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Sample records for neonates

  1. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  2. Neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice lasting greater than 2 weeks should be investigated. Pale stools and dark or yellow urine are evidence of liver disease, which should be urgently investigated. The neonatal hepatitis syndrome has many causes, and a structured approach to investigation is mandatory. It should be possible to confirm or exclude biliary atresia within one week, so that definitive surgery is not delayed unnecessarily. Babies with the neonatal hepatitis syndrome should have vigorous fat-soluble vitamin supplementation, including parenteral vitamin K if coagulation is abnormal. The prognosis for infants with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and multifactorial cholestasis is excellent.

  3. Neonatal anemia.

    PubMed

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  4. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  5. Neonatal medications.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert M; Stiers, Justin; Buchi, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is reaching epidemic proportions related to perinatal use of opioids. There are many approaches to assess and manage NAS, including one we have outlined. A standardized approach is likely to reduce length of stay and variability in practice. Circumcision is a frequent, painful procedure performed in the neonatal period. The rationale for providing analgesia is presented as well as a review of methods. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have expanded our understanding of diseases and their drug therapy. Some applications of pharmacogenomics to the neonatal period are presented, along with pediatric challenges of developmental expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  6. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  7. Neonatal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P G; Anninos, P; Kotini, A; Koutlaki, N; Garas, A; Galazios, G

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the validity of magnetocardiography (MCG) in the estimation of neonatal cardiac rhythm using a single channel superconductive quantum interference device (SQUID). Our study population consisted of 50 neonates who were delivered normally between 37-41 weeks of gestation from clinically uncomplicated pregnancies. There was also a neonate included in the study in which the diagnosis of "hypoplastic left heart syndrome" was demonstrated by U/S Doppler examination. Maternal age ranged from 18 to 39 years (mean=29.15, SD=6.13). Our study results revealed 44 neonates with normal cardiac rhythm, four with ventricular tachycardia (VT), one with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and extrasystolic beats and one with bradycardia. The neonate with the hypoplastic left heart syndrome presented frequent episodes of ventricular bigeminy in the magnetocardiographic trace. M-mode echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of the seven cases of arrhythmia in our study group. Results gained from the study lead us to believe that MCG could provide clinical practice with a non-invasive, rapid and easy to perform method, which could be used as an adjunct to conventional methods for the evaluation of neonatal cardiac rhythm.

  8. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  9. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  10. Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis is extensive, and a step-wise approach based on the initial history and physical examination is useful to rapidly identify the underlying etiology. Early recognition of neonatal cholestasis is essential to ensure timely treatment and optimal prognosis. Even when specific treatment is not available, infants who have cholestasis benefit from early medical management and optimization of nutrition. Future studies are necessary to determine the most reliable and cost-effective method of universal screening for neonatal cholestasis. PMID:24244109

  11. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  12. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... better the outcome. Possible Complications Complications may include: Disability Death When to Contact a Medical Professional Seek medical help right away for an infant that shows symptoms of neonatal sepsis. Prevention Pregnant women may need preventive antibiotics if they have: Chorioamnionitis ...

  13. Neonatal hematology.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Miller, Jacob; Vogel, Adam M

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex and dynamic process in the pediatric population. Surgeons frequently encounter hematologic issues regarding hemostasis, inflammation, and wound healing. This publication provides a surgeon-directed review of hematopoiesis in the newborn, as well as an overview of the current understanding of their hemostatic profile under normal and pathologic conditions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  15. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neonatal hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Whitington, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as "self" and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies.

  17. [Neonatal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, J L

    2015-01-13

    Intussusception in infants and young children is a relatively common entity with a well defined clinical picture and a favorable outcome in most cases.The neonatal intussusceptions is extremely rare and does not have a well-defined clinical picture since its clinical manifestations vary according to the gestational time it occurs, the response of the injured intestine and the gestational age of the child concerned. Two new cases of neonatal intussusceptions are presented and a review of the world literature is performed. Given the stage of intussusceptions (pre- or postnatal) occurs and gestational age of the affected infant (preterm or term), there are three entities with clinical characteristics, topography and evolution rather different: prenatal or intrauterine intussusception, postnatal intussusception in the preterm and postnatal intussusception in the term infant.

  18. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  19. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  20. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate.

  1. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  2. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  3. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  4. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow's triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the coagulation proteins as

  5. Neonatal and Perinatal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amira M; Morris, Shaun K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-08-01

    Lack of success in achieving considerable reductions in neonatal mortality is a contributory factor in failing to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4.2.6 million neonates still die each year, with preterm birth and infections the two leading causes. Maternal infections and environmental and infant factors influence acquisition of viral and bacterial infections in the perinatal and neonatal period. Scaling up evidence-based interventions addressing maternal risk factors and underlying causes could reduce neonatal infections by 84%. The emergence of new infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance present public health challenges that must be addressed to achieve substantial reductions in neonatal mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  7. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  8. Management of Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is common and often fatal in extremely premature neonates. In the last decade, the therapeutic armamentarium for IC has markedly expanded; however, the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of most antifungal agents in premature neonates are unknown. We will review the major systemic antifungal agents in clinical use. PMID:9849983

  9. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  11. Neonatal Brain Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bodeliwala, Shaam; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Daljit

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors in neonatal age group is uncommon comparing with older children and adults. In older children brain tumors are commonly infratentorial, where as in neonates, they are supratentorial. Though extracranial tumors are commoner in neonates, brain tumors cause 5-20% deaths approximately. We are presenting a review on brain tumors in neonates. PMID:28770127

  12. Neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serane, V Tiroumourougane; Kurian, Ommen

    2008-09-01

    To study the substance misuse in pregnant mothers and its impact on their newborns. Case note review of the study population was undertaken. Infants of mothers who had taken substance of misuse were monitored regularly using Finnegan's score and treatment initiated based on a pre-existing protocol. The parameters that were studied included maternal drug habits, antenatal problems, and neonatal epidemiology with particular reference to growth, neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), its severity and management. Out of 32 neonates, 28 had developed neonatal withdrawal requiring treatment. The earliest presentation of NAS was at six hours and the average time of presentation of NAS was 26 hours. The dose of methadone taken by the mother related well with the likelihood of development of NAS. The most common symptoms noted at the time of diagnosis were irritable cry, increased tone, tachypnea, sleeplessness and tremor. Majority of neonates born to mothers on methadone exhibit neonatal abstinence syndrome and require pharmacological treatment. Neonates who had not exhibited symptoms of drug withdrawal within the first 3 days of life are unlikely to present with NAS requiring treatment.

  13. Neonatal outreach simulation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Bobbi J; Manhas, Deepak

    2016-11-01

    Numerous factors contribute to neonatal morbidity and mortality, and inexperienced providers managing crisis situations is one major cause. Simulation-based medical education is an excellent modality to employ in community hospitals to help refine and refresh resuscitation skills of providers who infrequently encounter neonatal emergencies. Mounting evidence suggests that simulation-based education improves patient outcomes. Academic health centers have the potential to improve neonatal outcomes through collaborations with community hospital providers, sharing expertise in neonatal resuscitation and simulation. Community outreach programs using simulation have been successfully initiated in North America. Two examples of programs are described here, including the models for curricular development, required resources, limitations, and benefits. Considerations for initiating outreach simulation programs are discussed. In the future, research demonstrating improved neonatal outcomes using outreach simulation will be important for personnel conducting outreach programs. Neonatal outreach simulation is a promising educational endeavor that may ultimately prove important in decreasing neonatal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  15. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  16. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  17. Maternal and neonatal tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58 000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  18. Monitoring neonates for ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Kemph, Alison; Tharpe, Anne Marie; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; McEvoy, Cynthia; Steyger, Peter S

    2017-06-22

    Neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at greater risk of permanent hearing loss compared to infants in well mother and baby units. Several factors have been associated with this increased prevalence of hearing loss, including congenital infections (e.g. cytomegalovirus or syphilis), ototoxic drugs (such as aminoglycoside or glycopeptide antibiotics), low birth weight, hypoxia and length of stay. The aetiology of this increased prevalence of hearing loss remains poorly understood. Here we review current practice and discuss the feasibility of designing improved ototoxicity screening and monitoring protocols to better identify acquired, drug-induced hearing loss in NICU neonates. A review of published literature. We conclude that current audiological screening or monitoring protocols for neonates are not designed to adequately detect early onset of ototoxicity. This paper offers a detailed review of evidence-based research, and offers recommendations for developing and implementing an ototoxicity monitoring protocol for young infants, before and after discharge from the hospital.

  19. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  20. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  1. [Neonatal lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Mayet, W J; Hermann, E; Bachmann, M; Poralla, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1989-01-01

    The neonatal lupus erythematosus syndrome, first described by McCuistion and Schoch in 1954, is associated with characteristic skin lesions and congenital heart block in the new-born, and the presence of Ro-(SSA), La-(SSB), or RNP antibodies in mothers and infants. A transplacental transference of maternal autoantibodies is discussed as possible pathophysiologic mechanism in neonatal lupus. The symptoms, the onset, and recently published pathogenetic concepts are reviewed.

  2. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  3. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sandra E.; Pet, Gillian C.

    2015-01-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This chapter will explore some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury will be discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  4. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical trials in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Clarissa; Lutsar, Irja; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Turner, Mark A; Heath, Paul T; Sharland, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic licensing studies remain a problem in neonates. The classical adult clinical syndrome-based licensing studies do not apply to neonates, where sepsis is the most common infection. The main obstacle to conducting neonatal antibiotic trials is a lack of consensus on the definition of neonatal sepsis itself and the selection of appropriate endpoints. This article describes the difficulties of the clinical and laboratory definitions of neonatal sepsis and reviews the varying designs of previous neonatal sepsis trials. The optimal design of future trials of new antibiotics will need to be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, combined with adequately powered clinical studies to determine safety and efficacy.

  6. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  7. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  8. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  9. Natal and neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Deema J; Ahmed, Muhammad M

    2014-05-01

    Natal teeth (teeth present at birth) and neonatal teeth (teeth observed in the first 30 days of life) are uncommon. They may cause feeding problems and ulcerations on the ventral surface of the tongue. They can also be alarming to parents and cause discomfort with breastfeeding. A review of literature was conducted to review their etiology, significance, and clinical features with special emphasis on the complications and management. The opportunity of establishing a dental home through the early dental visits was highlighted. Furthermore, this case report details the examination and management of a 24-hour old neonate with 2 neonatal teeth. Natal teeth, although uncommon, are best referred to pediatric dentists for investigation and management.

  10. Neonatal solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Aravindan

    2017-07-11

    Neonatal tumors are different from tumors of the older children and knowledge gained from treating older children can not be extrapolated to neonates. Neonates have immature physiology and their haematopoietic and immune systems are not fully developed and the response to therapy is unpredictable. Hence it is imperative to study these tumors as separate entity. The aim of this study is to analyse this rare set of tumors in terms of their incidence, clinical features and management. All babies admitted in our hospital with tumors from January, 2011 to January 2016 were studied. Tumor-like conditions like haemangioma, lymphangioma and hamartomas were included. The age, sex distribution, type of tumor and management were studied. A total of 51 cases were registered out of which, 29 cases were haemangiomas and lymphangiomas. Of remaining 20 cases, 5 were benign ovarian cysts, 3 were neuroblastomas, 3 were congenital fibrosarcomas, 3 were sacrococcygeal teratomas. Wilm's tumor, congenital mesoblastic nephroma, haemangioendothelioma of liver and others formed the remaining six cases. Our study insists that the neonatal tumors are distinct subset of pediatric tumors, requiring careful selection of treatment modalities and most of the solid tumors can be successfully managed if diagnosed and treated early. Neonatal tumors are defined as tumors which are diagnosed before the first month of life. Some of them can be congenital (present at birth). Neonatal tumors are different from tumors in older children in terms of etiopathogenesis, behavior and response to therapy as well as long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Neonatal brucellosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alnemri, Abdul Rahman M; Hadid, Adnan; Hussain, Shaik Asfaq; Somily, Ali M; Sobaih, Badr H; Alrabiaah, Abdulkarim; Alanazi, Awad; Shakoor, Zahid; AlSubaie, Sarah; Meriki, Naema; Kambal, Abdelmageed M

    2017-02-28

    Although brucellosis is not uncommon in Saudi Arabia, neonatal brucellosis has been infrequently reported. In this case of neonatal brucellosis, Brucella abortus was isolated by blood culture from both the mother and the neonate. Serology was positive only in the mother.

  12. The neonatal tear film.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, John G; Murphy, Paul J; Esmaeelpour, Marieh

    2003-12-01

    The importance of the tear film for the integrity of the ocular surface is well established. Full-term neonates produce tears normally, but low spontaneous blink rates during early life raises important questions regarding tear dynamics and stability. Although an afferent neural pathway that could potentially detect tear break-up is in place at birth, there is indirect evidence that the neonatal tear film is adapted to resist evaporation-mediated tear thinning. This adaptation presumably prevents drying of the ocular surface during long inter-blink periods. However, low rates of tear turnover may have important implications for the defence of the eye against potential pathogens.

  13. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  14. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  15. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  16. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  17. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  18. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death.

  19. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  20. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  1. Neonatal compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, B; Treharne, L

    2016-09-01

    A term neonate was born with a grossly swollen and discoloured left hand and forearm. He was transferred from the local hospital to the plastic surgical unit, where a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent emergency forearm fasciotomies at six hours of age. Following serial debridements of necrotic tissue, he underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the resultant defects of his forearm, hand and digits. At the clinic follow-up appointment two months after the procedure, he was found to have developed severe flexion contractures despite regular outpatient hand therapy and splintage. He has had further reconstruction with contracture release, use of artificial dermal matrix, and K-wire fixation of the thumb and wrist. Despite this, the long term outcome is likely to be an arm with poor function. The key learning point from this case is that despite prompt transfer, diagnosis and appropriate surgical management, the outcome for neonatal compartment syndrome may still be poor.

  2. Neonatal hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Purves, Erica

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex subspecialty of pediatric hematology, combining the unique aspects of the maternal/fetal relationship, the delicate balance of coagulation factors, and the distinctive physiologic conditions of the newborn period. The objective of this article is to briefly review specific hematologic disorders that commonly present in the newborn period. Alloimmune cytopenias, polycythemia, thrombosis and bleeding associated with vitamin K deficiency will be discussed through a focus on pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, current treatment strategies, and implications for nursing care.

  3. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  4. Neonatal acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah A; Whitington, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure (NALF) is a rare disease about which there is little published data; however, NALF is an extremely important condition as it is distinct from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. First, unlike acute liver failure in older patients, NALF can be diagnosed in an infant with cirrhosis. This is due to the fetal-neonatal continuum of liver disease, or the principle that neonatal liver failure may be the result of a liver disease that began in utero. Further differences exist in the mechanism of disease, diagnostic principles, and the common etiologies of NALF when compared with pediatric and adult acute liver failure. This review will address many of the distinguishing features of NALF and focus on the most common etiologies of NALF, including gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD), the most common cause of NALF. Additionally, this review will provide insight into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare condition. Liver Transplantation 22 677-685 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lauren M; Velez, Martha

    2012-04-01

    This review will discuss the complex nature of maternal and other factors that can affect the infant's display of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), clinical presentation and treatment of NAS, and the impact of recent findings on future directions for research. NAS has traditionally been described as a constellation of signs/symptoms displayed by the neonate upon withdrawal of gestational opioid exposure; however, recent research has advanced our understanding of this disorder. Other psychoactive substances, such as increasingly prescribed serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may produce an independent or synergistic discontinuation syndrome. The wide variability in NAS presentation has generated interest in the interplay of prenatal and postnatal environmental and genetic factors that may moderate or mediate its expression. Finally, recent advances in the treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women have suggested buprenorphine as an alternative treatment to methadone during pregnancy, largely due to reduced NAS severity in exposed neonates. Physicians should be aware of the complexity of the maternal, fetal, and infant factors that combine to create the infant's display of NAS, and incorporate these aspects into comprehensive assessment and care of the dyad. Further research regarding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAS is warranted.

  7. Neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kocherlakota, Prabhakar

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a result of the sudden discontinuation of fetal exposure to substances that were used or abused by the mother during pregnancy. Withdrawal from licit or illicit substances is becoming more common among neonates in both developed and developing countries. NAS continues to be an important clinical entity throughout much of the world. NAS leads to a constellation of signs and symptoms involving multiple systems. The pathophysiology of NAS is not completely understood. Urine or meconium confirmation may assist the diagnosis and management of NAS. The Finnegan scoring system is commonly used to assess the severity of NAS; scoring can be helpful for initiating, monitoring, and terminating treatment in neonates. Nonpharmacological care is the initial treatment option, and pharmacological treatment is required if an improvement is not observed after nonpharmacological measures or if the infant develops severe withdrawal. Morphine is the most commonly used drug in the treatment of NAS secondary to opioids. An algorithmic approach to the management of infants with NAS is suggested. Breastfeeding is not contraindicated in NAS, unless the mother is taking street drugs, is involved in polydrug abuse, or is infected with HIV. Future studies are required to assess the long-term effects of NAS on children after prenatal exposure. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. [Neonatal lupus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Solano-Fiesco, Liborio; Romero-Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Olivera-Solórzano, Florisela; Alonso-Pérez, Nancy Carmencita; Marcos-Cabrera, Liliana; González-Martínez, Rosa Ana

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus has a rare incidence, distinct from systemic lupus erythematosus. This is an acquired autoimmune disease associated with maternal antibodies to proteins Ro / La (SSA /SSB), transferred by the placenta; it represents the prototype of passive transfer of antibodies from mother to child. The disease can affect the skin, heart, and rarely, the hepatobiliary or hematologic systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most severe form of neonatal lupus. In clinical practice it is important to distinguish in utero a complete from an incomplete atrioventricular block (AV) in order to render prompt care. We present the case of a new born female, who was diagnosed with an atrio-ventricular block at 26 weeksí gestation. When the baby was delivered at 38 weeksí gestation, she presented bradycardia (54 xí). On the suspicion of neonatal lupus, we required antinuclear antibodies, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B, which were positive. A bicameral pacemaker was placed uneventfully.

  9. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  10. Restrictive management of neonatal polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Morag, Iris; Strauss, Tzipora; Lubin, Daniel; Schushan-Eisen, Irit; Kenet, Gili; Kuint, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Partial exchange transfusion (PET) is traditionally suggested as treatment for neonates diagnosed with polycythemia. Nevertheless, justification of this treatment is controversial. We evaluated the risk for short-term complications associated with a restrictive treatment protocol for neonatal polycythemia. A retrospective cross-sectional analytical study was conducted. Three treatment groups were defined and managed according to their degree of polycythemia, defined by capillary tube filled with venous blood and manually centrifuged hematocrit: group 1, hematocrit 65 to 69% and no special treatment was recommended; group 2, hematocrit 70 to 75% and intravenous fluids were given and feedings were withheld until hematocrit decreased to < 70%; and group 3, hematocrit ≥ 76% or symptomatic neonates and PET was recommended. During the study period, 190 neonates were diagnosed with polycythemia. The overall rate of short-term complications was 15% (28 neonates). Seizures, proven necrotizing enterocolitis, or thrombosis did not occur in any participating neonates. PET was performed in 31 (16%) neonates. The groups did not differ in their rate of early neonatal morbidities or length of hospitalization. Restrictive treatment for neonatal asymptomatic polycythemia is not associated with an increased risk of short-term complications.

  11. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  12. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully.

  14. The conundrum of neonatal coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Revel-Vilk, Shoshana

    2012-01-01

    The maturation and postnatal development of the human coagulation system was first studied and described more than 20 years ago. These older studies, supported by more recent data, confirm the significant and important differences in the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis in neonates and young children compared with older children and adults. Subsequently, significant differences were also described in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in global in vitro tests for hemostasis. These differences, which mostly reflect the immaturity of the neonatal hemostasis system, are functionally balanced. Healthy neonates show no signs of easy bruising or other bleeding diathesis and no increased tendency to thrombosis for any given stimulus compared with adults. Systemic diseases may affect hemostasis, predisposing ill neonates to increased hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. The immaturity of the hemostasis system in preterm and very-low-birth-weight neonates may contribute to a higher risk for intraventricular hemorrhage. Therapies targeting the hemostasis system can be effective for preventing and treating these events. The concept of "neonatal coagulopathy" has an important impact on both the diagnosis and management of hemorrhagic or thrombotic events in neonates. For diagnosis of hemostasis disorders, diagnostic laboratories processing pediatric samples should use age-, analyzer-, and reagent-appropriate reference ranges. Age-specific guidelines should be followed for the management of neonates with hemostatic disorders.

  15. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neonatal drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Mark L; Tan, Rosemarie C

    2012-02-01

    Maternal use of certain drugs during pregnancy can result in transient neonatal signs consistent with withdrawal or acute toxicity or cause sustained signs consistent with a lasting drug effect. In addition, hospitalized infants who are treated with opioids or benzodiazepines to provide analgesia or sedation may be at risk for manifesting signs of withdrawal. This statement updates information about the clinical presentation of infants exposed to intrauterine drugs and the therapeutic options for treatment of withdrawal and is expanded to include evidence-based approaches to the management of the hospitalized infant who requires weaning from analgesics or sedatives.

  17. Eye pathologies in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nyaish; Mansoor, Tihami; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, newborn assessment incorporates a screening eye examination for any structural abnormalities, observation of neonate's visual behaviour and direct ophthalmoscopy examination looking for red reflex. Early identification and immediate management of eye related pathologies should commence soon after birth as early diagnosis and prompt intervention may have significant impact on the prognosis for many potentially blinding but treatable disorders such as congenital cataracts and retinoblastoma. If left undetected and untreated, such problems may potentially lead to irreversible damage to the vision which persists into adulthood resulting in lack of self-confidence together with difficulties in educational attainment and job opportunities. PMID:28003988

  18. Neonatal screening: ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hermerén, G

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the ethical issues raised by neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis and to propose a structure for the ethical analysis of these issues. The structure is based on an analysis of some of the most common shortcomings of ethical analyses. The structure needs to be supplemented by facts about the present state of the art concerning effects and costs of the various screening and treatment alternatives. Such information is provided by other contributions to these proceedings.

  19. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Sublett, Juli

    2013-03-01

    Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) occurs in infants exposed to opiates or illicit drugs during pregnancy. It can be severe and cause long hospital stays after birth and with symptoms up to 6 months after birth. Pharmacologic interventions are commonly used as treatment for NAS; however, their safety and efficacy are not fully recognized. Pharmacologic treatments for NAS include medications such as methadone, buprenorphine, morphine, and phenobarbital. Nonpharmacologic interventions and complementary therapies have been documented in neonates. However, there are gaps in the literature regarding use of these therapies for neonatal withdrawal. This article provides an overview of the possible risks, benefits, and outcomes of pharmacologic and complementary therapies in the neonatal population, and illustrates the gaps in knowledge related to their use for neonatal withdrawal.

  20. [Transient neonatal myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Licht, C; Model, P; Kribs, A; Herkenrath, P; Michalk, D V; Haupt, W F; Göhring, U J; Roth, B

    2002-08-01

    Ten to twenty percent of the offspring of mothers suffering from myasthenia gravis (MG) also develop transient neonatal MG, since maternal antibodies are able to cross the placenta. We report the course of two newborns of a mother with MG and a healthy father. The first pregnancy was complicated during the 3rd trimester by a hydramnion. The newborn presented with generalized muscle weakness, respiratory distress, weak sounding, anaemia, and poor sucking. Mechanical ventilation was necessary. Confirmation of the diagnosis was achieved by the result of repetitive muscle stimulation, showing a typical decrement in the EMG, and measurement of serum antiacetylcholin receptor antibodies. For 3 months, the infant was treated with neostigmin (cholinesterase inhibitor). After 26 days of hospitalization, the patient was released and followed up regularly. Myasthenic symptoms completely resolved. Side effects of the treatment were not observed. The course of the second pregnancy was normal. This second newborn was healthy. Our case report is remarkable for the very different presentation of two children of the same mother with MG during pregnancy and after delivery, with one child developing severe transient neonatal MG, initially requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment followed by quick recovery, and one child being healthy. We also present a score for monitoring the clinical course and adjusting anticholinesterase therapy accordingly.

  1. Outcome following neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Marlow, Neil; Rennie, Janet M

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are the most common manifestation of neurological disorders in the newborn period and an important determinant of outcome. Overall, for babies born at full term, mortality following seizures has improved in the last decade, typical current mortality rates being 10% (range: 7-16%), down from 33% in reports from the 1990s. By contrast, the prevalence of adverse neurodevelopmental sequelae remains relatively stable, typically 46% (range: 27-55%). The strongest predictors of outcome are the underlying cause, together with the background electroencephalographic activity. In preterm babies, for whom the outlook tends to be worse as background mortality and disability are high, seizures are frequently associated with serious underlying brain injury and therefore subsequent impairments. When attempting to define the prognosis for a baby with neonatal seizures, we propose a pathway involving history, examination, and careful consideration of all available results (ideally including brain magnetic resonance imaging) and the response to treatment before synthesizing the best estimate of risk to be conveyed to the family. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neonatal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B; Treharne, L

    2016-01-01

    A term neonate was born with a grossly swollen and discoloured left hand and forearm. He was transferred from the local hospital to the plastic surgical unit, where a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent emergency forearm fasciotomies at six hours of age. Following serial debridements of necrotic tissue, he underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the resultant defects of his forearm, hand and digits. At the clinic follow-up appointment two months after the procedure, he was found to have developed severe flexion contractures despite regular outpatient hand therapy and splintage. He has had further reconstruction with contracture release, use of artificial dermal matrix, and K-wire fixation of the thumb and wrist. Despite this, the long term outcome is likely to be an arm with poor function. The key learning point from this case is that despite prompt transfer, diagnosis and appropriate surgical management, the outcome for neonatal compartment syndrome may still be poor. PMID:27138850

  3. Hypernatremia in the Neonate: Neonatal Hypernatremia and Hypernatremic Dehydration in Neonates Receiving Exclusive Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Mujawar, Nilofer Salim; Jaiswal, Archana Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration in neonates receiving exclusive breastfeeding. Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia is a serious condition in the newborn period. We present infants with hypernatremic dehydration due to breast milk (BM) hypernatremia. Hypernatremic dehydration in breast-fed newborns is usually secondary to insufficient lactation. We present the neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration encountered between January and December, 2012, its causes and treatment. Methodology: This was a retrospective study. We analyzed records of babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit who were investigated and found to have hypernatremia and whose mother's BM sodium (BM Na) was done. Inclusion Criteria: (1) Babies with serum Na >145 meq/l, (2) euglycemia, (3) normocalcemic, (4) no clinical and lab evidence of sepsis, (5) exclusive breast feeds. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates not satisfying any mentioned criterion. Results: BM Na correlated strongly with neonatal hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed babies who did not otherwise have any risk factor. Conclusion: Elevated BM Na is an important etiological factor in neonatal hypernatremia. PMID:28197048

  4. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  5. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  6. Continuous electroencephalography monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Shellhaas, Renée A

    2012-08-01

    As more critically ill term and premature neonates are surviving their acute illness, their long-term neurodevelopmental morbidity is being recognized. Continuous monitoring of cerebral function, with electroencephalography or derived digital trends, can provide key information regarding seizures and background patterns, with direct treatment and prognostic implications. Conventional video-electroencephalography remains the gold standard for neonatal seizure diagnosis and quantification, but can be supplemented by digital trending modalities. Both conventional and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography can provide valuable data regarding the background trends. This review describes indications and methods for continuous electroencephalography monitoring in high-risk neonates.

  7. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  8. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  9. [Courses in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    The optimal management of newborns with asphyxia is closely associated with improved survival and a better quality of life without neuromotor handicaps. Therefore, the training of health professionals who are present at the time of birth in neonatal resuscitation should be a priority. In the present article, we present a program of training courses in neonatal resuscitation. This program has been designed for the training of health care providers and instructors in technical aspects of neonatal resuscitation. The type of courses, their contents and methodology are described.

  10. Management and outcomes of neonates with down syndrome admitted to neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Mann, Jake P; Statnikov, Eugene; Modi, Neena; Johnson, Nik; Springett, Anna; Morris, Joan K

    2016-06-01

    Neonates with Down syndrome have an increased risk of being admitted to a neonatal unit compared with unaffected neonates. We aimed to estimate the proportion of neonates with Down syndrome admitted to a neonatal unit and compare their management and outcomes with other neonatal admissions. Case-control study of neonates born from 2009 to 2011 admitted to 122 NHS Neonatal Units in England using data from the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register and the National Neonatal Research Database. For each neonate with Down syndrome, three neonates admitted to the same unit in the same month and born at the same gestation were identified. Forty-six percent of neonates with Down syndrome were admitted to a neonatal unit. Boys were more likely to be admitted than girls (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.0). Neonates with Down syndrome required more intensive or high dependency care compared with unaffected neonates (37% vs. 27%. p < 0.01) and stayed in neonatal units for longer (11 days vs. 5 days, p < 0.01). A total of 31% of neonates with Down syndrome required respiratory support compared with 22% (p < 0.001) of unaffected neonates, and 11% were discharged requiring oxygen supplementation compared with 3% (p < 0.001) of unaffected neonates. A total of 3% of neonates with Down syndrome died in a neonatal unit compared with 1% (p = 0.01) of unaffected neonates. Neonates with Down syndrome are more likely than unaffected neonates to be admitted to a neonatal unit, have a prolonged stay, and be discharged home on supplemental oxygen. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:468-474, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Natal and neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Seminario, Ana Lucía; Ivancaková, Romana

    2004-01-01

    Tooth eruption follows a chronology corresponding to the date when the tooth erupts into the oral cavity. This date has been established in the literature and is subject to small variations depending on hereditary, endocrine and environmental features. Any disturbance during the development of the teeth -systemic or local- can affect not only the morphology, structure of dental hard tissues or number of teeth but also the time of eruption. The presence of a tooth in the mouth at birth or during the first month of life has been studied and denominated as natal and neonatal teeth. The aim of this paper is to review current information on this topic and to give treatment alternatives if it is necessary.

  12. [Neonatal lupus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is a passively acquired autoimmune syndrome in which pathogenic autoantibodies (anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, and both, or rarely anti-U(1)RNP antibodies) are transmitted from a mother to her fetus through the placenta. The major clinical manifestations in the infants are cardiac (congenital heart block), dermatologic (skin lesion), hepatic (elevated hepatic enzymes), and hematologic (cytopenia). Congenital complete heart block (CCHB) is irreversible, while noncardiac manifestations are transient, resolving by one-year-old of age without specific treatments. Two prospective studies show that the prevalence of CCHB in children from a woman previously known to have anti-SSA/Ro antibodies is approximately 2%. However, when the previous pregnancy is complicated by CCHB and skin lesion, the recurrence rates of these symptoms go much higher to 10.5% and 26%, respectively, in the subsequent pregnancy.

  13. Neonatal sensitization to latex.

    PubMed

    Worth, J

    2000-05-01

    Babies born in delivery rooms of hospitals are exposed to latex through skin and mucous membrane contact with prepowdered latex gloves worn by midwives and doctors, and through the inhalation of latex-bound starch powder in the air of the delivery room. This paper examines the hypothesis that they are at risk for latex sensitization, and that part of the sharp increase of childhood asthma, eczema and anaphylaxis in the past 30-40 years may be linked. These possibilities seem hitherto unsuspected. In over 700 papers on latex allergy no mention of neonatal exposure to latex has been found. Even obstetric papers discussing the risks for an atopic mother (atopy - a tendency to develop allergies) do not seem to anticipate any risk for the baby, who might also be atopic. Latex allergy is primarily regarded as an occupational hazard. This paper suggests that it is a hazard for every baby handled by latex gloves at birth. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. [Neonatal seizures management].

    PubMed

    Roubertie, A; Masson, F; de Villepin-Touzery, A; Suau, B; Barbanel, G; Rideau, A; Cambonie, G

    2011-07-01

    For several decades, experimental studies have sought to explain the biological causes of newborn seizures and to assess the anatomical and functional consequences. Laboratory studies have shown that prolonged or repeated seizures disturb central nervous system development and may predispose to later epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Although these findings have not been clinically demonstrated in humans, several observations suggest that neonatal seizures have a deleterious effect on the immature brain and generate long-term sequelae. No therapeutic trial, however, has directly demonstrated the benefits of treatment, underlining the need for controlled studies that integrate the advances in electroencephalographic monitoring and pharmacology of anticonvulsant drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Bryan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    An explosion of work over the last decade has produced insight into the multiple hereditary causes of a nonimmunological form of diabetes diagnosed most frequently within the first 6 months of life. These studies are providing increased understanding of genes involved in the entire chain of steps that control glucose homeostasis. Neonatal diabetes is now understood to arise from mutations in genes that play critical roles in the development of the pancreas, of β-cell apoptosis and insulin processing, as well as the regulation of insulin release. For the basic researcher, this work is providing novel tools to explore fundamental molecular and cellular processes. For the clinician, these studies underscore the need to identify the genetic cause underlying each case. It is increasingly clear that the prognosis, therapeutic approach, and genetic counseling a physician provides must be tailored to a specific gene in order to provide the best medical care. PMID:18436707

  16. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  17. Serum immunoglobulins in Nigerian neonates.

    PubMed

    Akinwolere, O A; Akinkugbe, F M; Oyewole, A I; Salimonu, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins G, M and A levels were studied in 187 Nigerian neonates. Estimations were done by the radial immunodifusion method of Mancini. Immunoglobulin G shows a fall in value in the first few days of life to about 62% of the value in the last days of the neonatal period. There is however a gradual increase in the level of IgM to about double at the end of the neonatal period. IgA level remained relatively constantly low throughout this period. The effect of maternal education on the levels of immunoglobulins of their neonates was also investigated. This had a positive influence at the secondary educational level, affecting only the IgG and IgA.

  18. Parent Experience of Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the parent experience of caring for an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. In this mixed-methods study, we performed semistructured interviews with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parent experience of caring for a child with neonatal encephalopathy was characterized by 3 principal themes. Theme 1: Many families described cumulative loss and grief throughout the perinatal crisis, critical neonatal course, and subsequent missed developmental milestones. Theme 2: Families experienced entangled infant and broader family interests. Theme 3: Parents evolved into and found meaning in their role as an advocate. These data offer insight into the lived experience of parenting an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. Primary data from parents can serve as a useful framework to guide the development and interpretation of parent-centered outcomes.

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  20. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E.

    2014-01-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  1. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible.

  2. Singapore Neonatal Resuscitation Guidelines 2016

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Cheo Lian; Biswas, Agnihotri; Ee, Teong Tai Kenny; Chinnadurai, Amutha; Baral, Vijayendra Ranjan; Chang, Alvin Shang Ming; Ereno, Imelda Lustestica; Ho, Kah Ying Selina; Poon, Woei Bing; Shah, Varsha Atul; Quek, Bin Huey

    2017-01-01

    We present the revised Neonatal Resuscitation Guidelines for Singapore. The 2015 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Neonatal Task Force’s consensus on science and treatment recommendations (2015), and guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council were debated and discussed. The final recommendations of the National Resuscitation Council, Singapore, were derived after the task force had carefully reviewed the current available evidence in the literature and addressed their relevance to local clinical practice. PMID:28741001

  3. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  4. [Neonatal Volkmann's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dandurand, M; Michel, B; Fabre, C; Stoebner, P; Meunier, L

    2009-11-01

    , excessive maternal weight gain or diabetes. Our case emphasized three main points. First, the diagnostic value of early MR angiography in the event of associated extensive tissue oedema, multiple arterial compression and decreased vascular perfusion. Second, the role of shoulder dystocia in triggering the traumatic factor reported for the first time. Third, the role of neuroleptic and anxiolytic treatments taken by the mother during pregnancy. Prazepam is a long-acting benzodiazepine that can cause impregnation and withdraw syndromes in neonates. Impregnation "floppy infant syndrome" is an early event characterized by hypotonia, hypoventilation and lethargy. Hypotonia and decreased foetal movements may favour prolonged pressures and malposition with secondary crush injury during delivery. Maternal medication has not been cited hitherto as an aetiological factor in neonatal compartment syndrome.

  5. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  6. Neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Naoto; Sumitomo, Naofumi; Miura, Masaru; Shibuya, Kazuhiko; Nagai, Hiroshi; Goto, Mikako; Murashima, Atsuko

    2017-01-01

      Neonatal lupus (NL), a passively-acquired autoimmune disease associated with maternal anti-SSA antibody, presents both cardiac manifestations such as cardiac NL and non-cardiac manifestations including rashes, cytopenia, and hepatic abnormalities. Cardiac NL, occurring in 1-2% of anti-SS-A antibody-positive mothers, is a life-threatening complication with a mortality rate of 20% and a pacemaker implantation rate of 70%. In contrast, cutaneous NL, which is more common than cardiac NL, usually resolves in six months. Since half of NL cases occur in asymptomatic mothers, if an infant presents characteristic cutaneous or cardiac manifestations of NL, the mother should be tested for anti-SS-A antibody. In mothers positive for anti-SS-A antibody, the risk of having a child with cardiac NL increases ten-fold and five-fold for a previous child with cardiac NL and cutaneous NL, respectively. A joint American, British, and French retrospective study of NL registries showed that hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) reduced the cardiac NL risk in subsequent pregnancies in mothers who previously had a child with cardiac NL. A prospective open-label study to confirm this effect is being undertaken in the USA. A similar prospective multi-center study will be undertaken in Japan. Establishing a Japanese registry of children with NL and subsequent pregnancies of their mothers will help promote clinical research in NL in Japan.

  7. Neonatal invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Stronati, M; Decembrino, L

    2006-12-01

    Over the last two decades, systemic fungal infections have emerged to play a primary role in hospital-acquired infections. C. albicans is involved in 75% of neonatal candidiasis; however, the incidence of infection from C. parapsilosis is also increasing significantly. The higher incidence observed in the high-risk group of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants is linked to their special physical characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures they undergo. Colonization is a relevant risk factor depending on the colonized site , the fungal species and the type of colonization. Serological tests have a low specificity and sensitivity; in many cases, they do not distinguish between colonization and infection. Blood culture, although the best diagnostic test for determining systemic infection, can result negative, even in cases of deep organ involvement. In addition, fungi grow more slowly than bacteria in cultures. So, the difficulty in diagnosing systemic candidiasis and its aspecific clinical features may make empirical therapy appropriate. Amphotericin B (AmB) alone or combined with 5-fluorocytosine remains the drug of choice. Fluconazole represents a valid alternative. Recently developed new formulations of amphotericin incapsulated in liposomes can avoid possible adverse effects. Prognosis depends on the specific micro-organism involved; mortality is higher in the presence of C. albicans. As prognosis is associated with high mortality, prevention measures to reduce risk factors are of critical importance.

  8. Porcine Neonatal Coccidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, S. E.; Josephson, G. K. A.

    1981-01-01

    Coccidia were identified in intestinal sections from 82 piglets comprising 37 consignments from 34 farms, and represented a yearly increasing incidence in the three years 1978 to 1980. Piglets were primarily from medium to large farms with intensive, continuous-farrowing, confinement-rearing programs. Piglets, usually five days to 15 days old, had yellow, fluid diarrhea, became unthrifty and sometimes died. In six piglets from two farms, a green, adherent, fibrinonecrotic membrane was seen throughout most of the jejunum and ileum. Significant gross lesions were not observed in the other 76 piglets. Moderate to severe villous atrophy of jejunum and ileum was seen histologically. Various asexual and sexual stages of coccidia were seen within parasitophorous vacuoles of villar epithelial cells. Multifocal erosions with necrosis of villar tips and occasionally more diffuse mucosal necrosis with fibrinocellular exudate were seen. Isospora suis oocysts were identified in feces from several weaners from one farm. Amprolium and decoquinate mixed in the sow ration at 1 kg/tonne for three weeks prior to and postfarrowing was moderately successful in stopping outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea associated with coccidiosis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7343074

  9. Safety of neonatal phototherapy lamp exposure.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Douglas McG; Satodia, P; Hadley, Ian

    2016-12-01

    A routine review of light exposure within a neonatal intensive care unit is described following the introduction of a new model of neonatal phototherapy lamp. Spectral measurements were undertaken using a Bentham Dmc150 spectroradiometer system. Safety assessments were undertaken based on likely exposure of parents at the cot side, neonates in adjacent cots and the effectiveness of eye protection for neonates with direct phototherapy. An aphakic eye response was used for assessment of neonatal risk and the blue-light response for estimation of adult exposure using current ICNIRP guidelines. Such estimations indicated exposure levels of parents at the cot side and neonates in adjacent cots were within current established safe limits. The level of light blocking provided by the available neonatal eye protection was estimated to be entirely adequate and presented no hazard to the infant when correctly positioned over the neonate. It is likely, however, that an increased safety factor is potentially present for the neonate due to the fact that the neonate's eyes will typically be shut for over 50% of the time. It is identified, however, that the aphakic response is essentially associated with mature adult retinal cells, and that the maturing cells of the neonate may exhibit additional light sensitivity, especially in the case of premature infants. Changes in neonatal physiology associated with neonatal phototherapy are discussed, which may influence mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage.

  10. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %.

