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Sample records for neoplastic non-random transformation

  1. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  2. Neoplastic Transformation Induced by Carbon Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bettega, Daniela Calzolari, Paola; Hessel, Petra; Stucchi, Claudio G.; Weyrather, Wilma K.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The objective of this experiment was to compare the oncogenic potential of carbon ion beams and conventional photon beams for use in radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The HeLa X human skin fibroblast cell line CGL1 was irradiated with carbon ions of three different energies (270, 100, and 11.4 MeV/u). Inactivation and transformation data were compared with those for 15 MeV photons. Results: Inactivation and transformation frequencies for the 270 MeV/u carbon ions were similar to those for 15-MeV photons. The maximal relative biologic effectiveness (RBE{sub {alpha}}) values for 100MeV/u and 11.4 MeV/u carbon ions, respectively, were as follows: inactivation, 1.6 {+-} 0.2 and 6.7 {+-} 0.7; and transformation per surviving cell, 2.5 {+-} 0.6 and 12 {+-} 3. The curve for dose-transformation per cell at risk exhibited a maximum that was shifted toward lower doses at lower energies. Conclusions: Transformation induction per cell at risk for carbon ions in the entrance channel was comparable to that for photons, whereas for the lower energies, 100 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u, which are representative of the energies delivered to the tumor margins and volume, respectively, the probability of transformation in a single cell was greater than it was for photons. In addition, at isoeffective doses with respect to cell killing, the 11.4-MeV/u beam was more oncogenic than were photons.

  3. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis by the human protooncogene MYC

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, G.M.; Bishop, J.M. ); Moscovici, G.; Moscovici, C. )

    1990-03-01

    Damage to the protooncogene MYC has been implicated in the genesis of diverse human tumors, but the tumorigenic potential of the isolated gene has been disputed. Here the authors report the use of a retroviral vector to test the potency of human MYC for neoplastic transformation in avian cells. They found that sustained and abundant expression of MYC can transform both embryonic fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells and elicit granulocytic leukemias in chickens. Transformation by MYC is accompanied by changes in diverse aspects of cellular phenotype, including morphology, ability to grow in suspension, rate of proliferation, the structure of the cytoskeleton, and the composition of the extracellular matrix. Nevertheless, the biological potency of MYC is inherently constrained when compared to that of the retroviral oncogene v-myc. The findings enlarge on previous descriptions of neoplastic transformation by MYC and sustain the view that ungoverned expression of the gene can contribute to the genesis of human tumors.

  4. Cellular neoplastic transformation induced by 916 MHz microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wang, Minglian; Zeng, Yi; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2012-08-01

    There has been growing concern about the possibility of adverse health effects resulting from exposure to microwave radiations, such as those emitted by mobile phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular neoplastic transformation effects of electromagnetic fields. 916 MHz continuous microwave was employed in our study to simulate the electromagnetic radiation of mobile phone. NIH/3T3 cells were adopted in our experiment due to their sensitivity to carcinogen or cancer promoter in environment. They were divided randomly into one control group and three microwave groups. The three microwave groups were exposed to 916 MHz EMF for 2 h per day with power density of 10, 50, and 90 w/m(2), respectively, in which 10 w/m(2) was close to intensity near the antenna of mobile phone. The morphology and proliferation of NIH/3T3 cells were examined and furthermore soft agar culture and animal carcinogenesis assay were carried out to determine the neoplastic promotion. Our experiments showed NIH/3T3 cells changed in morphology and proliferation after 5-8 weeks exposure and formed clone in soft agar culture after another 3-4 weeks depending on the exposure intensity. In the animal carcinogenesis study, lumps developed on the back of SCID mice after being inoculated into exposed NIH/3T3 cells for more than 4 weeks. The results indicate that microwave radiation can promote neoplastic transformation of NIH/3T3cells.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  6. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation and progression of breast cancer. The combination of these two genotoxic insults can induce significant damage to the genetic material of the cells resulting in neoplastic transformation. Methods To study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation and tobacco smoke on breast cells, MCF 10A cells were treated either with radiation (Rad - 0.1 Gray) or cigarette smoke condensate (Csc - 10 microgram/ml of medium) or a combination of Rad + Csc. Following treatments, cells were analyzed for cell cycle distribution patterns and the ability to extrude the Hoechst 33342 dye. In addition, in vitro invasion and migration as well as mammosphere formation assays were performed. Finally, differential gene expression profiles were generated from the individual and combination treatment. Results Exposure of MCF 10A cells to the combination of radiation plus cigarette smoke condensate generated a neoplastic phenotype. The transformed phenotype promoted increased mammosphere numbers, altered cell cycle phases with a doubling of the population in S phase, and increased invasion and motility. Also, exclusion of Hoechst 33342 dye, a surrogate marker for increased ABC transporters, was observed, which indicates a possible increase in drug resistance. In addition, changes in gene expression include the up regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in metabolic pathways and inflammation. Conclusions The results indicate that when normal breast cells are exposed to low dose radiation in combination with

  7. Neoplastic transformation in the planarian: I. Cocarcinogenesis and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Hall, F; Morita, M; Best, J B

    1986-11-01

    Although several investigators have reported that exposure to mammalian carcinogens induces abnormal tumorlike growths and teratogenic remodeling in planarians, there is no general agreement that these, or comparable responses in any other invertebrates, model mammalian carcinogenesis. To investigate this question, freshwater planarians of the species Dugesia dorotocephala were exposed to culture water containing an initiator and a promoter, either alone or in combination. Cadmium, a potent carcinogen, was used as an initiator in the protocol. Treatment with sublethal concentrations of cadmium sulfate produced a benign, but persistent, tumor in a small percentage of the planarians. The addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a phorbol ester and well-known promoter, to the cadmium-containing solutions resulted in the induction of a progressive, potentially lethal, transplantable tumor in a large proportion of the treated flatworms. Light and electron microscopy revealed this particular tumor to be composed both of immature cells and of a single mature cell type: newly differentiated, but transformed, reticular cells. Further examination of the infiltrating tissue formations elucidated the profile of differentiation, from a population of mitotically active transformed stem cells through the transitional stages in the associated reticuloma. These results suggest that 1) the freshwater planarian displays the major phenomenology of mammalian cocarcinogenesis and that 2) the planarian reticuloma models several important features of a neoplastic stem cell disease.

  8. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  10. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  11. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major deleterious late effects of ionizing radiation is related to the induction of neoplasms. In the present report recent experimental results on neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions are presented, and possible means to circumvent the carcinogenic effect of space radiation are discussed. Biological effects observed in experiments involving the use of energetic heavy ions accelerated at the Bevalac suggest that many of the biological effects observed in earlier space flight experiments may be due to space radiation, particularly cosmic rays. It is found that the effect of radiation on cell transformation is dose-rate dependent. The frequency of neoplastic transformation for a given dose decreases with a decrease of dose rate of Co-60 gamma rays. It is found that various chemical agents give radiation protection, including DMSO.

  12. Pycnogenol reduces talc-induced neoplastic transformation in human ovarian cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Buz'Zard, Amber R; Lau, Benjamin H S

    2007-06-01

    Talc and poor diet have been suggested to increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer; which can be reduced by a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Talc is ubiquitous despite concern about its safety, role as a possible carcinogen and known ability to cause irritation and inflammation. It was recently shown that Pycnogenol (Pyc; a proprietary mixture of water-soluble bioflavonoids extracted from French maritime pine bark) was selectively toxic to established malignant ovarian germ cells. This study investigated talc-induced carcinogenesis and Pyc-induced chemoprevention. Normal human epithelial and granulosa ovarian cell lines and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were treated with talc, or pretreated with Pyc then talc. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neoplastic transformation by soft agar assay were measured. Talc increased proliferation, induced neoplastic transformation and increased ROS generation time-dependently in the ovarian cells and dose-dependently in the PMN. Pretreatment with Pyc inhibited the talc-induced increase in proliferation, decreased the number of transformed colonies and decreased the ROS generation in the ovarian cells. The data suggest that talc may contribute to ovarian neoplastic transformation and Pyc reduced the talc-induced transformation. Taken together, Pyc may prove to be a potent chemopreventative agent against ovarian carcinogenesis.

  13. The Route to HPV-Associated Neoplastic Transformation: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tulay, Pinar; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs)-small, nonenveloped viruses with double-stranded circular DNA-are believed to have a role in the progression of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms are not well established. The interference of HPV proteins, especially E6 and E7, in the cell cycle is considered to be the main pathway. It is still questioned whether the expression of these proteins or the viral load is more important in neoplastic transformation. Furthermore, HPV is believed to adapt mechanisms to evade the host cell immune system; persistent HPV infection may also play a role in oncogenic transformation by causing genomic instability and local immune suppression. These factors may cause accumulation of genomic alterations within the host cell and integration of the viral genome into the host genome. In recent years, epigenetic modifications, such as methylation, have also been considered to take part in neoplastic transformation. All of these alterations to the genome may be favorable to the development of cancer. This article highlights the association of HPV in neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. PMID:27278883

  14. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

    2011-03-29

    We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker

  15. The neoplastic transformation potential of mammography X rays and atomic bomb spectrum radiation.

    PubMed

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J

    2004-08-01

    Considerable controversy currently exists regarding the biological effectiveness of 29 kVp X rays which are used for mammography screening. This issue must be resolved to enable proper evaluation of radiation risks from breast screening. Here a definitive assessment of the biological effectiveness of 29 kVp X rays compared to the quality of radiation to which the atomic bomb survivors were exposed is presented for the first time. The standard radiation sources used were (a) an atomic bomb simulation spectrum and (b) 2.2 MeV electrons from a strontium-90/yttrium-90 (90Sr/90Y) radioactive source. The biological end point used was neoplastic transformation in vitro in CGL1 (HeLa x human fibroblast hybrid) cells. No significant difference was observed for the biological effectiveness of the two high-energy sources for neoplastic transformation. A limiting relative biological effectiveness (RBE(M)) of 4.42 +/- 2.02 was observed for neoplastic transformation by 29 kVp X rays compared to these two sources. This compares with values of 4.67 +/- 3.93 calculated from previously published data and 3.58 +/- 1.77 when the reference radiation was 200 and 220 kVp X rays. This suggests that the risks associated with mammography screening may be approximately five times higher than previously assumed and that the risk-benefit relationship of mammography exposures may need to be re-examined. PMID:15387138

  16. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    For many years we have been interested in understanding the potential carcinogenic effects of cosmic rays. We have studied the oncogenic effects of cosmic rays with accelerator-produced heavy particle radiation and with a cultured mammalian cell system--C3H10T1/2 cells. Our quantitative data obtained with carbon, neon, silicon, and iron particles showed that RBE is both dose and LET dependent for neoplastic cell transformation. RBE is higher at lower dose, and RBE increases with LET up to about 200 keV/μm. In nonproliferation confluent cells, heavy-ion induced transformation damage may not be repairable, although a dose modifying factor of about 1.7 was observed for X-ray radiation. Our recent studies with super-heavy high-energy particles, e.g., 960 MeV/u U235 ions (LET = 1900 keV/μm), indicate that these ions with a high inactivation cross-section can cause neoplastic cell transformation. The induction of cell transformation by radiation can be modified with various chemicals. We have found that the presence of DMSO (either during or many days after irradiation) decreased the transformation frequency significantly. It is, therefore, potentially possible to reduce the oncogenic effect of cosmic rays in space through some chemical protection.

  17. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: Effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism. PMID:25309063

  18. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-10-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism.

  19. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-10-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism. PMID:25309063

  20. Neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary epithelial cells by deregulated myc expression.

    PubMed Central

    Telang, N T; Osborne, M P; Sweterlitsch, L A; Narayanan, R

    1990-01-01

    A spontaneously immortalized, nontumorigenic mouse mammary epithelial cell line (MMEC) was transfected with an activated myc construct by electroporation. Constitutive expression of myc in MMEC resulted in anchorage independence in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice. The myc-expressing MMEC showed higher saturation density, faster growth rate, and partial abrogation of serum-derived growth factor(s) requirement compared with parent MMEC. Epidermal growth factor or transforming growth factor alpha stimulated the anchorage-independent growth, but not the anchorage-dependent growth, of MMEC-myc cells. Type 1 transforming growth factor beta, on the other hand, inhibited both the anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent growth of MMEC-myc cells. These results demonstrate that deregulated expression of myc results in neoplastic transformation iin mammary epithelial cells. Accompanying the transformation is altered sensitivity to polypeptide growth factors. Images PMID:2088530

  1. Relation of the slow growth phenotype to neoplastic transformation: possible significance for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chow, M; Rubin, H

    1999-09-01

    Deletions are widely distributed over the genome in the most frequently occurring human cancers and are the most abundant genetic lesion found there. Deletions are highly correlated with the slow growth phenotype of mutated animal and human cells and result in chromosomal transposition when the retained ends are joined. Transpositions are only a minor source of mutation in rapidly multiplying bacteria but are a major cause of mutations in stationary bacteria. The NIH 3T3 line of mouse cells undergoes neoplastic transformation during prolonged incubation in a stationary state and expresses the slow growth phenotype on serial subculture at low density, suggesting a relation between transformation and chromosomal deletions. To further explore the relation between neoplastic transformation and the slow growth phenotype as a surrogate for deletions, two sublines of the NIH 3T3 cells with differing competence for transformation were serially subcultured in the stationary state at confluence and tested at each subculture for transformation and growth rate. Cell death in a fraction of the population and a heritable slowdown in proliferation of most of the survivors became increasingly pronounced with successive rounds of confluence. The reduction in growth rate was not proportional to the degree of transformation of the cultures, but all of the transformed cultures were slow growers at low density. All of the discrete colonies from cloning transformed cultures developed at a lower initial rate than control colonies under optimal conditions for growth, but they continued to grow at later stages, forming multilayered colonies under conditions that inhibited the further growth of the control colonies. The results suggest that prolonged incubation of NIH 3T3 cells in the stationary state results in growth-impairing deletions over a wide range of sites in the genome, but more restricted subsets of such lesions are responsible for neoplastic transformation. These findings

  2. Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation12

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Neale, Geoffrey; Ye, Jianming; Paul, Leena; Kuliyev, Emin; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L; Washington, M Kay; Rehg, Jerold; Finkelstein, David B; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness. PMID:26992918

  3. Meta-analysis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma microarray data explores mechanism of EBV-regulated neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia; Liang, Shuang; Zheng, WenLing; Liao, ZhiJun; Shang, Tao; Ma, WenLi

    2008-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) presumably plays an important role in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the molecular mechanism of EBV-dependent neoplastic transformation is not well understood. The combination of bioinformatics with evidences from biological experiments paved a new way to gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of cancer. Results We profiled gene expression using a meta-analysis approach. Two sets of meta-genes were obtained. Meta-A genes were identified by finding those commonly activated/deactivated upon EBV infection/reactivation. These genes could be key players for pathways de-regulated by EBV during latent infection and lytic proliferation. Meta-B genes were obtained from differential genes commonly expressed in NPC and PEL (primary effusion lymphoma). We then integrated meta-A, meta-B and associated factors into an interaction network using acquired information. Our analysis suggests that NPC transformation depends on timely regulation of DEK, CDK inhibitor(s), p53, RB and several transcriptional cascades, interconnected by E2F, AP-1, NF-κB, STAT3 among others during latent and lytic cycles. Conclusion In conclusion, our meta-analysis strategy re-analyzed EBV-related tumor data sets and identified sets of meta-genes possibly involved in maintaining latent or switching to lytic cycles of EBV in NPC. The results of this analysis may shed new lights to further our understanding of the EBV-led neoplastic transformation. PMID:18605998

  4. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  5. Generation of tumor-specific transplantation antigens by UV radiation can occur independently of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, L W; Ananthaswamy, H N; Kripke, M L

    1986-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the UV-associated antigens present on tumors induced in mice by chronic UV irradiation could be induced by in vitro irradiation of cells that were already tumorigenic, or whether their occurrence was associated with the primary neoplastic transformation event. Cells of a nonantigenic, spontaneous fibrosarcoma cell line were exposed to UV radiation in vitro, were cloned, and were tested for antigenic properties. A large number of the clones obtained after UV irradiation of the fibrosarcoma cells were highly antigenic (20 of 39), whereas clones derived from unirradiated cultures were not (0 of 10). The antigenic variants did not induce cross-protection among themselves, but induced only variant-specific immunity in vivo. Several antigenic variants were tested for susceptibility to the action of UV-induced suppressor cells, which seem to recognize a common determinant shared among UV-induced tumors. The variants tested were indeed subject to the activity of the UV-induced suppressor lymphocytes. These results demonstrate that the unique antigenic properties exhibited by UV-induced murine skin cancers are also exhibited by cells exposed to UV radiation in vitro. In addition, they imply that the UV-associated antigens arise as a consequence of exposing cells to UV radiation and that they can occur independently of an initial neoplastic transformation event. PMID:3760572

  6. Measuring neoplastic transformation in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Brown, William; Wax, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is a promising technique which combines the depth resolution of low coherence interferometry with the sensitivity of light scattering spectroscopy for probing the health of epithelial tissue layers. Our new fLCI system configuration utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source and a 4-f interferometer which re-images light scattered from the sample onto the detection plane. The system employs an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire depth resolved profiles from 252 adjacent spatial points without the need for any scanning. The limited spatial coherence of the light source requires the resolution of adjacent spatial points for the generation of depth information. Depth-resolved spectral information is recovered by performing a short-time Fourier transform on the detected spectra, similar to spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain information about the neoplastic transformation of the probed cells. Previous studies have demonstrated fLCI as an excellent technique for probing the scatterer morphology of simple phantoms and of in vitro cancer cell monolayers. We now seek to assess the ability of the new fLCI system to measure the health of subsurface tissue layers using the hamster cheek pouch model. Seven hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. We expect our results to establish the feasibility of fLCI to distinguish between healthy and dysplastic epithelial tissues in the hamster cheek pouch.

  7. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  8. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Leslie Redpath

    2007-01-17

    The objective of the research was to examine mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of low doses (<10 cGy) of low-LET radiation on the endpoint of neoplastic transformation in vitro. The findings indicated a role for upregulation of DNA repair but not of antioxidants.

  9. Neoplastic transformation of rat liver epithelial cells is enhanced by non-transferrin-bound iron

    PubMed Central

    Messner, Donald J; Kowdley, Kris V

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron overload is associated with liver toxicity, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. While most iron circulates in blood as transferrin-bound iron, non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) also becomes elevated and contributes to toxicity in the setting of iron overload. The mechanism for iron-related carcinogenesis is not well understood, in part due to a shortage of suitable experimental models. The primary aim of this study was to investigate NTBI-related hepatic carcinogenesis using T51B rat liver epithelial cells, a non-neoplastic cell line previously developed for carcinogenicity and tumor promotion studies. Methods T51B cells were loaded with iron by repeated addition of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) to the culture medium. Iron internalization was documented by chemical assay, ferritin induction, and loss of calcein fluorescence. Proliferative effects were determined by cell count, toxicity was determined by MTT assay, and neoplastic transformation was assessed by measuring colony formation in soft agar. Cyclin levels were measured by western blot. Results T51B cells readily internalized NTBI given as FAC. Within 1 week of treatment at 200 μM, there were significant but well-tolerated toxic effects including a decrease in cell proliferation (30% decrease, p < 0.01). FAC alone induced little or no colony formation in soft agar. In contrast, FAC addition to cells previously initiated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) resulted in a concentration dependent increase in colony formation. This was first detected at 12 weeks of FAC treatment and increased at longer times. At 16 weeks, colony formation increased more than 10 fold in cells treated with 200 μM FAC (p < 0.001). The iron chelator desferoxamine reduced both iron uptake and colony formation. Cells cultured with 200 μM FAC showed decreased cyclin D1, decreased cyclin A, and increased cyclin B1. Conclusion These results establish NTBI as a tumor promoter in T51B rat liver

  10. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  11. Radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of C3H10T1/2 cells is suppressed by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, M.; Terasima, T.; Seki, M. )

    1989-12-01

    X-ray induced transformation of C3H10T1/2 cells was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by administration of ascorbic acid after irradiation (0.1-20 micrograms/ml for the first week) in the culture medium. The dose-response curve was shifted about 60% downward and was slightly steeper in the presence of ascorbic acid (5 micrograms/ml for the first week) than in its absence. The 1-week treatment procedure revealed that cells initiated by radiation remained susceptible to ascorbic acid until the time of morphological phenotype expression. The neoplastically transformed phenotype expressed after incubation for 8 weeks could no longer be suppressed by ascorbic acid even after culture transfer. Similarly, the neoplastically transformed phenotype suppressed for 8 weeks by ascorbic acid treatment was not subsequently expressed in the absence of ascorbic acid. On the basis of the oxygen-detoxifying nature of ascorbic acid, we postulated that expression of the neoplastically transformed phenotype is promoted by reactive oxygen species and peroxy radicals generated in cells during the whole assay period. The data may be useful as a guide for chemopreventive efforts against radiation carcinogenesis.

  12. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications.

  13. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential. PMID:26898918

  14. Inhibition of chemically-induced neoplastic transformation by a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin derivative.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Frey, Dean A; McLaws, Mark D; Østerlie, Marianne; Lockwood, Samuel F; Bertram, John S

    2005-09-01

    Carotenoids have been implicated in numerous epidemiological studies as being protective against cancer at many sites, and their chemopreventive properties have been confirmed in laboratory studies. Astaxanthin (AST), primarily a carotenoid of marine origin, responsible for the pink coloration of salmon, shrimp and lobster, has received relatively little attention. As with other carotenoids, its highly lipophilic properties complicate delivery to model systems. To overcome this issue we have synthesized a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin (pAST) derivative with aqueous dispersibility of 25.21 mg/ml. pAST was delivered to C3H/10T1/2 cells in an aqueous/ethanol solution and compared with non-esterified AST dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. We show pAST to (i) upregulate connexin 43 (Cx43) protein expression; (ii) increase the formation of Cx43 immunoreactive plaques; (iii) upregulate gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); and (iv) cause 100% inhibition of methylcholanthrene-induced neoplastic transformation at 10(-6) M. In all these assays, pAST was superior to non-esterified AST itself; in fact, pAST exceeded the potency of all other previously tested carotenoids in this model system. Cleavage of pAST to non-esterified (free) AST and uptake into cells was also verified by HPLC; however, levels of free AST were approximately 100-fold lower than in cells treated with AST itself, suggesting that pAST possesses intrinsic activity. The dual properties of water dispersibility (enabling parenteral administration in vivo) and increased potency should prove extremely useful in the future development of cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:15888493

  15. Inhibition of chemically-induced neoplastic transformation by a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin derivative.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Frey, Dean A; McLaws, Mark D; Østerlie, Marianne; Lockwood, Samuel F; Bertram, John S

    2005-09-01

    Carotenoids have been implicated in numerous epidemiological studies as being protective against cancer at many sites, and their chemopreventive properties have been confirmed in laboratory studies. Astaxanthin (AST), primarily a carotenoid of marine origin, responsible for the pink coloration of salmon, shrimp and lobster, has received relatively little attention. As with other carotenoids, its highly lipophilic properties complicate delivery to model systems. To overcome this issue we have synthesized a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin (pAST) derivative with aqueous dispersibility of 25.21 mg/ml. pAST was delivered to C3H/10T1/2 cells in an aqueous/ethanol solution and compared with non-esterified AST dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. We show pAST to (i) upregulate connexin 43 (Cx43) protein expression; (ii) increase the formation of Cx43 immunoreactive plaques; (iii) upregulate gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); and (iv) cause 100% inhibition of methylcholanthrene-induced neoplastic transformation at 10(-6) M. In all these assays, pAST was superior to non-esterified AST itself; in fact, pAST exceeded the potency of all other previously tested carotenoids in this model system. Cleavage of pAST to non-esterified (free) AST and uptake into cells was also verified by HPLC; however, levels of free AST were approximately 100-fold lower than in cells treated with AST itself, suggesting that pAST possesses intrinsic activity. The dual properties of water dispersibility (enabling parenteral administration in vivo) and increased potency should prove extremely useful in the future development of cancer chemopreventive agents.

  16. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-01-01

    An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon) or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV). An increase (P<0.05) in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons. PMID:21738697

  17. Guanidine Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Monanchora pulchra Show Cytotoxic Properties and Prevent EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.; Tabakmakher, Kseniya M.; Hauschild, Jessica; Shchekaleva, Regina K.; Otte, Katharina; Guzii, Alla G.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Kudryashova, Ekaterina K.; Fedorov, Sergey N.; Shubina, Larisa K.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Honecker, Friedemann; Stonik, Valentin A.; von Amsberg, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Guanidine alkaloids from sponges Monanchora spp. represent diverse bioactive compounds, however, the mechanisms underlying bioactivity are very poorly understood. Here, we report results of studies on cytotoxic action, the ability to inhibit EGF-induced neoplastic transformation, and the effects on MAPK/AP-1 signaling of eight rare guanidine alkaloids, recently isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra, namely: monanchocidin A (1), monanchocidin B (2), monanchomycalin C (3), ptilomycalin A (4), monanchomycalin B (5), normonanchocidin D (6), urupocidin A (7), and pulchranin A (8). All of the compounds induced cell cycle arrest (apart from 8) and programmed death of cancer cells. Ptilomycalin A-like compounds 1–6 activated JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, following AP-1 activation and caused p53-independent programmed cell death. Compound 7 induced p53-independent cell death without activation of AP-1 or caspase-3/7, and the observed JNK1/2 activation did not contribute to the cytotoxic effect of the compound. Alkaloid 8 induced JNK1/2 (but not ERK1/2) activation leading to p53-independent cell death and strong suppression of AP-1 activity. Alkaloids 1–4, 7, and 8 were able to inhibit the EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ Cl41 cells. Our results suggest that investigated guanidine marine alkaloids hold potential to eliminate human cancer cells and prevent cancer cell formation and spreading. PMID:27428983

  18. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-01-01

    An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon) or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV). An increase (P<0.05) in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons.

  19. Autophagy-deficiency in hepatic progenitor cells leads to the defects of stemness and enhances susceptibility to neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Hu, Lei; Ge, Ruiliang; Yang, Lixue; Liu, Kai; Li, Yunyun; Sun, Yanfu; Wang, Kui

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved and lysosome-dependent degradation process which assists in cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Although previous reports have shown that deletion of the essential autophagy gene disturbs stem cell maintenance in some cell types such as hematopoietic and neural cells, it remains unclear how autophagy-deficiency influences hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here we report that Atg5-deficiency in HPCs delays HPC-mediated rat liver regeneration in vivo. In vitro researches further demonstrate that loss of autophagy decreases the abilities of colony and spheroid formations, and disrupts the induction of hepatic differentiation in HPCs. Meanwhile, autophagy-deficiency increases the accumulations of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA damage repair in HPCs. Moreover, in both diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and CCl4 models, autophagy-deficiency accelerates neoplastic transformation of HPCs. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance and reduces susceptibility to neoplastic transformation in HPCs.

  20. Guanidine Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Monanchora pulchra Show Cytotoxic Properties and Prevent EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A; Tabakmakher, Kseniya M; Hauschild, Jessica; Shchekaleva, Regina K; Otte, Katharina; Guzii, Alla G; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Kudryashova, Ekaterina K; Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Honecker, Friedemann; Stonik, Valentin A; von Amsberg, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Guanidine alkaloids from sponges Monanchora spp. represent diverse bioactive compounds, however, the mechanisms underlying bioactivity are very poorly understood. Here, we report results of studies on cytotoxic action, the ability to inhibit EGF-induced neoplastic transformation, and the effects on MAPK/AP-1 signaling of eight rare guanidine alkaloids, recently isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra, namely: monanchocidin A (1), monanchocidin B (2), monanchomycalin C (3), ptilomycalin A (4), monanchomycalin B (5), normonanchocidin D (6), urupocidin A (7), and pulchranin A (8). All of the compounds induced cell cycle arrest (apart from 8) and programmed death of cancer cells. Ptilomycalin A-like compounds 1-6 activated JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, following AP-1 activation and caused p53-independent programmed cell death. Compound 7 induced p53-independent cell death without activation of AP-1 or caspase-3/7, and the observed JNK1/2 activation did not contribute to the cytotoxic effect of the compound. Alkaloid 8 induced JNK1/2 (but not ERK1/2) activation leading to p53-independent cell death and strong suppression of AP-1 activity. Alkaloids 1-4, 7, and 8 were able to inhibit the EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P⁺ Cl41 cells. Our results suggest that investigated guanidine marine alkaloids hold potential to eliminate human cancer cells and prevent cancer cell formation and spreading. PMID:27428983

  1. Epigenetic blockade of neoplastic transformation by bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) domain protein inhibitor JQ-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengyue; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Ling; Shu, Limin; Yang, Yuqing; Guo, Yue; Pung, Douglas; Bountra, Chas; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2016-10-01

    The neoplastic transformation of cells and inflammation are processes that contribute to tumor initiation. Recently, emerging evidence has suggested that epigenetic alterations are also implicated in the early stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, potent small molecules targeting epigenetic regulators have been developed as novel cancer therapeutic and preventive strategies. Bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins are epigenetic readers that play key roles at the interface between chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of the BET inhibitor JQ-1 on malignant transformation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells. Treatment with JQ-1 effectively impaired TPA-induced colony formation in vitro. At the molecular level, the expression of several key TPA-induced pro-survival and pro-proliferative genes (Bcl2, Cyclin D1, and c-Myc) decreased rapidly after BET inhibition. In addition, JQ-1 treatment attenuated the activation of inflammatory NF-κB signaling triggered by TPA. Luciferase reporter assays using plasmids carrying different elements from the COX2 or IL6 promoters demonstrated that JQ-1 does not directly inhibit interactions between NF-κB and its binding sequence; rather, it affects CRE-element-associated transcriptional enhancement. Through siRNA gene silencing, we found that JQ-1 inhibits the p300-dependent transcriptional activation of COX2, which correlates with the results of the luciferase assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TPA elevated H3K27Ac enrichment in the COX2 promoter region, which is mediated by p300, and Brd4. JQ-1 treatment did not change H3K27Ac levels but decreased the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA Polymerase II. Collectively, our study reveals that the BET inhibitor JQ-1 exerts potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with the core transcriptional program of neoplastic transformation

  2. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  3. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  4. Role of H-Ras/ERK signaling in carbon nanotube-induced neoplastic-like transformation of human mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Stueckle, Todd A.; Park, Jino; Tse, William; Dinu, Cerasela-Zoica; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and deployment of engineered nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various commercial and biomedical applications have raised concerns about their potential adverse health effects, especially their long-term effects which have not been well addressed. We demonstrated here that prolonged exposure of human mesothelial cells to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) induced neoplastic-like transformation as indicated by anchorage-independent cell growth and increased cell invasiveness. Such transformation was associated with an up-regulation of H-Ras and activation of ERK1/2. Downregulation of H-Ras by siRNA or inactivation of ERK by chemical inhibitor effectively inhibited the aggressive phenotype of SWCNT-exposed cells. Integrin alpha V and cortactin, but not epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcriptional regulators, were up-regulated in the SWCNT-exposed cells, suggesting their role in the aggressive phenotype. Cortactin expression was shown to be controlled by the H-Ras/ERK signaling. Thus, our results indicate a novel role of H-Ras/ERK signaling and cortactin in the aggressive transformation of human mesothelial cells by SWCNT. PMID:24971065

  5. Neoplastic transformation of neonatal human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to radiation from a quartz-halogen lamp.

    PubMed

    West, R W; Rowland, K L; Miller, S A; Beer, J Z

    1995-06-01

    The use of unfiltered quartz-halogen lamps exposes human skin to radiation that spans much of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Reports indicate that exposure to quartz-halogen lamps is erythemogenic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. To compare the carcinogenic potential of quartz-halogen lamps with that of other UV sources, we determined the dose dependence for cytotoxicity and neoplastic transformation in neonatal human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to: a 15 W germicidal lamp (primarily 254 nm radiation), a 15 W Cool White fluorescent lamp, and an unfiltered 20 W quartz-halogen lamp. Fluence-survival relationships were multiphasic with linear dose response below about 40% survival, and all three sources produced fluence-dependent transformation as indicated by induction of anchorage-independent growth. Maximum transformation frequencies were observed at fluences of 5-8 J/m2 for the germicidal lamp, 6.3 kJ/m2 for the fluorescent lamp, and 300 J/m2 for the quartz-halogen lamp. These data confirm the carcinogenic potential of the quartz-halogen lamp. PMID:8555010

  6. Inhibition of HMGI-C protein synthesis suppresses retrovirally induced neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Manfioletti, G; Santoro, M; Bandiera, A; Visconti, R; Giancotti, V; Fusco, A

    1995-01-01

    Elevated expression of the three high-mobility group I (HMGI) proteins (HMGI, HMGY, and HMGI-C) has previously been correlated with the presence of a highly malignant phenotype in epithelial and fibroblastic rat thyroid cells and in experimental thyroid, lung, mammary, and skin carcinomas. Northern (RNA) blot and run-on analyses demonstrated that the induction of HMGI genes in transformed thyroid cells occurs at the transcriptional level. An antisense methodology to block HMGI-C protein synthesis was then used to analyze the role of this protein in the process of thyroid cell transformation. Transfection of an antisense construct for the HMGI-C cDNA into normal thyroid cells, followed by infection with transforming myeloproliferative sarcoma virus or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, generated cell lines that expressed significant levels of the retroviral transforming oncogenes v-mos or v-ras-Ki and removed the dependency on thyroid-stimulating hormones. However, in contrast with untransfected cells or cells transfected with the sense construct, those containing the antisense construct did not demonstrate the appearance of any malignant phenotypic markers (growth in soft agar and tumorigenicity in athymic mice). A great reduction of the HMGI-C protein levels and the absence of the HMGI(Y) proteins was observed in the HMGI-C antisense-transfected, virally infected cells. Therefore, the HMGI-C protein seems to play a key role in the transformation of these thyroid cells. PMID:7862147

  7. Appalachian Mountaintop Mining Particulate Matter Induces Neoplastic Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells and Promotes Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that living near mountaintop coal mining (MTM) activities is one of the contributing factors for high lung cancer incidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term carcinogenic potential of MTM particulate matter (PMMTM) exposure on human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results show that chronic exposure (3 months) to noncytotoxic, physiological relevant concentration (1 μg/mL) of PMMTM, but not control particle PMCON, induced neoplastic transformation, accelerated cell proliferation, and enhanced cell migration of the exposed lung cells. Xenograft transplantation of the PMMTM-exposed cells in mice caused no apparent tumor formation, but promoted tumor growth of human lung carcinoma H460 cells, suggesting the tumor-promoting effect of PMMTM. Chronic exposure to the main inorganic chemical constituent of PMMTM, molybdenum but not silica, similarly induced cell transformation and tumor promotion, suggesting the contribution of molybdenum, at least in part, in the PMMTM effects. These results provide new evidence for the carcinogenic potential of PMMTM and support further risk assessment and implementation of exposure control for PMMTM. PMID:25347054

  8. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of this project was to investigate mechanisms underlying the adaptive response seen following exposure of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells to low doses of low LET radiation. It was proposed to investigate the contributions of three possible mechanisms. These were: 1. Upregulation of cellular antioxidant status. 2. Upregulation of DNA repair. 3. Upregulation of gap junction intracellular communication. We have completed the study of the role of upregulation of reduced glutathione (GSH) as a possible mechanism underlying our observed suppression of transformation frequency at low radiation doses. We have also completed our study of the possible role of upregulation of DNA repair in the observed adaptive response against neoplastic transformation. We concluded that upregulation of DNA repair may be more important in modulating transformation at the higher dose. A manuscript describing the above studies has been submitted published in Carcinogenesis 24:1961-1965, 2003. Finally, we have completed two studies of the possible role of upregulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in modulating transformation frequency at low doses of low LET radiation. This research was published in Radiation Research 162:646-654, 2004. In order to optimize the opportunity for GJIC, we then carried out a study where confluent cultures were irradiated. The results indicated, that while the degree of low dose suppression was somewhat reduced compared to that seen for subconfluent cultures, it was not completely absent. This research has been submitted for publication. Our research program was of sufficient interest to generate two invited reviews, and five invited presentations.

  9. Neoplastic transformation of oral lichen: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, G; Foscolo, AM; Gallotti, M; Lancella, A; Mingo, F

    2006-01-01

    Summary Aim of the present investigation was to analyse the possible malignant transformation of oral lichen planus to carcinoma, especially in the atrophic erosive forms and those displaying plaques involving the top of the tongue. A review has been made of the literature, from 1986 to the present day. This search outlines the relationship between oral lichen planus, hepatitis C virus infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection and the importance of periodic follow-up in all patients with oral lichen planus. The case is described of malignant transformation of oral lichen planus to oral cancer in a female presenting asymptomatic hepatitis C virus infection. The clinical history confirms the most important aspects of the relationship between oral lichen planus and oral cancer. Oral lichen planus should be considered as a precancerous lesion, particularly in patients presenting hepatitis C virus infection, requiring follow-up, at close intervals, starting from 3 months after diagnosis. PMID:18383758

  10. Neoplastic transformation of human lung fibroblast MRC-5 SV2 cells induced by benzo[a]pyrene and confluence culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huijun; Gooderham, Nigel

    2002-08-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is potent rodent carcinogen and a reputed human carcinogen. Although much is known about its metabolic activation leading to DNA damage, the mechanisms of its actions are not as well understood at a cellular level. In addressing this, we have established an in vitro model that follows the progression toward neoplastic transformation induced by BaP. The model uses immortal nontumorigenic human lung fibroblast MRC-5 SV2 cells as effectors, cocultured with a metabolically competent human lymphoblastoid line h1A1v2 (activator cells). Treatment of the coculture with BaP for 48 h induced a dose-dependent decrease in cloning efficiency of the MRC-5 SV2 cells; nevertheless, cultures continued to progress to confluence. At prolonged confluence culture (day 11), an elevation in the proportion of G2-M phase cells was detected by flow cytometry. By day 15, the G2-M phase peak disappeared, accordant with the appearance of a population with DNA content greater than the cells in G2-M phase. These changes in DNA ploidy were coincident with changes in morphology, specifically the appearance of enlarged and irregular-shaped nuclei. Confluence culture of BaP-treated MRC-5 SV2 cells for more than 2 weeks resulted in cell death; however, a few colonies survived the crisis to reach confluence again after an additional 10-14 days. The number of death-resistant colonies was proportional to the dose of BaP, with the majority of the cells exhibiting abnormal morphology. The degree of morphological change progressively increased with successive rounds of confluence. Cells that survived three rounds of confluence adopted a vastly different morphology, becoming polygonal, spindle, or other irregular-shaped, and acquired the ability to form large dense clumps that grew in an anchorage-independent manner. In parallel experiments, treatment with the vehicle alone (DMSO) resulted in substantially less death resistance and lower numbers of high-density clumps. Our studies

  11. Neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells requires the junB and fra-1 gene induction which is dependent on the HMGI-C gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Vallone, D; Battista, S; Pierantoni, G M; Fedele, M; Casalino, L; Santoro, M; Viglietto, G; Fusco, A; Verde, P

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the high mobility group I (HMGI)-C chromatin component was shown previously to be essential for the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype in retrovirally transformed thyroid cell lines. To identify possible targets of the HMGI-C gene product, we have analyzed the AP-1 complex in normal, fully transformed and antisense HMGI-C-expressing rat thyroid cells. We show that neoplastic transformation is associated with a drastic increase in AP-1 activity, which reflects multiple compositional changes. The strongest effect is represented by the dramatic junB and fra-1 gene induction, which is prevented in cell lines expressing the antisense HMGI-C. These results indicate that the HMGI-C gene product is essential for the junB and fra-1 transcriptional induction associated with neoplastic transformation. The inhibition of Fra-1 protein synthesis by stable transfection with a fra-1 antisense RNA vector significantly reduces the malignant phenotype of the transformed thyroid cells, indicating a pivotal role for the fra-1 gene product in the process of cellular transformation. PMID:9311991

  12. Cell cycle dependent oscillatory expression of estrogen receptor-α links Pol II elongation to neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Tocchetti, Marta; Cappelletti, Vera; Gurtner, Aymone; Villa, Alessandro; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decades of studies provided a detailed view of the mechanism of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) regulated gene transcription and the physio-pathological relevance of the genetic programs controlled by this receptor in a variety of tissues. However, still limited is our knowledge on the regulation of ERα synthesis. Preliminary observations showed that the expression of ERα is cell cycle regulated. Here, we have demonstrated that a well described polymorphic sequence in the first intron of ERα (PvuII and XbaI) has a key role in regulating the ERα content in cycling cells. We have shown that the RNA Pol II (Pol II) elongation is blocked at the polymorphic site and that the proto-oncogene c-MYB modulates the release of the pausing polymerase. It is well known that the two SNPs are associated to an increased risk, progression, survival and mortality of endocrine-related cancers, here we have demonstrated that the c-MYB-dependent release of Pol II at a specific phase of the cell cycle is facilitated by the px haplotype, thus leading to a higher ERα mitogenic signal. In breast cancer, this mechanism is disrupted when the hormone refractory phenotype is established; therefore, we propose this oscillator as a novel target for the development of therapies aimed at sensitizing breast cancer resistant to hormonal treatments. Because PvuII and XbaI were associated to a broad range physio-pathological conditions beside neoplastic transformation, we expect that the ERα oscillator contributes to the regulation of the estrogen signal in several tissues. PMID:24979764

  13. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis associated with overexpression of imup-1 and imup-2 genes in cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoo, Zae Young . E-mail: jaewoong64@hanmail.net; Jung, Boo Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ryeul; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Ahn, Jung Yong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Youl Hee; Park, Jae Hak; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2006-10-27

    Immortalization-upregulated protein 1 (IMUP-1) and immortalization-upregulated protein 2 (IMUP-2) genes have been recently cloned and are known to be involved in SV40-mediated immortalization. IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 genes were strongly expressed in various cancer cell lines and tumors, suggesting the possibility that they might be involved in tumorigenicity. To directly elucidate the functional role of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 on neoplastic transformation and tumorigenicity, we stably transfected IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 into NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Cellular characteristics of the neoplastic transformation were assessed by transformation foci, growth in soft agar, and tumor development in nude mice. We found that IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 overexpressing cells showed altered growth properties, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and inducing tumor in nude mice. Furthermore, IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 transformants proliferated in reduced serum and shortened cell cycle. These results suggest that ectopic overexpression of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 may play an important role in acquiring a transformed phenotype, tumorigenicity in vivo, and be related to cellular proliferation.

  14. Focus formation and neoplastic transformation by herpes simplex virus type 2 inactivated intracellularly by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and near UV light.

    PubMed Central

    Manak, M M; Aurelian, L; Ts'o, P O

    1981-01-01

    The induction of focus formation in low serum and of neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells was examined after the expression of herpes simplex virus type 2 functions. Syrian hamster embryo cells infected at a high multiplicity (5 PFU/cell) with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled herpes simplex virus type 2 (11% substitution of thymidine residues) were exposed to near UV light irradiation at various times postinfection. This procedure specifically inactivated the viral genome, while having little, if any, effect on the unlabeled cellular DNA. Focus formation in 1% serum and neoplastic transformation were observed in cells exposed to virus inactivated before infection, but the frequency was enhanced (15- to 27-fold) in cells in which the virus was inactivated at 4 to 8 h postinfection. Only 2 to 45 independently isolated foci were capable of establishing tumorigenic lines. The established lines exhibited phenotypic alterations characteristic of a transformed state, including reduced serum requirement, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity. They retained viral DNA sequences and, even at relatively late passage, expressed viral antigens, including ICP 10. Images PMID:6270382

  15. Neoplastic transformation of BALB/3T3 cells and cell cycle of HL-60 cells are inhibited by mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice and mango juice extracts.

    PubMed

    Percival, Susan S; Talcott, Stephen T; Chin, Sherry T; Mallak, Anne C; Lounds-Singleton, Angela; Pettit-Moore, Jennifer

    2006-05-01

    The mango, Mangifera indica L., is a fruit with high levels of phytochemicals, suggesting that it might have chemopreventative properties. In this study, whole mango juice and juice extracts were screened for antioxidant and anticancer activity. Antioxidant activity of the mango juice and juice extracts was measured by 3 standard in vitro methods. The results of the 3 methods were in general agreement, although different radicals were measured in each. Anticancer activity was measured by examining the effect on cell cycle kinetics and the ability to inhibit chemically induced neoplastic transformation of mammalian cell lines. Incubation of HL-60 cells with whole mango juice and mango juice fractions resulted in an inhibition of the cell cycle in the G(0)/G(1) phase. A fraction of the eluted mango juice with low peroxyl radical scavenging ability was most effective in arresting cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase. Whole mango juice was effective in reducing the number of transformed foci in the neoplastic transformation assay in a dose-dependent manner. These techniques provide valuable screening tools for health benefits derived from mango phytochemicals.

  16. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  17. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  18. Rat Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase η Suppresses the Neoplastic Phenotype of Retrovirally Transformed Thyroid Cells through the Stabilization of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Trapasso, Francesco; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Boccia, Angelo; Stella, Antonella; Visconti, Roberta; Bruni, Paola; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Santoro, Massimo; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    The r-PTPη gene encodes a rat receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase whose expression is negatively regulated by neoplastic cell transformation. Here we first demonstrate a dramatic reduction in DEP-1/HPTPη (the human homolog of r-PTPη) expression in a panel of human thyroid carcinomas. Subsequently, we show that the reexpression of the r-PTPη gene in highly malignant rat thyroid cells transformed by retroviruses carrying the v-mos and v-ras-Ki oncogenes suppresses their malignant phenotype. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that r-PTPη caused G1 growth arrest and increased the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 protein level by reducing the proteasome-dependent degradation rate. We propose that the r-PTPη tumor suppressor activity is mediated by p27Kip1 protein stabilization, because suppression of p27Kip1 protein synthesis using p27-specific antisense oligonucleotides blocked the growth-inhibitory effect induced by r-PTPη. Furthermore, we provide evidence that in v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-transformed thyroid cells, the p27Kip1 protein level was regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway and that r-PTPη regulated p27Kip1 stability by preventing v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-induced MAP kinase activation. PMID:11094075

  19. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  20. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a six month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. PMID:22521957

  1. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesia S; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-04-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo.

  2. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P.; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo. PMID:26936995

  3. Enhanced neoplastic transformation by mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays: indication for a strong dependence on photon energy of the RBE(M) for various end points.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, D; Kelnhofer, K; Bär, K; Frankenberg-Schwager, M

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental assumption implicit in the use of the atomic bomb survivor data to derive risk estimates is that the gamma rays of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are considered to have biological efficiencies equal to those of other low-LET radiations up to 10 keV/microm, including mammography X rays. Microdosimetric and radiobiological data contradict this assumption. It is therefore of scientific and public interest to evaluate the efficiency of mammography X rays (25-30 kVp) to induce cancer. In this study, the efficiency of mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays to induce neoplastic cell transformation was evaluated using cells of a human hybrid cell line (CGL1). For both radiations, a linear-quadratic dose-effect relationship was observed for neoplastic transformation of CGL1 cells; there was a strong linear component for the 29 kVp X rays. The RBE(M) of mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays was determined to be about 4 for doses < or = 0.5 Gy. A comparison of the electron fluences for both X rays provides strong evidence that electrons with energies of < or = 15 keV can induce neoplastic transformation of CGL1 cells. Both the data available in the literature and the results of the present study strongly suggest an increase of RBE(M) for carcinogenesis in animals, neoplastic cell transformation, and clastogenic effects with decreasing photon energy or increasing LET to an RBE(M) approximately 8 for mammography X rays relative to 60Co gamma rays. PMID:11754647

  4. Interval process model and non-random vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ni, B. Y.; Liu, N. Y.; Han, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops an interval process model for time-varying or dynamic uncertainty analysis when information of the uncertain parameter is inadequate. By using the interval process model to describe a time-varying uncertain parameter, only its upper and lower bounds are required at each time point rather than its precise probability distribution, which is quite different from the traditional stochastic process model. A correlation function is defined for quantification of correlation between the uncertain-but-bounded variables at different times, and a matrix-decomposition-based method is presented to transform the original dependent interval process into an independent one for convenience of subsequent uncertainty analysis. More importantly, based on the interval process model, a non-random vibration analysis method is proposed for response computation of structures subjected to time-varying uncertain external excitations or loads. The structural dynamic responses thus can be derived in the form of upper and lower bounds, providing an important guidance for practical safety analysis and reliability design of structures. Finally, two numerical examples and one engineering application are investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of the interval process model and corresponding non-random vibration analysis method.

