11 (91.7 %) newborns; one developed hydrocephalus. Eight of nine infants who completed 6 mo follow up were normal. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy for B. cepacia infection results in complete recovery in majority.

  10. Management of Shock in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhat, B Vishnu; Plakkal, Nishad

    2015-10-01

    Shock is characterized by inadequate oxygen delivery to the tissues, and is more frequent in very low birth weight infants, especially in the first few days of life. Shock is an independent predictor of mortality, and the survivors are at a higher risk of neurologic impairment. Understanding the pathophysiology helps to recognize and classify shock in the early compensated phase and initiate appropriate treatment. Hypovolemia is rarely the primary cause of shock in neonates. Myocardial dysfunction is especially common in extremely preterm infants, and in term infants with perinatal asphyxia. Blood pressure measurements are easy, but correlate poorly with cerebral and systemic blood flows. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound can help in individualized assessment of problems, selecting appropriate therapy and monitoring response, but may not always be available, and long-term benefits need to be demonstrated. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy to guide treatment of neonatal shock is currently experimental. In the absence of hypovolemia, excessive administration of fluid boluses is inappropriate therapy. Dobutamine and dopamine are the most common initial inotropes used in neonatal shock. Dobutamine has been shown to improve systemic blood flow, especially in very low birth weight infants, but dopamine is better at improving blood pressure in hypotensive infants. Newer inodilators including milrinone and levosimendan may be useful in selected settings. Data on long-term survival and neurologic outcomes following different management strategies are scarce and future research efforts should focus on this.

  11. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Clinical Trials Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  12. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  13. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  14. Managing common neonatal respiratory conditions during transport.

    PubMed

    Coe, Kristi L; Jamie, Scott F; Baskerville, Rosland M

    2014-10-01

    As neonatal care in the tertiary setting advances, neonatal transport teams are challenged with incorporating these innovations into their work environment. One of the largest areas of advancement over the last decade involves respiratory support and management. Many major respiratory treatments and the equipment required have been adapted for transport, whereas others are not yet feasible. This article reviews the history of respiratory management during neonatal transport and discusses current methodologies and innovations in transport respiratory management.

  15. Free T4 (Thyroxine) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... function and diagnose thyroid diseases , including hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism , usually after discovering that the thyroid stimulating hormone ( ... much or too little thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism) and diagnose the cause Distinguish between different thyroid ...

  16. Hypopituitarism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the breasts to release milk Prolactin -- stimulates female breast development and milk production Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) -- stimulates the thyroid gland to release hormones that affect the body's metabolism ...

  17. Sex hormone receptors in the hypothalamus and their role in sexual differentiation of the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkina, I.V.; Babichev, V.N.; Ozol', L.Yu.

    1986-09-01

    In this investigation, changes in the level of receptors for sex hormones in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats were studied on the first through fifth days of postnatal life, and the results obtained were compared with the levels of luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in the peripheral blood in order to discover any correlation between these parameters. 2,4,6,7,-/sup 3/H-estradiol-17..beta.. and 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H-testosterone were used as labeled hormones. The values of the association constant and concentration of specific binding sites for estradiol and testosterone in hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats during neonatal development is shown. It is found that in male rats on the first day after birth, receptors for estradiol and testosterone are present and they enable the action both of the testicular hormone and that of estradiol to be realized.

  18. Neonatal procedural pain exposure predicts lower cortisol and behavioral reactivity in preterm infants in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth E; Holsti, Liisa; Haley, David W; Oberlander, Tim; Weinberg, Joanne; Solimano, Alfonso; Whitfield, Michael F; Fitzgerald, Colleen; Yu, Wayne