  11. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P

    1994-09-01

    Neonatal lupus continues to generate considerable interest despite its rarity; more than 15 original contributions were made to the literature in the past year. Diverse aspects of this "syndrome" of passively acquired autoimmunity have been covered. Experiments using a rabbit model provided insights into the pathogenicity of maternal anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B antibodies. Perfusion of rabbit hearts with anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B sera resulted in conduction abnormalities in whole adult rabbit hearts and induced a reduction in the peak slow inward current in patch-clamp experiments of isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, suggesting involvement of calcium channels. Clinical investigations are moving away from case reports, and recent studies now include substantial entries. Assuming that patients reported from the United States, Finland, and England are all separate, sera from at least 100 different mothers of infants with congenital heart block have been studied. Although there is apparently no serologic profile that is unique to mothers of affected children, compared with mothers of healthy children, anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies (anti-52-kD antibodies are more prevalent by immunoblot in congenital heart block, although all these sera are likely to have anti-60-kD antibodies by immunoprecipitation) are usually of high titer and associated with anti-La/SS-B antibodies. To date, the only maternal autoantibodies that have been associated with congenital heart block recognize Ro/SS-A or La/SS-B antigens. Mothers of affected infants are often asymptomatic, and when symptomatic, the clinical features are frequently characteristic of Sjögren's syndrome. Although treatment of affected fetuses with dexamethasone has successfully diminished associated effusions, there has been no report of reversal of established third-degree heart block.

  12. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  13. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  14. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  15. Neurophysiological aspects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) has been increasingly used and proved useful in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for the management of neonatal seizures. It does not replace, but is supplementary to standard EEG. This article reviews some of findings obtained with standard EEGs, and tries to interpret them with recent findings in the field of basic science. Seizures mainly occur in active-REM sleep in neonates. This is in sharp contrast to those in older children and adults, in whom epileptic seizures occur mainly in NREM sleep. This may be explained by neurotransmitter effects on sleep mechanisms of the neonatal brain that are different from those of older individuals. When all clinical seizures have no electrical correlates, they are non-epileptic, but when the correlation between clinical seizures and frequent electrical discharges are inconsistent, they should rather be considered epileptic, reflecting progression of status epilepticus causing electro-clinical dissociation. Electro-clinical dissociation is not a characteristic of neonatal seizures per se, but a feature of prolonged status epilepticus in adults as well as children. It occurs when prolonged status epilepticus itself causes a progressively severe encephalopathy, or when status occurs in the presence of a severe underlying encephalopathy. In neonates without pre-existing brain damage, frequent seizures per se may cause mild depression characterized by the loss of high voltage slow patterns, an important constituent of slow wave sleep reflecting cortico-cortical connectivity. Mild depression only in the acute stage is not associated with neurological sequelae, but previously damaged brain may be more vulnerable than normal brain.

  16. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  17. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Neonatal Resuscitation: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Bosco A.; Kraftcheck, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    All medical personnel participating in obstetrical deliveries have the obligation to anticipate potential neonatal problems and to maintain competence in newborn resuscitation. This step-by-step demonstration of neonatal resuscitation is applicable to both community and teaching hospitals. ImagesStep 1Step 2Step 3Step 4Step 5Step 6Step 7Step 8Step 9Step 10Step 11Step 12Step 13Step 14Step 15Step 16Step 17Step 18Step 19Step 20Step 21Step 22Step 23Step 24Step 25Step 26Step 27Step 28Step 29Step 30Step 31Step 32Step 33Step 34 PMID:21248905

  19. Reference Intervals in Neonatal Hematology.

    PubMed

    Henry, Erick; Christensen, Robert D

    2015-09-01

    The various blood cell counts of neonates must be interpreted in accordance with high-quality reference intervals based on gestational and postnatal age. Using very large sample sizes, we generated neonatal reference intervals for each element of the complete blood count (CBC). Knowledge of whether a patient has CBC values that are too high (above the upper reference interval) or too low (below the lower reference interval) provides important insights into the specific disorder involved and in many instances suggests a treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Are male neonates more vulnerable to neonatal abstinence syndrome than female neonates?

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Annemarie; Jagsch, Reinhold; Baewert, Andjela; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Martin, Peter R.; Coyle, Mara; Fischer, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Objective Prior studies have shown an increased vulnerability among males, to adverse outcomes during the postnatal period. The majority of children exposed to opioids and other medication in utero develop a neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), yet individual predisposition for NAS is poorly understood. This investigation examines the role of neonatal sex in the postnatal period, for neonates exposed to standardized opioid maintenance treatment in utero with a focus on the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) regarding severity, medication requirements and duration. Patients and Methods This is a secondary analysis of data collected in a prospective randomized, double-blind, double-dummy multi-center trial examining the comparative safety and efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine during pregnancy (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental research MOTHER – study). 131 neonates born to opioid-dependent women randomized at six US sites (n=74) and one European site (n=37) were analyzed. Sex-based differences in birth weight, length, head circumference, NAS duration, NAS severity, and treatment parameters of full-term neonates were assessed. Results Males had a significantly higher birth weight (p=0.027) and head circumference (p=0.017) than females, with no significant sex difference in rates of preterm delivery. No significant sex-related differences were found for NAS development, severity, duration, or medication administered with non significant differences in concomitant drug consumption during pregnancy (p =0.959). Conclusions This unique prospective study shows similar postnatal vulnerability for both sexes, suggesting that factors other than sex are the major determinants of clinically significant NAS. PMID:22088886

  1. Neonatal EEG audification for seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Temko, Andriy; Marnane, William; Boylan, Geraldine; O'Toole, John M; Lightbody, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Technologies for automated detection of neonatal seizures are gradually moving towards cot-side implementation. The aim of this paper is to present an alternative way to visualize the output of a neonatal seizure detection algorithm. For this purpose audified neonatal EEG is considered. The EEG is audified with the aid of the neonatal seizure detection algorithm which selects the representative channels for stereo audio image and controls the signal gain. A survey on the usefulness and accuracy of the presented audification method has been performed. The results of the audification method compare favourably to that of using amplitude integrated EEG for detection of neonatal seizures.

  2. Arginine production in the neonate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  3. Communication Challenges in Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2016-09-01

    Families must process complex information related to neonatal encephalopathy and therapeutic hypothermia. In this mixed methods study, semi-structured interviews were performed with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parental experience of communicating with clinicians was characterized by 3 principle themes. Theme 1 highlighted that a fragmented communication process mirrored the chaotic maternal and neonatal course. Parents often received key information about neonatal encephalopathy and therapeutic hypothermia from maternal clinicians. Infant medical information was often given to 1 family member (60%), who felt burdened by the responsibility to relay that information to others. Families universally valued the role of the bedside nurse, who was perceived as the primary source of communication for most (75%) families. Theme 2 encompassed the challenges of discussing the complex therapy of therapeutic hypothermia: families appreciated clinicians who used lay language and provided written material, and they often felt overwhelmed by technical information that made it hard to understand the "big picture" of their infant's medical course. Theme 3 involved the uncertain prognosis after neonatal encephalopathy. Parents appreciated specific expectations about their infant's long-term development, and experienced long-term distress about prognostic uncertainty. Communicating complex and large volumes of information in the midst of perinatal crisis presents inherent challenges for both clinicians and families. We identified an actionable set of communication challenges that can be addressed with targeted interventions. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. [Top five neonatal articles 2015].

    PubMed

    Flamant, C; Fischer Fumeaux, C J

    2016-09-01

    This review includes five randomized controlled trials, published in the Medline database in 2015, which were selected by the Scientific commission of the French society of neonatology, taking into account their influence in perinatology. This selection was presented during the specific "Top five" session in the French congress of neonatal research.

  5. Neonatal haemoglobinopathy screening in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Gulbis, B; Cotton, F; Ferster, A; Ketelslegers, O; Dresse, M F; Rongé-Collard, E; Minon, J M; Lé, P Q; Vertongen, F

    2009-01-01

    A neonatal haemoglobinopathy screening programme was implemented in Brussels more than a decade ago and in Liège 5 years ago; the programme was adapted to the local situation. Neonatal screening for haemoglobinopathies was universal, performed using liquid cord blood and an isoelectric focusing technique. All samples with abnormalities underwent confirmatory testing. Major and minor haemoglobinopathies were reported. Affected children were referred to a specialist centre. A central database in which all screening results were stored was available and accessible to local care workers. A central clinical database to monitor follow-up is under construction. A total of 191,783 newborns were screened. One hundred and twenty-three (1:1559) newborns were diagnosed with sickle cell disease, seven (1:27,398) with beta thalassaemia major, five (1:38,357) with haemoglobin H disease, and seven (1:27,398) with haemoglobin C disease. All major haemoglobinopathies were confirmed, and follow-up of the infants was undertaken except for three infants who did not attend the first medical consultation despite all efforts. The universal neonatal screening programme was effective because no case of major haemoglobinopathy was identified after the neonatal period. The affected children received dedicated medical care from birth. The screening programme, and specifically the reporting of minor haemoglobinopathies, has been an excellent health education tool in Belgium for more than 12 years.

  6. Immunology of neonatal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2007-10-01

    Gene therapy could result in the permanent correction or amelioration of the clinical manifestations of many genetic diseases. However, immune responses to the therapeutic protein pose a significant hurdle for successful gene therapy. Problematic immune responses can include the development of a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response that results in the destruction of genetically-modified cells and/or the formation of antibodies directed against the therapeutic protein. One approach to avoid an immune response is to perform gene therapy in newborns, which takes advantage of the fact that the immune system is relatively immature at birth. This approach has been highly effective in mice, and has resulted in stable expression without antibody formation for proteins that are highly immunogenic after transfer to adults. High levels of expression after neonatal gene therapy were more effective at inducing tolerance than low levels of expression in mice, which suggests that high antigen levels are more efficient at inducing tolerance. A criticism of this approach is that the murine immune system is less mature at birth than the immune systems of larger animals. Indeed, neonatal gene therapy to cats with mucopolysaccharidosis I resulted in a CTL response that destroyed expressing cells. Nevertheless, the immune system was still relatively immature, as transient administration of a single immunosuppressive agent at the time of neonatal gene therapy resulted in stable expression. Neonatal administration can reduce, but not eliminate, immune responses after gene therapy.

  7. Time Perception during Neonatal Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Res, Giulia; Sordino, Desiree; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Weiner, Gary; Cavallin, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of time perception during a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participants in 5 neonatal resuscitation program courses were directly involved in a complex simulation scenario. They were asked to assume the role of team leader, assistant 1, or assistant 2. At the end of the scenario, each participant completed a questionnaire on perceived time intervals for key resuscitation interventions. During the scenario, actual times were documented by an external observer and video recorded for later review. In addition, participants were asked to evaluate their self-perceived level of stress and preparation. Health care providers (68 physicians and 40 nurses) were involved in 36 scenarios. Perceived time intervals for the initiation of key resuscitation interventions were shorter than the actual time intervals, regardless of the participant's role in the scenario. Self-assessed levels of stress and preparation did not influence time perception. Health care providers underestimate the passage of time, irrespective of their role in a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participant's self-assessed levels of stress and preparation were not related to the accuracy of their time perception. These findings highlight the importance of assigning a dedicated individual to document interventions and the passage of time during a neonatal resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Steven; Allegaert, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aims to integrate drug measurement results into clinical decision making. The basic rules apply when using TDM in neonates (aminoglycosides, vancomycin, phenobarbital, digoxin), but additional factors should also be taken into account. First, due to both pharmacokinetic variability and non-pharmacokinetic factors, the correlation between dosage and concentration is poor in neonates, but can be overcome with the use of more complex, validated dosing regimens. Second, the time to reach steady state is prolonged, especially when no loading dose is used. Consequently, the timing of TDM sampling is important in this population. Third, the target concentration may be uncertain (vancomycin) or depend on specific factors (phenobarbital during whole body cooling). Finally, because of differences in matrix composition (eg, protein, bilirubin), assay-related inaccuracies may be different in neonates. We anticipate that complex validated dosing regimens, with subsequent TDM sampling and Bayesian forecasting, are the next step in tailoring pharmacotherapy to individual neonates. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Type V hyperlipoproteinaemia in neonates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G N; Knight, A J; Craig, I H; Bresson, J L

    1987-09-01

    A boy investigated for neonatal jaundice was noted to have lipaemic serum and was subsequently shown to have type V hyperlipoproteinaemia. Dietary treatment was maintained for five years and he followed a typical clinical course. Circumstantial evidence suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.

  11. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  12. Neonatal hypoglycaemia: learning from claims

    PubMed Central

    Hawdon, Jane M; Beer, Jeanette; Sharp, Deborah; Upton, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a potential cause of neonatal morbidity, and on rare but tragic occasions causes long-term neurodevelopmental harm with consequent emotional and practical costs for the family. The organisational cost to the NHS includes the cost of successful litigation claims. The purpose of the review was to identify themes that could alert clinicians to common pitfalls and thus improve patient safety. Design The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) Claims Management System was reviewed to identify and review 30 claims for injury secondary to neonatal hypoglycaemia, which were notified to the NHS LA between 2002 and 2011. Setting NHS LA. Patients Anonymised documentation relating to 30 neonates for whom claims were made relating to neonatal hypoglycaemia. Dates of birth were between 1995 and 2010. Interventions Review of documentation held on the NHS LA database. Main outcome measures Identifiable risk factors for hypoglycaemia, presenting clinical signs, possible deficits in care, financial costs of litigation. Results All claims related to babies of at least 36 weeks’ gestation. The most common risk factor for hypoglycaemia was low birth weight or borderline low birth weight, and the most common reported presenting sign was abnormal feeding behaviour. A number of likely deficits in care were reported, all of which were avoidable. In this 10-year reporting period, there were 25 claims for which damages were paid, with a total financial cost of claims to the NHS of £162 166 677. Conclusions Acknowledging that these are likely to be the most rare but most seriously affected cases, the clinical themes arising from these cases should be used for further development of training and guidance to reduce harm and redivert NHS funds from litigation to direct care. PMID:27553590

  13. Assessing neonates for neonatal abstinence: are you reliable?

    PubMed

    DʼApolito, Karen C

    2014-01-01

    Nationally, there has been a steady increase in the number of infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome or drug withdrawal. Many of these infants remain in the hospital because their signs of withdrawal require pharmacologic management. The length of hospital stay can range from 1 week to several months depending on the severity of withdrawal. One way to decrease the length of stay and reduce the cost of care is to discharge the infant from the hospital sooner. To discharge infants sooner, their neonatal abstinence syndrome must be accurately assessed so that appropriate pharmacologic management can be administered. One way to increase the accuracy of assessing withdrawal signs is to implement an interobserver reliability protocol. This approach will allow healthcare professionals to gain consistency and accuracy in assessing infants for signs of withdrawal that may facilitate earlier discharge from the hospital.

  14. Are male neonates more vulnerable to neonatal abstinence syndrome than female neonates?

    PubMed

    Unger, Annemarie; Jagsch, Reinhold; Bäwert, Andjela; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Martin, Peter R; Coyle, Mara; Fischer, Gabriele

    2011-12-01

    Prior studies have shown an increased vulnerability among males to adverse outcomes during the postnatal period. Most children exposed to opioids and other medications in utero develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), yet individual predisposition for NAS is poorly understood. This investigation examined the role of neonatal sex in the postnatal period for neonates exposed to standardized opioid maintenance treatment in utero with a focus on NAS regarding severity, medication requirements, and duration. This was a secondary analysis of data collected in a prospective randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter trial (MOTHER study) that examined the comparative safety and efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine during pregnancy. A total of 131 neonates born to opioid-dependent women randomized at 6 US sites (n = 74) and 1 European site (n = 37) were analyzed. Sex-based differences in birth weight, length, head circumference, NAS duration, NAS severity, and treatment parameters of full-term neonates were assessed. Males had a significantly higher birth weight (P = 0.027) and head circumference (P = 0.017) compared with females, with no significant sex difference in rates of preterm delivery. No significant sex-related differences were found for NAS development, severity, or duration, or medication administered, and there were no significant differences in concomitant drug consumption during pregnancy (P = 0.959). This unique prospective study shows similar postnatal vulnerability for both sexes, suggesting that factors other than sex are the major determinants of clinically significant NAS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT 00271219. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology of early neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, N K; Bharambe, M S; Garg, B S; Mathur, J S; Goswami, K

    1994-01-01

    During 1981-1991 at a rural teaching hospital (Kasturba Hospital) of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Sevagram, Wardha, India, 454 of 13,939 newborns died during the early neonatal period for an early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) of 33.7/1000 live births. The ENMR for boys was not significantly different from that for girls (36.1 vs. 28.6). Community medicine specialists analyzed data on these early neonatal deaths to examine distribution of early neonatal mortality, especially its relationship with prematurity, low birth weight, birth order, and by sex. They calculated average percent deaths (APD) per hour to examine the dynamics in early neonatal mortality. The mean age at death was lower among newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (23.47 vs. 26.85 hours; p 0.001). ENMR was higher for newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (41.74% vs. 27.35%; P 0.001). The mean age at death increased as gestation increased (10.34 for 28 weeks; 24.27 for 28-33 weeks, 31.53 for 33-37 weeks, and 34.43 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). ENMR decreased as gestation increased (850 for 28 weeks; 375 for 28-33 weeks, 147.02 for 33-37 weeks, and 8.77 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). The mean age at death increased as birth weight increased for newborns weighing less than 1500 gms through 2000-2500 gms (23.36-37.13 hours; p 0.001). It was lowest among those weighing more 3000 gms (11.55 gms). ENMR fell as birth weight increased (614.33 for 1500 gms, 116.19 for 1500-2000 gms, 19.38 for 2000-2500 gms, 10.99 for 2500-3000 gms, and 5.41 for 3000 gms; p 0.001). The APD/hour for the first hour of life was 3.74% for a relative risk of 12.9. It decreased steadily as the hours of life increased (3.08% for 1-6 hours, 1.19% for 6-24 hours, 0.67% for 24-72 hours, and 0.29% for 72-168 hours). Knowledge of time of likely death can help providers know where they need to focus their attention to prevent early neonatal deaths.

  16. [Heart surgery in neonates (experience with surgery in 420 neonates)].

    PubMed

    Hucín, B; Tláskal, T; Horváth, P; Kostelka, M; Kucera, V; Tax, P; Reich, O; Chaloupecký, V; Skovránek, J; Kopecká, L

    1994-03-01

    In the child cardiocentre in Prague 5-Motol in 1977-1993 a total of 420 neonates with critical inborn heart disease were operated. Obstructive defects of the left heart were found in 178 children, obstructive defects of the right heart in 87, defects with a left-right shunt with pulmonary hypertension in 75, conotruncal malformations in 73 and various operations were made in 7 children. Complete repair of the defect was achieved in 281 neonates, incl. 104 where extracorporeal circulation was used. Palliative operations were made in 139 children. Early mortality during the entire period was 26%, whereby a decrease from 40% to 16% was recorded during the last three years. At present it is possible to repair permanently critical inborn heart disease in the majority of neonates. This is made possible in particular by early non-invasive diagnosis, treatment with prostaglandins E in duct-dependent critical heart disease, optimal time for and selection of most suitable surgery, microsurgical technique, miniaturization of extracorporeal circulation and the method of deep hypothermia.

  17. Forecasting hemoglobinopathy burden through neonatal screening in Omani neonates.

    PubMed

    Alkindi, Salam; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Al Madhani, Ali; Daar, Shahina; Al Haddabi, Hamood; Al Abri, Qamariya; Gravell, David; Berbar, Tsouria; Pravin, Sahaya; Pathare, Anil; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of hemoglobinopathies in Omani subjects and to forecast its future burden on health resources, we initiated a prospective neonatal screening program in two major cities of the Sultanate of Oman. Consecutive cord blood samples from a total of 7,837 neonates were analyzed for complete blood counts and for hemoglobin (Hb) profile by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). No case with Hb H (beta4) was detected. We observed that the overall incidence of alpha-thalassemia (alpha-thal) was 48.5% [based on the presence of Hb Bart's (gamma4)] and the beta-globin-related abnormalities accounted for 9.5% of the samples (4.8% sickle cell trait, 2.6% beta-thal trait, 0.9% Hb E trait, 0.8% Hb D trait, 0.08% Hb C trait, 0.3% sickle cell disease and 0.08% homozygous beta-thal). This is also the first large study to establish reference ranges of cord red blood cell (RBC) indices for Omani neonates.

  18. Contralateral hemimicrencephaly in neonatal hemimegalencephaly.

    PubMed

    Shiroishi, Mark S; Jackson, Hollie A; Nelson, Marvin D; Bluml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2010-11-01

    Identification of abnormalities in the contralateral hemisphere in patients with hemimegalencephaly is critical in their management. In this report, we present a 5-day-old neonate with hemimegalencephaly who demonstrated an enlarged ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere and diffuse volume loss in the contralateral hemisphere on conventional MR imaging sequences. The ipsilateral frontal white matter demonstrated relatively increased NAA, fractional anistropy, and cerebral blood volume values compared to published normative data. In addition, the white matter of the contralateral hemisphere demonstrated elevated lactate and increased mean diffusivity compared to published normative data, supporting the abnormal conventional MR findings. Advanced MR neuroimaging techniques may help further confirm and characterize abnormalities in the smaller contralateral hemisphere in neonatal hemimegalencephaly.

  19. Treatment Effects on Neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rawad; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-10-01

    Conventional EEG and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography are used in neonates to assess prognosis and significant changes in brain activity. Neuroactive medications and hypothermia can influence brain activity and therefore alter EEG interpretation. There are limited studies on the effect of these therapies on neonatal EEG background activity. Medication effects on the EEG or amplitude-integrated electroencephalography include increased interburst interval duration, voltage suppression, and sleep disruption. The effect is transient in term newborns but can be persistent in premature newborns. Although therapeutic hypothermia does not produce significant changes in EEG activity, it does change the time point at which EEG can accurately predict neurodevelopmental outcome. It is important to account for these effects on the EEG to avoid inaccurate interpretation that may affect prognostication.

  20. Neonatal Pustular Dermatosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions. PMID:25814724

  1. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  2. Neonatal and pediatric esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal perforation (EP) is a rare complication that is often iatrogenic in origin. In contrast with adult patients in whom surgical closure of the defect is preferred, nonoperative treatment has become a common therapeutic approach for EP in neonates and children. Principles of management pediatric EP includes rapid diagnosis, appropriate hemodynamic monitoring and support, antibiotic therapy, total parenteral nutrition, control of extraluminal contamination, and restoration of luminal integrity either through time or operative approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Myasis occuring in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Obasa, Temitope O.; Sowunmi, Funmilola Olusola

    2012-01-01

    Myasis is the infestation of skin by larvae or maggots of a variety of flies. It is a condition that occurs more commonly in adults who are living and/or have visited tropical countries. It rarely occurs in neonates, and even when seen, only few larvae are extracted. This case report describes myasis occurring in an 11-day-old female who had 47 larvae in her skin. PMID:23355934

  4. Morphine Enhances HIV Infection of Neonatal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Mooney, Kathy; Song, Li; Wang, Xu; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Savani, Rashmin C.; Metzger, David S.; Douglas, Steven D.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal transmission of HIV accounts for almost all new HIV infections in children. There is an increased risk of perinatal transmission of HIV with maternal illicit substance abuse. Little is known about neonatal immune system alteration and subsequent susceptibility to HIV infection after morphine exposure. We investigated the effects of morphine on HIV infection of neonatal monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Morphine significantly enhanced HIV infection of neonatal MDM. Morphine-induced HIV replication in neonatal MDM was completely suppressed by naltrexone, the opioid receptor antagonist. Morphine significantly up-regulated CCR5 receptor expression and inhibited the endogenous production of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in neonatal MDM. Thus, morphine, most likely through alteration of β-chemokines and CCR5 receptor expression, enhances the susceptibility of neonatal MDM to HIV infection, and may have a cofactor role in perinatal HIV transmission and infection. PMID:12736382

  5. Burkholderia cepacia sepsis among neonates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saikat; Bhat Y, Ramesh; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Purakayastha, Jayashree; Sivaramaraju, V Vamsi; Kalwaje E, Vandana; Mishra, Swathi

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a rare cause of sepsis in newborns and its transmission involves human contact with heavily contaminated medical devices and disinfectants. The authors aimed to determine epidemiology, clinical features, antibiotic sensitivity pattern, complications and outcome of blood culture proven B. cepacia infections in 12 neonates. All neonates were outborn, 5 preterm and 7 term. B. cepacia was isolated from blood in all and concurrently from CSF in three neonates. Lethargy and respiratory distress (41.7 %) were major presenting features. Five newborns (41.7 %) required mechanical ventilation for 3-7 d. Highest bacterial susceptibility was observed for meropenem (100 %), followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (all 83 %), ceftazidime (75 %) and ciprofloxacin (42 %). Piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole either singly or in combination led to complete recovery of 11 (91.7 %) newborns; one developed hydrocephalus. Eight of nine infants who completed 6 mo follow up were normal. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy for B. cepacia infection results in complete recovery in majority.

  6. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  7. Which Biomarkers Reveal Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Bhandari, Vineet; Chepustanova, Sofya; Huber, Greg; O′Hara, Stephen; O′Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Kirby, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We address the identification of optimal biomarkers for the rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. We employ both canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and sparse support vector machine (SSVM) classifiers to select the best subset of biomarkers from a large hematological data set collected from infants with suspected sepsis from Yale-New Haven Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). CCA is used to select sets of biomarkers of increasing size that are most highly correlated with infection. The effectiveness of these biomarkers is then validated by constructing a sparse support vector machine diagnostic classifier. We find that the following set of five biomarkers capture the essential diagnostic information (in order of importance): Bands, Platelets, neutrophil CD64, White Blood Cells, and Segs. Further, the diagnostic performance of the optimal set of biomarkers is significantly higher than that of isolated individual biomarkers. These results suggest an enhanced sepsis scoring system for neonatal sepsis that includes these five biomarkers. We demonstrate the robustness of our analysis by comparing CCA with the Forward Selection method and SSVM with LASSO Logistic Regression. PMID:24367543

  8. Neonatal asphyxia and forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    d'Aloja, E; Müller, M; Paribello, F; Demontis, R; Faa, A

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades, the scientific literature addressing neonatal encephalopathy has grown in a logarithmic way and malpractice claims in obstetrics and neonatology have become a major threat to the health service. At the moment, scientific evidence are insufficient to clearly identify in each single case whether the hypoxic insult has developed in the course of labor or in the first few hours after the birth or, otherwise, whether the damage has to recognize a remote and long-lasting cause acting during pregnancy. Several authors feel that this scientific uncertainty leads to a higher percentage of civil suit decisions prone to recognizing a guilty medical behavior, and they wish a more in-depth analysis of all these cases to clearly identify all the data either in favor or in contrary to the assumption of the existence of a causal correlation between neonatal encephalopathy and medical misbehavior. This article will focus on the medico-legal approach to a hypoxic-ischemic event in the perinatal period, addressing the relevant data to be collected in order to establish the medical and juridical cause of the neonatal damage.

  9. Transient pseudohypoparathyroidism of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, M; Yasuda, T; Kobayashi, Y; Niimi, H

    1995-08-01

    We report three neonates with transient hypoparathyroidism with elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels to clarify further the pathogenesis of late neonatal hypocalcemia and calcium homeostasis. Clinical signs were seizures starting at age of 10 and 11 days. The biochemical features were characterized by transient hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia due to a high transport maximum of the phosphate/glomerular filtration rate, despite high PTH levels. All had normal magnesium and calcidiol levels (at least 5 micrograms/l) for their age, and this precludes hypoparathyroidism due to low magnesium levels and hyperparathyroidism due to overt vitamin D deficiency. To diagnose pseudohypoparathyroidism type I, intravenous human PTH (1-34) infusions were performed; however, they showed brisk responses of plasma and/or urine cyclic AMP in response to the PTH infusion, but the phosphaturic response to the PTH was sluggish compared to the controls. All three showed an increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting PTH stimulation of osteoblasts. They were treated initially with calcium lactate or (1 alpha)-hydroxycalciol/calcitriol. Their hypoparathyroid condition, however, was transient; they maintained normal serum calcium and PTH levels without medication before the age of 6 months. The etiology, possibly intracellular signal transduction distal to cyclic AMP and/or distinct from adenylate cyclase in the kidney, is developmental and the condition was resolved completely within 6 months of age. We have termed this condition "transient pseudohypoparathyroidism of the neonate".

  10. Management of Shock in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhat, B Vishnu; Plakkal, Nishad

    2015-10-01

    Shock is characterized by inadequate oxygen delivery to the tissues, and is more frequent in very low birth weight infants, especially in the first few days of life. Shock is an independent predictor of mortality, and the survivors are at a higher risk of neurologic impairment. Understanding the pathophysiology helps to recognize and classify shock in the early compensated phase and initiate appropriate treatment. Hypovolemia is rarely the primary cause of shock in neonates. Myocardial dysfunction is especially common in extremely preterm infants, and in term infants with perinatal asphyxia. Blood pressure measurements are easy, but correlate poorly with cerebral and systemic blood flows. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound can help in individualized assessment of problems, selecting appropriate therapy and monitoring response, but may not always be available, and long-term benefits need to be demonstrated. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy to guide treatment of neonatal shock is currently experimental. In the absence of hypovolemia, excessive administration of fluid boluses is inappropriate therapy. Dobutamine and dopamine are the most common initial inotropes used in neonatal shock. Dobutamine has been shown to improve systemic blood flow, especially in very low birth weight infants, but dopamine is better at improving blood pressure in hypotensive infants. Newer inodilators including milrinone and levosimendan may be useful in selected settings. Data on long-term survival and neurologic outcomes following different management strategies are scarce and future research efforts should focus on this.

  11. Managing common neonatal respiratory conditions during transport.

    PubMed

    Coe, Kristi L; Jamie, Scott F; Baskerville, Rosland M

    2014-10-01

    As neonatal care in the tertiary setting advances, neonatal transport teams are challenged with incorporating these innovations into their work environment. One of the largest areas of advancement over the last decade involves respiratory support and management. Many major respiratory treatments and the equipment required have been adapted for transport, whereas others are not yet feasible. This article reviews the history of respiratory management during neonatal transport and discusses current methodologies and innovations in transport respiratory management.

  12. Inherited factor V deficient neonate with galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan; Sharifi-Hoseini, Mohamad Reza; Shahroudian, Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Reporting a case of inherited factor V deficiency and galactosemia. A neonate was admitted with hematoma, jaundice, splenomegaly, diarrhea, anemia, abdominal ascites and bilateral cataracts that diagnosis of galactosaemia and factor V deficiency was established. Coinheritance of both coagulation disorder and metabolic disorder is very rare episode that was identified in a neonate. Our case indicates that in mild bleeding episodes of neonates that imitate of coagulation disorders should be considered promptly by pediatricians. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hemolytic Disorders Causing Severe Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Yaish, Hassan M

    2015-09-01

    A shortened erythrocyte life span, because of hemolytic disorders, is a common cause of extreme neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Clinical and laboratory examinations can frequently identify the underlying cause of extreme neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In this article, several tests, techniques, and approaches have been reviewed, including red blood cell morphology assessment, end-tidal carbon monoxide quantification, eosin-5-maleimide flow cytometry, as well as next-generation DNA sequencing using neonatal jaundice panels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neonatal somatosensory evoked potentials persist during hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Ahtola, Eero; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2017-06-01

    Treatment with therapeutic hypothermia has challenged the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography in predicting outcomes after perinatal asphyxia. In this study, we assessed the feasibility and gain of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) during hypothermia. This retrospective study comprised neonates from 35 + 6 to 42 + 2 gestational weeks and treated for asphyxia or hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy at Helsinki University Hospital between 14 February 2007 and 23 December 2009. This period was partly before the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia, which enabled us to include normothermic neonates who would these days receive hypothermia treatment. We analysed SEPs from 47 asphyxiated neonates and compared the results between 23 normothermic and 24 hypothermic neonates. Our data showed that hypothermia led to SEP latencies lengthening by a few milliseconds, but the essential gain for predicting outcomes by SEPs was preserved during hypothermia. Of the 24 hypothermic neonates, bilaterally absent SEPs were associated with poor outcome in 2/2 neonates, normal SEPs were associated with good outcomes in 13/15 neonates and 5/7 neonates with unilaterally absent or grossly delayed SEPs had a poor outcome. Our findings indicated that SEPs were a reliable tool for evaluating the somatosensory system in asphyxiated neonates in both normothermic and hypothermic conditions. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. WHY IS NEONATAL ANAESTHESIA SUCH A CHALLENGE?

    PubMed

    Wołoszczuk-Gebicka, Bogumiła

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 1.5 million neonates receive general anaesthesia each year for surgical procedures. Providing anaesthesia to neonates is not easy. Surgical procedures are often difficult and extensive, and the physiology of neonates makes respiratory and cardiovascular problems more frequent and life-threatening. The paper covers the changing concepts in neonatal anaesthesia, including recent studies that indicate that anaesthetic exposure could cause neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain. This could potentially influence the long-term developmental outcome, especially in infants requiring multiple surgical procedures. Respiratory and cardiovascular critical events, age-related differences of the pharmacokinetics of the drugs used for anaesthesia, as well as technical problems are also covered.

  16. Neonatal animal models of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Kimberlei A; Yohay, Anne-Lise J; Gauda, Estelle B; McLemore, Gabrielle L

    2006-01-01

    The symptoms of opiate withdrawal in infants are defined as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a significant cause of morbidity in term and preterm infants. Factors, such as polysubstance abuse, inadequate prenatal care, nutritional deprivation, and the biology of the developing central nervous system contribute to the challenge of evaluating and treating opiate-induced alterations in the newborn. Although research on the effects of opiates in neonatal animal models is limited, the data from adult animal models have greatly contributed to understanding and treating opiate tolerance, addiction, and withdrawal in adult humans. Yet the limited neonatal data that are available indicate that the mechanisms involved in these processes in the newborn differ from those in adult animals, and that neonatal models of opiate withdrawal are needed to understand and develop effective treatment regimens for NAS. In this review, the behavioral and neurochemical evidence from the literature is presented and suggests that mechanisms responsible for opiate tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal differ between adult and neonatal models. Also reviewed are studies that have used neonatal rodent models, the authors' preliminary data based on the use of neonatal rat and mouse models of opiate withdrawal, and other neonatal models that have been proposed for the study of neonatal opiate withdrawal.

  17. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome from opioids.

    PubMed

    Grim, Kendra; Harrison, Tracy E; Wilder, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    Most infants at risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome have opioid plus another drug exposure; polypharmacy is the rule rather than the exception. Scales for evaluation of neonatal abstinence syndrome are primarily based for opioid withdrawal. A standard protocol to treat neonatal abstinence syndrome has not been developed. Institute nonpharmacologic strategies for all neonates at risk. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends mechanism-directed therapy (treat opioid withdrawal with an opioid) as the first-line therapy. Second-line medications are currently under evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neonatal vaccination: Challenges and intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Surendran, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While vaccines have been tremendously successful in reducing the incidence of serious infectious diseases, newborns remain particularly vulnerable in the first few months of their life to life-threatening infections. A number of challenges exist to neonatal vaccination. However, recent advances in the understanding of neonatal immunology offers insights to overcome many of those challenges. OBJECTIVE This review will present an overview of the features of neonatal immunity which make vaccination difficult, survey the mechanisms of action of available vaccine adjuvants with respect to the unique features of neonatal immunity, and propose a possible mechanism contributing to the inability of neonates to generate protective immune responses to vaccines. METHODS We surveyed recent published findings on the challenges to neonatal vaccination and possible intervention strategies including the use of novel vaccine adjuvants to develop efficacious neonatal vaccines. RESULTS Challenges in the vaccination of neonates include interference from maternal antibody and excessive skewing towards Th2 immunity, which can be counteracted by the use of proper adjuvants. CONCLUSION Synergistic stimulation of multiple Toll-like receptors by incorporating well defined agonist-adjuvant combinations to vaccines is a promising strategy to ensure a protective vaccine response in neonates. PMID:26757146

  19. Sonographic Features of Physiologic Neonatal Breast Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, Anugayathri; Vade, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    The varying presentations of neonatal breast enlargement on imaging have been underreported in the literature. Our case report profiles a 3-week-old female patient who presented with a history of left breast enlargement with redness and tenderness for 2 days, who was clinically diagnosed and managed for neonatal mastitis, which was actually a neonatal breast enlargement with adjacent cellulitis. Awareness that physiologic neonatal breast enlargement can be associated with adjacent cellulitis without mastitis can prevent unnecessary hospitalization and treatment with parenteral antibiotics. PMID:25024978

  20. Foetal and neonatal thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Radetti, G; Zavallone, A; Gentili, L; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bona, G

    2002-10-01

    Thyroid hormones have been shown to be absolutely necessary for early brain development. During pregnancy, both maternal and foetal thyroid hormones contribute to foetal brain development and maternal supply explains why most of the athyreotic newborns usually do not show any signs of hypothyroidism at birth. Foetal and/or neonatal hypothyroidism is a rare disorder. Its incidence, as indicated by neonatal screening, is about 1:4000. Abnormal thyroid development (i.e. agenesia, ectopic gland, hypoplasia) or inborn errors in thyroid hormone biosynthesis are the most common causes of permanent congenital hypothyroidism. Recent studies reported that mutations involving Thyroid Transcriptor Factors (TTF) such as TTF-1, TTF-2, PAX-8 play an important role in altered foetal thyroid development. Deficiency of transcriptor factor (Pit-1, Prop-1, LHX-3) both in mother and in the foetus represents another rare cause of foetal hypothyroidism. At birth clinical picture may be not always so obvious and typical signs appear only after several weeks but a delayed diagnosis could have severe consequences consisting of delayed physical and mental development. Even if substitutive therapy is promptly started some learning difficulties might still arise suggesting that intrauterine adequate levels of thyroid hormones are absolutely necessary for a normal neurological development. Placental transfer of maternal antithyroid antibodies inhibiting fetal thyroid function can cause transient hypothyroidism at birth. If the mother with thyroid autoimmune disease is also hypothyroid during pregnancy and she doesn't receive substitutive therapy, a worse neurological outcome may be expected for her foetus. Foetal and/or neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare condition and its incidence has been estimated around 1:4000-40000, according to various authors. The most common causes are maternal thyroid autoimmune disorders, such as Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Rarer non autoimmune causes

  1. An illness severity score and neonatal mortality in retrieved neonates.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Simon J; Berry, Andrew; Jacobe, Stephen; Cheeseman, Paul; Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Greenough, Anne

    2004-07-01

    The Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) score is a simple tool to measure clinical risk and illness severity in very low birth weight infants. The aim of this study was to determine if a modified CRIB score (MCRIB) used at first telephone contact with a transport service differentiated between retrieved infants who did or did not die in the neonatal period and hence might be a useful triage tool. A retrospective cohort study of 2504 infants, median gestational age 36 weeks and birth weight 2782 g, transported by the New South Wales Newborn and Paediatric Emergency Transport Service (NETS) was performed. MCRIB was calculated at four time points during the retrieval process. The MCRIB score at the time of the first call and the change in the MCRIB score over the retrieval process were related to outcome (neonatal death or survival). The mean MCRIB score at the time of first call was higher in those infants who died during the neonatal period (4.37) than in those who survived (2.63), (P < 0.0001). MCRIB performed better (area under the receiver operator characteristic curves of 0.72) with regard to predicting mortality than gestational age (0.56) or birth weight (0.52). The mean MCRIB score fell progressively from the time of first call to admission at the accepting NICU (P < 0.0001); infants whose MCRIB score increased were more likely to die (P < 0.0001). these results suggest an illness severity score, applied at the time of first call to a transport service would be helpful in setting priorities for retrievals. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  2. Maternal methadone dose and neonatal withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Berghella, Vincenzo; Lim, Pearl J; Hill, Mary K; Cherpes, Jennifer; Chennat, Jennifer; Kaltenbach, Karol

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal methadone dosage correlates with neonatal withdrawal in a large heroin-addicted pregnant population. A retrospective review of all maternal/neonatal records of pregnancies that were maintained on methadone therapy in our institution was conducted. After in-hospital stabilization, women were given daily methadone therapy under direct surveillance, with liberal dosage increases according to maternal withdrawal symptoms. Neonatal withdrawal was assessed objectively by the neonatal abstinence score. The average methadone dose in the last 12 weeks of pregnancy and the last methadone dose before delivery (cutoffs of 40, 60, or 80 mg) were correlated to various objective measures of neonatal withdrawal. One hundred mother/neonate pairs on methadone therapy were identified. Women who received an average methadone dose of <80 mg (n=50 women) had a trend toward a higher incidence of illicit drug abuse before delivery than women who received doses of >/=80 mg (n=50 women; 48% vs 32%; P=.1). Women who received an average methadone dose of <80 mg had similar highest neonatal abstinence score, need for neonatal treatment for withdrawal, and duration of withdrawal compared with women whose condition was maintained with dosages of >/=80 mg (score, 11.1 vs 11.5; 68% vs 66%; and 13.3 vs 13.6 days, respectively; all P>.5). For all cutoffs that were used for high versus low dose and for both the average and last methadone dosage analyses, neonatal withdrawal was similar. The maternal methadone dosage does not correlate with neonatal withdrawal; therefore, maternal benefits of effective methadone dosing are not offset by neonatal harm.