  5. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  6. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  7. Neoplastic complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Penn, I

    1993-09-01

    Cancer incidence in transplant patients ranges from 4% to 18% (average, 6%). We present data on 7668 types of malignancy that occurred in 7192 patients. The predominant tumors are skin/lip carcinomas, lymphomas, vulvar/perineal carcinomas, in situ uterine cervical carcinomas, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), renal carcinomas, hepatobiliary tumors, and soft tissue/visceral sarcomas. Tumors appear relatively early after transplantation. The earliest is KS, appearing an average of 22 months post-transplantation whereas the latest are vulva/perineal carcinomas, presenting an average of 113 months posttransplantation. Skin cancers present unusual features: a remarkable frequency of KS; reversal of the high ratio of basal to squamous-cell carcinomas seen in the general population; the low age of the patients; and a high incidence of multiple tumors (in 42% of patients). Unusual features of lymphomas are the high incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL); common involvement of extranodal sites; marked predilection for the brain; and frequent allograft involvement. Lymphomas are much more common in nonrenal than in renal allograft recipients. Vulvar/perineal carcinomas occur at a much lower age than in the general population, and are often preceded by condyloma acuminatum. Neoplastic regression following reduction or cessation of immunosuppressive therapy occurs in some patients with NHL or KS. PMID:8016484

  8. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... error are no longer suspended for non-random prepayment complex medical review. (d) Periodic re... that appears to have resumed a high level of payment error on non-random prepayment complex medical... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination and extension of non-random...

  9. Non-random DNA fragmentation in next-generation sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poptsova, Maria S.; Il'Icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Khodikov, Mingian V.; Oparina, Nina Y.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.; Grokhovsky, Sergei L.

    2014-03-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology is based on cutting DNA into small fragments, and their massive parallel sequencing. The multiple overlapping segments termed ``reads'' are assembled into a contiguous sequence. To reduce sequencing errors, every genome region should be sequenced several dozen times. This sequencing approach is based on the assumption that genomic DNA breaks are random and sequence-independent. However, previously we showed that for the sonicated restriction DNA fragments the rates of double-stranded breaks depend on the nucleotide sequence. In this work we analyzed genomic reads from NGS data and discovered that fragmentation methods based on the action of the hydrodynamic forces on DNA, produce similar bias. Consideration of this non-random DNA fragmentation may allow one to unravel what factors and to what extent influence the non-uniform coverage of various genomic regions.

  10. Non-random DNA fragmentation in next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Poptsova, Maria S.; Il'icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Khodikov, Mingian V.; Oparina, Nina Y.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.; Grokhovsky, Sergei L.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology is based on cutting DNA into small fragments, and their massive parallel sequencing. The multiple overlapping segments termed “reads” are assembled into a contiguous sequence. To reduce sequencing errors, every genome region should be sequenced several dozen times. This sequencing approach is based on the assumption that genomic DNA breaks are random and sequence-independent. However, previously we showed that for the sonicated restriction DNA fragments the rates of double-stranded breaks depend on the nucleotide sequence. In this work we analyzed genomic reads from NGS data and discovered that fragmentation methods based on the action of the hydrodynamic forces on DNA, produce similar bias. Consideration of this non-random DNA fragmentation may allow one to unravel what factors and to what extent influence the non-uniform coverage of various genomic regions. PMID:24681819

  11. Proteoglycans in normal and neoplastic monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kolset, S.O.

    1987-02-01

    35S proteoglycans produced by normal and neoplastic (U-937) monocytes after a 20-h pulse with (35S)sulfate in vitro have been isolated and compared. Both cell types produce exclusively chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG), which are released into the medium and are not contained within the cells. The neoplastic cell-derived molecules were much larger in molecular size, due to the substitution of galactosaminoglycan chains, with an approximate Mr of 60,000. The corresponding chains in monocyte CSPG had an Mr of approx. 20,000. The latter chains were also found to be more sulfated than their neoplastic counterparts.

  12. Reducing bias in survival under non-random temporary emigration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peñaloza, Claudia L.; Kendall, William L.; Langtimm, Catherine Ann

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive monitoring, temporary emigration from the sampling area can induce bias severe enough for managers to discard life-history parameter estimates toward the terminus of the times series (terminal bias). Under random temporary emigration unbiased parameters can be estimated with CJS models. However, unmodeled Markovian temporary emigration causes bias in parameter estimates and an unobservable state is required to model this type of emigration. The robust design is most flexible when modeling temporary emigration, and partial solutions to mitigate bias have been identified, nonetheless there are conditions were terminal bias prevails. Long-lived species with high adult survival and highly variable non-random temporary emigration present terminal bias in survival estimates, despite being modeled with the robust design and suggested constraints. Because this bias is due to uncertainty about the fate of individuals that are undetected toward the end of the time series, solutions should involve using additional information on survival status or location of these individuals at that time. Using simulation, we evaluated the performance of models that jointly analyze robust design data and an additional source of ancillary data (predictive covariate on temporary emigration, telemetry, dead recovery, or auxiliary resightings) in reducing terminal bias in survival estimates. The auxiliary resighting and predictive covariate models reduced terminal bias the most. Additional telemetry data was effective at reducing terminal bias only when individuals were tracked for a minimum of two years. High adult survival of long-lived species made the joint model with recovery data ineffective at reducing terminal bias because of small-sample bias. The naïve constraint model (last and penultimate temporary emigration parameters made equal), was the least efficient, though still able to reduce terminal bias when compared to an unconstrained model. Joint analysis of several

  13. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medical review; or (2) When calculation of the error rate indicates that the provider or supplier has... non-random prepayment complex medical review. If the reduction in the error rate is attributed to a 25... billing error are no longer suspended for non-random prepayment complex medical review. (d) Periodic...

  14. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complex medical review. 421.505 Section 421.505 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 421.505 Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review. (a) Timeframe that a provider or supplier must be on non-random prepayment complex medical review. There is no...

  15. Degradation of type IV collagen by neoplastic human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sheela, S.; Barrett, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    An assay for the degradation of type IV (basement membrane) collagen was developed as a biochemical marker for neoplastic cells from chemically transformed human skin fibroblasts. Type IV collagen was isolated from basement membrane of Syrian hamster lung and type I collagen was isolated from rat tails; the collagens were radioactively labelled by reductive alkylation. The abilities of normal (KD) and chemically transformed (Hut-11A) human skin fibroblasts to degrade the collagens were studied. A cell-associated assay was performed by growing either normal or transformed cells in the presence of radioactively labelled type IV collagen and measuring the released soluble peptides in the medium. This assay also demonstrated that KD cells failed to synthesize an activity capable of degrading type IV collagen whereas Hut-11A cells degraded type IV collagen in a linear manner for up to 4 h. Human serum at very low concentrations, EDTA and L-cysteine inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas protease inhibitors like phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, N-ethyl maleimide or soybean trypsin inhibitor did not inhibit the enzyme from Hut-11A cells. These results suggest that the ability to degrade specifically type IV collagen may be an important marker for neoplastic human fibroblasts and supports a role for this collagenase in tumor cell invasion.

  16. An immunohistochemical study of bizarre neoplastic cells in pleomorphic adenoma: its cytological nature and proliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y

    1999-11-01

    The cytological nature and proliferative activity of bizarre neoplastic cells, widely scattered in pleomorphic adenomas of salivary gland origin were studied. Pleomorphic adenomas containing numerous bizarre neoplastic cells were found in four cases, and were equal to 2.9% of all pleomorphic adenomas examined. All four cases presented as well-circumscribed, firm masses measuring less than 1.5 cm in size, located in the palate, and were of 7 months to 4 years duration. Histopathologically, these pleomorphic adenomas were cell rich type, and were well demarcated from surrounding tissues, although their fibrous capsules were partially defective. In addition to characteristic histopathological findings of pleomorphic adenoma, numerous neoplastic cells with bizarre appearance were scattered throughout the lesion, excepting for tubuloductal structures. These bizarre neoplastic cells had irregular-shaped and large nuclei with or without hyperchromatism, although their nucleoli were small and mitotic figures were few. Furthermore, there were many multinucleated giant cells, some of which showed multilobulated nuclei. Neither necrosis nor infarct was seen in the tumors. Immunohistochemically, bizarre neoplastic cells scattered in solid-proliferating areas and myxoid areas were neoplastic myoepithelial cells in nature. There was no statistical significance of MIB-1 labeling indices between pleomorphic adenomas with bizarre neoplastic cells and usual pleomorphic adenomas. The p53 labeling indices were quite low. Although the benign nature of pleomorphic adenomas with numerous bizarre neoplastic cells and hypercellularity, distinguishing such pleomorphic adenomas from various stages of malignant transformation in pleomorphic adenomas and other carcinomas should be made by histological section of submitted biopsy specimen or aspirated content for cytological diagnosis. The present paper suggests that the term 'bizarre cell pleomorphic adenoma' is an appropriate name for this

  17. Neoplastic reprogramming of patient-derived adipose stem cells by prostate cancer cell-associated exosomes.

    PubMed

    Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Yang, Yijun; Thomas, Raju; Ranjan, Manish; Mondal, Debasis; Moroz, Krzysztof; Fang, Zhide; Rezk, Bashir M; Moparty, Krishnarao; Sikka, Suresh C; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B

    2014-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are often recruited to tumor sites but their functional significance in tumor growth and disease progression remains elusive. Herein we report that prostate cancer (PC) cell microenvironment subverts PC patient adipose-derived stem cells (pASCs) to undergo neoplastic transformation. Unlike normal ASCs, the pASCs primed with PC cell conditioned media (CM) formed prostate-like neoplastic lesions in vivo and reproduced aggressive tumors in secondary recipients. The pASC tumors acquired cytogenetic aberrations and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and expressed epithelial, neoplastic, and vasculogenic markers reminiscent of molecular features of PC tumor xenografts. Our mechanistic studies revealed that PC cell-derived exosomes are sufficient to recapitulate formation of prostate tumorigenic mimicry generated by CM-primed pASCs in vivo. In addition to downregulation of the large tumor suppressor homolog2 and the programmed cell death protein 4, a neoplastic transformation inhibitor, the tumorigenic reprogramming of pASCs was associated with trafficking by PC cell-derived exosomes of oncogenic factors, including H-ras and K-ras transcripts, oncomiRNAs miR-125b, miR-130b, and miR-155 as well as the Ras superfamily of GTPases Rab1a, Rab1b, and Rab11a. Our findings implicate a new role for PC cell-derived exosomes in clonal expansion of tumors through neoplastic reprogramming of tumor tropic ASCs in cancer patients.

  18. Non-Random Integration of the HPV Genome in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Martina; Driesch, Corina; Jansen, Lars; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    HPV DNA integration into the host genome is a characteristic but not an exclusive step during cervical carcinogenesis. It is still a matter of debate whether viral integration contributes to the transformation process beyond ensuring the constitutive expression of the viral oncogenes. There is mounting evidence for a non-random distribution of integration loci and the direct involvement of cellular cancer-related genes. In this study we addressed this topic by extending the existing data set by an additional 47 HPV16 and HPV18 positive cervical carcinoma. We provide supportive evidence for previously defined integration hotspots and have revealed another cluster of integration sites within the cytogenetic band 3q28. Moreover, in the vicinity of these hotspots numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are located and may be influenced by the integrated HPV DNA. By compiling our data and published reports 9 genes could be identified which were affected by HPV integration at least twice in independent tumors. In some tumors the viral-cellular fusion transcripts were even identical with respect to the viral donor and cellular acceptor sites used. However, the exact integration sites are likely to differ since none of the integration sites analysed thus far have shown more than a few nucleotides of homology between viral and host sequences. Therefore, DNA recombination involving large stretches of homology at the integration site can be ruled out. It is however intriguing that by sequence alignment several regions of the HPV16 genome were found to have highly homologous stretches of up to 50 nucleotides to the aforementioned genes and the integration hotspots. One common region of homologies with cellular sequences is between the viral gene E5 and L2 (nucleotides positions 4100 to 4240). We speculate that this and other regions of homology are involved in the integration process. Our observations suggest that targeted disruption, possibly also of critical cellular genes, by HPV

  19. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  20. Non-random structures in universal compression and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, A. V.; Allahverdyan, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the hypothesis of information panspermia assigned recently among possible solutions of the Fermi paradox ("where are the aliens?"). It suggests that the expenses of alien signaling can be significantly reduced, if their messages contained compressed information. To this end we consider universal compression and decoding mechanisms ( e.g. the Lempel-Ziv-Welch algorithm) that can reveal non-random structures in compressed bit strings. The efficiency of the Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter for detection of non-randomness is illustrated, along with the Zipf's law. The universality of these methods, i.e. independence from data details, can be principal in searching for intelligent messages.

  1. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  2. Neoplastic transformation in longstanding fistula-in-ano.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, G. H.; Finlay, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    A case in which an infiltrating mucinous carcinoma developed within a suprasphincteric fistula-in-ano is presented. The diagnosis was suspected on biopsy and confirmed by repeat biopsy. The clinical and histological features of this case establish with certainty that the carcinoma arose within the fistula and was not a secondary manifestation of the tumour. It is suggested that this rare complication of chronic fistula-in-ano may be prevented by prompt expert management of complex primary fistula. Images Figure 1 PMID:2829151

  3. Organoids as Models for Neoplastic Transformation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer models strive to recapitulate the incredible diversity inherent in human tumors. A key challenge in accurate tumor modeling lies in capturing the panoply of homo- and heterotypic cellular interactions within the context of a three-dimensional tissue microenvironment. To address this challenge, researchers have developed organotypic cancer models (organoids) that combine the 3D architecture of in vivo tissues with the experimental facility of 2D cell lines.

  4. Somatic mutation and cell differentiation in neoplastic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Collart, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    In brief, the authors suggest that tumor formation may result from continuous expression of growth facilitating genes that, as a result of irreversible changes during the initiation step, are placed under the control of genes expressed during normal differentiation. Thus, to understand carcinogenesis, we must decipher the processes that lead to the acquisition of a mature phenotype in both normal and tumor cells and characterize the growth dependency of tumor cells to inducers of cell differentiation. Furthermore, the growth of a variety of tumors may be controlled through the use of inducers of maturation that activate genes located beyond the gene that is altered during tumor initiation. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  6. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  7. Bayesian hierarchical modeling for a non-randomized, longitudinal fall prevention trial with spatially correlated observations

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, T. E.; Allore, H. G.; Leo-Summers, L.; Carlin, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    Because randomization of participants is often not feasible in community-based health interventions, non-randomized designs are commonly employed. Non-randomized designs may have experimental units that are spatial in nature, such as zip codes that are characterized by aggregate statistics from sources like the U.S. census and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. A perennial concern with non-randomized designs is that even after careful balancing of influential covariates, bias may arise from unmeasured factors. In addition to facilitating the analysis of interventional designs based on spatial units, Bayesian hierarchical modeling can quantify unmeasured variability with spatially correlated residual terms. Graphical analysis of these spatial residuals demonstrates whether variability from unmeasured covariates is likely to bias the estimates of interventional effect. The Connecticut Collaboration for Fall Prevention is the first large-scale longitudinal trial of a community-wide healthcare intervention designed to prevent injurious falls in older adults. Over a two-year evaluation phase, this trial demonstrated a rate of fall-related utilization at hospitals and emergency departments by persons 70 years and older in the intervention area that was 11 per cent less than that of the usual care area, and a 9 per cent lower rate of utilization from serious injuries. We describe the Bayesian hierarchical analysis of this non-randomized intervention with emphasis on its spatial and longitudinal characteristics. We also compare several models, using posterior predictive simulations and maps of spatial residuals. PMID:21294148

  8. The quality of control groups in non-randomized studies published in Journal of Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shepard P.; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate control group selection in non-randomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery American (JHS). Methods We reviewed all papers published in JHS in 2013 to identify studies that used non-randomized control groups. Data collected included type of study design and control group characteristics. We then appraised studies to determine if authors discussed confounding and selection bias and how they controlled for confounding. Results Thirty-seven non-randomized studies were published in JHS in 2013. The source of control was either the same institution as the study group, a different institution, a database, or not provided in the manuscript. Twenty-nine (78%) studies statistically compared key characteristics between control and study group. Confounding was controlled with matching, exclusion criteria, or regression analysis. Twenty-two (59%) papers explicitly discussed the threat of confounding and 18(49%) identified sources of selection bias. Conclusions In our review of non-randomized studies published in JHS, papers had well-defined controls that were similar to the study group, allowing for reasonable comparisons. However, we identified substantial confounding and bias that were not addressed as explicit limitations, which might lead the reader to overestimate the scientific validity of the data. Clinical relevance Incorporating a brief discussion of control group selection in scientific manuscripts should help readers interpret the study more appropriately. Authors, reviewers, and editors should strive to address this component of clinical importance. PMID:25447000

  9. Neoplastic Reprogramming of Patient-Derived Adipose Stem Cells by Prostate Cancer Cell-Associated Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Yang, Yijun; Thomas, Raju; Ranjan, Manish; Mondal, Debasis; Moroz, Krzysztof; Fang, Zhide; Rezk, Bashir M.; Moparty, Krishnarao; Sikka, Suresh C.; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are often recruited to tumor sites but their functional significance in tumor growth and disease progression remains elusive. Herein we report that prostate cancer (PC) cell microenvironment subverts PC patient adipose-derived stem cells (pASCs) to undergo neoplastic transformation. Unlike normal ASCs, the pASCs primed with PC cell conditioned media (CM) formed prostate-like neoplastic lesions in vivo and reproduced aggressive tumors in secondary recipients. The pASC tumors acquired cytogenetic aberrations and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) and expressed epithelial, neoplastic, and vasculogenic markers reminiscent of molecular features of PC tumor xenografts. Our mechanistic studies revealed that PC cell-derived exosomes are sufficient to recapitulate formation of prostate tumorigenic mimicry generated by CM-primed pASCs in vivo. In addition to down-regulation of the large tumor suppressor homolog2 (Lats2) and the programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4), a neoplastic transformation inhibitor, the tumorigenic reprogramming of pASCs was associated with trafficking by PC cell-derived exosomes of oncogenic factors, including H-ras and K-ras transcripts, oncomiRNAs miR-125b, miR-130b, and miR-155 as well as the Ras superfamily of GTPases Rab1a, Rab1b, and Rab11a. Our findings implicate a new role for PC cell-derived exosomes in clonal expansion of tumors through neoplastic reprogramming of tumor tropic ASCs in cancer patients. PMID:24715691

  10. [Non-neoplastic lesions of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Tzankov, A

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is a complex body region of limited space but containing numerous organs of different embryonic origins. A variety of lesions that are difficult to distinguish from each other can occur here. Non-neoplastic lesions of the mediastinum represent important differential diagnostic pitfalls to mediastinal tumors, clinically, radiologically and histopathologically. It is important to bear these lesions in mind and to adequately verify or exclude them before starting further differential diagnostic considerations on mediastinal neoplasms. The most common non-neoplastic lesions in this region include cysts and lymphadenopathies. Mediastinal cysts result from abnormal events in the branching of the tracheobronchial tree, the pharyngeal pouches, the primary intestines, the pleuropericardial membranes and the brain meninges or are complications of inflammatory and hydrostatic processes. The histogenesis of the lining epithelium and the cyst wall structure are decisive for the exact classification. The histopathologically most prevalent patterns of mediastinal lymphadenopathies are those accompanied by increased histiocytes and Castleman's disease. Sclerosis is a non-specific reaction pattern of the mediastinum and can be associated with many processes; therefore, when establishing the diagnosis of sclerosing mediastinitis, several differential diagnoses have to be excluded. Simple thymic hyperplasia can be accompanied by considerable increase in organ size with severe local symptoms, while follicular thymic hyperplasia is often associated with myasthenia gravis and represents the most common findings in non-thymoma thymectomy specimens. PMID:27465275

  11. CDDO-Me protects against space radiation-induced transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Ugur; Kim, Sang Bum; Roig, Andres I; Kitten, Erin; Batten, Kimberly; Cornelius, Crystal; Zou, Ying S; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-01

    Radiation-induced carcinogenesis is a major concern both for astronauts on long-term space missions and for cancer patients being treated with therapeutic radiation. Exposure to radiation induces oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, which are critical initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants can reduce the risk of radiation-induced cancer. In this study, we found that a synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Me (bardoxolone methyl), was able to protect human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) against radiation-induced transformation. HCECs that were immortalized by ectopic expression of hTERT and cdk4 and exhibit trisomy for chromosome 7 (a non-random chromosome change that occurs in 37% of premalignant colon adenomas) can be transformed experimentally with one combined exposure to 2 Gy of protons at 1 GeV/nucleon followed 24 h later by 50 cGy of (56)Fe ions at 1 GeV/nucleon. Transformed cells showed an increase in proliferation rate and in both anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation ability. A spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed in transformed cells, with 40% showing loss of 17p (e.g. loss of one copy of p53). Pretreatment of cells with pharmacological doses of CDDO-Me, which has been shown to induce antioxidative as well as anti-inflammatory responses, prevented the heavy-ion-induced increase in proliferation rate and anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation efficiencies. Taken together, these results demonstrate that experimentally immortalized human colon epithelial cells with a non-random chromosome 7 trisomy are valuable premalignant cellular reagents that can be used to study radiation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. The utility of premalignant HCECs to test novel compounds such as CDDO-Me that can be used to protect against radiation-induced neoplastic transformation is also demonstrated. PMID:20681796

  12. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts – An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    D’Silva, Shaloom; Sumathi, M K; Balaji, N; Shetty, Nisha K N; Pramod, K M; Cheeramelil, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background: Calretinin a 29-kDa calcium binding protein is expressed widely in normal human tissue and tumours including amelobastoma. The objective of this study was to determine calretinin expression in heamatoxylin and eosin diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma and non-neoplastic odontogenic cysts. Materials & Methods: The lining epithelium in 3 cases of radicular cysts, 5 cases of odontogenic keratocysts, 5 cases of dentigerous cysts and 11 cases of ameloblastomas were examined for expression of calretinin. Results: No positive epithelial staining was observed in radicular and dentigerous cysts. In comparison, however 100% of cases of ameloblastomas and 40% of cases of odontogenic karatocysts showed positive calretinin expression. Conclusion: Calretinin may be a specific immunohistochemical marker for ameloblastoma. If there is any possible relation between calretinin expression and neural origin of the odontogenic epithelium and its neoplastic transformation and if calretinin could be used as an early marker to predict the tendency of neoplastic change of odontogenic epithelium could be answered through further researches. How to cite this article: D’Silva S, Sumathi MK, Balaji N, Shetty NK, Pramod KM, Cheeramelil J. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts – An immunohistochemical study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):42-8 . PMID:24453443

  13. Checklists of Methodological Issues for Review Authors to Consider When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, George A.; Shea, Beverley; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Sterne, Jonathan; Tugwell, Peter; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest from review authors about including non-randomized studies (NRS) in their systematic reviews of health care interventions. This series from the Ottawa Non-Randomized Studies Workshop consists of six papers identifying methodological issues when doing this. Aim: To format the guidance from the preceding…

  14. Revisiting the impacts of non-random extinction on the tree-of-life.

    PubMed

    Davies, T Jonathan; Yessoufou, Kowiyou

    2013-08-23

    The tree-of-life represents the diversity of living organisms. Species extinction and the concomitant loss of branches from the tree-of-life is therefore a major conservation concern. There is increasing evidence indicating that extinction is phylogenetically non-random, such that if one species is vulnerable to extinction so too are its close relatives. However, the impact of non-random extinctions on the tree-of-life has been a matter of recent debate. Here, we combine simulations with empirical data on extinction risk in mammals. We demonstrate that phylogenetically clustered extinction leads to a disproportionate loss of branches from the tree-of-life, but that the loss of their summed lengths is indistinguishable from random extinction. We argue that under a speciational model of evolution, the number of branches lost might be of equal or greater consequences than the loss of summed branch lengths. We therefore suggest that the impact of non-random extinction on the tree-of-life may have been underestimated.

  15. Non-neoplastic salivary gland lesions: a 15-year study.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Tahlan, Anita; Mundi, Irneet; Punia, R P S; Dass, Arjun

    2011-08-01

    The spectrum of salivary gland lesions is wide and the relative incidence of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic lesions is variable in different studies. A series of non-neoplastic salivary gland lesions is reviewed to analyze their spectrum and their relative frequency. This is a retrospective study of salivary gland excisions and biopsies received in our department from January 1994 to December 2008. Routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of all the salivary gland excisions and biopsies received were analyzed. Of the 393 salivary gland excisions and biopsies received, 216 cases were reported as non-neoplastic (55%) and formed our study group; 177 (45%) were neoplastic. Non-neoplastic lesions were more frequent in major salivary glands (65.7%) and submandibular gland was the most commonly involved (66.2%). Lip was the most frequent site (81.7%) for minor salivary gland lesions. Inflammation was the predominant pathological finding (49.5%), of which non-specific chronic sialadenitis constituted the majority (86.9%). Sialolithiasis was present in 22 cases (20.6%); all of these cases were of non-specific chronic sialadenitis. Cysts were second in frequency (36.6%), of which mucocele was the most common (54.5%). There were 5.6% cases of benign lympho-epithelial lesions, while normal salivary gland tissue was seen in 6.5% cases. Non-neoplastic salivary gland diseases are more common than neoplastic diseases and have a wide disease spectrum.

  16. Expression of Cytokeratin-19 and Thyroperoxidase in Relation to Morphological Features in Non-Neoplastic and Neoplastic Lesions of Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Revathishree; Noorunnisa, Naseen; Durairaj, Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a protein involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. TPO gene suppression and mutation were involved in thyroid tumours. CK-19 plays important role in the structural integrity of epithelial cells. Reduced TPO expression with increased CK-19 immunoreactivity has been implicated as a marker for differentiating non neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Aim To study the histopathological features of thyroid lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic role of thyroperoxidase and CK-19 in non-neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of 65 thyroid specimens was studied for detailed histopathological examination and Expression of Immunohistochemical Markers Cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) and Thyroperoxidase. Results TPO IHC marker was expressed by non-neoplastic and benign lesions of thyroid but not in malignancy. CK-19 was expressed 100% in papillary carcinoma of thyroid and its variants, focal and weak staining noted in goitre and hyperplastic areas. Conclusion Most of the non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions were diagnosed based on histopathological features. When the histopathological diagnosis are equivocal, immunohistochemical markers aids in diagnosing malignancy. Diffuse and strong TPO expression indicates non-neoplastic thyroid lesions whereas diffused and strong CK-19 expression indicates thyroid malignancy. PMID:27504290

  17. Regulatory Considerations Of Waste Emplacement Within The WIPP Repository: Random Versus Non-Random Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S. C.; Patterson, R. L.; Gross, M.; Lickliter, K.; Stein, J. S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. As part of that responsibility, DOE must comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) radiation protection standards in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 191 and 194. This paper addresses compliance with the criteria of 40 CFR Section 194.24(d) and 194.24(f) that require DOE to either provide a waste loading scheme for the WIPP repository or to assume random emplacement in the mandated performance and compliance assessments. The DOE established a position on waste loading schemes during the process of obtaining the EPA's initial Certification in 1998. The justification for utilizing a random waste emplacement distribution within the WIPP repository was provided to the EPA. During the EPA rulemaking process for the initial certification, the EPA questioned DOE on whether waste would be loaded randomly as modeled in long-term performance assessment (PA) and the impact, if any, of nonrandom loading. In response, DOE conducted an impact assessment for non-random waste loading. The results of this assessment supported the contention that it does not matter whether random or non-random waste loading is assumed for the PA. The EPA determined that a waste loading plan was unnecessary because DOE had assumed random waste loading and evaluated the potential consequences of non-random loading for a very high activity waste stream. In other words, the EPA determined that DOE was not required to provide a waste loading scheme because compliance is not affected by the actual distribution of waste containers in the WIPP.

  18. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Non-Neoplastic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tokito, Akinori; Jougasaki, Michihisa

    2016-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent endopeptidases belonging to the metzincin superfamily. There are at least 23 members of MMPs ever reported in human, and they and their substrates are widely expressed in many tissues. Recent growing evidence has established that MMP not only can degrade a variety of components of extracellular matrix, but also can cleave and activate various non-matrix proteins, including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, contributing to both physiological and pathological processes. In normal conditions, MMP expression and activity are tightly regulated via interactions between their activators and inhibitors. Imbalance among these factors, however, results in dysregulated MMP activity, which causes tissue destruction and functional alteration or local inflammation, leading to the development of diverse diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, neurodegenerative disease, as well as cancer. This article focuses on the accumulated evidence supporting a wide range of roles of MMPs in various non-neoplastic diseases and provides an outlook on the therapeutic potential of inhibiting MMP action. PMID:27455234

  19. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces.

  20. Non-random mate choice in humans: insights from a genome scan.

    PubMed

    Laurent, R; Toupance, B; Chaix, R

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors influencing mate choice in humans. Still, there is evidence for non-random mate choice with respect to physical traits. In addition, some studies suggest that the Major Histocompatibility Complex may affect pair formation. Nowadays, the availability of high density genomic data sets gives the opportunity to scan the genome for signatures of non-random mate choice without prior assumptions on which genes may be involved, while taking into account socio-demographic factors. Here, we performed a genome scan to detect extreme patterns of similarity or dissimilarity among spouses throughout the genome in three populations of African, European American, and Mexican origins from the HapMap 3 database. Our analyses identified genes and biological functions that may affect pair formation in humans, including genes involved in skin appearance, morphogenesis, immunity and behaviour. We found little overlap between the three populations, suggesting that the biological functions potentially influencing mate choice are population specific, in other words are culturally driven. Moreover, whenever the same functional category of genes showed a significant signal in two populations, different genes were actually involved, which suggests the possibility of evolutionary convergences.

  1. Impact of non-random vibrations in Mössbauer rotor experiments testing time dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Y.; Nowik, I.; Felner, I.; Steiner, J. M.; Yudkin, E.; Livshitz, S.; Wille, H.-C.; Wortmann, G.; Arogeti, S.; Levy, R.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2016-06-01

    All experiments testing time dilation by measuring the spectral shift of a rotating Mössbauer absorber assume that vibrations do not affect the spectral shift because of their purely random nature and claim that the observed shift is due to time dilation only. Our recent experiment using the Synchrotron Mössbauer Source at ESRF revealed, however, a shift due to the non-random periodic vibration patterns caused by the rotor/bearing system. These patterns fit the predictions of the Jeffcott model for such a system with non-zero eccentricity. We have calculated this shift due to the non-random vibrations and the resulting relative shift between two states when the acceleration of the absorber is anti-parallel and parallel to the source. This relative shift exhibits the same behavior as the observed relative shift. Hence, the effect of the spectral shift due to vibrations cannot be ignored in any Mössbauer rotor experiments for testing time dilation. Recommendations for improvement of future rotor experiments testing time dilation are presented.

  2. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces. PMID:24352672

  3. The non-random walk of chiral magnetic charge carriers in artificial spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Zeissler, K.; Walton, S. K.; Ladak, S.; Read, D. E.; Tyliszczak, T.; Cohen, L. F.; Branford, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    The flow of magnetic charge carriers (dubbed magnetic monopoles) through frustrated spin ice lattices, governed simply by Coulombic forces, represents a new direction in electromagnetism. Artificial spin ice nanoarrays realise this effect at room temperature, where the magnetic charge is carried by domain walls. Control of domain wall path is one important element of utilizing this new medium. By imaging the transit of domain walls across different connected 2D honeycomb structures we contribute an important aspect which will enable that control to be realized. Although apparently equivalent paths are presented to a domain wall as it approaches a Y-shaped vertex from a bar parallel to the field, we observe a stark non-random path distribution, which we attribute to the chirality of the magnetic charges. These observations are supported by detailed statistical modelling and micromagnetic simulations. The identification of chiral control to magnetic charge path selectivity invites analogy with spintronics. PMID:23409243

  4. Non-random mating in classical lekking grouse species: seasonal and diurnal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, L. J. S.; DeIuliis, G.; Hansell, R. I. C.; Kozlovic, D. R.; Sokolowski, M. B.

    This paper is the first to integrate both field and theoretical approaches to demonstrate that fertility benefits can be a direct benefit to females mating on the classical lek. Field data collected for male sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), a classical lekking species, revealed potential fertility benefits for selective females. Adult males and individuals occupying centrally located territories on the lek were found to have significantly larger testes than juveniles and peripheral individuals. Further, using empirical data from previously published studies of classical lekking grouse species, time-series analysis was employed to illustrate that female mating patterns, seasonal and daily, were non-random. We are the first to show that these patterns coincide with times when male fertility is at its peak.

  5. Non-random aneuploidy specifies subgroups of pilocytic astrocytoma and correlates with older age

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Bechet, Denise; Gayden, Tenzin; Kool, Marcel; De Jay, Nicolas; Jacob, Karine; Gerges, Noha; Hutter, Barbara; Şeker-Cin, Huriye; Witt, Hendrik; Montpetit, Alexandre; Brunet, Sébastien; Lepage, Pierre; Bourret, Geneviève; Klekner, Almos; Bognár, László; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklós; Farmer, Jean-Pierre; Montes, Jose-Luis; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lambert, Sally; Kwan, Tony; Korshunov, Andrey; Tabori, Uri; Collins, V. Peter; Albrecht, Steffen; Faury, Damien; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Jabado, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children but is rare in adults, and hence poorly studied in this age group. We investigated 222 PA and report increased aneuploidy in older patients. Aneuploid genomes were identified in 45% of adult compared with 17% of pediatric PA. Gains were non-random, favoring chromosomes 5, 7, 6 and 11 in order of frequency, and preferentially affecting non-cerebellar PA and tumors with BRAF V600E mutations and not with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions or FGFR1 mutations. Aneuploid PA differentially expressed genes involved in CNS development, the unfolded protein response, and regulators of genomic stability and the cell cycle (MDM2, PLK2),whose correlated programs were overexpressed specifically in aneuploid PA compared to other glial tumors. Thus, convergence of pathways affecting the cell cycle and genomic stability may favor aneuploidy in PA, possibly representing an additional molecular driver in older patients with this brain tumor. PMID:26378811

  6. The neoplastic potential of rat tracheal epithelial cell lines induced by dibenzo(a, i)pyrene and 1-nitropyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, M.; Ong, T. |; Nath, J.

    1997-10-01

    The rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cell transformation system is an important short-term assay for respiratory carcinogenesis. In our laboratories, studies have been performed using this assay system to determine the carcinogenic potential of dibenzo(a,i)pyrene (DBP) and 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), two compounds commonly contaminating occupational and environmental settings. RTE cells were exposed in vivo to DBP or 1-NP by intertracheal instillation. RTE cells were then isolated and plated on a medium for determination of cloning and transformation frequencies. Cell lines established from transformed cells induced by DBP and 1-NP were analyzed for their neoplastic potential with the soft agar cloning and the athymic nude mouse tumorigenicity assays. Results showed that: (1) incidence of transformed foci in cultures treated with DBP or 1-NP in vivo was significantly higher than that in the control cultures; (2) 8 and 25 cell lines were established from 28 and 48 transformed foci induced by DBP and 1-NP, respectively; (3) 3 of 5 cell lines from DBP and 5 anchorage independent growth in soft agar; (4) some of the cell lines from DBP and 1-NP induced transformed foci formed tumors after cells were injected in athymic nude mice. These results indicate that in vivo exposure to DBP and 1-NP can induce RTE cell transformation and that transformed cells induced by DBP and 1-NP may have neoplastic potential.

  7. WT1 expression in salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas: a reliable marker of the neoplastic myoepithelium.

    PubMed

    Langman, Gerald; Andrews, Claire L; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2011-02-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign salivary gland neoplasm with a diverse morphology. This is considered to be a function of the neoplastic myoepithelium, which shows histological and immunophenotypical variability. Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1) protein, involved in bidirectional mesenchymal-epithelial transition, has been detected by reverse transcription PCR in salivary gland tumors showing myoepithelial-epithelial differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivity of WT1 in pleomorphic adenomas and to compare the pattern of staining with p63 and calponin, two reliable markers of myoepithelial cells. A total of 31 cases of pleomorphic adenoma were selected. The myoepithelium was classified as myoepithelial-like (juxtatubular and spindled), modified myoepithelium (myxoid, chondroid and plasmacytoid) and transformed myoepithelium (solid epithelioid, squamous and basaloid cribriform). Immunohistochemistry for WT1, p63 and calponin was assessed in each myoepithelial component, as well as in nonneoplastic myoepithelial cells and inner tubular epithelial cells. There was no immunostaining of tubular epithelial cells by any of the markers. In contrast to p63 and calponin, WT1 did not react with normal myoepithelial cells. Cytoplasmic WT1 staining was present in all pleomorphic adenomas, and in 29 cases (94%), >50% of neoplastic myoepithelial cells were highlighted. p63 and calponin stained the myoepithelium in 30 tumors. In comparison, 50% of cells were positive in 21 (68%) and 9 (29%) cases of p63 and calponin, respectively. Staining with WT1 showed less variability across the spectrum of myoepithelial differentiation with the difference most marked in the transformed myoepithelium. WT1 is a sensitive marker of the neoplastic myoepithelial cell in pleomorphic adenomas. The role of this protein in influencing the mesenchymal-epithelial state of cells suggests that WT1 and the myoepithelial cell have an important role in the histogenesis of

  8. Role of neoplastic monocyte-derived fibrocytes in primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Manshouri, Taghi; Pilling, Darrell; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Newberry, Kate J; Prijic, Sanja; Knez, Liza; Bozinovic, Ksenija; Harris, David M; Spaeth, Erika L; Post, Sean M; Multani, Asha S; Rampal, Raajit K; Ahn, Jihae; Levine, Ross L; Creighton, Chad J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-08-22

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a fatal neoplastic disease characterized by clonal myeloproliferation and progressive bone marrow (BM) fibrosis thought to be induced by mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated by overproduced growth factors. However, tissue fibrosis in other diseases is associated with monocyte-derived fibrocytes. Therefore, we sought to determine whether fibrocytes play a role in the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF. In this study, we show that BM from patients with PMF harbors an abundance of clonal, neoplastic collagen- and fibronectin-producing fibrocytes. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with myelofibrosis patients' BM cells developed a lethal myelofibrosis-like phenotype. Treatment of the xenograft mice with the fibrocyte inhibitor serum amyloid P (SAP; pentraxin-2) significantly prolonged survival and slowed the development of BM fibrosis. Collectively, our data suggest that neoplastic fibrocytes contribute to the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF, and inhibiting fibrocyte differentiation with SAP may interfere with this process. PMID:27481130

  9. Hypothesis: are neoplastic macrophages/microglia present in glioblastoma multiforme?

    PubMed Central

    Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Akgoc, Zeynep; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2011-01-01

    Most malignant brain tumours contain various numbers of cells with characteristics of activated or dysmorphic macrophages/microglia. These cells are generally considered part of the tumour stroma and are often described as TAM (tumour-associated macrophages). These types of cells are thought to either enhance or inhibit brain tumour progression. Recent evidence indicates that neoplastic cells with macrophage characteristics are found in numerous metastatic cancers of non-CNS (central nervous system) origin. Evidence is presented here suggesting that subpopulations of cells within human gliomas, specifically GBM (glioblastoma multiforme), are neoplastic macrophages/microglia. These cells are thought to arise following mitochondrial damage in fusion hybrids between neoplastic stem cells and macrophages/microglia. PMID:21834792

  10. Non-random decay of chordate characters causes bias in fossil interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, Mark A

    2010-02-11

    Exceptional preservation of soft-bodied Cambrian chordates provides our only direct information on the origin of vertebrates. Fossil chordates from this interval offer crucial insights into how the distinctive body plan of vertebrates evolved, but reading this pre-biomineralization fossil record is fraught with difficulties, leading to controversial and contradictory interpretations. The cause of these difficulties is taphonomic: we lack data on when and how important characters change as they decompose, resulting in a lack of constraint on anatomical interpretation and a failure to distinguish phylogenetic absence of characters from loss through decay. Here we show, from experimental decay of amphioxus and ammocoetes, that loss of chordate characters during decay is non-random: the more phylogenetically informative are the most labile, whereas plesiomorphic characters are decay resistant. The taphonomic loss of synapomorphies and relatively higher preservation potential of chordate plesiomorphies will thus result in bias towards wrongly placing fossils on the chordate stem. Application of these data to Cathaymyrus (Cambrian period of China) and Metaspriggina (Cambrian period of Canada) highlights the difficulties: these fossils cannot be placed reliably in the chordate or vertebrate stem because they could represent the decayed remains of any non-biomineralized, total-group chordate. Preliminary data suggest that this decay filter also affects other groups of organisms and that 'stem-ward slippage' may be a widespread but currently unrecognized bias in our understanding of the early evolution of a number of phyla.

  11. Random and non-random mating populations: Evolutionary dynamics in meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Game theoretic tools are utilized to analyze a one-locus continuous selection model of sex-specific meiotic drive by considering nonequivalence of the viabilities of reciprocal heterozygotes that might be noticed at an imprinted locus. The model draws attention to the role of viability selections of different types to examine the stable nature of polymorphic equilibrium. A bridge between population genetics and evolutionary game theory has been built up by applying the concept of the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection. In addition to pointing out the influences of male and female segregation ratios on selection, configuration structure reveals some noted results, e.g., Hardy-Weinberg frequencies hold in replicator dynamics, occurrence of faster evolution at the maximized variance fitness, existence of mixed Evolutionarily Stable Strategy (ESS) in asymmetric games, the tending evolution to follow not only a 1:1 sex ratio but also a 1:1 different alleles ratio at particular gene locus. Through construction of replicator dynamics in the group selection framework, our selection model introduces a redefining bases of game theory to incorporate non-random mating where a mating parameter associated with population structure is dependent on the social structure. Also, the model exposes the fact that the number of polymorphic equilibria will depend on the algebraic expression of population structure. PMID:26524140

  12. Non-random assembly of bacterioplankton communities in the subtropical north pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Alexander; Hayakawa, Darin H; Rappé, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    The exploration of bacterial diversity in the global ocean has revealed new taxa and previously unrecognized metabolic potential; however, our understanding of what regulates this diversity is limited. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data from bacterial small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes we show that, independent of depth and time, a large fraction of bacterioplankton co-occurrence patterns are non-random in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG). Pair-wise correlations of all identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed a high degree of significance, with 6.6% of the pair-wise co-occurrences being negatively correlated and 20.7% of them being positive. The most abundant OTUs, putatively identified as Prochlorococcus, SAR11, and SAR116 bacteria, were among the most correlated OTUs. As expected, bacterial community composition lacked statistically significant patterns of seasonality in the mostly stratified water column except in a few depth horizons of the sunlit surface waters, with higher frequency variations in community structure apparently related to populations associated with the deep chlorophyll maximum. Communities were structured vertically into epipelagic, mesopelagic, and bathypelagic populations. Permutation-based statistical analyses of T-RFLP data and their corresponding metadata revealed a broad range of putative environmental drivers controlling bacterioplankton community composition in the NPSG, including concentrations of inorganic nutrients and phytoplankton pigments. Together, our results suggest that deterministic forces such as environmental filtering and interactions among taxa determine bacterioplankton community patterns, and consequently affect ecosystem functions in the NPSG.

  13. The MHC and non-random mating in a captive population of Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Neff, B D; Garner, S R; Heath, J W; Heath, D D

    2008-08-01

    Detailed analysis of variation in reproductive success can provide an understanding of the selective pressures that drive the evolution of adaptations. Here, we use experimental spawning channels to assess phenotypic and genotypic correlates of reproductive success in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Groups of 36 fish in three different sex ratios (1:2, 1:1 and 2:1) were allowed to spawn and the offspring were collected after emergence from the gravel. Microsatellite genetic markers were used to assign parentage of each offspring, and the parents were also typed at the major histocompatibility class IIB locus (MHC). We found that large males, and males with brighter coloration and a more green/blue hue on their lateral integument sired more offspring, albeit only body size and brightness had independent effects. There was no similar relationship between these variables and female reproductive success. Furthermore, there was no effect of sex ratio on the strength or significance of any of the correlations. Females mated non-randomly at the MHC, appearing to select mates that produced offspring with greater genetic diversity as measured by amino-acid divergence. Females mated randomly with respect to male genetic relatedness and males mated randomly with respect to both MHC and genetic relatedness. These results indicate that sexual selection favours increased body size and perhaps integument coloration in males as well as increases genetic diversity at the MHC by female mate choice.