    2005-02-01

    Data from animal models indicate that neonatal stress or pain can permanently alter subsequent behavioral and/or physiological reactivity to stressors. However, cumulative effects of pain related to acute procedures in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on later stress and/or pain reactivity has received limited attention. The objective of this study is to examine relationships between prior neonatal pain exposure (number of skin breaking procedures), and subsequent stress and pain reactivity in preterm infants in the NICU. Eighty-seven preterm infants were studied at 32 (+/-1 week) postconceptional age (PCA). Infants who received analgesia or sedation in the 72 h prior to each study, or any postnatal dexamethasone, were excluded. Outcomes were infant responses to two different stressors studied on separate days in a repeated measures randomized crossover design: (1) plasma cortisol to stress of a fixed series of nursing procedures; (2) behavioral (Neonatal Facial Coding System; NFCS) and cardiac reactivity to pain of blood collection. Among infants born neonatal procedural pain exposure was related to lower cortisol response to stress and to lower facial (but not autonomic) reactivity to pain, at 32 weeks PCA, independent of early illness severity and morphine exposure since birth. Repeated neonatal procedural pain exposure among neurodevelopmentally immature preterm infants was associated with down-regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which was not counteracted with morphine. Differential effects of early pain on development of behavioral, physiologic and hormonal systems warrant further investigation.

  19. Neonatal vaccination: Challenges and intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Surendran, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While vaccines have been tremendously successful in reducing the incidence of serious infectious diseases, newborns remain particularly vulnerable in the first few months of their life to life-threatening infections. A number of challenges exist to neonatal vaccination. However, recent advances in the understanding of neonatal immunology offers insights to overcome many of those challenges. OBJECTIVE This review will present an overview of the features of neonatal immunity which make vaccination difficult, survey the mechanisms of action of available vaccine adjuvants with respect to the unique features of neonatal immunity, and propose a possible mechanism contributing to the inability of neonates to generate protective immune responses to vaccines. METHODS We surveyed recent published findings on the challenges to neonatal vaccination and possible intervention strategies including the use of novel vaccine adjuvants to develop efficacious neonatal vaccines. RESULTS Challenges in the vaccination of neonates include interference from maternal antibody and excessive skewing towards Th2 immunity, which can be counteracted by the use of proper adjuvants. CONCLUSION Synergistic stimulation of multiple Toll-like receptors by incorporating well defined agonist-adjuvant combinations to vaccines is a promising strategy to ensure a protective vaccine response in neonates. PMID:26757146

  20. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  1. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  2. Hormone Profiling in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Plant hormones are for a long time known to act as chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence. Furthermore, plant hormones simultaneously coordinate physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To study the hormonal regulation of physiological processes, three main approaches have been used (1) exogenous application of hormones, (2) correlative studies through measurements of endogenous hormone levels, and (3) use of transgenic and/or mutant plants altered in hormone metabolism or signaling. A plant hormone profiling method is useful to unravel cross talk between hormones and help unravel the hormonal regulation of physiological processes in studies using any of the aforementioned approaches. However, hormone profiling is still particularly challenging due to their very low abundance in plant tissues. In this chapter, a sensitive, rapid, and accurate method to quantify all the five "classic" classes of plant hormones plus other plant growth regulators, such as jasmonates, salicylic acid, melatonin, and brassinosteroids is described. The method includes a fast and simple extraction procedure without time consuming steps as purification or derivatization, followed by optimized ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. This protocol facilitates the high-throughput analysis of hormone profiling and is applicable to different plant tissues.

  3. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  4. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  5. Effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum Vitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Yin, Xiangdang; Chu, Haifeng; Zheng, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum vitamin D levels, and to analyze the application value of glutamine. Methods: One hundred ninty neonates enrolled in intensive care unit were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=95) that were both given enteral and parenteral nutrition support. Meanwhile, the treatment group was fed formula milk containing 0.3 g/(kg·d) glutamine as enteral nutrition support for 14 days. Results: The weight of the treatment group increased significantly faster than that of the control group did (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly higher milk amount and calorie intake than those of the control group (P<0.05), and neonates in the treatment group who reached calorie intake of 50/80/100 kcal/kg/d were significantly younger (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the treatment group was significantly less prone to feeding intolerance than the control group (P<0.05). After 14 days of feeding, the serum motilin, gastrin and vitamin D levels of both groups all increased, with significant intra-group and inter-group differences. Such levels of the treatment group significantly exceeded those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Supplementing early enteral micro-feeding with glutamine promoted the absorption of neonatal routine nutrients and vitamin D, obviously regulated gastrointestinal hormones, and elevated weight as a result. PMID:26870119