  3. A Neonatal Murine Model of MRSA Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishwas; Siefker, David; Patel, Vivek S.; Yadav, Nikki; Jaligama, Sridhar; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants particularly following lower respiratory tract viral infections such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). However, the mechanisms by which co-infection of infants by MRSA and RSV cause increased lung pathology are unknown. Because the infant immune system is qualitatively and quantitatively different from adults we developed a model of infant MRSA pneumonia which will allow us to investigate the effects of RSV co-infection on disease severity. We infected neonatal and adult mice with increasing doses of MRSA and demonstrate that neonatal mice have delayed kinetics in clearing the bacteria in comparison to adult mice. There were differences in recruitment of immune cells into the lung following infection. Adult mice exhibited an increase in neutrophil recruitment that coincided with reduced bacterial titers followed by an increase in macrophages. Neonatal mice, however, exhibited an early increase in neutrophils that did not persist despite continued presence of the bacteria. Unlike the adult mice, neonatal mice failed to exhibit an increase in macrophages. Neonates exhibited a decrease in phagocytosis of MRSA suggesting that the decrease in clearance was partially due to deficient phagocytosis of the bacteria. Both neonates and adults responded with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines following infection. However, in contrast to the adult mice, neonates did not express constitutive levels of the anti-microbial peptide Reg3γ in the lung. Infection of neonates did not stimulate expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 by dendritic cells and neonates exhibited a diminished T cell response compared to adult mice. Overall, we have developed a neonatal model of MRSA pneumonia that displays a similar delay in bacterial clearance as is observed in the neonatal intensive care unit and will be useful for performing co

  4. [Immigrant pregnancy and neonatal morbidity].

    PubMed

    Domingo Puiggròs, M; Figaró Voltà, C; Loverdos Eseverri, I; Costa Colomer, J; Badia Barnusell, J

    2008-06-01

    Over the past few years immigration has become an important growth issue in Spain, with the subsequent social, economic and health impact it produces. To analyze the characteristics of immigrant pregnancy and its neonatal morbidity. Prospective, descriptive, and cross-sectional study, which includes live-born infants born in the Hospital de Sabadell, from the 1st of September until the 31st of December, 2004. All demographic data were collected, together with details of the pregnancy, the labour, the infant and its associated morbidity. There were 902 births during this period, of which 159 (17.6%) were immigrant pregnancies, with Latin Americans and Moroccans predominant. About 83.3% of immigrant pregnancies where of mothers who have lived in Spain for less than 5 years. The average age of immigrant pregnancies was 27 years (p<0.001), multiparous is more frequent (p<0.001) and have a lower control of pregnancy than non-immigrant (p=0.001). The average gestational age is similar between both groups, nevertheless, the average weight is significantly higher in immigrant women newborns (p<0.05). About 36.5% of the newborns are admitted with their mother o in the neonatal unit, with the main reason for admission being the risk of infection with a predominance between the newborns of immigrant pregnancies (p=0.05). The number of newborns admitted in the neonatal unit is similar in both groups. This study allowed us to look at characteristics of immigrant pregnancies and draw conclusions in providing the necessary medical assistance for this new and growing population.

  5. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  6. Cognitive outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A; Vohr, Betty R; Hintz, Susan R; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Tyson, Jon E; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-03-01

    To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment-Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, -49.3 to -35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-10-10

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion.

  8. Stable rates of neonatal sepsis in a tertiary neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Lean, Wei Ling; Kamlin, Camille O; Garland, Suzanne M; Jacobs, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    To describe the rate of early- and late-onset sepsis in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at the Royal Women's Hospital and to compare the rate of late-onset sepsis (LOS) with a published (2008) cohort from the same unit. The secondary aim was to examine clinicians' compliance with antibiotic guidelines. Infants born <32 weeks' gestation or <1500 g admitted between 1 July 2011 and 31 December 2011 were included. Strict definitions of sepsis and compliance with antibiotic guidelines were applied. One hundred and seventy-two infants met the inclusion criteria, with 152 having blood culture evaluations for early-onset sepsis (EOS) and 58 having 109 evaluations for LOS. Definite EOS occurred in 1.3% with Escherichia coli isolated. The rate of definite LOS in 2011 of 22% was not significantly different than the 27% in 2008, with coagulase-negative staphylococcus the main isolate. Antibiotic continuation beyond 72 h in infants with negative blood cultures was the main reason for non-compliance with antibiotic guidelines. The rate of EOS is comparable with published reports and the rate of LOS has remained stable over a 3-year period. Discontinuation of antibiotics with negative septic markers and blood cultures at 48-72 h is encouraged. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Opioid withdrawal in critically ill neonates.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Karen D; Lomako, Dawn M; Katz, Robert W; Kelly, H William

    2003-04-01

    To determine the occurrence of and risk factors for opioid withdrawal in critically ill neonates receiving continuous infusions of fentanyl. A prospective interventional cohort study was conducted in a university hospital neonatal intensive care unit with 19 neonates who received a minimum of 24 hours of fentanyl by continuous infusion. Fentanyl total dose, duration of infusion, and peak infusion rate were recorded. Patients were evaluated for withdrawal using the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System of Finnegan. Patients with a score >/=8 were considered to have opioid withdrawal. Withdrawal was observed in 10 (53%) of 19 neonates. The fentanyl total dose (median 525 vs. 168 micro g/kg, respectively; p = 0.03) and infusion duration (median 10 vs. 7 d, respectively; p = 0.04) were significantly greater in neonates with withdrawal compared to those without withdrawal. A fentanyl total dose >/=415 micro g/kg predicted withdrawal with 70% sensitivity and 78% specificity. A fentanyl infusion duration >/=8 days predicted withdrawal with 90% sensitivity and 67% specificity. The most frequent symptoms of withdrawal were sleeping <3 hours after feeding (81%) and increased muscle tone (55%). In all neonates with withdrawal, onset occurred within 24 hours of fentanyl discontinuation. Opioid withdrawal occurs frequently in critically ill neonates who receive continuous infusions of fentanyl. Longer infusion duration and higher total dose were associated with withdrawal symptoms.

  10. Sublingual epidermoid cyst in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Fadekemi Olufunmilayo; Oladejo, Taoreed; Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Adenekan, Anthony Taiwo

    2014-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts (EC) in the head and neck region could be considered a rare condition representing only 6.9% of all ECs occurring in the body. They occur rarely in children and neonates. We present a case of sublingual EC in a Nigerian neonate. PMID:24987608

  11. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  12. Narcotics and Sedative Use in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Borenstein-Levin, Liron; Synnes, Anne; Grunau, Ruth E; Miller, Steven P; Yoon, Eugene W; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate patterns of narcotic and sedative use in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across Canada using data collected by the Canadian Neonatal Network. We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of preterm neonates at <33 weeks' gestation and admitted to a participating Canadian Neonatal Network NICU. The proportion of all neonates who received sedative(s), narcotic(s), or either sedative(s), narcotic(s), or both during their NICU stay was calculated for each year. Because opioids are used for premedication before intubation, only continuous infusions of a narcotic drug were included. Variation in narcotics and sedative usage between sites in 2014 was determined using logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for gestational age, surgery, and mechanical ventilation. Of 20 744 neonates, 29% of neonates received a narcotic, a sedative, or both; 23% received a narcotic and 17% a sedative. Although no clinically significant changes in drug exposure were documented during the 5-year period, there were statistically significant differences in narcotic and sedative use between sites, ranging from 3% to 41% for narcotic and 2% to 48% for sedative use (aORs 0.2-5.7 and 0.1-15, respectively, P < .05). Exposure to narcotic or sedative agents is highly variable in preterm neonates across Canada despite concerns of adverse outcomes associated with these drugs. The tremendous variation in practice suggests that further research on their current usage, as well as identifying optimal practice procedures is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  14. Sex Differences in Neonatal Stress Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Maryann; Emory, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Examined the sex differences in physiological and behavioral stress reactivity among 36 healthy, full-term neonates after a mildly stressful behavioral assessment procedure. Salivary cortisol, heart rate change, Neonatal Behavior Assessment Scale (NBAS) cluster scores, and behavioral states after the NBAS provided 100% discrimination between male…

  15. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  16. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  17. Clinical pharmacology of carbapenems in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria; Allegaert, Karel

    2014-04-01

    Carbapenems are an effective tool to treat complicated bacterial infections. This review aims to summarize the available information on carbapenems in neonates to guide clinicians on drug choice and indications in neonates. Moreover, identification of knowledge gaps may stimulate researchers to design studies to further improve pharmacotherapy in neonates. To do so, a bibliographic search [infant/newborn and meropenem, imipenem, panipenem, ertapenem, doripenem or imipenem] was performed (PubMed, EMBASE) and public clinical trial registries (clinicaltrials.gov, EU registry) were searched to summarize the available information. Carbapenem clearance in neonates is low. Variability relates to maturation (weight, age) and renal function (creatinine clearance), while observations in neonates with renal failure are absent. Pharmacodynamics are almost exclusively limited to meropenem, and the available information will further increase (NeoMero-1-2, necrotizing enterocolitis, meningitis). Finally, there are also some ongoing doripenem pharmacokinetics (PK) studies in neonates. It was concluded that observations on carbapenems in neonates are limited, but studies (NeoMero, doripenem) are ongoing. Until this information becomes available, off label prescription of meropenem seems to be the most reasonable choice when a carbapenem is appropriate. Knowledge gaps relate to PK in neonates with renal failure and to the potential benefit of prolonged compared to short duration of infusion.

  18. Sex Differences in Neonatal Stress Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Maryann; Emory, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Examined the sex differences in physiological and behavioral stress reactivity among 36 healthy, full-term neonates after a mildly stressful behavioral assessment procedure. Salivary cortisol, heart rate change, Neonatal Behavior Assessment Scale (NBAS) cluster scores, and behavioral states after the NBAS provided 100% discrimination between male…

  19. Clinical significance of neonatal menstruation.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Ivo; Benagiano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have clearly shown the existence of a spectrum of endometrial progesterone responses in neonatal endometrium, varying from proliferation to full decidualization with menstrual-like shedding. The bleedings represent, similar to what occurs in adult menstruation, a progesterone withdrawal bleeding. Today, the bleeding is completely neglected and considered an uneventful episode of no clinical significance. Yet clinical studies have linked the risk of bleeding to a series of events indicating fetal distress. The potential link between the progesterone response and major adolescent disorders requires to be investigated by prospective studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    Bacteriological and clinical data on 68 children with neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis were analysed as part of a wider study of bacterial meningitis undertaken between 1976 and 1982. Twenty five per cent of patients died and there was no difference in the mortality rate between early and late onset disease. Sixteen per cent of the infants weighed less than 2500 g at birth but in 50% no predisposing aetiological factor was found. Streptococcus agalactiae type III was isolated in 57% of the patients. PMID:6375583

  1. Neonatal disorders of germinal matrix.

    PubMed

    Raets, M M A; Dudink, J; Govaert, P

    2015-11-01

    The germinal matrix (GM) is a richly vascularized, transient layer near the ventricles. It produces neurons and glial cells, and is present in the foetal brain between 8 and 36 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks, it reaches its maximum volume and subsequently withers. The GM is vulnerable to haemorrhage in preterm infants. This selective vulnerability is explained by limited astrocyte end-feet coverage of microvessels, reduced expression of fibronectin and immature tight junctions. Focal lesions in the neonatal period include haemorrhage, germinolysis and stroke. Such lesions in transient layers interrupt normal brain maturation and induce neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  2. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  3. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  4. Photoacoustic investigation of a neonatal skull phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Xu, Qiuyun; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for continued research into the diagnosis, prevention and cure of neonatal brain disease and disorders. These disorders lead to fatalities and developmental disorders in infants. Non-invasive imaging techniques are being researched for this purpose. However, the availability of neonatal skull samples for this work is very low. A phantom can be used to simulate the neonatal skull and brain to improve imaging techniques. This study selects a phantom of polyurethane and titanium dioxide and proves its value as a replacement for neonatal skull in research. The methods used for this proof are validation of choice against the literature, transmissivity and acoustic experimentation compared to existing literature, and finally photoacoustic evaluation of the final choice to show its usefulness as a neonatal skull phantom.

  5. Ganaxolone: A New Treatment for Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Yawno, Tamara; Miller, Suzie L.; Bennet, Laura; Wong, Flora; Hirst, Jonathan J.; Fahey, Michael; Walker, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are amongst the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal care service. Seizures can exacerbate existing brain injury, induce “de novo” injury, and are associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities in post-neonatal life. In this mini-review, we present evidence in support of the use of ganaxolone, a GABAA agonist neurosteroid, as a novel neonatal therapy. We discuss evidence that ganaxolone can provide both seizure control and neuroprotection with a high safety profile when administered early following birth-related hypoxia, and show evidence that it is likely to prevent or reduce the incidence of the enduring disabilities associated with preterm birth, cerebral palsy, and epilepsy. We suggest that ganaxolone is an ideal anti-seizure treatment because it can be safely used prospectively, with minimal or no adverse effects on the neonatal brain. PMID:28878622

  6. Patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, R; Bajpai, A; Deorari, A K; Paul, V K

    2001-10-01

    Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close within 48-96 hours of postnatal age results in a left to right shunt across the ductus and overloading of the pulmonary circulation. This is more likely to happen in premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. Deterioration in the respiratory status on day 3-4 in a ventilated neonate and unexplained metabolic acidosis may be the earliest indicators of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Indomethacin is the main stay of medical management of PDA in preterm neonates. Guidelines for administration of indomethacin have been described in the protocol. Restricted fluid therapy may be beneficial in the prevention of PDA in preterm neonates. Presence of PDA in a term neonate should be investigated to rule out an underlying congenital heart disease.

  7. Patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Deorari, Ashok K; Paul, Vinod K

    2008-03-01

    Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close within 48-96 hours of postnatal age results in a left to right shunt across the ductus and overloading of the pulmonary circulation. This is more likely to happen in premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. Deterioration in the respiratory status on day 3-4 in a ventilated neonate and unexplained metabolic acidosis may be the earliest indicators of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Indomethacin is the main stay of medical management of PDA in preterm neonates. Guidelines for administration of indomethacin have been described in the protocol. Restricted fluid therapy may be beneficial in the prevention of PDA in preterm neonates. Presence of PDA in a term neonate should be investigated to rule out an underlying congenital heart disease.

  8. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  9. Imaging approach to persistent neonatal jaundice

    SciTech Connect

    Kirks, D.; Coleman, R.E.; Filston, H.C.; Rosenberg, E.R.; Merten, D.F.

    1984-03-01

    Fifteen patients with persistent neonatal jaundice were evaluated by sonography and radionuclide scintigraphy. The sonographic features of both neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia are nonspecific. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy after phenobarbital pretreatment in patients with neonatal hepatitis demonstrates normal hepatic extraction and delayed tracer excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. If there is neonatal hepatitis with severe hepatocellular damage, the hepatic extraction of tracer activity is decreased and excretion may be delayed or absent. Patients under 3 months of age with biliary atresia have normal hepatic extraction of tracer with no excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. Sonography in patients with a choledochal cyst shows a cystic mass in the porta hepatis with associated bile-duct dilatation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirms that the choledochal cyst communicates with the biliary system. Initial sonography demonstrates hepatobiliary anatomy; subsequent phenobarbital-enhanced radionuclide scintigraphy determines hepatobiliary function. An expedient diagnostic approach is recommended for the evaluation of persistent neonatal jaundice.

  10. Neonatal electroencephalography: review of a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Shany, Eilon; Berger, Itai

    2011-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) recordings have routinely been performed for more than half a century. ''Old'' technical difficulties are no longer of concern with the advent of modern digital technology. Still, many ''old'' issues are at debate: characterization of neonatal EEG features, identification of EEG waveforms with potential clinical correlates, the role of neonatal EEG in prediction of neurodevelopmental outcome, and use of new devices. In the past decades, neonatal EEG and emerging issues' literature has greatly expanded. In this review, the authors have summarized some of these issues to increase the availability of the information for both clinical and research purposes. They propose an up-to-date concentrated practical approach to this rapidly expanding ''subfield'' of neonatal neurology.

  11. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  12. Palivizumab use in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Kingston, S; Murphy, B P

    2010-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Palivizumab is an immunoprophylactic agent for RSV prevention in preterm infants and those with neonatal chronic lung disease. This study examines its use across neonatal units in Ireland. A questionnaire was administered to one Consultant Neonatologist or Paediatrician in each of the 20 maternity centres in Ireland about their guidelines for Palivizumab administration. There is variation in administration of Palivizumab with little consistency found between protocols reported in terms of age and presence of chronic lung disease. Ten centres have in house protocols, 3 centres use the American Academy of Paediatrics (AAP) guidelines, 2 centres prefer the UK Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) guidelines and 3 centres do not have a set protocol. Four participants felt its use has impacted on hospital admissions and 61% believe its use is cost effective. The budgetary implication for immunoprophylaxis with Palivizumab in Ireland is estimated at 1.5 to 2 million euros annually. Given current pharmacoeconomic constraints there is a need to implement a national protocol on RSV immunoprophylaxis.

  13. Redirecting treatment during neonatal transport.

    PubMed

    Dulkerian, Susan J; Douglas, Webra Price; Taylor, Renee McCraine

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal transport teams comprise multidisciplinary health care providers who are skilled in patient care, communication and customer service, and equipment mechanics. They are extensively trained in resuscitation and stabilization, preparing for accelerating care, and their focus is preservation of life. In any situation focused on caring for critically ill patients, ethical issues and questions may arise. For instance, is it compassionate and/or cost-effective to separate mothers and infants when continuing/accelerating care is futile, and when and how should care be redirected from acute and lifesaving care to comfort care and bereavement support for the family? The knowledge and skills required to address such situations and communicate and participate in a redirection of care may not be adequately emphasized in the preparation of the professionals responsible for stabilizing and transporting critically ill newborns. This article raises issues relating to transport and redirecting care such as eligibility for transport, parental request and consent, separation of mothers and infants, palliative and bereavement care, ethical considerations, competitive transport environment, and customer service. A shared mental model is essential. The focus of this article is not to provide answers to all of these issues, but to highlight the complexity of the topic of redirecting treatment during neonatal transport. Redirecting treatment needs to be discussed, and health care professionals should be prepared during their transport team training. Each family and situation must be approached individually, with the acceptance that there will always be more questions than answers.

  14. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  15. Active ear acupuncture points in neonates with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

    PubMed

    Raith, Wolfgang; Kutschera, Jörg; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of acupuncture ear points in neonates with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS occurs in the first days of life in neonates whose mothers have a history of drug abuse, and may also occur in neonates whose mothers are currently following substitution therapy. The patients are neonates with NAS admitted over one year to the Division of Neonatology at the University Hospital Graz. The examination took place on the third day after delivery (mean value 70.3 hours) and was performed by a neuronal pen (PS 3 © Silberbauer, Vienna, Austria). An integrated sound and optical signal detected the active ear points that were then placed on an ear map. We investigated six neonates (four male, two female). All investigated neonates showed the presence of active ear acupuncture points. The psychovegetative rim was the most common organic area of the children, following by a few organic points. This corresponds with the results found in healthy neonates. In all neonates with NAS, we found the presence of psychic ear points. The identified psychic ear points are the frustration-point, R-point and the psychotropic area nasal from the incisura intertragica. In all neonates with NAS, active organic and psychic ear points were detectable in both ears. In the future, it could be possible to use active ear points for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  16. Antifungal agents in neonates: issues and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Almirante, Benito; Rodríguez, Dolors

    2007-01-01

    Fungal infections are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period, particularly among premature neonates. Four classes of antifungal agents are commonly used in the treatment of fungal infections in pediatric patients: polyene macrolides, fluorinated pyrimidines, triazoles, and echinocandins. Due to the paucity of pediatric data, many recommendations for the use of antifungal agents in this population are derived from the experience in adults. The purpose of this article was to review the published data on fungal infections and antifungal agents, with a focus on neonatal patients, and to provide an overview of the differences in antifungal pharmacology in neonates compared with adults. Pharmacokinetic data suggest dosing differences in children versus adult patients with some antifungals, but not all agents have been fully evaluated. The available pharmacokinetic data on the amphotericin B deoxycholate formulation in neonates exhibit considerable variability; nevertheless, the dosage regimen suggested in the neonatal population is similar to that used in adults. More pharmacokinetic information is available on the liposomal and lipid complex preparations of amphotericin B and fluconazole, and it supports their use in neonates; however, the optimal dosage and duration of therapy is difficult to establish. All amphotericin-B formulations, frequently used in combination with flucytosine, are useful for treating disseminated fungal infections and Candida meningitis in neonates. Fluconazole, with potent in vitro activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and almost all Candida spp., has been used in neonates with invasive candidiasis at dosages of 6 mg/kg/day, and for antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk neonates. There are limited data on itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole use in neonates. Caspofungin, which is active against Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., requires higher doses in children relative to adults, and dosing is

  17. Differences in the profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome signs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gaalema, Diann E.; Scott, Teresa Linares; Heil, Sarah H.; Coyle, Mara G.; Kaltenbach, Karol; Badger, Gary J.; Arria, Amelia M.; Stine, Susan M.; Martin, Peter R.; Jones, Hendrée E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the profile of signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed infants. Design, setting and participants Secondary analysis of NAS data from a multi-site, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized clinical trial. Data from a total of 129 neonates born to opioid-dependent women who had been assigned to receive methadone or buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy were examined. Measurements For 10 days after delivery, neonates (methadone = 72, buprenorphine = 57) were assessed regularly using a 19-item modified Finnegan scale. Data from neonates who required pharmacological treatment (methadone = 41, buprenorphine = 27) were included up to the time treatment was initiated. The incidence and mean severity of the total NAS score and each individual sign of NAS were calculated and compared between medication conditions, as was the median time until morphine treatment initiation among treated infants in each condition. Findings Two NAS signs (undisturbed tremors and hyperactive Moro reflex) were observed significantly more frequently in methadone-exposed neonates and three (nasal stuffiness, sneezing, loose stools) were observed more frequently in buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Mean severity scores on the total NAS score and five individual signs (disturbed and undisturbed tremors, hyperactive Moro reflex, excessive irritability, failure to thrive) were significantly higher among methadone-exposed neonates, while sneezing was higher among buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Among treated neonates, methadone-exposed infants required treatment significantly earlier than buprenorphine-exposed infants (36 versus 59 hours postnatal, respectively). Conclusions The profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome differs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates, with significant differences in incidence, severity and treatment initiation time. Overall, methadone-exposed neonates have a more severe neonatal

  18. Differences in the profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome signs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates.

    PubMed

    Gaalema, Diann E; Scott, Teresa Linares; Heil, Sarah H; Coyle, Mara G; Kaltenbach, Karol; Badger, Gary J; Arria, Amelia M; Stine, Susan M; Martin, Peter R; Jones, Hendrée E

    2012-11-01

    To compare the profile of signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed infants. Secondary analysis of NAS data from a multi-site, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized clinical trial. Data from a total of 129 neonates born to opioid-dependent women who had been assigned to receive methadone or buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy were examined. For 10 days after delivery, neonates (methadone = 72, buprenorphine = 57) were assessed regularly using a 19-item modified Finnegan scale. Data from neonates who required pharmacological treatment (methadone = 41, buprenorphine = 27) were included up to the time treatment was initiated. The incidence and mean severity of the total NAS score and each individual sign of NAS were calculated and compared between medication conditions, as was the median time until morphine treatment initiation among treated infants in each condition. Two NAS signs (undisturbed tremors and hyperactive Moro reflex) were observed significantly more frequently in methadone-exposed neonates and three (nasal stuffiness, sneezing, loose stools) were observed more frequently in buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Mean severity scores on the total NAS score and five individual signs (disturbed and undisturbed tremors, hyperactive Moro reflex, excessive irritability, failure to thrive) were significantly higher among methadone-exposed neonates, while sneezing was higher among buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Among treated neonates, methadone-exposed infants required treatment significantly earlier than buprenorphine-exposed infants (36 versus 59 hours postnatal, respectively). The profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome differs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates, with significant differences in incidence, severity and treatment initiation time. Overall, methadone-exposed neonates have a more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the

  19. Neonatal Discontinuation Syndrome in Serotonergic Antidepressant-Exposed Neonates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Amy; Ciolino, Jody D; Pinheiro, Emily; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Sit, Dorothy K Y; Wisner, Katherine L

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether infants exposed in utero to serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants or a DSM-IV-TR-defined mood disorder have significantly more neonatal discontinuation signs compared to an unexposed group of infants at 2-4 weeks after birth. This secondary analysis was derived from 2 observational studies with enrollment from July 2000 to December 2011 in Cleveland, Ohio, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mothers (n = 214) belonged to one of 3 groups based on exposure status during pregnancy: (1) Comparison-women who did not take psychotropics during pregnancy and had no major mood disorder; (2) SRI-exposed-women with a mood disorder who were taking an SRI but no benzodiazepines; and (3) Mood Disorder-women with depression or bipolar disorder who did not take psychotropic medications. The infants were examined for signs according to the Finnegan Scale by evaluators blind to maternal exposure status. The rates of sign presence (defined as a score ≥ 2 on the Finnegan Scale) in the SRI, Mood Disorder, and Comparison groups were similar at 34.1%, 35.1%, and 30.4%, respectively. Women in the SRI group had a significantly higher preterm birth rate (24.4%) compared to the other 2 groups (7.4% and 8.9% in the Mood Disorder and Comparison groups, respectively; P = .012). Preterm newborns had a significantly higher sign rate compared to full-term newborns (54% vs 31%, P = .020). We observed a significant relationship between Finnegan signs and preterm birth. The presence of neonatal signs at 2-4 weeks was more closely associated with prematurity than with in utero SRI or mood disorder exposure. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00279370 and NCT00585702.

  20. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  1. Determinants of neonatal mortality in central Sudan.

    PubMed

    Taha, T E; Gray, R H; Abdelwahab, M M

    1993-01-01

    A follow-up study was conducted in six community health centres during the period April 1989 to March 1990 to determine the risk factors which influence neonatal survival in central Sudan. The estimated neonatal mortality rate ranged between 20.0 and 36.0 per 1000 live births per year, and the major cause of death was tetanus neonatorum (29% of neonatal deaths). The mortality rate was lowest when tetanus toxoid was received during pregnancy and the umbilical cord was cleaned by a modern hygienic method (mortality rate of 11 per 1000). In contrast, the mortality rate was highest when no tetanus toxoid was received and no or traditional cord cleaning was used (mortality rate of 62 per 1000; relative risk (RR) = 5.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-14.9). The major predictors of neonatal mortality were tetanus, short birth-to-conception interval, multiparity, reported malaria during pregnancy, low birthweight, low maternal weight and low socio-economic status. The population attributable risks were high, and the preventable factors collectively accounted for 93.5% of neonatal mortality. Safe deliveries and wider immunization coverage are needed to control neonatal tetanus in this community. Other interventions to lower neonatal mortality in central Sudan should include accessible family planning programmes and measures to lower the incidence of low birthweight.

  2. Laser Photoradiation Therapy For Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes our leading experience in the clinical application of laser in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. Currently, the irradiation of jaundiced infants during neonatal life to fluorescent light is the most common treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The authors have investigated the photodegradation of bilirubin by laser in vitro and in Gunn rats before embarking on its clinical application in the treatment of jaundice in the new born child. This work was done to study the theraputic effect of laser compared to the currently used phototherapy in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We selected 16 full term neonates with jaundice to be the subject of this study. The neonates of the study were devided into two groups. The first group was treated with continuous phototherapy . The second group recieved photoradiation therapy with gas laser The laser used was a CW argon-ion laser tuned to oscillate at 488.0 nm wavelength. This wavelength selection was based on our previous studies on the effect of laser irradiation of Gunn rats at different wavelengths. Comparison of the results of both methods of treatment will be reported in detail. The advantages and limitations of laser photoradiation therapy for neonatal jaundice will be discussed.

  3. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  4. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  5. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidental Findings on Routine Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography Performed in Preterm Neonates Younger Than 29 Weeks' Gestation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aisling; Breatnach, Colm R; James, Adam T; Franklin, Orla; El-Khuffash, Afif

    2017-09-25

    The aim of this study was to quantify the rate of incidental findings identified on elective research echocardiography performed on neonates younger than 29 weeks' gestation. We conducted a retrospective study of echocardiographic examinations performed within the first 24 hours of age on neonates younger than 29 weeks' gestation over a 3-year period for research purposes. Incidental echocardiographic findings and pertinent clinical data were recorded. Echocardiographic examinations performed on 145 neonates were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-three neonates (30%) had a total of 54 unexpected findings (37%). Most comprised malpositioned umbilical venous catheters, where the tip was located in the left atrium. The remainder of the conditions identified included unsuspected congenital heart disease, liver hematomas, and unexpected pulmonary hypertension. There is a high rate of incidental findings identified on screening echocardiograms. Routine targeted neonatal echocardiographic screening of preterm neonates may be warranted to identify the considerable likelihood of asymptomatic findings. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Acute Renal Failure in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Owais A; Hageman, Joseph R; Clardy, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in a neonate is a serious condition that impacts 8% to 24% of hospitalized neonates. There is a need for prompt evaluation and treatment to avoid additional complications. In this review, a neonate was found to have renal failure associated with renal vein thrombosis. There are varying etiologies of ARF. Causes of ARF are typically divided into three subsets: pre-renal, renal or intrinsic, and post-renal. Treatment of ARF varies based on the cause. Renal vein thrombosis is an interesting cause of renal or intrinsic ARF and can be serious, often leading to a need for dialysis.

  8. Neonatal transport: communication--the essential element.

    PubMed

    Finsterwald, W

    1988-01-01

    The Bronson Methodist Hospital Neonatal Transport System (Kalamazoo, MI) has identified effective communication as a necessity when providing optimal patient care. Our experience shows that good communication comes only from good relationships between our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff and each referring hospital's staff. This article describes the two educational methods used to aid these relationships: the development of site visits and the distribution of informative publications. By using these methods, our relationships with our 17 referring hospital staffs have improved, which has had a direct bearing on more effective communication during neonatal transport.

  9. Neonatal uterine prolapse - a case report.

    PubMed

    Saha, D K; Hasan, K M; Rahman, S M; Majumder, S K; Zahid, M K; Chakraborty, A K; Bari, M S

    2014-04-01

    Uterine prolapse is commonly seen in the geriatric age group. Congenital vaginouterine prolapse is a rare condition occurring in neonates and is usually associated with spinal cord malformations in about 85% of cases. Several modalities of treatment have been described for neonatal uterine prolapse. Conservative treatment in the form of simple digital reposition, use of pessary or other self-retaining device is usually sufficient to treat this condition, which is self-limiting and regressive. Here we report our first case of neonatal uterine prolapse, managed successfully with simple digital reposition.

  10. Monitoring Cerebral Oxygenation in Neonates: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral oxygenation is not always reflected by systemic arterial oxygenation. Therefore, regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is of added value in neonatal intensive care. rScO2 represents oxygen supply to the brain, while cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction, which is the ratio between rScO2 and systemic arterial oxygen saturation, reflects cerebral oxygen utilization. The balance between oxygen supply and utilization provides insight in neonatal cerebral (patho-)physiology. This review highlights the potential and limitations of cerebral oxygenation monitoring with NIRS in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:28352624

  11. Pediatric Spinal Ultrasound: Neonatal and Intraoperative Applications.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Enrique; Leach, James; Caré, Marguerite; Mangano, Francesco; O Hara, Sara

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the use of ultrasound as a screening tool for spinal diseases in neonates and infants and its intraoperative value in selected pediatric neurosurgical disorders. A review of spinal embryology followed by a description of common spinal diseases in neonates assessed with ultrasound is presented. Indications for spinal ultrasound in neonates, commonly identified conditions, and the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in selected cases are emphasized. Additionally, the use of ultrasound in selected neurosurgical spinal diseases in pediatric patients is presented with magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative correlation. Technique, limitations, and pitfalls are discussed.

  12. [Multiple pregnancies. Neonatal morbidity and mortality].

    PubMed

    Lenclen, R; Chassevent, J; Blanc, P; Hoenn, E; Olivier-Martin, M; Paupe, A; Philippe, H J

    1991-10-01

    The increase in the number of multiple pregnancies and the high incidence of prematurity in this type of pregnancy justifies a pediatric evaluation. A retrospective study (1985-1989) compared the perinatal and neonatal characteristics of children resulting from 14 multifetal (at least 3 fetuses) pregnancies, with a gestational age of less than 34 weeks, with 27 children resulting from monofetal pregnancies of the same duration. Neonatal morbidity and mortality appeared to be similar in both groups. Thus at this very early time of onset of labour (mean gestational age of 30 weeks), fetal multiplicity expressed itself neither by any particular neonatal pathology nor by malnutrition.

  13. Unusual cause of neonatal cyanosis

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Rahman, M.Y.; Al Qurashi, M.M.; Al Khalifeh, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a full-term female neonate who presented at 6 h of age with severe cyanosis and was partially responsive to oxygen supplementation. An echocardiogram showed an isolated congenital severe tricuspid valve insufficiency due to rupture of the papillary muscle of the anterior tricuspid valve leaflet. Magnesium sulfate was infused to lower the pulmonary resistance and thus enhancing the antegrade pulmonary blood flow. Ductal patency was secured by prostaglandin infusion thus providing an additional pulmonary blood flow through the ductus arteriosus. The above measures were adequate to stabilize the patient with no further deterioration or the need for other supportive measures such as Nitric Oxide therapy or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Therefore, early diagnosis and adequate measures to improve the pulmonary blood flow are mandatory, important pre-operative measures in the management of these patients. PMID:23960635

  14. Benevolent injustice: a neonatal dilemma.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Brenda

    2009-06-01

    There is a little-recognized cohort of NICU patients whose outcomes are the result of a "benevolent injustice" in their healthcare course. Many of these infants are saved by technology; however, they are left both medically fragile and medically dependent, and many of them are required to live in a medical facility. Many of these babies never get to go home with their parents. This emerging cohort of patients may evolve from the difficult ability to prognosticate outcomes for neonates, overtreatment, and acquiescing to parental demands for continued aggressive care. Neonatology is an unpredictable process and one that is never intended to harm, but carries with it the potential of devastating consequences, thus creating a benevolent injustice.

  15. Futile care and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Romesberg, Tricia L

    2003-10-01

    The concept of futile care is controversial and difficult to define. Efforts to prolong life, once considered an outcome of healing, may now be viewed by some as harmful acts of prolonging suffering. This article reviews a number of cases representing this challenging ethical dilemma, such as Baby K and MacDonald v. Milleville. The Baby Doe regulations, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Born-Alive Protection Act of 2001, also are discussed to provide an improved understanding of the legal framework that impacts ethical decision making. Nurses at the bedside must be equipped with the ethical knowledge and communication skills necessary to care for patients and families facing the ethical dilemma of futile care. An increased focus on neonatal palliative care is suggested to provide infants, families, and staff with the necessary tools to work through this painful process.

  16. Treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K; Gerada, C; Greenough, A

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is suffered by infants withdrawing from substances on which they have become physically dependent after in utero exposure. They may require prolonged treatment and spend weeks or even months in hospital. A wide range of drugs have been used to treat NAS. The efficacy of few, however, have been adequately investigated. Evidence suggests that opioids are the most appropriate, at least in infants exposed to diamorphine or methadone. In all "head to head" trials, diazepam has been shown to be ineffective. Morphine and methadone are currently the most commonly prescribed opioids to treat NAS, but randomised trials have not been undertaken to determine which is the more beneficial. Many infants with NAS have been exposed to multiple substances in utero. Further research is required into whether a single opiate or a multiple drug regimen is the best option for such patients.

  17. Kernicterus in a neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Loynachan, Alan T; Williams, N M; Freestone, J F

    2007-03-01

    A 5-day-old Thoroughbred foal was submitted to the necropsy service at the University of Kentucky Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center. The foal had a clinical history of seizure activity and severe icterus. A complete blood count and serum chemistry analysis indicated that the foal was anemic (hematocrit, 16%), hyperbilirubinemic (45 mg/dl), and hypoglycemic. At necropsy, all tissues were discolored various shades of yellow. Microscopically, there was degeneration and necrosis of cerebral neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells; severe hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis; and deposition of amorphous golden-yellow material in the cerebellar granular cell layer, pulmonary alveoli, renal tubular epithelium, splenic trabecula, and the lamina propria of the small and large intestine. The golden-yellow material in the brain, lung, spleen, and small intestine was identified as bilirubin by histochemistry. Based on the macroscopic and microscopic findings, a diagnosis of kernicterus (bilirubin encephalopathy) was made. This report describes a rare case of equine neonatal kernicterus.

  18. Neonatal eyelid conditioning during sleep.

    PubMed

    Tarullo, Amanda R; Isler, Joseph R; Condon, Carmen; Violaris, Kimon; Balsam, Peter D; Fifer, William P

    2016-11-01

    Using an eyelid conditioning paradigm modeled after that developed by Little, Lipsitt, and Rovee-Collier (1984), Fifer et al. (2010) demonstrated that newborn infants learn during sleep. This study examined the role of sleep state in neonatal learning. We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG), respiratory, and cardiovascular activity from sleeping full term newborn infants during delay eyelid conditioning. In the experimental group (n = 21), a tone was paired with an air puff to the eye. Consistent with Fifer et al. (2010), newborn infants reliably learned during sleep. The experimental group more than doubled EMR rates to a tone alone, while a control group (n = 17) presented with unpaired tones and puffs maintained low EMR rates. Infant learners were more likely to produce a conditioned EMR during quiet sleep compared to active sleep. Understanding the influence of sleep state on conditioned responses will inform the potential use of eyelid conditioning for early screening. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neonatal medicine in ancient art.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2010-01-01

    There are a limited number of artistic objects from ancient times with particular importance in neonatal medicine. The best examples are figurines from ancient Egypt of Isis nursing Horus, showing the importance of breastfeeding. The earliest images of the human fetus were made by the Olmecs in Mexico around 1200- 400 BCE. One of the earliest representations of congenital anomalies is a figurine of diencephalic twins thought to be the goddess of Anatolia, dated to around 6500 BCE. In addition to these figurines, three sets of twins in the ancient world have medical importance, and Renaissance artists often used them as a subject for their paintings: "direct suckling animals" (Romulus and Remus), "heteropaternal superfecundation" (mother: Leda, fathers: Zeus, the king of the Olympian gods, and Leda's husband, Tyndareus), and "twin-to-twin transfusion" in monozygotic twins (Jacob and Esau).

  20. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis.

    PubMed

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-06-10

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis

    PubMed Central

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26063107

  2. Characteristics and mortality of neonates in an emergency obstetric and neonatal care facility, rural Burundi

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, R.; Ndelema, B.; Bulckaert, D.; Manzi, M.; Lambert, V.; Zachariah, R.; Reid, A. J.; Harries, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A Médecins Sans Frontières emergency obstetric and neonatal care facility specialising as a referral centre for three districts for women with complications during pregnancy or delivery in rural Burundi. Objective: To describe the characteristics and in-facility mortality rates of neonates born in 2011. Design: Descriptive study involving a retrospective review of routinely collected facility data. Results: Of 2285 women who delivered, the main complications were prolonged labour 331 (14%), arrested labour 238 (10%), previous uterine intervention 203 (9%), breech 171 (8%) and multiple gestations 150 (7%). There were 175 stillbirths and 2110 live neonates, of whom 515 (24%) were of low birth weight, 963 (46%) were delivered through caesarean section and 267 (13%) required active birth resuscitation. Overall, there were 102 (5%) neonatal deaths. A total of 453 (21%) neonates were admitted to dedicated neonatal special services for sick and low birth weight babies. A high proportion of these neonates were delivered by caesarean section and needed active birth resuscitation. Of 67 (15%) neonatal deaths in special services, 85% were due to conditions linked to low birth weight and birth asphyxia. Conclusion: Among neonates born to women with complications during pregnancy or delivery, in-facility deaths due to low birth weight and birth asphyxia were considerable. Sustained attention is needed to reduce these mortality rates. PMID:26393046

  3. Retrospective chart review comparing morphine and methadone in neonates treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Young, Mallory E; Hager, Shanna J; Spurlock, Darrell

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective was to determine whether oral morphine sulfate contributed to decreased length of stay, both in the hospital and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), when compared to oral methadone for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Secondary objectives included evaluation of NAS scores, opioid requirements, use of adjuvant therapy, and total cost of hospital stay. An equal number of neonates who received oral morphine sulfate and oral methadone as treatment for NAS were identified. Inclusion criteria included in utero exposure to opioids as determined by maternal history, toxicology reports during pregnancy or at the time of delivery, or infant urine toxicology reports and symptoms of NAS requiring pharmacological treatment. Exclusion criteria included neonates transferred to or from another facility during treatment, neonates discharged on NAS treatment, and neonates diagnosed with iatrogenic NAS due to postnatal exposure to opioids. Twenty six neonates met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant decreases in length of hospital and NICU stay, length of treatment, maximum opioid requirements, and total cost were found when neonates treated for NAS with oral morphine sulfate were compared to those treated with oral methadone. No statistically significant differences in average maximum NAS score or use of adjuvant therapy were found between the two groups. Oral morphine sulfate reduced length of NICU and hospital stay, length of treatment, and total cost of treatment for neonates treated for NAS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Water intoxication and hyponatraemic convulsions in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Vanapruks, V; Prapaitrakul, K

    1989-01-01

    We studied two neonates fed diluted formula and excessive water who developed hyponatraemic convulsions; treatment included intravenous hypertonic saline and water restriction. Educating mothers is important to stop recurrences. PMID:2730130

  6. Fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism: diagnostic and therapeutic approachment

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism may occur in mothers with Graves’ disease. Fetal thyrotoxicosis manifestation is observed with the transition of TSH receptor stimulating antibodies to the fetus from the 17th–20th weeks of pregnancy and with the fetal TSH receptors becoming responsive after 20 weeks. The diagnosis is confirmed by fetal tachycardia, goiter and bone age advancement in pregnancy and maternal treatment is conducted in accordance. The probability of neonatal hyperthyroidism is high in the babies of mothers that have ongoing antithyroid requirement and higher antibody levels in the last months of pregnancy. Clinical manifestation may be delayed by 7–17 days because of the antithyroid drugs taken by the mother. Neonatal hyperthyroidism symptoms can be confused with sepsis and congenital viral infections. Herein, the diagnosis and therapeutic approach are reviewed in cases of fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism. PMID:28439194

  7. Neonatal euthanasia: moral considerations and criminal liability.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, M

    2001-02-01

    Despite tremendous advances in medical care for critically ill newborn infants, caregivers in neonatal intensive care units still struggle with how to approach those patients whose prognoses appear to be the most grim, and whose treatments appear to be the most futile. Although the practice of passive neonatal euthanasia, from a moral perspective, has been widely (albeit quietly) condoned, those clinicians and families involved in such cases may still be found legally guilty of child abuse or even manslaughter. Passive neonatal euthanasia remains both a moral dilemma and a legal ambiguity. Even the definition of passive euthanasia remains unclear. This manuscript reviews the basic moral and legal considerations raised by the current practice of neonatal euthanasia, and examines the formal position statements of the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The paper concludes by emphasising the need, at least in the United States, to clarify the legal status of this relatively common medical practice.