  14. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  15. Non-Random Assembly of Bacterioplankton Communities in the Subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Hayakawa, Darin H.; Rappé, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration of bacterial diversity in the global ocean has revealed new taxa and previously unrecognized metabolic potential; however, our understanding of what regulates this diversity is limited. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data from bacterial small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes we show that, independent of depth and time, a large fraction of bacterioplankton co-occurrence patterns are non-random in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG). Pair-wise correlations of all identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed a high degree of significance, with 6.6% of the pair-wise co-occurrences being negatively correlated and 20.7% of them being positive. The most abundant OTUs, putatively identified as Prochlorococcus, SAR11, and SAR116 bacteria, were among the most correlated OTUs. As expected, bacterial community composition lacked statistically significant patterns of seasonality in the mostly stratified water column except in a few depth horizons of the sunlit surface waters, with higher frequency variations in community structure apparently related to populations associated with the deep chlorophyll maximum. Communities were structured vertically into epipelagic, mesopelagic, and bathypelagic populations. Permutation-based statistical analyses of T-RFLP data and their corresponding metadata revealed a broad range of putative environmental drivers controlling bacterioplankton community composition in the NPSG, including concentrations of inorganic nutrients and phytoplankton pigments. Together, our results suggest that deterministic forces such as environmental filtering and interactions among taxa determine bacterioplankton community patterns, and consequently affect ecosystem functions in the NPSG. PMID:21747815

  16. Plasticity-Driven Self-Organization under Topological Constraints Accounts for Non-random Features of Cortical Synaptic Wiring

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Daniel; Triesch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of cortical connectivity is vital to understanding cortical function. Experimental data strongly suggest that local recurrent connectivity in the cortex is significantly non-random, exhibiting, for example, above-chance bidirectionality and an overrepresentation of certain triangular motifs. Additional evidence suggests a significant distance dependency to connectivity over a local scale of a few hundred microns, and particular patterns of synaptic turnover dynamics, including a heavy-tailed distribution of synaptic efficacies, a power law distribution of synaptic lifetimes, and a tendency for stronger synapses to be more stable over time. Understanding how many of these non-random features simultaneously arise would provide valuable insights into the development and function of the cortex. While previous work has modeled some of the individual features of local cortical wiring, there is no model that begins to comprehensively account for all of them. We present a spiking network model of a rodent Layer 5 cortical slice which, via the interactions of a few simple biologically motivated intrinsic, synaptic, and structural plasticity mechanisms, qualitatively reproduces these non-random effects when combined with simple topological constraints. Our model suggests that mechanisms of self-organization arising from a small number of plasticity rules provide a parsimonious explanation for numerous experimentally observed non-random features of recurrent cortical wiring. Interestingly, similar mechanisms have been shown to endow recurrent networks with powerful learning abilities, suggesting that these mechanism are central to understanding both structure and function of cortical synaptic wiring. PMID:26866369

  17. Insight to neoplastic thyroid lesions by fine needle aspiration cytology

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, M; Narendra, KL; Patel, S; Gururajprasad, C; Manjunath, GV

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a valuable adjunct to pre-operative screening in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules, and in most cases, it can distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. Aim: To study the cytology of neoplastic thyroid lesions to minimize surgical intervention and for confirmation of the diagnosis by histopathological study. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of thyroid FNAC smears were analyzed and cyto-histopathological correlation was done in 47 cases. Galen and Gambino's method was used to calculate the sensitivity and positive predictive value. Results: Of the 100 cases, 90 were diagnosed as neoplastic lesions by FNAC and ten cases as non-neoplastic lesions, which turned out to be neoplasms on histopathological study. Among 100 cases, 47 were biopsied and subjected to histopathological study. The sensitivity of FNAC was 75.60%, and positive predictive value was 83.78% for malignant lesions. Conclusions: FNAC is a rapid, efficient, cost-effective, relatively painless procedure with a high diagnostic accuracy. It has high rate of sensitivity and positive predictive value in diagnosing thyroid neoplastic lesions. Hence, it is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:23661936

  18. Proteins That Underlie Neoplastic Progression of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brentnall, Teresa A.; Pan, Sheng; Bronner, Mary P.; Crispin, David A.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Cooke, Kelly; Tamura, Yasuko; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; JeBailey, Lellean; Goodlett, David R.; McIntosh, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Chen, Ru

    2009-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer. Because UC tumorigenesis is associated with genomic field defects that can extend throughout the entire colon, including the non-dysplastic mucosa; we hypothesized that the same field defect will include abnormally expressed proteins. Here we applied proteomics to study the protein expression of UC neoplastic progression. The protein profiles of colonic epithelium were compared from 1) UC patients without dysplasia (non-progressors); 2) none-dysplastic colonic tissue from UC patient with high-grade dysplasia or cancer (progressors); 3) high-grade dysplastic tissue from UC progressors and 4) normal colon. We identified protein differential expression associated with UC neoplastic progression. Proteins relating to mitochondria, oxidative activity, calcium-binding proteins were some of interesting classes of these proteins. Network analysis discovered that Sp1 and c-myc proteins may play roles in UC early and late stages of neoplastic progression, respectively. Two over-expressed proteins in the non-dysplastic tissue of UC progressors, CPS1 and S100P, were further confirmed by IHC analysis. Our study provides insight into the molecular events associated with UC neoplastic progression, which could be exploited for the development of protein biomarkers in fields of non-dysplastic mucosa that identify a patient’s risk for UC dysplasia. PMID:20098637

  19. Performance of statistical methods for analysing survival data in the presence of non-random compliance.

    PubMed

    Odondi, Lang'o; McNamee, Roseanne

    2010-12-20

    Noncompliance often complicates estimation of treatment efficacy from randomized trials. Under random noncompliance, per protocol analyses or even simple regression adjustments for noncompliance, could be adequate for causal inference, but special methods are needed when noncompliance is related to risk. For survival data, Robins and Tsiatis introduced the semi-parametric structural Causal Accelerated Life Model (CALM) which allows time-dependent departures from randomized treatment in either arm and relates each observed event time to a potential event time that would have been observed if the control treatment had been given throughout the trial. Alternatively, Loeys and Goetghebeur developed a structural Proportional Hazards (C-Prophet) model for when there is all-or-nothing noncompliance in the treatment arm only. Whitebiet al. proposed a 'complier average causal effect' method for Proportional Hazards estimation which allows time-dependent departures from randomized treatment in the active arm. A time-invariant version of this estimator (CHARM) consists of a simple adjustment to the Intention-to-Treat hazard ratio estimate. We used simulation studies mimicking a randomized controlled trial of active treatment versus control with censored time-to-event data, and under both random and non-random time-dependent noncompliance, to evaluate performance of these methods in terms of 95 per cent confidence interval coverage, bias and root mean square errors (RMSE). All methods performed well in terms of bias, even the C-Prophet used after treating time-varying compliance as all-or-nothing. Coverage of the latter method, as implemented in Stata, was too low. The CALM method performed best in terms of bias and coverage but had the largest RMSE. PMID:20963732

  20. Non-random correlation structures and dimensionality reduction in multivariate climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vejmelka, Martin; Pokorná, Lucie; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Jajcay, Nikola; Paluš, Milan

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that the global climate is a complex phenomenon with dynamics driven by the interaction of a multitude of identifiable but intertwined subsystems. The identification, at some level, of these subsystems is an important step towards understanding climate dynamics. We present a method to determine the number of principal components representing non-random correlation structures in climate data, or components that cannot be generated by a surrogate model of independent stochastic processes replicating the auto-correlation structure of each time series. The purpose of the method is to automatically reduce the dimensionality of large climate datasets into spatially localised components suitable for further interpretation or, for example, for use as nodes in a complex network analysis of large-scale climate dynamics. We apply the method to two 2.5° resolution NCEP/NCAR reanalysis global datasets of monthly means: the sea level pressure (SLP) and the surface air temperature (SAT), and extract 60 components explaining 87 % variance and 68 components explaining 72 % variance, respectively. The obtained components are in agreement with previous results in that they recover many well-known climate modes previously identified using other approaches including regionally constrained principal component analysis. Selected SLP components are discussed in more detail with respect to their correlation with important climate indices and their relationship to other SLP and SAT components. Finally, we consider a subset of the obtained components that have not yet been explicitly identified by other authors but seem plausible in the context of regional climate observations discussed in literature.

  1. Intrauterine synechiae after myomectomy; laparotomy versus laparoscopy: Non-randomized interventional trial

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Zahra; Hafizi, Leili; Hosseini, Rayhaneh; Javaheri, Atiyeh; Rastad, Hathis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leiomyomata is the most frequent gynecological neoplasm. One of the major complications of myomectomy is intrauterine adhesion (synechiae). Objective: To evaluate and compare the rate and severity of synechiae formation after myomectomy by laparotomy and laparoscopy. Materials and Methods: In this non-randomized interventional trial, hysteroscopy was performed in all married fertile women who had undergone myomectomy (type 3-6 interamural and subserosal fibroids) via laparotomy and laparoscopy in Tehran’s Arash Hospital from 2010 to 2013. Three months after the operation, the occurrence rate and severity of intrauterine synechiae, and its relationship with type, number and location of myomas were investigated and compared in both groups. Results: Forty patients (19 laparoscopy and 21 laparotomy cases) were studied. Both groups were similar regarding the size, type (subserosal or intramural), number and location of myoma. The occurrence rate of synechiae in the laparoscopy and laparotomy group was 21% and 19%, respectively; showing no significant difference (p=0.99). Among all patients, no significant relationship was found between the endometrial opening (p=0.92), location (p=0.14) and type of myoma (p=0.08) with the occurrence rate of synechiae. However, a significant relationship was observed between myoma’s size (p=0.01) and the location of the largest myoma with the occurrence of synechiae (p=0.02). Conclusion: With favorable suturing methods, the outcome of intrauterine synechiae formation after myomectomy, either performed by laparotomy or laparoscopy, is similar. In all cases of myomectomy in reproductive-aged women, postoperative hysteroscopy is highly recommended to better screen intrauterine synechiae. PMID:26000007

  2. Non-random fragmentation patterns in circulating cell-free DNA reflect epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of cell-free circulating DNA fragments, also known as a "liquid biopsy" of the patient's plasma, is an important source for the discovery and subsequent non-invasive monitoring of cancer and other pathological conditions. Although the nucleosome-guided fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have not yet been studied in detail, non-random representation of cfDNA sequencies may reflect chromatin features in the tissue of origin at gene-regulation level. Results In this study, we investigated the association between epigenetic landscapes of human tissues evident in the patterns of cfDNA in plasma by deep sequencing of human cfDNA samples. We have demonstrated that baseline characteristics of cfDNA fragmentation pattern are in concordance with the ones corresponding to cell lines-derived. To identify the loci differentially represented in cfDNA fragment, we mapped the transcription start sites within the sequenced cfDNA fragments and tested for association of these genomic coordinates with the relative strength and the patterns of gene expressions. Preselected sets of house-keeping and tissue specific genes were used as models for actively expressed and silenced genes. Developed measure of gene regulation was able to differentiate these two sets based on sequencing coverage near gene transcription start site. Conclusion Experimental outcomes suggest that cfDNA retains characteristics previously noted in genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure, in particular, in MNase-seq assays. Thus far the analysis of the DNA fragmentation pattern may aid further developing of cfDNA based biomarkers for a variety of human conditions. PMID:26693644

  3. Cortical atrophy patterns in multiple sclerosis are non-random and clinically relevant.

    PubMed

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Daams, Marita; Tijms, Betty M; Wink, Alle Meije; Balk, Lisanne J; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Pouwels, Petra J W

    2016-01-01

    of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral sensorimotor cortex and bilateral insula), and global cortical thickness. The final model predicting average cognition (adjusted R(2) = 0.469; P < 0.001) consisted of age, the loadings of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral temporal pole), overall white matter lesion load and normal-appearing white matter integrity. Although white matter pathology measures were part of the final clinical regression models, they explained limited incremental variance (to a maximum of 4%). Several cortical atrophy patterns relevant for multiple sclerosis were found. This suggests that cortical atrophy in multiple sclerosis occurs largely in a non-random manner and develops (at least partly) according to distinct anatomical patterns. In addition, these cortical atrophy patterns showed stronger associations with clinical (especially cognitive) dysfunction than global cortical atrophy.

  4. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non-randomness

  5. Gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty: neoplastic causes and endocrine considerations.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Matthew D; Zage, Peter E; Waguespack, Steven G

    2011-01-01

    Premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis manifests as gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. The mechanisms behind HPG activation are complex and a clear etiology for early activation is often not elucidated. Though collectively uncommon, the neoplastic and developmental causes of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty are very important to consider, as a delay in diagnosis may lead to adverse patient outcomes. The intent of the current paper is to review the neoplastic and developmental causes of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. We discuss the common CNS lesions and human chorionic gonadotropin-secreting tumors that cause sexual precocity, review the relationship between therapeutic radiation and gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty, and finally, provide an overview of the therapies available for height preservation in this unique patient population.

  6. A rare neoplastic growth on the ear lobe.

    PubMed

    Rovere, R K; Hilgert, S F; da Costa, P Camara; de Lima, A S

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of an 83-year-old previously healthy female patient presenting with a swiftly evolving erythematous violaceous, infiltrative, ulcerated onion like mass with hyperkeratotic surface on the left ear lobe. The lesion was excised and resulted as an atypical fibroxanthoma, an extremely rare neoplastic growth, being a superficial variant of pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma. A brief review of dia-gnosis, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25312715

  7. Micro-Raman spectroscopy Detects Individual Neoplastic and Normal Hematopoietic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D; Zwerdling, T; Lane, S M; Ihara, K; Huser, T

    2005-01-18

    Current methods for identifying neoplastic cells and discerning them from their normal counterparts are often non-specific, slow, biologically perturbing, or a combination, thereof. Here, we show that single-cell micro-Raman spectroscopy averts these shortcomings and can be used to discriminate between unfixed normal human lymphocytes and transformed Jurkat and Raji lymphocyte cell lines based on their biomolecular Raman signatures. We demonstrate that single-cell Raman spectra provide a highly reproducible biomolecular fingerprint of each cell type. Characteristic peaks, mostly due to different DNA and protein concentrations, allow for discerning normal lymphocytes from transformed lymphocytes with high confidence (p << 0.05). Spectra are also compared and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to demonstrate that normal and transformed cells form distinct clusters that can be defined using just two principal components. The method is shown to have a sensitivity of 98.3% for cancer detection, with 97.2% of the cells being correctly classified as belonging to the normal or transformed type. These results demonstrate the potential application of confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy as a clinical tool for single cell cancer detection based on intrinsic biomolecular signatures, therefore eliminating the need for exogenous fluorescent labeling.

  8. Effect of extracellular calcium on regucalcin expression and cell viability in neoplastic and non-neoplastic human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Cátia V; Rodrigues, Daniel B; Socorro, Sílvia; Maia, Cláudio J

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) and its receptor, the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR), play an important role in prostate physiology, and it has been shown that the deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis and the overexpression of CaSR are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). Regucalcin (RGN), a Ca2+-binding protein that plays a relevant role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, was identified as an under-expressed protein in human PCa. Moreover, RGN was associated with suppression of cell proliferation, suggesting that the loss of RGN may favor development and progression of PCa. This work aims to unveil the role of Ca2+o on RGN expression and viability of non-neoplastic (PNT1A) and neoplastic (LNCaP) prostate cell lines. It was demonstrated that Ca2+o up-regulates RGN expression in both cell lines, but important differences were found between cells for dose- and time-responses to Ca2+o treatment. It was also shown that high [Ca2+]o triggers different effects on cell proliferation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic PCa cells, which seems to be related with RGN expression levels. This suggests the involvement of RGN in the regulation of cell proliferation in response to Ca2+o treatment. Also, the effect of Ca2+o on CaSR expression seems to be dependent of RGN expression, which is strengthened by the fact that RGN-knockdown in PNT1A cells increases the CaSR expression, whereas transgenic rats overexpressing RGN exhibit low levels of CaSR. Overall, our results highlighted the importance of RGN as a regulatory protein in Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways and its deregulation of RGN expression by Ca2+o may contribute for onset and progression of PCa.

  9. Seminal plasma induces the expression of IL-1α in normal and neoplastic cervical cells via EP2/EGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a chronic inflammatory disease of multifactorial etiology usually presenting in sexually active women. Exposure of neoplastic cervical epithelial cells to seminal plasma (SP) has been shown to promote the growth of cancer cells in vitro and tumors in vivo by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators including pro-inflammatory cytokines. IL-1α is a pleotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine induced in several human cancers and has been associated with virulent tumor phenotype and poorer prognosis. Here we investigated the expression of IL-1α in cervical cancer, the role of SP in the regulation of IL-1α in neoplastic cervical epithelial cells and the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. Methods and results Real-time quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the elevated expression of IL-1α mRNA in cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma tissue explants, compared with normal cervix. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-1α was localized to the neoplastically transformed squamous, columnar and glandular epithelium in all cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinomas explants studied. We found that SP induced the expression of IL-α in both normal and neoplastic cervical tissue explants. Employing HeLa (adenocarcinoma) cell line as a model system we identified PGE2 and EGF as possible ligands responsible for SP-mediated induction of IL-1α in these neoplastic cells. In addition, we showed that SP activates EP2/EGFR/PI3kinase-Akt signaling to induce IL-1α mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in normal cervical tissue explants the induction of IL-1α by SP is via the activation of EP2/EGFR/PI3 kinase-Akt signaling. Conclusion SP-mediated induction of IL-1α in normal and neoplastic cervical epithelial cells suggests that SP may promote cervical inflammation as well as progression of cervical cancer in sexually active women. PMID:25237386

  10. Methodological issues in observational studies and non-randomized controlled trials in oncology in the era of big data.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-04-01

    Non-randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and database studies are appealing study designs when there are urgent needs for safety data, outcomes of interest are rare, generalizability is a matter of concern, or randomization is not feasible. This paper reviews four typical case studies from methodological viewpoints and clarifies how to minimize bias in observational studies in oncology. In summary, researchers planning observational studies should be cautious of selection of appropriate databases, validity of algorithms for identifying outcomes, comparison with incident users or self-control, rigorous collection of information on potential confounders and reporting details of subject selection. Further, a careful study protocol and statistical analysis plan are also necessary.

  11. LCM assisted biomarker discovery from archival neoplastic gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Meitner, Patricia A; Resnick, Murray B

    2011-01-01

    Expression array analysis of epithelial mRNA to identify biomarkers of premalignant and malignant conditions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an area of intense study. Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues documenting these changes are readily available and should be a valuable resource for retrospective analysis. Laser capture microdissection of defined areas of epithelial cells at different stages of neoplastic progression is described together with methods for prequalification of RNA in FFPE tissue blocks selected for analysis. Paradise reagents specifically designed for isolation and amplification of RNA from FFPE archival tissue specimens are used to prepare probes for the human X3P microarray from Affymetrix.

  12. De-misty-fying the mesentery: an algorithmic approach to neoplastic and non-neoplastic mesenteric abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Taffel, Myles T; Khati, Nadia J; Hai, Nabila; Yaghmai, Vahid; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Mesenteric abnormalities are often incidentally discovered on cross-sectional imaging performed during daily clinical practice. Findings can range from the vague "misty mesentery" to solid masses, and the possible etiologic causes encompass a wide spectrum of underlying pathologies including infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic processes. Unfortunately, the clinical and imaging findings are often non-specific and may overlap. This article discusses the various diseases that result in mesenteric abnormalities. It provides a framework to non-invasively differentiate these entities, when possible. PMID:24633598

  13. Clonality assessment of adenomatoid tumor supports its neoplastic nature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huiting; Wang, Jigang; Wang, Shuyang; Wang, Diyi; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhu, Hongguang

    2016-02-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is a relatively rare disease that predominantly involves male and female internal genital tracts. Although its clinical and pathologic features are well characterized, there is still controversy regarding its nature as a true neoplasm or a variant of mesothelial hyperplasia of a reactive nature. We sought to resolve this debate by investigating the clonality of uterine adenomatoid tumor from 13 female cases. The mesothelial cells and surrounding normal myometrium were precisely harvested using laser capture microdissection, and genomic DNA was extracted for clonal analysis by assessing the patterns of X-chromosome inactivation. Fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification of a highly polymorphic short tandem repeat of the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) gene with and without methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII digestion was performed on DNA extracted from mesothelial cells, using normal myometrium and male blood sample as controls. Of the 13 cases successfully amplified, all 10 informative cases showed concordant nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation pattern consistent with monoclonality. In comparison, surrounding normal myometrium showed a polyclonal pattern of X-chromosome inactivation, and male blood sample failed to be amplified after HpaII treatment. Our results demonstrate that adenomatoid tumor is a monoclonal disease favoring a neoplastic process. This neoplastic rather than reactive nature probably accounts for its frequently observed infiltrative growth pattern and the occurrence of diffuse adenomatoid tumor, especially when host immunity is compromised. Additional studies with larger sample sizes will be needed to conclusively prove our conclusion. PMID:26772404

  14. Identification of non-random sequence properties in groups of signature peptides obtained in random sequence peptide microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B

    2016-05-01

    Immunosignaturing is an emerging experimental technique that uses random sequence peptide microarrays to detect antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a particular disease. Two important questions regarding immunosignaturing are "Do microarray peptides that exhibit a strong affinity to a given type of antibodies share common sequence properties?" and "If so, what are those properties?" In this work, three statistical tests designed to detect non-random patterns in the amino acid makeup of a group of microarray peptides are presented. One test detects patterns of significantly biased amino acid usage, whereas the other two detect patterns of significant bias in the biochemical properties. These tests do not require a large number of peptides per group. The tests were applied to analyze 19 groups of peptides identified in immunosignaturing experiments as being specific for antibodies produced in response to various types of cancer and other diseases. The positional distribution of the biochemical properties of the amino acids in these 19 peptide groups was also studied. Remarkably, despite the random nature of the sequence libraries used to design the microarrays, a unique group-specific non-random pattern was identified in the majority of the peptide groups studied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 318-329, 2016. PMID:27037995

  15. Patterns of microRNA Expression in Non-Human Primate Cells Correlate with Neoplastic Development In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Teferedegne, Belete; Murata, Haruhiko; Quiñones, Mariam; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They play a critical role in developmental and physiological processes and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including cancer. To identify miRNA signatures associated with different stages of neoplastic development, we examined the expression profile of 776 primate miRNAs in VERO cells (a neoplastically transformed cell line being used for the manufacture of viral vaccines), progenitor primary African green monkey kidney (pAGMK) cells, and VERO cell derivatives: spontaneously immortalized, non-tumorigenic, low-passage VERO cells (10-87 LP); tumorigenic, high-passage VERO cells (10-87 HP); and a cell line (10-87 T) derived from a 10-87 HP cell tumor xenograft in athymic nude mice. When compared with pAGMK cells, the majority of miRNAs were expressed at lower levels in 10-87 LP, 10-87 HP, and 10-87 T cells. We identified 10 up-regulated miRNAs whose level of expression correlated with VERO cell evolution from a non-tumorigenic phenotype to a tumorigenic phenotype. The overexpression of miR-376a and the polycistronic cluster of miR-376a, miR-376b and miR-376c conferred phenotypic changes to the non-tumorigenic 10-87 LP cells that mimic the tumorigenic 10-87 HP cells. Thirty percent of miRNAs that were components of the identified miRNAs in our spontaneously transformed AGMK cell model are also dysregulated in a variety of human tumors. These results may prove to be relevant to the biology of neoplastic development. In addition, one or more of these miRNAs could be biomarkers for the expression of a tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:21203544

  16. INSL-3 is expressed in human hyperplastic and neoplastic thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Kehlen, Astrid; Hinze, Raoul; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Weber, Ekkehard; Fischer, Bernd; Dralle, Henning; Klonisch, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    The insulin-like hormone INSL-3, also named relaxin-like factor (RLF) or Leydig-derived insulin-like peptide (LEY-IL), is expressed in various reproductive tissues and is regarded a marker of differentiation in human testicular Leydig cells. Recently, we have identified differential expression of human INSL-3 in neoplastic Leydig cells and mammary epithelial cells suggesting an involvement of INSL-3 in tumor biology. Here we have investigated the expression of INSL-3 in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and in the human thyroid gland which has been shown to express transcripts for the G protein coupled INSL-3 receptor LGR8. When we determined the expression of INSL-3 in eight human thyroid carcinoma cell lines, a novel INSL-3 splice variant containing a 95 bp out-of-frame insertion at the beginning of exon II of the INSL-3 gene was discovered. Treatment of the human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C with diethylstilbestrol (DES) caused a significant dose-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of INSL-3 and a marked up-regulation of LGR8. Employing in situ hybridization to detect INSL-3 transcripts and specific rabbit antisera against the INSL-3 proteins, both INSL-3 isoforms were detected in patients with Graves' disease (n=10), follicular carcinomas (FTC; n=12), papillary carcinomas (PTC; n=9) and undifferentiated anaplastic carcinomas (UTC; n=15). By contrast, thyrocytes of all 15 benign goiter tissues studied were devoid of both INSL-3 isoforms, mRNA and protein. Our data indicate that INSL-3 hormone is up-regulated in hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes suggesting that the INSL-3 isoforms may serve as additional markers for hyperplastic and neoplastic human thyrocytes. In the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505C, the regulation of both INSL-3 and LGR8 by estrogen may be the first indication of a novel hormonally responsive, auto-/paracrine INSL-3 LGR8 ligand receptor system active in human thyroid carcinoma cells.

  17. Risk factors for neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Elizabeth F; Ang, Yeng S

    2011-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) confers a significant increased risk for development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), with the pathogenesis appearing to progress through a “metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma” (MDC) sequence. Many of the genetic insults driving this MDC sequence have recently been characterized, providing targets for candidate biomarkers with potential clinical utility to stratify risk in individual patients. Many clinical risk factors have been investigated, and associations with a variety of genetic, specific gastrointestinal and other modifiable factors have been proposed in the literature. This review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in neoplastic progression of BE to EAC and critically appraises the relative roles and contributions of these putative risk factors from the published evidence currently available. PMID:21990948

  18. Adverse effects of thalidomide administration in patients with neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, Vagelis

    2004-10-01

    Thalidomide, a glutamic acid derivative, was withdrawn from clinical use in 1962 due to its severe teratogenic effects. Its recent reinstitution in clinical practice was related to its benefits in leprosy and multiple myeloma. Moreover, the antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory properties of thalidomide have led to its evaluation in several malignant diseases, including myelofibrosis, renal cell cancer, prostate cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma. However, thalidomide use is associated with several side effects: somnolence and constipation are the most common, while deep vein thrombosis and peripheral neuropathy are the most serious. A combination of thalidomide with steroids or chemotherapy is being evaluated in several phase 2 studies. While it is not yet clear whether these combinations will enhance efficacy, they appear to increase the toxicity of thalidomide, and thalidomide analogs are being developed to minimize this toxicity. Ongoing studies will clarify the potential advantages of these agents in the treatment of neoplastic diseases.

  19. [Clinical manifestations of hematological non-neoplastic diseases in Dentistry].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2012-06-01

    Systemic disease can cause clinical manifestations in the oral and maxillofacial area, which is important to recognize because it could be the first symptom of an undiagnosed illness. There are different oral signs that could suggest the clinician a blood disorder, such as pallor, petechiae, ecchymosis, ulcerations, gingival hypertrophy or spontaneous gingival bleeding. In addition, blood disorders will determine the dental management of these patients and the protocol for limiting possible complications that may arise due to the treatment itself. This paper reviews the oral manifestations and dental management of non-neoplastic alterations of red cells, white cells and hemostasis, with emphasis on two-way relationship that must exist between the dentist and the patient's hematologist for making a treatment plan.

  20. The Origin of Aging: Imperfectness-Driven Non-Random Damage Defines the Aging Process and Control of Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties preclude ideal biomolecules and perfect biological functions. This inherent imperfectness leads to the generation of damage by every biological process, at all levels, from small molecules to cells. The damage is too numerous to be repaired, is partially invisible to natural selection and manifests as aging. I propose that it is the inherent imperfectness of biological systems that is the true root of the aging process. As each biomolecule generates specific forms of damage, the cumulative damage is largely non-random and is indirectly encoded in the genome. I consider this concept in light of other proposed theories of aging and integrate these disparate ideas into a single model. I also discuss the evolutionary significance of damage accumulation and strategies for reducing damage. Finally, I suggest ways to test this integrated model of aging. PMID:23769208

  1. Modifications of glycosphingolipid profile and synthesis in normal rat fibroblasts and in syngeneic neoplastic cells at different subculture stages.

    PubMed

    Colombo, I; Sottocornola, E; Moretti, S; Meloni, M A; Pippia, P; Berra, B

    2000-05-31

    Glycosphingolipids are plasma membrane macromolecules involved in diversified recognition functions on the cell surface resulting in modulation of cell adhesion and differentiation. As the in vitro cellular system of the neoplastic cell line SGS/4A and syngeneic normal fibroblasts (FG) represents a useful tool for studies on molecular mechanisms regulating cell adhesion, neoplastic transformation and cellular ageing, we studied the changes of glycosphingolipid and of the enzymes involved in their metabolism in both cultured cells at different subculture stages. The FG subculture progression induces a drastic decrease of total glycosphingolipid content with consistent alterations in the molecular composition. In particular, a significant decrease of GM(3), a slight increase of GD(1a), the disappearance of 'b'-series gangliosides and the drastic reduction of triosylceramides were observed. On the contrary, the increasing number of SGS/4A subcultures, characterized by a specific and different glycosphingolipid composition as compared with FG cells, does not cause modifications. Although glycosyltransferase activity levels quite well parallel the glycosphingolipid patterns and can account for the noted variations, the mRNA expression analysis of two glycosyltransferases suggests that the in vitro cell ageing of normal rat fibroblasts causes drastic changes in the glycosphingolipid profile through the regulation, at either the transcriptional or post-translational level, of some biosynthetic enzymes.

  2. LDOC1 silenced by cigarette exposure and involved in oral neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Pan, Kao-Lu; Tang, Ya-Chu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Shen, Mei-Ya; Cheng, Ying-Min; Huang, Tze-Ta; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-09-22

    Previously, we identified global epigenetic aberrations in smoking-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We hypothesized that cigarette exposure triggers OSCC through alteration of the methylome of oral cells. Here we report that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) significantly changes the genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine content and nuclear accumulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3A in human untransformed oral cells. By using integrated analysis of cDNA and methylation arrays of the smoking-associated dysplastic oral cell line and OSCC tumors, respectively, we identified four epigenetic targets--UCHL1, GPX3, LXN, and LDOC1--which may be silenced by cigarette. Results of quantitative methylation-specific PCR showed that among these four genes, LDOC1 promoter was the most sensitive to CSC. LDOC1 promoter hypermethylation and gene silencing followed 3 weeks of CSC treatment. LDOC1 knockdown led to a proliferative response and acquired clonogenicity of untransformed oral cells. Immunohistochemistry showed that LDOC1 was downregulated in 53.3% (8/15) and 57.1% (20/35) of premalignant oral tissues and early stage OSCCs, respectively, whereas 76.5% (13/17) of normal oral tissues showed high LDOC1 expression. Furthermore, the microarray data showed that LDOC1 expression had decreased in the lung tissues of current smokers compared with that in those of never smokers and had significantly decreased in the lung tumors of smokers compared with that in normal lung tissues. Our data suggest that CSC-induced promoter methylation may contribute to LDOC1 downregulation, thereby conferring oncogenic features to oral cells. These findings also imply a tumor suppressor role of LDOC1 in smoking-related malignancies such as OSCC and lung cancer. PMID:26317789

  3. [Hyperplastic polyp with neoplastic transformation in a patient with atrophic gastritis and multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Moura, E G H; Domingos, T A; Alvarado, H; Iriya, K; Kishi, H S; Martins, B C; Moura, E T H; P, P Sakai

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplastic gastric polyps are often found at GI endoscopy and are not considered premalignant lesions, although some cases of malignancy have been reported. Neuroendocrine tumors, conversely, are rare and account for approximately 1% to 2% of gastric polyps. Both hyperplastic gastric polyps and neuroendocrine tumors are related to gastric atrophy. The case of a hyperplastic polyp with multifocal areas of adenocarcinoma within the polyp associated to multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors is reported.

  4. Modeling dynamic reciprocity: Engineering three-dimensional culture models of breast architecture, function, and neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand why cancer develops as well as predict the outcome of pharmacological treatments, we need to model the structure and function of organs in culture so that our experimental manipulations occur under physiological contexts. This review traces the history of the development of a prototypic example, the three-dimensional (3D) model of the mammary gland acinus. We briefly describe the considerable information available on both normal mammary gland function and breast cancer generated by the current model and present future challenges that will require an increase in its complexity. We propose the need for engineered tissues that faithfully recapitulate their native structures to allow a greater understanding of tissue function, dysfunction, and potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:15963732

  5. Hedgehog signaling in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Adriana P; Lewis, Michael T

    2010-09-01

    The hedgehog signal transduction network is a critical regulator of metazoan development. Inappropriate activation of this network is implicated in several different cancers, including breast. Genetic evidence in mice as well as molecular biological studies in human cells clearly indicate that activated signaling can lead to mammary hyperplasia and, in some cases, tumor formation. However, the exact role(s) activated hedgehog signaling plays in the development or progression of breast cancer also remain unclear. In this review, we have discussed recent data regarding the mechanism(s) by which the hedgehog network may signal in the mammary gland, as well as the data implicating activated signaling as a contributing factor to breast cancer development. Finally, we provide a brief update on the available hedgehog signaling inhibitors with respect to ongoing clinical trials, some of which will include locally advanced or metastatic breast cancers. Given the growing intensity with which the hedgehog signaling network is being studied in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland, a more complete understanding of this network should allow more effective targeting of its activities in breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  6. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  7. Uroplakin Gene Expression by Normal and Neoplastic Human Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, E. Dawn; Smith, Barbara A.; Hall, Geoffrey D.; Harnden, Patricia; Roberts, Paul; Selby, Peter J.; Trejdosiewicz, Ludwik K.; Southgate, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  8. Uroplakin gene expression by normal and neoplastic human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Lobban, E D; Smith, B A; Hall, G D; Harnden, P; Roberts, P; Selby, P J; Trejdosiewicz, L K; Southgate, J

    1998-12-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  9. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins of human neoplastic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Gao, Y H; Ohara-Nemoto, Y; Kataoka, H; Satoh, M

    1997-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are crucial factors of osteogenesis. We investigated the expressions of BMP subtypes in human salivary adenocarcinoma cell line (HSG-S8), tongue squamous cell (HSC-4) and gingival squamous cell (Ca9-22) carcinoma cell lines, gastric poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cell (MNK45) and signet ring cell (KATOIII) carcinoma cell lines, rectal adenocarcinoma (RCM-1, RCM-2, and RCM-3), and thyroid (8505C) and bladder (T24) carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RT-PCR disclosed that BMP-1 was expressed in all cell lines examined, and BMP-2 was amplified in almost all cells except MKN45. Two squamous cell carcinomas, HSC-4 and Ca9-22, and KATOIII expressed only BMP-1 and BMP-2. MKN45 did not express BMP-2, but expressed BMP-7 and weakly BMP-4 and BMP-5. In addition to the expression BMP-7, and HSG-S8 expressed BMP-6. These findings indicated that the neoplastic epithelial cells possessed a rather great potency to express BMP mRNAs. On the other hand, among these carcinoma cells, HSG-S8 solely induced bone in nude mouse tumors, and HSC-4 and KATOIII contained many calcified masses in tumors while the rest did not induce either. PMID:9247707

  10. Randomly and Non-Randomly Missing Renal Function Data in the Strong Heart Study: A Comparison of Imputation Methods.

    PubMed

    Shara, Nawar; Yassin, Sayf A; Valaitis, Eduardas; Wang, Hong; Howard, Barbara V; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Umans, Jason G

    2015-01-01

    Kidney and cardiovascular disease are widespread among populations with high prevalence of diabetes, such as American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Studying these conditions simultaneously in longitudinal studies is challenging, because the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases result in missing data, and these data are likely not missing at random. When such data are merely excluded, study findings may be compromised. In this article, a subset of 2264 participants with complete renal function data from Strong Heart Exams 1 (1989-1991), 2 (1993-1995), and 3 (1998-1999) was used to examine the performance of five methods used to impute missing data: listwise deletion, mean of serial measures, adjacent value, multiple imputation, and pattern-mixture. Three missing at random models and one non-missing at random model were used to compare the performance of the imputation techniques on randomly and non-randomly missing data. The pattern-mixture method was found to perform best for imputing renal function data that were not missing at random. Determining whether data are missing at random or not can help in choosing the imputation method that will provide the most accurate results.

  11. Does balneotherapy with low radon concentration in water influence the endocrine system? A controlled non-randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Berhés, István; Kovács, Tibor; Kávási, Norbert; Somlai, János; Bender, Tamás

    2009-08-01

    Radon bath is a well-established modality of balneotherapy for the management of degenerative musculoskeletal disorders. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether baths of relatively low (80 Bq/l) radon concentration have any influence on the functioning of the endocrine system. In the study, a non-randomized pilot study, 27 patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders received 30-min radon baths (of 31-32 degrees C temperature and 80 Bq/l average radon concentration) daily, for 15 days. Twenty-five patients with matching pathologies were subjected to balneotherapy according to the same protocol, using thermal water with negligible radon content (6 Bq/l). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and dehydroepiandrosterone levels were measured before and after a balneotherapy course of 15 sessions. Comparison of the accumulated data using the Wilcoxon test did not reveal any significant difference between pre- and post-treatment values or between the two patient groups. It is noted that while the beneficial effects of balneotherapy with radon-containing water on degenerative disorders is widely known, only few data have been published in the literature on its effect on endocrine functions. The present study failed to demonstrate any substantial effect of thermal water with relatively low radon content on the functioning of the endocrine system.

  12. A polymerase chain reaction assay for non-random X chromosome inactivation identifies monoclonal endometrial cancers and precancers.

    PubMed

    Mutter, G L; Chaponot, M L; Fletcher, J A

    1995-02-01

    We hypothesize that endometrial carcinoma and their precursors share a monoclonal growth pattern and tested this thesis with archival paraffin-embedded tissues using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay for non-random X chromosome inactivation. Of the 10 well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma cases with heterozygous markers (HUMARA, X-linked androgen receptor gene), 9 had skewed X inactivation consistent with a monoclonal process, and one contained a structurally altered HUMARA gene. X inactivation skewing similar to that of the tumor was seen in matched control polyclonal tissues of 4 (of 9) cases, caused by the small number of endometrial stem cells at the time of embryonic X inactivation. When the polymerase chain reaction assay was applied to four potential endometrial precancers (atypical endometrial hyperplasia) and matched control tissues, two were inconclusive, and two were found to be monoclonal. We conclude that 1) it is essential to include polyclonal control tissues in X inactivation analyses to determine whether skewing is a specific indicator of monoclonality; and 2) endometrial adenocarcinomas and some putative precancers, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, are monoclonal.

  13. Non-random cation distribution in hexagonal Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, S. K.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Sudarsan, V.

    2010-05-01

    Based on powder X-ray diffraction and 31P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) investigations of mixed phosphate Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4, prepared by co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 900 °C for 24 h, it is shown that Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4 phase crystallizes in hexagonal form with lattice parameter a=0.491(2) and c=1.106(4) nm. This hexagonal phase of Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4 is similar to that of pure GaPO 4. The 31P MAS NMR spectrum of the mixed phosphate sample consists of five peaks with systematic variation of their chemical shift values and is arising due to existence of P structural units having varying number of the Al 3+/Ga 3+ cations as the next nearest neighbors in the solid solution. Based on the intensity analysis of the component NMR spectra of Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4, it is inferred that the distribution of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ cations is non-random for the hexagonal Al 0.5Ga 0.5PO 4 sample although XRD patterns showed a well-defined solid solution formation.

  14. Detecting neoplastic development in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Robles, Francisco; Chen, Xiaoxin; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is an optical technique that recovers depth-resolved spectroscopic information about scatterers. The current fLCI system utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source, a 4-f interferometer, and an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire spectra from 256 adjacent spatial points. This configuration permits the acquisition of ultrahigh depth resolution Fourier domain OCT images without the need for any beam scanning. fLCI has traditionally obtained depth-resolved spectral information by performing a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) on the detected spectra, similar to the processing techniques of spectroscopic OCT. We now employ a dual Gaussian window processing method which simultaneously obtains high spectral and temporal resolution, thus avoiding the resolution trade-off normally associated with the STFT. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain structural information about the probed scatterers. We now verify fLCI's ability to distinguish between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissue using the hamster cheek pouch model. Thirty hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. Our results will further establish fLCI as an effective method for distinguishing between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissues.

  15. Ultrasonography of small intestinal inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasonography, which has become a mainstay of diagnosing intestinal diseases in dogs and cats, is often one of the first diagnostic tools used to differentiate inflammatory from neoplastic infiltration of the small intestine. Although overlap in the sonographic appearances of inflammatory and neoplastic infiltration make a definitive diagnosis difficult, awareness of features of both diseases is important for the accurate interpretation of the sonographic findings. Full-thickness intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for differentiating inflammatory from neoplastic disease of the small intestine.

  16. Methylation of Cervical Neoplastic Cells Infected With Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Eun Young; Lee, Keun Ho; Hur, Soo Young; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee Kyung; Kang, Chung; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the role of methylation of adenylate cyclase activating peptide 1 (ADCYAP1), paired box gene 1 (PAX1), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), and T-lymphocyte maturation–associated protein (MAL) during carcinogenesis. Methods We evaluated the methylation of 4 genes by using the cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, and C33A) and cervical neoplastic cells from 56 subjects with human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)–infected low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 50 subjects with HPV16-infected high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and 24 subjects with HPV16-infected invasive cervical cancer who attended Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Methylation of the 4 genes was evaluated using quantitative bisulfate pyrosequencing. Results The ADCYAP1 promoter was hypermethylated in the 4 cell lines (CaSki, 97.40 ± 1.39; SiHa, 82.04 ± 17.02; HeLa, 96.14 ± 2.08; and C33A, 78 ± 10.18). PAX1 and CADM1 were hypermethylated in the HPV16/18-infected cell lines CaSki (PAX1, 91.18 ± 9.91; CADM1, 93.5 ± 7.33), SiHa (PAX1, 96.14 ± 2.08; CADM1, 93.15 ± 8.81), and HeLa (PAX1, 82.04 ± 17.02; CADM1, 92.43 ± 9.95). MAL was hypermethylated in the CaSki cell line (96.04 ± 4.74). Among human cervical neoplastic cells, the methylation indices of ADCYAP1 were 7.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 7.0–8.6) in subjects with LSILs and 39.8 (95% CI, 29.0–54.7) in those with cervical cancer (P < 0.001); for PAX1, 7.2 (95% CI, 6.1–8.5) and 37.8 (95% CI, 27.1–52.7), respectively; for CADM1, 3.5 (95% CI, 3.0–4.0) and 17.7 (95% CI, 10.8–29.1), respectively; for MAL, 2.7 (95% CI, 2.5–3.0) and 13.0 (95% CI, 7.6–22.0), respectively (P < 0.001 for each). Immunohistochemical staining results were positive in the cytoplasm of subjects with low methylation of the 4 gene promoters; however, they were negative in the cytoplasm of those with hypermethylation of the 4 gene promoters. Conclusions The results of this

  17. Co-occurrence analyses show that non-random community structure is disrupted by fire in two groups of soil arthropods (Isopoda Oniscidea and Collembola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzalis, Monica; Luiselli, Luca; Bologna, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that natural catastrophes may destroy non-random community structure in natural assemblages of organisms. As a study system, we selected fire as the catastrophic event, and two groups of soil arthropods (Collembola and Isopoda Oniscidea) as target organisms. By co-occurrence analyses and Monte Carlo simulations of niche overlap analysis (C-score, with fixed-equiprobable model; RA2 and RA3 algorithms) we evaluated whether the community structure of these two groups were random/non-random at three unburnt sites and at three neighbour burnt sites that were devastated by a large-scale fire in summer 2000. Both taxa experienced a remarkable reduction in the number of species sampled in burnt versus unburnt sites, but the difference among sites was not statistically significant for Oniscidea. We determined that community structure was clearly non-random at the unburnt sites for both Collembola (according to RA3 algorithm) and Isopoda Oniscidea (according to co-occurrence analysis) and that, as predicted by theory, the catastrophic event did deeply alter the community structure by removing the non-random organization of the species interactions. We also observed a shift from segregation to aggregation/randomness in soil arthropods communities affected by fire, a pattern that was similar to that observed in natural communities of organisms perturbed by the introduction of alien species, thus indicating that this pattern may be generalizable when alteration of communities may occur.

  18. Issues Relating to Study Design and Risk of Bias When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews on the Effects of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Julian P. T.; Ramsay, Craig; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Shea, Beverley; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George

    2013-01-01

    Non-randomized studies may provide valuable evidence on the effects of interventions. They are the main source of evidence on the intended effects of some types of interventions and often provide the only evidence about the effects of interventions on long-term outcomes, rare events or adverse effects. Therefore, systematic reviews on the effects…

  19. Issues Relating to Confounding and Meta-analysis When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews on the Effects of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Simon G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding caused by selection bias is often a key difference between non-randomized studies (NRS) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions. Key methodological issues: In this third paper of the series, we consider issues relating to the inclusion of NRS in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions. We discuss…

  20. Survival following Ommaya reservoir placement for neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Marie; Rughani, Anand; Lin, Chih-Ta; Cushing, Deborah A; Florman, Jeffrey E; Wu, Julian K

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM) following Ommaya reservoir placement in order to determine whether any patient factors are associated with longer survival. NM is a devastating late manifestation of cancer, and given its dismal prognosis, identifying appropriate patients for Ommaya reservoir placement is difficult. The authors performed a retrospective review of 80 patients who underwent Ommaya reservoir placement at three medical centers from September 2001 through September 2012. The primary outcome was death. Differences in survival were assessed with Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. The Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression modeling were performed to identify factors associated with survival. The primary diagnoses were solid organ, hematologic, and primary central nervous system tumors in 53.8%, 41.3%, and 5%, respectively. The median overall survival was 72.5 days (95% confidence interval 36-122) with 30% expiring within 30 days and only 13.8% surviving more than 1 year. There were no differences in median overall survival between sites (p=0.37) despite differences in time from diagnosis of NM to Ommaya reservoir placement (p<0.001). Diagnosis of hematologic malignancy was inversely associated with death within 90 days (p=0.04; odds ratio 0.34), older age was associated with death within 90 days (p=0.05; odds ratio 1.5, per 10 year increase in age). The prognosis of NM remains poor despite the available treatment with intraventricular chemotherapy. There exists significant variability in treatment algorithms among medical centers and consideration of this variability is crucial when interpreting existing series of Ommaya reservoir use in the treatment of patients with NM.

  1. Behavioral approach with or without surgical intervention to the vulvar vestibulitis syndrome: a prospective randomized and non-randomized study.

    PubMed

    Weijmar Schultz, W C; Gianotten, W L; van der Meijden, W I; van de Wiel, H B; Blindeman, L; Chadha, S; Drogendijk, A C

    1996-09-01

    This article describes the outcome of a behavioral approach with or without preceding surgical intervention in 48 women with the vulvar vestibulitis syndrome. In the first part of the study, 14 women with the vulvar vestibulitis syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two treatment programs: either a behavioral approach or a behavioral approach preceded by surgery. In the second part of the study, 34 women and their partners were given a choice of treatment. Follow-up data were gathered a mean of 3 and 2 1/2 years after treatment, respectively. In the randomized patient population, the intervention had a positive effect on all of them: the complaints disappeared, diminished or did not change but formed less of a problem. The difference in outcome between the two different treatments, a behavioral approach with or without preceding surgery, was not statistically significant. In the second non-randomized part of the study, 28 out of the 34 women (82%) chose the behavioral approach without preceding surgery. The difference in outcome between the two treatments was not statistically significant. Two out of the 28 women who chose behavioral treatment without preceding surgery had to be referred for psychiatric consultation because of serious psycho-sexual problems. In one woman, psychiatric treatment was successful. Three other women, whose behavioral treatment failed, underwent additional surgery, which clearly helped them to overcome the deadlock in the behavioral approach. The behavioral approach should be the first choice of treatment for the vulvar vestibulitis syndrome. Surgical intervention should be considered as an additional form of treatment in some cases with the vulvar vestibulitis syndrome to facilitate breaking the vicious circle of irritation, pelvic floor muscle hypertonia and sexual maladaptive behavior.

  2. A school intervention for mental health literacy in adolescents: effects of a non-randomized cluster controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background “Mental health for everyone” is a school program for mental health literacy and prevention aimed at secondary schools (13–15 yrs). The main aim was to investigate whether mental health literacy, could be improved by a 3-days universal education programme by: a) improving naming of symptom profiles of mental disorder, b) reducing prejudiced beliefs, and c) improving knowledge about where to seek help for mental health problems. A secondary aim was to investigate whether adolescent sex and age influenced the above mentioned variables. A third aim was to investigate whether prejudiced beliefs influenced knowledge about available help. Method This non-randomized cluster controlled trial included 1070 adolescents (53.9% boys, M age14 yrs) from three schools in a Norwegian town. One school (n = 520) received the intervention, and two schools (n = 550) formed the control group. Pre-test and follow-up were three months apart. Linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations models were employed for analysis. Results Mental health literacy improved contingent on the intervention, and there was a shift towards suggesting primary health care as a place to seek help. Those with more prejudiced beleifs did not suggest places to seek help for mental health problems. Generally, girls and older adolescents recognized symptom profiles better and had lower levels of prejudiced beliefs. Conclusions A low cost general school program may improve mental health literacy in adolescents. Gender specific programs and attention to the age and maturity of the students should be considered when mental health literacy programmes are designed and tried out. Prejudice should be addressed before imparting information about mental health issues. PMID:24053381

  3. Cytochemically demonstrable B-glucuronidase activity in normal and neoplastic human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Machin, G A; Halper, J P; Knowles, D M

    1980-12-01

    Mononuclear cell suspensions were prepared from 40 normal peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue specimens and 42 neoplastic specimens obtained from patients with malignant lymphoma and lymphocytic leukemia. These suspensions were analyzed for la antigens, surface immunoglobulin (Slg), sheep erythrocyte (E) rosette formation and, in some instances, acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity. The results of these studies were correlated with the expression of cytochemically demonstrable BG activity. The percentage of BG+ lymphocytes was found to be comparable, within 10%, to the percentage of E+ (T) cells in the majority of normal, non-neoplastic peripheral blood, tonsil, spleen, and lymph node specimens examined. Occasionally, the percentage of E+ cells exceeded the percentage of BG+ cells by 20% or more, suggesting the presence of an E+BG- T cell subpopulation. BG+ B lymphocytes were only demonstrated in 1 of 40 non-neoplastic lymphoid specimens. The neoplastic B cells in each of 14 B cell (la+Slg+E-) lymphomas were BG-. However, a variable proportion of the neoplastic cells isolated from 6 cases of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and neoplastic plasma cells isolated from 7 cases of multiple myeloma expressed BG activity. Thus, it appears that both normal and neoplastic BG- and BG+ B lymphocyte populations exist; the latter may be related to a state of activation or a stage of B cell differentiation. The neoplastic cells isolated from 4 T cell (la-Slg-E+) malignancies were BG+ while those isolated from 3 T cell malignancies were BG-. The variable expression of BG activity by T cell malignancies may be related to T cell differentiation. Investigation of BG expression by T cell derived malignancies may prove useful in sorting out T cell phenotypes. PMID:7437515

  4. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-07-01

    bloodstream infections of Salmonella typhimurium and Capno-cytophaga canimorsus in Hodgkin's disease patients seems likely due to a particular mechanism which infection by these species is favored. The specific nature of these mechanisms remains to be determined. The recovery of any unusual bacterium from blood should warrant a careful consideration of the possibility of underlying disease, especially cancer. Microbiologists should advise clinicians of the unusual nature of the identified organism and provide the counsel that certain neoplastic processes, often accompanied by neutropenia, render the human host susceptible to invasion by almost any bacterium. The recovery of such organisms as C. septicum or S. bovis should prompt the clinician to aggressively seek to identify an occult neoplasm if one has not yet been diagnosed.