  6. A Neonatal Murine Model of MRSA Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishwas; Siefker, David; Patel, Vivek S.; Yadav, Nikki; Jaligama, Sridhar; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants particularly following lower respiratory tract viral infections such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). However, the mechanisms by which co-infection of infants by MRSA and RSV cause increased lung pathology are unknown. Because the infant immune system is qualitatively and quantitatively different from adults we developed a model of infant MRSA pneumonia which will allow us to investigate the effects of RSV co-infection on disease severity. We infected neonatal and adult mice with increasing doses of MRSA and demonstrate that neonatal mice have delayed kinetics in clearing the bacteria in comparison to adult mice. There were differences in recruitment of immune cells into the lung following infection. Adult mice exhibited an increase in neutrophil recruitment that coincided with reduced bacterial titers followed by an increase in macrophages. Neonatal mice, however, exhibited an early increase in neutrophils that did not persist despite continued presence of the bacteria. Unlike the adult mice, neonatal mice failed to exhibit an increase in macrophages. Neonates exhibited a decrease in phagocytosis of MRSA suggesting that the decrease in clearance was partially due to deficient phagocytosis of the bacteria. Both neonates and adults responded with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines following infection. However, in contrast to the adult mice, neonates did not express constitutive levels of the anti-microbial peptide Reg3γ in the lung. Infection of neonates did not stimulate expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 by dendritic cells and neonates exhibited a diminished T cell response compared to adult mice. Overall, we have developed a neonatal model of MRSA pneumonia that displays a similar delay in bacterial clearance as is observed in the neonatal intensive care unit and will be useful for performing co

  7. Beneficial Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes of Thyroid Hormone Replacement for Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Creswell J.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothyroidism and raised thyroid antibody levels have been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes. Several studies have investigated causal associations, but results have been inconsistent and few studies have reported the effects of thyroxine replacement therapy on pregnancy outcomes in hypothyroid patients. Objective. The primary study objective was to determine the outcome of pregnancies in women diagnosed with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) (serum TSH > 2.5 mIU/L) and those with elevated circulating thyroid autoantibody levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and after the institution of appropriate thyroxine replacement therapy to maintain the serum TSH ≤ 2.5 mIU/L. Study Design. This prospective observational study was undertaken between 2013 and 2016. Blood samples were taken from 1025 women at presentation for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb), and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Those with a TSH > 2.5 mIU/L were treated with thyroxine and managed appropriately to ensure that the TSH was maintained ≤2.5 mIU/L. Outcomes in these patients were compared to those in euthyroid patients. Maternal antenatal complications and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Results. There were a total of 1025 patients of whom 382 (37.5%) were nulliparous. 10.1% had a TSH level > 2.5 mIU/L and 18.2% had at least one raised thyroid antibody level. No differences in adverse outcomes of pregnancy were evident in women treated for SCH or overt hypothyroidism compared to the euthyroid group. There was also no association between raised thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in either group. Conclusion. There were no adverse outcomes of pregnancy found in pregnant women who had been diagnosed and treated with thyroxine for SCH at the time of presentation when compared to euthyroid patients. There was also no relationship with thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in the

  8. Beneficial Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes of Thyroid Hormone Replacement for Subclinical Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Norman J; Eastman, Creswell J

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothyroidism and raised thyroid antibody levels have been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes. Several studies have investigated causal associations, but results have been inconsistent and few studies have reported the effects of thyroxine replacement therapy on pregnancy outcomes in hypothyroid patients. Objective. The primary study objective was to determine the outcome of pregnancies in women diagnosed with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) (serum TSH > 2.5 mIU/L) and those with elevated circulating thyroid autoantibody levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and after the institution of appropriate thyroxine replacement therapy to maintain the serum TSH ≤ 2.5 mIU/L. Study Design. This prospective observational study was undertaken between 2013 and 2016. Blood samples were taken from 1025 women at presentation for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb), and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Those with a TSH > 2.5 mIU/L were treated with thyroxine and managed appropriately to ensure that the TSH was maintained ≤2.5 mIU/L. Outcomes in these patients were compared to those in euthyroid patients. Maternal antenatal complications and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Results. There were a total of 1025 patients of whom 382 (37.5%) were nulliparous. 10.1% had a TSH level > 2.5 mIU/L and 18.2% had at least one raised thyroid antibody level. No differences in adverse outcomes of pregnancy were evident in women treated for SCH or overt hypothyroidism compared to the euthyroid group. There was also no association between raised thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in either group. Conclusion. There were no adverse outcomes of pregnancy found in pregnant women who had been diagnosed and treated with thyroxine for SCH at the time of presentation when compared to euthyroid patients. There was also no relationship with thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in the