  8. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children.

  9. Arousal Effects on Visual Preferences in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Judith M.; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the influence of arousal level on visual preferences by observing the looking preferences of 12 full-term neonates twice; once before feeding while unswaddled and once after feeding while swaddled. (Author/RH)

  10. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  11. Neonatal muscular manifestations in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Tulinius, Már; Oldfors, Anders

    2011-08-01

    During the last decade rapid development has occurred in defining nuclear gene mutations causing mitochondrial disease. Some of these newly defined gene mutations cause neonatal or early infantile onset of disease, often associated with severe progressive encephalomyopathy combined with other multi-organ involvement such as cardiomyopathy or hepatopathy and with early death. Findings suggesting myopathy in neonates are hypotonia, muscle weakness and wasting, and arthrogryposis. We aim to describe the clinical findings of patients with mitochondrial disease presenting with muscular manifestations in the neonatal period or in early infancy and in whom the genetic defect has been characterized. The majority of patients with neonatal onset of mitochondrial disease have mutations in nuclear genes causing dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, leading to defective oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Intensive care of the neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Koterba, A M; Drummond, W H; Kosch, P

    1985-04-01

    The basic concepts of diagnosis and treatment in the abnormal neonatal foal are presented. Methods of restraint, sedation, and general nursing care are discussed, as well as more specific techniques of respiratory and circulatory system support.

  13. Neonatal opioid withdrawal and antenatal opioid prescribing.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Gomes, Tara; Camacho, Ximena; Yao, Zhan; Guttmann, Astrid; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal is increasing in both Canada and the United States. However, the degree to which the treatment of pain with opioids, rather than the misuse of prescription opioids or heroin, contributes to the prevalence of neonatal opioid withdrawal remains unknown. We conducted a retrospective, population-based, cross-sectional study between 1992 and 2011 in Ontario with 2 objectives. First, we determined the annual incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome. Second, using data from a subset of women eligible for publicly funded prescription drugs, we determined what proportion of women who deliver an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome were given a prescription for an opioid before and during pregnancy. The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome in Ontario increased 15-fold during the study period, from 0.28 per 1000 live births in 1992 to 4.29 per 1000 live births in 2011. During the final 5 years of the study, we identified 927 deliveries of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome to mothers who were public drug plan beneficiaries. Of these mothers, 67% had received an opioid prescription in the 100 days preceding delivery, including 53.3% who received methadone, an increase from 28.6% in the interval spanning 1 to 2 years before delivery (p < 0.001). Prescription for nonmethadone opioids decreased from 38% to 17% (p < 0.001). The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal in Ontario has increased substantially over the last 20 years. Most of the women in this cohort who delivered an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome had received a prescription for an opioid both before and during their pregnancy.

  14. [Sensorineural hearing loss due to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    PubMed

    Clarós, P; Turcanu, D; Caballero, M; Costa, C; Clavería, M A; Clarós, A; Clarós, A

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the sensorineural hearing loss is presented as a possible sequelae of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In our program of early hipoacusia detection, 241 babies were examined from January 1996 until November 1999; 7 cases had a history of hyperbilirubinemia in the neonatal period and 2 of them were diagnosed of sensorineural hearing loss. We discuss how the bilirubin or any other associated factor might have been the cause and this could explain the selective affectation of some children.

  15. Diffuse pneumocephalus in neonatal Citrobacter meningitis.

    PubMed

    Alviedo, Joseph N; Sood, Beena G; Aranda, Jacob V; Becker, Cristie

    2006-11-01

    Pneumocephalus, intracranial air or gas collection, associated with neonatal meningitis is extremely rare. We report the first case in the United States and the second case in the world of intracranial gas accumulation in a neonate with Citrobacter koseri meningitis. The clinical presentation was acute with pneumocephalus demonstrated by cranial sonography and computed tomography. The clinical course was fatal despite the prompt administration of antibiotics.

  16. Neonatal opioid withdrawal and antenatal opioid prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tara; Camacho, Ximena; Yao, Zhan; Guttmann, Astrid; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Juurlink, David N.; Dhalla, Irfan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal is increasing in both Canada and the United States. However, the degree to which the treatment of pain with opioids, rather than the misuse of prescription opioids or heroin, contributes to the prevalence of neonatal opioid withdrawal remains unknown. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based, cross-sectional study between 1992 and 2011 in Ontario with 2 objectives. First, we determined the annual incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome. Second, using data from a subset of women eligible for publicly funded prescription drugs, we determined what proportion of women who deliver an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome were given a prescription for an opioid before and during pregnancy. Results The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome in Ontario increased 15-fold during the study period, from 0.28 per 1000 live births in 1992 to 4.29 per 1000 live births in 2011. During the final 5 years of the study, we identified 927 deliveries of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome to mothers who were public drug plan beneficiaries. Of these mothers, 67% had received an opioid prescription in the 100 days preceding delivery, including 53.3% who received methadone, an increase from 28.6% in the interval spanning 1 to 2 years before delivery (p < 0.001). Prescription for nonmethadone opioids decreased from 38% to 17% (p < 0.001). Interpretation The incidence of neonatal opioid withdrawal in Ontario has increased substantially over the last 20 years. Most of the women in this cohort who delivered an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome had received a prescription for an opioid both before and during their pregnancy. PMID:25844370

  17. Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abdulraheem, Muhydeen Abiodun; Tongo, Olukemi Oluwatoyin; Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Akinbami, Olukayode Felix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal transport involves moving sick neonates in optimal conditions to ensure good outcomes. It is well organized in most developed countries but receives little attention in developing countries where the highest burden of neonatal mortality exists and a large number of newborns require referrals daily for better medical care. This study sought to evaluate the modes of transport, pre- and intra-transport care of neonates referred to the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods The methods of transporting 401 neonates presenting to the children’s emergency room of the hospital were evaluated as well as the care the babies received during transport. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi square test while continuous variables were compared by the student t-test. Results About a third presented in the first 12hours and 85% in the first week of life, all from within 80km radius. There were 67.1% term, 31.4% preterm and 1.5% post-term neonates, all without prior communication. The modes of transport included private vehicles (43.9%), commercial vehicles (40.6%), motorcycles (9.0%), ambulance (4.0%) and on foot (2.5%). Only 3 (0.7%) were transported in incubators and none in KMC position. Only 42.0% had referral letters and 7.0% were accompanied by medical personnel. Materials available during transport included Ambubags (3.7%), oxygen (3.5%) and some drugs (3.5%). Events during transport were apnoea, 4.7%, vomiting 1.0%, reduced activity 16.2% and seizures 13.7%. 19 (4.7%) neonates were dead on arrival. Pre-transport care included resuscitation (18.2%), intravenous fluid/feeding (24.4%) and supplemental oxygen (14.0%). Conclusion Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria are abysmal with associated high mortality. PMID:27800071

  18. Delayed umbilical cord clamping in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Kaempf, Joseph W; Tomlinson, Mark W; Kaempf, Andrew J; Wu, YingXing; Wang, Lian; Tipping, Nicole; Grunkemeier, Gary

    2012-08-01

    Delayed umbilical cord clamping is reported to increase neonatal blood volume. We estimated the clinical outcomes in premature neonates who had delayed umbilical cord clamping compared with a similar group who had early umbilical cord clamping. This was a before-after investigation comparing early umbilical cord clamping with delayed umbilical cord clamping (45 seconds) in two groups of singleton neonates, very low birth weight (VLBW) (401-1,500 g) and low birth weight (LBW) (greater than 1,500 g but less than 35 weeks gestation). Neonates were excluded from delayed umbilical cord clamping if they needed immediate major resuscitation. Primary outcomes were provision of delivery room resuscitation, hematocrit, red cell transfusions, and the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes. In VLBW neonates (77 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 1,099±266 g; 77 early umbilical cord clamping 1,058±289 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with less delivery room resuscitation, higher Apgar scores at 1 minute, and higher hematocrit. Delayed umbilical cord clamping was not associated with significant differences in the overall transfusion rate, peak bilirubin, any of the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes, or mortality. In LBW neonates (172 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 2,159±384 g; 172 early umbilical cord clamping 2,203±447 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with higher hematocrit and was not associated with a change in delivery room resuscitation or Apgar scores or with changes in the transfusion rate or peak bilirubin. Regression analysis showed increasing gestational age and birth weight and delayed umbilical cord clamping were the best predictors of higher hematocrit and less delivery room resuscitation. Delayed umbilical cord clamping can safely be performed in singleton premature neonates and is associated with a higher hematocrit, less delivery room

  19. [Neonatal parenteral nutrition prescription practices in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Neves, A; Pereira-da-Silva, L; Fernandez-Llimos, F

    2014-02-01

    The use of guidelines for neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) improves its clinical efficiency and the safety of prescription. To evaluate the practices of neonatal parenteral nutrition prescription in Portugal, and the adherence to the National Consensus on neonatal PN (2008). A questionnaire based on a multiple choice response on parenteral nutrition prescription was conducted, and sent to the coordinators of the 50 public and private Portuguese neonatal special care units, 25 being level III and 25 level II. Parenteral nutrition was prescribed in 32 neonatal units, 23 of which (71.9%) responded to the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 19 (82.6%) refer to follow the National Consensus, the remaining following local guidelines; 17 (73.9%) of units referred to using an electronic based system for prescription. In preterm neonates, most mentioned: administering judiciously the fluid intake during the first post-natal week; starting amino acids from the first post-natal day with 1.5-3g/kg/d, increasing up to 3-4g/kg/d; starting lipids from the first three post-natal days with 1g/kg/d, increasing up to 3g/kg/d; administering 40-70mg/kg/d of calcium and of phosphorus with the fixed calcium:phosphorus ratio of 1.7: 1 (mg:mg); and estimating the osmolality of the solutions, and weekly monitoring of serum triglycerides, blood urea, serum phosphorus and liver function. The high response rate is probably representative of the practice of PN prescription in Portugal. Most of the units used the National Consensus on neonatal PN as a reference, thus contributing to better nutritional support for neonates. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  1. Optical topographic studies of adults and neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissila, Ilkka T.; Kotilahti, Kalle; Noponen, Tommi E.; Huotilainen, Minna; Naatanen, Risto; Katila, Toivo E.

    2003-07-01

    We used a four-channel intensity-modulated near-infrared spectroscopy device to study the hemodynamic responses due to brain activation in adults and neonates. The stimuli included finger tapping, tickling of the heel, and auditory stimuli. The subjects included two adults and ten neonates of age between 0.5 and 4 days. A block paradigm was used in the studies, and responses were successfully obtained from both subject groups.

  2. Intracardiac Fungal Mass in a Term Neonate

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M.; Kurkluoglu, Mustafa; Hynes, Conor F.; Klugman, Darren; Puscasiu, Elena; Nath, Dilip S.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic fungal infections pose insidious challenges in neonatal intensive care settings. We present the case of a 9-day-old male term neonate admitted for polymicrobial sepsis and hepatic dysfunction who later developed candidemia superinfection. Despite broad antifungal therapy, the fungemia was complicated by progressive growth of a fungus ball in the right ventricular outflow tract that threatened cardiac function. Surgical excision of the mass was undertaken by right atriotomy and histologic examination confirmed Candida albicans. PMID:28289498

  3. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  5. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  6. Maternal Risk Factors for Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    March, Melissa I.; Gupta, Munish; Modest, Anna M.; Wu, Lily; Hacker, Michele R.; Martin, Camilia R.; Rana, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the relationship between maternal hypertensive disease and other risk factors and the neonatal development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Methods This was a retrospective case control study of infants with NEC from 2008 to 2012. The primary exposure of interest was maternal hypertensive disease, which has been hypothesized to put infants at risk for NEC. Other variables collected included demographics, pregnancy complications, medications, and neonatal hospital course. Data was abstracted from medical records. Results 28 cases of singleton neonates with NEC and 81 matched controls were identified and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome. Fetuses with an antenatal diagnosis of growth restriction were more likely to develop NEC (p=0.008). Infants with NEC had lower median birth weight than infants without NEC (p=0.009). Infants with NEC had more late-onset sepsis (p=0.01) and mortality before discharge (p=0.001). Conclusions The factors identified by this case-control study that increased the risk of neonatal NEC included intrauterine growth restriction and lower neonatal birth weight. The primary exposure, hypertensive disease, did not show a significantly increased risk of neonatal NEC, however there was a nearly two-fold difference observed. Our study was underpowered to detect the observed difference. PMID:25162307

  7. A history of neonatal medicine in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaeizadeh, Golnaz; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal medicine was officially initiated in the United States of America in 1973, and in the same year, the American Board of Pediatrics held the first subspecialty examination in the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine. The first Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Tehran began its work with great efforts of Prof. Hadi Samaee at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital, approved by the Ministry of Health as the first standard center for training neonatologists. Hence, the first neonatology fellowship program began in 1986 and two years later (1988) its graduate started work at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital. Afterwards, more NICUs were built all over the country and equipped gradually. The Iranian Association of Neonatology and Perinatology were founded in 1998 and 2003, respectively. These two scientific associations jointly made recommendations to health officials to develop consistent educational programs for neonatal and maternal health promotion in Iran. Regionalization of maternal-neonatal health services was also another recommendation which has now been presented to the Ministry of Health as a national program to promote neonatal and maternal health status. Thanks to the measures taken so far over the last few years, the index of neonatal mortality has declined from 26 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 11 per 1,000 live births in 2012.

  8. Neonatal aortic thrombosis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Nagel, K; Tuckuviene, R; Paes, B; Chan, A K

    2010-05-01

    Neonatal aortic thrombosis is a rare occurrence, but can be fatal. Treatment of this condition is hampered by the lack of large studies involving this pediatric population. Reporting of this condition is also not standardized. The purpose of this review is to collate available literature on the incidence, risk factors, presentation, treatment and outcome of neonatal aortic thrombosis as well as suggest a treatment model. A Medline search of PubMed, OVID and Cochrane databases was undertaken using the key words "neonatal", "infant", "aorta", "aortic", "thrombosis", "thrombus" and "clot". Limits were set for articles that were English language only and published between 1980 and September 2009. Following review of all articles using predetermined search words and criteria, 38 were found with sufficient data for our purpose. The reported total number of neonatal patients with aortic thrombosis was 148 and 78% of the aortic thromboses in this review were related to arterial umbilical catheterization. We have suggested a classification system to standardize reporting of neonatal aortic thrombosis, as well as a treatment decision tree, and a clinical guide for the treatment of thrombosis in children. As always, clinicians should balance the risks and benefits of their decision to treat with the level of local expertise. This guide may specifically serve the neonatal population with line-related aortic thrombosis.

  9. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Received by Premature Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Aramesh, Mohmmadreza; Zanganeh, Kobra Aria; Dehdashtian, Masoud; Malekian, Arash; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the radiation dose received by premature neonates using diagnostic radiographies. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 premature neonates with gestational age from 25 to 37 weeks; with the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) and tachypnea, they were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Ahvaz Imam Khomeini Hospital in 2015. For assessing the dose received, the model GR-200 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) was used. For each premature neonate under radiation, three TLDs separately (one for each) were placed on surfaces of Ch1, T1, and G1 (chest, thyroid, and gonad of first newborn, respectively). Moreover, for the adjacent neonate at a distance of 60 - 100 cm, two TLDs were laid in the surfaces of T2 and G2 (thyroid and gonad of second newborn, respectively). The dose received by TLDs for any baby and the adjacent neonate under the entrance surface dose (ESD) was estimated. Results The mean of neonates’ weight under study was 1,950.78 ± 484.9 g. During the hospitalization period, minimum one and maximum three radiographies were done for any premature neonate. The doses received in the premature neonates to Ch1, T1 and G1 were 0.08 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.01, and 0.05 ± 0.01 mSv, respectively and for adjacent infants for T2 and G2 were 0.003 ± 0.001 and 0.002 ± 0.0009 mSv, respectively. Conclusions In the study, radiation dose received by organs at risk of premature neonates was lower than the international criteria and standards, therefore, also due to the lack of radiation damage threshold, to limit collimator, and the use of the proper filtration, kilovoltage and time during radiography of premature neonates are recommended. PMID:28090228

  10. Prevalence of Stroke in Neonates Who Admitted With Seizures in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    FARHADI, Roya; ALAEE, Abdolrasool; ALIPOUR, Zahra; ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; NAKHSHAB, Maryam; DERAKHSHANFAR, Hojjat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prevalence of neonatal stroke has been reported 1/2300-1/4000 live births and accounts for 12-20% of the cases of neonatal seizures. Although stroke has been introduced as the second cause of the neonatal seizures in literatures, it may remain unclear in diagnostic evaluations of seizure in neonates. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of stroke in neonates with seizure. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all neonates ≥ 28 weeks of gestation with a diagnosis of seizures admitted to the NICU of Boo-Ali Sina Hospital in Sari, north of Iran, were enrolled. Brain CT scan and a Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were performed for the all cases. In cases that stroke were reported in one or two above modalities, an MRI was also performed and prevalence of stroke was reported. Putative risk factors of stroke were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results From 174 newborn infants, 75.3% of neonates were male. Prevalence of stroke was 8%, 2.3% and 3.4% in Doppler ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI reports respectively. Umbilical venous catheterization was the risk factor of stroke in the univariate and multivariate analysis (P= 0.001; OR, 10.39; 95% CI, 2.72- 39.77). The most common form of seizure was focal clonic seizures (78.6%) in neonates with stroke. Conclusion Investigation of stroke as an etiology of neonatal seizures is essential because seizure may be the only symptom of neonatal cerebral infarction. Doppler ultrasonography can be a valuable diagnostic tool at first in critically ill neonates or in situations that MRI is not available primarily. Further studies with notice to outcome assessment of these infants recommended. PMID:26664440

  11. Evaluation of neonatal jaundice in the Makkah region.

    PubMed

    Alkhotani, Abdulaziz; Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Zaghloul, Amal; Mujahid, Shakil

    2014-04-25

    The aims of this study were to detect the frequency at which the different types of neonatal jaundice occur in Makkah and to estimate the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. This study included 239 neonates with neonatal jaundice, 20 anemic neonates and 21 healthy neonates. ABO incompatibility was observed in 31.6% of neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia, in 14.3% of those with early onset jaundice, in 9.5% of those with persistent jaundice, in 8.5% of those with physiological jaundice, in 5% of anemic neonates and in 12% of all neonates. glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency was observed in 10.5% of neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia, in 3.9% of those with physiological jaundice, in 11.1% of those with direct hyperbilirubinemia, in 12% of those with persistent jaundice, in 10% of anemic neonates and in 6.6% of all neonates. Rh incompatibility and polycythemia were found in 2.6% of neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia and in 0.4% of all neonates. In comparison to control group, MDA was significantly higher in all groups except for the anemic group. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility and G6PD deficiency frequently result in neonatal jaundice in Makkah, whereas Rh incompatibility and polycythemia are rare. The MDA level may serve as an indicator of oxidative stress.

  12. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in neonates born to opioid maintained women.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Nina; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Baewert, Andjela; Jagsch, Reinhold; Peternell, Alexandra; Thau, Kenneth; Fischer, Gabriele

    2007-03-16

    Neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers are at risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which often requires pharmacological treatment. This study examined the effect of opioid maintenance treatment on the incidence and timing of NAS, and compared two different NAS treatments (phenobarbital versus morphine hydrochloride). Fifty-three neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers were included in this study. The mothers received methadone (n=22), slow-release oral morphine (n=17) or buprenorphine (n=14) throughout pregnancy. Irrespective of maintenance treatment, all neonates showed APGAR scores comparable to infants of non-opioid dependent mothers. No difference was found between the three maintenance groups regarding neonatal weight, length or head circumference. Sixty percent (n=32) of neonates required treatment for NAS [68% in the methadone-maintained group (n=15), 82% in the morphine-maintained group (n=14), and 21% in the buprenorphine-maintained group (n=3)]. The mean duration from birth to requirement of NAS treatment was 33 h for the morphine-maintained group, 34 h for the buprenorphine-maintained group and 58 h for the methadone-maintained group. In neonates requiring NAS treatment, those receiving morphine required a significantly shorter mean duration of treatment (9.9 days) versus those treated with phenobarbital (17.7 days). Results suggest that morphine hydrochloride is preferable for neonates suffering NAS due to opioid withdrawal.

  13. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  14. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  15. Understanding neonatal ventilation: strategies for decision making in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Petty, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal ventilation is an integral component of care delivered in the neonatal unit. The aim of any ventilation strategy is to support the neonate's respiratory system during compromise while limiting any long-term damage to the lungs. Understanding the principles behind neonatal ventilation is essential so that health professionals caring for sick neonates and families have the necessary knowledge to understand best practice. Given the range of existing ventilation modes and parameters available, these require explanation and clarification in the context of current evidence. Many factors can influence clinical decision making on both an individual level and within the wider perspective of neonatal care.

  16. Pantoea dispersa: an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mehar, Veerendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Sanghvi, Jyoti; Gupta, Nidhi; Singh, Kuldeep

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal septicemia is the most important cause of neonatal mortality. A wide variety of bacteria both aerobic and anaerobic can cause neonatal sepsis. Genus Pantoea is a member of Enterobacteriaceae family that inhabits plants, soil and water and rarely causes human infections, however, Pantoea dispersa has not been reported as a causative organism for neonatal sepsis. We hereby report two neonates with early onset sepsis caused by Pantoea dispersa. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic therapy can improve overall outcome of this rare infection in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Disorders: Prospects and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Ahn, So Yoon; Sung, Sein

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal medicine, neonatal disorders, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in term neonates, remain major causes of mortality and morbidities. Promising preclinical research results suggest that stem cell therapies represent the next breakthrough in the treatment of currently intractable and devastating neonatal disorders with complex multifactorial etiologies. This review focuses primarily on the potential role of stem cell therapy in the above mentioned neonatal disorders, highlighting the results of human clinical trials and the challenges that remain to be addressed for their safe and successful translation into clinical care of newborn infants. PMID:28120555

  18. [Updated treatments for neonatal phimosis and redundant prepuce].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Chun; Liu, De-Kai; Ben, Kun-Long

    2010-07-01

    Phimosis and redundant prepuce, as common problems in andrology, are found in the majority of male neonates. Early treatment of neonatal phimosis and redundant prepuce has the advantages of better cost--effectiveness and higher safety, and contributes much to the prevention of childhood urinary tract infection and adult sexually transmitted diseases, as well as to the improvement of genital hygiene. Neonatal circumcision is commonly performed in some countries, but remains at a low rate in China. This article updates surgical and non-surgical treatments of neonatal phimosis and redundant prepuce, introduces the benefits of neonatal circumcision, and appeals for more attention to the management of neonatal phimosis and redundant prepuce.

  19. Fetal and Neonatal Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are substances commonly encountered in every setting and condition in the modern world. It is virtually impossible to avoid the contact with these chemical compounds in our daily life. Molecules defined as endocrine disruptors constitute an extremely heterogeneous group and include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants and their by-products. Natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens) also act as endocrine disruptors. Different from adults, children are not exposed only to chemical toxins in the environment but may also be exposed during their intrauterine life. Hundreds of toxic substances, which include neuro-immune and endocrine toxic chemical components that may influence the critical steps of hormonal, neurological and immunological development, may affect the fetus via the placental cord and these substances may be excreted in the meconium. Children and especially newborns are more sensitive to environmental toxins compared to adults. Metabolic pathways are immature, especially in the first months of life. The ability of the newborn to metabolize, detoxify and eliminate many toxins is different from that of the adults. Although exposures occur during fetal or neonatal period, their effects may sometimes be observed in later years. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects of these substances on the endocrine system and to provide evidence for preventive measures. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22672860

  20. Memory in the Neonate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Gómez, David M.; Macagno, Francesco; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Peretz, Isabelle; Mehler, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background The capacity to memorize speech sounds is crucial for language acquisition. Newborn human infants can discriminate phonetic contrasts and extract rhythm, prosodic information, and simple regularities from speech. Yet, there is scarce evidence that infants can recognize common words from the surrounding language before four months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied one hundred and twelve 1-5 day-old infants, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We found that newborns tested with a novel bisyllabic word show greater hemodynamic brain response than newborns tested with a familiar bisyllabic word. We showed that newborns recognize the familiar word after two minutes of silence or after hearing music, but not after hearing a different word. Conclusions/Significance The data show that retroactive interference is an important cause of forgetting in the early stages of language acquisition. Moreover, because neonates forget words in the presence of some –but not all– sounds, the results indicate that the interference phenomenon that causes forgetting is selective. PMID:22087327

  1. Memory in the neonate brain.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Gómez, David M; Macagno, Francesco; Bion, Ricardo A H; Peretz, Isabelle; Mehler, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The capacity to memorize speech sounds is crucial for language acquisition. Newborn human infants can discriminate phonetic contrasts and extract rhythm, prosodic information, and simple regularities from speech. Yet, there is scarce evidence that infants can recognize common words from the surrounding language before four months of age. We studied one hundred and twelve 1-5 day-old infants, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We found that newborns tested with a novel bisyllabic word show greater hemodynamic brain response than newborns tested with a familiar bisyllabic word. We showed that newborns recognize the familiar word after two minutes of silence or after hearing music, but not after hearing a different word. The data show that retroactive interference is an important cause of forgetting in the early stages of language acquisition. Moreover, because neonates forget words in the presence of some--but not all--sounds, the results indicate that the interference phenomenon that causes forgetting is selective.

  2. [Neonatal lupus syndrome: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Levesque, K; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Le Bidois, J; Bessières, B; Brouzes, C; Le Mercier, D; Villain, E; Maltret, A; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is associated with transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Children display cutaneous, hematological, liver or cardiac features. Cardiac manifestations include congenital heart block (CHB); endocardial fibroelastosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women with known connective tissue disease is between 1 and 2% and the risk of recurrence is around 19%. Skin and systemic lesions are transient, whereas CHB is definitive and associated with significant morbidity and a mortality of 18%. A pacemaker must be implanted in 2/3 of cases. Myocarditis may be associated or appear secondly. Mothers of children with CHB are usually asymptomatic or display Sjogren's syndrome or undifferentiated connective tissue disease. In anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women, fetal echocardiography should be performed at least every 2 weeks from the 16th to 24th week gestation. An electrocardiogram should be performed for all newborn babies. The benefit of fluorinated corticosteroid therapy for CHB detected in utero remains unclear. Maternal use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a decreased recurrent CHB risk in a subsequent offspring. A prospective study is actually ongoing to confirm these findings.

  3. Neonatal mortality: an invisible and marginalised trauma

    PubMed Central

    Målqvist, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal mortality is a major health problem in low and middle income countries and the rate of improvement of newborn survival is slow. This article is a review of the PhD thesis by Mats Målqvist, titled ‘Who can save the unseen – Studies on neonatal mortality in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam,’ from Uppsala University. The thesis aims to investigate structural barriers to newborn health improvements and determinants of neonatal death. The findings reveal a severe under-reporting of neonatal deaths in the official health statistics in Quang Ninh province in northern Vietnam. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) found was four times higher than what was reported to the Ministry of Health. This underestimation of the problem inhibits adequate interventions and efforts to improve the survival of newborns and highlights the invisibility of this vulnerable group. The findings of the thesis also point at an inequity in survival chances based on ethnicity of the mother. Newborns of ethnic minority mothers were at a twofold risk of dying within the first 4 weeks of life compared to their peers belonging to the hegemonic group of Kinh (OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.39–3.10). This increased risk was independent of maternal education and household economic status. Neonatal mortality was also associated with home deliveries, non-attendance to antenatal care and distance to the health care facilities. However, ethnic minority mothers still had an increased risk of experiencing a neonatal death even if they attended antenatal care, delivered at, or lived close to a health facility. This example of ethnic inequity highlights the importance to target those most in need. PMID:21423597

  4. CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian; Fan, Yong; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; An, Hongyu; Wald, Lawrence L.; Gerig, Guido; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of high-quality magnetic resonance (MR) images of neonatal brains is largely hampered by their characteristically small head size and insufficient tissue contrast. As a result, subsequent image processing and analysis, especially brain tissue segmentation, are often affected. To overcome this problem, a dedicated phased array neonatal head coil is utilized to improve MR image quality by augmenting signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution without lengthening data acquisition time. In addition, a specialized hybrid atlas-based tissue segmentation algorithm is developed for the delineation of fine structures in the acquired neonatal brain MR images. The proposed tissue segmentation method first enhances the sheet-like cortical gray matter (GM) structures in the to-be-segmented neonatal image with a Hessian filter for generation of a cortical GM confidence map. A neonatal population atlas is then generated by averaging the presegmented images of a population, weighted by their cortical GM similarity with respect to the to-be-segmented image. Finally, the neonatal population atlas is combined with the GM confidence map, and the resulting enhanced tissue probability maps for each tissue form a hybrid atlas that is used for atlas-based segmentation. Various experiments are conducted to compare the segmentations of the proposed method with manual segmentation (on both images acquired with a dedicated phased array coil and a conventional volume coil), as well as with the segmentations of two population-atlas-based methods. Results show the proposed method is capable of segmenting the neonatal brain with the best accuracy, and also preserving the most structural details in the cortical regions. PMID:20690143

  5. Neonatal Health Psychology [NNHP]: theories and practice.

    PubMed

    Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina Nabuco

    2004-12-01

    By 1994, Health Psychology had been established as a discipline, and defined by Marie Johnston as the scientific study of the psychological processes and behaviour in health, illness and health care. Health Psychology, so far, has mainly related to the adult population, although increasing attention is now being paid to both pediatric and broadly-based child health psychology. It is noteworthy that attention devoted to pediatric and child health psychology has increased dramatically, but the great majority of published work refers to the child and not to the preterm neonate; yet being preterm means being born early, and sometimes too small, and is a stressful life event. In the field of Medicine, Neonatology has appeared as a sub-discipline, and both investigates and cares for at-risk babies, including risk for developmental disabilities. The time is consequently opportune for psychology to make an effective contribution to both the theory and care of the preterm neonate, viewed as a unique, emergent, coactional and hierarchical human being. The formal framework for this is Neonatal Health Psychology (NNHP), which is defined in the article as 'the scientific study of biopsychosocial and behavioural processes in health, illness, and health care of the preterm (and fullterm) neonate during his/her first 28 days of life, and the relationship of such processes with later outcome.' Early work in this category has shown that NNHP has profound interdisciplinary connotations, not least because of the diverse ways in which information has to be derived from the non-verbal neonates. The pathways and scope of NNHP are identified, and many examples of work with preterm neonates are summarised in the article. In making the case for the professional formalization of NNHP, descriptions are given of Neonatal Assessments and very-early interventions; the interdisciplinary character of much of the early work is shown to have been essential. Indication of theoretical frameworks for

  6. Bacteriological profile and antibiogram of neonatal septicemia.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Narayan; Sanjana, Raj Kumari

    2013-05-01

    To determine the incidence of neonatal septicemia, identify the bacterial isolates and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in neonates visiting out-patient door (OPD) and admitted to the pediatric ward and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the College of Medical Sciences, Teaching Hospital, Chitwan, Nepal. Blood culture of all neonates who were suspected for septicemia was performed. Isolate identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by standard microbiological method. Out of the total 7,868 blood culture samples submitted to the microbiology laboratory, 1,572 (19.97 %) samples were from suspected cases of neonatal septicemia. The blood culture was positive for neonatal sepsis in 238 (15.13 %) samples. The incidence of gram positive and gram negative organisms were 44.1 % and 55.9 % respectively. Staphylococcus aureus remained the predominant isolate followed by Klebsiella spp. Most of the gram positive isolates exhibited higher resistance to penicillin and cephalosporin. Susceptibility to commonly used aminoglycosides and quinolones was found. Similarly, more than two third isolates of gram negative Enterobacteriaceae showed resistance to ampicillin. Third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides were found to be more satisfactory among gram negative organisms as compared to gram positive. The high incidence of neonatal septicemia in the present setting reflects high magnitude of problem in central part of Nepal. Organisms isolated in the study exhibited higher resistance towards commonly used antimicrobials. High resistances to recommended drugs awares health care workers to seek for alternative antimicrobial agents. The periodic survey of etiological agents and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns is indeed necessary for the timely alarm of such type of problems.

  7. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and neonatal respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti; Dell, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74-94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85-99) specificity for PCD. When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. METHODS: This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74–94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85–99) specificity for PCD. CONCLUSIONS: When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). PMID:25422025

  9. Hypocalcemia in jaundiced neonates receiving phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashal; Malik, Kanwal Altaf; Bai, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of hypocalcemia in term neonates with jaundice receiving phototherapy. Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted at Neonatal intensive care unit, National Institute of Child Health, Karachi from 1st January 2014 to 30th December 2014. A total of 123 term neonates with jaundice of either gender managed by phototherapy were enrolled in the study. Gestational age was assessed through modified Ballard scoring. Duration of phototherapy was recorded. A sample of 3 ml of blood was sent to the laboratory for serum calcium level before initiating phototherapy and after 24 hours of continued phototherapy. All the data were recorded in the preformed proforma. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 19. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: The mean age of the neonates was 8.35±6.74 days. Mean gestational age at the time of birth was 39.08±1.37 weeks. Mean duration of jaundice was 2.4±1.20 days. Mean duration of phototherapy was 1.74±0.98 days. Serum calcium level before and after 24 hours of initiating phototherapy was 8.73±0.68 mg/dl and 7.47±0.82mg/dl respectively Frequency of hypocalcemia in term jaundiced neonates receiving phototherapy were observed in 22.76% (28/123). Conclusions: The frequency of hypocalcemia is significant in the jaundiced neonates treated with phototherapy. One needs to be vigilant in dealing neonates in this context while serial monitoring for hypocalcemia and its complications should be considered in institutional policy and research priority. PMID:28083043

  10. Neonatal sepsis-- a global problem: an overview.

    PubMed

    Afroza, S

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the major health problems throughout the world. Every year an estimated 30 million newborns acquire infection and 1-2 million of these die. The present review provides updates regarding neonatal sepsis to help paediatricians to protect the newborn from this deadly problem. The onset of sepsis within first 48 hours of life (early onset sepsis) is frequently associated with pre and perinatal predisposing factors while onset after 48-72 hours of life (late onset sepsis) frequently reflects infection acquired nosocomially. Some literatures say that early onset disease presents in the first 5-7 days of life. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing neonatal sepsis in Bangladesh and neighbouring countries. Among many risk factors the single most important neonatal risk factor is low birth weight. Other main risk factors are invassive procedures in the postnatal period and inadequate hand washing before and after handling babies. Sepsis score is a useful method for early and rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis which was developed by Tollner U in 1982. Antibiotics should be given to most of the neonates suspected of infection. Ampicillin and gentamicin are the first drug of choice. In Bangladesh context sepsis score may be used as a good parameter for the early and rapid diagnosis of sepsis and that will guide the treatment plan. Clean and safe delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, strict postnatal cleanliness following adequate handwashing and aseptic technique during invasive procedure might reduce the incidence of neonatal sepsis. Prompt use of antibiotic according to standard policy is warranted to save the newborn lives from septicaemia.

  11. Neonatal tetanus in the world today*

    PubMed Central

    Stanfield, J. P.; Galazka, A.