  5. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-01-01

    bloodstream infections of Salmonella typhimurium and Capno-cytophaga canimorsus in Hodgkin's disease patients seems likely due to a particular mechanism which infection by these species is favored. The specific nature of these mechanisms remains to be determined. The recovery of any unusual bacterium from blood should warrant a careful consideration of the possibility of underlying disease, especially cancer. Microbiologists should advise clinicians of the unusual nature of the identified organism and provide the counsel that certain neoplastic processes, often accompanied by neutropenia, render the human host susceptible to invasion by almost any bacterium. The recovery of such organisms as C. septicum or S. bovis should prompt the clinician to aggressively seek to identify an occult neoplasm if one has not yet been diagnosed. PMID:7553569

  6. Neoplastic human embryonic stem cells as a model of radiation resistance of human cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, Steve; Lee, Jung Bok; Guezguez, Borhane; Fiebig, Aline; McNicol, Jamie; Boreham, Douglas; Collins, Tony J.; Bhatia, Mick

    2015-01-01

    Studies have implicated that a small sub-population of cells within a tumour, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have an enhanced capacity for tumour formation in multiple cancers and may be responsible for recurrence of the disease after treatment, including radiation. Although comparisons have been made between CSCs and bulk-tumour, the more important comparison with respect to therapy is between tumour-sustaining CSC versus normal stem cells that maintain the healthy tissue. However, the absence of normal known counterparts for many CSCs has made it difficult to compare the radiation responses of CSCs with the normal stem cells required for post-radiotherapy tissue regeneration and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that transformed human embryonic stem cells (t-hESCs), showing features of neoplastic progression produce tumours resistant to radiation relative to their normal counterpart upon injection into immune compromised mice. We reveal that t-hESCs have a reduced capacity for radiation induced cell death via apoptosis and exhibit altered cell cycle arrest relative to hESCs in vitro. t-hESCs have an increased expression of BclXL in comparison to their normal counterparts and re-sensitization of t-hESCs to radiation upon addition of BH3-only mimetic ABT737, suggesting that overexpression of BclXL underpins t-hESC radiation insensitivity. Using this novel discovery platform to investigate radiation resistance in human CSCs, our study indicates that chemotherapy targeting Bcl2-family members may prove to be an adjuvant to radiotherapy capable of targeting CSCs. PMID:26082437

  7. Neoplastic human embryonic stem cells as a model of radiation resistance of human cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Steve; Lee, Jung Bok; Guezguez, Borhane; Fiebig, Aline; McNicol, Jamie; Boreham, Douglas; Collins, Tony J; Bhatia, Mick

    2015-09-01

    Studies have implicated that a small sub-population of cells within a tumour, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have an enhanced capacity for tumour formation in multiple cancers and may be responsible for recurrence of the disease after treatment, including radiation. Although comparisons have been made between CSCs and bulk-tumour, the more important comparison with respect to therapy is between tumour-sustaining CSC versus normal stem cells that maintain the healthy tissue. However, the absence of normal known counterparts for many CSCs has made it difficult to compare the radiation responses of CSCs with the normal stem cells required for post-radiotherapy tissue regeneration and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that transformed human embryonic stem cells (t-hESCs), showing features of neoplastic progression produce tumours resistant to radiation relative to their normal counterpart upon injection into immune compromised mice. We reveal that t-hESCs have a reduced capacity for radiation induced cell death via apoptosis and exhibit altered cell cycle arrest relative to hESCs in vitro. t-hESCs have an increased expression of BclXL in comparison to their normal counterparts and re-sensitization of t-hESCs to radiation upon addition of BH3-only mimetic ABT737, suggesting that overexpression of BclXL underpins t-hESC radiation insensitivity. Using this novel discovery platform to investigate radiation resistance in human CSCs, our study indicates that chemotherapy targeting Bcl2-family members may prove to be an adjuvant to radiotherapy capable of targeting CSCs.

  8. Effectiveness of a 'Global Postural Reeducation' program for persistent Low Back Pain: a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this non-randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) program as compared to a Stabilization Exercise (SE) program in subjects with persistent low back pain (LBP) at short- and mid-term follow-up (ie. 3 and 6 months). Methods According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 100 patients with a primary complaint of persistent LBP were enrolled in the study: 50 were allocated to the GPR group and 50 to the SE group. Primary outcome measures were Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were lumbar Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Fingertip-to-floor test (FFT). Data were collected at baseline and at 3/6 months by health care professionals unaware of the study. An intention to treat approach was used to analyze participants according to the group to which they were originally assigned. Results Of the 100 patients initially included in the study, 78 patients completed the study: 42 in the GPR group and 36 in the SE group. At baseline, the two groups did not differ significantly with respect to gender, age, BMI and outcome measures. Comparing the differences between groups at short- and mid-term follow-up, the GPR group revealed a significant reduction (from baseline) in all outcome measures with respect to the SE group. The ordered logistic regression model showed an increased likelihood of definitive improvement (reduction from baseline of at least 30% in RMDQ and VAS scores) for the GPR group compared to the SE group (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.7 to 5.7). Conclusions Our findings suggest that a GPR intervention in subjects with persistent LBP induces a greater improvement on pain and disability as compared to a SE program. These results must be confirmed by further studies with higher methodological standards, including randomization, larger sample size, longer follow-up and subgrouping of the LBP subjects. Trial registration NCT

  9. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) activity in hepatocellular carcinoma, benign peri-neoplastic and normal liver.

    PubMed

    Mun, Kein-Seong; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Baharudin, Nurul Bahiyah; Looi, Lai-Meng

    2006-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the ten most common cancers in Malaysian males. As cellular proliferation is an important feature of malignant transformation, we studied the proliferation pattern of normal and benign perineoplastic liver versus hepatocellular carcinoma in an attempt to further understand the tumour transformation process. 39 HCC (21 with accompanying and 18 without cirrhosis) histologically diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya Medical Centre between January 1992 and December 2003 were immunohistochemically studied using a monoclonal antibody to PCNA (Clone PC10: Dako). 20 livers from cases who had succumbed to traumatic injuries served as normal liver controls (NL). PCNA labeling index (PCNA-LI) was determined by counting the number of immunopositive cells in 1000 contiguous HCC, benign cirrhotic perineoplastic liver (BLC), benign perineoplastic non-cirrhotic (BLNC) and NL cells and conversion to a percentage. The PCNA-LI was also expressed as Ojanguren et al's grades. PCNA was expressed in 10% NL, 38.9% BLNC, 76.2% BLC and 71.8% HCC with BLNC, BLC and HCC showing significantly increased (p < 0.05) number of cases which expressed PCNA compared with NL. The number of BLC which expressed PCNA was also significantly increased compared with BLNC. PCNA-LI ranged from 0-2.0% (mean = 0.2%) in NL, 0-2.0% (mean = 0.3%) in BLNC, 0-3.6% (mean = 0.7%) in BLC and 0-53.8% (mean = 7.6%) in HCC with PCNA-LI significantly increased (p < 0.05) only in HCC compared with BLC, BLNC and NL. Accordingly, all NL, BLC and BLNC showed minimal (<5% cells being immunopositive) immunoreactivity on Ojanguren et al's grading system and only HCC demonstrated immunoreactivity which ranged up to grade 3 (75% of cells). From this study, there appears to be a generally increasing trend of proliferative activity from NL to BLNC to BLC and HCC. Nonetheless, BLNC and BLC, like NL, retained low PCNA-LI and only HCC had a significantly increased PCNA

  10. Immunoperoxidase staining of surface and intracellular immunoglobulin in human neoplastic lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, D Y; Leonard, R C; Laurent, G; Gourdin, M F

    1980-07-01

    An immunoperoxidase technique for the optical microscopic detection of cellular immunoglobulin has been used to stain fixed smears of human neoplastic B lymphoid cells. Only four out of 28 cases of chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) showed membrane labelling by this technique. In contrast, when 14 samples from other types of B lymphoproliferative disorder (including hairy cell leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and prolymphocytic leukaemia) were studied, all samples showed membrane immunoglobulin labelling (confirmed by capping experiments). This discrepancy was attributed to the greater density of surface immunoglobulin present on neoplastic cells in the latter group of disorders compared to CLL. This immunoperoxidase technique is therefore less sensitive than immunofluorescent staining of cells in suspension for the demonstration of neoplastic cell surface immunoglobulin. However, it offers a number of advantages (eg, excellent visualisation of cell morphology, permanence of stained preparations, and applicability to stored samples) which recommend it as the method of choice in certain clinical haematological contexts. PMID:7000833

  11. Intracavitary administration of interleukin-2 as palliative therapy for neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Barni, S; Ardizzoia, A; Paolorossi, F; Tisi, E; Crispino, S; Tancini, G

    1992-04-30

    Cytokines have recently appeared to be effective in the palliative therapy of neoplastic effusions. The present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and the tolerability of an intracavitary injection of IL-2 in patients with neoplastic effusion due to solid tumors. The study included 14 patients with cytologically positive effusion (pleura, 11; peritoneum, 2; pericardium, 1). Tumor histotypes were: mesothelioma, 5; non-small cell lung cancer, 3; breast cancer, 2; ovarian cancer, 2; cervix carcinoma, 1; unknown primary tumor, 1. The efficacy was evaluated according to the criteria of Paladine et al. (Cancer 38: 1903, 1976). An objective response was achieved in 10/14 (71%) patients (4 CR, 6 PR), with a median duration of 4 months (range, 2-8). No important toxicity was seen. This preliminary study showed that low dose IL-2 given intracavitarily is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in patients with neoplastic effusions.

  12. An Engineered Bivalent Neuregulin Protects Against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity with Reduced Pro-Neoplastic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Murthy, Ashwin C.; Hawkins, Jessica F.; Wortzel, Joshua R.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Alvarez, Luis M.; Gannon, Joseph; Macrae, Calum A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Doxorubicin (DOXO) is an effective anthracycline chemotherapeutic, but its use is limited by cumulative dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Neuregulin-1β (NRG1B) is an ErbB receptor family ligand that is effective against DOXO-induced cardiomyopathy in experimental models but is also pro-neoplastic. We previously showed that an engineered bivalent neuregulin-1β (NN) has reduced pro-neoplastic potential compared to the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain of NRG1B (NRG), an effect mediated by receptor biasing towards ErbB3 homotypic interactions uncommonly formed by native NRG1B. Here, we hypothesized that a newly formulated, covalent NN would be cardioprotective with reduced pro-neoplastic effects compared to NRG. Methods and Results NN was expressed as a maltose-binding protein fusion in E. coli. As established previously, NN stimulated anti-neoplastic or cytostatic signaling and phenotype in cancer cells, whereas NRG stimulated pro-neoplastic signaling and phenotype. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM), NN and NRG induced similar downstream signaling. NN, like NRG, attenuated the double-stranded DNA breaks associated with DOXO exposure in NRCM and human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. NN treatment significantly attenuated DOXO-induced decrease in fractional shortening as measured by blinded echocardiography in mice in a chronic cardiomyopathy model (57.7% ± 0.6% vs. 50.9% ± 2.6%, P=0.004), whereas native NRG had no significant effect (49.4% ± 3.7% vs. 50.9% ± 2.6%, P=0.813). Conclusions NN is a cardioprotective agent that promotes cardiomyocyte survival and improves cardiac function in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. Given the reduced pro-neoplastic potential of NN versus NRG, NN has translational potential for cardioprotection in cancer patients receiving anthracyclines. PMID:23757312

  13. Hyaluronidases and hyaluronan synthases expression is inversely correlated with malignancy in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, affecting prognosis

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, V.K.; Rocha, T.P.; Moreira, AL.; Soares, F.A.; Takagaki, T.; Carvalho, L.; Nicholson, A.G.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    We collected a series of 136 lung/bronchial and 56 matched lung parenchyma tissue samples from patients who underwent lung/bronchial biopsies and presented invasive carcinoma after lung surgery. The lung/bronchial samples included basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, moderate dysplasia, adenomatous hyperplasia, severe dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Matched lung parenchyma tissue samples included 25 squamous cell carcinomas and 31 adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze for the distribution of hyaluronidase (Hyal)-1 and −3, and hyaluronan synthases (HAS)-1, −2, and −3. Hyal-1 showed significantly higher expression in basal cell hyperplasia than in moderate dysplasia (P=0.01), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.0001), or severe dysplasia (P=0.03). Lower expression of Hyal-3 was found in atypical adenomatous hyperplasia than in basal cell hyperplasia (P=0.01) or moderate dysplasia (P=0.02). HAS-2 was significantly higher in severe dysplasia (P=0.002) and in squamous metaplasia (P=0.04) compared with basal cell hyperplasia. HAS-3 was significantly expressed in basal cell hyperplasia compared with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.05) and severe dysplasia (P=0.02). Lower expression of HAS-3 was found in severe dysplasia compared with squamous metaplasia (P=0.01) and moderate dysplasia (P=0.01). Epithelial Hyal-1 and −3 and HAS-1, −2, and −3 expressions were significantly higher in pre-neoplastic lesions than in neoplastic lesions. Comparative Cox multivariate analysis controlled by N stage and histologic tumor type showed that patients with high HAS-3 expression in pre-neoplastic cells obtained by lung/bronchial biopsy presented a significantly higher risk of death (HR=1.19; P=0.04). We concluded that localization of Hyal and HAS in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions was inversely related to malignancy, which implied that visualizing these factors could be a useful diagnostic

  14. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  15. [X-ray computed tomography in non-neoplastic pathology of the larynx].

    PubMed

    Vadalà, G; Di Guglielmo, L; Dore, R; Alerci, M; Santarelli, P; Pricca, P; Failoni, S; Di Giulio, G

    1984-10-01

    The authors describe the CT findings in 57 patients suffering from various non-neoplastic disease of the larynx: chronic laryngitis, pseudotumor, paralysis, post-traumatic lesions, laryngocele, cyst. CT is usefull in evaluating site and extension of the disease, as well as its relations with the surrounding tissues. The densitometric evaluation and the functional tests are important in differential diagnosis with malignant neoplasms.

  16. Cell cannibalism by malignant neoplastic cells: three cases in dogs and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Cazzini, Paola; Camus, Melinda; Doria-Torra, Georgina; Marco Valle, Alberto Jesús; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Cell cannibalism refers to the engulfment of cells by nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Studies in human medicine have demonstrated a relationship between the presence of cell cannibalism by neoplastic cells and a poor outcome, and have shown a positive correlation with the presence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. The biologic significance of cell cannibalism is unknown, but it is proposed that it may represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune evasion as a survival strategy in cases of unfavorable microenvironmental conditions. This report describes clinical and morphologic features of 3 cases of dogs with malignant neoplasia in which the presence of cellular cannibalism was observed in cytologic and histologic specimens. In the 1(st) case, a dog with a primary tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma with metastasis to retropharyngeal lymph nodes had neoplastic epithelial cells engulfing neutrophils noted in cytologic examination of the lymph nodes. In the 2(nd) case, neoplastic epithelial cells were seen engulfing each other in fine-needle aspirates from a primary mammary carcinoma with lung metastasis. In the 3(rd) case, poorly differentiated neoplastic mast cells from a recurrent, metastatic grade III mast cell tumor were observed cannibalizing eosinophils. A brief review of the literature describing known cell-into-cell relationships and the possible biologic significance and mechanisms involved in this phenomenon is provided. The relationship between cell cannibalism and distant metastasis should be explored in further studies, as it may prove to be a criterion of malignancy, as it is proposed in human medicine.

  17. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  18. Rational study endpoints in anti-neoplastic agent regulatory approval trials in the gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Markman, Maurie

    2016-07-01

    A discussion of rational endpoints in clinical trials seeking regulatory approval for new anti-neoplastic agents involving the three major gynecologic malignancies, cancers of the ovary, cervix, and endometrial, is particularly interesting as (in the opinion of this commentator) the conclusion will be different in the individual cancers. PMID:27638892

  19. 78 FR 76507 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cancer (Malignant Neoplastic Diseases)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... comments at the time because they were outside the scope of the 2008 NPRM. \\1\\ 74 FR 51229. \\2\\ 73 FR 22871... commonly used term, and more recognized by the lay public and by health care professionals. The phrase ``malignant neoplastic disease'' is a term used almost exclusively, although infrequently, by health...

  20. Generation and Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Low Frequency Ultrasound to Determine the Sonic Sensitivity of Untreated and Treated Neoplastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D.; Zoino, Joseph N.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency ultrasound in the 20 to 60 kHz range is a novel physical modality by which to induce selective cell lysis and death in neoplastic cells. In addition, this method can be used in combination with specialized agents known as sonosensitizers to increase the extent of preferential damage exerted by ultrasound against neoplastic cells, an approach referred to as sonodynamic therapy (SDT). The methodology for generating and applying low frequency ultrasound in a preclinical in vitro setting is presented to demonstrate that reproducible cell destruction can be attained in order to examine and compare the effects of sonication on neoplastic and normal cells. This offers a means by which to reliably sonicate neoplastic cells at a level of consistency required for preclinical therapeutic assessment. In addition, the effects of cholesterol-depleting and cytoskeletal-directed agents on potentiating ultrasonic sensitivity in neoplastic cells are discussed in order to elaborate on mechanisms of action conducive to sonochemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26274053

  1. High-resolution sonography for distinguishing neoplastic gallbladder polyps and staging gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Young; Baek, Jee Hyun; Eun, Hyo Won; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purposes of this study were to compare staging accuracy of high-resolution sonography (HRUS) with combined low- and high-MHz transducers with that of conventional sonography for gallbladder cancer and to investigate the differences in the imaging findings of neoplastic and nonneoplastic gallbladder polyps. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Our study included 37 surgically proven gallbladder cancer (T1a = 7, T1b = 2, T2 = 22, T3 = 6), including 15 malignant neoplastic polyps and 73 surgically proven polyps (neoplastic = 31, nonneoplastic = 42) that underwent HRUS and conventional transabdominal sonography. Two radiologists assessed T-category and predefined polyp findings on HRUS and conventional transabdominal sonography. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square and McNemar tests. RESULTS. The diagnostic accuracy for the T category was T1a = 92-95%, T1b = 89-95%, T2 = 78-86%, and T3 = 84-89%, all with good agreement (κ = 0.642) using HRUS. The diagnostic accuracy for differentiating T1 from T2 or greater than T2 was 92% and 89% on HRUS and 65% and 70% with conventional transabdominal sonography. Statistically common findings for neoplastic polyps included size greater than 1 cm, single lobular surface, vascular core, hypoechoic polyp, and hypoechoic foci (p < 0.05). The value of HRUS in the differential diagnosis of a gallbladder polyp was more clearly depicted internal echo foci than conventional transabdominal sonography (39 vs 21). A polyp size greater than 1 cm was independently associated with a neoplastic polyp (odds ratio = 7.5, p = 0.02). The AUC of a polyp size greater than 1 cm was 0.877. The sensitivity and specificity were 66.67% and 89.13%, respectively. CONCLUSION. HRUS is a simple method that enables accurate T categorization of gallbladder carcinoma. It provides high-resolution images of gallbladder polyps and may have a role in stratifying the risk for malignancy.

  2. Delivery of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in bioadhesive hydrogel stimulates migration of dendritic cells in models of human papillomavirus-associated (pre)neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pascale; Evrard, Brigitte; Maillard, Catherine; Franzen-Detrooz, Elizabeth; Delattre, Luc; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnes; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    Because of the central role of dendritic cells and/or Langerhans cells(DC/LC) in the induction of cellular immune responses, pharmacological agents that modulate the recruitment of these cells might have a clinical interest. The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of several pharmaceutical formulations to topically deliver granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated genital (pre)neoplastic lesions. The formulations were evaluated for their bioactivity and for their potential to recruit DC in organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes. We found that a bioadhesive polycarbophil gel (Noveon) at pH 5.5 is able to maintain the bioactivity of GM-CSF at 4 or 37 degrees C for at least 7 days, whereas a decreased activity of GM-CSF was observed when the molecule is included in other polymer gels. GM-CSF incorporated in the polycarbophil gel was also a potent factor in enhancing the colonization of DC into organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes since the infiltration of DC in the in vitro-formed (pre)neoplastic epithelium was very low under basal conditions and dramatically increased in the presence of GM-CSF gel. We next demonstrated that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel induces the recruitment of human DC in a human (pre)neoplastic epithelium grafted into NOD/SCID mice. The efficacy of GM-CSF in this formulation was equivalent to that observed with liquid GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel could play an important role in the recruitment of DC/LC in mucosal surfaces and be useful as a new immunotherapeutic approach for genital HPV-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions.

  3. Multiplex Gene Expression Profiling of 16 Target Genes in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissues Using Branched-DNA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Conradine Hammer, Susanne; Mohr, Annika; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Brenig, Bertram; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland tumors are one of the most common neoplasms in female dogs, and certain breeds are prone to develop the disease. The use of biomarkers in canines is still restricted to research purposes. Therefore, the necessity to analyze gene profiles in different mammary entities in large sample sets is evident in order to evaluate the strength of potential markers serving as future prognostic factors. The aim of the present study was to analyze the gene expression of 16 target genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, FOXO3, GATA4, HER2, HMGA1, HMGA2, HMGB1, MAPK1, MAPK3, MCL1, MYC, PFDN5, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TP53) known to be involved in human and canine mammary neoplasm development. Expression was analyzed in 111 fresh frozen (FF) and in 170 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues using a multiplexed branched-DNA (b-DNA) assay. TP53, FOXO3, PTEN, and PFDN5 expression revealed consistent results with significant low expression in malignant tumors. The possibility of utilizing them as predictive factors as well as for assisting in the choice of an adequate gene therapy may help in the development of new and improved approaches in canine mammary tumors. PMID:27657059

  4. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Castro, Patrícia F; Fantoni, Denise T; Miranda, Bruna C; Matera, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates.

  5. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Patrícia F.; Fantoni, Denise T.; Miranda, Bruna C.; Matera, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates. PMID:26981315

  6. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Castro, Patrícia F; Fantoni, Denise T; Miranda, Bruna C; Matera, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates. PMID:26981315

  7. Ultrastructural study of neoplastic cells in Macoma balthica (Bivalvia) from the Gulf of Gdansk (Poland).

    PubMed

    Smolarz, Katarzyna; Renault, Tristan; Wołowicz, Maciej

    2006-06-01

    In the Baltic clam Macoma balthica from the Gulf of Gdansk, neoplasia is considered as a serious epizootic linked to bad environmental conditions and high levels of pollutants. Previous research was focused on the diagnosis, prevalence, seasonality and histopathological characteristic of the cancer. This study is focused on electron microscopy analyses describing cell ultrastructure abnormalities related to neoplasia. Examinations using the electron microscopy highlighted changes confined to anatomic ultrastructures, shapes and functions of neoplastic cells. The lobulated appearance of the nucleus, changes in cellular matrix and the occurrence of large granular cells with hyperchromatic nuclei, atypical Golgi structures and deterioration of rough endoplasmic reticulum manifested the disease. The presence of atypical mitochondria, free ribosomes and hypertrophic nuclei suggests the adaptation of neoplastic cells to increased mitotic activity, while the observed modification of cellular membranes may reflect functional changes connected to increased pinocytotic activity or intercellular transport. The cancer cells were found to appear in two types, abnormal round-shaped cells and spindle-shaped cells, both with increased frequencies of cell division. Round-shaped cells typical for disseminated neoplasia were observed in all affected bivalves, in a few cases co-occurring with abnormal spherical cells. Spindle-shaped cells containing some intracytoplasmic filaments, and with a tendency of the nuclei to be orientated as in a palisade were interpreted as myofibroblasts-like cells and were observed in five out of eleven clams diagnosed as neoplastic. This finding represents the first demonstration of phenotypic differences in the cell types co-occurring in animals diagnosed as neoplastic and by that suggests coexistence of two types of bivalve cancer, disseminated neoplasia and probable fibrosarcoma.

  8. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  9. Mediastinal sarcoidosis mimicking lymph malignancy recurrence after anti-neoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    El Hammoumi, Massine; El Marjany, Mohamed; Moussaoui, Driss; Doudouh, Aberahim; Mansouri, Hamid; Kabiri, El Hassane

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our work is to promote the awareness about the development of sarcoidosis after antineoplastic therapy in order to avoid diagnostic errors with FDG-PET/CT findings. We report the observation of three women with breast, cervix and stomach treated cancers who developed a sarcoidosis after the end of anti-neoplastic therapy. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is in pinpointing the organs candidates for diagnostic biopsy and not distinguishing between the malignancy and granulomatous or inflammatory diseases.

  10. Use of pericardial fluid pH to distinguish between idiopathic and neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed

    Fine, Deborah M; Tobias, Anthony H; Jacob, Kristin A

    2003-01-01

    Pericardial effusion (PE) resulting from neoplasia usually is associated with a poor prognosis, whereas idiopathic PE frequently has a good prognosis. This study examined the utility of pH measurement to distinguish between these 2 etiologies. Dogs were classified as having idiopathic PE (n = 12) if pericarditis was diagnosed on histopathology (n = 4) or if no historical, physical, or echocardiographic evidence of recurrent PE was present for at least 6 months after pericardiocentesis (n = 8). Dogs were classified as having neoplastic PE (n = 25) if pericardial or myocardial neoplasia was detected on histopathology (n = 11) or a discrete mass associated with the right atrium, right ventricle, or the aorta was visualized on echocardiography (n = 14). Samples of PE were centrifuged and the supernatant pH was measured with a portable pH meter. The lowest pH (6.40) was found in a dog with idiopathic PE and the highest pH (7.85) was found in a dog with neoplastic PE. However, data from the 2 groups overlapped in 33 out of 37 (89%) instances, and median pH from the idiopathic and neoplastic groups was not significantly different (7.40 and 7.47, respectively; P = 0.28; difference in medians = -0.7; 95% CI, -0.26-0.06). Because of the degree of overlap, our data provide little justification for the use of pH measurement as a diagnostic test in cases of PE.

  11. Immunoperoxidase staining of surface and intracellular immunoglobulin in human neoplastic lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, D Y; Leonard, R C; Laurent, G; Gourdin, M F

    1980-01-01

    An immunoperoxidase technique for the optical microscopic detection of cellular immunoglobulin has been used to stain fixed smears of human neoplastic B lymphoid cells. Only four out of 28 cases of chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) showed membrane labelling by this technique. In contrast, when 14 samples from other types of B lymphoproliferative disorder (including hairy cell leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and prolymphocytic leukaemia) were studied, all samples showed membrane immunoglobulin labelling (confirmed by capping experiments). This discrepancy was attributed to the greater density of surface immunoglobulin present on neoplastic cells in the latter group of disorders compared to CLL. This immunoperoxidase technique is therefore less sensitive than immunofluorescent staining of cells in suspension for the demonstration of neoplastic cell surface immunoglobulin. However, it offers a number of advantages (eg, excellent visualisation of cell morphology, permanence of stained preparations, and applicability to stored samples) which recommend it as the method of choice in certain clinical haematological contexts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7000833

  12. Neoplastic lesions in CADASIL syndrome: report of an autopsied Japanese case.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wael Abdo; Udaka, Naoka; Ueda, Akihiko; Ando, Yukio; Ito, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common heritable causes of stroke and dementia in adults. The gene involved in the pathogenesis of CADASIL is Notch3; in which mutations affect the number of cysteine residues in its extracellular domain, causing its accumulation in small arteries and arterioles of the affected individuals. Besides the usual neurological and vascular findings that have been well-documented in CADASIL patients, this paper additionally reports multiple neoplastic lesions that were observed in an autopsy case of CADASIL patient; that could be related to Notch3 mutation. The patient was a 62 years old male, presented with a past history of neurological manifestations, including gait disturbance and frequent convulsive attacks. He was diagnosed as CADASIL syndrome with Notch3 Arg133Cys mutation. He eventually developed hemiplegia and died of systemic convulsions. Autopsy examination revealed-besides the vascular and neurological lesions characteristic of CADASIL- multiple neoplastic lesions in the body; carcinoid tumorlet and diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuro-endocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the lungs, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), prostatic adenocarcinoma (ADC) and adenomatoid tumor of the epididymis. This report describes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions that were found in a case of CADASIL patient that could be related to Notch3 gene mutations. PMID:26261665

  13. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  14. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome induced by neoplastic meningitis in a patient receiving maintenance hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is characterized by neurological symptoms resulting from cerebral edema, which occurs as a consequence of hemodialysis. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome most often occurs in patients who have just started hemodialysis, during hemodialysis, or soon after hemodialysis; although it may also occur in patients who are under maintenance hemodialysis with pre-existing neurological disease. Case presentation A 70-year-old woman, who had been receiving maintenance hemodialysis for one year, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer by ascites cytological examination. Two years later, she reported severe headache and nausea during hemodialysis and was diagnosed with dialysis disequilibrium syndrome. Although brain images revealed mild hydrocephalus without any mass lesions, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells were detected in her cerebrospinal fluid. These findings indicated that DDS was induced by neoplastic meningitis due to ovarian cancer metastasis. Conclusion Neoplastic meningitis should be considered and excluded in hemodialysis patients with dialysis disequilibrium syndrome and malignancy by cytological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid even if cerebral imaging shows no obvious lesions. This is the first reported case of dialysis disequilibrium syndrome induced by neoplastic meningitis in a patient receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:24238645

  15. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  16. High voltage electron microscopy and low voltage scanning electron microscopy of human neoplastic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M

    1991-01-01

    Improved procedures were developed to correlate cell culture data with the images provided by advanced ultrastructural technologies. These procedures were compatible with the two main types of cellular behavior: adherent, spreading (melanomas, rhabdomyosarcomas) and non-adherent in suspension (leukemias). The ultrastructure and function of spreading neoplastic cells primarily depend on surface properties of the attaching substrates. Therefore, the films used for cultured cell whole-mount ultrastructural analysis must have adherence features identical to those of standard cell culture vessels. Improved procedures were developed to produce the polystyrene films of required qualities. These films allowed processing of cells for electron microscopy including chemical fixation, cryo-immobilization, and immunolabelling. Furthermore, these polystyrene films permitted observations of the same cell in the high voltage electron microscope to reveal the internal organization and in the low voltage scanning electron microscope to reveal the surface topography. Neoplastic cells in suspension may dramatically change their ultrastructure as a result of interactions with substrates or other cells. Therefore, immobilization of cellular processes must occur rapidly while cells remain in suspension. These processes were cryo-immobilized by high pressure freezing through the use of the newly designed specimen carrier. Procedures allowing high yield attachment of cryo-fixed neoplastic cells to amino-propyl-derived glass carriers enabled observations of cell surface topography. Furthermore, freeze-substitution and drying of freeze-fractured cells revealed their three-dimensional internal organization in the low voltage scanning electron microscope. PMID:1822024

  17. A 4-Mb deletion in the region Xq27.3-q28 is associated with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.R.; Han, L.P.; Michalickova, K.

    1994-09-01

    A girl with severe Hunter disease was found to have a submicroscopic deletion distrupting the IDS locus in the region Xq27.3-q28 together with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome. Southern analysis of DNA from the parents and from hamster-patient somatic cell hybrids containing only the mutant X chromosome revealed that the deletion represented a de novo mutation involving the paternal X chromosome. Methylation-sensitive RFLP analysis of DNA from maternal fibroblasts and lymphocytes showed methylation patterns consistent with random X-inactivation, indicating that the non-random X-inactivation in the patient was not inherited and was likely a direct result of the Xq27.3-q28 deletion. A 15 kb EcoRI junction fragment, identified in patient DNA using IDS cDNA probes, was cloned from a size-selected patient DNA library. Clones containing the deletion junction were restriction mapped and fragments were subcloned and used to isolate normal sequence on either side of the deletion from normal X chromosome libraries. Comparison of the sequences from normal and mutant X chromosome clones straddling the deletion breakpoint showed that the mutation had occurred by recombination between Alu repeats. Screening of YAC contigs containing normal X chromosome sequence from the region of the mutation, using probes from either side of the deletion breakpoint, showed that the deletion was approximately 4 Mb in size. Probing of mutant DNA with 16 STSs distributed throughout the region of the deletion confirmed that the mutation is a simple deletion with no complex rearrangements of islands of retained DNA. A search for sequences at Xq27.3-q28 involved in X chromosome inactivation is in progress.

  18. Drosophila endocytic neoplastic tumor suppressor genes regulate Sav/Wts/Hpo signaling and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brian S; Moberg, Kenneth H

    2011-12-01

    Genetic screens in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have identified a class of neoplastic tumor suppressor genes (endocytic nTSGs), which encode proteins that localize to endosomes and facilitate the trafficking of membrane-bound receptors and adhesion molecules into the degradative lysosome. Loss of endocytic nTSGs transforms imaginal disc epithelia into highly proliferative, invasive tissues that fail to differentiate and display defects in cellular apicobasal polarity, adhesion and tissue architecture. As vertebrate homologs of some Drosophila nTSGs are linked to tumor formation, identifying molecular changes in signaling associated with nTSG loss could inform understanding of neoplastic transformation in vertebrates. Here we show that mutations in genes that act at multiple steps of the endolysosomal pathway lead to autonomous activation of the Sav/Wts/Hpo (SWH) transcriptional effector Yki (YAP/TAZ in vertebrates) and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is known to promote Yki activity in cells with disrupted polarity. Yki and JNK activity are elevated by mutations at multiple steps in the endolysosomal pathway including mutations in the AP-2σ gene, which encodes a component of the AP-2 adaptor complex that recruits cargoes into clathrin-coated pits for subsequent internalization. Moreover, reduction of JNK activity can decrease elevated Yki-signaling caused by altered endocytosis. These studies reveal a broad requirement for components of the endocytic pathway in regulating SWH and JNK outputs, and place Drosophila endocytic nTSGs into a network that involving two major signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis. PMID:22101275

  19. Localization of collagen modifying enzymes on fibroblastic reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Rintaro; Aung, Naing Ye; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Suto, Aya; Tamazawa, Nobuyuki; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the localization of collagen modifying enzymes (CMEs) on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues and various malignant lymphomas. The expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1), lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was frequently observed on FRCs and FDCs in the germinal center (GC), except for the mantle zone. The expression of CMEs was lower in most lymphomas than in their respective postulated normal counterparts. The ratio of transglutaminase II(+) FRCs/CD35(+) FDCs was also lower in follicular lymphomas (FL) than in other lymphomas. The mRNAs of some CMEs (P4H1, prolyl 4-hydroxylase 3, LH3, and heat shock protein 47) were confirmed in almost all lymphomas. These results indicate that lymphoma cell proliferation suppresses/decreases the number of CMEs expressing FRCs and FDCs in most lymphomas. PMID:26700650

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein-6 is a marker of serous acinar cell differentiation in normal and neoplastic human salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, K A; Laine, M A; Ritvos, O V; Voutilainen, R J; Hogan, B L; Leivo, I V; Heikinheimo, A K

    1999-11-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-6, also known as vegetal-pale-gene-related and decaplentaplegic-vegetal-related) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of multifunctional signaling molecules. BMP-6 appears to play various biological roles in developing tissues, including regulation of epithelial differentiation. To study the possible involvement of BMP-6 in normal and neoplastic human salivary glands, we compared its mRNA and protein expression in 4 fetal and 15 adult salivary glands and in 22 benign and 32 malignant salivary gland tumors. In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis indicated that BMP-6 transcripts are expressed at low levels in acinar cells of adult submandibular glands but not in ductal or stromal cells. BMP-6 was immunolocated specifically in serous acini of parotid and submandibular glands. None was found in primitive fetal acini or any other types of cell in adult salivary glands, including mucous acini and epithelial cells of intercalated, striated, and excretory ducts. All 16 cases of acinic cell carcinoma consistently exhibited cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining in the acinar tumor cells. Other cell types in these tumors, including intercalated duct-like cells, clear, vacuolated cells, and nonspecific glandular cells, exhibited no cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining. Other benign and malignant salivary gland tumors lacked BMP-6 immunoreactivity, except in areas of squamous differentiation. The results indicate that in salivary glands, BMP-6 expression is uniquely associated with acinar cell differentiation and suggest that BMP-6 may play a role in salivary gland function. More importantly, our experience of differential diagnostic problems related to salivary gland tumors suggests that the demonstration of consistent and specific BMP-6 immunoreactivity in acinic cell carcinoma is likely to be of clinical value.

  1. Chloroplast transformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Yin, Wei-Bo; Hu, Zan-Min

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly review the developmental history and current research status of chloroplast transformation and introduce the merits of chloroplast transformation as compared with the nuclear genome transformation. Furthermore, according to the chloroplast transformation achieved in oilseed rape (Brassica napus), we introduce the preparation of explants, transformation methods, system selection, identification methods of the transplastomic plants, and experimental results. The technical points, the bottleneck, and the further research directions of the chloroplast transformation are discussed in the notes.

  2. Links between fear of humans, stress and survival support a non-random distribution of birds among urban and rural habitats.

    PubMed

    Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Carrete, Martina; Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Cabezas, Sonia; Marchant, Tracy A; Bortolotti, Gary R; Tella, José L

    2015-01-01

    Urban endocrine ecology aims to understand how organisms cope with new sources of stress and maintain allostatic load to thrive in an increasingly urbanized world. Recent research efforts have yielded controversial results based on short-term measures of stress, without exploring its fitness effects. We measured feather corticosterone (CORTf, reflecting the duration and amplitude of glucocorticoid secretion over several weeks) and subsequent annual survival in urban and rural burrowing owls. This species shows high individual consistency in fear of humans (i.e., flight initiation distance, FID), allowing us to hypothesize that individuals distribute among habitats according to their tolerance to human disturbance. FIDs were shorter in urban than in rural birds, but CORTf levels did not differ, nor were correlated to FIDs. Survival was twice as high in urban as in rural birds and links with CORTf varied between habitats: while a quadratic relationship supports stabilizing selection in urban birds, high predation rates may have masked CORTf-survival relationship in rural ones. These results evidence that urban life does not constitute an additional source of stress for urban individuals, as shown by their near identical CORTf values compared with rural conspecifics supporting the non-random distribution of individuals among habitats according to their behavioural phenotypes.

  3. Non-random association of opsin alleles in wild groups of red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus) and maintenance of the colour vision polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Surridge, Alison K; Suárez, Sandra S; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2005-12-22

    The remarkable X-linked colour vision polymorphism observed in many New World primates is thought to be maintained by balancing selection. Behavioural tests support a hypothesis of heterozygote advantage, as heterozygous females (with trichromatic vision) exhibit foraging benefits over homozygous females and males (with dichromatic vision) when detecting ripe fruit on a background of leaves. Whilst most studies to date have examined the functional relevance of polymorphic colour vision in the context of foraging behaviour, alternative hypotheses proposed to explain the polymorphism have remained unexplored. In this study we examine colour vision polymorphism, social group composition and breeding success in wild red-bellied tamarins Saguinus labiatus. We find that the association of males and females within tamarin social groups is non-random with respect to colour vision genotype, with identified mating partners having the greatest allelic diversity. The observed distribution of alleles may be driven by inbreeding avoidance and implies an important new mechanism for maintaining colour vision polymorphism. This study also provides the first preliminary evidence that wild trichromatic females may have increased fitness compared with dichromatic counterparts, as measured by breeding success and longevity. PMID:17148234

  4. Design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health programme on microfinance clients in India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Somen

    2014-01-01

    Microfinance is the provision of financial services for the poor. Health program through microfinance has the potential to address several access barriers to health. We report the design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health program on the members of two microfinance organizations from Karnataka and Gujarat states of India. Villages identified for roll-out of health services with microfinance were pair-matched with microfinance only villages. A quantitative survey at inception and twelve months post health intervention compare the primary outcome (incidence of childhood diarrhea), and secondary outcome (place of last delivery, toilet at home, and out-of-pocket expenditure on treatment). At baseline, the intervention and comparison communities were similar except for out-of-pocket expenditure on health. Low reported use of toilet at home indicates the areas are heading towards a sanitation crisis. This should be an area of program priority for the microfinance organizations. While respondents primarily rely on their savings for meeting treatment expenditure, borrowing from friends, relatives, and money-lenders remains other important source of meeting treatment expenditure in the community. Programs need to prioritize steps to ensure awareness about national health insurance schemes, entitlement to increase service utilization, and developing additional health financing safety nets for financing outpatient care, that are responsible for majority of health-debt. Finally we discuss implications of such programs for national policy makers. PMID:24373263

  5. A non-randomized confirmatory study regarding selection of fertility-sparing surgery for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1203).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toyomi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kanato, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takano, Masashi; Baba, Tsukasa; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ushijima, Kimio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Fertility-sparing treatment has been accepted as a standard treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in stage IA non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. In order to expand an indication of fertility-sparing treatment, we have started a non-randomized confirmatory trial for stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The protocol-defined fertility-sparing surgery is optimal staging laparotomy including unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, peritoneal cytology and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or biopsy. After fertility-sparing surgery, four to six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin are administered. We plan to enroll 250 patients with an indication of fertility-sparing surgery, and then the primary analysis is to be conducted for 63 operated patients with pathologically confirmed stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The primary endpoint is 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints are other survival endpoints and factors related to reproduction. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000013380. PMID:26059697

  6. Design and Baseline Findings of a Multi-site Non-randomized Evaluation of the Effect of a Health Programme on Microfinance Clients in India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somen

    2014-01-01

    Microfinance is the provision of financial services for the poor. Health program through microfinance has the potential to address several access barriers to health. We report the design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health program on the members of two microfinance organizations from Karnataka and Gujarat states of India. Villages identified for roll-out of health services with microfinance were pair-matched with microfinance only villages. A quantitative survey at inception and twelve months post health intervention compare the primary outcome (incidence of childhood diarrhea), and secondary outcome (place of last delivery, toilet at home, and out-of-pocket expenditure on treatment). At baseline, the intervention and comparison communities were similar except for out-of-pocket expenditure on health. Low reported use of toilet at home indicates the areas are heading towards a sanitation crisis. This should be an area of program priority for the microfinance organizations. While respondents primarily rely on their savings for meeting treatment expenditure, borrowing from friends, relatives, and money-lenders remains other important source of meeting treatment expenditure in the community. Programs need to prioritize steps to ensure awareness about national health insurance schemes, entitlement to increase service utilization, and developing additional health financing safety nets for financing outpatient care, that are responsible for majority of health-debt. Finally we discuss implications of such programs for national policy makers. PMID:24373263

  7. A non-randomized confirmatory study regarding selection of fertility-sparing surgery for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1203).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toyomi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kanato, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takano, Masashi; Baba, Tsukasa; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ushijima, Kimio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Fertility-sparing treatment has been accepted as a standard treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in stage IA non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. In order to expand an indication of fertility-sparing treatment, we have started a non-randomized confirmatory trial for stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The protocol-defined fertility-sparing surgery is optimal staging laparotomy including unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, peritoneal cytology and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or biopsy. After fertility-sparing surgery, four to six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin are administered. We plan to enroll 250 patients with an indication of fertility-sparing surgery, and then the primary analysis is to be conducted for 63 operated patients with pathologically confirmed stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The primary endpoint is 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints are other survival endpoints and factors related to reproduction. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000013380.

  8. Non-random association between alleles detected at D4S95 and D4S98 and the Huntington's disease gene.

    PubMed Central

    Theilmann, J; Kanani, S; Shiang, R; Robbins, C; Quarrell, O; Huggins, M; Hedrick, A; Weber, B; Collins, C; Wasmuth, J J

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of many families with linked DNA markers has provided support for the Huntington's disease (HD) gene being close to the telomere on the short arm of chromosome 4. However, analysis of recombination events in particular families has provided conflicting results about the precise location of the HD gene relative to these closely linked DNA markers. Here we report an investigation of linkage disequilibrium between six DNA markers and the HD gene in 75 separate families of varied ancestry. We show significant non-random association between alleles detected at D4S95 and D4S98 and the mutant gene. These data suggest that it may be possible to construct high and low risk haplotypes, which may be helpful in DNA analysis and genetic counselling for HD, and represent independent evidence that the gene for HD is centromeric to more distally located DNA markers such as D4S90. This information may be helpful in defining a strategy to clone the gene for HD based on its location in the human genome. Images PMID:2531224

  9. Links between fear of humans, stress and survival support a non-random distribution of birds among urban and rural habitats

    PubMed Central

    Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Carrete, Martina; Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Cabezas, Sonia; Marchant, Tracy A.; Bortolotti, Gary R.; Tella, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Urban endocrine ecology aims to understand how organisms cope with new sources of stress and maintain allostatic load to thrive in an increasingly urbanized world. Recent research efforts have yielded controversial results based on short-term measures of stress, without exploring its fitness effects. We measured feather corticosterone (CORTf, reflecting the duration and amplitude of glucocorticoid secretion over several weeks) and subsequent annual survival in urban and rural burrowing owls. This species shows high individual consistency in fear of humans (i.e., flight initiation distance, FID), allowing us to hypothesize that individuals distribute among habitats according to their tolerance to human disturbance. FIDs were shorter in urban than in rural birds, but CORTf levels did not differ, nor were correlated to FIDs. Survival was twice as high in urban as in rural birds and links with CORTf varied between habitats: while a quadratic relationship supports stabilizing selection in urban birds, high predation rates may have masked CORTf-survival relationship in rural ones. These results evidence that urban life does not constitute an additional source of stress for urban individuals, as shown by their near identical CORTf values compared with rural conspecifics supporting the non-random distribution of individuals among habitats according to their behavioural phenotypes. PMID:26348294

  10. Novel gene arrangement in the mitochondrial genome of Bothus myriaster (Pleuronectiformes: Bothidae): evidence for the Dimer-Mitogenome and Non-random Loss model.

    PubMed

    Gong, Li; Shi, Wei; Yang, Min; Li, Donghe; Kong, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the oval flounder Bothus myriaster was determined and a novel gene rearrangement was discovered. A striking finding was that eight genes encoded by the L-strand (ND6 and tRNA-Q, A, C, Y, S1, E, and P genes) were translocated to a position between tRNA-T and tRNA-F. Simultaneously, the original order of the rearranged genes Q-A-C-Y-S1-ND6-E-P was maintained. Thus, the genes with identical transcriptional polarities were clustered in the genome with one exception that tRNA-N gene is located in the original position. The other rearrangement was the H-strand-encoded tRNA-D that translocated from its typical location between COI and COII to a position between S1 and ND6. The Dimer-Mitogenome and Non-random Loss model (DMNL)was adopted to account for the novel rearrangement in B. myriaster mitogenome, which provides evidence to support the hypothesis of the DMNL model.