  9. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  10. Effects of PCBs and PBDEs on thyroid hormone, lymphocyte proliferation, hematology and kidney injury markers in residents of an e-waste dismantling area in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiwei; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Gangqiang; Shen, Haitao; Wu, Lizhi; Chen, Zhijian; Han, Jianlong; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are two typical categories of contaminants released from e-waste dismantling environments. In China, the body burdens of PCBs and PBDEs are associated with abnormal thyroid hormones in populations from e-waste dismantling sites, but the results are limited and contradictory. In this study, we measured the serum levels of PCBs and PBDEs and the thyroid hormone free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 40 residents in an e-waste dismantling area and in 15 residents in a control area. Additionally, we also measured some lymphocyte proliferation indexes, hematologic parameters and kidney injury markers, including white blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, platelets, serum creatinine and beta 2-microglobulin (β2-MG). The results indicated that the mean level of ΣPCBs in the exposure group was significantly higher than that in the control group (964.39 and 67.98 ng g(-1), p<0.0001), but the mean level of ΣPBDEs in the exposure group was not significantly higher than that in the controls (139.32 vs. 75.74 ng g(-1), p>0.05). We determined that serum levels of FT3, FT4, monocytes and lymphocytes were significantly lower, whereas the levels of neutrophils, hemoglobin, platelets and serum creatinine were significantly higher in the exposed group (p<0.05). The mean level of ΣPCBs was negatively correlated with levels of FT3, FT4, monocytes and lymphocytes (p<0.05) and positively correlated with levels of neutrophils, hemoglobin, serum creatinine and β2-MG (p<0.05). Additionally, the mean level of ΣPBDEs was positively correlated with levels of white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelets (p<0.05). Our data suggest that exposure to an e-waste dismantling environment may increase the body burdens of PCBs and the specific PBDEs congeners in native residents and that the contaminants released from e-waste may contribute to

  11. Parathyroid Hormone Signaling via Gαs Is Selectively Inhibited by an NH2-Terminally Truncated Gαs: Implications for Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Puzhko, Svetlana; Goodyer, Cynthia Gates; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Canaff, Lucie; Misra, Madhusmita; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat; Hendy, Geoffrey N

    2013-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroid patients have resistance predominantly to parathyroid hormone (PTH), and here we have examined the ability of an alternative Gαs-related protein to inhibit Gαs activity in a hormone-selective manner. We tested whether the G/VAS exon A/B-derived NH2-terminally truncated (Tr) αs protein alters stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the PTH receptor (PTHR1), the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR), the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), or the AVP receptor (V2R). HEK293 cells cotransfected with receptor and full-length (FL) Gαs±Tr ±s protein expression vectors were stimulated with agonists (PTH [10−7 to 10−9 M], TSH [1 to 100 mU], isoproterenol [10−6 to 10−8M], or AVP [10−6 to 10−8M]). Following PTH stimulation, HEK293 cells cotransfected with PTHR1 + FL Gαs + Tr αs had a significantly lower cAMP response than those transfected with only PTHR1 + FL Gαs. Tr αs also exerted an inhibitory effect on the cAMP levels stimulated by TSH via the TSHR but had little or no effect on isoproterenol or AVP acting via β2AR or V2R, respectively. These differences mimic the spectrum of hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP-1a) and type 1b (PHP-1b) patients. In opossum kidney (OK) cells, endogenously expressing the PTHR1 and β2AR, the exogenous expression of Tr αs at a level similar to endogenous FL Gαs resulted in blunting of the cAMP response to PTH, whereas that to isoproterenol was unaltered. A pseudopseudohypoparathyroid patient with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy harbored a de novo paternally inherited M1l Gαs mutation. Similar maternally inherited mutations at the initiation codon have been identified previously in PHP-1a patients. The M1l αs mutant (lacking the first 59 amino acids of Gαs) blunted the increase in cAMP levels stimulated via the PTHR1 in both HEK293 and OK cells similar to the Tr αs protein. Thus NH2-terminally truncated forms of Gαs may contribute to the pathogenesis of

  12. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  13. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-10-10

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion.