    1984-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus is an important cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. In the past this disease was overlooked by the health services of many developing countries, but recently the extent and magnitude of neonatal tetanus has become clearer and shown that it is a very serious health problem in the developing countries. The results of community-based surveys show that neonatal tetanus mortality rates range from less than 5 to more than 60 per 1000 live births; these deaths represent between 23% and 72% of all neonatal deaths. The results so far suggest that this disease claims the lives of over half a million new-born children every year. All forms of tetanus, and especially neonatal tetanus, remain substantially under-reported in many countries, and routine reporting systems identify only about 2-5% of the estimated number of tetanus cases (based on the results of community surveys). More reliable and accurate estimates of the incidence and mortality from tetanus are therefore required. The elimination of neonatal tetanus is an essential and attainable goal. It may be achieved by combining two approaches: (1) increasing the immunization coverage of women of child-bearing age, and especially pregnant women, with tetanus toxoid, and (2) improving maternity care, with particular emphasis on increasing the proportions of deliveries that are attended by trained persons. Neonatal tetanus mortality should serve as an index of the quality and the extent of utilization of the maternal health services, of the impact of immunization programmes, and of the progress being made in achieving the WHO goal of “Health for All by the Year 2000”. The elimination of neonatal tetanus calls for a full commitment by governments and by other bodies, public and private, with a responsibility for the care of women and children. The occurrence of even a single case of neonatal tetanus is witness to failures in the health system, for prevention is possible through the actions of

  12. The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Kersbergen, Karina J; de Reus, Marcel A; Keunen, Kristin; Kahn, René S; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-09-01

    The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory. Acquiring diffusion-weighted imaging and resting-state fMRI, we studied connectome formation during the preterm phase of macroscopic connectome genesis. In total, 27 neonates were scanned at week 30 and/or week 40 gestational age (GA). Examining the architecture of the neonatal anatomical brain network revealed a clear presence of a small-world modular organization before term birth. Analysis of neonatal functional connectivity (FC) showed the early formation of resting-state networks, suggesting that functional networks are present in the preterm brain, albeit being in an immature state. Moreover, structural and FC patterns of the neonatal brain network showed strong overlap with connectome architecture of the adult brain (85 and 81%, respectively). Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01). Computational analysis further showed that developmental changes involved an increase in integration capacity of the connectivity network as a whole. Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Structural Connectivity Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V.; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  14. The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; de Reus, Marcel A.; Keunen, Kristin; Kahn, René S.; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S.; Benders, Manon J.N.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory. Acquiring diffusion-weighted imaging and resting-state fMRI, we studied connectome formation during the preterm phase of macroscopic connectome genesis. In total, 27 neonates were scanned at week 30 and/or week 40 gestational age (GA). Examining the architecture of the neonatal anatomical brain network revealed a clear presence of a small-world modular organization before term birth. Analysis of neonatal functional connectivity (FC) showed the early formation of resting-state networks, suggesting that functional networks are present in the preterm brain, albeit being in an immature state. Moreover, structural and FC patterns of the neonatal brain network showed strong overlap with connectome architecture of the adult brain (85 and 81%, respectively). Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01). Computational analysis further showed that developmental changes involved an increase in integration capacity of the connectivity network as a whole. Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development. PMID:24833018

  15. Inadvertent Methylergonovine Administration to a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Bryan M.; O’Connell, Charles; Boutin, Mallory A.; Fatayerji, Nabil I.; Sauer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, Newborn Final Diagnosis: Accidental methylergonovine poisoning Symptoms: Respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Methylergonovine is an ergot alkaloid used to treat post-partum hemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Mistaking methylergonovine for vitamin K with accidental administration to the neonate is a rare iatrogenic illness occurring almost exclusively in the delivery room setting. Complications of ergot alkaloids in neonates include respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Case Report: A term infant was inadvertently given 0.1 mg of methylergonovine intramuscularly in the right thigh. The error was only noted when the vial of medication was scanned, after administration, identifying it as methylergonovine rather than vitamin K. The local poison center was notified, and the infant was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for observation. Two hours after transfer, the infant was noted to have oxygen desaturations and required oxygen via nasal cannula. Supplemental oxygen was continued for 4 hours until the neonate was able to maintain normal oxygen saturations in room air. Feeding was started by 10 hours of life, and the infant was discharged home in good condition after a 72-hour stay without further complications. Conclusions: Because of the potential for serious adverse events, vigilance is required to prevent accidental administration of methylergonovine to the neonate as a result of possible confusion with vitamin K in the early post-partum period. PMID:27765939

  16. Neonatal Sleep Predicts Attention Orienting and Distractibility.

    PubMed

    Geva, Ronny; Yaron, Hagit; Kuint, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Children with sleep disorders tend to experience attention problems, yet little is known about the relationship between sleep and attention in early development. This prospective follow-up study investigated the longitudinal relationships between neonatal sleep, attention, and distraction in infants born preterm. We used actigraphy and sleep-wake diaries in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, N = 65), attention orienting in a visual-recognition-memory task (VRM) at age 4 months, and structured observation of attention and distractibility at age 18 months. Infants with poorer neonatal sleep (n = 31) exhibited longer first gaze durations in the VRM at 4 months and longer distraction episodes at 18 months relative to neonatal controls who slept well (p < .01). Hierarchical regression models support relations between neonatal sleep and gaze behavior at 4 months and distractibility at 18 months; moreover, alterations in orienting attention at 4 months predicted the likelihood of being distracted during the second year of life. Findings underscore the importance of early sleep-wake and attention regulation in the development of distraction in infants born preterm. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  18. Lactoferrin for prevention of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Christie G.; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Pezo, Alonso; Cruz, Karen; Zegarra, Jaime; Bellomo, Sicilia; Cam, Luis; Llanos, Raul; Castañeda, Anne; Tucto, Lourdes; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm neonates are at risk to acquire infections. In addition to the high mortality associated with sepsis, these patients are at risk for long-term disabilities, particularly neurodevelopment impairment. Several interventions have been evaluated to reduce rates of infections in neonates but have not proven efficacy. Lactoferrin (LF), a milk glycoprotein with anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-microbial properties, has the potential to prevent infections in young children. We performed a review of current and ongoing clinical trials of LF for prevention of neonatal sepsis, and found eleven registered clinical trials that include more than 6000 subjects. Few of these trials have finished; despite their small sample size, the preliminary results show a trend towards a positive protective effect of LF on neonatal infections. Larger trials are underway to confirm the findings of these initial studies. This information will help to define LF´s role in clinical settings and, if proven effective, would profoundly affect the treatment of low birth weight neonates as a cost-effective intervention worldwide. PMID:24935001

  19. Antibiotic stewardship in perinatal and neonatal care.

    PubMed

    Ramasethu, Jayashree; Kawakita, Tetsuya

    2017-10-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistance due to the use and misuse of antibiotics around the world is now a major health crisis. Neonates are exposed to antibiotics both before and after birth, often empirically because of risk factors for infection, or for non-specific signs which may or may not indicate sepsis. There is increasing evidence that, apart from antibiotic resistance, the use of antibiotics in pregnancy and in the neonatal period alters the microbiome in the fetus and neonate with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse effects. Antibiotic stewardship is a co-ordinated program that promotes the appropriate use of antibiotics, improves patient outcomes, reduces microbial resistance, and decreases the spread of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. This review addresses some of the controversies in antibiotic use in the perinatal period, examines opportunities for reduction of unnecessary antibiotic exposure in neonates, and provides a framework for antibiotic stewardship in neonatal care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acinetobacter baumannii neonatal mastitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; Berhane, Abeba; Zora, John Gregory; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2014-09-25

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare infection. When it does occur, infants younger than 2 months of age are typically affected and the majority of cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We present the first reported case of neonatal mastitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii, an unusual organism for this type of infection. A 15-day-old full-term Caucasian male neonate presented to our emergency room following fever at home and was admitted for routine neonatal sepsis evaluation. After admission, he developed purulent drainage from his right nipple, was diagnosed with mastitis, and was started on empiric therapy with clindamycin and cefotaxime with presumed coverage for S. aureus. Drainage culture identified pan-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii/haemolyticus and antibiotic therapy was changed to ceftazidime. He was discharged after 5 days of ceftazidime with complete resolution of his symptoms. This case illustrates the importance of obtaining drainage cultures in mastitis cases because of the possibility of organisms besides S. aureus causing infection. Acinetobacter baumannii is considered part of the normal human flora and is associated with serious infections in intensive care units. This is the first case report describing Acinetobacter baumannii as an etiologic agent of neonatal mastitis and highlights the importance of including unusual organisms in the differential for infectious etiologies for general practitioners.

  1. Do phototherapy hoods really protect the neonate?

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, G; Pye, S D; Laing, I A

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the protection given to the eyes of neonates by an Amber 300 phototherapy hood during blue-light phototherapy from Drager Phototherapie 800 units, and to make recommendations for clinical practice. Hazard-weighted blue-light radiance of phototherapy lamps was measured inside neonatal incubators, with and without the use of a protective phototherapy hood. The study was carried out in a tertiary referral neonatal unit. No patients were involved. A mannequin was used as model of a jaundiced neonate being treated with blue-light phototherapy. The study shows that hazard-weighted blue-light radiance levels detectable from within the space enclosed by the hood may be several times greater than accepted industrial threshold limits for adults. Nursing and medical staff must ensure meticulous care in the positioning of infants, so that the caudal edge of the shadow cast by the hood is always at least 30 mm inferior to the infants' lower eyelids. The vulnerability of the neonatal retina and the relatively high levels of blue-light radiance visible from within the shadow of the hood may make it advisable to use more effective eye protection. Triple phototherapy using lamps at the foot-end of the incubator is clearly hazardous and should not be carried out unless the infant's eyes are protected by eye-patches.

  2. Neonatal euthanasia: moral considerations and criminal liability

    PubMed Central

    Sklansky, M.

    2001-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in medical care for critically ill newborn infants, caregivers in neonatal intensive care units still struggle with how to approach those patients whose prognoses appear to be the most grim, and whose treatments appear to be the most futile. Although the practice of passive neonatal euthanasia, from a moral perspective, has been widely (albeit quietly) condoned, those clinicians and families involved in such cases may still be found legally guilty of child abuse or even manslaughter. Passive neonatal euthanasia remains both a moral dilemma and a legal ambiguity. Even the definition of passive euthanasia remains unclear. This manuscript reviews the basic moral and legal considerations raised by the current practice of neonatal euthanasia, and examines the formal position statements of the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The paper concludes by emphasising the need, at least in the United States, to clarify the legal status of this relatively common medical practice. Key Words: Euthanasia • neonatal intensive care • defective newborns PMID:11233379

  3. Neonatal vancomycin continuous infusion: still a confusion?

    PubMed

    Gwee, Amanda; Cranswick, Noel; Metz, David; Coghlan, Benjamin; Daley, Andrew J; Bryant, Penelope A; Curtis, Nigel

    2014-06-01

    Continuous infusions of vancomycin over 24 hours have been shown in adults to reduce drug toxicity, lower treatment costs and require fewer blood samples for therapeutic drug monitoring. They may also improve clinical outcome through earlier attainment of target drug concentrations. In neonates, there is no consensus on vancomycin dosing. We reviewed the literature to assess the evidence for vancomycin dosing regimens for continuous infusion in neonates. Medline and Embase were searched for studies about continuous vancomycin dosing regimens in neonates that reported serum drug concentrations. The search identified 469 articles, of which 5 were relevant. Five prospective studies were included; 2 studies used non-linear mixed effects modeling. Vancomycin was administered with parenteral nutrition or 5% dextrose. Target serum concentrations varied (range: 10-30 mg/L). Four studies used loading doses before continuous infusion; only 1 documented achievement of therapeutic concentrations after the load. The time to a therapeutic concentration was not reported for the other studies. Attainment of target concentrations ranged from 56% to 89% of measurements. Only 1 study compared intermittent to continuous infusions, reporting higher attainment of target concentrations with continuous dosing (82% vs. 46%). No adverse effects were reported, although 3 neonates developed a reversible raised serum creatinine in the setting of septicemia. Continuous infusions of vancomycin in neonates are well tolerated, require less blood sampling and may result in improved attainment of target concentrations. Further prospective studies are needed in this population.

  4. Concept clarification of neonatal neurobehavioural organization.

    PubMed

    Bell, Aleeca F; Lucas, Ruth; White-Traut, Rosemary C

    2008-03-01

    This paper is a report of a concept analysis of neonatal neurobehavioural organization for healthy full-term infants. The neonatal period is an opportune time for researchers and clinicians to assess and intervene for optimal neurobehavioural organization. Yet there is inconsistency and lack of clarity in a scientifically grounded definition of neonatal neurobehavioural organization. Clarification of the concept will strengthen research findings that influence practice for optimal infant development. A concept analysis of the literature between 1939 and 2007 (n = 57) was conducted using Penrod and Hupcey's principle-based concept analysis and Morse's concept clarification. The concept analysis within and across multiple disciplines revealed: (1) a view of the concept as a holistic phenomenon with multiple dimensions; (2) no agreement on the ideal instrument to operationally define the concept; and (3) consistency in implied meaning, but great variability in terminology. Neonatal neurobehavioural organization was defined as the ability of the neonate to use goal-directed states of consciousness, in reciprocal interaction with the caregiving environment, to facilitate the emergence of differentiating, hierarchical, and coordinated neurobehavioural systems, with ever-increasing resiliency and capacity to learn from complex stimuli. A clear conceptual definition will help the international community to communicate effectively within and between disciplines and to apply evidence-based research findings. It will encourage the development of valid and reliable instruments to capture the concept's multiple dimensions and direct attention to the infant's experience, which sculpts early neurobehavioural organization.

  5. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  6. A case series of neonatal arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Isik, Dilek Ulubas; Celik, Istemi Han; Kavurt, Sumru; Aydemir, Ozge; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Demirel, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal arrhythmias (NAs) are defined as abnormal heart rates in the neonatal period. They may occur as a result of various cardiovascular, systemic and metabolic problems. A retrospective chart review was performed on newborns who were diagnosed with NA during hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), or who were admitted to the NICU because of an arrhythmia diagnosis in two NICUs in Turkey from May 2011 to June 2013. Seventeen neonates with arrhythmias were identified. The incidence of NA was 0.4% and 0.3% in the two NICUs, and was 0.37% in the study population as a whole. Mean gestational age was 37 (29-40) weeks. Nine of the infants (53%) were diagnosed with fetal arrhythmia (FA) during the last week of gestation. The distribution of NA types was as follows: six (35%) supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), six (35%) premature atrial contractions (PACs), two (11%) premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), two (11%) multiple arrhythmias such as SVT + PAC and AV block + PVC, and one (5%) AV block. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was present in one patient. An association of NA with congenital heart malformations was identified in five cases. Cardiac arrhythmias are important causes of infant morbidity, and an occasional cause of infant mortality if undiagnosed and untreated. It is important for the physician to be aware of the etiology, development and natural history of arrhythmias in the fetal and neonatal period.

  7. Clinical Data of Neonatal Systemic Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Saracco, Paola; Bagna, Rossana; Gentilomo, Chiara; Magarotto, Mariella; Viano, Alice; Magnetti, Federica; Giordano, Paola; Luciani, Matteo; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Suppiej, Agnese; Ramenghi, Luca Antonio; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate clinical data and associated risk conditions of noncerebral systemic venous thromboembolism (VT), arterial thromboembolism (AT), and intracardiac thromboembolism (ICT) in neonates. Data analysis of first systemic thromboembolism occurring in 75 live neonates (0-28 days), enrolled in the Italian Registry of Pediatric Thrombosis from neonatology centers between January 2007 and July 2013. Among 75 events, 41 (55%) were VT, 22 (29%) AT, and 12 (16%) ICT; males represented 65%, and 71% were preterm. In 19 (25%), thromboembolism was diagnosed on the first day of life. In this "early onset" group, prenatal-associated risk conditions (maternal/placental disease) were reported in 70% and inherited thrombophilia in 33%. Postnatal risk factors were present in 73%; infections and central vascular catheters in 56% and 54% VT, respectively, and in 67% ICT vs 27% AT (<.05). Overall mortality rate was 15% and significant thromboembolism-related sequelae were reported in 16% of discharged patients. This report from the Registro Italiano Trombosi Infantili, although limited by representing an uncontrolled case series, can be used to develop future clinical trials on appropriate management and prevention of neonatal thrombosis, focusing on obstetrical surveillance and monitoring of critically ill neonates with vascular access. A thrombosis risk prediction rule specific for the neonatal population should be developed through prospective controlled studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  9. [Study of neonatal malnutrition risk in the Zaire milieu].

    PubMed

    Tandu-Umba, N F; Mputa Lobota, A; Bouillon, R

    1996-01-01

    This study is intended to assess neonatal risk of malnutrition owed to maternal energy intake lower than 2000 kcal/day among Zairian primiparae. Ninety-eight mother-neonate couples were classified according to the level of maternal energy intake. Neonatal albuminemia which previously showed itself as neonatal nutritional marker served for grouping neonates. Possibility of reaching optimal albuminemia value (29,34 g/l) was assessed according to different maternal energy profiles, using U-test and Chi 2. When maternal intake is lower than 2000 kcal/day, neonatal optimum is reached in 26% of cases; when maternal recommendation is lowered to 1675,21 kcal/day, neonatal optimum is reached in 63,43% of cases; with 2000 kcal/day as recommendation, this rate rises up to 71,4%. Under 2000 kcal/day neonatal risk of malnutrition is thus very high.

  10. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

    PubMed

    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  11. Neonatal Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia and meningitis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Di Nello, C H; Chaisilwattana, P; Fagnant, R J; Monif, G R

    1990-03-01

    Neonatal septicemia/meningitis from Streptococcus pneumoniae occurred in a 36-hour-old infant. The mother had no overt evidence of infection. This case illustrates the pathogenic potential of this common bacterium in the neonate.

  12. Neonatal Phototherapy and Infantile Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wickremasinghe, Andrea C; Kuzniewicz, Michael W; Grimes, Barbara A; McCulloch, Charles E; Newman, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether neonatal phototherapy is associated with cancer in the first year after birth. We analyzed a data set from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development that was created by linking birth certificates, death certificates, and hospital discharge abstracts up to age 1 year. Subjects were 5 144 849 infants born in California hospitals at ≥35 weeks' gestation from 1998 to 2007. We used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify phototherapy at <15 days and discharge diagnoses of cancer at 61 to 365 days. We adjusted for potential confounding variables by using traditional and propensity-adjusted logistic regression models. Cancer was diagnosed in 58/178 017 infants with diagnosis codes for phototherapy and 1042/4 966 832 infants without such codes (32.6/100 000 vs 21.0/100 000; relative risk 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.0, P = .002). In propensity-adjusted analyses, associations were seen between phototherapy and overall cancer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9), myeloid leukemia (aOR 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.0), and kidney cancer (aOR 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.1). The marginal propensity-adjusted absolute risk increase for cancer after phototherapy in the total population was 9.4/100 000 (number needed to harm of 10 638). Because of the higher baseline risk of cancer in infants with Down syndrome, the number needed to harm was 1285. Phototherapy may slightly increase the risk of cancer in infancy, although the absolute risk increase is small. This risk should be considered when making phototherapy treatment decisions, especially for infants with bilirubin levels below current treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Neonatal Endocrine Labomas - Pitfalls and Challenges in Reporting Neonatal Hormonal Reports.

    PubMed

    Chittawar, Sachin; Dutta, Deep; Khandelwal, Deepak; Singla, Rajiv

    2017-09-15

    This review highlights pitfalls and challenges in interpreting neonatal hormone reports. Pre-analytical errors contribute to nearly 50% of all errors. Modern chemiluminescence assay are more accurate, have lower risk of Hook's effect, but continue to have problems of assay interference. Liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy is gold standard for most hormone assays. Neonatal hypoglycemia diagnostic cut-offs are lower than adults. Random growth hormone testing is of value in diagnosing growth hormone deficiency in neonates. 17-hydroxy-progesterone testing in first three days of life for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) remains a challenge due to cross-reactivity with maternal circulating steroids, prematurity and lack of adrenal maturation. Both T4 and TSH testing is encouraged after 48 hours of delivery for diagnosing neonatal hypothyroidism; repeat testing should be done immediately for confirmation of diagnosis. There is an urgent need to develop age- sex- and ethnicity-based normative data for different hormone parameters in neonates. Laboratory should develop their own neonatal references and avoid using ranges from manufacturers. In neonatal endocrinopathies, the clinical scenario should primarily dictate the treatment formulation with hormonal assay to supplement treatment.

  14. Association between intrapartum fetal heart rate patterns and neonatal abstinence syndrome in methadone exposed neonates.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Lawrence M; Brown, Steffen A; Albright, Brittany; Skipper, Betty; Hsi, Andrew; Rayburn, William F

    2011-07-01

    Determine whether infants exposed to chronic maternal methadone with abnormal intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns are more likely to require treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Intrapartum FHR tracings analyzed in 104 pregnancies at ≥ 34 weeks gestation for FHR variability, accelerations, and decelerations. FHR patterns compared between neonates based on treatment with methadone for NAS. Secondary analysis included relation between maternal methadone dose and intrapartum FHR patterns, initiation of methadone, age at methadone initiation, and total neonatal methadone dose. Study powered to detect 30% increase in NAS incidence in neonates with abnormal FHR tracings. Seventy-six (73%) of 104 neonates required methadone treatment for NAS. Neonates who required methadone had higher average baseline FHR (131 vs. 126 bpm; p < 0.04) in active labor and less likely to have FHR tracings without accelerations (1.7% vs. 20.3%; p = 0.007) in latent labor. No significant associations between neonate's need for methadone and intrapartum FHR variability or FHR decelerations. No association between maternal methadone dose (range 30-280 mg) and treatment for NAS. The need for an infant to require methadone treatment for NAS was not reliably predicted by the intrapartum FHR patterns or the maternal methadone dose.

  15. Two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Zorzi, G; Paoletti, P; Mambelli, G; Carlucci, A

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal hemorrhage is a relatively rare event in newborns but must be considered in the presence of a persistent unexplained jaundice, especially in presence of predisposing factors. Serial ultrasonography is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We report two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice. The causes of the neonatal adrenal hemorrhages were a difficult vaginal delivery in macrosomic infant and a neonatal infection.

  16. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  17. Compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guideline in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Zoafa, Aniyehsadat; Marofi, Maryam; Badiee, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are important instruments for increasing the quality of clinical practice in the treatment team. Compilation of clinical guidelines is important due to special condition of the neonates and the nurses facing critical conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With 98% of neonatal deaths occurring in NICUs in the hospitals, it is important to pay attention to this issue. This study aimed at compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines in NICU. This study was conducted with multistage comparative strategies with localization in Isfahan in 2013. In the first step, the components of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines were determined by searching in different databases. In the second stage, the level of expert group's consensus with each component of neonatal palliative care in the nominal group and focus group was investigated, and the clinical guideline was written based on that. In the third stage, the quality and applicability were determined with the positive viewpoints of medical experts, nurses, and members of the science board of five cities in Iran. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics through SPSS. In the first stage, the draft of neonatal palliative care was designed based on neonates', their parents', and the related staff's requirements. In the second stage, its rank and applicability were determined and after analyzing the responses, with agreement of the focus group, the clinical guideline was written. In the third stage, the means of indication scores obtained were 75%, 69%, 72%, 72%, and 68% by Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. The compilation of the guideline can play an effective role in provision of neonatal care in nursing.

  18. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  19. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  20. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Evisceration following Abdominal Scarification in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Emordi, Victor C; Aisien, Efosa; Osagie, Osasumwen T; Osifo, Osarumwense D

    2017-06-10

    Invasive traditional practices which are frequently harmful are common in the care of children including neonates in developing countries. We report two cases of evisceration of intra-abdominal viscera in two neonates subjected to abdominal scarification with razor blades following febrile illnesses. The greater omentum and a loop of jejunum, respectively, were eviscerated. Both were successfully managed and discharged home. Consent was obtained from the parents for the use of the photos. These cases highlight the dangers of invasive traditional practices on neonates and the urgent need for enlightenment campaigns as well as enactment of policies to help protect these children in developing countries. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  3. Endotracheal DNase for atelectasis in ventilated neonates.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, R; Wheeler, K I; Sokol, J

    2011-12-01

    Management of atelectasis and lung collapse in ventilated neonates remains a common challenge in the neonatal intensive care unit. Recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) is an established treatment of atelectasis in cystic fibrosis and its use is also reported in the management of asthma, respiratory syncitial virus bronchiolitis and bronchiectasis to liquefy sputum and aid its clearance from the lungs. We report the use of rhDNase in a subgroup of ventilated neonates with severe end-stage respiratory failure and atelectasis. Three of the four patients showed clinical improvement. A previously undiagnosed lung anomaly was subsequently identified in the fourth patient. Future randomized studies could examine any potential benefits of this emerging therapy.

  4. Opioids in Pregnancy and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Megan W.; Davis, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use in pregnancy has increased dramatically over the past decade and now represents a major public health problem. More women are using prescription opioids, illegal opioids, and opioid substitution therapy. These drugs are associated with numerous obstetrical complications including intrauterine growth restriction, placental abruption, preterm delivery, oligohydramnios, stillbirth, and maternal death. Neonatal complications are also significant, such as an increased risk of mortality as well as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a serious and highly variable condition characterized by central nervous system hyperirritability and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The present review seeks to define current practices regarding the management of opiate dependence in pregnancy and care of the neonate with prenatal opiate exposure. Since genetic factors appear to be associated with the incidence and severity of NAS, opportunities for “personalized genomic medicine” and unique therapeutic interventions could be developed in the future. PMID:26452318

  5. Opioids in pregnancy and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stover, Megan W; Davis, Jonathan M

    2015-11-01

    Opiate use in pregnancy has increased dramatically over the past decade and now represents a major public health problem. More women are using prescription opioids, illegal opioids, and opioid-substitution therapy. These drugs have been associated with numerous obstetrical complications including intrauterine growth restriction, placental abruption, preterm delivery, oligohydramnios, stillbirth, and maternal death. Neonatal complications are also significant, such as an increased risk of mortality as well as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a serious and highly variable condition characterized by central nervous system hyperirritability and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The present review seeks to define current practices regarding the management of opiate dependence in pregnancy and care of the neonate with prenatal opiate exposure. Since genetic factors appear to be associated with the incidence and severity of NAS, opportunities for "personalized genomic medicine" and unique therapeutic interventions could be developed in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Presentation and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Kaltenbach, Karol; Johnson, Elisabeth; Seashore, Carl; Freeman, Emily; Malloy, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case conference discusses the treatment of a pregnant woman with opioid use disorder in a comprehensive care program that includes buprenorphine pharmacotherapy. The presentation summarizes common experiences that pregnant women who receive buprenorphine pharmacotherapy face, and also what their prenatally opioid-exposed children confront in the immediate postpartum period. It describes the elements of a successful comprehensive care model and corollary neonatal abstinence syndrome treatment regimen. Expert commentary is included on issues that arise in the buprenorphine induction and maintenance throughout the prenatal and postpartum periods and in the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems during both the prenatal and postpartum periods, particularly the treatment of depression. There is also expert commentary on the care of opioid-exposed neonates, with attention to the treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  7. [Platelet transfusion role in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Petermann, R

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal immune thrombocytopenia represent less than 5% of cases of early thrombocytopenia (early-onset<72hours post-delivery). As in adults, thrombocytopenia in neonates is defined as a platelet count less than 150G/L. They are either auto- or allo-immune. Thrombocytopenia resulting from transplacental passage of maternal antibodies directed to platelet membrane glycoproteins can be severe. The major complication of severe thrombocytopenia is bleeding and particularly intra-cranial haemorrhage and neurologic sequelea following. However, auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenia have very different characteristics including the treatment management. In fact, this treatment is based on platelet transfusion associated or not to intravenous immunoglobulin administration. The purpose of this article is to remind platelet transfusion's place in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia in terms of recently published French guidelines and international practices.

  8. Neonatal Diabetes With End-Stage Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Esmatjes, Enric; Jimenez, Amanda; Diaz, Gonzalo; Mora, Mireia; Casamitjana, Roser; Pérez de Nanclares, G.; Castaño, Luis; José Ricart, Maria

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe the diagnosis of a patient with neonatal diabetes who had been misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes and referred to our hospital for pancreas and kidney transplantation because of end-stage renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A diagnosis of neonatal diabetes was made after a molecular genetic study revealed a mutation in exon 34 of the ABCC8 gene. Pancreas transplantation was ill-advised. RESULTS—The patient was switched from insulin to glibenclamide 4 months after kidney transplantation, confirming that pancreas transplantation would not have been a good decision. CONCLUSIONS—This is the first report of a patient with neonatal diabetes who developed diabetic nephropathy that progressed to end-stage renal disease. This report illustrates that careful endocrinological evaluation, including molecular genetic studies, if necessary, is mandatory before a decision to perform a pancreas transplant is made. PMID:18678608

  9. A fatal case of neonatal adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Cynthia J

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus can produce severe disease and even death in the immunocompromised neonate. Symptoms of adenovirus infection are similar to those seen with bacterial infections in neonates, making early recognition and diagnosis difficult. Consideration of adenovirus as a causative agent is important to early diagnosis. Currently available culture techniques, particularly the shell vial culture technique, make more rapid identification of adenovirus infection possible. Early identification and treatment are necessary to improve patient outcomes and prevent the spread of infection to other neonates. Available agents for the treatment of adenovirus have had mixed results, yet their use is preferable to nontreatment of critical patients. This article presents the case of a preterm infant who became fatally ill from disseminated adenoviral infection.

  10. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  11. UK neonatal intensive care services in 1996

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, J.; Tarnow-Mordi, W.; Gould, C.; Parry, G.; Marlow, N.

    1999-01-01

    A census of activity and staff levels in 1996 was conducted in UK neonatal units and achieved a 100% response from 246 units. Among the 186 neonatal intensive care units, the median (interquartile range) number of total cots was 18(14−22); level 1 intensive care cots 4(2−6); total admissions 318(262−405); very low birthweight admissions 40(28−68); and the number ventilated or given CPAP by endotracheal tube 52(32−83). Forty six (25%) intensive care units lacked the recommended minimum of one consultant with prime responsibility for neonatal medicine. As a conservative estimate 79% of intensive care units had a lower nursing provision than that recommended in previously published guidelines. There was substantial variation in activity and staffing levels among units.

 PMID:10212089

  12. Cytomegalovirus in pregnancy and the neonate

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Vincent C.; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains a leading cause of disability in children. Understanding the pathogenesis of infection from the mother via the placenta to the neonate is crucial if we are to produce new interventions and provide supportive mechanisms to improve the outcome of congenitally infected children. In recent years, some major goals have been achieved, including the diagnosis of primary maternal CMV infection in pregnant women by using the anti-CMV IgG avidity test and the diagnosis and prognosis of foetal CMV infection by using polymerase chain reaction real-time tests to detect and quantify the virus in amniotic fluid. This review summarises recent advances in our understanding and highlights where challenges remain, especially in vaccine development and anti-viral therapy of the pregnant woman and the neonate. Currently, no therapeutic options during pregnancy are available except those undergoing clinical trials, whereas valganciclovir treatment is recommended for congenitally infected neonates with moderately to severely symptomatic disease. PMID:28299191

  13. Neonatal listeriosis followed by nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Dinic, M; Stankovic, S

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is widely reported, but this is the first case reported in Serbia. A newborn developed respiratory distress syndrome 2 hours after delivery and was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Initial empirical therapy was inappropriate. Consequently, on the second day, the patient developed meningitis. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the tracheal aspirate, blood, periumbilical swab, and cerebrospinal fluid. After bacteriology results, the therapy was changed to ampicillin and meropenem. On day 11 of hospitalization, the patient developed nosocomial infection due to multidrug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Since therapeutic options were limited, the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin. After 26 days of hospitalization the patient showed complete recovery and was discharged with no apparent sequelae. This case showed the importance of bacteriological examination in cases of infections caused by uncommon organisms. Pediatricians should be aware of the neonatal infection caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

  14. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  15. Oxidative stress, phototherapy and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, G; Sharma, S

    2000-11-01

    Phototherapy is the most widely used form of therapy for unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Its non-invasive nature and few side effects reported earlier have led to the assumption that it is innocuous. Recent research has revealed that phototherapy is a photodynamic stress and can induce lipid peroxidation. There is increasing evidence that many severe diseases of the neonate are caused by oxidative injury and lipid peroxidation. In the present communique, we review the oxidative susceptibility of the neonate and the evidence now available that phototherapy induces oxidative stress. Although intensive phototherapy (up to 40 mwatt/cm2/nm) has been reported to be increasingly effective, a little caution, we believe is warranted, till more definite data in the human neonate, help resolve the issue.

  16. Neonatal Hypoglycemia: Risk Factors and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stomnaroska, Orhideja; Petkovska, Elizabeta; Jancevska, Snezana; Danilovski, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    Severe neonatal hypoglycemia (HG) leads to neurologic damage, mental retardation, epilepsy, personality disorders, impaired cardiac performance and muscle weakness. We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of children with hypoglycemia in a random population of newborns. We investigated 84 patients (M:F=35:48) born at the University Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Skopje (hospitalized in the NICU) who were found to have hypoglycemia. In total 89.25% of the babies were premature. The mean birth weight was 1795.95 +/596.08 grams, the mean birth length was 41.92+/- 4.62 cm, while the mean gestational age was 33.05±3.19 weeks. 32 children (38.08%) were very low birth weight (<1500g), 38 (45.22%) were low birth weight (1500-2500g), while there were 8 children (9.52%) appropriate for age BW and no high BW for age patients (>4000 g). HG duration was 2.42+/-2.41 hours. In the group as a whole, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) was found in 3 children (3.57%), infections in 22 (26.18%), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in 9 patients (10.62%), intracranial haemorrhage in 2 patients (2.38%). There were no inborn errors of metabolism. There were two deaths (2.38%). Neonatal HG is a significant factor in the overall neonatal mortality. HG can also cause severe invalidity. We found that infections, LBW and low gestational age were most commonly associated with neonatal HG. However the Spearman test showed weak direct correlation, without statistical significance. Neonatal HG requires complex and team interaction of prenatal and postnatal approaches to reduce the incidence of seizures, their consequences and the overall mortality. Special consideration is to be taken in measures that avoid neonatal infections, HIE, LBW and low gestational age. Further studies on a larger population are needed to fully understand and prevent the phenomenon of HG in newborns.

  17. Transcutaneous Optical Measurement of Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Iyad Salam

    Bilirubin, a yellow pigment, is formed by the breakdown of hemoglobin. Neonates are susceptible to high bilirubin levels in their blood which places them at risk of neuronal damage, and monitoring of the bilirubin levels in these neonates is clinically required. Transcutaneous optical monitoring of the bilirubin will provide a non -invasive, inexpensive measurement of bilirubin in the skin. The optical properties of skin are important for interpretation of the reflected light from the skin. In this report, the optical properties of neonatal skin were measured in the visible range on twenty in vitro skin samples. The scattering of the skin is dominated by the collagen fiber bundles in the dermis. Scattering in the dermis increases linearly with gestational maturity due to the accompanying increase in the size and number of the collagen fiber bundles. Scattering in the dermis was modelled by Mie and Rayleigh scattering. The collection efficiency of an optical patch used for reflectance measurements at the skin surface varies with the skin's optical properties. The collection efficiency of the optical patch as a function of optical properties was determined by measurements in phantoms, and by Monte Carlo computer models. Dermal absorbers and epidermal melanin affect the reflected signals differently, and have to be analyzed separately. In addition to bilirubin content of neonatal skin, other sources of variation include skin maturity, skin thickness, melanin content, blood depth, and blood content. Each of these factors affects the reflected spectrum. Each source of variation was analyzed individually and an algorithm was developed to determine the absorbances of bilirubin and blood in the dermis from optical patch reflectance measurements. The algorithm was applied to analyze reflectance measurements performed on a heterogeneous clinical population consisting of 47 neonates. The algorithm was then adjusted to minimize a score designed to ensure that the determined in

  18. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar <7 at 5 minutes, arterial cord pH <7.1, continuous positive airway pressure use, intubation, or respiratory distress). Logistic regression was used to adjust for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neonatal Morbidity Associated with Shoulder Dystocia Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Janine E.; Frey, Heather A.; Tuuli, Methodius G.; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A.; Cahill, Alison G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. Study Design A retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005-2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar <7 at 5 minutes, arterial cord pH <7.1, CPAP use, intubation, or respiratory distress). Logistic regression was used to adjust for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Results Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. Conclusion We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. PMID:25291256

  20. Cotrimoxazole and neonatal kernicterus: a review

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Deshpande, Sharad S.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and trimethoprim (TMP) individually and a combination known as cotrimoxazole (SMX-TMP) are widely used for the treatment of protozoan and bacterial infections. SMX-TMP is also one of the widely used antibiotics administered orally in neonates, along with gentamicin injection, for treating pneumonia and sepsis by home-based healthcare providers in Asian countries. Although the use of this drug has successfully reduced neonate mortality, there is a concern for it causing neurotoxicity. Previous clinical studies with sulfisoxazole have demonstrated occurrence of kernicterus in neonates. This sulfonamide is thought to displace bilirubin from its albumin-binding sites in plasma leading to an elevation of plasma bilirubin, which crosses the blood-brain barrier, reaches central neurons to cause kernicterus. We performed an extensive review of clinical and animal studies with cotrimoxazole, which showed no reported incidences of kernicterus with SMX-TMP use in neonates. EndNote, BasicBiosis, Embase, PubMed and Toxline database searches were conducted using specific keywords yielding 74 full-length articles relevant to the review. This review has taken into account various factors, including the disease itself, direct effects of the drug and its metabolism through conjugation and acetylation through a thorough review of the literature to examine the potentials of SMX-TMP to cause kernicterus in neonates. SMX-TMP in oral doses administered to neonates for 7–10 days is unlikely to cause kernicterus. Also, this review recommends warranting the need of future studies using animal models and clinical studies in humans to address SMX-TMP toxicity. PMID:24099411

  1. Cotrimoxazole and neonatal kernicterus: a review.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Deshpande, Sharad S

    2014-04-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and trimethoprim (TMP) individually and a combination known as cotrimoxazole (SMX-TMP) are widely used for the treatment of protozoan and bacterial infections. SMX-TMP is also one of the widely used antibiotics administered orally in neonates, along with gentamicin injection, for treating pneumonia and sepsis by home-based healthcare providers in Asian countries. Although the use of this drug has successfully reduced neonate mortality, there is a concern for it causing neurotoxicity. Previous clinical studies with sulfisoxazole have demonstrated occurrence of kernicterus in neonates. This sulfonamide is thought to displace bilirubin from its albumin-binding sites in plasma leading to an elevation of plasma bilirubin, which crosses the blood-brain barrier, reaches central neurons to cause kernicterus. We performed an extensive review of clinical and animal studies with cotrimoxazole, which showed no reported incidences of kernicterus with SMX-TMP use in neonates. EndNote, BasicBiosis, Embase, PubMed and Toxline database searches were conducted using specific keywords yielding 74 full-length articles relevant to the review. This review has taken into account various factors, including the disease itself, direct effects of the drug and its metabolism through conjugation and acetylation through a thorough review of the literature to examine the potentials of SMX-TMP to cause kernicterus in neonates. SMX-TMP in oral doses administered to neonates for 7-10 days is unlikely to cause kernicterus. Also, this review recommends warranting the need of future studies using animal models and clinical studies in humans to address SMX-TMP toxicity.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  3. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  4. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  5. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  6. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  7. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  8. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  9. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  10. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a...

  11. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Presenting with Neonatal Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri; Woolfrey, Ann; Fleming, Mark; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  12. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  14. Neonatal Host Defense against Staphylococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Kronforst, Kenny; Levy, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Preterm infants are especially susceptible to late-onset sepsis that is often due to Gram-positive bacterial infections resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. Herein, we will describe neonatal innate immunity to Staphylococcus spp. comparing differences between preterm and full-term newborns with adults. Newborn innate immunity is distinct demonstrating diminished skin integrity, impaired Th1-polarizing responses, low complement levels, and diminished expression of plasma antimicrobial proteins and peptides, especially in preterm newborns. Characterization of distinct aspects of the neonatal immune response is defining novel approaches to enhance host defense to prevent and/or treat staphylococcal infection in this vulnerable population. PMID:23935651

  15. Neonatal host defense against Staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Power Coombs, Melanie R; Kronforst, Kenny; Levy, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Preterm infants are especially susceptible to late-onset sepsis that is often due to Gram-positive bacterial infections resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. Herein, we will describe neonatal innate immunity to Staphylococcus spp. comparing differences between preterm and full-term newborns with adults. Newborn innate immunity is distinct demonstrating diminished skin integrity, impaired Th1-polarizing responses, low complement levels, and diminished expression of plasma antimicrobial proteins and peptides, especially in preterm newborns. Characterization of distinct aspects of the neonatal immune response is defining novel approaches to enhance host defense to prevent and/or treat staphylococcal infection in this vulnerable population.

  16. Vesiculo-Bullous Disorders of the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Roberta M.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first of three articles which outline the diagnoses to be considered when vesiculo-bullous lesions are identified in the neonate, children, and adults. This paper presents a brief sketch of blistering disorders which may occur during the first few weeks of life. Vesiculo-bullous lesions in the neonate may represent benign, infectious, genetic, or life-threatening disorders. Early recognition, appropriate diagnostic procedures, and specific therapeutic interventions can be vital in reducing potential morbidity and mortality. General guidelines for diagnostic procedures and therapeutic interventions are discussed, along with some of the newer etiologic and epidemiologic concepts. PMID:21263952

  17. Neonatal kerion Celsi: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Margarita; Gomar, Begoña; Boggio, Paula; Abad, María Eugenia; Pagotto, Betina

    2010-01-01

    Tinea capitis is a fungal infection caused by dermatophytes, frequent in children but uncommon in the neonatal period. Kerion Celsi is the inflammatory manifestation of tinea capitis secondary to host immunologic responses and its occurrence in newborns is extremely infrequent. We describe three neonates with the diagnosis of kerion Celsi. The isolated dermatophytes were Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes in two patients and Trichophyton rubrum in the third. Both patients with T. mentagrophytes referred an indirect contact with rabbits and were successfully treated with systemic antifungal (griseofulvin and fluconazole). The patient with T. rubrum had a father with a tinea manuum and both received just topical antimycotic treatment.

  18. Genes and Environment in Neonatal Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Laura R.; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R.; Bada, Henrietta S.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Kaiser, Jeffrey R.; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, C. Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P.; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low birth weight preterm neonates. PMID:26516117

  19. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Nicholaus J; Schelonka, Robert L; Waites, Ken B

    2003-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is an uncommon but potentially serious bacterial pathogen causing infections of the bloodstream, lungs, and central nervous system of preterm neonates. A case of bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a 19-day-old preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin, tobramycin, meropenem, and clindamycin is described. Implications for the diagnostic laboratory and clinicians when Bacillus species are detected in normally sterile sites are discussed, and the small numbers of infant infections proven to be due to this organism that have been described previously are reviewed.

  20. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis caused by maternal autoimmune hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Miguel Fragata; Maria, Ana Teresa; Prado, Sara; Limbert, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal immune hyperthyroidism is a rare but potentially fatal condition. It occurs in 1–5% of infants born to women with Graves’ disease (GD). In most of the cases it is due to maternal antibodies transferred from the mother into the fetal compartment, stimulating the fetal thyroid by binding thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor. We present a case of neonatal thyrotoxicosis due to maternal GD detected at 25 days of age and discuss the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis. PMID:25750228

  1. Exploring the genetic architecture of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Watchko, Jon F; Lin, Zhili

    2010-06-01

    The potential for genetic variation to modulate neonatal hyperbilirubinemia risk is increasingly being recognized. In particular, polymorphisms across three genes involved in bilirubin production and metabolism [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1), and solute carrier organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1 (SLCO1B1)] may interact with each other and/or environmental contributors to produce significant hyperbilirubinemia. Variant gene co-expression including compound and synergistic heterozygosity enhances hyperbilirubinemia risk, contributing to the etiologic heterogeneity and complex nature of neonatal jaundice.

  2. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families. © 2014 AWHONN.