  11. Sensitivity to radiation of human normal, hyperthyroid, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; Hiraoka, T.; Kopecky, K.J.; Nakamura, N.; Jones, M.P.; Ito, T.; Clifton, K.H.

    1987-07-01

    Samples of thyroid tissue removed surgically from 63 patients were cultured in vitro and exposed to X irradiation to investigate the radiosensitivities of various types of thyroid epithelial cells. A total of 76 samples were obtained, including neoplastic cells from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) or follicular adenoma (FA), cells from hyperthyroidism (HY) patients, and normal cells from the surgical margins of PC and FA patients. Culturing of the cells was performed in a manner which has been shown to yield a predominance of epithelial cells. Results of colony formation assays indicated that cells from HY and FA patients were the least radiosensitive: when adjusted to the overall geometric mean plating efficiency of 5.5%, the average mean lethal dose Do was 97.6 cGy for HY cells and 96.7 and 94.3 cGy, respectively for neoplastic and normal cells from FA patients. Cells from PC patients were more radiosensitive, normal cells having an adjusted average Do of 85.0 cGy and PC cells a significantly lower average Do of 74.4 cGy. After allowing for this variation by cell type, in vitro radiosensitivity was not significantly related to age at surgery or sex. These results suggest that malignant thyroid cells may be especially radiosensitive.

  12. Evaluation of impact of immunocytochemical techniques in cytological diagnosis of neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, A; Bussolati, G

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study (1984-87) on the immunocytochemical identification of cancer cells in effusions using HMFG2 monoclonal antibody, and in addition, monoclonal anti-CEA and B72.3 antibodies in cases of suspected mesothelioma, was undertaken. On the basis of cytology alone, of a total of 2362 pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions, 525 cases were diagnosed as positive and 1485 as negative for neoplastic cells, while in 352 (15%) specimens from 307 patients the diagnosis was doubtful. Sections of the embedded sediment of doubtful cases were tested with HMFG2 antibody and proved positive in 215 cases, negative in 108, and inconclusive in 29. The results were checked by following the clinical outcome of the cases. The method was specific in identifying cancer cells in cases at best diagnosed as suspicious on the basis of cytology alone; this represents a clear diagnostic gain. Sensitivity of the test, however, was relatively low (41%). Combined cytological and immunocytochemical characteristics (CEA negative and only some of the neoplastic cells positive with HMFG2 and B72.3 monoclonal antibodies) permitted diagnosis on the effusions of most cases of mesothelioma. The impact of the diagnosis on the progress of the disease was not appreciable as no difference in outcome was noted, irrespective of whether cancer cells had been recognised. The occurrence of an effusion remains an ominous sign in most patients treated for cancer. Images PMID:2685053

  13. Interobserver agreement for the spine instability neoplastic score varies according to the experience of the evaluator

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, William Gemio Jacobsen; de Mesquita Coutinho, Pedro Ricardo; Marchese, Luiz Delboni; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the interobserver agreement for the Neoplastic Spine Instability Score (SINS) among spine surgeons with or without experience in vertebral metastasis treatment and physicians in other specialties. METHODS: Case descriptions were produced based on the medical records of 40 patients with vertebral metastases. The descriptions were then published online. Physicians were invited to evaluate the descriptions by answering questions according to the Neoplastic Spine Instability Score (SINS). The agreement among physicians was calculated using the kappa coefficient. RESULTS: Seventeen physicians agreed to participate: three highly experienced spine surgeons, seven less-experienced spine surgeons, three surgeons of other specialties, and four general practitioners (n = 17). The agreement for the final SINS score among all participants was fair, and it varied according to the SINS component. The agreement was substantial for the spine location only. The agreement was higher among experienced surgeons. The agreement was nearly perfect for spinal location among the spine surgeons who were highly experienced in vertebral metastases. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the experience of the evaluator has an impact on SINS scale classification. The interobserver agreement was only fair among physicians who were not spine surgeons and among spine surgeons who were not experienced in the treatment of vertebral metastases, which may limit the use of the SINS scale for the screening of unstable lesions by less-experienced evaluators. PMID:23525318

  14. A core of kinase-regulated interactomes defines the neoplastic MDSC lineage

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Isabel; Liechtenstein, Therese; Arasanz, Hugo; Lozano, Teresa; Casares, Noelia; Chaikuad, Apirat; Knapp, Stefan; Guerrero-Setas, David; Escors, David; Kochan, Grazyna; Santamaría, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) differentiate from bone marrow precursors, expand in cancer-bearing hosts and accelerate tumor progression. MDSCs have become attractive therapeutic targets, as their elimination strongly enhances anti-neoplastic treatments. Here, immature myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), MDSCs modeling tumor-infiltrating subsets or modeling non-cancerous (NC)-MDSCs were compared by in-depth quantitative proteomics. We found that neoplastic MDSCs differentially expressed a core of kinases which controlled lineage-specific (PI3K-AKT and SRC kinases) and cancer-induced (ERK and PKC kinases) protein interaction networks (interactomes). These kinases contributed to some extent to myeloid differentiation. However, only AKT and ERK specifically drove MDSC differentiation from myeloid precursors. Interfering with AKT and ERK with selective small molecule inhibitors or shRNAs selectively hampered MDSC differentiation and viability. Thus, we provide compelling evidence that MDSCs constitute a distinct myeloid lineage distinguished by a “kinase signature” and well-defined interactomes. Our results define new opportunities for the development of anti-cancer treatments targeting these tumor-promoting immune cells. PMID:26320174

  15. [The role of the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in the control of cancer in Peru].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Miriam Rosario; Regalado-Rafael, Roxana; Navarro, Jeannie Magalli; Montanez, Dayana Melissa; Abugattas, Julio Elías; Vidaurre, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    With a mortality rate that constitutes the second nationwide, the estimated incidence of cancer in Peru is 150 cases x 100 000 inhabitants. Around 75% of the cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mainly in Lima. In this context, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) has promoted the decentralization of oncological care creating regional institutes of neoplastic diseases, oncological units and prevention centers. In addition, INEN has designed, developed and implemented the Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, which, since 2011, has allowed for more than 7000 centers around the country to allocate resources to the prevention, promotion and early detection of the most frequent cancers in Peru. With the financial support of the state's health insurance system, the basic strategic central points were integrated to provide low-income cancer patients with comprehensive medical care. Through this way, and within the framework of a state policy integrated to and articulated with the health sector, the National Plan for Comprehensive Medical Care for Cancer Patients and the Improvement in the Access to Oncological Services in Peru, known as "The Hope Plan", was born. This article elaborates on the role that INEN plays in the control of cancer as a public health issue, highlighting the importance of the Strategic Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control and its role in the "The Hope Plan".

  16. Hypercobalaminaemia is associated with hepatic and neoplastic disease in cats: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When increased serum cobalamin concentrations are encountered clinically they are usually attributed to parenteral supplementation, dietary factors, or otherwise ignored. However, recently, hypercobalaminaemia has been associated with numerous diseases in humans, most notably neoplastic and hepatic disorders. The aim of this retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study was to determine the significance of increased cobalamin in cats. Results In total, 237 records were retrieved and 174 cats, of various ages and sexes met the inclusion criteria. A total of 42 cats had increased serum cobalamin concentration, and had not received prior supplementation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that increased serum cobalamin concentration was positively related to pedigree breed (pedigree breeds more likely to have increased cobalamin concentration, odds ratio [OR] 4.24, 95% CI 1.78-10.15, P = 0.001), to having liver disease (OR 9.91, 95% CI 3.54-27.68), and to having a solid neoplasm (OR 8.54, 95% CI 1.10-66.45). Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that increased serum cobalamin concentrations should not be ignored in cats with no history of supplementation, and investigation for underlying hepatic or neoplastic disease is warranted. PMID:25103858

  17. Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. In addition to demographic data, we compiled information on clinical signs and symptoms, radiologic and pathologic findings, and surgical approaches. All patients exhibited gradual-onset facial weakness or facial twitching. Imaging identified an extratemporal tumor in 128 patients (58%), an intratemporal lesion in 55 patients (25%), and an intradural mass in 38 (17%). Almost all of the extratemporal tumors (99%) were malignant, while 91% of the intratemporal and intradural tumors were benign. A transtemporal surgical approach was used in the 93 intratemporal and intradural tumor resections, while the 128 extratemporal lesions required a parotidectomy with partial temporal bone dissection. The vast majority of patients (97%) underwent facial reanimation. We conclude that gradual-onset facial paralysis or twitching may occur as a result of a neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve along its course from the cerebellopontine angle to the parotid gland. We caution readers to beware of a diagnosis of "atypical Bell's palsy."

  18. Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. In addition to demographic data, we compiled information on clinical signs and symptoms, radiologic and pathologic findings, and surgical approaches. All patients exhibited gradual-onset facial weakness or facial twitching. Imaging identified an extratemporal tumor in 128 patients (58%), an intratemporal lesion in 55 patients (25%), and an intradural mass in 38 (17%). Almost all of the extratemporal tumors (99%) were malignant, while 91% of the intratemporal and intradural tumors were benign. A transtemporal surgical approach was used in the 93 intratemporal and intradural tumor resections, while the 128 extratemporal lesions required a parotidectomy with partial temporal bone dissection. The vast majority of patients (97%) underwent facial reanimation. We conclude that gradual-onset facial paralysis or twitching may occur as a result of a neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve along its course from the cerebellopontine angle to the parotid gland. We caution readers to beware of a diagnosis of "atypical Bell's palsy." PMID:27657317

  19. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  20. [Non-neoplastic enlargement of salivary glands: clinico-histologic analysis].

    PubMed

    González Guevara, Martha Beatriz; Torres Tejero, Marco Antonio; Martínez Mata, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study on non-neoplastic enlargement of the salivary glands at the Oral Histopathology Diagnostic Center of the Autonomous Metropolitan University at Xochimilco (UAM-Xochimilco) in Mexico during a period of 24 years (1979-2003). From 5,625 biopsies received and analyzed, a total of 461 (8.2%) were non-neoplastic enlargement of the salivary glands; for each case, we registered demographic data as well as clinic characteristics. These lesions were characterized as a heterogeneous group of pathologic entities among which we included local, obstructive, infectious, and immunopathologic lesions. The most frequent lesion was the extravasation cyst in 341 (74%) cases, followed by chronic sialoadenitis and Sjögren's syndrome with 54 (11.7%) and 41 (8.8%) cases, respectively, and at a lesser percentage mucous retention cyst, sialosis, benign lymphoepithelial lesions and those related with sialolytes. Females were affected more frequently; mean age was second to third life decades. These lesions were most frequently localized on inferior labial mucosa.

  1. Increased radiation-induced transformation in C3H/10T1/2 cells after transfer of an exogenous c-myc gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, V; Drozdoff, V; Zeitz, L; Fleissner, E

    1987-01-01

    C3H/10T1/2 cells were infected with a retroviral vector expressing a mouse c-myc oncogene and a drug-selection marker. The resulting cells, morphologically indistinguishable from C3H/10T1/2, displayed a greatly enhanced sensitivity to neoplastic transformation by ionizing radiation or by a chemical carcinogen. Constitutive expression of myc therefore appears to synergize with an initial carcinogenic event, providing a function analogous to a subsequent event that apparently is required for the neoplastic transformation of these cells. This cell system should prove useful in exploring early stages in radiation-induced transformation. Images PMID:3473497

  2. SV40 expression in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues: perspectives on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Procopio, A; Marinacci, R; Marinetti, M R; Strizzi, L; Paludi, D; Iezzi, T; Tassi, G; Casalini, A; Modesti, A

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the association of SV40 and human pleural malignant mesothelioma. Here, we have investigated whether SV40 viral sequences may be associated with other human tumours or other non-neoplastic pathology and whether SV40 DNA or protein expression may be of diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic relevance. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. SV40, JC and BK viral sequences were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and molecular hybridization with specific probes. The screening with three different sets of SV40-related primers demonstrated that 7/18 (38.8%) mesothelioma specimens were SV40 positive as well as 5/18 (27.7%) tubercular pleural lesions. None of the 18 lung cancers, nor the 20 pleural non-specific inflammatory specimens tested were positive. Twenty-five blood samples and 18 urinary sediments from MM patients were also negative. We have also found that SV40 Tag proteins are present in mesothelioma cells and tumours. Tag proteins may interfere with tumour suppressor gene products, such as p53. Preliminary results suggest that wild type p53 transgene expression, obtained after infection with recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV.p53), inhibited in vitro and in vivo proliferation, inducing apoptosis of mesothelioma cells. Infections with control viruses were ineffective. Thus, SV40 DNA and Tag expression in mesothelioma tumour cells, though probably not relevant for diagnostic or prognostic purposes, may be crucial for innovative gene therapy strategies.

  3. SV40 expression in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues: perspectives on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Procopio, A; Marinacci, R; Marinetti, M R; Strizzi, L; Paludi, D; Iezzi, T; Tassi, G; Casalini, A; Modesti, A

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the association of SV40 and human pleural malignant mesothelioma. Here, we have investigated whether SV40 viral sequences may be associated with other human tumours or other non-neoplastic pathology and whether SV40 DNA or protein expression may be of diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic relevance. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. SV40, JC and BK viral sequences were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and molecular hybridization with specific probes. The screening with three different sets of SV40-related primers demonstrated that 7/18 (38.8%) mesothelioma specimens were SV40 positive as well as 5/18 (27.7%) tubercular pleural lesions. None of the 18 lung cancers, nor the 20 pleural non-specific inflammatory specimens tested were positive. Twenty-five blood samples and 18 urinary sediments from MM patients were also negative. We have also found that SV40 Tag proteins are present in mesothelioma cells and tumours. Tag proteins may interfere with tumour suppressor gene products, such as p53. Preliminary results suggest that wild type p53 transgene expression, obtained after infection with recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV.p53), inhibited in vitro and in vivo proliferation, inducing apoptosis of mesothelioma cells. Infections with control viruses were ineffective. Thus, SV40 DNA and Tag expression in mesothelioma tumour cells, though probably not relevant for diagnostic or prognostic purposes, may be crucial for innovative gene therapy strategies. PMID:9776257

  4. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Georgy, K A; Mei, M; Durante, M; Craise, L M

    1995-10-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  5. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  6. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  7. Rabaptin-5 and Rabex-5 are neoplastic tumour suppressor genes that interact to modulate Rab5 dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster☆

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Chloe; Strutt, David

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis plays an important role in the regulation of tumour growth and metastasis. In Drosophila, a number of endocytic neoplastic tumour suppressor genes have been identified that when mutated cause epithelial disruption and over-proliferation. Here we characterise the Drosophila homologue of the Rab5 effector Rabaptin-5, and show that it is a novel neoplastic tumour suppressor. Its ability to bind Rab5 and modulate early endosomal dynamics is conserved in Drosophila, as is its interaction with the Rab5 GEF Rabex5, for which we also demonstrate neoplastic tumour suppressor characteristics. Surprisingly, we do not observe disruption of apico-basal polarity in Rabaptin-5 and Rabex-5 mutant tissues; instead the tumour phenotype is associated with upregulation of Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and Janus Kinase (JAK)/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) signalling. PMID:24104056

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  9. Brachytherapy versus radical hysterectomy after external beam chemoradiation: a non-randomized matched comparison in IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cetina, Lucely; Garcia-Arias, Alicia; Candelaria, Myrna; Cantú, David; Rivera, Lesbia; Coronel, Jaime; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Flores, Vladimir; Gonzalez, Aaron; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Background A current paradigm in the treatment of cervical cancer with radiation therapy is that intracavitary brachytherapy is an essential component of radical treatment. This is a matched retrospective comparison of the results of treatment in patients treated with external beam chemoradiation (EBRT-CT) and radical hysterectomy versus those treated with identical chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. Methods In this non-randomized comparison EBRT-CT protocol was the same in both groups of 40 patients. In the standard treated patients, EBRT-CT was followed by one or two intracavitary Cesium (low-dose rate) applications within 2 weeks of finishing external radiation to reach a point A dose of at least 85 Gy. In the surgically treated patients, radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymph node sampling were performed within 7 weeks after EBRT-CT. Response, toxicity and survival were evaluated. Results A total of 80 patients were analyzed. The patients receiving EBRT-CT and surgery were matched with the standard treated cases. There were no differences in the clinicopathological characteristics between groups or in the delivery of EBRT-CT. The pattern of acute and late toxicity differed. Standard treated patients had more chronic proctitis while the surgically treated had acute complications of surgery and hydronephrosis. At a maximum follow-up of 60 months, median follow-up 26 (2–31) and 22 (3–27) months for the surgery and standard therapy respectively, eight patients per group have recurred and died. The progression free and overall survival are the same in both groups. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that radical hysterectomy can be used after EBRT-CT without compromising survival in FIGO stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients in settings were brachytherapy is not available. A randomized study is needed to uncover the value of surgery after EBRT-CT. PMID:19220882

  10. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Short-Course Deep Sedation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Surgery: A Non-Randomized Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dapeng; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qiushi; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background While mild and moderate sedation have been widely used to reduce sudden agitation in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients after surgery, agitation is still a frequent problem, which may cause postoperative blood pressure fluctuation. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course deep sedation for the treatment of ICH after surgery. Material/Methods A total of 41 ICH patients who received surgery, including traditional craniotomy hematoma removal and decompressive craniectomy, were including in this non-randomized control study. Patients in the deep sedation group received continuous postoperative sedation with a target course for ≤12 hours and reached SAS scores of 1~2. Patients in the traditional sedition group received continuous light sedation and reached SAS scores of 3~4. Additional therapeutic interventions included antihypertensive treatment, mechanical ventilation, tracheotomy, and re-operation. Results Patients in the deep sedation group had deeper sedation degree, and lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Residual hematoma after surgery in patients in the deep sedation group were smaller on the second, seventh, and fourteenth day after surgery (p=0.023, 0.003, 0.004, respectively). The 3-month mortality and quality of life of patients in the deep sedation group were lower and better than that of patients in the traditional sedation group, respectively (p=0.044, p<0.01). No significant difference in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ICU days were observed between the two groups. Conclusions Short-course deep sedation therapy in ICH patients after surgery is efficient in controlling postoperative blood pressure, reducing re-bleeding, and improving clinical prognosis. PMID:27466863

  11. Mechanisms by which the Hawksley random zero sphygmomanometer underestimates blood pressure and produces a non-random distribution of RZ values.

    PubMed

    Brown, W C; Kennedy, S; Inglis, G C; Murray, L S; Lever, A F

    1997-02-01

    Four faults are reported in the Hawksley Random Zero Sphygmomanometer (RZS). Our study is of their mechanism. (i) Compared with a mercury sphygmomanometer the RZS underestimates blood pressure (BP). We confirm this: for 240 measurements by three experienced operators in 12 patients, systolic BP was 3.4 mm Hg lower in the RZS; diastolic pressure was not underestimated. A cause of under-estimation in 89% of measurements was that mercury stuck in the manometer giving a false high reading of random zero (RZ). Tilting the RZS before reading RZ reduced under-reading by 1.6 mm Hg. A rare cause is failure of the operator to completely close the reservoir tap. (ii) Values of RZ are not randomly distributed; non-randomness is most marked in measurements made by experienced operators whose speed of measurement provides insufficient time during cuff inflation for filling of the diaphragm chamber. Smaller contributions are made by the sticking of mercury in the manometer and by a leak of air through the air bleed screw. (iii) Consecutive RZ estimates often have similar value. This has two causes: short cuff inflation time and short interval between opening the reservoir tap and spinning the thumb-wheel. (iv) An inverse relation of RZ and BP suggested by earlier work and by our own data is probably an artifact: when BP is low, measurement is quick and RZ is falsely high; when BP is high, measurement takes longer and RZ is lower. These four faults could be partly or wholly avoided by a change in the operators' technique.

  12. Effectiveness of a peer-led HIV prevention intervention in secondary schools in Rwanda: results from a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the HIV epidemic is levelling off in sub-Saharan Africa, it remains at an unacceptably high level. Young people aged 15-24 years remain particularly vulnerable, resulting in a regional HIV prevalence of 1.4% in young men and 3.3% in young women. This study assesses the effectiveness of a peer-led HIV prevention intervention in secondary schools in Rwanda on young people’s sexual behavior, HIV knowledge and attitudes. Methods In a non-randomized longitudinal controlled trial, fourteen schools were selected in two neighboring districts in Rwanda Bugesera (intervention) and Rwamagana (control). Students (n = 1950) in eight intervention and six control schools participated in three surveys (baseline, six and twelve months in the intervention). Analysis was done using linear and logistic regression using generalized estimation equations adjusted for propensity score. Results The overall retention rate was 72%. Time trends in sexual risk behavior (being sexually active, sex in last six months, condom use at last sex) were not significantly different in students from intervention and control schools, nor was the intervention associated with increased knowledge, perceived severity or perceived susceptibility. It did significantly reduce reported stigma. Conclusions Analyzing this and other interventions, we identified several reasons for the observed limited effectiveness of peer education: 1) intervention activities (spreading information) are not tuned to objectives (changing behavior); 2) young people prefer receiving HIV information from other sources than peers; 3) outcome indicators are not adequate and the context of the relationship in which sex occurs and the context in which sex occurs is ignored. Effectiveness of peer education may increase through integration in holistic interventions and redefining peer educators’ role as focal points for sensitization and referral to experts and services. Finally, we argue that a narrow focus on

  13. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Short-Course Deep Sedation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Surgery: A Non-Randomized Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dapeng; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qiushi; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While mild and moderate sedation have been widely used to reduce sudden agitation in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients after surgery, agitation is still a frequent problem, which may cause postoperative blood pressure fluctuation. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course deep sedation for the treatment of ICH after surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 41 ICH patients who received surgery, including traditional craniotomy hematoma removal and decompressive craniectomy, were including in this non-randomized control study. Patients in the deep sedation group received continuous postoperative sedation with a target course for ≤12 hours and reached SAS scores of 1~2. Patients in the traditional sedition group received continuous light sedation and reached SAS scores of 3~4. Additional therapeutic interventions included antihypertensive treatment, mechanical ventilation, tracheotomy, and re-operation. RESULTS Patients in the deep sedation group had deeper sedation degree, and lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Residual hematoma after surgery in patients in the deep sedation group were smaller on the second, seventh, and fourteenth day after surgery (p=0.023, 0.003, 0.004, respectively). The 3-month mortality and quality of life of patients in the deep sedation group were lower and better than that of patients in the traditional sedation group, respectively (p=0.044, p<0.01). No significant difference in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ICU days were observed between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Short-course deep sedation therapy in ICH patients after surgery is efficient in controlling postoperative blood pressure, reducing re-bleeding, and improving clinical prognosis.

  14. Rock magnetic evidence of non-random raw material selection criteria in Cerro Toledo Obsidian Artifacts from Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregovich, A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Steffen, A.; Sternberg, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Stone tools are one of the most enduring forms of ancient human behavior available to anthropologists. The geologic materials that comprise stone tools are a reflection of the rocks that were available locally or through trade, as are the intended use of the tools and the knapping technology needed to produce them. Investigation of the rock magnetic and geochemical characteristics of the artifacts and the geological source materials provides a baseline to explore these past behaviors. This study uses rock magnetic properties to explore the raw material selection criteria involved in the production of obsidian tools in the region around Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Obsidian is locally abundant and was traded by tribes across the central United States. Here we compare the rock magnetic properties of a sample of obsidian projectile points (N =25) that have been geochemically sourced to the Cerro Toledo obsidian flow with geological samples collected from four sites within the same flow (N =135). This collection of archaeological artifacts, albeit small, contains representatives of at least 8 different point styles that were used over 6000 years from the Archaic into the Late Prehistoric. Bulk rock hysteresis parameters (Mr, Ms, Bc, and Bcr) and low-field susceptibility (Χ) measurements show that the projectile points generally contain a lower concentration of magnetic minerals than the geologic samples. For example, the artifacts' median Ms value is 2.9 x 10-3 Am2kg-1, while that of the geological samples is 6.5 x 10-3 Am2kg-1. The concentration of magnetic minerals in obsidian is a proxy for the concentration of microlites in general, and this relationship suggests that although obsidian was locally abundant, toolmakers employed non-random selection criteria resulting in generally lower concentrations of microlites in their obsidian tools.

  15. Non-random cation distribution in hexagonal Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshreshtha, S.K.; Jayakumar, O.D.; Sudarsan, V.

    2010-05-15

    Based on powder X-ray diffraction and {sup 31}P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) investigations of mixed phosphate Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}, prepared by co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 900 deg. C for 24 h, it is shown that Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4} phase crystallizes in hexagonal form with lattice parameter a=0.491(2) and c=1.106(4) nm. This hexagonal phase of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4} is similar to that of pure GaPO{sub 4}. The {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectrum of the mixed phosphate sample consists of five peaks with systematic variation of their chemical shift values and is arising due to existence of P structural units having varying number of the Al{sup 3+}/Ga{sup 3+} cations as the next nearest neighbors in the solid solution. Based on the intensity analysis of the component NMR spectra of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}, it is inferred that the distribution of Al{sup 3+} and Ga{sup 3+} cations is non-random for the hexagonal Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4} sample although XRD patterns showed a well-defined solid solution formation. - Graphical abstract: {sup 31}P MAS NMR pattern of hexagonal Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4} solid solution.

  16. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  17. Infrared microspectroscopy of benign and neoplastic prostate: correlation of spectral patterns with histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriboga, Luis; Diem, Max; Yee, Herman T.

    2000-05-01

    The diagnosis of prostate cancer is based on the visible microscopic evaluation of both cytological and architectural features of the prostate tissue sections. In order to determine whether IR spectral 'mapping' can be used to objectively distinguish between normal and neoplastic prostate tissue, a comparison between 'visual, point-by- point' and 'automated, point-by-point' IR measurements was performed. Automated, point-by-point analysis was performed without any prior diagnostic information. Visual, point-by- point measurements were based on histopathology, histochemistry and immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. The spectra obtained from these measurements were compared to the spectra obtained from automated point- by-point analysis. Our results indicate that the spectra obtained from histopathologically directed measurements compares well with those of automated mapping methods. Therefore, we believe that current mapping methodology can be directly correlated with pathological diagnoses.

  18. Brachyury: A Diagnostic Marker for the Differential Diagnosis of Chordoma and Hemangioblastoma versus Neoplastic Histological Mimickers

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Branca, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Brachyury is a transcription factor which is required for posterior mesoderm formation and differentiation as well as for notochord development during embryogenesis. Due to its expression in the neoplastic cells of chordoma, a malignant tumour deriving from notochordal remnants, but not in tumors showing a similar histology, brachyury has been proposed as a diagnostic marker of this neoplasia. Though commonly considered a hallmark of chordoma, the expression of brachyury has been also documented in the stromal cells of hemangioblastoma (HBL), a slow growing tumor which may involve the central nervous system (CNS) and, rarely, the kidney. Herein we review the role of brachyury immunohistochemical detection in the identification and differential diagnosis of chordoma and HBL towards histological mimickers and suggest that brachyury is added to the panel of immunohistochemical markers for the recognition of HBL in routinary practice, principally in unusual sites. PMID:24591762

  19. DICER1-pleuropulmonary blastoma familial tumor predisposition syndrome: a unique constellation of neoplastic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiandong; Doros, Leslie; Williams, Gretchen M.; Harris, Anne; Stewart, Douglas R.; Messinger, Yoav; Field, Amanda; Dehner, Louis P.; Hill, D Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in DICER1 are associated with increased risk for a wide variety of neoplastic conditions, including pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), cystic nephroma, nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, botryoid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, ciliary body medulloepithelioma, pineoblastoma, pituitary blastoma and nodular thyroid hyperplasia or thyroid carcinoma. These tumors may be seen in isolation or in constellation with other characteristic tumor types in individuals or family members. Here we describe the medical history of a child with a heterozygous, loss of function germline DICER1 mutation and multiple tumors associated with the syndrome.. Although germline mutations in DICER1 are rare, tumors of these types will be seen by practicing pathologists and should prompt consideration of an underlying DICER1 mutation. PMID:25356068

  20. Action of some proteic and carbohydrate components of Symphytum officinale upon normal and neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Olinescu, A; Manda, G; Neagu, M; Hristescu, S; Daşanu, C

    1993-01-01

    The crude watery extract of Symphytum officinale and certain proteic and carbohydrate components isolated from it were studied for their effect upon the in vivo and in vitro proliferation of Ehrlich ascites cells, EL-4 cell line and of human T lymphocytes and upon the respiratory burst of human PMN granulocytes stimulated via Fc receptors. The results indicate that the crude extract and its proteic fraction stimulate the in vivo proliferation of the studied neoplastic cells and exert an antimitotic effect on human T lymphocytes in vitro stimulated with PHA. The vegetal preparations have remarkable effects on the respiratory burst of the granulocytes non-stimulated and stimulated via Fc receptors. The data underline the necessity to study thoroughly the effects of different phyto compounds through both pharmacological and immunological methods. PMID:8186457

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of papillomavirus structural antigens in animal hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Sironi, G; Caniatti, M; Scanziani, E

    1990-12-01

    One hundred and seventy-two hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions from 8 different mammalian and 1 avian species have been tested with an immunohistochemical technique to detect papillomavirus structural antigens. Selected lesions were diagnosed histologically as papilloma, fibropapilloma, equine sarcoid, squamous cell carcinoma, basalioma, epulis, keratoacanthoma, trichoepithelioma, pilomatrixoma, epidermal inclusion cyst, and hyperkeratotic or acanthotic epidermal lesions. Positive nuclear staining was detected in 14 out of 23 papillomas, 8 out of 32 fibropapillomas and in 1 out of 3 hyperplastic epidermal lesions. Positive samples were found in 5 of 8 mammalian species. Selected samples were also examined by transmission electron microscopy. In 4 samples papillomavirus was seen. In two other samples, negative with immunoperoxidase technique, papovavirus-like particles were observed.

  2. Regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by the Lgl neoplastic tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Marta; Parsons, Linda M; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Richardson, Helena E

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved neoplastic tumor suppressor protein, Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl), plays roles in cell polarity and tissue growth via regulation of the Hippo pathway. In our recent study, we showed that in the developing Drosophila eye epithelium, depletion of Lgl leads to increased ligand-dependent Notch signaling. lgl mutant tissue also exhibits an accumulation of early endosomes, recycling endosomes, early-multivesicular body markers and acidic vesicles. We showed that elevated Notch signaling in lgl− tissue can be rescued by feeding larvae the vesicle de-acidifying drug chloroquine, revealing that Lgl attenuates Notch signaling by limiting vesicle acidification. Strikingly, chloroquine also rescued the lgl− overgrowth phenotype, suggesting that the Hippo pathway defects were also rescued. In this extraview, we provide additional data on the regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by Lgl, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Lgl depletion contributes to signaling pathway defects and tumorigenesis. PMID:25789785

  3. Bioactive substances with anti-neoplastic efficacy from marine invertebrates: Porifera and Coelenterata

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Peter; Vetvicka, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    An ever increasing demand for new lead compounds in the pharmaceutical industry has led scientists to search for natural bioactive products. Based on this extensive research, marine invertebrates now represent a rich source of novel substances with significant anti-neoplastic activities. As the current approach of synthesizing new and chemically modifying old drugs seems to have slowed down, and the identification of new anticancer drugs is not too promising, a new approach is clearly needed. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date data on these newer compounds. Based on the data summarized in this short review, it is clear that marine invertebrates represent an extremely important source of compounds with potential anti-cancer effects. Considering that we tested only a tiny number of Porifera and Coelenterata, the best is yet to come. PMID:22087433

  4. [Duodenojejunostomy in the symptomatic treatment of neoplastic obstruction of the duodenum--clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Górka, Z; Lesiecka, M; Kuśnierz, K; Mrowiec, S; Leidgens, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the value of duodenojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy in the treatment of neoplastic obstruction in the distal part of the duodenum. From 1992-1996, 37 patients (15 women, 22 men, aged 31-76 years) underwent a palliative operation for pancreatic cancer infiltrating the distal part of duodenum. Roux-en-Y procedure was used to create anastomoses between the duodenal bulb and jejunal loop. In 13 patients only alimentary by-pass was made whereas in the remaining 24 biliary decompression was also performed. The results were compared with the outcome in 26 patients in whom gastrojejunal side-to-side anastomosis been made. The advantage of Roux-en-Y duodenojejunostomy is that it does not interfere with gastric emptying and thus prevents jejuno biliary reflux and the consequent complications. Improvement of nutrition and quality of life in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer, were noticed with this method.

  5. The origin of pre-neoplastic metaplasia in the stomach: Chief cells emerge from the Mist

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek; Mills, Jason C.

    2011-11-15

    The digestive-enzyme secreting, gastric epithelial chief (zymogenic) cell is remarkable and underappreciated. Here, we discuss how all available evidence suggests that mature chief cells in the adult, mammalian stomach are postmitotic, slowly turning over cells that arise via a relatively long-lived progenitor, the mucous neck cell, The differentiation of chief cells from neck cells does not involve cell division, and the neck cell has its own distinct pattern of gene expression and putative physiological function. Thus, the ontogeny of the normal chief cell lineage exemplifies transdifferentiation. Furthermore, under pathophysiogical loss of acid-secreting parietal cell, the chief cell lineage can itself trasndifferentiate into a mucous cell metaplasia designated Spasmolytic Polypeptide Expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Especially in the presence of inflammation, this metaplastic lineage can regain proliferative capacity and, in humans may also further differentiate into intestinal metaplasia. The results indicate that gastric fundic lineages display remarkable plasticity in both physiological ontogeny and pathophysiological pre-neoplastic metaplasia.

  6. DICER1-pleuropulmonary blastoma familial tumor predisposition syndrome: a unique constellation of neoplastic conditions.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kris Ann; Yang, Jiandong; Doros, Leslie; Williams, Gretchen M; Harris, Anne; Stewart, Douglas R; Messinger, Yoav; Field, Amanda; Dehner, Louis P; Hill, D Ashley

    2014-03-01

    Germline mutations in DICER1 are associated with increased risk for a wide variety of neoplastic conditions, including pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), cystic nephroma, nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, botryoid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, ciliary body medulloepithelioma, pineoblastoma, pituitary blastoma and nodular thyroid hyperplasia or thyroid carcinoma. These tumors may be seen in isolation or in constellation with other characteristic tumor types in individuals or family members. Here we describe the medical history of a child with a heterozygous, loss of function germline DICER1 mutation and multiple tumors associated with the syndrome.. Although germline mutations in DICER1 are rare, tumors of these types will be seen by practicing pathologists and should prompt consideration of an underlying DICER1 mutation.

  7. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Repair-dependent cell radiation survival and transformation: an integrated theory.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, John C

    2014-09-01

    The repair-dependent model of cell radiation survival is extended to include radiation-induced transformations. The probability of transformation is presumed to scale with the number of potentially lethal damages that are repaired in a surviving cell or the interactions of such damages. The theory predicts that at doses corresponding to high survival, the transformation frequency is the sum of simple polynomial functions of dose; linear, quadratic, etc, essentially as described in widely used linear-quadratic expressions. At high doses, corresponding to low survival, the ratio of transformed to surviving cells asymptotically approaches an upper limit. The low dose fundamental- and high dose plateau domains are separated by a downwardly concave transition region. Published transformation data for mammalian cells show the high-dose plateaus predicted by the repair-dependent model for both ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. For the neoplastic transformation experiments that were analyzed, the data can be fit with only the repair-dependent quadratic function. At low doses, the transformation frequency is strictly quadratic, but becomes sigmodial over a wider range of doses. Inclusion of data from the transition region in a traditional linear-quadratic analysis of neoplastic transformation frequency data can exaggerate the magnitude of, or create the appearance of, a linear component. Quantitative analysis of survival and transformation data shows good agreement for ultraviolet radiation; the shapes of the transformation components can be predicted from survival data. For ionizing radiations, both neutrons and x-rays, survival data overestimate the transforming ability for low to moderate doses. The presumed cause of this difference is that, unlike UV photons, a single x-ray or neutron may generate more than one lethal damage in a cell, so the distribution of such damages in the population is not accurately described by Poisson statistics. However, the complete

  9. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Methods Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. Results The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). Conclusion The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues. PMID:26761548

  10. Nanodiamond modified copolymer scaffolds affects tumour progression of early neoplastic oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Salwa; Mustafa, Kamal; Krueger, Anke; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Osdal, Tereza; Hamza, Amani O; Sun, Yang; Parajuli, Himalaya; Waag, Thilo; Nickel, Joachim; Johannessen, Anne Christine; McCormack, Emmet; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tumorigenic potential of functionalising poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds. The copolymer scaffolds were functionalised with nanodiamonds (nDP) or with nDP and physisorbed BMP-2 (nDP-PHY) to enhance osteoinductivity. Culturing early neoplastic dysplastic keratinocytes (DOK(Luc)) on nDP modified scaffolds reduced significantly their subsequent sphere formation ability and decreased significantly the cells' proliferation in the supra-basal layers of in vitro 3D oral neoplastic mucosa (3D-OT) when compared to DOK(Luc) previously cultured on nDP-PHY scaffolds. Using an in vivo non-invasive environmentally-induced oral carcinogenesis model, nDP scaffolds were observed to reduce bioluminescence intensity of tumours formed by DOK(Luc) + carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAF). nDP modification was also found to promote differentiation of DOK(Luc) both in vitro in 3D-OT and in vivo in xenografts formed by DOK(Luc) alone. The nDP-PHY scaffold had the highest number of invasive tumours formed by DOK(Luc) + CAF outside the scaffold area compared to the nDP and control scaffolds. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo results presented here demonstrate that nDP modified copolymer scaffolds are able to decrease the tumorigenic potential of DOK(Luc), while confirming concerns for the therapeutic use of BMP-2 for reconstruction of bone defects in oral cancer patients due to its tumour promoting capabilities. PMID:27108402

  11. Effect of carcinogen dose on the dynamics of neoplastic development in rat tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Terzaghi, M.; Nettesheim, P.; Riester, L.

    1982-11-01

    The aim was to analyze carcinogen dose effects on the development of carcinogen-altered preneoplastic epithelial cell populations following exposure to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Upon exposure to carcinogen, cells appear in the tracheal epithelium which are distinguishable by an enhanced in vitro growth capacity. Cultures established from carcinogen-exposed cells form expanding epithelial foci (EF). Designated EF-forming units (EFFU), these clonogenic units often escape senescence permanently and may become neoplastic after repeated subculturing. Clonogenic units give rise to subculturable progeny (EFFU/sub s/) and to progeny which became anchorage independent (EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//). In the tracheal cell culture system, anchorage-independent growth is highly correlated with oncogenicity in vivo. Tracheas were exposed in vivo for 4 weeks to DMBA in doses ranging from 5 to 335 ..mu..g. Exposure to DMBA resulted in a 100- to 500-fold increase in frequency of EFFU, but no definitive carcinogen dose-response effect was detected on the number of clonogenic cells forming EF or subculturable EF, although there was some indication that the latter might be increasing with increasing dose. There was a marked carcinogen dose effect on the frequency and rate of appearance of EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//. The data suggest that the carcinogen dose affects either the rate of growth of EFFU/sub x,ag/sup +//, the cell compartment with neoplastic potential, or the conversion rate of EFFU/sub s/ to EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//.

  12. Contrast-agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of neoplastic lesions of the CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Rosa, Louis; Rajan, Sunder S.; Francisco, John

    1991-06-01

    Even though the intrinsic soft tissue contrast sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords excellent visualization of anatomic detail, certain pathologic processes may be diagnosed earlier with the administration of a contrast-enhancing agent. At present there is one agent, gadopentetate dimeglumine, GdDTPA, that has received FDA approval for use in the MR scanning of the brain and spine in human patients. This paramagnetic chelate distributes throughout the extracellular fluid space as dictated by capillary permeability so that abnormal vascularity and sites of blood-CNS barrier breakdown are highlighted. Primary neoplastic disease, metastases, meningeal extension, residual and recurrent tumor have been found to be better distinguished in MR images acquired after administration of GdDTPA. Routine administration of GdDTPA for cranial imaging has resulted in the discovery of otherwise occult lesions in approximately 3 of patients. Although the clinical utility and high therapeutic safety index of the first approved magnetic resonance contrast agent, GdDTPA, have been well established, other contrast agents, having different physical, chemical and biological properties, may offer improved sensitivity and bio-specificity. Agents currently being evaluated in vivo include: low osmolal paramagnetic chelates, superparamagnetic particles, metalloporphyrins, liposome encapsulated agents, perfluorocarbons, intravascular macromolecular chelate complexes and labeled monoclonal antibodies. Concurrent with advances in the development of new compounds, innovations in scanning hardware, pulse sequence design and image post-processing are helping to extend the efficacy of contrast media. Additional clinical experience will indicate which contrast agents and which MR techniques can best facilitate the early detection of specific neoplastic lesions.

  13. Characterization of intra-molecular distances and site-specific dynamics in chemically unfolded barstar: evidence for denaturant-dependent non-random structure.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anoop M; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2006-05-26

    The structure and dynamics of the unfolded form of a protein are expected to play critical roles in determining folding pathways. In this study, the urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-unfolded forms of the small protein barstar were explored by time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Barstar was labeled specifically with thionitrobenzoate (TNB), by coupling it to the thiol side-chain of a cysteine residue at one of the following positions on the sequence: 14, 25, 40, 42, 62, 82 and 89, in single cysteine-containing mutant proteins. Seven intra-molecular distances (R(DA)) under unfolding conditions were estimated from measurements of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the donor Trp53 and the non-fluorescent acceptor TNB coupled to one of the seven cysteine side-chains. The unfolded protein chain expands with an increase in the concentration of the denaturants. The extent of expansion was found to be non-uniform, with different intra-molecular distances expanding to different extents. In general, shorter distances were found to expand less when compared to longer spans. The extent of expansion was higher in the case of GdnHCl when compared to urea. A comparison of the measured values of R(DA) with those derived from a model based on excluded volume, revealed that while shorter spans showed good agreement, the experimental values of R(DA) of longer spans were smaller when compared to the theoretical values. Sequence-specific flexibility of the polypeptide was determined by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements on acrylodan or 1,5-IAEDANS labeled single cysteine-containing proteins under unfolding conditions. Rotational dynamics derived from these measurements indicated that the level of flexibility increased with increase in the concentration of denaturants and showed a graded increase towards the C-terminal end. Taken together, these results appear to indicate the presence of specific non-random coil structures and

  14. Adenocarcinoma of the rete testis with prominent papillary structure and clear neoplastic cells: morphologic and immunohistochemical findings and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rete testis is rare, and its etiology is unknown. The definite diagnosis merely depends on the exclusion of other tumors and histological features. We first describe a 38-year-old man with a carcinoma arising in the rete testis. The tumor was characterized by clear neoplastic cells and branching papillary growth. Focal stromal invasion and transition of normal rete epithelium to neoplastic cells were seen. The neoplastic cells were positive for epithelial membrane antigen, Ber-Ep4, vimentin, renal cell carcinoma marker, and CD10, while negative for Wilms' tumor 1, thyroid transcription factor-1, estrogen receptor, prostate specific antigen, placental alkaline phosphate, CD117, and alpha-1-fetoprotein. According to the above features, we diagnosed this tumor as adenocarcinoma of the rete testis. To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case of adenocarcinoma of the rete testis with prominently papillary structure and clear neoplastic cells. The rarity of adenocarcinoma of the rete testis and the unique features in our case cause diagnostic pitfalls. A complete clinicopathological study and thorough differential diagnosis are crucial for the correct result. PMID:25885143

  15. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  16. Oncogenic transformation tunes the cross-talk between mesenchymal stem cells and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Nilda; Miranda, Alex; Funes, Juan M; Hevia, Giselle; Pérez, Rolando; de León, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells from mesenchymal origin (MSC) exert a plethora of immunomodulatory effects. We created a neoplastic model based on in vitro step-wise transformation to assess whether oncogenic pathways have the capacity to mould the cross-talk of MSC and lymphocytes. Neoplastic MSC exhibit an increased inhibitory effect on T cell proliferation, either directly or mediated by myeloid derived suppressor cells. Additionally, transformation of MSC enhances T cell apoptosis without reducing either the percentage of CD25 expressing cells or the level of this protein expression. Malignant transformation drives MSC to lose dependency on nitric oxide for immunosuppression whilst increasing the constitutive production of PGE2. Our results indicate that oncogenesis tunes the interplay between MSC and immune cells, favoring cancer immune evasion. PMID:24841856

  17. Differential roles of ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra G; Hawthorne, Michael; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; Torres, Karen E O; Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L; Kopelovich, Levy

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments were performed to determine the roles of estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland. In wild-type mice, in vivo administration of estradiol (E) + progesterone (P) stimulated mammary ductal growth and alveolar differentiation. Mammary glands from mice in which the ERβ gene has been deleted (βERKO mice) demonstrated normal ductal growth and differentiation in response to E + P. By contrast, mammary glands from mice in which the ERα gene has been deleted (αERKO mice) demonstrated only rudimentary ductal structures that did not differentiate in response to E + P. EGF demonstrates estrogen-like activity in the mammary glands of αERKO mice: treatment of αERKO mice with EGF + P (without E) supported normal mammary gland development, induced expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and increased levels of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR30) protein. Mammary gland development in βERKO mice treated with EGF + P was comparable to that of wild-type mice receiving EGF + P; EGF had no statistically significant effects on the induction of PR or expression of GPR30 in mammary glands harvested from either wild-type mice or βERKO mice. In vitro exposure of mammary glands to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced preneoplastic mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in glands from wild-type mice and βERKO mice, but failed to induce MAL in mammary glands from αERKO mice. Microarray analysis of DMBA-treated mammary glands identified 28 functional pathways whose expression was significantly different in αERKO mice versus both βERKO and wild-type mice; key functions that were differentially expressed in αERKO mice included cell division, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The data demonstrate distinct roles for ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland, and suggest that EGF can mimic the ERα-mediated effects of E in this organ.

  18. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  19. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  20. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-09-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3-6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  1. Rejection of normal and neoplastic hemopoietic cells by lethally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Afifi, M.S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of rejection of normal and neoplastic hemopoietic cells by lethally irradiated mice, in part by investigating the hypothesis that two or more cell types are involved in recognition and rejection of hemopoietic cells. Interferon (IFN) was used as a tool for investigating such mechanisms. IFN alpha/beta stimulated the rejection of normal hemopoietic marrow cell grafts in Fl hybrid and in allogeneic host mice but did not affect the growth of cells in syngeneic mice. IFN alpha/beta was effective in hosts pretreated with silica but not in hosts pretreated with cyclophosphamide (Cy) or with anti-asialoGMI serum. Rabbit anti-IFN alpha/beta, but not anti-IFN gamma, serum inhibited genetic resistance to bone marrow cells. These results indicated that IFN alpha/beta was acting indirectly during the rejection of normal hemopoietic cells. It is proposed that four events occur in succession: a host cell recognizes the hemopoietic histocompatibility (Hh) antigens expressed on the surface of incompatible stem cells; this recognition leads to secretion of IFN; IFN activates natural killer (NK) cells; NK cells lyse donor stem cells. Silica interrupts one or both of the first two events. i.e., recognition and/or interrupts one or both of the first two events, i.e. recognition and/or IGN secretion.