  14. Sublingual epidermoid cyst in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Fadekemi Olufunmilayo; Oladejo, Taoreed; Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Adenekan, Anthony Taiwo

    2014-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts (EC) in the head and neck region could be considered a rare condition representing only 6.9% of all ECs occurring in the body. They occur rarely in children and neonates. We present a case of sublingual EC in a Nigerian neonate. PMID:24987608

  15. Sex Differences in Neonatal Stress Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Maryann; Emory, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Examined the sex differences in physiological and behavioral stress reactivity among 36 healthy, full-term neonates after a mildly stressful behavioral assessment procedure. Salivary cortisol, heart rate change, Neonatal Behavior Assessment Scale (NBAS) cluster scores, and behavioral states after the NBAS provided 100% discrimination between male…

  16. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  17. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  18. Clinical pharmacology of carbapenems in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria; Allegaert, Karel

    2014-04-01

    Carbapenems are an effective tool to treat complicated bacterial infections. This review aims to summarize the available information on carbapenems in neonates to guide clinicians on drug choice and indications in neonates. Moreover, identification of knowledge gaps may stimulate researchers to design studies to further improve pharmacotherapy in neonates. To do so, a bibliographic search [infant/newborn and meropenem, imipenem, panipenem, ertapenem, doripenem or imipenem] was performed (PubMed, EMBASE) and public clinical trial registries (clinicaltrials.gov, EU registry) were searched to summarize the available information. Carbapenem clearance in neonates is low. Variability relates to maturation (weight, age) and renal function (creatinine clearance), while observations in neonates with renal failure are absent. Pharmacodynamics are almost exclusively limited to meropenem, and the available information will further increase (NeoMero-1-2, necrotizing enterocolitis, meningitis). Finally, there are also some ongoing doripenem pharmacokinetics (PK) studies in neonates. It was concluded that observations on carbapenems in neonates are limited, but studies (NeoMero, doripenem) are ongoing. Until this information becomes available, off label prescription of meropenem seems to be the most reasonable choice when a carbapenem is appropriate. Knowledge gaps relate to PK in neonates with renal failure and to the potential benefit of prolonged compared to short duration of infusion.

  19. Sex hormones and acne.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Tao, Tao; Hu, Tingting; Karadağ, Ayşe Serap; Al-Khuzaei, Safaa; Chen, WenChieh

    The skin is an endocrine organ with the expression of metabolizing enzymes and hormone receptors for diverse hormones. The sebaceous gland is the main site of hormone biosynthesis, especially for androgens, and acne is the classical androgen-mediated dermatosis. In sebocytes, conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone directly to dihydrotestosterone bypassing testosterone has been demonstrated, while type II 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase can inactivate the action of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. The androgen receptor-dependent genomic effect of dihydrotestosterone on sebocytes is confirmed. Further evidence supports the PI3 K/Akt/FoxO1/mTOR signaling in the involvement of the interplay between androgens, insulin, insulin-like growth factor, and hyperglycemic diet in acne. Androgens not only regulate embryology and lipogenesis/sebum synthesis in sebocytes but also influence inflammation in acne. Genetic studies indicate that regulation of the androgen receptor is an important factor in severe acne. Further studies are required to understand the effect of estrogen and progesterone on sebaceous gland and comedogenesis, considering the change of acne in pregnancy and postmenopausal acne. Special attention should be paid to nonobese patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome and hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome. In spite of extensive gynecologic experience in the use of combined oral contraceptives for acne, evidence based on dermatologic observation should be intensified.

  20. [Acne and hormones].

    PubMed

    Faure, Michel

    2002-04-15

    Androgens stimulate sebum production which is necessary for the development of acne. Acne in women may thus be considered as a manifestation of cutaneous androgenization. Most of acnes may be related to an idiopathic skin hyperandrogenism due to in situ enzyme activity and androgen receptor hypersensitivity, as also noted in idiopathic hirsutism. Some acne may correspond to elevated ovarian or adrenal androgen secretion. The presence of acne in women may lead to a diagnosis of functional hyperandrogenism, either polycysticovary syndrome or nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Plasma level assays for testosterone, delta 4 androstenedione and 17-OH progesterone and ovarian echography are necessary to determine the possibility for an ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, but not to better treat acne. The goal of hormonal therapy in acne is to oppose the effects of androgens on the sebaceous gland. Hormones may be used in female acne in the absence of endocrine abnormalities. Antiandrogens (cyproterone acetate or aldactone) may be useful in severe acne, hormonal contraceptives with cyproterone acetate or non androgenic progestins in mild or common acne often in association with other anti-acneic drugs. Glucocorticoids have to be administered in acne fulminans and other forms of acute, severe, inflammatory acne, for their anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. Neonatal disorders of germinal matrix.