  4. Neonatal Testicular Torsion; a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Riaz-Ul-haq, Muhammad; Mahdi, Diaa Eldin Abdelhamid; Elhassan, Elbagir Uthman

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal testicular torsion, also known as perinatal testicular torsion is a subject of debate among surgeons. Neonatal testicular torsion either intrauterine or postnatal results into extravaginal torsion which is a different entity than intravaginal type but has the same devastating consequences if not diagnosed and managed well in time. Testicular torsion results into acute ischemia with its resultant sequelae such as abnormality of testicular function and fertility. Urgent surgical exploration and fixation of the other testis are the key points in the management. General anesthesia is not a contraindication for exploration as thought before. Diagnosis and controversies on management of testicular torsion are discussed in this review. PMID:23400637

  5. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Treatment and Pediatric Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Beth A.; Brown, Mark S.; Hayes, Marie J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent rise in rates of opiate replacement therapy among pregnant women have resulted in increasing number of infants requiring treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. Short- and long-term developmental outcomes associated with prenatal opiate exposure are discussed, including symptoms and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), and early cognitive and motor delays. Maternal and infant risk factors are discussed, and include patterns of maternal substance use during pregnancy, genetic risk, polysubstance exposure pharmacologic treatment for NAS and breastfeeding. The importance of characterizing corollary environmental risk factors is also considered. PMID:23314720

  6. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  7. Neonatal acute liver failure: a diagnosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Álvarez, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure is a rare, very severe disease with a high rate of mortality. It is clinically and etiologically different from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. Coagulopathy with an international normalized ratio ≥ 3 is the critical parameter that defines it. The most common causes are fetal alloimmune hepatitis, previously called neonatal hemochromatosis, viral infections, metabolic disorders, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. There is a group of treatable diseases that require a very early diagnosis for the prescription of an adequate treatment. Patients should be immediately referred to a specialized facility where pediatric liver transplantation is available to implement such therapeutic alternative, if indicated.

  8. Ventilatory support of the neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J E

    1994-04-01

    Many sick neonatal foals have respiratory failure secondary to perinatal hypoxia, sepsis, or pneumonia. These foals require ventilatory support to prevent respiratory embarrassment and other complications associated with chronic hypoxia and hypercapnia. This article discusses practical aspects of ventilatory therapy, such as choosing a candidate for mechanical ventilation, choosing the proper ventilatory mode, placing a foal on a ventilator, maintaining a foal on mechanical ventilation, and weaning from mechanical ventilation. This article details some of the techniques that have been developed based on experiences with mechanical ventilation of neonatal foals and encourages other clinicians to consider ventilatory therapy as a feasible option.

  9. Biological and neurodevelopmental implications of neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2013-09-01

    Nociceptive pathways are functional following birth. In addition to physiological and behavioral responses, neurophysiological measures and neuroimaging evaluate nociceptive pathway function and quantify responses to noxious stimuli in preterm and term neonates. Intensive care and surgery can expose neonates to painful stimuli when the developing nervous system is sensitive to changing input, resulting in persistent impacts into later childhood. Early pain experience has been correlated with increased sensitivity to subsequent painful stimuli, impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes, and structural changes in brain development. Parallel preclinical studies have elucidated underlying mechanisms and evaluate preventive strategies to inform future clinical trials.

  10. Acute suppurative neonatal parotitis: Case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sardar U; O'Sullivan, Peter G; McKiernan, John

    2010-02-01

    Neonatal suppurative parotitis is very rare. One review of the English-language literature spanning 35 years found only 32 cases. Most cases are managed conservatively with antibiotic therapy; early antibiotic treatment reduces the need for surgery. The predominant organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report a new case of neonatal suppurative parotitis in a 3-week-old boy. The patient was diagnosed on the basis of parotid swelling, a purulent exudate from a Stensen duct, and the growth of pathogenic bacteria in culture. He responded well to 9 days of intravenous antibiotic therapy. We also discuss the microbiologic and clinical patterns of this disease.

  11. Probable nosocomial transmission of listeriosis in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, C; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Vaillant, V; Coignard, B; Blanchard, H; Novakova, I; Astagneau, P

    2013-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in two neonates born consecutively in the same hospital in France. The isolates had indistinguishable pulsed-field electrophoresis profiles. Retrospective epidemiological investigations found no evidence of a food-borne or environmental source. Infection control protocols and decontamination processes were in accordance with standard recommendations. The timing of onset of these infections within the same maternity unit, and the similarity of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles suggests cross-infection of L. monocytogenes between the two neonates.

  12. Maternal and neonatal factors impacting response to methadone therapy in infants treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Isemann, B; Meinzen-Derr, J; Akinbi, H

    2011-01-01

    To identify maternal and neonatal factors that impact response to methadone therapy for neonatal abstinence syndrome. This is a retrospective review of 128 infants that received pharmacotherapy for opiate withdrawal to identify factors associated with favorable response to methadone therapy. Maternal and neonatal data were analyzed with univariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Maternal methadone maintenance dose during pregnancy correlated with length of stay (P=0.009). There was an inverse correlation between the amount of mother's breast milk ingested and length of stay (β=-0.03, P=0.02). Methadone was initiated later, tapered more rapidly and was more successful as monotherapy in preterm infants. Five percent of infants were admitted to hospital again for rebound withdrawal following reduction of breast milk intake. Severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome may be mitigated by titrating methadone to the lowest effective dose during pregnancy and by encouraging breast milk feeds, which should be weaned gradually.

  13. [Neonatal skin care in tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Csoma, Zsanett Renáta; Doró, Péter; Tálosi, Gyula; Machay, Tamás; Szabó, Miklós

    2014-07-13

    Skin physiology of neonates and preterm infants and evidence-based skin care are not well explored for health care providers. The aim of our present study was to investigate the skin care methods of the tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Hungary. A standardized questionnaire was distributed among the 22 tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Units with questions regarding skin care methods, bathing, emollition, skin disinfection, umbilical cord care, treatment of diaper dermatitis, and use of adhesive tapes. The skin care methods of the centres were similar in several aspects, but there were significant differences between the applied skin care and disinfectant products. The results of this survey facilitate the establishment of a standardized skin care protocol for tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Units with the cooperation of dermatologists, neonatologists and pharmacists.

  14. An improved technique for repeated gavage administration to rat neonates.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko; Yoshimura, Shinsuke; Azegami, Jiro; Kojima, Kouichi; Ono, Hiroshi; Nagao, Tetsuji

    2003-09-01

    The technique for gavage administration to rat nurslings was improved to allow determination of the direct effects of chemical substances in the nurslings. Rat neonates were treated with distilled water from postnatal day 1 through 20 using this technique. The viability of neonates during the administration period was comparable to that of untreated neonates. No adverse effects of this technique on the development of neonates were found, and no histological alterations of the esophagus or pharynx. Therefore, we conclude that use of our improved gavage administration method will contribute to ensuring successful neonatal development and thus allowing accurate assessment of the toxicological effects of test compounds on rat nurslings.

  15. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India.

    PubMed

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Increasing incidence of the neonatal abstinence syndrome in U.S. neonatal ICUs.

    PubMed

    Tolia, Veeral N; Patrick, Stephen W; Bennett, Monica M; Murthy, Karna; Sousa, John; Smith, P Brian; Clark, Reese H; Spitzer, Alan R

    2015-05-28

    The incidence of the neonatal abstinence syndrome, a drug-withdrawal syndrome that most commonly occurs after in utero exposure to opioids, is known to have increased during the past decade. However, recent trends in the incidence of the syndrome and changes in demographic characteristics and hospital treatment of these infants have not been well characterized. Using multiple cross-sectional analyses and a deidentified data set, we analyzed data from infants with the neonatal abstinence syndrome from 2004 through 2013 in 299 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the United States. We evaluated trends in incidence and health care utilization and changes in infant and maternal clinical characteristics. Among 674,845 infants admitted to NICUs, we identified 10,327 with the neonatal abstinence syndrome. From 2004 through 2013, the rate of NICU admissions for the neonatal abstinence syndrome increased from 7 cases per 1000 admissions to 27 cases per 1000 admissions; the median length of stay increased from 13 days to 19 days (P<0.001 for both trends). The total percentage of NICU days nationwide that were attributed to the neonatal abstinence syndrome increased from 0.6% to 4.0% (P<0.001 for trend), with eight centers reporting that more than 20% of all NICU days were attributed to the care of these infants in 2013. Infants increasingly received pharmacotherapy (74% in 2004-2005 vs. 87% in 2012-2013, P<0.001 for trend), with morphine the most commonly used drug (49% in 2004 vs. 72% in 2013, P<0.001 for trend). From 2004 through 2013, the neonatal abstinence syndrome was responsible for a substantial and growing portion of resources dedicated to critically ill neonates in NICUs nationwide.

  17. Bilateral acute neonatal suppurative parotitis: A rare finding in neonatal age.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K; Garima, G; U, J

    2015-03-10

    Acute suppurative parotitis is a rare entity in neonates. Bilateral involvement is extremely rare. Low birth weight, prematurity, gavage feeding, dehydration, sepsis are all known risk factors. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism, other organisms responsible for parotitis are streptococcus, E. coli, pseudomonas and klebsiella. We report a neonate suffering from bilateral acute suppurative parotitis with an unusual causative association. CPAP and its association for acute suppurative parotitis has been proposed.

  18. Association of early caffeine administration and neonatal outcomes in very preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Lodha, Abhay; Seshia, Mary; McMillan, Douglas D; Barrington, Keith; Yang, Junmin; Lee, Shoo K; Shah, Prakesh S

    2015-01-01

    Advantages of caffeine for apnea of prematurity have prompted clinicians to use it prophylactically even before apnea. To determine the effect of early initiation of caffeine therapy on neonatal outcomes in very preterm infants born in Canada. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. Patients included preterm neonates born at less than 31 weeks' gestation admitted to 29 participating Canadian Neonatal Network neonatal intensive care units between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Neonates who received caffeine were divided into 2 groups based on the following timing of caffeine initiation: within the first 2 days after birth (early) and on or after the third day following birth (late). A composite of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Of 5517 eligible neonates, 5101 (92.5%) received caffeine (early: 3806 [74.6%]; late: 1295 [25.4%]). There was no difference in weight or gestational age at birth between the groups. Neonates in the early group had decreased odds of a composite outcome of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.98) and patent ductus arteriosus (AOR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.62-0.89). There was no difference between the groups in mortality (AOR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.70-1.37), necrotizing enterocolitis (AOR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.65-1.20), severe neurological injury (AOR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63-1.01), or severe retinopathy of prematurity (AOR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.56-1.10). In very preterm neonates, early (prophylactic) caffeine use was associated with a reduction in the rates of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia and patent ductus arteriosus. No adverse impact on any other outcomes was observed.

  19. Opioid analgesia in neonates following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Gregory B; Golianu, Brenda

    2007-03-01

    Pain in the newborn is complex, involving a variety of receptors and mechanisms within the developing nervous system. When pain is generated, a series of sequential neurobiologic changes occur within the central nervous system. If pain is prolonged or repetitive, the developing nervous system could be permanently modified, with altered processing at spinal and supraspinal levels. In addition, pain is associated with a number of adverse physiologic responses that include alterations in circulatory (tachycardia, hypertension, vasoconstriction), metabolic (increased catabolism), immunologic (impaired immune response), and hemostatic (platelet activation) systems. This "stress response" associated with cardiac surgery in neonates could be profound and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Neonates undergoing cardiac operations are exposed to extensive tissue damage related to surgery and additional painful stimulation related to endotracheal and thoracostomy tubes that may remain in place for variable periods of time following surgery. In addition, postoperatively neonates endure repeated procedural pain from suctioning of endotracheal tubes, placement of vascular catheters, and manipulation of wounds (eg, sternal closure) and dressings. The treatment and/or prevention of pain are widely considered necessary for humanitarian and physiologic reasons. Improved clinical and developmental outcomes underscore the importance of providing adequate analgesia for newborns who undergo major surgery, mechanical ventilation, and related procedures in the intensive care unit. This article reviews published information regarding opioid administration and associated issues of tolerance and abstinence syndromes (withdrawal) in neonates with an emphasis on those having undergone cardiac surgery.

  20. Abdominal Plain Radiograph in Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G Raghavendra; Aziz, Amtul

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive all-inclusive resource on plain radiograph in neonatal intestinal obstruction is presented. This is an attempt to develop a protocol and to regain expertise in evaluating a plain radiograph that most often yields more than enough clues to diagnose and to decide a plan of action. PMID:28083492

  1. The Genomics of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cole, F Sessions; Wegner, Daniel J; Davis, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Significant variability has been observed in the development and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) among neonates exposed to prenatal opioids. Since maternal opioid dose does not appear to correlate directly with neonatal outcome, maternal, placental, and fetal genomic variants may play important roles in NAS. Previous studies in small cohorts have demonstrated associations of variants in maternal and infant genes that encode the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and prepronociceptin (PNOC) with a shorter length of hospital stay and less need for treatment in neonates exposed to opioids in utero. Consistently falling genomic sequencing costs and computational approaches to predict variant function will permit unbiased discovery of genomic variants and gene pathways associated with differences in maternal and fetal opioid pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and with placental opioid transport and metabolism. Discovery of pathogenic variants should permit better delineation of the risk of developing more severe forms of NAS. This review provides a summary of the current role of genomic factors in the development of NAS and suggests strategies for further genomic discovery.

  2. The changing spectrum of neonatal infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Plano, L R W

    2010-10-01

    To understand the changing spectrum of neonatal infectious disease, one must first be familiar with the history, the variety of organisms and the progression of change of neonatal infections over the years. As progressively more immature neonates are surviving, the spectrum of infectious disease has changed in response to current medical practice responsible for this success and to selective pressures on the microorganisms. The surviving very low birth weight infants are at a significant risk for contracting infections from this expanding repertoire of pathogens. Microorganisms once thought seemingly benign and nonpathogenic are now commonly accepted as pathogens and are among the most likely organisms to cause infections in this extremely vulnerable patient population. When considering the possible identity of infecting organisms and attempting to tailor specific therapies to decrease unwanted consequences, one must consider the level of maturity and the age of neonate, as well as the intensity of care necessary for a successful outcome. This brief review focuses primarily on the changing spectrum of bacterial and fungal infections and will not substantially address viral infections.

  3. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications.

  4. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  5. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic...

  6. Paracetamol overdose in a preterm neonate

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, G; Bucens, I; Whyte, I

    2001-01-01

    The first oral overdose of paracetamol in a neonate is reported. A 55 day old neonate, born 29 weeks premature, was accidentally given 136 mg/kg paracetamol. Treatment was with activated charcoal, supportive care, and N-acetylcysteine. There was no biochemical evidence of hepatotoxicity, and no long term sequelae. After modelling of the data, the following pharmacokinetic variables were calculated: absorption half life (tabs), 0.51 hours; volume of distribution (V/Foral), 0.80 litres/kg; clearance (CL/Foral), 0.22 litres/h; they were consistent with population pharmacokinetic studies. The increased plasma half life (Tβ) of 5.69 hours thus reflected normal slower metabolism in infants, rather than toxicity. The toxicity of paracetamol in neonates is unclear, but appears to be low because of slow oxidative metabolism and rapid glutathione synthesis. In an overdose, estimates of toxicity can be made from dose and Tβ in neonates, or from maternal toxicity in transplacental poisoning. Treatment includes N-acetylcysteine and supportive care, with activated charcoal for oral poisoning.

 PMID:11420329

  7. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  8. Ralstonia picketti neonatal sepsis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Pradeep; Soni, Priyanka; Gupta, Basudev

    2017-01-07

    Ralstonia genus are gram negative bacillus and includes four bacteria namely Ralstonia picketti, Ralstonia Solanacearum, Ralstonia insidiosa and Ralstonia mannitolilytica. These are opportunistic pathogens and cause infections in immunocompromised host. The sources of infection are usually contaminated solutions and water. The majority of the reported cases are caused by R. picketti. It is very rare cause of neonatal sepsis with less than twenty cases reported in literature till date. A late preterm male infant, Indian race was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit for respiratory distress developing soon after birth. The infant was managed with respiratory support and gradually infant improved and diagnosis of transient tachypnea of newborn was made. At age of 84 h of postnatal life, the infant developed features of neonatal sepsis and investigations were suggestive of sepsis. The infant was started on intravenous antibiotic, multiple vasopressors and steroids. The blood culture showed growth of multi-drug resistant R. picketti. The antibiotics were changed as per sensitivity pattern and infant was discharged in good condition and was accepting breast feeding at the time of discharge. There was also no other case of R. picketti in the nursery during the same time period. Ralstonia picketti is an uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis and usually source of infection are contaminated solutions and medical products. The management involves early detection, treatment with appropriate antibiotics and doing surveillance culture to identify the possible source of infection.

  9. Global DNA methylation in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dhas, Benet Bosco; Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Bhat, Vishnu; Newton, Banupriya; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-04-01

    To find out whether gDNA methylation can be used as a diagnostic/prognostic method for neonatal sepsis. The study was conducted in the neonatal division of a tertiary care referral hospital. Fifty one newborns as cases and thirty seven newborns as controls were enrolled in the study. Using 5-mC DNA ELISA method, the percentage of genomic DNA methylated in these newborns was established. Highly significant difference in percentage of gDNA methylated was found between the cases and controls (Cases: 2.4 ± 0.39; 2.07 ± 0.35; P < 0.0001). Culture proven and possible cases were also significantly distinguishable (P < 0.05). No significant differences in methylation were observed in terms of gestational age, birth weight and outcomes such shock, thrombocytopenia, except for renal failure. The index results showed that genomic DNA methylation varies significantly among newborns with sepsis (clinical, probable and culture positive) and without sepsis. Although the global DNA methylation was not a highly sensitive diagnostic method, this study reveals that DNA methylation might play a vital role in neonatal sepsis susceptibility. Identification of the specific differentially methylated genes might serve as a promising future diagnostic/prognostic marker for neonatal sepsis.

  10. Patent ductus arteriosus in the premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Page, G G

    1985-03-01

    This article has reviewed current thought on the pathophysiology, medical management, and nursing implications of PDA in the premature newborn. The ductus arteriosus is a normal vascular channel that provides a route for blood flow to the descending aorta in the fetus; and it is an abnormal channel in the newborn that allows additional pulmonary blood flow to be shunted from the higher pressured aorta. Left heart volume overload and additional insults in connection with concurrent RDS and BPD were discussed. Current management for closure advocates indomethacin administration, and ligation, should indomethacin fail or be contraindicated. Continued patency with prostaglandin administration is the objective in cyanotic neonates with congenital heart disease and diminished pulmonary blood flow and in acyanotic neonates with aortic arch abnormalities that lead to decreased descending aortic flow. Nursing responsibilities encompass the well-being of the newborn as well as the family. The neonate must be assessed frequently for signs of cardiopulmonary deterioration. The neonate's responses to drug administration must be monitored for their effect on the ductus and the minimization of side effects. Care of the parents regarding support and information was discussed.

  11. The Genomics of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cole, F. Sessions; Wegner, Daniel J.; Davis, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Significant variability has been observed in the development and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) among neonates exposed to prenatal opioids. Since maternal opioid dose does not appear to correlate directly with neonatal outcome, maternal, placental, and fetal genomic variants may play important roles in NAS. Previous studies in small cohorts have demonstrated associations of variants in maternal and infant genes that encode the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and prepronociceptin (PNOC) with a shorter length of hospital stay and less need for treatment in neonates exposed to opioids in utero. Consistently falling genomic sequencing costs and computational approaches to predict variant function will permit unbiased discovery of genomic variants and gene pathways associated with differences in maternal and fetal opioid pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and with placental opioid transport and metabolism. Discovery of pathogenic variants should permit better delineation of the risk of developing more severe forms of NAS. This review provides a summary of the current role of genomic factors in the development of NAS and suggests strategies for further genomic discovery. PMID:28879171

  12. Neonate Orientation Behaviour towards Human Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegria, J.; Noirot, E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of a recorded male human voice on neonate head, eye, mouth and crying behaviors. Vocal Stimulation enhanced head movement, eye opening, mouthing and crying and influenced hand sucking. Differences between breast fed and bottle fed babies were found for mouth orientation, hand sucking and crying. (RH)

  13. Neonatal Seizures: Advances in Mechanisms and Management

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemorrhage. Conventional, prolonged, continuous video-electroencephalogram (cEEG) is the gold standard for detecting seizures, whereas amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) is a convenient and useful bedside tool. Evaluation of neonatal seizures involves a thorough search for the etiology of the seizures, and includes detailed clinical history, routine chemistries, neuroimaging (and preferably magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and specialized testing such as screening for inborn errors of metabolism if no structural cause is identified and seizures persist after correction of transient metabolic deficits. Expert opinion supports rapid medical treatment to abolish electrographic seizures, however the relative risk versus benefit for aggressive medical treatment of neonatal seizures is not known. While there is increasing evidence to support a harmful effect of seizures on the developing brain, there is also evidence that commonly used medications are potentially neurotoxic in animal models. Newer agents appear less harmful, but data are lacking regarding optimal dosing and efficacy. PMID:24524454

  14. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-11

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  15. Review of fetal and neonatal immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Sharon; Bussel, James B

    2015-01-01

    The fetoplacental interface plays a unique role in pathologies of the fetus and neonate, and is increasingly being recognized for effects on fetal and neonatal development that resonate into adulthood. In this review, we will use several exemplary disorders involving each of the 3 types of blood cells to explore the effect of perinatal insults on subsequent development of the affected cell line. We will present new data regarding outcomes of infants treated prenatally for fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and contrast these with outcomes of infants affected by hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We also will explore the differences between FNAIT and passively transferred antibodies, as seen in maternal idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Neonatal hemochromatosis is an example of a disease that previously was largely fatal, but whose newly discovered etiology as an immune-mediated perinatal disorder has resulted in development of highly effective treatment. Finally, we will examine the interplay between lymphopoiesis and the placenta in an effort to further explore the phenomenon of neutropenia in preeclampsia, whose etiology remains unknown.

  16. Maternal and neonatal complications of macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Nkwabong, Elie

    2014-10-01

    This case control study, aimed at identifying complications of macrosomia, was conducted in two major hospitals of Yaoundé, Cameroon over a 6-month period from 1 October 2012. Maternity records were compared of births weighing ≥4000 g with those weighing between 3000 g and 3500 g. The main outcome variables were mode of delivery, low genital lacerations, Apgar score, birth injuries, postpartum haemorrhage and early neonatal death. Data were analysed using SPSS 18.0. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test and t-test were used for comparison. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Maternal complications observed were poor uterine contractions during labour, second-degree perineal tears, Caesarean section, instrumental delivery and postpartum haemorrhage. Neonatal complications were birth injuries, poor 5-minute Apgar score and early neonatal death. In our setting, macrosomia is associated with increased maternal and neonatal complications. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Neonatal atlas construction using sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-09-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases.

  18. Gender-Related Differences in Neonatal Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Orvos, Hajnalka; Pal, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional behaviour is in part sex-related in humans, although the contribution of the biological and socio-cultural factors is not yet known. This study explores sex-related differences during the earliest communicative exchange, the neonatal imitation in 43 newborn infants (3-96 hours old) using an index finger extension imitative gesture.…

  19. Imitation in Neonatal Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence for imitative abilities in neonatal chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes"), our closest relatives. Two chimpanzees were reared from birth by their biological mothers. At less than 7 days of age the chimpanzees could discriminate between, and imitate, human facial gestures (tongue protrusion and mouth opening). By the time…

  20. [Advances in the management of neonatal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos; Becker, Michele M; Ranzan, Josiane; Winckler, Maria Isabel B; Ohlweiler, Lygia

    2013-09-06

    Introduccion. Durante el nacimiento, ocurren cambios fisiologicos en practicamente todos los organos del niño, incluyendo el sistema nervioso central. En esta fase de transicion, es posible un cierto grado de hipoxemia, en general bien tolerado por el neonato. Sin embargo, si la hipoxia neonatal es muy intensa y continuada, puede instalarse una encefalopatia neonatal, lo que caracteriza una situacion critica para el recien nacido. Su abordaje adecuado es imprescindible para garantizar un buen pronostico a largo plazo. Desarrollo. Se actualizan las informaciones acerca de la hipoxia neonatal y se revisan publicaciones recientes acerca de los avances en su abordaje a traves de la medicina basada en evidencias. Conclusiones. La encefalopatia neonatal se puede clasificar desde el punto de vista clinico en tres niveles de intensidad. Usualmente, los casos leves tienen un buen pronostico, los casos de intensidad moderada tienen un 30% de posibilidad de secuelas y los de intensidad grave tienen mas del 70% de mortalidad, pero practicamente todos los supervivientes tendran secuelas. Los avances ocurrieron en dos areas: en el diagnostico, con nuevas tecnicas de EEG y RM, y en el tratamiento, con la aparicion de la hipotermia terapeutica. Existe la posibilidad de un uso futuro para la terapia con celulas madre. El pronostico depende de la clasificacion clinica, de los datos de neuroimagen y del EEG.

  1. Parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to answer the following 2 questions: (a) What are the needs of parents who have infants in the neonatal intensive care unit? (b) What behaviors support parents with an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit? Using the search terms "parents or parenting" and the "neonatal intensive care unit," computer library databases including Medline and CINAHL were searched for qualitative and quantitative studies. Only research published in English between 1998 and 2008 was included in the review. Based on the inclusion criteria, 60 studies were selected. Study contents were analyzed with the 2 research questions in mind. Existing research was organized into 1 of 3 tables based on the question answered. Nineteen articles addressed the first question, 24 addressed the second, and 17 addressed both. Six needs were identified for parents who had an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit: (a) accurate information and inclusion in the infant's care, (b) vigilant watching-over and protecting the infant, (c) contact with the infant, (d) being positively perceived by the nursery staff, (e) individualized care, and (f) a therapeutic relationship with the nursing staff. Four nursing behaviors were identified to assist parents in meeting these needs: (a) emotional support, (b) parent empowerment, (c) a welcoming environment with supportive unit policies, and (d) parent education with an opportunity to practice new skills through guided participation.

  2. Detecting Neonatal Seizures With Computer Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Temko, Andriy; Lightbody, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    It is now generally accepted that EEG is the only reliable way to accurately detect newborn seizures and, as such, prolonged EEG monitoring is increasingly being adopted in neonatal intensive care units. Long EEG recordings may last from several hours to a few days. With neurophysiologists not always available to review the EEG during unsociable hours, there is a pressing need to develop a reliable and robust automatic seizure detection method-a computer algorithm that can take the EEG signal, process it, and output information that supports clinical decision making. In this study, we review existing algorithms based on how the relevant seizure information is exploited. We start with commonly used methods to extract signatures from seizure signals that range from those that mimic the clinical neurophysiologist to those that exploit mathematical models of neonatal EEG generation. Commonly used classification methods are reviewed that are based on a set of rules and thresholds that are either heuristically tuned or automatically derived from the data. These are followed by techniques to use information about spatiotemporal seizure context. The usual errors in system design and validation are discussed. Current clinical decision support tools that have met regulatory requirements and are available to detect neonatal seizures are reviewed with progress and the outstanding challenges are outlined. This review discusses the current state of the art regarding automatic detection of neonatal seizures.

  3. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  4. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  5. The neonate with an abdominal mass.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John C; Gauderer, Michael W L

    2004-08-01

    Abdominal masses in neonates reflect a wide spectrum of diseases,from lesions that can cause significant morbidity and mortality,to conditions readily corrected surgically, to entities which maybe safely observed. It is incumbent upon the infant's physician to determine the nature of the mass in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  6. Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Kay

    This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

  7. Gender-Related Differences in Neonatal Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Orvos, Hajnalka; Pal, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional behaviour is in part sex-related in humans, although the contribution of the biological and socio-cultural factors is not yet known. This study explores sex-related differences during the earliest communicative exchange, the neonatal imitation in 43 newborn infants (3-96 hours old) using an index finger extension imitative gesture.…

  8. Cultural Competence of Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Heitzler, Ella T

    To measure the cultural competence level of obstetric and neonatal nurses, explore relationships among cultural competence and selected sociodemographic variables, and identify factors related to cultural competence. Descriptive correlational study. Online survey. A convenience sample of 132 obstetric and neonatal registered nurses practicing in the United States. Nurse participants completed the Cultural Competence Assessment (CCA) instrument, which included Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity (CAS) and Cultural Competence Behaviors (CCB) subscales, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. The average CCA score was 5.38 (possible range = 1.00-7.00). CCA scores were negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with self-ranked cultural competence, years of nursing experience, years of experience within the specialty area, and number of types of previous cultural diversity training. CCB subscale scores were correlated positively with age, years of nursing experience, years of experience within the specialty area, and number of types of previous diversity training. CAS subscale scores were positively correlated with number of types of previous diversity training. Standard multiple linear regression explained approximately 10%, 12%, and 11% of the variance in CCA, CAS, and CCB scores, respectively. Obstetric and neonatal registered nurses should continue to work toward greater cultural competence. Exposing nurses to more types of cultural diversity training may help achieve greater cultural competence. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    PubMed Central

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  10. A survey of the management of neonatal hypoglycaemia within the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network.

    PubMed

    Harris, Deborah L; Weston, Philip J; Battin, Malcolm R; Harding, Jane E

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a common problem linked to both brain damage and death. There is controversy regarding both the definition of and best treatment for neonatal hypoglycaemia. To determine current management of neonatal hypoglycaemia within the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN). Four questionnaires were sent to the Director of each of the 45 nurseries within the ANZNN. The Director was asked to complete one questionnaire and give the remaining three to other doctors involved with the management of babies with hypoglycaemia in the nursery. One hundred and eighty surveys were sent and 127 were returned (71%), including at least one from each nursery. Almost all respondents (120, 94%) reported using a protocol to treat hypoglycaemia. Only 2 (2%) reported screening all babies for neonatal hypoglycaemia, with the remainder screening babies at risk. Only 67, (53%) reported that blood glucose levels were tested on an analyser generally considered to be reliable at low levels. Most respondents (99, 78%) reported the clinical threshold for treatment was <2.6 mmol/L. However, when provided with clinical scenarios, respondents reported a variety of interventions, including no treatment. Doctors within the ANZNN are consistent about definition and screening for neonatal hypoglycaemia. However, frequently, the diagnosis is made using unreliable analysers. There is also wide variation in treatment, suggesting a lack of reliable evidence on which to base practice. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in neonatal intensive care units: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Donn, S M

    2006-01-01

    To determine the monitoring and treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) following opiate or polydrug exposure in utero. A pretested questionnaire was distributed via email to the chiefs of the neonatology divisions with accredited Fellowship programs in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine in the United States. Of the 102 individuals contacted, 75 participated in the survey. In all, 41 of the respondents (54.5%) have a written policy regarding the management of neonatal NAS. The method of Finnegan is the most commonly used abstinence scoring system (49 of 75, 65%), while only three respondents use the Lipsitz tool. Opioids (tincture of opium, or morphine sulfate solution) are used most commonly for management of both opioid (63% of respondents) and polydrug (52% of respondents) withdrawal, followed by phenobarbital (32 % of respondents) for polydrug withdrawal and methadone (20% of respondents) for opioid withdrawal. In all, 53 respondents (70%) use phenobarbital, and 19 (25%) use intravenous morphine to control opioid withdrawal seizures, while 61 (81%) use phenobarbital in cases of polydrug withdrawal seizures. Only 53 respondents (70%) always use an abstinence scoring system to determine when to start, titrate, or terminate pharmacologic treatment of neonatal NAS. The management of neonatal psychomotor behavior consistent with withdrawal varies widely, with inconsistent policies to determine its presence or treatment. Only about half of NICUs have written guidelines for the management of NAS, which may preclude effective auditing of this practice. Educational interventions may be necessary to ensure changes in clinical practice.

  12. Neonatal and post-neonatal onset of early congenital syphilis: a report from Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Davanzo, R; Antonio, C; Pulella, A; Lincetto, O; Schierano, S

    1992-01-01

    Congenital syphilis (CS) has been and continues to be a principal public health problem in developing countries. Despite the wide experience acquired, physicians still have problems in diagnostic evaluation. We report 145 cases of CS at the Central Hospital, Maputo, emphasizing the differences in clinical features and in the results of serological and X-ray examinations between the neonatal and post-neonatal age groups. In the post-neonatal age group, the clinical expression of CS is mostly overt. It is commonly recognized that manifestations of CS in the neonatal age group are often poor or negative, yet a relevant percentage of CS that we report were fully symptomatic. In the neonatal age, the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test in the mother and characteristic osteochondritic lesions on X-ray examination of the long bones help to make the diagnosis; in the post-neonatal age group, the VDRL test in the child is more often positive than in the mother and X-ray examination shows most periostitic lesions.

  13. Golden hour of neonatal life: Need of the hour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    "Golden Hour" of neonatal life is defined as the first hour of post-natal life in both preterm and term neonates. This concept in neonatology has been adopted from adult trauma where the initial first hour of trauma management is considered as golden hour. The "Golden hour" concept includes practicing all the evidence based intervention for term and preterm neonates, in the initial sixty minutes of postnatal life for better long-term outcome. Although the current evidence supports the concept of golden hour in preterm and still there is no evidence seeking the benefit of golden hour approach in term neonates, but neonatologist around the globe feel the importance of golden hour concept equally in both preterm and term neonates. Initial first hour of neonatal life includes neonatal resuscitation, post-resuscitation care, transportation of sick newborn to neonatal intensive care unit, respiratory and cardiovascular support and initial course in nursery. The studies that evaluated the concept of golden hour in preterm neonates showed marked reduction in hypothermia, hypoglycemia, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this review article, we will discuss various components of neonatal care that are included in "Golden hour" of preterm and term neonatal care.

  14. Cotoneaster: A Safe and Easy Way to Reduce Neonatal Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Kheiri, Soleiman; Shemian, Rabin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Consumption of cotoneaster may reduce neonatal jaundice. Aim Hence this study was undertaken to determine the effect of mothers’ cotoneaster consumption on treatment of their neonates’ jaundice. Materials and Methods In this randomized clinical trial study, 120 neonates with jaundice referred to a hospital in southwest Iran were enrolled by nonprobability sampling and divided randomly into four groups. In the first group both mothers and neonates received cotoneaster; in the second group only mothers; in the third group only neonates; and in the fourth group the neonates received distilled water as placebo. Phototherapy was done under the same condition for all neonates. Results The reduction of bilirubin was significantly higher in treatment groups compared to control group (p<0.05). Bilirubin in the group of neonates whose mothers consumed cotoneaster was less compared to control group at 24 and 36 hours (p<0.05) and the highest reduction in bilirubin was observed in the first group. The mean duration of hospitalization was longer for the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion Consumption of cotoneaster by both mothers and neonates caused a decrease in neonatal jaundice more rapidly compared to other groups and decreased the duration of hospitalization. Cotoneaster consumption by mothers, neonates, or both may be useful in treatment of neonatal jaundice. PMID:27190910

  15. Pathophysiology of the Cardiovascular System and Neonatal Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shead, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Hypotension is common in low birth weight neonates and less common in term newborns and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Determining an adequate blood pressure in neonates remains challenging for the neonatal nurse because of the lack of agreed-upon norms. Values for determining norms for blood pressure at varying gestational and postnatal ages are based on empirical data. Understanding cardiovascular pathophysiology, potential causes of hypotension, and assessment of adequate perfusion in the neonatal population is important and can assist the neonatal nurse in the evaluation of effective blood pressure. This article reviews cardiovascular pathophysiology as it relates to blood pressure and discusses potential causes of hypotension in the term and preterm neonate. Variation in management of hypotension across centers is discussed. Underlying causes and pathophysiology of hypotension in the neonate are described.

  16. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  17. Risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location.

  18. Management and prevention of neonatal anemia: current evidence and guidelines.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, Jeannette S; Lopriore, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal anemia is a common disorder, particularly in (very) preterm neonates. Management of neonatal anemia is based principally on red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Although the use of blood products is nowadays widespread in neonatal medicine, evidence on the potential benefit is extremely limited. Recent studies suggest that RBC transfusions in newborns may be associated with an increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, transfer of infectious agents and negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. Whether the benefits of RBC transfusions outweigh the risks is controversial and requires further studies. In this review, we summarize the current evidence on the management of neonatal anemia and compare the various international guidelines. In addition, we discuss the various strategies to prevent neonatal anemia and reduce the need for RBC transfusions and discuss important trials currently enrolling patients to improve the management in neonatal anemia.

  19. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  20. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Frank, Matthew W; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O; Gonzalez, Frank J; Schuetz, John D

    2015-09-29

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition.

  1. Vaccines for women for preventing neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Demicheli, Vittorio; Barale, Antonella; Rivetti, Alessandro

    2015-07-06

    Tetanus is an acute, often fatal, disease caused by an exotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. It occurs in newborn infants born to mothers who do not have sufficient circulating antibodies to protect the infant passively, by transplacental transfer. Prevention may be possible by the vaccination of pregnant or non-pregnant women, or both, with tetanus toxoid, and the provision of clean delivery services. Tetanus toxoid consists of a formaldehyde-treated toxin that stimulates the production of antitoxin. To assess the effectiveness of tetanus toxoid, administered to women of reproductive age or pregnant women, to prevent cases of, and deaths from, neonatal tetanus. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2015), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 1), PubMed (1966 to 28 January 2015), EMBASE (1974 to 28 January 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of tetanus toxoid in pregnant women or women of reproductive age on numbers of neonatal tetanus cases and deaths. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two effectiveness trials (9823 infants) and one safety trial (48 mothers) were included. The main outcomes were measured on infants born to a subset of those randomised women who became pregnant during the course of the studies. For our primary outcomes, there was no high-quality evidence according to GRADE assessments.One study (1182 infants) assessed the effectiveness of tetanus toxoid in comparison with influenza vaccine in preventing neonatal tetanus deaths. A single dose did not provide significant protection against neonatal tetanus deaths, (risk ratio (RR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 1.24; 494 infants; GRADE: low-quality evidence). However, a two- or three-dose course did provide protection against neonatal deaths, (RR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00 to 0

  2. Complete Repair of Tetralogy of Fallot in the Neonatal Versus Non-neonatal Period: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Buelow, Matthew W; Woods, Ronald K

    2017-02-11

    It is unclear if neonatal tetralogy of Fallot repair offers better outcomes compared to repair later in infancy. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis comparing outcomes of neonatal and non-neonatal repair. Manuscripts were identified and reviewed for quality and bias with favorably scored manuscripts being included in the final meta-analysis. Several perioperative and postoperative variables were compared. A total of 8 studies with 3858 patients were included in the analysis. Of these patients, 19% underwent neonatal repair. Neonatal repair was associated with increased mortality, longer intensive care unit stays, and longer total hospital length of stay.

  3. Neonatal withdrawal syndrome, Michigan, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Hekman, Kimberly A; Grigorescu, Violanda I; Cameron, Lorraine L; Miller, Corinne E; Smith, Ruben A

    2013-07-01

    Neonatal withdrawal syndrome, which is associated most frequently with opioid use in pregnancy, is an emerging public health concern, with recent studies documenting an increase in the rate of U.S. infants diagnosed. This study examined neonatal withdrawal syndrome diagnosis among Michigan infants from 2000 to 2009 and hospital length of stay (LOS) between infants with and without the syndrome for a subset of years (2006-2009). Michigan live birth records from 2000 to 2009 were linked with hospital discharge data to identify infants with neonatal withdrawal syndrome. Linked data were restricted to infants born between 2006 and 2009 to examine the difference in hospital LOS between infants with and without the syndrome. Multivariable regression models were constructed to examine the adjusted impact of syndrome diagnosis on infant LOS and fit using negative binomial distribution. Data were analyzed from July 2011 to February 2012. From 2000 to 2009, the overall birth rate of infants with neonatal withdrawal syndrome increased from 41.2 to 289.0 per 100,000 live births (p<0.0001). Among infants born from 2006 to 2009, the average hospital LOS for those with the syndrome was between 1.36 (95% CI=1.24, 1.49) and 5.75 (95% CI=5.41, 6.10) times longer than for infants without it. Diagnosis of neonatal withdrawal syndrome increased significantly in Michigan with infants who had the syndrome requiring a significantly longer LOS compared to those without it. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Approaches to the definition of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J C

    1997-04-01

    There is no current agreement on the definition of neonatal hypoglycemia. Three different bases for the definition are presented, with a review of evidence of relevant to each approach. (1) Not commonly encountered; requires evidence of normal distribution of blood glucose concentrations. (2) Increased risk of adverse sequelae; requires evidence of short-term and long-term sequelae of different blood glucose concentrations. (3) Benefits of intervention outweigh risks; requires evidence from randomized trials of intervention. The usual distribution of neonatal blood glucose concentrations varies with birthweight, postnatal age, nutritional intake and other factors. Clinical signs occur in some but not all babies with low blood glucose concentrations, but such signs lack specificity. Abnormality in sensory evoked potentials is associated with variations in blood glucose concentrations; these changes suggest that values less than 2.6 mmol/L have acute effects in areas of the brain with high glucose demand. Among low birthweight babies, case series suggest a high risk of impairment (50%) following symptomatic hypoglycemia, and controlled studies generally confirm an association between very low neonatal blood glucose concentrations and adverse neurodevelopment. However, these studies do not establish a level of blood glucose concentration or duration of hypoglycemia that is critical. There are no reports of randomized trials that have assessed the effect on neurodevelopment of alternative policies of glucose provision in the neonatal period. There is a need for a randomized controlled trial to assess reliably the short- and long-term clinical effects of alternative policies of the clinical management of blood glucose concentration in babies at high risk both of low neonatal blood glucose concentrations and adverse neurodevelopment.

  5. [Prolonged pain in neonates: retrospective analysis].