  2. Cytoskeletal characteristics of myofibroblasts in benign neoplastic and reactive fibroblastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Hirose, T; Kudo, E; Abe, J; Hizawa, K

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of the cytoskeleton of myofibroblasts were examined immunohistochemically in 10 extra-abdominal desmoid tumours, 3 palmar and 2 plantar fibromatoses and 5 nodular fasciitis; in the cultured cells of one desmoid tumour, and also ultrastructurally in 3 desmoid tumours. Polyclonal anti-desmin antibody reacted with the cells in 7 extra-abdominal desmoid tumours, 1 palmar fibromatosis, 1 plantar fibromatosis and 3 nodular fasciitis. Monoclonal antidesmin antibody reacted with cells in only 2 desmoid tumours. Desmin-positive spindle cells were scattered throughout these lesions. There were no marked ultrastructural differences between desmin-positive and desmin-negative desmoids. All specimens except one specimen of nodular fasciitis showed immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin. Muscle actin-positive cells were observed in all specimens. Cultured cells gave positive reactions with polyclonal desmin antibody as well as to vimentin antibodies and two preparations of actin antibodies, whereas the original tumour did not react with desmin antibody. The present studies suggested that the cytoskeleton of some myofibroblasts in both neoplastic and reactive lesions resembles that of smooth muscle cells.

  3. Effect of Pomegranate Hull Extract on Liver Neoplastic Changes in Rats: More than an Antioxidant.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Eman G; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Abd El-Fattah, Eslam E

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The current work was designed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effect of pomegranate hull extract (PHE) in livers of rats exposed to the hepatocarcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DENA) with emphasis on oxidative stress, proliferation, and apoptosis. Male albino rats were divided into three groups: normal control, DENA group, and PHE group. PHE was given to rats orally 3 times weekly for 10 wk, 4 wk before and 6 wk after DENA (200 mg/kg, single i.p. dose). The results indicated a prophylactic effect of PHE against neoplastic changes in the liver, which was evidenced by the decrease of tumor size, liver index, and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2; and the increase of glutathione. PHE group also showed decreased expression of liver cyclin D1 and β-catenin genes compared with DENA group. It is proved that PHE has antitumorigenic effect and could be a candidate for anticancer drugs. PMID:27383944

  4. Comparative immunohistochemical study of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic C cells of the rat thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lacave, I; Rojas, F; Bernabé, R; Utrilla, J C; Fernández-Santos, J M; De Miguel, M; Conde, E

    2002-09-01

    In rats, the frequency of spontaneous C-cell tumours is very high and is both age and gender dependent. The three specific stages of neoplastic progression can be distinguished into diffuse C-cell hyperplasia, focal C-cell hyperplasia and bona fide C-cell tumours. Based on this hypothetical model of human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we carried out an immunohistochemical study using different markers (calcitonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, somatostatin and chromogranin) to verify the existence of any relationship between their expression and the successive steps of tumour development. We found a characteristic immunohistochemical staining pattern, particularly for calcitonin and somatostatin, which distinguishes C-cell tumours from both normal and hyperplastic C cells, with no differences related to the gender of the animals under study. Specifically, a considerable heterogeneity in calcitonin expression was only displayed by C-cell carcinomas, being less pronounced in C-cell adenomas. As for somatostatin, this regulatory peptide was found only in a minority of calcitonin-positive cells in normal and hyperplastic glands. However, in some C-cell adenomas and most C-cell carcinomas nearly all calcitonin-positive cells also coexpressed somatostatin. We conclude that rat C-cell neoplasms constitute a very particular tumour entity which shares many but not all immunohistochemical features with human MTC.

  5. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravi; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-01-18

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a ''phantom.'' Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  6. Expression pattern of FCRL (FREB, FcRX) in normal and neoplastic human B cells.

    PubMed

    Masir, Noraidah; Jones, Margaret; Pozzobon, Michela; Marafioti, Teresa; Volkova, Olga Y; Mechetina, Ludmila V; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Taranin, Alexander V; Mason, David Y

    2004-11-01

    FCRL (also known as FREB and FcRX) is a recently described member of the family of Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the present study we analysed its expression in normal and neoplastic lymphoid tissue using immunohistochemical techniques. FCRL was preferentially expressed in a proportion of germinal centre cells and, more weakly, in mantle zone B cells. In addition, strong labelling was observed in marginal zone B cells in the spleen, representing one of the few markers for this cell type. The majority of cases of small B-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's disease were positive for FCRL. However, the number of positive cells varied widely, and in consequence we could not define a cut-off that distinguished subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our results also showed that FCRL tended to be negative in T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and in classical Hodgkin's disease. FCRL may therefore represent a novel marker for normal B cells (e.g. splenic marginal zone cells) and may also be useful as a potential marker of B-cell neoplasms. PMID:15491296

  7. Analysis of IMP3 expression in normal and neoplastic human pituitary tissues.

    PubMed

    Righi, Alberto; Zhang, Shuya; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Kovacs, Gabor; Goth, Miklos I; Korbonits, Marta; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2010-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in fetal tissue and malignant tumors but rarely found in adult benign tissues. In various tumors, IMP3 expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and reduced overall survival. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in pituitary tumors. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of IMP3 in five normal pituitary tissues and 75 pituitary tumors (64 adenomas and 11 carcinomas) to determine if specific tumor types expressed IMP3 and if there were differences in IMP3 expression between adenomas and carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IMP3 was positive in four (80%) normal pituitaries with focal stain in a subset of normal anterior pituitary cells. IMP3 was expressed in 31% (20/64) of adenomas and in 36% (4/11) of carcinomas. A slightly higher level of IMP3 expression was observed in PRL-GH-TSH adenomas compared to the other types of pituitary adenomas. Expression of IMP3 was not significantly higher in carcinomas than in adenomas (p = 0.737). RT-PCR and Western Blotting supported the heterogeneous expression of IMP3. These results indicate that IMP3 is expressed both in normal and in neoplastic pituitary gland tissues without significant differences in expression levels in pituitary carcinomas. PMID:19898970

  8. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Paul S. Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-11-15

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals.

  9. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein in Neoplastic Thyroid Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sun A; Kim, Won Gu; Jeon, Min Ji; Han, Ji Min; Sung, Tae Yon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Hong, Suck Joon; Shong, Young Kee; Gong, Gyungyub

    2011-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is associated with tumor genesis, growth, progression and metastasis, and acts by blocking caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression patterns of XIAP in various neoplastic thyroid disorders and determine the association between XIAP expression and clinicopathologic factors. Expression of XIAP was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal anti-XIAP in 164 specimens of conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and 53 specimens of other malignant or benign thyroid tumors. XIAP positivity was observed in 128 (78%) of the 164 conventional PTC specimens. Positive rates of XIAP expression in follicular variant PTC, follicular, medullary, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma specimens were 20%, 25%, 38%, 67%, and 38%, respectively. Six nodular hyperplasia specimens were negative and 1 of 7 follicular adenomas (8%) was positive for XIAP. Lateral neck lymph node metastases were more frequent in patients negative for XIAP expression (P = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining for XIAP as a novel molecular marker may thus be helpful in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Moreover, high XIAP expression in conventional PTC is strongly associated with reduced risk of lateral neck lymph node metastasis. PMID:21935275

  10. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the head and neck: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-07-01

    Forty-nine patients with neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx and tracheobronchial tree have been treated with photodynamic therapy with follow-up to 40 months. Those patients with primary recurrent leukoplakia, carcinoma-in-situ, and T1 carcinomas obtained a complete response after one photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment and remain free of disease. Eight patients with T2 and T3 carcinomas treated with PDT obtained a complete or partial response, but in all cases, the carcinomas recurred locally, many times with overlying normal mucosa. This is due to the inability to adequately deliver laser light to the depths of the tumor bed, despite aggressive use of interstitial implantation. PDT is highly effective for the curative treatment of early carcinomas (CIS, T1) of the head and neck. Further development of devices to measure and deliver light into the depths of a tumor bed are required prior to the use of PDT to effectively treat larger solid tumors of the head and neck.

  11. Automatic segementation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a "phantom." Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  12. [The value of fine needle aspiration cytology in suspected neoplastic salivary gland enlargement].

    PubMed

    Schoengen, A; Binder, T; Krause, H R; Stussak, G; Zeelen, U

    1995-04-01

    Imaging offers little support in the management of salivary gland masses suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. There are also contraindications for a surgical biopsy in many cases. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is not yet widely recognized as a diagnostic tool. To date, 206 FNAC were carried out from 1986 through 1993 on 181 consecutive patients and were reviewed in the present study. Histological confirmation was possible in 174 tests, while 32 were confirmed on clinical follow-up. In sum, 192 samples were sufficient for interpretation, 10 were questionable by our standards and 4 were non-diagnostic. One hundred-seventy-one samples were true-negative, 27 true-positive, 4 false-negative and 4 false-positive. Sensitivity was 87.1% and specificity 97.7%. Out of 141 primary diagnostic procedures in which a final histologic diagnosis was available, FNAC was able to determine histogenesis in 113/124 benign lesions and 9/17 malignant masses. These included 65/67 pleomorphic adenomas and 21/22 adenolymphomas. In 8 cases a diagnosis of "adenoma" was made. Difficulties in interpretation were found in lesions that were mucoepidermoid carcinomas and, in part, adenoid cystic carcinomas. No complications occurred. Provided that there was sufficient experience in performing the aspiration technique and in cytologic interpretation, FNAC was found to be a quick, reliable, low-cost, easy-to-perform method with low risk in the management of nearly all benign and most malignant salivary gland lesions.

  13. [Unusual non-neoplastic lesions in the "surgical pathology" of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Magro, G; Torrisi, A; Ippolito, O; Torrisi, A; Bisceglia, M

    2006-04-01

    This review aims to describe and assist in the categorization of most of the unusual non-neoplastic conditions, encountered in the surgical pathology of the thyroid. The conditions included are: normal intrathyroidal vestigial tissues/structures (i.e. rests of the ultimobranchial body and thyroglossal duct) and their relevant pathological derivatives (ultimobranchial body cyst, intrathyroidal lymphoepithelial cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst); mature intrathyroidal heterologous tissues/organs of either metaplastic or heterotopic origin (adipose tissue, striated skeletal muscle, cartilage, parathyroid glands, thymus, salivary gland tissue) and their relevant pseudotumoural lesions; varieties of metaplastic and non-metaplastic morphologic changes of the thyroid follicular epithelium (oncocytic, clear cell/signet ring cell, darkly pigmented cell, mucinous (myxoid), squamous, spindle cell); amyloid goiter; some reactive and/or degenerative cytologic and nuclear atypicalities (nuclear pseudoclearing and cell pleomorphism) as well as some hyperplastic or peculiar growth patterns (capsular pseudoinvasion; vascular invasion; papillary carcinoma-like and paraganglioma-like patterns) of benign conditions mimicking neoplasia; and finally. some pseudotumoural lesions of the stroma (pseudoangiosarcomatous vascular proliferation, and post-fine-needle aspiration spindle cell nodule). The pathogenetic mechanism, the morphologic interpretation, and the differential diagnosis of each of the above-listed conditions are discussed and pertinent illustrations for many of them are also provided. Lesions of thyroid tissue situated outside of the gland itself are not discussed.

  14. Increased messenger RNA levels of the antagonist thyroid hormone receptor erbA-alpha 2 and decreased levels of erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 receptor messenger RNAs in neoplastic rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Too, C K; Guernsey, D L

    1992-04-15

    Nothern blot analysis of total RNA from the mouse C3H/10T1/2 cell line indicated that the erbA alpha gene transcribed three mRNA species of similar sizes (2.6, 5.5, 6.6 kilobases) as found in rodents. The 2.6-kilobase mRNA (erbA-alpha 2) was approximately 7- to 8-fold more abundant than either the 5.5- (erbA-alpha 1) or 6.6-kilobase species. The expression of the erbA-alpha 2 transcript increased 3- to 30-fold when "normal" mouse or rat cells were growth arrested by concluence. Triiodothyronine, at a concentration of 1 nM, had no effect on the levels of the erbA-alpha mRNA species in confluent cells nor on the levels of erbA-alpha 2 in proliferative normal or transformed C3H/10T1/2 cells. In log-phase growing cells there was a 2.5- to 5-fold increase in the relative expression of erbA-alpha 2 mRNA in transformed mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells, transformed cloned rat embryo fibroblasts (CREF), transformed rat embryo fibroblasts (REF), and a transformed temperature-sensitive rat mutant cell line (ts7E) when compared with their non-transformed counterparts. In contrast to the elevation of erbA-alpha 2 in transformed cells, erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 mRNAs decreased in transformed mouse and rat cell lines. In conclusion, it is suggested that the increased levels of the erbA-alpha 2 transcript and the decreased levels of erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 in neoplastic cells may account for the loss of thyroid hormone regulation of inducible pathways and decreased nuclear triiodothyronine binding as previously reported.

  15. Active vitamin D potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of calcium in the colon: A cross talk through the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Höbaus, Julia; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Prinz-Wohlgenannt, Maximilian; Graça, João; Price, Sally A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse correlation between dietary calcium (Ca(2+)) and vitamin D intake and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been shown in vitro that the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) can upregulate expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In the colon, CaSR has been suggested to regulate proliferation of colonocytes. However, during tumorigenesis colonic CaSR expression is downregulated and we hypothesized that the loss of CaSR could influence the anti-tumorigenic effects of Ca(2+) and vitamin D. Our aim was to assess the impact of CaSR expression and function on the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 in colon cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that in the healthy colon of mice, high vitamin D diet (2500 IU/kg diet) increased expression of differentiation and apoptosis markers, decreased expression of proliferation markers and significantly upregulated CaSR mRNA expression, compared with low vitamin D diet (100 IU/kg diet). To determine the role of CaSR in this process, we transfected Caco2-15 and HT29 CRC cells with wild type CaSR (CaSR-WT) or a dominant negative CaSR mutant (CaSR-DN) and treated them with 1,25-D3 alone, or in combination with CaSR activators (Ca(2+) and NPS R-568). 1,25-D3 enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of Ca(2+) and induced differentiation and apoptosis only in cells with a functional CaSR, which were further enhanced in the presence of NPS R-568, a positive allosteric modulator of CaSR. The mutant CaSR inhibited the anti-tumorigenic effects of 1,25-D3 suggesting that the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 are, at least in part, mediated by the CaSR. Taken together, our data provides molecular evidence to support the epidemiological observation that both, vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. This article is part of a Special Issue

  16. Therapeutic and toxicologic evaluation of anti-lipogenic agents in cancer cells compared with non-neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi; Vandhana, Suryanarayanan; Jayanthi, Udayakumar; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2012-06-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a multi-enzyme complex, is involved in lipid biosynthesis. FASN is over-expressed in different types of cancers and is being widely investigated for its role in cancer progression, diagnosis and therapy. Here, three inhibitors targeting different domains of FASN--cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat--were evaluated for their anti-proliferative efficacy in ocular cancer, retinoblastoma (RB) cells and their toxicity (if any) in normal cells. FASN inhibitors were tested in cultured retinoblastoma Y79 cells, normal fibroblast (3T3) and Müller glial (MIOM1) cells. Cell viability was determined by MTT-based assay, and IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) of the FASN inhibitors was calculated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells. The IC(50) after 48 and 96 hr of incubation with the three anti-FASN agents showed that cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat inhibited retinoblastoma cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cancer cells exhibited differential dose- and time-dependent response/sensitivities to cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat. The 48-hr neoplastic IC(50) dosages were, however, not toxic to the normal cells. These findings were confirmed by phase-contrast microscopic assessment of cell morphology. Therapeutic index (TI) was calculated as a ratio of the IC(50) normal cells, to the IC(50) neoplastic cells. Relative to normal MIOM1 cells, TI was 9.18 for cerulenin, while 5.32 for triclosan and 1.72 for orlistat. The TI computed relative to 3T3 cells was 28.64, 7.10 and 2.58 for cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat, respectively. DNA fragmentation analysis suggests that FASN inhibitors induced apoptotic DNA damage in retinoblastoma cells. Thus, FASN inhibition can be an effective strategy in retinoblastoma therapy. PMID:22151915

  17. An update on recent advances in the understanding of non-neoplastic diseases of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Scully, C

    1992-08-01

    The recent advances in the understanding of the non-neoplastic disorders of salivary glands are summarised in this paper. The common infections are discussed and newer aspects of juvenile recurrent parotitis outlined. The benign lympho-epithelial lesion is reviewed in relation to Sjogren's syndrome and the salivary gland pathology seen in relation to infection with human immunodeficiency virus. A range of unusual conditions that may affect the minor salivary glands in particular, and can cause diagnosis dilemmas, is summarised.

  18. The wound inflammatory response exacerbates growth of pre-neoplastic cells and progression to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Nicole; Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie Louise; Ward, Laura Chloe; Collin, John; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Steiniche, Torben; Schmidt, Henrik; Feng, Yi; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a long-standing association between wound healing and cancer, with cancer often described as a “wound that does not heal”. However, little is known about how wounding, such as following surgery, biopsy collection or ulceration, might impact on cancer progression. Here, we use a translucent zebrafish larval model of RasG12V-driven neoplasia to image the interactions between inflammatory cells drawn to a wound, and to adjacent pre-neoplastic cells. We show that neutrophils are rapidly diverted from a wound to pre-neoplastic cells and these interactions lead to increased proliferation of the pre-neoplastic cells. One of the wound-inflammation-induced trophic signals is prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In an adult model of chronic wounding in zebrafish, we show that repeated wounding with subsequent inflammation leads to a greater incidence of local melanoma formation. Our zebrafish studies led us to investigate the innate immune cell associations in ulcerated melanomas in human patients. We find a strong correlation between neutrophil presence at sites of melanoma ulceration and cell proliferation at these sites, which is associated with poor prognostic outcome. PMID:26136213

  19. Effect of carcinogen release rate on the incidence of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract epithelium in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, M.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Marchok, A.C.; Pal, B.C.; Nettesheim, P.

    1982-11-01

    Inbred F344 rat tracheal transplants were exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) delivered at different release rates from intraluminal pellets made of various matrices to study the effect of carcinogen dose rate on the induction of lesions in the epithelium. These matrices were beeswax, beeswax-stearyl alcohol, and beeswax-cholesterol. In addition, DMBA adsorbed onto carbon particles was dispersed in beeswax-stearyl alcohol. The fastest release was obtained from beeswax pellets from which 99% of the carcinogen (198 ..mu..g) was released in 4 weeks, and the slowest release was from DMBA adsorbed on carbon at a ratio of 1:9 from which only 56% (113 ..mu..g) was released in 16 weeks. Morphometry of histologic sections showed marked differences in the percentage of luminal surface covered by dysplastic-neoplastic epithelium (i.e., 7.5% in the tracheas exposed to the fastest releasing pellets and 46.3% in the tracheas exposed to the slowest releasing pellets). An inverse linear correlation was found between the cumulative amount of DMBA release from the different pellet matrices at 2 weeks and the incidence of dysplastic plus neoplastic lesions of tracheal epithelium at 16 weeks. The results indicated that lower doses of carcinogen delivered slowly are more effective in producing dysplastic plus neoplastic lesions than higher doses delivered rapidly.

  20. Organelle transformation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anjanabha; Kumar, Anish; Desai, Nirali; Parikh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The source of genetic information in a plant cell is contained in nucleus, plastids, and mitochondria. Organelle transformation is getting a lot of attention nowadays because of its superior performance over the conventional and most commonly used nuclear transformation for obtaining transgenic lines. Absence of gene silencing, strong predictable transgene expression, and its application in molecular pharming, both in pharmaceutical and nutraceuticals, are some of many advantages. Other important benefits of utilizing this technology include the absence of transgene flow, as organelles are maternally inherited. This may increase the acceptability of organelle transformation technology in the development of transgenic crops in a wider scale all over the globe. As the need for crop productivity and therapeutic compounds increases, organelle transformation may be able to bridge the gap, thereby having a definite promise for the future.

  1. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  2. Organelle transformation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anjanabha; Kumar, Anish; Desai, Nirali; Parikh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The source of genetic information in a plant cell is contained in nucleus, plastids, and mitochondria. Organelle transformation is getting a lot of attention nowadays because of its superior performance over the conventional and most commonly used nuclear transformation for obtaining transgenic lines. Absence of gene silencing, strong predictable transgene expression, and its application in molecular pharming, both in pharmaceutical and nutraceuticals, are some of many advantages. Other important benefits of utilizing this technology include the absence of transgene flow, as organelles are maternally inherited. This may increase the acceptability of organelle transformation technology in the development of transgenic crops in a wider scale all over the globe. As the need for crop productivity and therapeutic compounds increases, organelle transformation may be able to bridge the gap, thereby having a definite promise for the future. PMID:22610643

  3. Mobilization of iron from neoplastic cells by some iron chelators is an energy-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D R

    1997-05-16

    Iron (Fe) chelators of the pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) class may be useful agents to treat Fe overload disease and also cancer. These ligands possess high activity at mobilizing 59Fe from neoplastic cells, and the present study has been designed to examine whether their marked activity may be related to an energy-dependent transport process across the cell membrane. Initial experiments examined the release of 59Fe from SK-N-MC neuroblastoma (NB) cells prelabelled for 3 h at 37 degrees C with 59Fe-transferrin (1.25 microM) and then reincubated in the presence and absence of the chelators for 3 h at 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Prelabelled cells released 4-5% of total cellular 59Fe when reincubated in minimum essential medium at 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C. When the chelators desferrioxamine (DFO; 0.1 mM) or PIH (0.1 mM) were reincubated with labelled cells at 4 degrees C, they mobilized only 4-5% of cellular 59Fe, whereas as 37 degrees C, these ligands mobilized 21% and 48% of cell 59Fe, respectively. The lipophilic PIH analogue, 311 (2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone; 0.1 mM), which exhibits high anti-proliferative activity, released 10% and 53% of cellular 59Fe when reincubated with prelabelled cells at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively. Almost identical results were obtained using the SK-Mel-28 melanoma cell line. These data suggest that perhaps temperature-dependent mechanisms are essential for 59Fe mobilization from these cells. Interestingly, the metabolic inhibitors, 2,4-dinitrophenol, oligomycin, rotenone, and sodium azide, markedly decreased 59Fe mobilization mediated by PIH, but had either no effect or much less effect on 59Fe release by 311. Considering that an ATP-dependent process was involved in 59Fe release by PIH, further studies examined 4 widely used inhibitors of the multi-drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp). All of these inhibitors, namely, verapamil (Ver), cyclosporin A (CsA), reserpine (Res) and

  4. Treatment of neoplastic meningeal xenografts by intraventricular administration of an antiganglioside monoclonal antibody, 3F8.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I; Barmada, M A; Heller, G; Griffin, J A; Cheung, N K

    1999-08-12

    Leptomeningeal (LM) neoplastic metastases are painful, debilitating and inevitably lethal. Intrathecal (IT) anti-tumor antibodies may have therapeutic potential. We evaluated 3F8, an anti-G(D2) murine IgG(3) monoclonal antibody (MAb) in the treatment of human melanoma (SKMEL-1) and neuroblastoma (NMB7) xenografts in athymic rats. Both tumors were lysed efficiently in vitro by 3F8 in the presence of rat neutrophils or rat complement. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was not augmented by recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF), rhG-CSF, recombinant rat MIP-2 (rrMIP-2) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vivo, continuous intraventricular administration of 3F8 and LPS prevented tumor engraftment, retarded tumor growth and eradicated 3-day-old established xenografts whereas 3F8 alone, LPS alone or F(ab)'(2) plus LPS had no or only marginal effects. Tumor establishment in brain was completely prevented in 36% of animals implanted with SKMEL-1 and 65% of animals implanted with NMB7. Twenty percent of established xenografts around the brain were eradicated but all animals had persistent tumor in the lumbosacral meninges despite treatment. Continuous intraventricular infusion of LPS produced a variable polymorphonuclear (PMN) pleocytosis that was dose-dependent. Continuous intraventricular infusion of 3F8 produced immunohistochemically detectable attachment to 86% of persistent brain deposits of tumor but <1% of spinal lumbosacral deposits. We conclude that regional therapy with anti-G(D2) MAb could target neutrophils to inhibit LM tumor growth. However, optimal activation and mobilization of neutrophils into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and improved penetration of MAb to tumor sites remain critical variables.

  5. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  6. Aberrant expression of the neuronal transcription factor FOXP2 in neoplastic plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Lyne, Linden; Brown, Philip J; Launchbury, Rosalind J; Bignone, Paola; Chi, Jianxiang; Roncador, Giovanna; Lawrie, Charles H; Gatter, Kevin C; Kusec, Rajko; Banham, Alison H

    2010-04-01

    FOXP2 mutation causes a severe inherited speech and language defect, while the related transcription factors FOXP1, FOXP3 and FOXP4 are implicated in cancer. FOXP2 mRNA and protein expression were characterised in normal human tissues, haematological cell lines and multiple myeloma (MM) patients' samples. FOXP2 mRNA and protein were absent in mononuclear cells from different anatomical sites, lineages and stages of differentiation. However, FOXP2 mRNA and protein was detected in several lymphoma (8/20) and all MM-derived cell lines (n = 4). FOXP2 mRNA was expressed in bone marrow samples from 96% of MM patients (24/25), 66.7% of patients with the pre-neoplastic plasma cell proliferation monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (6/9), but not in reactive plasma cells. The frequency of FOXP2 protein expression in CD138(+) plasma cells was significantly higher in MGUS (P = 0.0005; mean 46.4%) and MM patients (P < or = 0.0001; mean 57.3%) than in reactive marrows (mean 2.5%). FOXP2 (>10% nuclear positivity) was detectable in 90.2% of MM (55/61) and 90.9% of MGUS (10/11) patients, showing more frequent expression than CD56 and labelling 75% of CD56-negative MM (9/12). FOXP2 represents the first transcription factor whose expression consistently differentiates normal and abnormal plasma cells and FOXP2 target genes are implicated in MM pathogenesis.

  7. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-01-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3–6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  8. Promotional effects of CO2 laser on neoplastic lesions in hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, Jeffrey S.; Margarone, Joseph E., III; Satchidanand, S.; Liebow, Charles

    1991-06-01

    Surgical incision may have promotional effects on neoplastic lesions, possibly through release of tissue growth factors (e.g., EGF, FGF(beta) , IGF, TGF(alpha) ). The CO2 laser may precipitate altered release of these factors. To test this, .5 cm laser, and scalpel incisions were made into fields treated by application of .5% DMBA in acetone, 3 times a week for 6 weeks (group 1) and 12 weeks (group 2). DMBA is a complete carcinogen (initiator and promoter). At 6 weeks, chemically, but not histologically, definable premalignant lesions are seen. Treatment for 12 weeks causes histologic neoplasia which can be graded with T-N-M classification. For both groups, the surgical sites were examined clinically and histologically 4 weeks post-op in a blind fashion. Standard criteria were utilized for defining neoplasia. For group 1, 3 out of 6 laser treated animals developed large exophytic squamous cell carcinomas, but no lesions developed in 12 contralateral, 3 control and 3 scalpel treated pouches. For group 2, 12 of 16 laser treated animals developed tumor with mean grade of 1.75 and mean size of 7.4 mm, 5 of 6 scalpel treated animals developed tumor with mean grade of 1.83 and mean size of 3.6 mm and 3 of 6 control animals developed tumor with mean grade of 1.00 and mean size of 1.5 mm. By the Student 't' test on the binomial distribution lasers cause significant promotion (p < .01). These results suggest that laser surgery may have earlier and more profound promotional effects than scalpel on initiated cells relative to tumor size in the vicinity of the wound site by increased release of growth factors.

  9. Non-random autosome segregation: a stepping stone for the evolution of sex chromosome complexes? Sex-biased transmission of autosomes could facilitate the spread of antagonistic alleles, and generate sex-chromosome systems with multiple X or Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Tanja; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2011-02-01

    A new study in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that homologous autosomes segregate non-randomly with the sex chromosome in the heterogametic sex. Segregation occurs according to size, small autosomes segregating with, and large autosomes segregating away from the X-chromosome. Such sex-biased transmission of autosomes could facilitate the spread of sexually antagonistic alleles whose effects favor the fitness of one sex at the expense of the other. This may provide a first step toward the evolution of new sex determination systems.

  10. Chromosomal changes in cultured human epithelial cells transformed by low- and high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tracy Chui-hsu; Craise, L.M; Prioleau, J.C.; Stampfer, M.R.; Rhim, J.S.

    1990-11-01

    For a better assessment of radiation risk in space, an understanding of the responses of human cells, especially the epithelial cells, to low- and high-LET radiation is essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed techniques to study the neoplastic transformation of two human epithelial cell systems by ionizing radiation. These cell systems are human mammary epithelial cells (H184B5) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). Both cell lines are immortal, anchorage dependent for growth, and nontumorigenic in athymic nude nice. Neoplastic transformation was achieved by irradiation cells successively. Our results showed that radiogenic cell transformation is a multistep process and that a single exposure of ionizing radiation can cause only one step of transformation. It requires, therefore, multihits to make human epithelial cells fully tumorigenic. Using a simple karyotyping method, we did chromosome analysis with cells cloned at various stages of transformation. We found no consistent large terminal deletion of chromosomes in radiation-induced transformants. Some changes of total number of chromosomes, however, were observed in the transformed cells. These transformants provide an unique opportunity for further genetic studies at a molecular level. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Chromosomal changes in cultured human epithelial cells transformed by low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craise, L. M.; Prioleau, J. C.; Stampfer, M. R.; Rhim, J. S.; Yang, TC-H (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    For a better assessment of radiation risk in space, an understanding of the responses of human cells, especially the epithelial cells, to low- and high-LET radiation is essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed techniques to study the neoplastic transformation of two human epithelial cell systems by ionizing radiation. These cell systems are human mammary epithelial cells (H184B5) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). Both cell lines are immortal, anchorage dependent for growth, and nontumorigenic in athymic nude mice. Neoplastic transformation was achieved by irradiating cells successively. Our results showed that radiogenic cell transformation is a multistep process and that a single exposure of ionizing radiation can cause only one step of transformation. It requires, therefore, multihits to make human epithelial cells fully tumorigenic. Using a simple karyotyping method, we did chromosome analysis with cells cloned at various stages of transformation. We found no consistent large terminal deletion of chromosomes in radiation-induced transformants. Some changes of total number of chromosomes, however, were observed in the transformed cells. These transformants provide an unique opportunity for further genetic studies at a molecular level.

  12. Chromosomal changes in cultured human epithelial cells transformed by low- and high-let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui-Hsu Yang, Tracy; Craise, Laurie M.; Prioleau, John C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Rhim, Johng S.

    1992-07-01

    For a better assessment of radiation risk in space, an understanding of the responses of human cells, especially the epithelial cells, to low- and high-LET radiation is essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed techniques to study the neoplastic transformation of two human epithelial cell systems by ionizing radiation. These cell systems are human mammary epithelial cells (H184B5) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). Both cell lines are immortal, anchorage dependent for growth, and nontumorigenic in athymic nude mice. Neoplastic transformation was achieved by irradiating cells successively. Our results showed that radiogenic cell transformation is a multistep process and that a single exposure of ionizing radiation can cause only one step of transformation. It requires, therefore, multihits to make human epithelial cells fully tumorigenic. Using a simple karyotyping method, we did chromosome analysis with cells cloned at various stages of transformation. We found no consistent large terminal deletion of chromosomes in radiation-induced transformants. Some changes of total number of chromosomes, however, were observed in the transformed cells. These transformants provide an unique opportunity for further genetic studies at a molecular level.

  13. Difference of the Nuclear Green Light Intensity between Papillary Carcinoma Cells Showing Clear Nuclei and Non-neoplastic Follicular Epithelia in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyekyung; Baek, Tae Hwa; Park, Meeja; Lee, Seung Yun; Son, Hyun Jin; Kang, Dong Wook; Kim, Joo Heon; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Background There is subjective disagreement regarding nuclear clearing in papillary thyroid carcinoma. In this study, using digital instruments, we were able to quantify many ambiguous pathologic features and use numeric data to express our findings. Methods We examined 30 papillary thyroid carcinomas. For each case, we selected representative cancer cells showing clear nuclei and surrounding non-neoplastic follicular epithelial cells and evaluated objective values of green light intensity (GLI) for quantitative analysis of nuclear clearing in papillary thyroid carcinoma. Results From 16,274 GLI values from 600 cancer cell nuclei and 13,752 GLI values from 596 non-neoplastic follicular epithelial nuclei, we found a high correlation of 94.9% between GLI and clear nuclei. GLI between the cancer group showing clear nuclei and non-neoplastic follicular epithelia was statistically significant. The overall average level of GLI in the cancer group was over two times higher than the non-neoplastic group despite a wide range of GLI. On a polygonal line graph, there was a fluctuating unique difference between both the cancer and non-neoplastic groups in each patient, which was comparable to the microscopic findings. Conclusions Nuclear GLI could be a useful factor for discriminating between carcinoma cells showing clear nuclei and non-neoplastic follicular epithelia in papillary thyroid carcinoma. PMID:27550048

  14. Transformation of a thymic branchial cyst to a carcinoma with pulmonary metastasis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Levien, A S; Summers, B A; Szladovits, B; Benigni, L; Baines, S J

    2010-11-01

    A 9-year-old, female neutered Dalmatian was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnoea. Thoracocentesis on presentation yielded 1300 ml sanguineous fluid, while thoracic radiology and ultrasonography showed a mixed-echoic cavitary cranial mediastinal mass, sternal lymph node enlargement and pleural effusion. Surgical exploration of the thorax revealed a multi-lobulated red/brown cranial mediastinal mass and multiple similarly coloured ovoid nodules within several lung lobes. Histopathology revealed thymic branchial cysts with neoplastic transformation and examination of the lung was consistent with metastasis. Despite initially recovering well, acute sepsis and pyothorax resulted in cardiac arrest 8 days postoperatively. This is the first veterinary report of neoplastic transformation of a thymic branchial cyst with pulmonary metastasis. PMID:20973790

  15. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Taccetta-Chapnick, M

    1996-01-01

    Rapid changes in the health care system have caused competition among institutions, as organizations are restructured to increase client satisfaction, resulting in the need for a new style of leadership. The transformational leader communicates the mission and vision of the organization and empowers others to effectively resolve conflicts that may arise with change. The health care team that can cope with changes and conflicts views restructuring as a positive transaction and approaches client satisfaction with energy and motivation. Institutions with transformational leadership are the ones that will survive the transition.

  16. Responsiveness of neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to calcium in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Habener, J F

    1978-01-01

    Secretory and biosynthetic responses of adenomatous, carcinomatous, and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to variable concentrations of extracellular calcium were assessed in vitro. Tissues, obtained at the time of parathyroidectomy, were incubated for 4 h in media containing radioactive amino acids and varying (0.5-5.0 mM) concentrations of calcium. Amounts of newly synthesized and total parathyroid hormone and proparathyroid hormone in extracts of tissues and media were measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by radioimmunoassay, respectively. All tissues studied (six adenomas, two specimens of chief-cell hyperplasia, one carcinoma, and normal bovine and human glands) responded to changes in calcium concentrations; decreasing concentrations of calcium stimulated release and decreased tissue storage of hormone. Six of the abnormal tissues required greater than normal concentrations of calcium (1.8-2.4 mM for 50% of effect) to elicit secretory responses comparable with those of normal glands (1.4 mM). Maximum effects of calcium on release of hormone varied from 2- to 10-fold among different tissues. Release of some hormone persisted even in concentrations of calcium as high as 5.0 mM. Relative amounts of hormone released from and retained in the tissues varied greatly among the tissues, as did the absolute amounts of hormone produced; newly synthesized, labeled hormone ranged between 0.6 and 12% of total labeled protein, and immunoreactive hormone ranged between 0.015 and 0.9% of total tissue protein. Effects of calcium on hormone biosynthesis, as determined by analyses of amounts of proparathyroid hormone in the tissues, were variable among tissues and in many cases were negligible. These results indicate that neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues retain secretory responsiveness to changes in extracellular concentrations of calcium. Responses, however, are highly variable among different tissues, and in many instances are abnormal, inasmuch as

  17. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine dysregulation in human infectious, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, D R; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M

    1996-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, Mosmann, Coffman, and their colleagues discovered that murine CD4+ helper T-cell clones could be distinguished by the cytokines they synthesized. The isolation of human Th1 and Th2 clones by Romagnani and coworkers in the early 1990s has led to a large number of reports on the effects of Th1 and Th2 on the human immune system. More recently, cells other than CD4+ T cells, including CD8+ T cells, monocytes, NK cells, B cells, eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and other cells, have been shown to be capable of producing "Th1" and "Th2" cytokines. In this review, we examine the literature on human diseases, using the nomenclature of type 1 (Th1-like) and type 2 (Th2-like) cytokines, which includes all cell types producing these cytokines rather than only CD4+ T cells. Type 1 cytokines include interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor beta, while type 2 cytokines include IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13. In general, type 1 cytokines favor the development of a strong cellular immune response whereas type 2 cytokines favor a strong humoral immune response. Some of these type 1 and type 2 cytokines are cross-regulatory. For example, gamma interferon and IL-12 decrease the levels of type 2 cytokines whereas IL-4 and IL-10 decrease the levels of type 1 cytokines. We use this cytokine perspective to examine human diseases including infections due to viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, as well as selected neoplastic, atopic, rheumatologic, autoimmune, and idiopathic-inflammatory conditions. Clinically, type 1 cytokine-predominant responses should be suspected in any delayed-type hypersensitivity-like granulomatous reactions and in infections with intracellular pathogens, whereas conditions involving hypergammaglobulinemia, increased immunoglobulin E levels, and/or eosinophilia are suggestive of type 2 cytokine-predominant conditions. If this immunologic concept is relevant to human diseases, the potential exists for

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear expression of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in normal and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Gambacorta, M.; Flenghi, L.; Fagioli, M.; Pileri, S.; Leoncini, L.; Bigerna, B.; Pacini, R.; Tanci, L. N.; Pasqualucci, L.; Ascani, S.; Mencarelli, A.; Liso, A.; Pelicci, P. G.; Falini, B.

    1996-01-01

    The RING-finger promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is the product of the PML gene that fuses with the retinoic acid receptor-alpha gene in the t(15; 17) translocation of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Wild-type PML localizes in the nucleus with a typical speckled pattern that is a consequence of the concentration of the protein within discrete subnuclear domains known as nuclear bodies. Delocalization of PML from nuclear bodies has been documented in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and suggested to contribute to leukemogenesis. In an attempt to get new insights into the function of the wild-type PML protein and to investigate whether it displays an altered expression pattern in neoplasms other than acute promyelocytic leukemia, we stained a large number of normal and neoplastic human tissues with a new murine monoclonal antibody (PG-M3) directed against the amino-terminal region of PML. As the PG-M3 epitope is partially resistant to fixatives, only cells that overexpress PML are detected by the antibody in microwave-heated paraffin sections. Among normal tissues, PML was characteristically up-regulated in activated epithelioid histiocytes and fibroblasts in a variety of pathological conditions, columnar epithelium in small active thyroid follicles, well differentiated foamy cells in the center of sebaceous glands, and hypersecretory endometria (Arias-Stella). Interferons, the PML of which is a primary target gene, and estrogens are likely to represent some of the cytokines and/or hormones that may be involved in the up-regulation of PML under these circumstances. In keeping with this concept, we found that PML is frequently overexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease, a tumor of cytokine-producing cells. Among solid tumors, overexpression of PML was frequently found in carcinomas of larynx and thyroid (papillary), epithelial thymomas, and Kaposi's sarcoma, whereas carcinomas of the lung, thyroid (follicular), breast, and colon were

  19. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hammer, Susanne Conradine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1), progesterone receptor (PGR), prolactin receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method.

  20. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hammer, Susanne Conradine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1), progesterone receptor (PGR), prolactin receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method. PMID:27649560

  1. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hammer, Susanne Conradine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1), progesterone receptor (PGR), prolactin receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method. PMID:27649560

  2. Biomarkers for cervical cancer screening: the role of p16(INK4a) to highlight transforming HPV infections.

    PubMed

    von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Schmidt, Dietmar; Bergeron, Christine

    2012-04-01

    Biomarkers indicating the initiation of neoplastic transformation processes in human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected epithelial cells are moving into the focus of cancer prevention research, particularly for anogenital cancer, including cancer of the uterine cervix. Based on the in-depth understanding of the molecular events leading to neoplastic transformation of HPV-infected human cells, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) turned out to be substantially overexpressed in virtually all HPV-transformed cells. This finding opened novel avenues in diagnostic histopathology to substantially improve the diagnostic accuracy of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. Furthermore, it provides a novel technical platform to substantially improve the accuracy of cytology-based cancer early-detection programs. Here, we review the molecular background and the current evidence for the clinical utility of the p16(INK4a) biomarker for HPV-related cancers, and cervical cancer prevention in particular.

  3. Autophagy in malignant transformation and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Baehrecke, Eric H; Cecconi, Francesco; Codogno, Patrice; Debnath, Jayanta; Gewirtz, David A; Karantza, Vassiliki; Kimmelman, Alec; Kumar, Sharad; Levine, Beth; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Martin, Seamus J; Penninger, Josef; Piacentini, Mauro; Rubinsztein, David C; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Simonsen, Anne; Thorburn, Andrew M; Velasco, Guillermo; Ryan, Kevin M; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In healthy cells, such a homeostatic activity constitutes a robust barrier against malignant transformation. Accordingly, many oncoproteins inhibit, and several oncosuppressor proteins promote, autophagy. Moreover, autophagy is required for optimal anticancer immunosurveillance. In neoplastic cells, however, autophagic responses constitute a means to cope with intracellular and environmental stress, thus favoring tumor progression. This implies that at least in some cases, oncogenesis proceeds along with a temporary inhibition of autophagy or a gain of molecular functions that antagonize its oncosuppressive activity. Here, we discuss the differential impact of autophagy on distinct phases of tumorigenesis and the implications of this concept for the use of autophagy modulators in cancer therapy.

  4. Autophagy in malignant transformation and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Baehrecke, Eric H; Cecconi, Francesco; Codogno, Patrice; Debnath, Jayanta; Gewirtz, David A; Karantza, Vassiliki; Kimmelman, Alec; Kumar, Sharad; Levine, Beth; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Martin, Seamus J; Penninger, Josef; Piacentini, Mauro; Rubinsztein, David C; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Simonsen, Anne; Thorburn, Andrew M; Velasco, Guillermo; Ryan, Kevin M; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In healthy cells, such a homeostatic activity constitutes a robust barrier against malignant transformation. Accordingly, many oncoproteins inhibit, and several oncosuppressor proteins promote, autophagy. Moreover, autophagy is required for optimal anticancer immunosurveillance. In neoplastic cells, however, autophagic responses constitute a means to cope with intracellular and environmental stress, thus favoring tumor progression. This implies that at least in some cases, oncogenesis proceeds along with a temporary inhibition of autophagy or a gain of molecular functions that antagonize its oncosuppressive activity. Here, we discuss the differential impact of autophagy on distinct phases of tumorigenesis and the implications of this concept for the use of autophagy modulators in cancer therapy. PMID:25712477

  5. The genetic/metabolic transformation concept of carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.

    2014-01-01

    The carcinogenesis process is poorly understood and subject to varying concepts and views. A rejuvenated interest has arisen regarding the role of altered cellular intermediary metabolism in the development and progression of cancer. As a result, differing views of the implications of altered metabolism in the development of cancer exist. None of the concepts recognize and incorporate the principles of cell metabolism to cell activity, which are applicable to all cells including the carcinogenesis process. This presentation incorporates a novel concept of carcinogenesis that includes a “genetic/metabolic” transformation that encompasses these principles of cell metabolism to cell activity. The intermediary metabolism transformation is essential to provide the bioenergetic/ synthetic, growth/proliferation, and migration/invasive events of malignancy. The concept invokes an “oncogenetic transformation” for the development of neoplastic cells from their precursor normal cells; and a required “genetic/metabolic” transformation for facilitation of the development of the neoplastic cells to malignant cells with the manifestation of the malignant process. Such a concept reveals stages and events of carcinogenesis that provide approaches for the identification of biomarkers and for development of therapeutic agents. The presentation discusses the contemporary application of genetics and proteomics to altered cellular metabolism in cancer; and underscores the importance of proper integration of genetics and proteomics with biochemical and metabolic studies, and the consequences of inappropriate studies. PMID:22109079

  6. Image classifiers for the cell transformation assay: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urani, Chiara; Crosta, Giovanni F.; Procaccianti, Claudio; Melchioretto, Pasquale; Stefanini, Federico M.

    2010-02-01

    The Cell Transformation Assay (CTA) is one of the promising in vitro methods used to predict human carcinogenicity. The neoplastic phenotype is monitored in suitable cells by the formation of foci and observed by light microscopy after staining. Foci exhibit three types of morphological alterations: Type I, characterized by partially transformed cells, and Types II and III considered to have undergone neoplastic transformation. Foci recognition and scoring have always been carried visually by a trained human expert. In order to automatically classify foci images one needs to implement some image understanding algorithm. Herewith, two such algorithms are described and compared by performance. The supervised classifier (as described in previous articles) relies on principal components analysis embedded in a training feedback loop to process the morphological descriptors extracted by "spectrum enhancement" (SE). The unsupervised classifier architecture is based on the "partitioning around medoids" and is applied to image descriptors taken from histogram moments (HM). Preliminary results suggest the inadequacy of the HMs as image descriptors as compared to those from SE. A justification derived from elementary arguments of real analysis is provided in the Appendix.

  7. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  8. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  9. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  10. p38α MAPK is required for arsenic-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Shi, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure has been reported to cause neoplastic transformation through the activation of PcG proteins. In the present study, we show that activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation. Exposure of cells to 0.5 μM arsenic increased CRE and c-Fos promoter activities that were accompanied by increases in p38α MAPK and CREB phosphorylation and expression levels concurrently with AP-1 activation. Introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNA-p38α into BALB/c 3T3 cells markedly suppressed arsenic-induced colony formation compared with wildtype cells. CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were decreased in p38α knockdown cells after arsenic treatment. Arsenic-induced AP-1 activation, measured as c-Fos and CRE promoter activities, and CREB phosphorylation were attenuated by p38 inhibition in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Thus, p38α MAPK activation is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation mediated through CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation.