    PubMed

    Raets, M M A; Dudink, J; Govaert, P

    2015-11-01

    The germinal matrix (GM) is a richly vascularized, transient layer near the ventricles. It produces neurons and glial cells, and is present in the foetal brain between 8 and 36 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks, it reaches its maximum volume and subsequently withers. The GM is vulnerable to haemorrhage in preterm infants. This selective vulnerability is explained by limited astrocyte end-feet coverage of microvessels, reduced expression of fibronectin and immature tight junctions. Focal lesions in the neonatal period include haemorrhage, germinolysis and stroke. Such lesions in transient layers interrupt normal brain maturation and induce neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  2. Neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    Bacteriological and clinical data on 68 children with neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis were analysed as part of a wider study of bacterial meningitis undertaken between 1976 and 1982. Twenty five per cent of patients died and there was no difference in the mortality rate between early and late onset disease. Sixteen per cent of the infants weighed less than 2500 g at birth but in 50% no predisposing aetiological factor was found. Streptococcus agalactiae type III was isolated in 57% of the patients. PMID:6375583

  3. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  4. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  5. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  6. Neonatal electroencephalography: review of a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Shany, Eilon; Berger, Itai

    2011-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) recordings have routinely been performed for more than half a century. ''Old'' technical difficulties are no longer of concern with the advent of modern digital technology. Still, many ''old'' issues are at debate: characterization of neonatal EEG features, identification of EEG waveforms with potential clinical correlates, the role of neonatal EEG in prediction of neurodevelopmental outcome, and use of new devices. In the past decades, neonatal EEG and emerging issues' literature has greatly expanded. In this review, the authors have summarized some of these issues to increase the availability of the information for both clinical and research purposes. They propose an up-to-date concentrated practical approach to this rapidly expanding ''subfield'' of neonatal neurology.

  7. Imaging approach to persistent neonatal jaundice

    SciTech Connect

    Kirks, D.; Coleman, R.E.; Filston, H.C.; Rosenberg, E.R.; Merten, D.F.

    1984-03-01

    Fifteen patients with persistent neonatal jaundice were evaluated by sonography and radionuclide scintigraphy. The sonographic features of both neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia are nonspecific. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy after phenobarbital pretreatment in patients with neonatal hepatitis demonstrates normal hepatic extraction and delayed tracer excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. If there is neonatal hepatitis with severe hepatocellular damage, the hepatic extraction of tracer activity is decreased and excretion may be delayed or absent. Patients under 3 months of age with biliary atresia have normal hepatic extraction of tracer with no excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. Sonography in patients with a choledochal cyst shows a cystic mass in the porta hepatis with associated bile-duct dilatation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirms that the choledochal cyst communicates with the biliary system. Initial sonography demonstrates hepatobiliary anatomy; subsequent phenobarbital-enhanced radionuclide scintigraphy determines hepatobiliary function. An expedient diagnostic approach is recommended for the evaluation of persistent neonatal jaundice.

  8. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  9. Neonatal overnutrition causes early alterations in the central response to peripheral ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Collden, Gustav; Balland, Eglantine; Parkash, Jyoti; Caron, Emilie; Langlet, Fanny; Prevot, Vincent; Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess nutrient supply and rapid weight gain during early life are risk factors for the development of obesity during adulthood. This metabolic malprogramming may be mediated by endocrine disturbances during critical periods of development. Ghrelin is a metabolic hormone secreted from the stomach that acts centrally to promote feeding behavior by binding to growth hormone secretagogue receptors in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Here, we examined whether neonatal overnutrition causes changes in the ghrelin system. Methods We used a well-described mouse model of divergent litter sizes to study the effects of postnatal overfeeding on the central and peripheral ghrelin systems during postnatal development. Results Mice raised in small litters became overweight during lactation and remained overweight with increased adiposity as adults. Neonatally overnourished mice showed attenuated levels of total and acyl ghrelin in serum and decreased levels of Ghrelin mRNA expression in the stomach during the third week of postnatal life. Normalization of hypoghrelinemia in overnourished pups was relatively ineffective at ameliorating metabolic outcomes, suggesting that small litter pups may present ghrelin resistance. Consistent with this idea, neonatally overnourished pups displayed an impaired central response to peripheral ghrelin. The mechanisms underlying this ghrelin resistance appear to include diminished ghrelin transport into the hypothalamus. Conclusions Early postnatal overnutrition results in central resistance to peripheral ghrelin during important periods of hypothalamic development. Because ghrelin signaling has recently been implicated in the neonatal programming of metabolism, these alterations in the ghrelin system may contribute to the metabolic defects observed in postnatally overnourished mice. PMID:25685686