    PubMed

    Lilla, Michèle; Stadelman-Diaw, Corinne; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2013-12-01

    Infants hospitalised in neonatology are inevitably exposed to pain repeatedly. Premature infants are particularly vulnerable, because they are hypersensitive to pain and demonstrate diminished behavioural responses to pain. They are therefore at risk of developing short and long-term complications if pain remains untreated. Compared to acute pain, there is limited evidence in the literature on prolonged pain in infants. However, the prevalence is reported between 20 and 40 %. This single case study aimed to identify the bio-contextual characteristics of neonates who experienced prolonged pain. This study was carried out in the neonatal unit of a tertiary referral centre in Western Switzerland. A retrospective data analysis of seven infants' profile, who experienced prolonged pain ,was performed using five different data sources. The mean gestational age of the seven infants was 32weeks. The main diagnosis included prematurity and respiratory distress syndrome. The total observations (N=55) showed that the participants had in average 21.8 (SD 6.9) painful procedures that were estimated to be of moderate to severe intensity each day. Out of the 164 recorded pain scores (2.9 pain assessment/day/infant), 14.6 % confirmed acute pain. Out of those experiencing acute pain, analgesia was given in 16.6 % of them and 79.1 % received no analgesia. This study highlighted the difficulty in managing pain in neonates who are exposed to numerous painful procedures. Pain in this population remains underevaluated and as a result undertreated.Results of this study showed that nursing documentation related to pain assessment is not systematic.Regular assessment and documentation of acute and prolonged pain are recommended. This could be achieved with clear guidelines on the Assessment Intervention Reassessment (AIR) cyclewith validated measures adapted to neonates. The adequacy of pain assessment is a pre-requisite for appropriate pain relief in neonates.

  6. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers.

  7. Atazanavir in pregnancy: impact on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Mazy, Fabienne; Floch-Tudal, Corinne; Meier, Françoise; Azria, Elie; Crenn-Hebert, Catherine; Treluyer, Jean Marc; Herinomenzanahary, Evelyne; Ferreira, Claudia; Peytavin, Gilles

    2011-07-01

    To study the impact on the neonate of maternal antiretroviral therapy with atazanavir (ATV). An observational study of 22 HIV-infected women receiving, for clinical indications, antiretroviral therapy with ATV 300 mg and ritonavir 100mg during pregnancy and their 23 HIV infants (including a twin pair). Mothers had received ATV for a median duration of 19 months [range 3-49] by delivery. At delivery, plasma HIV-RNA was <40 copies/mL in all patients. Liver enzymes were normal in 19/22 patients, but one woman had grade 3-4 liver toxicity. Maternal serum bilirubin concentrations were above the upper limit of normal in most patients, with grade 3 toxicity in 5 patients. All but one woman had trough ATV concentrations during pregnancy above the minimum effective concentration. The median cord blood ATV concentration was 130 ng/mL [range<30-758]; the cord/maternal ratio was 21%. All neonates were born at term [median 38.2 weeks]. Three neonates had mildly elevated AST transaminase levels. Bilirubin concentrations at birth were significantly higher than maternal concentrations, with a median of 44 μm/L [range 24-129]; values on days 2-3 were 63 [8-212]. Five neonates had jaundice requiring phototherapy, without liver damage, and recovered without sequelae. Neonates whose mothers were treated with ATV should be monitored for hyperbilirubinemia, which may be due to placental transfer of unconjugated bilirubin from the mother and/or a direct effect of transplacental ATV on bilirubin metabolism in the fetus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early neonatal lamb mortality: postmortem findings.

    PubMed

    Holmøy, I H; Waage, S; Granquist, E G; L'Abée-Lund, T M; Ersdal, C; Hektoen, L; Sørby, R

    2017-02-01

    An investigation of stillbirth and early neonatal lamb mortality was conducted in sheep flocks in Norway. Knowledge of actual causes of death are important to aid the interpretation of results obtained during studies assessing the risk factors for lamb mortality, and when tailoring preventive measures at the flock, ewe and individual lamb level. This paper reports on the postmortem findings in 270 liveborn lambs that died during the first 5 days after birth. The lambs were from 17 flocks in six counties. A total of 27% died within 3 h after birth, 41% within 24 h and 80% within 2 days. Most lambs (62%) were from triplet or higher order litters. In 81% of twin and larger litters, only one lamb died. The most frequently identified cause of neonatal death was infectious disease (n=97, 36%); 48% (n=47) of these died from septicaemia, 25% (n=24) from pneumonia, 22% (n=21) from gastrointestinal infections and 5% (n=5) from other infections. Escherichia coli accounted for 65% of the septicaemic cases, and were the most common causal agent obtained from all cases of infection (41%). In total, 14% of neonatal deaths resulted from infection by this bacterium. Traumatic lesions were the primary cause of death in 20% (n=53) of the lambs. A total of 46% of these died within 3 h after birth and 66% within 24 h. Severe congenital malformations were found in 10% (n=27) of the lambs, whereas starvation with no concurrent lesions was the cause of death in 6% (n=17). In 16% (n=43) of the lambs, no specific cause of death was identified, lambs from triplet and higher order litters being overrepresented among these cases. In this study, the main causes of neonatal lamb mortality were infection and traumatic lesions. Most neonatal deaths occurred shortly after birth, suggesting that events related to lambing and the immediate post-lambing period are critical for lamb survival.

  9. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male.

  10. Multidrug-resistant organisms in neonatal sepsis in two tertiary neonatal ICUs, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hesham A; Mohamed, Maha H; Badran, Nabil F; Mohsen, Manal; Abd-Elrhman, Al-Sayed A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a serious problem in any neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Bacterial organisms have developed increased resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Because not enough data are available from Egypt, the aim of the present study was to determine the causative bacteria and the level of their resistance to commonly used antibiotics in tertiary NICUs in Cairo, Egypt. A 3.5-year retrospective study was carried out at NICUs of the Children's Hospital of Ain Shams University and that of El-Hussein Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Egypt. Records of neonates were reviewed. All neonates with culture-proven sepsis were included in the study. Almost one-third of the admitted neonates (33.4%) were diagnosed as having neonatal sepsis, 32.25% of them culture-proven. Early/late onset sepsis was found in 35.4 and 64.6%, respectively. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria was found in 68 to 25.6%. Fungal infection was detected in 9% of the isolates. Escherichia coli was the main pathogen isolated in both early-onset sepsis (41.2%) and late-onset sepsis (24.5%). Overall, 77% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (60% of gram-positive bacteria and 83.4% of gram-negative bacteria). Nearly 80% (79%) of mortality was caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria showed high resistance against commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. There is an alarming increase in antibiotic resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility is needed to ensure proper empirical therapy. Improvement of infection control practices, avoidance of irrational use of antibiotics, and revision of the protocols are mandatory in the prevention of neonatal sepsis.

  11. Perinatal risk factors and neonatal complications in discordant twins admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-rui; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Chao-mei

    2013-03-01

    Many studies have shown a relationship between birth weight discordance and adverse perinatal outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the perinatal risk factors and neonatal complications of discordant twins who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. A total of 87 sets of twins were enrolled in this retrospective study, of which 22 sets were discordant twins and 65 sets were concordant twins. Binary Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors associated with the occurrence of discordant twins. The common neonatal complications of discordant twins were also investigated. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of assisted reproductive techniques, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and unequal placental sharing were risk factors for the occurrence of discordant twins. The incidence of small for gestational age infants and very low birth weight infants of discordant twins was significantly higher, while the birth weight of discordant twins was significantly lower than those of concordant twins. The duration of hospitalization of discordant twins was longer than that of concordant twins. The incidence of several neonatal complications, such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and intracranial hemorrhage, was higher in discordant twins than that in concordant twins. The percentage of those requiring pulmonary surfactant and mechanical ventilation was significantly higher in discordant twins than that in concordant twins. Use of assisted reproductive techniques, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and unequal placental sharing are perinatal risk factors of discordant twins who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. These infants are also much more likely to suffer from various neonatal complications, especially respiratory and central nervous system diseases. It is important to prevent the occurrence of discordant twins by decreasing these risk factors and timely treatment should be given to discordant twins.

  12. Multi-contrast human neonatal brain atlas: application to normal neonate development analysis.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Donohue, Pamela K; Ernst, Thomas; Anderson, Lynn; Buchthal, Steven; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Miller, Michael I; van Zijl, Peter C M; Chang, Linda

    2011-05-01

    MRI is a sensitive method for detecting subtle anatomic abnormalities in the neonatal brain. To optimize the usefulness for neonatal and pediatric care, systematic research, based on quantitative image analysis and functional correlation, is required. Normalization-based image analysis is one of the most effective methods for image quantification and statistical comparison. However, the application of this methodology to neonatal brain MRI scans is rare. Some of the difficulties are the rapid changes in T1 and T2 contrasts and the lack of contrast between brain structures, which prohibits accurate cross-subject image registration. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which provides rich and quantitative anatomical contrast in neonate brains, is an ideal technology for normalization-based neonatal brain analysis. In this paper, we report the development of neonatal brain atlases with detailed anatomic information derived from DTI and co-registered anatomical MRI. Combined with a diffeomorphic transformation, we were able to normalize neonatal brain images to the atlas space and three-dimensionally parcellate images into 122 regions. The accuracy of the normalization was comparable to the reliability of human raters. This method was then applied to babies of 37-53 post-conceptional weeks to characterize developmental changes of the white matter, which indicated a posterior-to-anterior and a central-to-peripheral direction of maturation. We expect that future applications of this atlas will include investigations of the effect of prenatal events and the effects of preterm birth or low birth weights, as well as clinical applications, such as determining imaging biomarkers for various neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neonatal neuropsychology: emerging relations of neonatal sensory-motor responses to white matter integrity.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Maya; Marom, Ronella; Berger, Irit; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Ben-Sira, Liat; Artzi, Moran; Uliel, Shimrit; Leitner, Yael; Geva, Ronny

    2014-09-01

    The neonatal period is considered to be essential for neurodevelopment and wellbeing throughout the life span, yet little is known about brain-behavior relationships in the neonatal period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between neonatal sensory-motor regulation and white-matter (WM) integrity of major fiber tracts in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that WM integrity of sensory-motor systems would predict neurobehavioral maturation during the first month of life. Forty-nine premature neonates underwent magnetic-resonance-imaging at term. Diffusion-tensor-imaging analysis was performed in major WM tracts along with repeated neonatal neurobehavioral evaluations assessing sensory reactivity and motor regulation. Difficulties in one or more behavioral sub-category, mostly in auditory and visual attention, hypotonicity and jitteriness, were documented in 78.3% infants at term. Sixty-six percent of infants experienced difficulties, mostly in auditory attention, head-neck control, hypotonicity and motor asymmetry, at 44 weeks. Attention difficulties were associated with reduced integrity of cerebral and superior cerebellar peduncles; while tonicity was associated with reduced integrity of the corpus-callosum and inferior-posterior tracts. Overall, results showed that early maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of sensory reactivity status while late maturing tracts were related with the degree of typicality of tonic regulation. WM integrity and maturation factors explained 40.2% of the variance in neurobehavior at 44 weeks. This study suggests that in preterm neonates, deviant sensory-motor reactivity can be detected very early in development in manners that are related to lower integrity/maturational level of early and late maturing fiber tracts.

  14. Neonatal mortality of low-birth-weight infants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, S.; Osrin, D.; Paul, E.; Costello, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the role of low birth weight (LBW) in neonatal mortality in a periurban setting in Bangladesh. METHODS: LBW neonates were recruited prospectively and followed up at one month of age. The cohort of neonates were recruited after delivery in a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and 776 were successfully followed up either at home or, in the event of early death, in hospital. FINDINGS: The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) for these infants was 133 per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval: 110-159). The corresponding NMRs (and confidence intervals) for early and late neonates were 112 (91-136) and 21 (12-33) per thousand live births, respectively. The NMR for infants born after fewer than 32 weeks of gestation was 769 (563-910); and was 780 (640-885) for infants whose birth weights were under 1500 g. Eighty-four per cent of neonatal deaths occurred in the first seven days; half within 48 hours. Preterm delivery was implicated in three-quarters of neonatal deaths, but was associated with only one-third of LBW neonates. CONCLUSION: Policy-relevant findings were: that LBW approximately doubles the NMR in a periurban setting in Bangladesh; that neonatal mortality tends to occur early; and that preterm delivery is the most important contributor to the NMR. The group of infants most likely to benefit from improvements in low-cost essential care for the newborn accounted for almost 61% of neonatal mortalities in the cohort. PMID:11477963

  15. Emerging Piglet Models of Neonatal Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, David W; Turner, Justine M; Wales, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a growing problem in the human neonatal population. In infants, SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure, the state of being unable to absorb sufficient nutrients for growth and development. Neonates with SBS are dependent on long-term parenteral nutrition therapy, but many succumb to the complications of sepsis and liver disease. Research in neonatal SBS is challenged by the ethical limits of studying sick human neonates and the heterogeneous nature of the disease process. Outcomes in SBS vary depending on residual intestinal anatomy, intestinal length, patient age, and exposure to nutrition therapies. The neonatal piglet serves as an appropriate translational model of the human neonate because of similarities in gastrointestinal ontogeny, physiological maturity, and adaptive processes. Re-creating the disease process in a piglet model presents a unique opportunity for researchers to discover novel insights and therapies in SBS. Emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS now represent the entire spectrum of disease seen in human infants. This review aims to contextualize these emerging piglet models within the context of SBS as a heterogeneous disease. We first explore the factors that account for SBS heterogeneity and then explore the suitability of the neonatal piglet as an appropriate translational animal model. We then examine differences between the emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS and how these differences affect their translational potential to human neonates with SBS.

  16. Unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction in full term infants

    PubMed Central

    Estan, J.; Hope, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the prevalence of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction in infants born at 32 weeks gestation and above; to describe the clinical course, imaging results, and outcome of neonatal cerebral infarction; and to investigate possible aetiology.
METHODS—Twelve cases of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction were identified from neonatal unit records for the years 1987-93. Each case was matched with two controls.
RESULTS—All cases of neonatal cerebral infarction occurred in full term infants. The prevalence was around 1 in 4000, and neonatal cerebral infarction was found in 12% of infants presenting with neonatal seizures. Cerebral ultrasound scans failed to demonstrate lesions seen by computed tomography in nine of 12 cases. Cases were more likely than controls to require assisted ventilation for resuscitation at birth (OR 7.0, 95% confidence interval 1.04-53.5), but Apgar scores at 5 minutes were no different. One infant with neonatal cerebral infarction developed a hemiparesis, the other 11 had normal motor development when assessed at 11-60 (median 33) months. None had overt cognitive deficits or persisting seizure disorder.
CONCLUSIONS—Neonatal cerebral infarction is a relatively common cause of neonatal seizures, but the aetiology remains unclear. Parents need to be made aware of possible neurological sequelae, but most cases in this series had a normal outcome.

 Keywords: cerebral infarction; seizures; neurodevelopmental outcome; stroke; hemiplegia. PMID:9135286

  17. Use and safety of azithromycin in neonates: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Coral; Egunsola, Oluwaseun; Choonara, Imti; Kotecha, Sailesh; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Sammons, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the use and adverse drug reactions associated with azithromycin in neonates. Setting Databases MEDLINE (1948–August 2015), EMBASE (1980–August 2015) and Pubmed (August 2015) were searched for studies on azithromycin in neonates. Participants All studies involving neonates (<28 days old) who have received at least a single dose of azithromycin for which safety was evaluated. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was adverse event (AE) associated with use of azithromycin. Use of azithromycin in neonates was the secondary outcome. Results A total of 11 articles involving 473 neonates were identified. 371 AEs were reported. Adverse events were mainly respiratory (358/1000 neonate), neurological (273/1000 neonates) and gastrointestinal (196/1000 neonates) in origin. Azithromycin significantly reduced the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in extremely premature neonates (RR=0.83, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.98, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in the incidence of elevated liver enzymes between the azithromycin and placebo group (p=0.76). There were four cases of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS). Conclusions Azithromycin significantly reduces the risk of BPD in preterm neonates. The relationship between azithromycin and IHPS requires further investigation. PMID:26656010

  18. [Bone Fractures in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Machado, Angela; Rocha, Gustavo; Silva, Ana Isabel; Alegrete, Nuno; Guimarães, Hercília

    2015-01-01

    Fractures during the neonatal period are rare. Some fractures, especially long bones, may occur during birth. Moreover, neonates hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit have an increased risk of fractures for several reasons. To evaluate the incidence and characterize fractures in newborns admitted in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A retrospective analysis of the newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with a diagnosis at discharge of one or more bone fractures from January 1996 to June 2013. Eighty neonates had one or more fractures. In 76 (95%) infants the fractures were attributed to birth injury. The most common fracture was the clavicle fracture in 60 (79%) neonates, followed by skull fracture in 6 (8%). In two (2.5%) neonates, extremely low birth weight infants, fractures were interpreted as resulting from osteopenia of prematurity. Both had multiple fractures, and one of them with several ribs. A change in obstetric practices allied to improvement premature neonateâÄôs care contributed to the decreased incidence of fractures in neonatal period. But in premature infants the diagnosis may be underestimated, given the high risk of fracture that these infants present.

  19. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management.

  20. Strategies to sustain a quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    van Heerden, Carlien; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many neonatal deaths can be prevented globally through effective resuscitation. South Africa (SA) committed towards attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, SA’s district hospitals have the highest early neonatal mortality rates. Modifiable and avoidable causes associated with patient-related, administrative and health care provider factors contribute to neonatal mortality. A quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation could contribute towards decreasing neonatal mortality, thereby contributing towards the attainment of the MDG4. Aim The aim of this study was, (1) to explore and describe the existing situation regarding neonatal resuscitation in a district hospital, (2) to develop strategies to sustain a neonatal resuscitation quality improvement initiative and (3) to decrease neonatal mortality. Changes that occurred and the sustainability of strategies were evaluated. Setting A maternity section of a district hospital in South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Sustainability Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. The Problem Resolving Action Research model was applied and the study was conducted in three cycles. Purposive sampling was used for the quantitative and qualitative aspects of data collection. Data was analysed accordingly. Results The findings indicated that the strategies formulated and implemented to address factors related to neonatal resuscitation (training, equipment and stock, staff shortages, staff attitude, neonatal transport and protocols) had probable sustainability and contributed towards a reduction in neonatal mortality in the setting. Conclusion These strategies had the probability of sustainability and could potentially improve neonatal outcomes and reduce neonatal mortality to contribute toward South Africa’s’ drive to attain the MDG4. PMID:27380840

  1. Unusual neonatal tooth in maxillary 1st molar region: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Sarkar, Soumyabrata

    2007-01-01

    Teeth erupting within the first month after birth are known as neonatal teeth. Incidence of neonatal teeth is very low. Neonatal teeth erupt in various regions of the maxillary and mandibular arch. Incidence of neonatal teeth in molar region is only 1%. A case of an unusual neonatal tooth in the maxillary molar region has been presented.

  2. Experience and pharmacokinetics of Levetiracetam in Korean neonates with neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Won; Jung, Yun Seob; Park, Kyungsoo; Eun, Ho Seon; Park, Min Soo; Park, Kook In; Namgung, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam (LEV) in neonates with seizures and to establish a population pharmacokinetics (PPK) model by using the software NONMEM. Methods A retrospective analysis of 18 neonatal patients with seizures, who were treated with LEV, including 151 serum samples, was performed. The mean loading dose was 20 mg/kg, followed by a mean maintenance dose of 29 mg/kg/day. Results Seventeen neonates (94%) had seizure cessation within 1 week and 16 (84%) remained seizure-free at 30 days under the LEV therapy. The mean serum concentration of LEV was 8.7 µg/mL. Eight samples (5%) were found above the therapeutic range. No serious adverse effects were detected. In the PPK analysis for Korean neonates, the half-life was 9.6 hours; clearance, 0.357 L/hr; and volume of distribution, 4.947 L, showing differences from those in adults. Conclusion LEV is a safe and effective option for the treatment of neonatal seizures with careful therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:28289434

  3. Neonatal Body Composition: Measuring Lean Mass as a Tool to Guide Nutrition Management in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Rice, Melissa S; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal nutrition adequacy is often determined by infant weight gain. The aim of this review is to summarize what is currently known about neonatal body composition and the use of body composition as a measure for adequate neonatal nutrition. Unlike traditional anthropometric measures of height and weight, body composition measurements account for fat vs nonfat mass gains. This provides a more accurate picture of neonatal composition of weight gain. Providing adequate neonatal nutrition in the form of quantity and composition can be a challenge, especially when considering the delicate balance of providing adequate nutrition to preterm infants for catch-up growth. Monitoring weight gain as fat mass and nonfat mass while documenting dietary intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in formulas may help provide the medical community the tools to provide optimal nutrition for catch-up growth and for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes. Tracking body composition in term and preterm infants may also provide critical future information concerning the nutritional state of infants who go on to develop future disease such as obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia as adolescents or adults. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Neonatal cranial sonography: ultrasound findings in neonatal meningitis—a pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Hemal; Bansal, Itisha; Hooda, Kusum; Sapire, Joshua M.; Anand, Rama; Kumar, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is a common manifestation of late onset neonatal sepsis. Cranial sonography (CRS) has a crucial role in assessment of infants with clinical suspicion of bacterial meningitis as well as follows up of its complications. CRS is performed with high frequency transducer through anterior fontanelle in both coronal and sagittal planes. Various sonographic findings range from echogenic and widened sulci, ventriculomegaly, ventriculitis, hydrocephalus, extra-axial fluid collections, cerebritis and brain abscess. Sonography is extremely beneficial in evaluating intraventricular contents, especially debris and intraventricular septations. Linear high frequency probe along with color Doppler interrogation are of utmost importance in evaluating extra-axial fluid collection and helps differentiating it from benign subarachnoid space enlargement. Due to low cost, easy portability, speed of imaging, no need for sedation and above all lack of ionizing radiation make it superior to other cross sectional imaging, like CT and MRI, in evaluation of these sick neonates. Apart from textbooks, there is paucity of recently available literature on cranial sonographic findings in neonatal meningitis. This article is written with an educational intent to review the spectrum of findings in neonatal meningitis, with stress on findings that will be beneficial in the clinical practice. PMID:28275563

  5. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced.

  6. Part 1: recognizing neonatal spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brand, M Colleen

    2006-02-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury can occur in utero, as well as after either a difficult delivery or a nontraumatic delivery. Spinal cord injury can also be related to invasive nursery procedures or underlying neonatal pathology. Early clinical signs of spinal cord injury that has occurred in utero or at delivery includes severe respiratory compromise and profound hypotonia. Knowledge of risk factors and awareness of symptoms is required for early recognition and appropriate treatment. This article reviews the embryological development of the spinal column highlighting mechanisms of injury and identifying underlying factors that increase the risk of spinal cord injury in newborns. Signs and symptoms of injury, cervical spine immobilization, and the differential diagnosis are discussed. Nursing implications, general prognosis, and research in spinal cord injury are provided.

  7. [Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of the neonate].

    PubMed

    Maglajlić, Svjetlana; Jesić, Milos; Necić, Svetislav; Lukac, Marija; Sindjić, Sanja; Jesić, Maja; Vujović, Dragana

    2004-10-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglicemia of the neonate is a rare heterogenous disease (clinically, histologically, metabolically and genetically), which is characterized by inadequatly high insuline rates in the presence of severe hypoglicemia. Hyperinsulinism, rather a syndrome than a disease, of which the main metabolic feature is hypoglicemia and decreased concentration of free fatty acids and ketones in serum (insulin inhibits lypolisis and synthesizes ketonic bodies), presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic chalenge. The disease is often followed by brain atrophy contributed by the attacks of hypoglicemia. It is inherited as an autosomally recessive and autosomally dominant disease. The genetic defects is located on the short arm of the chromosome 11. The authors report a successfully applied conservative treatment in a neonate with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglicemia.

  8. An Immunological Perspective on Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Bernard; Razzaghian, Hamid; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite concerted international efforts, mortality from neonatal infections remains unacceptably high in some areas of the world, particularly for premature infants. Recent developments in flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing technologies have led to major discoveries over the past few years, providing a more integrated understanding of the developing human immune system in the context of its microbial environment. We review these recent findings, focusing on how in human newborns incomplete maturation of the immune system before a full term of gestation impacts on their vulnerability to infection. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of this research in guiding the design of more-accurate age-adapted diagnostic and preventive strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26993220

  9. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K C; Choi, Paul C L

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments.

  10. Intestinal malrotation presenting outside the neonatal period.

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, R; Spitz, L

    1986-01-01

    We report 37 patients ranging in age from 1 month to 14 years treated for intestinal malrotation during a five year period. The main presenting features consisted of intermittent attacks of vomiting (15 patients), failure to thrive (seven), and recurrent colicky abdominal pain (seven). The diagnosis was confirmed by gastrointestinal contrast studies in all but three patients. A standard Ladd's procedure comprised the definitive surgical treatment. We emphasise the poor nutritional state at the time of operation (49% of the cases were on or below the third centile). In contrast with neonatal presentation, volvulus of the midgut occurred in only five patients (14%) compared with 68% in neonates with malrotation. There were two deaths in the series. Ninety four per cent of the remaining patients responded favourably to the operative procedure. Malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a wide variety of symptoms and should be treated promptly once the diagnosis has been confirmed. PMID:3740908

  11. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Cardiac emergencies in neonates and young infants

    PubMed Central

    Kabbani, Nasib; Kabbani, Mohamed S.; Al Taweel, Hayan

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac emergencies in children are not infrequent. Early recognition and management are essential to save life and prevent any comorbidity. The presentation of cardiac emergencies and etiologies is variable depending on the age of child at the time of presentation and type of cardiac lesion. Cyanotic and noncyanotic congenital heart diseases are the main causes in neonates and infants. Acquired heart diseases and dysrhythmia are more common causes for cardiac emergencies in toddler and childhood. In this review, we discuss the most common causes for cardiac emergencies in neonates and young infants highlighting important points in the presentation and management that are essential for early recognition and timely management of infants presenting with these conditions. PMID:28182035

  13. Cholestasis beyond the Neonatal and Infancy Periods

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Racha; Phen, Claudia; Karjoo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis results from impairment in the excretion of bile, which may be due to mechanical obstruction of bile flow or impairment of excretion of bile components into the bile canaliculus. When present, cholestasis warrants prompt diagnosis and treatment. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis beyond the neonatal period is broad and includes congenital and acquired etiologies. It is imperative that the clinician differentiates between intrahepatic and extrahepatic origin of cholestasis. Treatment may be supportive or curative and depends on the etiology. Recent literature shows that optimal nutritional and medical support also plays an integral role in the management of pediatric patients with chronic cholestasis. This review will provide a broad overview of the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management of cholestasis beyond the neonatal and infancy periods. PMID:27066444

  14. Risk assessment in neonatal early onset sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sagori; Puopolo, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of neonatal early onset sepsis has declined with the widespread use of intrapartum antibiotic therapies, yet early onset sepsis remains a potentially fatal condition, particularly among very low birth-weight infants. Clinical signs of neonatal infection are nonspecific and may be absent in the immediate postnatal period. Maternal and infant clinical characteristics, as well as infant laboratory values, have been used to identify newborns at risk and to administer empiric antibiotic therapy to prevent progression to more severe illness. Such approaches result in the evaluation of approximately 15% of asymptomatic term and late preterm infants and of nearly all preterm infants. The development of multivariate predictive models may provide more accurate methods of identifying newborns at highest risk and allow for more limited newborn antibiotic exposures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate.

    PubMed

    Tadele, Henok; Chanie, Abeje

    2017-03-01

    Ectopia Cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect with failure of fusion of the sternum with extra thoracic location of the heart. The estimated prevalence of this case is 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. We had a case of a 16-hour-old male neonate weighing 2.9kg with externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged surgical approach to this defect with the initial aim of replacement of the heart to the thoracic cavity was opted. The neonate died twenty minutes after the surgical intervention due to cardiogenic shock despite adequate resuscitative measures. This case report underscores the missed opportunity of antenatal ultra-sonographic diagnosis and the challenge of Ectopia Cordis treatment in Ethiopia.

  16. [Childbirth preparation courses: obstetrical and neonatal evaluation].

    PubMed

    Grignaffini, A; Soncini, E; Riccò, R; Vadora, E

    2000-01-01

    From 1997, R.A.T. (Respiratory Autogenous Training) and "Stretching" training have been performed into the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Parma, for childbirth preparation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the obstetric characteristics of these women during labor and delivery. We compared the labour and delivery characteristics of 200 women who have completed antepartum R.A.T. and stretching training with 100 matched controls who have not. Preparation is significantly related to reduction in dystocic deliveries (operative vaginal delivery and cesarean section) and emergency cesarean section. Epidural analgesia (an obstetric procedure that is not routinely offered in the department of Parma) is more frequently performed in women prepared with ante-partum training. The neonatal outcome is good in all the three groups. "Prepared-childbirth" courses offer measurable clinical, obstetrical and neonatal advantages and psychological support, providing a useful link between prenatal ambulatory care and hospital labor and delivery care.

  17. Prenatal methadone exposure and neonatal neurobehavioral functioning

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Martha L.; Jansson, Lauren M.; Schroeder, Jennifer; Williams, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Opioid-exposed infants display a wide and variable range of dysregulated neurobehavioral functioning, but the regulatory difficulties experienced by these infants outside the defined clusters of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) have not been well described, and may have implications for the infant’s developmental course. This study describes the neurobehavioral functioning of neonates prenatally exposed to methadone using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) and explores the relationships between maternal factors and infant functioning. The relationship between NNNS measures, NAS severity and need for pharmacotherapy for NAS were also evaluated. Infants who required pharmacological treatment for NAS showed more dysregulated behavior and signs of stress/abstinence as indicated by NNNS scores, but NNNS scores were not significantly correlated with maternal methadone dose. The determination of the range of the methadone exposed infant’s neurobehavioral repertoire could guide the optimal treatment of all such infants, particularly those requiring only non-pharmacological care. PMID:19690513

  18. Neonatal brain MRI segmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Devi, Chelli N; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Sundararaman, V K; Alex, Zachariah C

    2015-09-01

    This review paper focuses on the neonatal brain segmentation algorithms in the literature. It provides an overview of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the newborn brain and the challenges in automated tissue classification of neonatal brain MRI. It presents a complete survey of the existing segmentation methods and their salient features. The different approaches are categorized into intracranial and brain tissue segmentation algorithms based on their level of tissue classification. Further, the brain tissue segmentation techniques are grouped based on their atlas usage into atlas-based, augmented atlas-based and atlas-free methods. In addition, the research gaps and lacunae in literature are also identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adrenal Hemorrhage in Neonates: Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Alabsi, Samir Y; Layland, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a relatively uncommon condition in newborns. It may be asymptomatic or may present with flank abdominal mass, anemia, jaundice, or rarely as scrotal bruising or hematoma. We report two cases of AH in neonates; the first presented with scrotal hematoma and the second with adrenal mass associated with hypertension and oliguria, primarily secondary to coincidental renal vein thrombosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal ultrasound. Patients were managed conservatively with clinical observation and by following hemoglobin and bilirubin levels closely. Both infants were discharged without surgical intervention after several days in the hospital. Clinicians should consider AH when a newborn presents with scrotal bruising or hematoma, unexplained anemia, unexplained jaundice, or flank abdominal mass. Timely ultrasonographic evaluation of both adrenal glands and testes in neonates with scrotal hematoma may spare infants from unnecessary surgical intervention because scrotal hematoma often raises the suspicion of testicular torsion.

  20. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  1. Birthmarks of medical significance in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Latanya T

    2013-02-01

    Birthmarks are commonplace and most pose no significant detriment to health. It is usual for some 'birthmarks' to manifest within the first weeks to months of life and are not necessarily seen at birth. This is attributed in large part to the maturation of neonatal skin and the deepening of skin color over time. With time, increased pigment production in the skin by melanocytes eventually highlight the differences between normal and abnormal hypopigmented and hyperpigmented anomalies of the skin. Birthmarks can be seen as an isolated skin condition or serve as an important diagnostic aid for other more significant disorders. This review details four of the most common birthmarks regularly encountered in the neonatal period by perinatologists, obstetricians and pediatricians. This review emphasizes their medical significance and highlights any associated underlying systemic disease or genetic syndrome.

  2. [Neonatal screening: trends, debates and consensus].

    PubMed

    Vailly, Joëlle

    2007-03-01

    This study focuses on the social and political implications of the substantial expansion of genetic tests and neonatal screening. The introduction of neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis is one of the significant developments that have fuelled debate on their appropriateness. It has raised a series of questions on the pros and cons, the role of evidence in biomedicine, and the articulation between the therapeutic approach and foetal selection. In this respect France provides an ideal research field as it was one of the first countries to generalize this screening, launched in January 2002. Several questions arise: What were the terms of the debate in France and their underlying logics? How was consensus reached? More generally, what does this screening tell us about policies on life forms today?

  3. A neonate with a vesiculopustular rash.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Dominic O; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Alikhan, Mir; Tsoukas, Maria L; Stein, Sarah L; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-01-01

    Transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) is a unique form of acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMKL) that spontaneously regresses and is found in 3% to 10% of neonates with Down syndrome (DS). We report the case of a neonate with DS who presented with a widespread vesiculopustular eruption as an initial sign of TMD. Complete blood count was normal but peripheral smear revealed circulating megakaryoblasts. The severity of skin lesions correlated with the blast count. By age 2 months the TMD resolved and the patient remains disease-free after 18 months of follow-up. Several important features of TMD are highlighted: skin findings may provide an important clinical clue to TMD diagnosis; manual review of the peripheral smear is necessary when TMD is suspected; and patients with a history of TMD have a very high (∼30%) risk of recurrence with a persistent AMKL within the first 3 years of life. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    PubMed

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Is oral baclofen effective in neonatal hypertonia?

    PubMed

    Schulz, Elizabeth; Mathew, Oommen P

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral palsy is often associated with spasticity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of oral baclofen in hypertonic neonates. Retrospective chart review of patients treated with oral baclofen (identified by means of pharmacy records) during a 3-year period was undertaken. Data on muscle tone evaluated using the Modified Ashworth Scale scores were analyzed for effectiveness. Twenty-nine infants had Modified Ashworth Scale scores before and during oral baclofen therapy. The study infants had a mean gestational age of 25.7 ± 1.9 weeks. Baclofen was started at a postnatal age of 86.4 ± 33.6 days. Comparison of Modified Ashworth Scale scores after initiation of therapy to prebaclofen scores demonstrated no significant decrease in muscle tone. Results of our study show that there is no overall decrease in tone during oral baclofen therapy in hypertonic preterm neonates.

  6. Neonatal Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ng, D K; Chau, K W; Black, C; Thomas, T M; Mak, K L; Boxer, M

    1999-06-01

    A case of neonatal Marfan syndrome is presented. The patient was noted to have cardiomegaly and tricuspid regurgitation on antenatal ultrasound scan. She was born with long, slender fingers and toes, an aged appearance and non-paralytic hypotonia. Echocardiogram revealed a dilated right atrium, right ventricle, dysplastic tricuspid valve and severe tricuspid regurgitation. She subsequently died of severe heart failure. Post-mortem examination showed the pathological features of lobar emphysema and cystic medial necrosis of the aorta. These features supported the diagnosis of neonatal Marfan syndrome. Nucleotide sequencing showed substitution of G by A at codon 1032 in exon 25 located in the long arm of chromosome 15. This resulted in the substitution of a cysteine by a tyrosine. A de novo mutation is suggested by the absence of affected family members.

  7. Perception and expectation of iran neonatal transport expert regard to developing neonatal transport system in iran: a qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad-Bager; Jannati, Ali; Gholipour, Kamal; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Iezadi, Shabnam; Mojahed, Farokh; Vahidi, Reza Gholi

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to reach expert's expectations of neonatal transport system for developing neonatal transport system in Iran. This is a qualitative study conducted by using focus group discussion (FGD) to present expert's perspectives and expectancy about neonatal transport system. Participants was selected from all experts and specialist about neonatal transport in Iran countryside. Finally 48 experts, participate in this study. To data collection 4 FGD were conducted, data were analyzed by content analyses. All subthemes were categorized in main themes according to conceptual relationship as an expert panels opinions. In order to comply with the ethical issues involved in the study was voluntary, also permission for the recording session were taken and confidentiality was also ensured. According to FGD results, 11 themes and 90 subthemes were founded related to neonatal transport system, the main identified themes included: Aims, necessity and models of neonatal transport system, organizing the transport system, management and quality of instruments in the transport system, Neonatal transport system staff, Human resource management and issue related to human resources, conditions and requirements of neonatal transport system, facilitating factors in neonatal transport system, information management and communication system and weakness of neonatal transport system. Neonatal transport systems in different countries must adapted according to situation and component of each country have different strength and weakness and in implementing a system must attend to geographical conditions, financial ability and access to professionals, health system structure, facilities related to neonatal health care, antenatal services in regain, health care related, health care program about neonates and pregnant women and epidemiological status and mortality and morbidity in deferent locals and regains in countryside.

  8. Neonatal Sacrococcygeal Neuroblastoma Mimicking a Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Vicente, Humberto; Correa-Rivas, María; Bouet, Kary; Reyes Bou, Zayhara; Suleiman, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    We reported the first case of a congenital intrapelvic presacral neuroblastoma in Puerto Rico managed in the early neonatal period. The preoperative diagnosis was a sacrococcygeal teratoma Altman stage IV classification. This case confirms the importance of a comprehensive physical examination and observation of low-risk newborn infants with a history of adequate prenatal care and an unremarkable fetal ultrasonogram during pregnancy. PMID:28116200

  9. Caspofungin therapy of neonates with invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Odio, Carla M; Araya, Roberto; Pinto, Luis E; Castro, Carlos E; Vasquez, Sergio; Alfaro, Braulio; Sàenz, Alberto; Herrera, Marco L; Walsh, Thomas J

    2004-12-01

    Invasive candidiasis is an increasing problem in neonatal intensive care units worldwide and is an important cause of morbidity, mortality and prolongation of hospital stay. Despite administration of amphotericin B, invasive candidiasis in neonates is sometimes complicated by persistent fungemia and refractory invasive candidiasis. The problem has been augmented by the increasing prevalence of non-albicans species that often are resistant to fluconazole and to amphotericin B. The population consisted of 1 term and 9 premature neonates with invasive candidiasis caused by Candida albicans (n = 4), Candida parapsilosis (n = 3), Candida tropicalis (n = 2) and Candida glabrata (n = 1). Despite initial therapy with deoxycholate amphotericin B, blood cultures remained positive in all patients for 13-49 days. Invasive candidiasis progressed to meningitis and enlarging renal Candida bezoars in the kidney of one patient and an enlarging atrial vegetation in another. Another patient developed severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium supplementation. Two of the C. albicans and all of the non-albicans Candida isolates were resistant to fluconazole; the C. glabrata isolate was resistant to amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was discontinued and caspofungin initiated in all patients in a dosage of 1 mg/kg/d for 2 days followed by 2 mg/kg/d. All positive blood cultures cleared between 3 and 7 days after initiation of caspofungin, the atrial vegetation resolved and the renal Candida bezoars disappeared. Renal and hepatic function tests did not show any values above normal throughout caspofungin therapy. There were no attributable clinical adverse events during the administration of caspofungin in any of the patients. Caspofungin was effective, safe and well-tolerated as an alternative therapy for persistent and progressive candidiasis in those neonates who were unresponsive to or intolerant of deoxycholate amphotericin B.

  10. Spontaneous neonatal pneumomediastinum: the "spinnaker sail" sign.

    PubMed

    Lawal, T A; Glüer, S; Reismann, M; Dördelmann, M; Schirg, E; Ure, B

    2009-02-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a rare condition in the newborn, not associated with identifiable trauma or mechanical ventilation. It is diagnosed by a combination of physical examination and confirmatory chest radiograph, with various recognized signs identifiable in this condition. We report the case of a male neonate, who had pneumomediastinum confirmed by the presence of a wind blown spinnaker sail sign and was managed conservatively. We also reviewed the literature.

  11. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    PubMed

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Evaluation of echocardiography on the neonatal unit

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S; Kitchiner, D; Yoxall, C; Subhedar, N; Wren, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Echocardiography is an investigation that is being used increasingly on the neonatal unit. There is some controversy as to whether this service can be provided safely and effectively by neonatologists or whether it should only be performed by paediatric cardiologists. Aims: To describe (a) the indications for an echocardiogram, (b) the yield and range of positive findings, (c) the resulting changes in clinical management, and (d) the reliability of echocardiography in the hands of neonatologists when it is performed on the neonatal unit. Methods: Information about all echocardiograms performed on the neonatal unit was collected prospectively. Indications for performing echocardiography, echocardiographic findings, and any resulting changes in clinical management were determined. The concordance of findings in infants who underwent echocardiograms performed by both a neonatologist and a paediatric cardiologist was described. Results: A total of 157 echocardiograms were performed in 82 infants. Echocardiography identified 44 infants with a structural cardiac abnormality and a further 17 infants with a trivial abnormality. In addition, 13 babies were found to have an important functional abnormality. Echocardiography prompted a specific change in clinical management in 64 (78%) babies. In 31 of the 38 infants who had paired scans performed, there was complete concordance between the two examinations. No infants had scans that were completely different. Some discrepancy was identified in seven infants, but this did not prevent appropriate immediate clinical management. Conclusions: Echocardiography on the neonatal unit has a high yield for the diagnosis of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities, often results in a change in clinical management, and can be a reliable tool in the hands of neonatologists. PMID:12819159

  13. Reducing the risk in neonatal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal anesthesia is fraught with potential risk for the patient and stress for the anesthesiologist. Where possible, recognition of these risks, avoidance of, and being able to manage them appropriately, must impact positively on perioperative outcomes in this vulnerable group of patients. Good communication with the parents, as well as with other healthcare providers, is crucial to safe and successful anesthetic care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Integrated imaging of neonatal renal masses.