  11. Discrimination of Benign and Neoplastic Mucosa with a High-Resolution Microendoscope (HRME) in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Peter M.; Park, Chan W.; Pierce, Mark C.; Goldstein, Gregg H.; Levy, Lauren; Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Polydorides, Alexandras D.; Godbold, James H.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Miles, Brett A.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy of ablative surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) depends critically on obtaining negative margins. While intraoperative "frozen section" analysis of margins is a valuable adjunct, it is expensive, time-consuming, and highly dependent on pathologist expertise. Optical imaging has potential to improve the accuracy of margins by identifying cancerous tissue in real time. Our aim was to determine the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of head and neck cancer specialists using high-resolution microendoscopic (HRME) images to discriminate between cancerous and benign mucosa. Methods Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with HNSCC were enrolled in this single-center study. HRME was used to image each specimen after application of proflavine, with concurrent standard histopathologic analysis. Images were evaluated for quality control, and a training set containing representative images of benign and neoplastic tissue was assembled. After viewing training images, seven head and neck cancer specialists with no prior HRME experience reviewed 37 test images and were asked to classify each. Results The mean accuracy of all reviewers in correctly diagnosing neoplastic mucosa was 97 percent (95% Cl = 94–99%). The mean sensitivity and specificity were 98 percent (97–100%) and 92 percent (87–98%), respectively. The Fleiss kappa statistic for inter-rater reliability was 0.84 (0.77–0.91). Conclusions Medical professionals can be quickly trained to use HRME to discriminate between benign and neoplastic mucosa in the head and neck. With further development, the HRME shows promise as a method of real-time margin determination at the point of care. PMID:22492225

  12. In vitro and in vivo correlates of physiological and neoplastic human Fallopian tube stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ning, Gang; Howitt, Brooke E; Mehra, Karishma; Wu, Lingyan; Wang, Xia; Hong, Yue; Kern, Florian; Wei, Tay Seok; Zhang, Ting; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Basuli, Debargha; Torti, Suzy; Brewer, Molly; Choolani, Mahesh; McKeon, Frank; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa

    2016-03-01

    High-grade serous cancer (HGSC) progresses to advanced stages without symptoms and the 5-year survival rate is a dismal 30%. Recent studies of ovaries and Fallopian tubes in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations have documented a pre-metastatic intramucosal neoplasm that is found almost exclusively in the Fallopian tube, termed 'serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma' or STIC. Moreover, other proliferations, termed p53 signatures, secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs), and lower-grade serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasms (STINs) fall short of STIC but share similar alterations in expression, in keeping with an underpinning of genomic disturbances involved in, or occurring in parallel with, serous carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the cellular origins of this unique tubal pathway to high-grade serous cancer, we cloned and both immortalized and transformed Fallopian tube stem cells (FTSCs). We demonstrated that pedigrees of FTSCs were capable of multipotent differentiation and that the tumours derived from transformed FTSCs shared the histological and molecular features of HGSC. We also demonstrated that altered expression of some biomarkers seen in transformed FTSCs and HGSCs (stathmin, EZH2, CXCR4, CXCL12, and FOXM1) could be seen as well in immortalized cells and their in vivo counterparts SCOUTs and STINs. Thus, a whole-genome transcriptome analysis comparing FTSCs, immortalized FTSCs, and transformed FTSCs showed a clear molecular progression sequence that is recapitulated by the spectrum of accumulated perturbations characterizing the range of proliferations seen in vivo. Biomarkers unique to STIC relative to normal tubal epithelium provide a basis for novel detection approaches to early HGSC, but must be viewed critically given their potential expression in lesser proliferations. Perturbations shared by both immortalized and transformed FTSCs may provide unique early targets for prevention strategies. Central to these efforts has been the ability to clone

  13. Renal cell carcinoma and synchronous thyroid metastasis with neoplastic thrombosis of the internal jugular vein: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Matei, Deliu-Victor; Brescia, Antonio; Nordio, Andrea; Spinelli, Matteo Giulio; Melegari, Sara; Cozzi, Gabriele; Andrioli, Massimiliano; Salvatori, Pietro

    2011-12-01

    A case of thyroid metastasis of a renal clear cell carcinoma is presented. The fine-needle aspiration cytology pointed out the primary tumor origin. The patient underwent robot-assisted radical nephrectomy and contextual thyroidectomy. During the operative procedure, a neoplastic thrombus extending from the thyroid metastasis and protruding into the internal jugular vein was found. As a result, thrombectomy and ligation of the internal jugular vein were required. In cases of single synchronous thyroid metastases form RCC, radical surgery should be advisable. Robotic approach allows to associate major surgery procedures, as nephrectomy, with radical metastasectomy.

  14. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  15. Extra-prostatic Transgene-associated Neoplastic Lesions in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of two novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice as well as in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this paper we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice. PMID:24742627

  16. Electrotransfer of gene encoding endostatin into normal and neoplastic mouse tissues: inhibition of primary tumor growth and metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Cichoń, Tomasz; Jamrozy, Laura; Glogowska, Joanna; Missol-Kolka, Ewa; Szala, Stanisław

    2002-09-01

    Electroporation-mediated gene transfer relies upon direct delivery of plasmids into cells permeabilized by electric fields, a method more efficient than transfer using nonviral vectors, although neither approaches the transfer efficiency of viral vectors. Here we studied electrotransfer of a gene encoding an angiogenesis inhibitor (endostatin) into primary tumors and muscle tissues, which would serve as a site of synthesis and secretion into the bloodstream of a therapeutic antimetastatic protein with systemic effects. Optimum electroporation conditions (voltage, number and duration of impulses, separation of caliper electrodes) were first established to maximize expression of a reporter gene transferred into murine Renca kidney carcinoma, B16(F10) melanoma, or skeletal muscle tissues. In neoplastic tissues, electrotransfer of plasmid DNA was far more efficient than electroporation with lipoplexes, but no differences between naked DNA and lipoplexes were found in case of electroporated muscles. We then studied the electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying the endostatin gene into pre-established experimental Renca tumors. A significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in animals electroporated with this construct. Electrotransfer of the endostatin gene into muscle tissues resulted in reduced numbers of experimental B16(F10) metastases in the lungs. This study clearly shows that electroporation may be used to efficiently transfer antiangiogenic genes into both normal and neoplastic tissues. PMID:12189527

  17. Association of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis with papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. A new sporadic neoplastic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Chablé-Montero, Fredy; Córdova-Ramón, Juan Carlos; Henson, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    We describe 2 adult women (72 and 54 years), 1 with a low-grade noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis, who 14 years later developed a papillary carcinoma in 1 thyroid lobe and a medullary carcinoma in the contralateral lobe. Both neoplasms were similar in size and appeared symmetrical. Despite its small size, the medullary carcinoma metastasized in multiple cervical lymph nodes. The second patient had a high-grade invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis that infiltrated the renal parenchyma and metastasized in one of the lungs. Five months later, a papillary carcinoma was discovered in the thyroid gland. The 2 papillary thyroid carcinomas were of the follicular variant. Adjacent to 1 papillary carcinoma, there was a dominant nodule of a colloid and adenomatous goiter. The medullary carcinoma contained stromal amyloid and was immunoreactive for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen. There was no C-cell hyperplasia (medullary carcinoma in situ). The 2 patients are alive, 1 is living with pulmonary metastasis from the high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Twelve cases of this neoplastic association were registered in the Survey, Epidemiology, and End Results Program from 1980 to 2009. We believe that the combination of these unusual neoplasms in the same patient may represent a new sporadic neoplastic syndrome.

  18. Non-Randomized Confirmatory Trial of Laparoscopy-Assisted Total Gastrectomy and Proximal Gastrectomy with Nodal Dissection for Clinical Stage I Gastric Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1401

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kozo; Mizusawa, Junki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Morita, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Ito, Seiji; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Takeo; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Several prospective studies on laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer have been initiated, but no prospective study evaluating laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy has been completed to date. A non-randomized confirmatory trial was commenced in April 2015 to evaluate the safety of laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy and laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy for clinical stage I gastric cancer. A total of 245 patients will be accrued from 42 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with anastomotic leakage. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, proportion of patients with completed laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy, proportion of patients with conversion to open surgery, adverse events, and short-term clinical outcomes. The UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number is UMIN000017155. PMID:27433394

  19. Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews of Non-Randomized Studies of Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Thiazolidinediones and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors: Application of a New Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bilandzic, Anja; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare interventions frequently include non-randomized studies. These are subject to confounding and a range of other biases that are seldom considered in detail when synthesizing and interpreting the results. Our aims were to assess the reliability and usability of a new Cochrane risk of bias (RoB) tool for non-randomized studies of interventions and to determine whether restricting analysis to studies with low or moderate RoB made a material difference to the results of the reviews. Methods and Findings We selected two systematic reviews of population-based, controlled non-randomized studies of the relationship between the use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and major cardiovascular events. Two epidemiologists applied the Cochrane RoB tool and made assessments across the seven specified domains of bias for each of 37 component studies. Inter-rater agreement was measured using the weighted Kappa statistic. We grouped studies according to overall RoB and performed statistical pooling for (a) all studies and (b) only studies with low or moderate RoB. Kappa scores across the seven bias domains ranged from 0.50 to 1.0. In the COX-2 inhibitor review, two studies had low overall RoB, 14 had moderate RoB, and five had serious RoB. In the TZD review, six studies had low RoB, four had moderate RoB, four had serious RoB, and two had critical RoB. The pooled odds ratios for myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death for rosiglitazone versus pioglitazone remained significantly elevated when analyses were confined to studies with low or moderate RoB. However, the estimate for myocardial infarction declined from 1.14 (95% CI 1.07–1.24) to 1.06 (95% CI 0.99–1.13) when analysis was confined to studies with low RoB. Estimates of pooled relative risks of cardiovascular events with COX-2 inhibitors compared with no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug changed little when analyses were

  20. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  1. Short-term intake of a Japanese-style healthy lunch menu contributes to prevention and/or improvement in metabolic syndrome among middle-aged men: a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is now widely appreciated as a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as visceral obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. To date, incidence of metabolic syndrome is continuously increasing worldwide. In addition, low vegetable consumption has recently become a serious issue in Japan. Furthermore, Japan is facing a shortfall in places offering food that can help prevent metabolic syndrome in the first place. Our study is designed to influence these developments. We conducted a non-randomized controlled trial by offering a Japanese-style healthy lunch menu to middle-aged men in a workplace cafeteria. This menu was designed to prevent and reduce metabolic syndrome. Methods This intervention study took the form of a non-randomized controlled trial. Participants chose the control or intervention group. The control group consumed their habitual lunches without restriction and only nutrient contents were assessed. The intervention group received a Japanese-style healthy lunch at a workplace cafeteria for 3 months. The participants worked in offices at a city hall and mostly had low levels of physical activity. Data of 35 males (control group: 7 males, intervention group: 28 males, mean age: 47.2 ± 7.9 years) were collected and analyzed. Results We obtained an effective outcome by demonstrating that ongoing intake of a Japanese-style healthy lunch decreased blood pressure and serum lipids and increased plasma ghrelin levels. The results grew more pronounced as intake of Japanese-style healthy lunches increased in frequency. Conclusions This study presents new empirical data as a result of an original intervention program undertaken in Japan. A Japanese-style healthy lunch menu containing many vegetables consumed can help prevent and/or improve metabolic syndrome. PMID:24673894

  2. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  3. Morphological transformation of an established Syrian hamster dermal cell with the anti-tussive agent noscapine.

    PubMed

    Porter, R; Parry, E M; Parry, J M

    1992-05-01

    Following exposure to the alkaloid noscapine hydrochloride over a concentration range of 10-120 micrograms/ml immortal cultures of Syrian hamster dermal fibroblasts were shown to undergo morphological transformation. The resultant transformed foci produced cultures which were anchorage independent as confirmed by soft agar tests. Karyotype analysis of a noscapine transformed colony demonstrated an increase in chromosome number compared to the immortal culture and the non-random duplication of a translocated chromosome 9 previously identified in the immortal culture. These data indicate that noscapine, which has previously been shown to be a spindle inhibitor and inducer of polyploidy in cultured cells, is capable of inducing in vitro cell transformation. Such data indicate a carcinogenic potential for this widely used cough suppressant. PMID:1602976

  4. Fos family members: regulation, structure and role in oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Tulchinsky, E

    2000-07-01

    The members of the Fos protein family might be subdivided in two groups, according to their ability to transform rodent fibroblasts, transforming (c-Fos and FosB) and non-transforming (Fra-1 and Fra-2) proteins. Members of these groups are differently activated in response to external stimuli and possess different structural features. Importantly, whilst c-Fos and FosB contain multiple transactivation modules in their N- and C-terminal parts, transactivation domains are absent in the non-transforming Fos proteins. As a result, Fra-1 and Fra-2 though efficiently form dimers with the Jun proteins, are weak transcriptional activators and inhibit the c-Fos-dependent activation in transient transfection assay. The numerous experiments performed with the different Fos mutant proteins with impaired transforming ability, as well as with chimeric proteins revealed the importance of the transactivation function for transformation. Fra-1 and Fra-2 proteins albeit ineffectively triggering oncogenic transformation, are abundant in ras- and src-transformed murine and chicken fibroblasts, in neoplastic thyroid cells and in highly malignant mouse adenocarcinoma cells, which underwent mesenchymal transition. The abundance of the non-transforming Fos proteins in these systems might be mediated by a positive AP-l-dependent feedback mechanism, as well as by wnt signals. Furthermore, the manipulation of the Fra-1 expression level in thyroid and mammary tumor cells modulated the transcription of several tumor progression markers and affected cell morphology and invasiveness. These recent data demonstrate a novel function of non-transforming Fos proteins in the maintenance and progression of the transformed state. Interestingly, this function is independent of the documented invalidity of the Fra-1 and Fra-2 proteins as transcriptional activators in rodent fibroblasts.

  5. The cell-cycle dependence of the spectra of proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells using confocal resonance Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal resonance Raman (RR) spectra were collected from single proliferating cells and analyzed to detect spectral patterns that are cell-cycle dependent, as a consequence of cellular proliferation — normal or abnormal. The cells' biochemical age at each time point was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining to identify the presence or absence of cellular components that appear and/or disappear as the cells proceed through the cell-cycle. The RR spectra were collected and compared for each time point as the cells proceeded through the cell cycle to determine what spectral vibrational patterns are cell-cycle dependent. In this study, the question is whether the cell-cycle dependent RR spectral patterns of the vibrational modes observed in proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells are due to a state of cancer or are simply the consequences of the cells' changing internal biochemistry due to the process of cellular proliferation --- normal or abnormal.

  6. Three-dimensional lithographically-defined organotypic tissue arrays for quantitative analysis of morphogenesis and neoplastic progression

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Inman, Jamie L.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-02-13

    Here we describe a simple micromolding method to construct three-dimensional arrays of organotypic epithelial tissue structures that approximate in vivo histology. An elastomeric stamp containing an array of posts of defined geometry and spacing is used to mold microscale cavities into the surface of type I collagen gels. Epithelial cells are seeded into the cavities and covered with a second layer of collagen. The cells reorganize into hollow tissues corresponding to the geometry of the cavities. Patterned tissue arrays can be produced in 3-4 h and will undergo morphogenesis over the following one to three days. The protocol can easily be adapted to study a variety of tissues and aspects of normal and neoplastic development.

  7. Reliability of the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) among radiation oncologists: an assessment of instability secondary to spinal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) categorizes tumor related spinal instability. It has the potential to streamline the referral of patients with established or potential spinal instability to a spine surgeon. This study aims to define the inter- and intra-observer reliability and validity of SINS among radiation oncologists. Methods Thirty-three radiation oncologists, across ten international sites, rated 30 neoplastic spinal disease cases. For each case, the total SINS (0-18 points), three clinical categories (stable: 0-6 points, potentially unstable: 7-12 points, and unstable: 13-18 points), and a binary scale (‘stable’: 0-6 points and ‘current or possible instability’; surgical consultation recommended: 7-18 points) were recorded. Evaluation was repeated 6-8 weeks later. Inter-observer agreement and intra-observer reproducibility were calculated by means of the kappa statistic and translated into levels of agreement (slight, fair, moderate, substantial, and excellent). Validity was determined by comparing the ratings against a spinal surgeon’s consensus standard. Results Radiation oncologists demonstrated substantial (κ = 0.76) inter-observer and excellent (κ = 0.80) intra-observer reliability when using the SINS binary scale (‘stable’ versus ‘current or possible instability’). Validity of the binary scale was also excellent (κ = 0.85) compared with the gold standard. None of the unstable cases was rated as stable by the radiation oncologists ensuring all were appropriately recommended for surgical consultation. Conclusions Among radiation oncologists SINS is a highly reliable, reproducible, and valid assessment tool to address a key question in tumor related spinal disease: Is the spine ‘stable’ or is there ‘current or possible instability’ that warrants surgical assessment? PMID:24594004

  8. Mammalian NUMT insertion is non-random

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Junko; Frith, Martin C.; Tomii, Kentaro; Horton, Paul

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that remnants of partial or whole copies of mitochondrial DNA, known as Nuclear MiTochondrial sequences (NUMTs), are found in nuclear genomes. Since whole genome sequences have become available, many bioinformatics studies have identified putative NUMTs and from those attempted to infer the factors involved in NUMT creation. These studies conclude that NUMTs represent randomly chosen regions of the mitochondrial genome. There is less consensus regarding the nuclear insertion sites of NUMTs — previous studies have discussed the possible role of retrotransposons, but some recent ones have reported no correlation or even anti-correlation between NUMT sites and retrotransposons. These studies have generally defined NUMT sites using BLAST with default parameters. We analyze a redefined set of human NUMTs, computed with a carefully considered protocol. We discover that the inferred insertion points of NUMTs have a strong tendency to have high-predicted DNA curvature, occur in experimentally defined open chromatin regions and often occur immediately adjacent to A + T oligomers. We also show clear evidence that their flanking regions are indeed rich in retrotransposons. Finally we show that parts of the mitochondrial genome D-loop are under-represented as a source of NUMTs in primate evolution. PMID:22761406

  9. Quantum transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1998-01-09

    We show that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be written in the classical form with the spatial derivative {partial_derivative}{sub q} replaced by {partial_derivative}{sub q} with dq = dq/{radical}1{minus}{beta}{sup 2}(q), where {beta}{sup 2}(q) is strictly related to the quantum potential. This can be seen as the opposite of the problem of finding the wave function representation of classical mechanics as formulated by Schiller and Rosen. The structure of the above {open_quotes}quantum transformation{close_quotes}, related to the recently formulated equivalence principle, indicates that the potential deforms space geometry. In particular, a result by Flanders implies that both W(q) = V(q) {minus} E and the quantum potential Q are proportional to the curvatures {kappa}{sub W} and {kappa}{sub Q} which arise as natural invariants in an equivalence problem for curves in the projective line. In this formulation the Schroedinger equation takes the geometrical form ({partial_derivative}{sub q}{sup 2} + {kappa}{sub W}){psi} = 0.

  10. Cytotoxic effects of methionine alkyl esters and amides in normal and neoplastic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Clement, M A; Chapman, J M; Roberts, J

    1989-06-01

    Homologous series of L-methionine alkyl ester hydrochlorides and tosylates were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro growth inhibitory activity in Meth A sarcoma. Cytotoxicity, as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was found to be directly proportional to alkyl chain length and surface tension lowering activity. L-Methionine decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides possessed optimum cytotoxic activity (IC50 = 29, 28 microM) which was not reversible by the addition of L-methionine. Surface tension of a 50 microM solution of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides were 35.4 and 32.7 dyn/cm, respectively. The corresponding decyl and dodecyl ester tosylates and amide hydrochlorides were less active. The N-t-butoxycarbonyl analogues were essentially inactive, demonstrating the necessity of an unsubstituted and/or potentially cationic amino group. Methionine dependence characteristics and cytotoxicity were also determined for three human (IMR-90, LX-1, MCF7) and four additional murine (L1210, L5178Y, 3T3, SV-T2) cell lines. The human cell lines Meth A, LX-1, and SV-T2 were found to be methionine independent. The LX-1 tumor cell line and the SV-T2 transformed line exhibited two to four times more sensitivity to the cytotoxic and cytolytic properties of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides than their normal counterparts. The dodecyl amide hydrochloride derivative demonstrated enhanced cytotoxic activity in vivo relative to the corresponding ester, possibly due to decreased metabolic hydrolysis.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 in cutaneous histiocytic proliferative, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Pierezan, F; Mansell, J; Ambrus, A; Rodrigues Hoffmann, A

    2014-11-01

    Ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) has been used widely as a marker for microglial cells and, recently, was also recognized as a 'pan-macrophage marker', as it is expressed by all subpopulations of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. To determine the specificity of Iba1 as an immunohistochemical marker for canine and feline histiocytic proliferative, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders of the skin, we evaluated its expression in two types of histiocytic tumours, two non-neoplastic histiocytic proliferative conditions, one case of granulomatous dermatitis and four non-histiocytic tumours. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in all cases of canine cutaneous histiocytoma (9/9), reactive histiocytosis (9/9), histiocytic sarcomas (5/5), feline progressive dendritic cell histiocytosis (3/3) and macrophages in cutaneous mycobacteriosis (7/7) showed strong cytoplasmic expression of Iba1. Neoplastic cells of melanomas (10/10), lymphomas (7/7), mast cell tumours (7/7) and plasmacytomas (4/4) did not express Iba1. Iba1 is therefore a useful marker of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in canine and feline inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic conditions and can be used to identify these cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues. Iba1 is not able to differentiate between macrophages and dendritic antigen presenting cells and expression does not allow classification of these histiocytic disorders. PMID:25172051

  12. Fractionation of an Extract of Pluchea odorata Separates a Property Indicative for the Induction of Cell Plasticity from One That Inhibits a Neoplastic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Seelinger, Mareike; Popescu, Ruxandra; Seephonkai, Prapairat; Singhuber, Judith; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Unger, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Diaz, Rene; Tut, Foster M.; Frisch, Richard; Feistel, Björn; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies demonstrated that anti-inflammatory remedies exhibit excellent anti-neoplastic properties. An extract of Pluchea odorata (Asteraceae), which is used for wound healing and against inflammatory conditions, was fractionated and properties correlating to anti-neoplastic and wound healing effects were separated. Methods. Up to six fractionation steps using silica gel, Sephadex columns, and distinct solvent systems were used, and eluted fractions were analysed by thin layer chromatography, apoptosis, and proliferation assays. The expression of oncogenes and proteins regulating cell migration was investigated by immunoblotting after treating HL60 cells with the most active fractions. Results. Sequential fractionations enriched anti-neoplastic activities which suppressed oncogene expression of JunB, c-Jun, c-Myc, and Stat3. Furthermore, a fraction (F4.6.3) inducing or keeping up expression of the mobility markers MYPT, ROCK1, and paxillin could be separated from another fraction (F4.3.7), which inhibited these markers. Conclusions. Wound healing builds up scar or specific tissue, and hence, compounds enhancing cell migration support this process. In contrast, successful anti-neoplastic therapy combats tumour progression, and thus, suppression of cell migration is mandatory. PMID:22474515

  13. Exposure to airborne PM2.5 suppresses microRNA expression and deregulates target oncogenes that cause neoplastic transformation in NIH3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinxin; Shao, Mingming; Wu, Chen; Wang, Suhan; Li, Hongmin; Wei, Lixuan; Gao, Yanning; Tan, Wen; Cheng, Shujun; Wu, Tangchun; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to airborne PM2.5 is associated with increased lung cancer risk but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We characterized global microRNA and mRNA expression in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to PM2.5 organic extract and integrally analyzed microRNA-mRNA interactions. Foci formation and xenograft tumorigenesis in mice with NIH3T3 cells expressing genes targeted by microRNAs were performed to explore the oncogenic potential of these genes. We also detected plasma levels of candidate microRNAs in subjects exposed to different levels of air PM2.5 and examined the aberrant expression of genes targeted by these microRNAs in human lung cancer. Under our experimental conditions, treatment of cells with PM2.5 extract resulted in downregulation of 138 microRNAs and aberrant expression of 13 mRNAs (11 upregulation and 2 downregulation). In silico and biochemical analyses suggested SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1, among the upregulated genes, as target for miR-182 and miR-185, respectively. Ectopic expression of each of these genes significantly enhanced foci formation in NIH3T3 cells. Following subcutaneous injection of these cells into nude mice, fibrosarcoma were formed from SLC30A1- or SERPINB2-expressing cells. Reduced plasma levels of miR-182 were detected in subjects exposed to high level of PM2.5 than in those exposed to low level of PM2.5 (P = 0.043). Similar results were seen for miR-185 although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.328). Increased expressions of SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1 were detected in human lung cancer. These results suggest that modulation of miR-182 and miR-185 and their target genes may contribute to lung carcinogenesis attributable to PM2.5 exposure. PMID:26338969

  14. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  15. Normal and neoplastic urothelial stem cells: getting to the root of the problem

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Levy; Kurtova, Antonina; Chan, Keith Syson

    2012-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues contain self-renewing stem cells that mature into downstream progenies with increasingly limited differentiation potential. It is not surprising that cancers arising from such hierarchically organized epithelial tissues retain features of cellular differentiation. Accumulating evidence suggests that the urothelium of the urinary bladder is a hierarchically organized tissue, containing tissue-specific stem cells that are important for both normal homeostasis and injury response. The phenotypic and functional properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs; also known as tumour-initiating cells) from bladder cancer tissue have been studied in detail. Urothelial CSCs are not isolated by a ‘one-marker-fits-all’ approach; instead, various cell surface marker combinations (possibly reflecting the cell-of-origin) are used to isolate CSCs from distinct differentiation subtypes of urothelial carcinomas. Additional CSC markers, including cytokeratin 14 (CK14), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1 (ALDH1A1), and tumour protein 63 (p63), have revealed prognostic value for urothelial carcinomas. Signalling pathways involved in normal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are implicated in the malignant transformation of different subsets of urothelial carcinomas. Early expansion of primitive CK14+ cells—driven by genetic pathways such as STAT3—can lead to the development of carcinoma in situ, and CSC-enriched urothelial carcinomas are associated with poor clinical outcomes. Given that bladder CSCs are the proposed root of malignancy and drivers of cancer initiation and progression for urothelial carcinomas, these cells are ideal targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:22890301

  16. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, Thilo

    Exposure to radiation of high-energy and highly charged ions (HZE) causes a major risk to human beings, since in long term space explorations about 10 protons per month and about one HZE particle per month hit each cell nucleus (1). Despite the larger number of light ions, the high ionisation power of HZE particles and its corresponding more complex damage represents a major hazard for astronauts. Therefore, in order to get a reasonable risk estimate, it is necessary to take into account the entire mixed radiation field. Frequently, neoplastic cell transformation serves as an indicator for the oncogenic potential of radiation exposure. It can be measured for a small number of ion and energy combinations. However, due to the complexity of the radiation field it is necessary to know the contribution to the radiation damage of each ion species for the entire range of energies. Therefore, a model is required which transfers the few experimental data to other particles with different LETs. We use the Local Effect Model (LEM) (2) with its cluster extension (3) to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neoplastic transformation. It was originally developed in the framework of hadrontherapy and is applicable for a large range of ions and energies. The input parameters for the model include the linear-quadratic parameters for the induction of lethal events as well as for the induction of transformation events per surviving cell. Both processes of cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation per viable cell are combined to eventually yield the RBE for cell transformation. We show that the Local Effect Model is capable of predicting the RBE of neoplastic cell transformation for a broad range of ions and energies. The comparison of experimental data (4) with model calculations shows a reasonable agreement. We find that the cluster extension results in a better representation of the measured RBE values. With this model it should be possible to better

  17. RANDOMNESS of Numbers DEFINITION(QUERY:WHAT? V HOW?) ONLY Via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-Statistics(MBCS) Hot-Plasma VS. Digits-Clumping Log-Law NON-Randomness Inversion ONLY BOSE-EINSTEIN QUANTUM-Statistics(BEQS) .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Z.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    RANDOMNESS of Numbers cognitive-semantics DEFINITION VIA Cognition QUERY: WHAT???, NOT HOW?) VS. computer-``science" mindLESS number-crunching (Harrel-Sipser-...) algorithmics Goldreich "PSEUDO-randomness"[Not.AMS(02)] mea-culpa is ONLY via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-STATISTICS(NOT FDQS!!!) "hot-plasma" REPULSION VERSUS Newcomb(1881)-Weyl(1914;1916)-Benford(1938) "NeWBe" logarithmic-law digit-CLUMPING/ CLUSTERING NON-Randomness simple Siegel[AMS Joint.Mtg.(02)-Abs. # 973-60-124] algebraic-inversion to THE QUANTUM and ONLY BEQS preferentially SEQUENTIALLY lower-DIGITS CLUMPING/CLUSTERING with d = 0 BEC, is ONLY VIA Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (SON OF TRIZ)/"Category-Semantics"(C-S), latter intersection/union of Lawvere(1964)-Siegel(1964)] category-theory (matrix: MORPHISMS V FUNCTORS) "+" cognitive-semantics'' (matrix: ANTONYMS V SYNONYMS) yields Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS/C-S tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics: MBCS RANDOMNESS TRUTH/EMET!!!

  18. Effectiveness of Kenya's Community Health Strategy in delivering community-based maternal and newborn health care in Busia County, Kenya: non-randomized pre-test post test study

    PubMed Central

    Wangalwa, Gilbert; Cudjoe, Bennett; Wamalwa, David; Machira, Yvonne; Ofware, Peter; Ndirangu, Meshack; Ilako, Festus

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio and neonatal mortality rate trends in Kenya have remained unacceptably high in a decade. In 2007, the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation adopted a community health strategy to reverse the poor health outcomes in order to meet Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. It aims at strengthening community participation and its ability to take action towards health. The study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the strategy in improving maternal and neonatal health outcomes in Kenya. Methods Between 2008 and 2010, the African Medical and Research Foundation implemented a community-based maternal and newborn care intervention package in Busia County using the community health strategy approach. An interventional, non-randomized pre-test post test study design was used to evaluate change in essential maternal and neonatal care practices among mothers with children aged 0 - 23 months. Results There was statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in attendance of at least four antenatal care visits (39% to 62%), deliveries by skilled birth attendants (31% to 57%), receiving intermittent preventive treatment (23% to 57%), testing for HIV during pregnancy (73% to 90%) and exclusive breastfeeding (20% to 52%). Conclusion The significant increase in essential maternal and neonatal care practices demonstrates that, community health strategy is an appropriate platform to deliver community based interventions. The findings will be used by actors in the child survival community to improve current approaches, policies and practice in maternal and neonatal care. PMID:23467438

  19. Neuregulin-1 Administration Protocols Sufficient for Stimulating Cardiac Regeneration in Young Mice Do Not Induce Somatic, Organ, or Neoplastic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Balakrishnan; Nandhagopal, Nikitha; Polizzotti, Brian D.; Bennett, David; Asan, Alparslan; Wu, Yijen; Kühn, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously developed and validated a strategy for stimulating heart regeneration by administration of recombinant neuregulin (rNRG1), a growth factor, in mice. rNRG1 stimulated proliferation of heart muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and was most effective when administration began during the neonatal period. Our results suggested the use of rNRG1 to treat pediatric patients with heart failure. However, administration in this age group may stimulate growth outside of the heart. Methods NRG1 and ErbB receptor expression was determined by RT-PCR. rNRG1 concentrations in serum were quantified by ELISA. Mice that received protocols of recombinant neuregulin1-β1 administration (rNRG1, 100 ng/g body weight, daily subcutaneous injection for the first month of life), previously shown to induce cardiac regeneration, were examined at pre-determined intervals. Somatic growth was quantified by weighing. Organ growth was quantified by MRI and by weighing. Neoplastic growth was examined by MRI, visual inspection, and histopathological analyses. Phospho-ERK1/2 and S6 kinase were analyzed with Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Results Lung, spleen, liver, kidney, brain, and breast gland exhibited variable expression of the NRG1 receptors ErbB2, ErbB3, ErbB4, and NRG1. Body weight and tibia length were not altered in mice receiving rNRG1. MRI showed that administration of rNRG1 did not alter the volume of the lungs, liver, kidneys, brain, or spinal cord. Administration of rNRG1 did not alter the weight of the lungs, spleen, liver, kidneys, or brain. MRI, visual inspection, and histopathological analyses showed no neoplastic growth. Follow-up for 6 months showed no alteration of somatic or organ growth. rNRG1 treatment increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2, but not phospho-S6 kinase. Conclusions Administration protocols of rNRG1 for stimulating cardiac regeneration in mice during the first month of life did not induce unwanted growth effects. Further studies may be

  20. The Bargmann transform and canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Blas, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    This paper concerns a relationship between the kernel of the Bargmann transform and the corresponding canonical transformation. We study this fact for a Bargmann transform introduced by Thomas and Wassell [J. Math. Phys. 36, 5480-5505 (1995)]—when the configuration space is the two-sphere S2 and for a Bargmann transform that we introduce for the three-sphere S3. It is shown that the kernel of the Bargmann transform is a power series in a function which is a generating function of the corresponding canonical transformation (a classical analog of the Bargmann transform). We show in each case that our canonical transformation is a composition of two other canonical transformations involving the complex null quadric in C3 or C4. We also describe quantizations of those two other canonical transformations by dealing with spaces of holomorphic functions on the aforementioned null quadrics. Some of these quantizations have been studied by Bargmann and Todorov [J. Math. Phys. 18, 1141-1148 (1977)] and the other quantizations are related to the work of Guillemin [Integ. Eq. Operator Theory 7, 145-205 (1984)]. Since suitable infinite linear combinations of powers of the generating functions are coherent states for L2(S2) or L2(S3), we show finally that the studied Bargmann transforms are actually coherent states transforms.

  1. Transcriptional Dynamics of Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Transformation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masao; Higashino, Atsunori; Takeuchi, Kikuko; Hori, Yutaro; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Makino, Hatsune; Monobe, Yoko; Kishida, Marina; Adachi, Jun; Takeuchi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kameoka, Yosuke; Akagi, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression along with neoplastic transformation in human cells provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying transformation. To further address these questions, we performed whole transcriptome analysis to the human mesenchymal stem cell line, UE6E7T-3, which was immortalized with hTERT and human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes, in association with progress of transformation in these cells. At early stages of culture, UE6E7T-3 cells preferentially lost one copy of chromosome 13, as previously described; in addition, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and apoptosis-activating genes were overexpressed. After the loss of chromosome 13, additional aneuploidy and genetic alterations that drove progressive transformation, were observed. At this stage, the cell line expressed oncogenes as well as genes related to anti-apoptotic functions, cell-cycle progression, and chromosome instability (CIN); these pro-tumorigenic changes were concomitant with a decrease in tumor suppressor gene expression. At later stages after prolong culture, the cells exhibited chromosome translocations, acquired anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (sarcoma) and exhibited increased expression of genes encoding growth factor and DNA repair genes, and decreased expression of adhesion genes. In particular, glypican-5 (GPC5), which encodes a cell-surface proteoglycan that might be a biomarker for sarcoma, was expressed at high levels in association with transformation. Patched (Ptc1), the cell surface receptor for hedgehog (Hh) signaling, was also significantly overexpressed and co-localized with GPC5. Knockdown of GPC5 expression decreased cell proliferation, suggesting that it plays a key role in growth in U3-DT cells (transformants derived from UE6E7T-3 cells) through the Hh signaling pathway. Thus, the UE6E7T-3 cell culture model is a useful tool for assessing the functional contribution of

  2. Transcriptional Dynamics of Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yutaro; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Makino, Hatsune; Monobe, Yoko; Kishida, Marina; Adachi, Jun; Takeuchi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kameoka, Yosuke; Akagi, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression along with neoplastic transformation in human cells provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying transformation. To further address these questions, we performed whole transcriptome analysis to the human mesenchymal stem cell line, UE6E7T-3, which was immortalized with hTERT and human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes, in association with progress of transformation in these cells. At early stages of culture, UE6E7T-3 cells preferentially lost one copy of chromosome 13, as previously described; in addition, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and apoptosis-activating genes were overexpressed. After the loss of chromosome 13, additional aneuploidy and genetic alterations that drove progressive transformation, were observed. At this stage, the cell line expressed oncogenes as well as genes related to anti-apoptotic functions, cell-cycle progression, and chromosome instability (CIN); these pro-tumorigenic changes were concomitant with a decrease in tumor suppressor gene expression. At later stages after prolong culture, the cells exhibited chromosome translocations, acquired anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (sarcoma) and exhibited increased expression of genes encoding growth factor and DNA repair genes, and decreased expression of adhesion genes. In particular, glypican-5 (GPC5), which encodes a cell-surface proteoglycan that might be a biomarker for sarcoma, was expressed at high levels in association with transformation. Patched (Ptc1), the cell surface receptor for hedgehog (Hh) signaling, was also significantly overexpressed and co-localized with GPC5. Knockdown of GPC5 expression decreased cell proliferation, suggesting that it plays a key role in growth in U3-DT cells (transformants derived from UE6E7T-3 cells) through the Hh signaling pathway. Thus, the UE6E7T-3 cell culture model is a useful tool for assessing the functional contribution of

  3. A phloem-limited fijivirus induces the formation of neoplastic phloem tissues that house virus multiplication in the host plant

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiangfeng; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jianping; Sun, Liying

    2016-01-01

    A number of phloem-limited viruses induce the development of tumours (enations) in the veins of host plants, but the relevance of tumour induction to the life cycle of those viruses is unclear. In this study, we performed molecular and structural analyses of tumours induced by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV, genus Fijivirus) infection in maize plants. The transcript level of the maize cdc2 gene, which regulates the cell cycle, was highly elevated in tumour tissues. Two-dimensional electrophoresis identified 25 cellular proteins with altered accumulation in the tumour tissues. These proteins are involved in various metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, redox, energy pathways and amino acid synthesis. Histological analysis indicated that the tumours predominantly originated from hyperplastic growth of phloem, but those neoplastic tissues have irregular structures and cell arrangements. Immunodetection assays and electron microscopy observations indicated that in the shoots, RBSDV is confined to phloem and tumour regions and that virus multiplication actively occurs in the tumour tissue, as indicated by the high accumulation of non-structural proteins and formation of viroplasms in the tumour cells. Thus, the induction of tumours by RBSDV infection provides a larger environment that is favourable for virus propagation in the host plant. PMID:27432466

  4. Identification of circulating microRNAs during the liver neoplastic process in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Gadot, Nicolas; Roy, Vincent; Huang, Suli; Wu, Tangchun; Tanguay, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe inborn error of metabolism, impacting the tyrosine catabolic pathway with a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using a HT1 murine model, we investigated the changes in profiles of circulating and hepatic miRNAs. The aim was to determine if plasma miRNAs could be used as non-invasive markers of liver damage in HT1 progression. Plasma and liver miRNAome was determined by deep sequencing after HT1 phenotype was induced. Sequencing analysis revealed deregulation of several miRNAs including let-7/miR-98 family, miR-21 and miR-148a, during manifestation of liver pathology. Three miRNAs (miR-98, miR-200b, miR-409) presenting the highest plasmatic variations among miRNAs found in both plasma and liver and with >1000 reads in at least one plasma sample, were further validated by RT-qPCR. Two of these miRNAs have protein targets involved in HT1 and significant changes in their circulating levels are detectable prior an increase in protein expression of alpha-fetoprotein, the current biomarker for HCC diagnosis. Future assessment of these miRNAs in HT1 patients and their association with liver neoplastic lesions might designate these molecules as potential biomarkers for monitoring HT1 damage progression, improving diagnosis for early HCC detection and the design of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27282650

  5. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Methyl Eugenol-induced Nonneoplastic and Neoplastic Neuroendocrine Cell Lesions in Glandular Stomach of Rats.

    PubMed

    Janardhan, Kyathanahalli S; Rebolloso, Yvette; Hurlburt, Geoffrey; Olson, David; Lyght, Otis; Clayton, Natasha P; Gruebbel, Margarita; Picut, Catherine; Shackelford, Cynthia; Herbert, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Methyl eugenol induces neuroendocrine (NE) cell hyperplasia and tumors in F344/N rat stomach. Detailed histopathological and immunohistochemical (IHC) characterization of these tumors has not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to fill that data gap. Archived slides and paraffin blocks were retrieved from the National Toxicology Program Archives. NE hyperplasias and tumors were stained with chromogranin A, synaptophysin, amylase, gastrin, H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), pepsinogen, somatostatin, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) antibodies. Many of the rats had gastric mucosal atrophy, due to loss of chief and parietal cells. The hyperplasias and tumors were confined to fundic stomach, and females were more affected than the males. Hyperplasia of NE cells was not observed in the pyloric region. Approximately one-third of the females with malignant NE tumors had areas of pancreatic acinar differentiation. The rate of metastasis was 21%, with liver being the most common site of metastasis. Immunohistochemically, the hyperplasias and tumors stained consistently with chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Neoplastic cells were also positive for amylase and CK18 and negative for gastrin, somatostatin, H(+)/K(+) ATPase, and pepsinogen. Metastatic neoplasms histologically similar to the primary neoplasm stained positively for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Based on the histopathological and IHC features, the neoplasms appear to arise from enterochromaffin-like cells.

  6. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  7. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation.

  8. Serum anti-p53 autoantibodies in pleural malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer and non-neoplastic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Neri, Monica; Betta, Piergiacomo; Marroni, Paola; Filiberti, Rosangela; Cafferata, Mara; Mereu, Carlo; Ivaldi, Giampaolo; Montanaro, Fabio; Puntoni, Riccardo; Paganuzzi, Michela

    2003-02-01

    Alterations of the p53 gene may lead to the production of detectable autoantibodies (p53-Abs) in cancer patients. In order to evaluate the association of p53-Abs with pleuropulmonary diseases, four groups of subjects were analyzed by ELISA for serum p53-Abs, in the framework of a molecular epidemiologic study. Two of 30 pleural malignant mesothelioma patients (MM; 6.7%) and 8/48 lung cancer patients (LC; 16.7%) were seropositive, while all 51 healthy controls (HC) were negative. Two of 55 (3.6%) at-risk controls (RC) with non-malignant respiratory diseases were positive and were not subsequently diagnosed any cancer. The difference was statistically significant between LC and RC or HC (P = 0.01), but not between MM and any other group. No correlation was found with age, sex, cancer stage or histology, cigarette smoking or occupational exposure. A longer survival (not significant) was shown in seropositive LC but not in MM. p53 expression in tumor tissue was also evaluated in a subgroup of MM. In conclusion, the presence of detectable p53-Abs in serum was associated in a statistically significant proportion of cases with LC but only occasionally with MM. The longer survival among positive LC patients and the presence of two seropositive among patients with non-neoplastic respiratory diseases should be further investigated.

  9. Target interaction profiling of midostaurin and its metabolites in neoplastic mast cells predicts distinct effects on activation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Barbara; Winter, Georg E.; Blatt, Katharina; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Rix, Uwe; Eisenwort, Gregor; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Gridling, Manuela; Dutreix, Catherine; Hoermann, Gregor; Schwaab, Juliana; Radia, Deepti; Roesel, Johannes; Manley, Paul W.; Reiter, Andreas; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Valent, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic-based drug testing is an emerging approach to establish the clinical value and anti-neoplastic potential of multi-kinase inhibitors. The multikinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) is a promising new agent used to treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM). We examined the target interaction-profiles and the mast cell (MC)-targeting effects of two pharmacologically relevant midostaurin metabolites, CGP52421 and CGP62221. All three compounds, midostaurin and the two metabolites, suppressed IgE-dependent histamine secretion in basophils and MC with reasonable IC50 values. Midostaurin and CGP62221 also produced growth-inhibition and dephosphorylation of KIT in the MC leukemia cell line HMC-1.2, whereas the second metabolite, CGP52421, that accumulates in vivo, showed no substantial effects. Chemical proteomic profiling and drug-competition experiments revealed that midostaurin interacts with KIT and several additional kinase-targets. The key downstream-regulator FES was recognized by midostaurin and CGP62221, but not by CGP52421 in MC lysates, whereas the IgE-receptor-downstream target SYK was recognized by both metabolites. Together, our data show that the clinically relevant midostaurin metabolite CGP52421 inhibits IgE-dependent histamine release, but is a weak inhibitor of MC proliferation which may have clinical implications and may explain why mediator-related symptoms improve in SM patients even when disease progression occurs. PMID:26349526

  10. Appraisals of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants Used by Folk Medicine Practitioners in the Prevention and Management of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kabidul Azam, Md. Nur; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Biswas, Samanta

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which is categorized to differentiate into diverse cell types and move around in the body to sites of organogenesis that is key to the process of tumor genesis. All types of cancer fall into the group of malignant neoplastic diseases. In Bangladesh, cancer is now one of the foremost killer diseases and its personal, social, and economic bearing are huge. Plant-derived natural compounds (vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, paclitaxel, camptothecin, topotecan, and irinotecan) are useful for the treatment of cancer. Since there is no extensive ethnobotanical research study in Bangladesh regarding the traditional uses of medicinal plants against neoplasms, therefore, a randomized ethnopharmacological surveys were carried out in 3 districts of Bangladesh to learn more about the usage of anticancer medicinal plants and their chemical constituents having antineoplastic activity. Comprehensive interviews were conducted to the folk medicine practitioners and medicinal plants as pointed out by them were photographed, collected, deposited, and identified at the Bangladesh National Herbarium. The various plant parts have been used by the healers which included whole plant, leaves, fruits, barks, roots, and seeds. This study evaluated considerable potential for discovery of novel compounds with less side effects in the management and prevention of malignancy in cancer. PMID:27382642

  11. Telomere length in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) and its relationship to the severe clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Sumi, Kazuya; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Hirata, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. To clarify the clinical importance of telomere shortening in colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC), we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in UC patients and assessed its relationship to various clinical subtypes. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured in colonic biopsies obtained from rectal inflammatory mucosa from 86 UC patients as well as paired non-inflammatory proximal colonic mucosae from 10 patients. Data were correlated with various clinical phenotypes. In paired samples, average relative telomere length of rectal inflammatory mucosa was shortened compared to normal appearing proximal colon in eight out of ten cases (p = 0.01). Telomere length shortening was significantly associated with more severe Mayo endoscopic subscore (p < 0.0001) and cases needing surgery due to toxic megacolon or cancer occurrence (p = 0.043). When the severe clinical phenotype was defined as having at least one of following phenotypes, more than two times of hospitalization, highest Mayo endoscopic subscore, steroid dependent, refractory, or needing operation, average relative telomere length was significantly shortened in the same phenotypes than the others (p = 0.003). Telomere shortening is associated with more severe clinical phenotypes of UC, reflecting severe inflammatory state in the colonic mucosa.

  12. Identification of circulating microRNAs during the liver neoplastic process in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Gadot, Nicolas; Roy, Vincent; Huang, Suli; Wu, Tangchun; Tanguay, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe inborn error of metabolism, impacting the tyrosine catabolic pathway with a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using a HT1 murine model, we investigated the changes in profiles of circulating and hepatic miRNAs. The aim was to determine if plasma miRNAs could be used as non-invasive markers of liver damage in HT1 progression. Plasma and liver miRNAome was determined by deep sequencing after HT1 phenotype was induced. Sequencing analysis revealed deregulation of several miRNAs including let-7/miR-98 family, miR-21 and miR-148a, during manifestation of liver pathology. Three miRNAs (miR-98, miR-200b, miR-409) presenting the highest plasmatic variations among miRNAs found in both plasma and liver and with >1000 reads in at least one plasma sample, were further validated by RT-qPCR. Two of these miRNAs have protein targets involved in HT1 and significant changes in their circulating levels are detectable prior an increase in protein expression of alpha-fetoprotein, the current biomarker for HCC diagnosis. Future assessment of these miRNAs in HT1 patients and their association with liver neoplastic lesions might designate these molecules as potential biomarkers for monitoring HT1 damage progression, improving diagnosis for early HCC detection and the design of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27282650

  13. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  14. Neoplastic response in Japanese medaka and channel catfish exposed to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Pan, I J; Tu, W J; Lin, W H; Hong, C C; Brittelli, M R

    1996-01-01

    Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were investigated for carcinogenic response following a 28-day, 3 x/wk pulse exposure to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Five-wk-old medaka were exposed at concentrations of 0, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/L, and 5-mo-old catfish at concentrations of 0, 0.1, and 0.5 mg/L. In medaka, a total of 19 tumors including 2 branchioblastomas, 6 thyroid follicular adenomas and 1 adenocarcinoma, and 11 subcutaneous fibrosarcomas were observed in 16 of 96 MNNG-exposed fish. In catfish, a total of 37 tumors including 4 squamous cell carcinomas and 16 papillomas, 3 lipomas, 1 fibroma, 1 osteosarcoma, 4 branchioblastomas, 6 thymic epithelial tumors, and 2 generalized lymphosarcomas were observed in 34 of 172 MNNG-exposed fish. The induction of neoplasms in medaka was primarily in the gill, thyroid, and subcutis of the cervical and trunk regions, whereas in catfish skin, thymus, oro-pharynx, and hemopoietic tissues were also commonly affected. In both species, the neoplastic response was considered to be related to direct exposure of the tissues to MNNG. Some of these tumors have not been reported in the literature in either natural or experimental fish. The results also suggest species-specific differences in carcinogenic response following MNNG exposure. PMID:8994296

  15. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sébastien A B; Allaire, Joannie M; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1a(ΔMES)). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1a(ΔMES) stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  16. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Curcumin, the Anti-inflammatory Agent, Against Neurodegenerative, Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Metabolic, Autoimmune and Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.