  10. The Correlation between Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) and Thyroid Hormones in the General Population: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuemin; Wang, Hailong; Li, Jing; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Teng, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Certain epidemiological studies have suggested exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) affect the production and secretion of thyroid hormones (TH); however, conflicting results have been reported in different studies. There is not a convincing conclusion about this debate to date. Materials and Methods To perform a meta-analysis determining if there are correlations between PBDEs exposure and the serum levels of TH. Medical and scientific literature databases were searched for articles that met the eligibility criteria. The included articles were assessed for methodological quality. The correlation coefficient values or regression coefficient values between PBDEs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or total thyroxine (TT4) from each article were used for analysis. Data Synthesis Sixteen articles were included in this meta-analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were directly collected or calculated from data given in the articles. Then, Fisher’s z transformation was performed to convert each correlation coefficient to an approximately normal distribution. For z values between PBDEs exposure and TSH levels, the pooled z value for 18 studies was 0.08 (95% CI: -0.06, 0.22), and indicated significant heterogeneity (I2 values = 90.7%). Subgroup analysis was performed based on the median values of serum PBDEs in each study, there was not significant heterogeneity in each of the four subgroups (I2 values <30%). In meta-analysis of z values between PBDEs exposure and the levels of TT4, the pooled z value for 11 studies was -0.02 (95% CI: -0.11, 0.08), and also indicated significant heterogeneity (I2 values = 57.6%). Similar subgroup analysis was done for the PBDEs exposures and the levels of TT4. No significant heterogeneity was shown in either of the two subgroups (I2 values = 0). Conclusion The findings in our meta-analysis indicate the effects of PBDEs on thyroid function may mainly depend on PBDEs exposure and their levels found in

  11. Active ear acupuncture points in neonates with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

    PubMed

    Raith, Wolfgang; Kutschera, Jörg; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of acupuncture ear points in neonates with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS occurs in the first days of life in neonates whose mothers have a history of drug abuse, and may also occur in neonates whose mothers are currently following substitution therapy. The patients are neonates with NAS admitted over one year to the Division of Neonatology at the University Hospital Graz. The examination took place on the third day after delivery (mean value 70.3 hours) and was performed by a neuronal pen (PS 3 © Silberbauer, Vienna, Austria). An integrated sound and optical signal detected the active ear points that were then placed on an ear map. We investigated six neonates (four male, two female). All investigated neonates showed the presence of active ear acupuncture points. The psychovegetative rim was the most common organic area of the children, following by a few organic points. This corresponds with the results found in healthy neonates. In all neonates with NAS, we found the presence of psychic ear points. The identified psychic ear points are the frustration-point, R-point and the psychotropic area nasal from the incisura intertragica. In all neonates with NAS, active organic and psychic ear points were detectable in both ears. In the future, it could be possible to use active ear points for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  12. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  13. Antifungal agents in neonates: issues and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Almirante, Benito; Rodríguez, Dolors