    PubMed

    Kirks, D R; Rosenberg, E R; Johnson, D G; King, L R

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-three neonatal renal masses were evaluated during a 2-year interval. The final diagnoses in these 33 patients were hydronephrosis [14], multicystic dysplastic kidney [10], renal vein thrombosis [3], obstructed upper pole duplication [2], polycystic kidney disease [2], nephroblastomatosis [1], and mesoblastic nephroma [1]. We recommend an integrated imaging approach that utilizes sonography to clarify anatomy and renal scintigraphy or excretory urography to determine renal function.

  15. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero‐Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N.; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno‐Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A. D.; Rutherford, Mary A.; Counsell, Serena J.; Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High‐quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. Methods We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32‐channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI‐compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp‐up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32‐channel head coil. Results The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. Conclusion The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794–804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27643791

  16. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emer J; Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno-Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A D; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High-quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32-channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI-compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp-up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32-channel head coil. The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794-804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Iatrogenic calcinosis cutis in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Elizabeth Varkey; Shenoy, K Varadaraj; Daniel, James

    2013-01-01

    Calcification of soft tissues occur, secondary to trauma sustained in the course of neonatal intensive care. They can present with swelling and inflammatory signs, which mimic serious infections of bone, joints and soft tissues. The etiology of the presenting inflammatory response is often unknown and the clinical picture is variable. Hence babies get subjected to more invasive procedures and medications. Recognition is by awareness and radiography the key to diagnosis. Masterly inactivity and vigilance during followup is suggested. PMID:23436888

  18. Advances in Management of Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Mathur, Amit M.

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may also cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  19. Neonatal tuberculosis and cardiac inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.

    PubMed

    Banque, Maria Niña F; Ribu, Ramon O; Policarpio, Maria Theresa T

    2013-04-01

    A 1-month-old neonate was admitted in respiratory distress. Two-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed a mass anterior to the left ventricle and right ventricular outflow tract. A biopsy revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. A tuberculin test showed an 18-mm diameter induration. Three of the 6 household contacts were also positive for pulmonary tuberculosis. Antituberculosis medication was started. After 1 year, echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed complete resolution of the mass.

  20. Ethical map reading in neonatal care.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, P

    1987-01-01

    This paper suggests that medical ethics is often based on assumptions, commonly shared in modern medicine, which can cause problems and which need to be questioned. Two contrasting yet complementary ways of thinking about ethical dilemmas in neonatal care are described as the 'separation' and the 'attachment' approaches. The contribution of medical ethics to the substance and quality of discussions between doctors and parents is considered. PMID:2952801

  1. Neonatal Outcomes in Early Term Birth

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Laura I.; Reddy, Uma M.; Männistö, Tuija; Mendola, Pauline; Sjaarda, Lindsey; Hinkle, Stefanie; Chen, Zhen; Lu, Ms. Zhaohui; Laughon, S. Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine neonatal morbidity rates for early term birth compared to full term birth by precursor leading to delivery. Study Design This was a retrospective study of 188,809 deliveries from 37 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks of gestation with electronic medical record data from 2002 to 2008. Precursors for delivery were categorized as spontaneous labor, premature rupture of membranes (PROM), indicated, and no recorded indication. After excluding anomalies, rates of neonatal morbidities by precursor were compared at each week of delivery. Results Early term births (37 0/7 – 38 6/7 weeks) accounted for 34.1% of term births. Overall, 53.6% of early term births were due to spontaneous labor, followed by 27.6% indicated, 15.5% with no recorded indication, and 3.3% with PROM. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and respiratory morbidity were lowest at or beyond 39 weeks compared to the early term period for most precursors, although indicated deliveries had the highest morbidity compared to other precursors. The greatest difference in morbidity was between 37 and 39 weeks for most precursors, while most differences in morbidities between 38 and 39 weeks were not significant. Respiratory morbidity was higher at 37 than 39 weeks regardless of route of delivery. Conclusion Given the higher neonatal morbidity at 37 compared to 39 weeks regardless of delivery precursor, our data support recent recommendations for designating early term to include 37 weeks. Prospective data is urgently needed to determine the optimal timing of delivery for common pregnancy complications. PMID:24631438

  2. Antithrombotic Therapy in Neonates and Children

    PubMed Central

    Monagle, Paul; Chan, Anthony K. C.; Goldenberg, Neil A.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Journeycake, Janna M.; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonates and children differ from adults in physiology, pharmacologic responses to drugs, epidemiology, and long-term consequences of thrombosis. This guideline addresses optimal strategies for the management of thrombosis in neonates and children. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Results: We suggest that where possible, pediatric hematologists with experience in thromboembolism manage pediatric patients with thromboembolism (Grade 2C). When this is not possible, we suggest a combination of a neonatologist/pediatrician and adult hematologist supported by consultation with an experienced pediatric hematologist (Grade 2C). We suggest that therapeutic unfractionated heparin in children is titrated to achieve a target anti-Xa range of 0.35 to 0.7 units/mL or an activated partial thromboplastin time range that correlates to this anti-Xa range or to a protamine titration range of 0.2 to 0.4 units/mL (Grade 2C). For neonates and children receiving either daily or bid therapeutic low-molecular-weight heparin, we suggest that the drug be monitored to a target range of 0.5 to 1.0 units/mL in a sample taken 4 to 6 h after subcutaneous injection or, alternatively, 0.5 to 0.8 units/mL in a sample taken 2 to 6 h after subcutaneous injection (Grade 2C). Conclusions: The evidence supporting most recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in neonates and children remains weak. Studies addressing appropriate drug target ranges and monitoring requirements are urgently required in addition to site- and clinical situation-specific thrombosis management strategies. PMID:22315277

  3. Neonatal Erythroderma: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sandipan; Banerjee, Raghubir; Malakar, Rajib

    2012-01-01

    Erythroderma a life-threatening entity during the first one month, and many a time, a manifestation of genodermatosis, immune deficiency, psoriasis, metabolic diseases, and infections. Atopic dermatitis presenting as erythroderma is usually observed later, after this one-month period, and hence not a common differential for neonatal exfoliative dermatitis. Although a rare entity, there is a paucity of studies on this and in contrast to adults, some may manifest as cardinal signs of primary disease conditions. PMID:23248366

  4. Neonatal cholestasis due to primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Naman Sadanand; Shah, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is rarely caused due to primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is an inflammatory disease of the bile ducts, which results in obstructive fibrosis of the ducts. A 7-month-old male child presented with jaundice along with high-colored urine and clay-colored stools since birth. Liver biopsy showed mild bile duct proliferation with cholangioles showing bile and thrombi suggestive of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  5. [Magnetic resonance imaging without sedation in neonates].

    PubMed

    Ureta-Velasco, N; Martínez-de Aragón, A; Moral-Pumarega, M T; Núñez-Enamorado, N; Bergón-Sendín, E; Pallás-Alonso, C R

    2015-05-01

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without sedation in the neonatal period increases patient safety, availability and profitability of the diagnostic tool. The aim in this study was to evaluate a new protocol of MRI without sedation during a 20-month period. In the protocol, the patients are prepared in the neonatal unit. Prospective descriptive study, from May 2012 to December 2013. Patients included were neonates requiring MRI, clinically stable and not requiring ventilatory support. The method was based on the application of developmental centered care and the use of a vacuum matress to immobilize the baby. The principal outcome parameter of interest was the percentage of succesfully completed MRIs. The duration of the MRI and the number of interruptions, was also studied from October 2012. A total of 43 MRIs without sedation were carried out on 42 patients: 41 cerebral and 2 spinal. The success rate was 97.7% (42/43). The mean MRI time was 26.3 minutes (95% CI 23.3-29.3 mins; range 16-50 mins). MRIs were completed without interruption in 20 of the 34 cases (58%) in which the duration was recorded. The number of interruptions per procedure varied from 0 to 3, with a mean of 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-0.8) and a median of 0. The protocol had a success rate of over 90%. Thus MRI without sedation seems applicable in Spanish hospitals, with most of the preparation being performed in the neonatal unit, in order to reduce the occupation of the MRI unit, as well as minimizing stress to the baby. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Probiotics in neonatal intensive care - back to the future.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Girish; Rao, Shripada; Patole, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Survival of extremely preterm and critically ill neonates has improved significantly over the last few decades following advances in neonatal intensive care. These include antenatal glucocorticoids, surfactant, continuous positive airway pressure support, advanced gentle modes of ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide. Probiotic supplementation is a recent significant milestone in the history of neonatal intensive care. Very few, if any, interventions match the ability of probiotics to significantly reduce the risk of death and definite necrotising enterocolitis while facilitating enteral feeds in high-risk preterm neonates. Probiotics also have a potential to benefit neonates with surgical conditions with significant gastrointestinal morbidity. Current evidence for the benefits of probiotic supplementation for neonates in an intensive care unit is reviewed. The mechanisms for the benefits of probiotics in this population are discussed, and guidelines for clinicians are provided in the context of the regulatory framework in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. [Neonatal abstinence syndrome after maternal use of tramadol].

    PubMed

    de Wit, Djoeke; Koomen-Botman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is an opioid with lipophilic characteristics that freely crosses the placenta. Due to the placental transfer, there is a risk of neonatal withdrawal symptoms. Therefore, chronic use during pregnancy is not advised. A 25-year-old pregnant woman, gravida 3, para 1, used tramadol 100 mg 3 times a day for chronic headache and migraine during this pregnancy. Because of the risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome, delivery took place in the hospital and the neonate had to stay at least 3 days for observation. The newborn developed neonatal withdrawal symptoms 36 hours after delivery. Treatment with phenobarbital was effective; 9 days after delivery the newborn was discharged without further treatment. When tramadol is used during pregnancy, there is a serious risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome. Phenobarbital proved to be effective for the treatment of neonatal tramadol withdrawal.

  8. Intraprofessional Excellence in Nursing: Collaborative Strategies for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teague, Amanda H; Jnah, Amy J; Newberry, Desi

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a growing public health concern, one that costs the health care system $190-$720 million each year. Recently, state-level perinatal quality collaborative groups have disseminated NAS action plans: customizable frameworks aimed to assist health care systems in identifying, evaluating, treating, and coordinating discharge services for neonates with NAS. Hospital-based neonatal nursing quality improvement teams, including neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs), neonatal clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), and clinical neonatal nurses, by virtue of their collective academic, administrative, and practical years of experience, are ideally positioned to develop, implement, and evaluate NAS care bundles. The article's purpose is to discuss key elements of an NAS care bundle using the framework of the Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina NAS action plan as an exemplar. Discussion of evidence-based and nursing-driven metrics will be followed by a discussion of the emerging concept of an inpatient-to-outpatient transitional care NAS management model.

  9. Opiate v CNS depressant therapy in neonatal drug abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kandall, S R; Doberczak, T M; Mauer, K R; Strashun, R H; Korts, D C

    1983-04-01

    Paregoric and phenobarbital, administered randomly in 153 passively addicted neonates, initially appeared to control neonatal abstinence signs equally well. However, seven of the 62 phenobarbital-treated newborns had abstinence-associated seizures within the first month of life, while none of 49 paregoric-treated neonates had seizures. Forty-two neonates initially requiring no specific pharmacotherapy for abstinence signs were born to mothers taking less methadone hydrochloride just before delivery. Five of those 42 neonates, however, had seizures within the first 14 days of life. Seizure occurrence could not be predicted from analysis of early abstinence patterns. We consider paregoric to be the treatment of choice for the neonatal abstinence syndrome. Phenobarbital use should be monitored with serum drug levels and modification of recommended dosage regimens considered.

  10. Early diagnosis of neonatal cholestatic jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Benchimol, Eric I.; Walsh, Catharine M.; Ling, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review best practices for early recognition and treatment of conditions resulting in neonatal cholestasis, in order to improve long-term outcomes for affected infants. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Studies, review articles, and meta-analyses pertaining to neonatal-onset cholestasis were sought via electronic databases. Reference lists of studies and review articles supplemented the electronic search. Studies were included if they examined the importance of early diagnosis and intervention for cholestatic jaundice of any cause, and mainly comprised Level II and Level III evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Review of the relevant literature supports the recommendation that infants with jaundice at 2 weeks of age should be tested for cholestasis by quantifying the direct reacting bilirubin levels in their blood. Subsequent rapid investigation using a diagnostic algorithm enables early diagnosis of the specific cause and facilitates timely intervention for conditions whose outcomes are improved by early treatment. CONCLUSION Universal screening for neonatal cholestasis might help with early identification of cases and improve outcomes, although further study is required in the North American setting. PMID:20008595

  11. [Problems of the therapy of neonatal convulsions].

    PubMed

    Scarpa, P; Chierici, R; Fortini, C

    1982-01-01

    The newborn with seizures should be treated urgently, because of the high risk of consequent brain damage. In addition to general management in order to correct metabolic and functional unbalancement, associated with the fits, specific causes of neonatal seizures (hypoglicemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesiemia, hypo-hypernatremia, pyridoxine deficiency) should be immediately removed. If neonatal seizures depend on other non specific causes (anoxia, cerebral hemorrhagy, malformation, infection or other, a symptomatic anticonvulsant treatment should be carried out without delay. Useful drugs for the newborn are phenobarbital, phenytoin and benzodiazepine e.v. or e.m. After fits have been controlled, an oral maintenance therapy has to be started with phenobarbital or phenytoin in order to avoid seizure-relaps. Clinical EEG and hematological data should be monitored to detect side effects, as well as plasma drugs levels to achieve adequate maintenance doses. Criteria for discontinuing the neonatal seizures treatment have not been well established. On the bases of the data collected through a longitudinal study of 54 newborns who developed seizures in the first day of life, clinical and EEG criteria for discontinuing anticonvulsant therapy are discussed. If the fits are rare, short, immediately controlled and EEG is mildly abnormal, we attempt to discontinuing treatment within 15 days. If fits are unfrequent, varying in length, their therapeutical control is reached within 3 days and the EEG is markedly abnormal but recovered within 1 month, treatment is discontinuing between 15 days and 3 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics in Neonates Following Maternal Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Diana F.; Acosta, Edward P.; Rizk, Matthew L.; Bryson, Yvonne J.; Spector, Stephen A.; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Handelsman, Edward; Teppler, Hedy; Welebob, Carolee; Persaud, Deborah; Cababasay, Mae P.; Wang, JiaJia; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    IMPAACT P1097 was a multicenter trial to determine washout pharmacokinetics and safety of in utero/intrapartum exposure to raltegravir in infants born to HIV-infected pregnant women receiving raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy. Twenty-two mother-infant pairs were enrolled; evaluable pharmacokinetic data was available from 19 mother-infant pairs. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta, with median cord blood/maternal delivery plasma raltegravir concentration ratio 1.48 (range, 0.32–4.33). Raltegravir elimination was highly variable and extremely prolonged in some infants; [median t½ 26.6 hours (range 9.3–184 hours)]. Prolonged raltegravir elimination likely reflects low neonatal UGT1A1 enzyme activity and enterohepatic recirculation. Excessive raltegravir concentrations must be avoided in the neonate, since raltegravir at high plasma concentrations may increase the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. Sub-therapeutic concentrations, which could lead to inadequate viral suppression and development of raltegravir resistance, must be avoided as well. Two ongoing IMPAACT studies are investigating further the pharmacology of raltegravir in neonates. PMID:25162819

  13. Adverse consequences of neonatal antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Charles M

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics have not only saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating the impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to the initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. The review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely.

  14. Neonate with Mycoplasma hominis meningoencephalitis given moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Wildenbeest, Joanne G; Said, Ines; Jaeger, Bregje; van Hest, Reinier M; van de Beek, Diederik; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2016-11-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a commensal organism in the genitourinary tract that can cause life-threatening CNS infections in neonates after intrauterine infection or through vertical transmission during birth. We present a case of an 11-day-old neonate presenting with fever and supporting laboratory evidence of a CNS infection. No systemic maternal infection or maternal genitourinary tract infection occurred at the time of delivery. Empirical treatment was initiated, consisting of amoxicillin, cefotaxime, and aciclovir. After clinical deterioration, 16S ribosomal DNA PCR in cerebrospinal fluid detected M hominis, antibiotic treatment was switched to moxifloxacin, and pharmacokinetic data were obtained. This Grand Round illustrates the challenges that exist in the diagnosis and treatment of M hominis meningoencephalitis: bacterial cultures are often negative and recommended empirical antimicrobials do not provide adequate antimicrobial coverage. Optimal antimicrobial treatment regimens for M hominis meningoencephalitis are unknown. Although we describe successful treatment of a neonate with a complicated M hominis meningoencephalitis with moxifloxacin, caution with fluoroquinolone monotherapy (including moxifloxacin) has to be taken into account because resistance to fluoroquinolones has previously been described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinal microvascular plasticity in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Y; Hartley, L; Smith, R

    2017-01-31

    Dilation and abnormal tortuosity of retinal vessels are the hallmarks of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in premature infants. The stages of ROP are defined by vessel appearance at the interface between the vascular and avascular retinal areas. Deregulated signaling pathways involving hypoxia-inducible factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in the pathogenesis of ROP. VEGF-antagonists are increasingly being used as 'off-label medication' to treat this condition, with some success. We present Baby SM (female), who was born prematurely at 24 weeks gestation in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit, and with a birth weight of 640 g. On screening at 35 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA), she was noted to have ROP, which became severe by 37 weeks PMA. She received one dose of intravitreal VEGF antagonist (Bevacizumab), resulting in a decrease in vessel tortuosity and dilation. However, repeat imaging at 4 weeks showed a re-emergence of vessel tortuosity. We believe the observed changes demonstrate an inherent retinal microvascular plasticity in premature neonates. With improved survival of extremely premature neonates and the availability of retinal imaging technology, we are now able to observe this plasticity.

  16. Improving Detection of IV Infiltrates in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, MD, Colleen; Langer, Melissa; Burke, Susan; El Metwally, MD, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Neonates and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit suffer significant morbidity when intravenous (IV) catheters infiltrate. The underreporting of adverse events through hospital voluntary reporting systems, such as ours, can complicate the monitoring of low incidence events, like IV infiltrates. Based on severe cases of IV infiltrates observed in our neonatal intensive care unit, we attempted to improve the detection of all infiltrates and reduce the incidence of Stage 4 infiltrates. We developed, and initiated the use of, an evidence-based guideline for the improved surveillance, prevention, and management of IV infiltrates, with corresponding educational interventions for faculty and staff. We instituted the use of a checklist for compliance with guidelines, and as a mechanism of surveillance. The baseline incidence rate of IV infiltrates, determined by the voluntary reporting system, was 5 per 1000 line days. Following initiation of the guidelines and checklist, the IV infiltrate rate increased to 9 per 1000 line days. In most months, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved by use of the checklist. During the post-intervention period the rate of Stage 4 infiltrates, as measured by usage of nitroglycerin ointment, was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved following our quality improvement interventions. Further, use of an evidence-based guideline for managing infiltrates may reduce the most severe infiltrate injuries. PMID:26734388

  17. Causes of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Daniel T

    2011-01-01

    The causes of brachial plexus palsy in neonates should be classified according to their most salient associated feature. The causes of brachial plexus palsy are obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, familial congenital brachial plexus palsy, maternal uterine malformation, congenital varicella syndrome, osteomyelitis involving the proximal head of the humerus or cervical vertebral bodies, exostosis of the first rib, tumors and hemangioma in the region of the brachial plexus, and intrauterine maladaptation. Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome, neonatal brachial plexus palsy due to placental insufficiency, is probably not a cause of brachial plexus palsy. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, the most common alleged cause of neonatal brachial plexus palsy, occurs when the forces generated during labor stretch the brachial plexus beyond its resistance. The probability of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is directly proportional to the magnitude, acceleration, and cosine of the angle formed by the direction of the vector of the stretching force and the axis of the most vulnerable brachial plexus bundle, and inversely proportional to the resistance of the must vulnerable brachial plexus bundle and of the shoulder girdle muscles, joints, and bones. Since in most nonsurgical cases neither the contribution of each of these factors to the production of the obstetrical brachial plexus palsy nor the proportion of traction and propulsion contributing to the stretch force is known, we concur with prior reports that the term of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy should be substituted by the more inclusive term of birth-related brachial plexus palsy.

  18. Adverse Consequences of Neonatal Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Antibiotics have saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review 1) summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, 2) discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and 3) presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Recent findings Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. Summary This review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely. PMID:26886785

  19. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with neonatal onset.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Khamis Butt, Umar Bin; Mannan, Jovaria

    2014-05-01

    We describe 2 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is a rare disorder of auto-immunity, chronic persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and hyper gamma globulinemia (1gG, 1gA). Both cases presented in neonatal period which is a rare age of presentation in this disease. A 20 days old female neonate presented with respiratory symptoms which rapidly progressed needing ventilatory support. There was hepatomegaly and no auscultatory findings in the chest. Serial CBCs (complete blood counts) showed persistent leucocytosis with predominant lymphocytosis. Her chest X-ray showed left sided consolidation which responded poorly to antibiotics. Her prompt clinical response to steroids raised the suspicion of autoimmunity and the diagnosis was established after a negative bone marrow examination for leukemia and a positive result for ALPS on flow cytometry. The second case presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia starting in neonatal period followed by persistent lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent infections which responded poorly to antibiotics. Diagnosis was delayed due to low index of suspicion, and finally achieved with multiple radiological studies, histopathology and flow cytometry.

  20. Visual evoked potentials in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Xiong; Wong, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is very standardized. However, there is a lack of an objective method to evaluate the cerebral effects of bilirubin apart from brainstem auditory evoked potentials. There were few studies evaluating the effects of hyperbilirubinemia or phototherapy on the visual pathway in infants with hyperbilirubinemia. Serial visual evoked potentials of two groups of term neonates (N = 24)--group 1 with moderate hyperbilirubinemia (n = 16) and group 2 with severe hyperbilirubinemia (n = 8)--were evaluated prospectively. All infants had regular physical, neurologic, visual, and auditory evaluations until 3 years. Four (16%) had abnormal visual evoked potentials before 1 year, and the abnormalities returned to normal thereafter. There was no significant difference in visual evoked potentials between the two groups. All had normal neurodevelopmental status by 3 years, with the exception of one child from the severe group with ABO incompatibility with transient mild motor delay, hypotonia, and abnormal visual evoked potential. There were no abnormal effects of phototherapy on visual evoked potentials in infants with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia after 1 year of age. Although our sample size was small, the results suggest that the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on visual evoked potentials might be transient. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:58-62).

  1. Isolation and Culture of Neonatal Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Lange, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes have long been used to study myofibrillogenesis and myofibrillar functions. Cultured cardiomyocytes allow for easy investigation and manipulation of biochemical pathways, and their effect on the biomechanical properties of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes. The following 2-day protocol describes the isolation and culture of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. We show how to easily dissect hearts from neonates, dissociate the cardiac tissue and enrich cardiomyocytes from the cardiac cell-population. We discuss the usage of different enzyme mixes for cell-dissociation, and their effects on cell-viability. The isolated cardiomyocytes can be subsequently used for a variety of morphological, electrophysiological, biochemical, cell-biological or biomechanical assays. We optimized the protocol for robustness and reproducibility, by using only commercially available solutions and enzyme mixes that show little lot-to-lot variability. We also address common problems associated with the isolation and culture of cardiomyocytes, and offer a variety of options for the optimization of isolation and culture conditions. PMID:24056408

  2. Euthanasia of mouse fetuses and neonates.

    PubMed

    Klaunberg, Brenda A; O'malley, James; Clark, Terri; Davis, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    We sought to determine whether any of the common methods of euthanasia for adult rodents would lead to an acceptable death for fetuses or neonates. We wanted to identify a method that was rapid, free of signs of pain or distress, reliable, and minimally distressful to the person performing the procedure and that minimized the amount of handling required to perform the procedure. We evaluated six methods of euthanasia, with and without anesthesia, in three age groups of mice: gravid mice (E14-20) and neonatal pups (P1-P7 and P8-P14). Euthanasia methods included: halothane inhalation, carbon dioxide inhalation, intraperitoneal sodium pentobarbital, intravenous potassium chloride, and cervical dislocation with and without anesthesia. Noninvasive echocardiography was used to assess heartbeat during euthanasia. With cardiac arrest as the definition of death, no method of euthanasia killed fetal mice. Halothane inhalation (5% by vaporizer) was not an acceptable method of euthanasia for mice of the age groups tested. Intraperitoneal administration of sodium pentobarbital for euthanasia required a higher dose than the previously established dose, and there is a risk of reduced efficacy in pregnant animals due to potential intrauterine injection. Carbon dioxide asphyxiation was the most efficient method of euthanasia for neonatal mouse pups P1-14. For pregnant adult mice, intravenous potassium chloride under anesthesia, carbon dioxide asphyxiation, and cervical dislocation alone or under anesthesia were excellent methods of euthanasia. Copyright 2004 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

  3. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  4. Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis.

  5. Predicting length of treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome in methadone-exposed neonates.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Neil S; Salva, Nicole; Hayes, Edward J; Dysart, Kevin C; Pequignot, Edward C; Baxter, Jason K

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the study was to identify maternal variables predicting length of treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). This was a retrospective cohort study of infants treated for NAS during 2000-2006 whose mothers were on methadone maintenance at delivery. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to examine the interaction of maternal and neonatal variables with length of treatment. Of 204 neonates born to methadone exposed mothers, the average dose at delivery was 127 mg daily (25-340 mg) with median length of treatment 32 days (1-122 days). Trimester of initial exposure (P = .33), methadone dose at delivery (P = .198), body mass index (P = .31), antidepressant use (P = .40), cigarette use (P = .76), race (P = .78), and maternal age (P = .84) did not predict length of treatment. In the multivariate analysis, gestational age at delivery and benzodiazepine use were significant predictors of length of treatment. Later gestational age and concomitant benzodiazepine use were associated with longer treatment.

  6. Population Pharmacokinetic Model of Sublingual Buprenorphine in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee M.; Dombrowsky, Erin; Lin, Hopi; Erlich, Michelle E.; Moody, David E.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kraft, Walter K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)—a clinical entity of infants from in utero exposure to psychoactive xenobiotic and buprenorphine—has been successfully used to treat NAS. However, nothing is known about the pharmacokinetics (PK) of buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the population pharmacokinetic of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. Design A retrospective population PK analysis of: (1) neonates with NAS treated with sublingual buprenorphine in randomized, double blinded clinical study and (2) data from healthy adults from a previously published pharmacokinetic study. Setting Neonatal intensive care unit and general clinical research unit. Patients Twenty-four neonates with NAS and five healthy adults. Interventions All participants received sublingual buprenorphine per study protocol. Measurements and Main Results A total of 303 PK data from 29 neonates and adults were used for model development. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a first order conditional estimation with interaction in the NONMEM software program. A two-compartment linear PK model with first-order absorption process best described the pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates. The apparent clearance (CL) of buprenorphine was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age via two distinct saturated pathways. A typical neonate with NAS (body weight, 2.9 kg; postnatal age; 5.4 days) had a CL of 3.5 L/kg/hour and elimination half-life of 11 hours. Phenobarbital did not affect the clearance of buprenorphine compared to neonates of similar age and weight. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate the population PK of sublingual buprenorphine in neonatal NAS. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to describe the age-dependent changes of buprenorphine PK in this patient population. No buprenorphine dose adjustment is needed for neonates with NAS

  7. Seizures in Preterm Neonates: A Multicenter Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Shellhaas, Renée A; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Chang, Taeun; Wusthoff, Courtney J; Chu, Catherine J; Cilio, M Roberta; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Massey, Shavonne L; Abend, Nicholas S; Soul, Janet S

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize seizures among preterm neonates enrolled in the Neonatal Seizure Registry, a prospective cohort of consecutive neonates with seizures at seven pediatric centers that follow the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's neonatal electroencephalography monitoring guideline. Of 611 enrolled neonates with seizures, 92 (15%) were born preterm. Seizure characteristics were evaluated by gestational age at birth for extremely preterm (<28 weeks, N = 18), very preterm (28 to <32 weeks, N = 18), and moderate to late preterm (32 to <37 weeks, N = 56) and compared with term neonates. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (33%) and intracranial hemorrhage (27%) accounted for the etiology in more than half of preterm neonates. Hypothermia therapy was utilized in 15 moderate to late preterm subjects with encephalopathy. The presence of subclinical seizures, monotherapy treatment failure, and distribution of seizure burden (including status epilepticus) was similar in preterm and term neonates. However, exclusively subclinical seizures occurred more often in preterm than term neonates (24% vs 14%). Phenobarbital was the most common initial medication for all gestational age groups, and failure to respond to an initial loading dose was 63% in both preterm and term neonates. Mortality was similar among the three preterm gestational age groups; however, preterm mortality was more than twice that of term infants (35% vs 15%). Subclinical seizures were more common and mortality was higher for preterm than term neonates. These data underscore the importance of electroencephalographic monitoring and the potential for improved management in preterm neonates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HELLP Syndrome and the Effects on the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is most often diagnosed between 27 and 37 weeks gestation. It is also a diagnosis that can be seen during the postpartum period. The effects of HELLP syndrome on the neonate can be significant. Recognizing the risks to the neonate can assist the clinician in preparing for the neonate prior to delivery. In doing so, the mortality and morbidity rates can be reduced.

  9. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neonatal Drug Therapy: The First Frontier of Therapeutics for Children

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, K; van den Anker, J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the safe and effective use of medicines in neonates has increased substantially but has resulted in few label changes. Drugs developed for use in adults are reshaped and tailored to specific neonatal indications. However, the use of drugs in neonates should not only mirror adult pharmacotherapy, but should be driven by their own specific needs. Therefore, building collaborative networks may assist to develop a newborn-driven research agenda addressing their clinical needs and diseases. PMID:26095519

  11. Population Pharmacokinetic Model of Sublingual Buprenorphine in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee M; Dombrowsky, Erin; Lin, Hopi; Erlich, Michelle E; Moody, David E; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Kraft, Walter K

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)--a clinical entity of infants from in utero exposure to psychoactive xenobiotic and buprenorphine--has been successfully used to treat NAS. However, nothing is known about the pharmacokinetics (PK) of buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the population pharmacokinetic of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates with NAS. A retrospective population PK analysis of: (1) neonates with NAS treated with sublingual buprenorphine in randomized, double blinded clinical study and (2) data from healthy adults from a previously published pharmacokinetic study. Neonatal intensive care unit and general clinical research unit. Twenty-four neonates with NAS and five healthy adults. All participants received sublingual buprenorphine per study protocol. A total of 303 PK data from 29 neonates and adults were used for model development. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a first order conditional estimation with interaction in the NONMEM software program. A two-compartment linear PK model with first-order absorption process best described the pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine in neonates. The apparent clearance (CL) of buprenorphine was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age via two distinct saturated pathways. A typical neonate with NAS (body weight, 2.9 kg; postnatal age; 5.4 days) had a CL of 3.5 L/kg/hour and elimination half-life of 11 hours. Phenobarbital did not affect the clearance of buprenorphine compared to neonates of similar age and weight. This is the first study to investigate the population PK of sublingual buprenorphine in neonatal NAS. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to describe the age-dependent changes of buprenorphine PK in this patient population. No buprenorphine dose adjustment is needed for neonates with NAS treated with buprenorphine and concurrent phenobarbital. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications

  12. [Neonatal seizures, buprenorphine abstinence syndrome, and substitutive treatment with morphine].

    PubMed

    Dahan, S; Elefant, E; Girard, I; Azcona, B; Champion, V; Mitanchez, D

    2011-03-01

    We report the case of a hypotrophic twin who presented neonatal abstinence syndrome to buprenorphine and developed neonatal seizures when the substitutive treatment by morphine was stopped. The other eutrophic twin did not develop withdrawal symptoms. This case demonstrates the unpredictable nature of transplacental transfer of buprenorphine. It also shows that neonatal abstinence syndrome can be potentially severe and that morphine treatment is not without risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. May maternal lifestyle have an impact on neonatal glucose levels?

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Porto, Maria Amelia S; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal glucose levels correlate negatively with umbilical cord levels of C-peptide, a polypeptide secreted with insulin. In other words, neonatal hypoglycemia results from excessive insulin secretion from fetal/neonatal beta cells. Given that insulin causes fat to be stored rather than to be used for energy, one would expect that chronic hyperinsulinemia would result in large-for-gestational-age neonates. The finding that many small-for-gestational-age neonates have hypoglycemia suggests that the stimulus for insulin production occurs close to delivery. We postulated that a potent stimulation of maternal insulin production close to delivery would also provide a potent stimulus for fetal and neonatal insulin production, causing neonatal hypoglycemia. This study has evaluated 155 mothers with markers of excessive insulin production (such as acanthosis or grade III obesity), or with situations characterized by increased insulin requirements (such as an invasive bacterial infection or use of systemic corticosteroid within a week before delivery; or sedentariness or high-carbohydrate intake within 24h before delivery) and their 158 neonates who were screened for glycemic levels at 1, 2 and 4h after birth. The minimum glucose level was correlated to the maternal parameters, and to classical predictors of neonatal hypoglycemia, such as low-birth weight and preterm delivery. The only independent predictors were sedentariness and high-carbohydrate intake within 24h before delivery. The risk of neonatal hypoglycemia increased five-fold with sedentariness, 11-fold with high-carbohydrate intake, and 329-fold with both risk factors. The risk of neonatal hypoglycemia seems to be highly influenced by maternal lifestyle within 24h before delivery. Controlled randomized trials may help determine whether a controlled carbohydrate diet combined with regular physical activity close to delivery can prevent neonatal hypoglycemia and all its severe complications to the newborn

  14. Congenital mesenteric hernia in neonates: Still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Alshahwani, Noora; Al-Balushi, Zainab; Arain, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction with devastating outcomes and still remains a challenge to diagnose pre-operatively. Patients are often managed with emergency surgical exploration and may need bowel resection. We present 2 neonates with small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulated transmesenteric hernia through a congenital defect in the small bowel mesentery, which were managed successfully. We have also reviewed the literature about congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates. PMID:26612129

  15. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates. PMID:27747129

  16. Neonatal drug therapy: The first frontier of therapeutics for children.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; van den Anker, J

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about the safe and effective use of medicines in neonates has increased substantially but has resulted in few label changes. Drugs developed for use in adults are reshaped and tailored to specific neonatal indications. However, the use of drugs in neonates should not only mirror adult pharmacotherapy, but should be driven by their own specific needs. Therefore, building collaborative networks may assist to develop a newborn-driven research agenda addressing their clinical needs and diseases.

  17. Predictors of positive blood culture and deaths among neonates with suspected neonatal sepsis in a tertiary hospital, Mwanza-Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kayange, Neema; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Mwizamholya, Damas L; Jeremiah, Seni; Mshana, Stephen E

    2010-06-04

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Appropriate clinical diagnosis and empirical treatment in a given setting is crucial as pathogens of bacterial sepsis and antibiotic sensitivity pattern can considerably vary in different settings. This study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC), Tanzania to determine the prevalence of neonatal sepsis, predictors of positive blood culture, deaths and antimicrobial susceptibility, thus providing essential information to formulate a policy for management of neonatal sepsis. This was a prospective cross sectional study involving 300 neonates admitted at BMC neonatal unit between March and November 2009. Standard data collection form was used to collect all demographic data and clinical characteristics of neonates. Blood culture was done on Brain Heart Infusion broth followed by identification of isolates using conventional methods and testing for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. Among 770 neonates admitted during the study period; 300 (38.9%) neonates were diagnosed to have neonatal sepsis by WHO criteria. Of 300 neonates with clinical neonatal sepsis 121(40%) and 179(60%) had early and late onset sepsis respectively. Positive blood culture was found in 57 (47.1%) and 92 (51.4%) among neonates with early and late onset neonatal sepsis respectively (p = 0.466). Predictors of positive blood culture in both early and late onset neonatal sepsis were inability to feed, lethargy, cyanosis, meconium stained liquor, premature rupture of the membrane and convulsion. About 49% of gram negatives isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins and 28% of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Deaths occurred in 57 (19%) of neonates. Factors that predicted deaths were positive blood culture (p = 0.0001), gram negative sepsis (p = 0.0001) and infection with ESBL (p = 0.008) or MRSA (p = 0

  18. Predictors of positive blood culture and deaths among neonates with suspected neonatal sepsis in a tertiary hospital, Mwanza- Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Appropriate clinical diagnosis and empirical treatment in a given setting is crucial as pathogens of bacterial sepsis and antibiotic sensitivity pattern can considerably vary in different settings. This study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC), Tanzania to determine the prevalence of neonatal sepsis, predictors of positive blood culture, deaths and antimicrobial susceptibility, thus providing essential information to formulate a policy for management of neonatal sepsis. Methods This was a prospective cross sectional study involving 300 neonates admitted at BMC neonatal unit between March and November 2009. Standard data collection form was used to collect all demographic data and clinical characteristics of neonates. Blood culture was done on Brain Heart Infusion broth followed by identification of isolates using conventional methods and testing for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. Results Among 770 neonates admitted during the study period; 300 (38.9%) neonates were diagnosed to have neonatal sepsis by WHO criteria. Of 300 neonates with clinical neonatal sepsis 121(40%) and 179(60%) had early and late onset sepsis respectively. Positive blood culture was found in 57 (47.1%) and 92 (51.4%) among neonates with early and late onset neonatal sepsis respectively (p = 0.466). Predictors of positive blood culture in both early and late onset neonatal sepsis were inability to feed, lethargy, cyanosis, meconium stained liquor, premature rupture of the membrane and convulsion. About 49% of gram negatives isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins and 28% of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Deaths occurred in 57 (19%) of neonates. Factors that predicted deaths were positive blood culture (p = 0.0001), gram negative sepsis (p = 0.0001) and infection with ESBL

  19. Maternal haemoglobin and short-term neonatal outcome in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Savajols, Elodie; Burguet, Antoine; Grimaldi, Marianne; Godoy, Florence; Sagot, Paul; Semama, Denis S

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a significant association between maternal haemoglobin measured before delivery and short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates. We included prospectively all live births occurring from 25 to 32+6 weeks of gestation in a tertiary care centre between January 1(st) 2009 and December 31(st) 2011. Outborn infants and infants presenting with lethal malformations were excluded. Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 409 infants met the inclusion criteria. For each mother-infant pair a prospective record of epidemiologic data was performed and maternal haemoglobin concentration recorded within 24 hours before delivery was retrospectively researched. Maternal haemoglobin was divided into quartiles with the second and the third one regarded as reference as they were composed of normal haemoglobin values. Short-term outcome was defined as poor in case of death during hospital stay and/or grades III/IV intraventricular haemorrhage and/or periventricular leukomalacia and/or necessity of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The global rate of poor short-term neonatal outcome was 11.4% and was significantly associated with low maternal haemoglobin values. This association remained significant after adjustment for antenatal corticosteroids therapy, gestational age, parity, mechanism of preterm birth, mode of delivery and birth weight (aOR = 2.97 CI 95% [1.36-6.47]). There was no relation between short-term neonatal outcome and high maternal haemoglobin concentration values. We show that low maternal haemoglobin concentration at delivery is an independent risk factor for poor short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates. This study is one of the first to show such an association within the preterm population.

  20. Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease in Otherwise Healthy Infants: Failure of Specific Neonatal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Alessandro; Stronati, Mauro; Fellay, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Only a small proportion of newborn infants exposed to a pathogenic microorganism develop overt infection. Susceptibility to infection in preterm infants and infants with known comorbidities has a likely multifactorial origin and can be often attributed to the concurrence of iatrogenic factors, environmental determinants, underlying pathogenic processes, and probably genetic predisposition. Conversely, infection occurring in otherwise healthy full-term newborn infants is unexplained in most cases. Microbial virulence factors and the unique characteristics of the neonatal immune system only partially account for the interindividual variability in the neonatal immune responses to pathogens. We here suggest that neonatal infection occurring in otherwise healthy infants is caused by a failure of the specific protective immunity to the microorganism. To explain infection in term and preterm infants, we propose an extension of the previously proposed model of the genetic architecture of infectious diseases in humans. We then focus on group B streptococcus (GBS) disease, the best characterized neonatal infection, and outline the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the selective failure of the immune responses against GBS. In light of the recent discoveries of pathogen-specific primary immunodeficiencies and of the role of anticytokine autoantibodies in increasing susceptibility to specific infections, we hypothesize that GBS disease occurring in otherwise healthy infants could reflect an immunodeficiency caused either by rare genetic defects in the infant or by transmitted maternal neutralizing antibodies. These hypotheses are consistent with available epidemiological data, with clinical and epidemiological observations, and with the state of the art of neonatal physiology and disease. Studies should now be designed to comprehensively search for genetic or immunological factors involved in susceptibility to severe neonatal infections. PMID:28326082