    2007-01-01

    Fungal infections are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period, particularly among premature neonates. Four classes of antifungal agents are commonly used in the treatment of fungal infections in pediatric patients: polyene macrolides, fluorinated pyrimidines, triazoles, and echinocandins. Due to the paucity of pediatric data, many recommendations for the use of antifungal agents in this population are derived from the experience in adults. The purpose of this article was to review the published data on fungal infections and antifungal agents, with a focus on neonatal patients, and to provide an overview of the differences in antifungal pharmacology in neonates compared with adults. Pharmacokinetic data suggest dosing differences in children versus adult patients with some antifungals, but not all agents have been fully evaluated. The available pharmacokinetic data on the amphotericin B deoxycholate formulation in neonates exhibit considerable variability; nevertheless, the dosage regimen suggested in the neonatal population is similar to that used in adults. More pharmacokinetic information is available on the liposomal and lipid complex preparations of amphotericin B and fluconazole, and it supports their use in neonates; however, the optimal dosage and duration of therapy is difficult to establish. All amphotericin-B formulations, frequently used in combination with flucytosine, are useful for treating disseminated fungal infections and Candida meningitis in neonates. Fluconazole, with potent in vitro activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and almost all Candida spp., has been used in neonates with invasive candidiasis at dosages of 6 mg/kg/day, and for antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk neonates. There are limited data on itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole use in neonates. Caspofungin, which is active against Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., requires higher doses in children relative to adults, and dosing is

  14. Evidence of associations between feto-maternal vitamin D status, cord parathyroid hormone and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and newborn whole body bone mineral content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of a high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in pregnant women and neonates, relationships among vitamin D status [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and whole body bone mineral content (WBBMC) in the newborn are poorly characterized. The purpose...

  15. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  16. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  17. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  18. Laser Photoradiation Therapy For Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes our leading experience in the clinical application of laser in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. Currently, the irradiation of jaundiced infants during neonatal life to fluorescent light is the most common treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The authors have investigated the photodegradation of bilirubin by laser in vitro and in Gunn rats before embarking on its clinical application in the treatment of jaundice in the new born child. This work was done to study the theraputic effect of laser compared to the currently used phototherapy in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We selected 16 full term neonates with jaundice to be the subject of this study. The neonates of the study were devided into two groups. The first group was treated with continuous phototherapy . The second group recieved photoradiation therapy with gas laser The laser used was a CW argon-ion laser tuned to oscillate at 488.0 nm wavelength. This wavelength selection was based on our previous studies on the effect of laser irradiation of Gunn rats at different wavelengths. Comparison of the results of both methods of treatment will be reported in detail. The advantages and limitations of laser photoradiation therapy for neonatal jaundice will be discussed.

  19. Juvenile hormone agonists affect the occurrence of male Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Tatarazako, Norihisa; Oda, Shigeto; Watanabe, Hajime; Morita, Masatoshi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2003-12-01

    The water flea Daphnia magna reproduces primarily by cyclic parthenogenesis. Environmental stimuli that signal a change to adverse conditions induce the organisms to switch from parthenogenesis to gamogenetic reproduction. During the gamogenetic period, they produce male daphnids and dormant resting eggs, which can survive prolonged periods of environmental adversity. However, little is known about the mechanisms associated with the switch from parthenogenesis to gamogenetic reproduction. We investigated the effects of several juvenoids on sex determination in Daphnia. Females less than 24 h old were exposed to various concentrations of the test substance and were observed for 21 days. It was found that they can trigger the appearance of male daphnids: the percentage of males in the population increases to a level greater than what occurs under ordinary environmental conditions. We found that methylfarnesoate, juvenile hormone III, methoprene, and the phenoxyphenoxy derivatives pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb (both insecticides) reduced the production of offspring and produced sex ratios dominated by male daphnids. Pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb showed striking effects at low concentrations. Exposure to either of these chemicals at a concentration of 330 ngl(-1) caused adult females to produce almost all male neonates. Methylfarnesoate, juvenile hormone III, and methoprene showed an effect in inducing male production at higher concentrations (3.7 x 10(3), 3.3 x 10(5), and 1.3 x 10(5) ngl(-1), respectively). Our findings suggest that juvenile hormone agonists, including some insecticides, affect the chemical signaling responsible for inducing the production of male offspring.

  20. Thyroid Hormones and Methylmercury Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Daniel M.; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for cellular metabolism, growth, and development. In particular, an adequate supply of thyroid hormones is critical for fetal neurodevelopment. Thyroid hormone tissue activation and inactivation in brain, liver, and other tissues is controlled by the deiodinases through the removal of iodine atoms. Selenium, an essential element critical for deiodinase activity, is sensitive to mercury and, therefore, when its availability is reduced, brain development might be altered. This review addresses the possibility that high exposures to the organometal, methylmercury (MeHg), may perturb neurodevelopmental processes by selectively affecting thyroid hormone homeostasis and function. PMID:18716716