    2009-01-01

    Although safe in most cases, ancient treatments are ignored because neither their active component nor their molecular targets are well defined. This is not the case, however, with curcumin, a yellow-pigment substance and component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), which was identified more than a century ago. For centuries it has been known that turmeric exhibits anti-inflammatory activity, but extensive research performed within the past two decades has shown that the this activity of turmeric is due to curcumin, a diferuloylmethane. This agent has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, protein kinases, adhesion molecules, redox status and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. The process of inflammation has been shown to play a major role in most chronic illnesses, including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. In the current review, we provide evidence for the potential role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of various pro-inflammatory chronic diseases. These features, combined with the pharmacological safety and negligible cost, render curcumin an attractive agent to explore further. PMID:18662800

  17. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition. PMID:24651472

  18. Appraisals of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants Used by Folk Medicine Practitioners in the Prevention and Management of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabidul Azam, Md Nur; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Biswas, Samanta; Ahmed, Md Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which is categorized to differentiate into diverse cell types and move around in the body to sites of organogenesis that is key to the process of tumor genesis. All types of cancer fall into the group of malignant neoplastic diseases. In Bangladesh, cancer is now one of the foremost killer diseases and its personal, social, and economic bearing are huge. Plant-derived natural compounds (vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, paclitaxel, camptothecin, topotecan, and irinotecan) are useful for the treatment of cancer. Since there is no extensive ethnobotanical research study in Bangladesh regarding the traditional uses of medicinal plants against neoplasms, therefore, a randomized ethnopharmacological surveys were carried out in 3 districts of Bangladesh to learn more about the usage of anticancer medicinal plants and their chemical constituents having antineoplastic activity. Comprehensive interviews were conducted to the folk medicine practitioners and medicinal plants as pointed out by them were photographed, collected, deposited, and identified at the Bangladesh National Herbarium. The various plant parts have been used by the healers which included whole plant, leaves, fruits, barks, roots, and seeds. This study evaluated considerable potential for discovery of novel compounds with less side effects in the management and prevention of malignancy in cancer. PMID:27382642

  19. In-situ visualization and evaluation of neoplastic lesions of the human gastrointestinal tract using endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Andrew M.; Westphal, Volker; Das, Ananya; Pfau, Patrick; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2001-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel biomedical imaging technique that uses low-coherence optical interferometry to obtain micron-scale resolution cross- sectional images of tissue microstructure noninvasively. OCT fills a valuable niche in imaging of tissue structure, providing subsurface imaging with high spatial resolution (on the order of 10 micrometers) and penetration depths of 1 - 2 mm with no contact or matching medium needed between the probe and the tissue. An OCT system for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has been developed using a small-diameter rotary-scanning probe compatible with standard GI endoscopes and capable of imaging in real-time. To date more than 100 volunteers have been imaged during routine upper and lower endoscopic procedures. Results of imaging in normal organs have demonstrated visualization of morphological layers (epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria) and microscopic structures (glands, villi, crypts, vessels) in all endoscopically accessible GI organs. It has been observed in more than 30 patients that the EOCT appearance of Barrett's mucosa is clearly differentiable from normal gastric or esophageal mucosa. Furthermore, the EOCT appearance of dysplasia and neoplastic lesions, including adenocarcenoma in Barrett's and villous tumor in colon have been observed and are under investigation. Preliminary data indicate the potential of EOCT for routine clinical diagnostics in GI tissues, including early cancer detection and staging and detection of tumor margins.

  20. Appraisals of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants Used by Folk Medicine Practitioners in the Prevention and Management of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabidul Azam, Md Nur; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Biswas, Samanta; Ahmed, Md Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which is categorized to differentiate into diverse cell types and move around in the body to sites of organogenesis that is key to the process of tumor genesis. All types of cancer fall into the group of malignant neoplastic diseases. In Bangladesh, cancer is now one of the foremost killer diseases and its personal, social, and economic bearing are huge. Plant-derived natural compounds (vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, paclitaxel, camptothecin, topotecan, and irinotecan) are useful for the treatment of cancer. Since there is no extensive ethnobotanical research study in Bangladesh regarding the traditional uses of medicinal plants against neoplasms, therefore, a randomized ethnopharmacological surveys were carried out in 3 districts of Bangladesh to learn more about the usage of anticancer medicinal plants and their chemical constituents having antineoplastic activity. Comprehensive interviews were conducted to the folk medicine practitioners and medicinal plants as pointed out by them were photographed, collected, deposited, and identified at the Bangladesh National Herbarium. The various plant parts have been used by the healers which included whole plant, leaves, fruits, barks, roots, and seeds. This study evaluated considerable potential for discovery of novel compounds with less side effects in the management and prevention of malignancy in cancer.

  1. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  2. Impact of a Multifaceted and Clinically Integrated Training Program in Evidence-Based Practice on Knowledge, Skills, Beliefs and Behaviour among Clinical Instructors in Physiotherapy: A Non-Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Nina Rydland; Bradley, Peter; Espehaug, Birgitte; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen; Lygren, Hildegunn; Frisk, Bente; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Physiotherapists practicing at clinical placement sites assigned the role as clinical instructors (CIs), are responsible for supervising physiotherapy students. For CIs to role model evidence-based practice (EBP) they need EBP competence. The aim of this study was to assess the short and long term impact of a six-month multifaceted and clinically integrated training program in EBP on the knowledge, skills, beliefs and behaviour of CIs supervising physiotherapy students. Methods We invited 37 CIs to participate in this non-randomized controlled study. Three self-administered questionnaires were used pre- and post-intervention, and at six-month follow-up: 1) The Adapted Fresno test (AFT), 2) the EBP Belief Scale and 3) the EBP Implementation Scale. The analysis approach was linear regression modeling using Generalized Estimating Equations. Results In total, 29 CIs agreed to participate in the study: 14 were invited to participate in the intervention group and 15 were invited to participate in the control group. One in the intervention group and five in the control group were lost to follow-up. At follow-up, the group difference was statistically significant for the AFT (mean difference = 37, 95% CI (15.9 -58.1), p<0.001) and the EBP Beliefs scale (mean difference = 8.1, 95% CI (3.1 -13.2), p = 0.002), but not for the EBP Implementation scale (mean difference = 1.8. 95% CI (-4.5-8.1), p = 0.574). Comparing measurements over time, we found a statistically significant increase in mean scores related to all outcome measures for the intervention group only. Conclusions A multifaceted and clinically integrated training program in EBP was successful in improving EBP knowledge, skills and beliefs among CIs. Future studies need to ensure long-term EBP behaviour change, in addition to assessing CIs’ abilities to apply EBP knowledge and skills when supervising students. PMID:25894559

  3. Prevalence and non-random distribution of exonic mutations in Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) in 307 families with Van der Woude syndrome and 37 families with popliteal pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira de Lima, Renata L. L.; Hoper, Sarah A.; Ghassibe, Michella; Cooper, Margaret E.; Rorick, Nicholas K.; Kondo, Shinji; Katz, Lori; Marazita, Mary L.; Compton, John; Bale, Sherri; Hehr, Ute; Dixon, Michael J.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Boute, Odile; Bayet, Bénédicte; Revencu, Nicole; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Vikkula, Miikka; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Schutte, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) encodes a member of the IRF family of transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude (VWS) and popliteal pterygium syndromes (PPS), two related orofacial clefting disorders. Here, we compared and contrasted the frequency and distribution of exonic mutations in IRF6 between two large geographically distinct collections of families with VWS and between one collection of families with PPS. Methods We performed direct sequence analysis of IRF6 exons on samples from three collections, two with VWS and one with PPS. Results We identified mutations in IRF6 exons in 68% of families in both VWS collections and in 97% of families with PPS. In sum, 106 novel disease-causing variants were found. The distribution of mutations in the IRF6 exons in each collection was not random; exons 3, 4, 7, and 9 accounted for 80%. In the VWS collections, the mutations were evenly divided between protein truncation and missense, whereas most mutations identified in the PPS collection were missense. Further, the missense mutations associated with PPS were localized significantly to exon 4, at residues that are predicted to bind directly to DNA. Conclusion The non-random distribution of mutations in the IRF6 exons suggests a two-tier approach for efficient mutation screens for IRF6. The type and distribution of mutations are consistent with the hypothesis that VWS is caused by haploinsufficiency of IRF6. On the other hand, the distribution of PPS-associated mutations suggests a different, though not mutually exclusive, effect on IRF6 function. PMID:19282774

  4. The use of transformed IMR90 cell model to identify the potential extra-telomeric effects of hTERT in cell migration and DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomesase, is responsible for telomere maintenance and its reactivation is implicated in almost 90% human cancers. Recent evidences show that hTERT is essential for neoplastic transformation independent of its canonical function. However, the roles of hTERT in the process remain elusive. In the current work, we explore the extra-telomeric role of hTERT in the neoplastic transformation of fibroblast IMR90. Results Here we established transformed IMR90 cells by co-expression of three oncogenic factors, namely, H-Ras, SV40 Large-T antigen and hTERT (RSH). The RSH-transformed cells acquired hallmarks of cancer, such as they can grow under anchorage independent conditions; self-sufficient in growth signals; attenuated response to apoptosis; and possessed recurrent chromosomal abnormalities. Furthermore, the RSH-transformed cells showed enhanced migration capability which was also observed in IMR90 cells expressing hTERT alone, indicating that hTERT plays a role in cell migration, and thus possibly contribute to their metastatic potential during tumor transformation. This notion was further supported by our microarray analysis. In addition, we found that Ku70 were exclusively upregulated in both RSH-transformed IMR90 cells and hTERT-overexpressing IMR90 cells, suggesting the potential role of hTERT in DNA damage response (DDR). Conclusions Collectively, our study revealed the extra-telomeric effects of hTERT in cell migration and DDR during neoplastic transformation. PMID:25098897

  5. Mist1 Expressing Gastric Stem Cells Maintain the Normal and Neoplastic Gastric Epithelium and Are Supported by a Perivascular Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Stancikova, Jitka; Sakitani, Kosuke; Asfaha, Samuel; Renz, Bernhard W; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A; Shibata, Wataru; Wang, Hongshan; Westphalen, Christoph B; Chen, Xiaowei; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Kim, Woosook; Khurana, Shradha S; Tailor, Yagnesh; Nagar, Karan; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D; Saha, Subhrajit; Ding, Lei; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G; Friedman, Richard A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Worthley, Daniel L; Korinek, Vladimir; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-12-14

    The regulation and stem cell origin of normal and neoplastic gastric glands are uncertain. Here, we show that Mist1 expression marks quiescent stem cells in the gastric corpus isthmus. Mist1(+) stem cells serve as a cell-of-origin for intestinal-type cancer with the combination of Kras and Apc mutation and for diffuse-type cancer with the loss of E-cadherin. Diffuse-type cancer development is dependent on inflammation mediated by Cxcl12(+) endothelial cells and Cxcr4(+) gastric innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). These cells form the perivascular gastric stem cell niche, and Wnt5a produced from ILCs activates RhoA to inhibit anoikis in the E-cadherin-depleted cells. Targeting Cxcr4, ILCs, or Wnt5a inhibits diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis, providing targets within the neoplastic gastric stem cell niche.

  6. Three-Dimensional Printing as an Interdisciplinary Communication Tool: Preparing for Removal of a Giant Renal Tumor and Atrium Neoplastic Mass.

    PubMed

    Golab, Adam; Slojewski, Marcin; Brykczynski, Miroslaw; Lukowiak, Magdalena; Boehlke, Marek; Matias, Daniel; Smektala, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing involves preparing 3D objects from a digital model. These models can be used to plan and practice surgery. We used 3D printing to plan for a rare complicated surgery involving the removal of a renal tumor and neoplastic mass, which reached the heart atrium. A printed kidney model was an essential element of communication for physicians with different specializations. PMID:27585198

  7. Prognostic Impact of Reduced Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Coupling of Neoplastic Stromal Cells in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Peter; Maros, Mate Elod; Barna, Gabor; Antal, Imre; Papp, Gergo; Sapi, Zoltan; Athanasou, Nicholas Anthony; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Pierro; Krenacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations of the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) cause bone malformations resulting in oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), while GJA1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop osteopenia. In this study we investigated Cx43 expression and channel functions in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), a locally aggressive osteolytic lesion with uncertain progression. Cx43 protein levels assessed by immunohistochemistry were correlated with GCTB cell types, clinico-radiological stages and progression free survival in tissue microarrays of 89 primary and 34 recurrent GCTB cases. Cx43 expression, phosphorylation, subcellular distribution and gap junction coupling was also investigated and compared between cultured neoplastic GCTB stromal cells and bone marow stromal cells or HDFa fibroblasts as a control. In GCTB tissues, most Cx43 was produced by CD163 negative neoplastic stromal cells and less by CD163 positive reactive monocytes/macrophages or by giant cells. Significantly less Cx43 was detected in α-smooth muscle actin positive than α-smooth muscle actin negative stromal cells and in osteoclast-rich tumor nests than in the adjacent reactive stroma. Progressively reduced Cx43 production in GCTB was significantly linked to advanced clinico-radiological stages and worse progression free survival. In neoplastic GCTB stromal cell cultures most Cx43 protein was localized in the paranuclear-Golgi region, while it was concentrated in the cell membranes both in bone marrow stromal cells and HDFa fibroblasts. In Western blots, alkaline phosphatase sensitive bands, linked to serine residues (Ser369, Ser372 or Ser373) detected in control cells, were missing in GCTB stromal cells. Defective cell membrane localization of Cx43 channels was in line with the significantly reduced transfer of the 622 Da fluorescing calcein dye between GCTB stromal cells. Our results show that significant downregulation of Cx43 expression and gap junction coupling in

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for non-neoplastic conditions in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic regions: pearls and potential pitfalls in imaging interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Suk; Kim, Dong Uk; Seo, Hyung Ii; Kim, Hyun Sung; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Tae Un

    2015-03-01

    Potentially, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) can assess the functional information on concerning the status of tissue cellularity, because increased cellularity is associated with impeded diffusion. DWI in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic regions has demonstrated the usefulness to detect malignant lesions and differentiate them from benign lesions. However, it has been shown more recently that there is some overlap in ADC values for benign and malignant neoplasms. Moreover, some non-neoplastic lesions in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic regions exhibit restricted diffusion on DWI, because of pus, inflammation, or high cellularity. Focal eosinophilic liver disease, hepatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, granulomatous liver disease, acute cholecystitis, xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis, focal pancreatitis, or autoimmune pancreatitis frequently exhibit restricted diffusion on DWI, which may be confused with malignancy in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic regions. Thus, DWI should not be interpreted in isolation, but in conjunction with other conventional images, to avoid the diagnostic pitfalls of DWI. Nevertheless, the presence of diffusion restriction in the non-neoplastic lesions sometimes provides additional information regarding the diagnosis, in problematic patients where conventional images have yielded equivocal findings. DWI may help differentiate hepatic abscess from malignant necrotic tumors, gallbladder empyema from dense bile or sludge in the gallbladder, and pylephlebitis from bland thrombosis in the portal vein. Therefore, knowledge of DWI findings to conventional imaging findings of diffusion-restricted non-neoplastic conditions in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic regions helps establishing a correct diagnosis. PMID:25216848

  9. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit anitsera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other cultured cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  10. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit antisera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other culture cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  11. Establishment of 3D Co-Culture Models from Different Stages of Human Tongue Tumorigenesis: Utility in Understanding Neoplastic Progression.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Sharada; Dongre, Harsh; Singh, Archana Kumari; Joshi, Shriya; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mahadik, Snehal; Ahire, Chetan; Makani, Vidhi; Dange, Prerana; Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    To study multistep tumorigenesis process, there is a need of in-vitro 3D model simulating in-vivo tissue. Present study aimed to reconstitute in-vitro tissue models comprising various stages of neoplastic progression of tongue tumorigenesis and to evaluate the utility of these models to investigate the role of stromal fibroblasts in maintenance of desmosomal anchoring junctions using transmission electron microscopy. We reconstituted in-vitro models representing normal, dysplastic, and malignant tissues by seeding primary keratinocytes on either fibroblast embedded in collagen matrix or plain collagen matrix in growth factor-free medium. The findings of histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses of the three types of 3D cultures showed that the stratified growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation were comparable between co-cultures and their respective native tissues; however, they largely differed in cultures grown without fibroblasts. The immunostaining intensity of proteins, viz., desmoplakin, desmoglein, and plakoglobin, was reduced as the disease stage increased in all co-cultures as observed in respective native tissues. Desmosome-like structures were identified using immunogold labeling in these cultures. Moreover, electron microscopic observations revealed that the desmosome number and their length were significantly reduced and intercellular spaces were increased in cultures grown without fibroblasts when compared with their co-culture counterparts. Our results showed that the major steps of tongue tumorigenesis can be reproduced in-vitro. Stromal fibroblasts play a role in regulation of epithelial thickness, cell proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of desmosomalanchoring junctions in in-vitro grown tissues. The reconstituted co-culture models could help to answer various biological questions especially related to tongue tumorigenesis. PMID:27501241

  12. Role of Lynx1 and related Ly6 proteins as modulators of cholinergic signaling in normal and neoplastic bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao Wen; Song, Ping Fang; Spindel, Eliot R

    2015-11-01

    The ly-6 proteins are a large family of proteins that resemble the snake three finger alpha toxins such as α-bungarotoxin and are defined by their multiple cysteine residues. Multiple members of the ly-6 protein family can modulate nicotinic signaling including lynx1, lynx2, slurp-1, slurp-2 and prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Consistent with the expression of multiple nicotinic receptors in bronchial epithelium, multiple members of the nicotinic-modulatory ly-6 proteins are expressed in lung including lynx1 and lynx2. We studied the role of lynx1 as an exemplar of the role of ly-6 proteins in lung. Our data demonstrates that lynx1 acts as a negative modulator of nicotinic signaling in normal and neoplastic lung. In normal lung lynx1 serves to limit the ability of chronic nicotine exposure to increase levels of nicotinic receptors and also serves to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of GABAA receptors in lung. In turn this allows lynx1 to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of mucin which is mediated by GABAergic signaling. This suggests that lynx1-mimetics may have potential for treatment of asthma and COPD. In that most lung cancer cells also express nicotinic receptor and lynx1 we examined the role of lynx-1 in lung cancer. Lynx1 levels are decreased in lung cancers compared to adjacent normal lung. Knockdown of lynx1 by siRNAs increased growth of lung cancer cells while expression of lynx1 in lung cancer cell decreased cell proliferation. This suggests that lynx1 is an endogenous regulator of lung cancer growth. Given that multiple small molecule negative and positive allosteric modulators of nicotinic receptors have already been developed, this suggests that lynx1 is a highly druggable target both for development of drugs that may limit lung cancer growth as well as for drugs that may be effective for asthma or COPD treatment. PMID:26025503

  13. MCT-1 expression and PTEN deficiency synergistically promote neoplastic multinucleation through the Src/p190B signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M-H; Chen, Y-A; Chen, H-H; Chang, K-W; Chang, I-S; Wang, L-H; Hsu, H-L

    2014-10-23

    Multinucleation is associated with malignant neoplasms; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the nuclear abnormality remains unclear. Loss or mutation of PTEN promotes the development of malignant tumors. We now demonstrate that increased expression of the oncogene MCT-1 (multiple copies in T-cell malignancy 1) antagonizes PTEN gene presentation, PTEN protein stability and PTEN functional activity, thereby further promoting phosphoinositide 3 kinase/AKT signaling, survival rate and malignancies of the PTEN-deficient cells. In the PTEN-null cancer cells, MCT-1 interacts with p190B and Src in vivo, supporting that they are in proximity of the signaling complexes. MCT-1 overexpression and PTEN loss synergistically augments the Src/p190B signaling function that leads to inhibition of RhoA activity. Under such a condition, the incidence of mitotic catastrophes including spindle multipolarity and cytokinesis failure is enhanced, driving an Src/p190B/RhoA-dependent neoplastic multinucleation. Targeting MCT-1 by the short hairpin RNA markedly represses the Src/p190B function, improves nuclear structures and suppresses xenograft tumorigenicity of the PTEN-null breast cancer cells. Consistent with the oncogenic effects in vitro, clinical evidence has confirmed that MCT-1 gene stimulation is correlated with p190B gene promotion and PTEN gene suppression in human breast cancer. Accordingly, MCT-1 gene induction is recognized as a potential biomarker of breast tumor development. Abrogating MCT-1 function may be a promising stratagem for management of breast cancer involving Src hyperactivation and/or PTEN dysfunction. PMID:24858043

  14. Establishment of 3D Co-Culture Models from Different Stages of Human Tongue Tumorigenesis: Utility in Understanding Neoplastic Progression.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Sharada; Dongre, Harsh; Singh, Archana Kumari; Joshi, Shriya; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mahadik, Snehal; Ahire, Chetan; Makani, Vidhi; Dange, Prerana; Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    To study multistep tumorigenesis process, there is a need of in-vitro 3D model simulating in-vivo tissue. Present study aimed to reconstitute in-vitro tissue models comprising various stages of neoplastic progression of tongue tumorigenesis and to evaluate the utility of these models to investigate the role of stromal fibroblasts in maintenance of desmosomal anchoring junctions using transmission electron microscopy. We reconstituted in-vitro models representing normal, dysplastic, and malignant tissues by seeding primary keratinocytes on either fibroblast embedded in collagen matrix or plain collagen matrix in growth factor-free medium. The findings of histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses of the three types of 3D cultures showed that the stratified growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation were comparable between co-cultures and their respective native tissues; however, they largely differed in cultures grown without fibroblasts. The immunostaining intensity of proteins, viz., desmoplakin, desmoglein, and plakoglobin, was reduced as the disease stage increased in all co-cultures as observed in respective native tissues. Desmosome-like structures were identified using immunogold labeling in these cultures. Moreover, electron microscopic observations revealed that the desmosome number and their length were significantly reduced and intercellular spaces were increased in cultures grown without fibroblasts when compared with their co-culture counterparts. Our results showed that the major steps of tongue tumorigenesis can be reproduced in-vitro. Stromal fibroblasts play a role in regulation of epithelial thickness, cell proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of desmosomalanchoring junctions in in-vitro grown tissues. The reconstituted co-culture models could help to answer various biological questions especially related to tongue tumorigenesis.

  15. Establishment of 3D Co-Culture Models from Different Stages of Human Tongue Tumorigenesis: Utility in Understanding Neoplastic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Sharada; Dongre, Harsh; Singh, Archana Kumari; Joshi, Shriya; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mahadik, Snehal; Ahire, Chetan; Makani, Vidhi; Dange, Prerana; Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    To study multistep tumorigenesis process, there is a need of in-vitro 3D model simulating in-vivo tissue. Present study aimed to reconstitute in-vitro tissue models comprising various stages of neoplastic progression of tongue tumorigenesis and to evaluate the utility of these models to investigate the role of stromal fibroblasts in maintenance of desmosomal anchoring junctions using transmission electron microscopy. We reconstituted in-vitro models representing normal, dysplastic, and malignant tissues by seeding primary keratinocytes on either fibroblast embedded in collagen matrix or plain collagen matrix in growth factor-free medium. The findings of histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses of the three types of 3D cultures showed that the stratified growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation were comparable between co-cultures and their respective native tissues; however, they largely differed in cultures grown without fibroblasts. The immunostaining intensity of proteins, viz., desmoplakin, desmoglein, and plakoglobin, was reduced as the disease stage increased in all co-cultures as observed in respective native tissues. Desmosome-like structures were identified using immunogold labeling in these cultures. Moreover, electron microscopic observations revealed that the desmosome number and their length were significantly reduced and intercellular spaces were increased in cultures grown without fibroblasts when compared with their co-culture counterparts. Our results showed that the major steps of tongue tumorigenesis can be reproduced in-vitro. Stromal fibroblasts play a role in regulation of epithelial thickness, cell proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of desmosomalanchoring junctions in in-vitro grown tissues. The reconstituted co-culture models could help to answer various biological questions especially related to tongue tumorigenesis. PMID:27501241

  16. Early progression stage of malignancy as revealed by immunohistochemical demonstration of DNA instability; II, Otorhinolaryngeal border-line neoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, H; Saito, H; Imamura, Y; Noriki, S; Fukuda, M

    1994-01-01

    The degree of DNA-instability as revealed by the immunohistochemical staining with anti-single-stranded DNA antibody after acid hydrolysis (DNA-instability test) was used as a marker of malignancy. This was applied to benign, border-line, and malignant neoplastic lesions found in the otorhinolaryngeal regions (31 cancer, 22 leukoplakia, 10 nasal inverted papilloma, 33 salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma, and 7 Warthin's tumor cases). Proliferative activity and polarity of the proliferative cell distribution were evaluated by PCNA-immunohistochemistry, and the quantitative analyses of the number, mean size, largest size, and maximum shape-irregularity of AgNORs in a nucleus were performed for all these cases. As the results, 31 cancer (100%), 20 leukoplakia (90.1%), 10 nasal inverted papilloma (100%), and 21 pleomorphic adenoma (63.6%) cases were positively stained by the DNA-instability test diffusely or sporadically, indicating their malignancy. Reflecting the malignant character, these cases showed a remarkable increase in the PCNA-index with the loss of polarity of PCNA-positive cell distribution, and also increased number, mean and largest sizes, and maximum shape-irregularity of AgNORs. These results indicate that all nasal inverted papillomas are malignant in nature, namely, in situ carcinoma, and the majority of leukoplakia is also regarded as in situ cancer, although a certain percentage of simple hyperplasia may be included. Furthermore, the pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary gland can be regarded as an "unstable tumor" which often contains or predisposes to bear malignant subclones with occasional capsular or extracapsular invasion, reflecting the progression of malignancy. In the present study, no sign of malignancy was detected in Warthin's tumor.

  17. Impact of tissue type and content of neoplastic cells of samples on the quality of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis among patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    PALIOGIANNIS, PANAGIOTIS; ATTENE, FEDERICO; COSSU, ANTONIO; DEFRAIA, EFISIO; PORCU, GIUSEPPE; CARTA, ANNAMARIA; SOTGIU, MARIA IGNAZIA; PAZZOLA, ANTONIO; CORDERO, LORENZO; CAPELLI, FRANCESCA; FADDA, GIOVANNI MARIA; ORTU, SALVATORE; SOTGIU, GIOVANNI; PALOMBA, GRAZIA; SINI, MARIA CRISTINA; PALMIERI, GIUSEPPE; COLOMBINO, MARIA

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutational status has become crucial in recent years in the molecular classification of patients with lung cancer. The impact of the type and quantity of malignant cells of the neoplastic specimen on the quality of mutation analysis remains to be elucidated, and only empirical and sporadic data are available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of tissue type and content of neoplastic cells in the specimen on the quality of EGFR mutation analysis among patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 515 patients with histologically-confirmed disease were included in the present study. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were used for the mutation analysis and the content of the neoplastic cells was evaluated using light microscopy. Genomic DNA was isolated using a standard protocol. The coding sequences and splice junctions of exons 18, 19 and 21 in the EGFR gene were then screened for mutations by direct automated sequencing. The mean age of the patients examined was 64.9 years and 357 (69.3%) were male. A total of 429 tissue samples (83.3%) were obtained by biopsy and the remaining samples were obtained by surgery. A total of 456 samples (88.5%) were observed from primary lung adenocarcinomas, while 59 (11.5%) were from metastatic lesions. EGFR mutations occurred in 59 cases (11.5%); exon 18 mutations were detected in one case (1.7%), whereas exon 19 and 21 mutations were detected in 30 (51%) and 28 (47.3%) cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were more frequent in females and patients that had never smoked. The distribution of the mutations among primary and metastatic tissues exhibited no significant differences in the proportions of EGFR mutations detected. However, a statistically significant difference in the number of mutations detected was found between samples with at least 50% of neoplastic cells (450 cases-57 mutations; 12.7%) and those with <50% of neoplastic

  18. Does school-based physical activity decrease overweight and obesity in children aged 6–9 years? A two-year non-randomized longitudinal intervention study in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, efforts aimed at the prevention of childhood obesity have led to the implementation of a range of school-based interventions. This study assessed whether augmenting physical activity (PA) within the school setting resulted in increased daily PA and decreased overweight/obesity levels in 6-9-year-old children. Methods Across the first to third primary school years, PA of 84 girls and 92 boys was objectively monitored five times (each for seven successive days) using Yamax pedometer (step counts) and Caltrac accelerometer (activity energy expenditure AEE - kcal/kg per day). Four schools were selected to participate in the research (2 intervention, 2 controls), comprising intervention (43 girls, 45 boys) and control children (41 girls, 47 boys). The study was non-randomized and the intervention schools were selected on the basis of existing PA-conducive environment. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures examined the PA programme and gender effects on the step counts and AEE. Logistic regression (Enter method) determined the obesity and overweight occurrence prospect over the course of implementation of the PA intervention. Results There was a significant increase of school-based PA during schooldays in intervention children (from ≈ 1718 to ≈ 3247 steps per day; and from 2.1 to ≈ 3.6 Kcal/Kg per day) in comparison with the control children. Increased school-based PA of intervention children during schooldays contributed to them achieving >10,500 steps and >10.5 Kcal/Kg per school day across the 2 years of the study, and resulted in a stop of the decline in PA levels that is known to be associated with the increasing age of children. Increased school-based PA had also positive impact on leisure time PA of schooldays and on PA at weekends of intervention children. One year after the start of the PA intervention, the odds of being overweight or obese in the intervention children was almost three times lower than that of

  19. Neoplastic and paraneoplastic synovitis.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Maria F; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Lu, Huifang

    2011-11-01

    Arthritis is a common finding in patients who have cancer. In this population, it is crucial to rule out septic arthritis and metastatic synovitis. Culture, crystallography, (table see text) and cytology of synovial fluid are useful initial diagnostics tools. If all are negative, histopathology of synovial tissue should be considered. Crystal synovitis is another frequent cause of arthritis in patients who have cancer, but it can also coexist with other conditions such as septic arthritis. Independent rheumatic disorders, drug-induced arthritis, and paraneoplastic syndromes should be considered after the exclusion of sepsis and metastatic disease. The diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome is easier when the malignancy is evident or typical findings such as HOA or palmar fasciitis are present. However, these paraneoplastic phenomena can occur before the cancer diagnosis, and it is important to be aware of the association of these conditions with an underlying tumor. Rheumatic disorders with atypical clinical presentation in older patients, poor response to usual treatment, systemic features such as weight loss, and clinical findings compatible with well recognized paraneoplastic syndromes should alert clinicians to the possible coexistence of an occult malignancy.

  20. Transforming the Way We Teach Function Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkenberry, Eileen Durand; Faulkenberry, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss "function," a well-defined rule that relates inputs to outputs. They have found that by using the input-output definition of "function," they can examine transformations of functions simply by looking at changes to input or output and the respective changes to the graph. Applying transformations to the input…

  1. Oncogenic Transformation of Dendritic Cells and Their Precursors Leads to Rapid Cancer Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Jan P; Zelenay, Santiago; Rogers, Neil C; Helft, Julie; Schraml, Barbara U; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are powerful APCs that can induce Ag-specific adaptive immune responses and are increasingly recognized as important players in innate immunity to both infection and malignancy. Interestingly, although there are multiple described hematological malignancies, DC cancers are rarely observed in humans. Whether this is linked to the immunogenic potential of DCs, which might render them uniquely susceptible to immune control upon neoplastic transformation, has not been fully investigated. To address the issue, we generated a genetically engineered mouse model in which expression of Cre recombinase driven by the C-type lectin domain family 9, member a (Clec9a) locus causes expression of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras)(G12D) oncogenic driver and deletion of the tumor suppressor p53 within developing and differentiated DCs. We show that these Clec9a(Kras-G12D) mice rapidly succumb from disease and display massive accumulation of transformed DCs in multiple organs. In bone marrow chimeras, the development of DC cancer could be induced by a small number of transformed cells and was not prevented by the presence of untransformed DCs. Notably, activation of transformed DCs did not happen spontaneously but could be induced upon stimulation. Although Clec9a(Kras-G12D) mice showed altered thymic T cell development, peripheral T cells were largely unaffected during DC cancer development. Interestingly, transformed DCs were rejected upon adoptive transfer into wild-type but not lymphocyte-deficient mice, indicating that immunological control of DC cancer is in principle possible but does not occur during spontaneous generation in Clec9a(Kras-G12D) mice. Our findings suggest that neoplastic transformation of DCs does not by default induce anti-cancer immunity and can develop unhindered by immunological barriers. PMID:26459350

  2. Systematic review of the relation between smokeless tobacco and non-neoplastic oral diseases in Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kallischnigg, Gerd; Weitkunat, Rolf; Lee, Peter N

    2008-01-01

    Background How smokeless tobacco contributes to non-neoplastic oral diseases is unclear. It certainly increases risk of oral mucosal lesions, but reviewers disagree as to other conditions. In some areas, especially South-East Asia, risk is difficult to quantify due to the many products, compositions (including non-tobacco ingredients), and usage practices involved. This review considers studies from Europe (in practice mainly Scandinavia) and from the USA. Methods Experimental and epidemiological studies published in 1963–2007 were identified that related risk of oral lesions to smokeless tobacco use. Data were assessed separately for oral mucosal lesions, periodontal and gingival diseases, dental caries and tooth loss, and oral pain. Results Oral mucosal lesions: Thirty-three epidemiological studies consistently show a strong dose-related effect of current snuff on oral mucosal lesion prevalence. In Scandinavia, users have a near 100% prevalence of a characteristic "snuff-induced lesion", but prevalence of the varied lesions reported in the USA is lower. Associations with chewing tobacco are weaker. The lack of clear association with former use suggests reversibility following cessation, consistent with experimental studies showing rapid lesion regression on quitting. Periodontal and gingival diseases: Two of four studies report a significant association of snuff with attachment loss and four out of eight with gingival recession. Snuff is not clearly related to gingivitis or periodontal diseases. Limited evidence suggests chewing tobacco is unrelated to periodontal or gingival diseases. Tooth loss: Swedish studies show no association with snuff, but one US study reported an association with snuff, and another with chewing tobacco. Dental caries: Evidence from nine studies suggests a possible relationship with use of smokeless tobacco, particularly chewing tobacco, and the risk of dental caries. Oral pain: Limited evidence precludes any clear conclusion

  3. Serpine2/PN-1 Is Required for Proliferative Expansion of Pre-Neoplastic Lesions and Malignant Progression to Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaillant, Catherine; Kool, Marcel; Schwarzentruber-Schauerte, Alexandra; Méreau, Hélène; Cabuy, Erik; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Pfister, Stefan; Zuniga, Aimée; Frank, Stephan; Zeller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background Medulloblastomas are malignant childhood brain tumors that arise due to the aberrant activity of developmental pathways during postnatal cerebellar development and in adult humans. Transcriptome analysis has identified four major medulloblastoma subgroups. One of them, the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup, is caused by aberrant Hedgehog signal transduction due to mutations in the Patched1 (PTCH1) receptor or downstream effectors. Mice carrying a Patched-1 null allele (Ptch1∆/+) are a good model to study the alterations underlying medulloblastoma development as a consequence of aberrant Hedgehog pathway activity. Results Transcriptome analysis of human medulloblastomas shows that SERPINE2, also called Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1) is overexpressed in most medulloblastomas, in particular in the SHH and WNT subgroups. As siRNA-mediated lowering of SERPINE2/PN-1 in human medulloblastoma DAOY cells reduces cell proliferation, we analyzed its potential involvement in medulloblastoma development using the Ptch1∆/+ mouse model. In Ptch1∆/+ mice, medulloblastomas arise as a consequence of aberrant Hedgehog pathway activity. Genetic reduction of Serpine2/Pn-1 interferes with medulloblastoma development in Ptch1∆/+ mice, as ~60% of the pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) fail to develop into medulloblastomas and remain as small cerebellar nodules. In particular the transcription factor Atoh1, whose expression is essential for development of SHH subgroup medulloblastomas is lost. Comparative molecular analysis reveals the distinct nature of the PNLs in young Ptch1∆/+Pn-1Δ/+ mice. The remaining wild-type Ptch1 allele escapes transcriptional silencing in most cases and the aberrant Hedgehog pathway activity is normalized. Furthermore, cell proliferation and the expression of the cell-cycle regulators Mycn and Cdk6 are significantly reduced in PNLs of Ptch1∆/+Pn-1Δ/+ mice. Conclusions Our analysis provides genetic evidence that aberrant Serpine2/Pn-1 is required for

  4. Optical source transformations.

    PubMed

    Kundtz, N; Roberts, D A; Allen, J; Cummer, S; Smith, D R

    2008-12-22

    Transformation optics is a recently appreciated methodology for the design of complex media that control the propagation of electromagnetic and other types of waves. The transformation optical technique involves the use of coordinate transformations applied to some region of space, providing a conceptual means to redirect the flow of waves. Successfully designed devices to date have made use of transformations acting on passive space only; however, the technique can also be applied when source distributions (e.g., current and charge) are included within the space being transformed. In this paper we present examples of source transformations that illustrate the potential of these expanded transformation optical methods. In particular, using finite-element full-wave simulations, we confirm the restoration of dipole radiation patterns from both a distorted 'pin-wheel' antenna and a bent dipole partially occluded by a cylindrical scatterer. We propose the technique of source transformations as a powerful approach for antenna design, especially in relation to conformal antennas.

  5. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  6. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces re-differentiation of early transformed breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    ARISI, MARIA F.; STARKER, REBECCA A.; ADDYA, SANKAR; HUANG, YONG; FERNANDEZ, SANDRA V.

    2014-01-01

    Retinoids have been used as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiative, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and antioxidant properties. We investigated the effect of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) at different stages of the neoplastic transformation using an in vitro model of breast cancer progression. This model was previously developed by treating the MCF-10F human normal breast epithelial cells with high dose of estradiol and consists of four cell lines which show a progressive neoplastic transformation: MCF-10F, normal stage; trMCF, transformed MCF-10F; bsMCF, invasive stage; and caMCF, tumorigenic stage. In 3D cultures, MCF-10F cells form tubules resembling the structures in the normal mammary gland. After treatment with estradiol, these cells formed tubules and spherical masses which are indicative of transformation. Cells that only formed spherical masses in collagen were isolated (trMCF clone 11) and treated with ATRA. After treatment with 10 or 1 μM ATRA, the trMCF clone 11 cells showed tubules in collagen; 10 and 43% of the structures were tubules in cells treated with 10 and 1 μM ATRA, respectively. Gene expression studies showed that 207 genes upregulated in transformed trMCF clone 11 cells were downregulated after 1 μM ATRA treatment to levels comparable to those found in the normal breast epithelial cells MCF-10F. Furthermore, 236 genes that were downregulated in trMCF clone 11 were upregulated after 1 μM ATRA treatment to similar levels shown in normal epithelial cells. These 443 genes defined a signature of the ATRA re-programming effect. Our results showed that 1 μM ATRA was able to re-differentiate transformed cells at early stages of the neoplastic process and antagonistically regulate breast cancer associated genes. The invasive and tumorigenic cells did not show any changes in morphology after ATRA treatment. These results suggest that ATRA could be used as a chemopreventive agent to inhibit the

  7. Transformation through Knowledge--Knowledge through Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadena, Felix

    1991-01-01

    Defines systematization as the process of creating critical knowledge (conscientization), a form of transformative research. Explains how systematization contributes to popular education and presents the form components of the process: identifying limits of research, obtaining data, interpretation, and socialization. (SK)

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on Reducing the Incidence Rate of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection: A Non-Randomized, Stepped Wedge, Single-Site, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA-CDI) is estimated at 1 in 100 patients. Antibiotic exposure is the most consistently reported risk factor for HA-CDI. Strategies to reduce the risk of HA-CDI have focused on reducing antibiotic utilization. Prospective audit and feedback is a commonly used antimicrobial stewardship intervention (ASi). The impact of this ASi on risk of HA-CDI is equivocal. This study examines the effectiveness of a prospective audit and feedback ASi on reducing the risk of HA-CDI. Methods Single-site, 339 bed community-hospital in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Primary outcome is HA-CDI incidence rate. Daily prospective and audit ASi is the exposure variable. ASi implemented across 6 wards in a non-randomized, stepped wedge design. Criteria for ASi; any intravenous antibiotic use for ≥ 48 hrs, any oral fluoroquinolone or oral second generation cephalosporin use for ≥ 48 hrs, or any antimicrobial use for ≥ 5 days. HA-CDI cases and model covariates were aggregated by ward, year and month starting September 2008 and ending February 2016. Multi-level mixed effect negative binomial regression analysis was used to model the primary outcome, with intercept and slope coefficients for ward-level random effects estimated. Other covariates tested for inclusion in the final model were derived from previously published risk factors. Deviance residuals were used to assess the model’s goodness-of-fit. Findings The dataset included 486 observation periods, of which 350 were control periods and 136 were intervention periods. After accounting for all other model covariates, the estimated overall ASi incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 0.48 (95% 0.30, 0.79). The ASi effect was independent of antimicrobial utilization. The ASi did not seem to reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile infection on the surgery wards (IRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.45, 1.69) compared to the medicine wards (IRR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28, 0.63). The ward

  9. Note: Tesla transformer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    Unexpected heavy damping in the two winding Tesla pulse transformer is shown to be due to small primary inductances. A small primary inductance is a necessary condition of operability, but is also a refractory inefficiency. A 30% performance loss is demonstrated using a typical "spiral strip" transformer. The loss is investigated by examining damping terms added to the transformer's governing equations. A significant alteration of the transformer's architecture is suggested to mitigate these losses. Experimental and simulated data comparing the 2 and 3 winding transformers are cited to support the suggestion.

  10. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  11. End-stage kidney disease: gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 and loss of Y chromosome in non-neoplastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondrej; Síma, Radek; Nemcová, Jana; Hora, Milan; Bulimbasic, Stela; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Urge, Tomás; Reischig, Tomás; Dvorák, Miroslav; Michal, Michal

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the copy number changes of chromosomes 7, 17, 3p, and Y in a non-neoplastic tubular epithelium in end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Seventeen kidneys from 11 patients with ESKD were retrieved from the archive files. Non-neoplastic kidney tissue in these cases was examined separately. Tissues containing papillary adenomas (PA), clear (CRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinomas (PRCC), and myxoid liposarcoma (LPS) were examined using the same probes and compared with non-neoplastic tissue. Tubular changes in the kidney parenchyma were classified into three types: (1) The vast majority of tubules were entirely atrophic; (2) Several tubules were hyperplastic, i.e., tubules with undifferentiated large epithelial cells, in which it was impossible to establish the specific type of a renal tubulus; (3) Dysplastic tubules were dilated, sometimes wrinkled. The basal membranes were lined by large eosinophilic epithelial cells with polymorphic nuclei and pseudostratification. Nucleoli were clearly visible. These tubular changes were multifocal with a haphazard distribution within the atrophic parenchyma. PA were detected in nine patients, of whom eight patients also revealed an additional tumor type(s) (4x CRCC, 3x PRCC, 1x PRCC, and CRCC). One patient had a CRCC only, another had a combination of PRCC and LPS. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in the second and third group of tubular changes, i.e., in hyperplastic and dysplastic tubules. Trisomy of chromosome 7 was detected in six cases, whereas trisomy of chromosome 17 in eight cases. A combination of both trisomies was found in five cases. Loss of chromosome Y was found in two cases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on tissues containing papillary adenomas, renal cell carcinomas, and liposarcoma revealed expected results, i.e., trisomy of chromosomes 7 and 17 in all PAs and PRCC. No gains were present in CRCC and LPS. Loss of Y was found in six PA, five PRCC, and one LPS; loss of X

  12. Identification of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human prostate: expression site of the estrogen receptor in the benign and neoplastic gland.

    PubMed

    Rago, V; Romeo, F; Giordano, F; Ferraro, A; Carpino, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are involved in growth, differentiation and pathogenesis of human prostate through the mediation of the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 'novel' mediator of estrogen signaling which has been recently recognized in some human reproductive tissues, but its expression in the prostate gland is still unknown. Here, we investigated GPER in benign (from 5 patients) and neoplastic prostatic tissues (from 50 patients) by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting. Normal areas of benign prostates revealed a strong GPER immunoreactivity in the basal epithelial cells while luminal epithelial cells were unreactive and stromal cells were weakly immunostained. GPER was also immunolocalized in adenocarcinoma samples but the immunoreactivity of tumoral areas decreased from Gleason pattern 2 to Gleason pattern 4. Furthermore, a strong GPER immunostaining was also revealed in cells of pre-neoplastic lesions (high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia). Western blot analysis of benign and tumor protein extracts showed the presence of a ~42 kDa band, consistent with the GPER molecular weight. An increase in both pAkt and p cAMP-response-binding protein (pCREB) levels was also observed in poorly differentiated PCa samples. Finally, this work identified GPER in the epithelial basal cells of benign human prostate, with a different localization with respect to the classical estrogen receptors. Furthermore, the expression of GPER in prostatic adenocarcinoma cells was also observed but with a modulation of the immunoreactivity according to tumor cell arrangements.

  13. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  14. Program Transformation in HATS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  15. Arsenicals produce stable progressive changes in DNA methylation patterns that are linked to malignant transformation of immortalized urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Novak, Petr; Wnek, Shawn M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, and alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome.

  16. Genetic Transformation of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert.

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students transform an ampicillin-sensitive strain of E. coli with a plasmid containing a gene for ampicillin resistance is described. The procedure for the preparation of competent cells and the transformation of competent E. coli is provided. (KR)

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Basile, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The final and largest volume to complete this four-volume treatise is published in response to the intense commercial and research interest in Fourier Transform Interferometry. Volume 4 introduces new information on, for example, applications of Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy in the Far-infrared Region. The editors place emphasis on surface studies and address advances in Capillary Gas Chromatography-Fourier Transform Interferometry.

  18. Transformative Learning and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illeris, Knud

    2014-01-01

    Transformative learning has usually been defined as transformations of meaning perspectives, frames of reference, and habits of mind--as proposed initially by Jack Mezirow. However, several authors have found this definition too narrow and too cognitively oriented, and Mezirow has later emphasized that emotional and social conditions are also…

  19. A Transformation Called "Twist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The transformations found in secondary mathematics curriculum are typically limited to stretches and translations (e.g., ACARA, 2010). Advanced students may find the transformation, twist, to be of further interest. As most available resources are written for professional-level readers, this article is intended to be an introduction accessible to…

  20. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  1. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  2. Support Principals, Transform Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Elena; Goldwasser, Davina; Tank-Crestetto, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    The Transformational Coaching Team in Oakland Unified School District provides differentiated, sustained, job-embedded support to the district's school leaders. In this article, members of the team describe how they work with principals to transform the culture of schools. Student achievement data show above-average improvement in schools in which…

  3. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  4. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Technical memorandum includes transformer area product numbers, which are used to summarize dimensional and electrical properties of C-cores, pot cores, lamination, powder cores, and tape-wound cores. To aid in core selection, comparison of five common core materials is presented to indicate their influence on overall transformer efficiency and weight.

  5. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  6. Two Different Squeeze Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S.

    1996-01-01

    Lorentz boosts are squeeze transformations. While these transformations are similar to those in squeezed states of light, they are fundamentally different from both physical and mathematical points of view. The difference is illustrated in terms of two coupled harmonic oscillators, and in terms of the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism.

  7. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power. PMID:25004532

  8. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  9. High Expression of the DNA Methyltransferase Gene Characterizes Human Neoplastic Cells and Progression Stages of Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Nelkin, Barry D.; Celano, Paul; Chiu Yen, Ray-Whay; Falco, Joseph P.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    1991-04-01

    DNA methylation abnormalities occur consistently in human neoplasia including widespread hypomethylation and more recently recognized local increases in DNA methylation that hold potential for gene inactivation events. To study this imbalance further, we have cloned and localized to chromosome 19 a portion of the human DNA methyltransferase gene that codes for the enzyme catalyzing DNA methylation. Expression of this gene is low in normal human cells, significantly increased (30- to 50-fold by PCR analysis) in virally transformed cells, and strikingly elevated in human cancer cells (several hundredfold). In comparison to colon mucosa from patients without neoplasia, median levels of DNA methyltransferase transcripts are 15-fold increased in histologically normal mucosa from patients with cancers or the benign polyps that can precede cancers, 60-fold increased in the premalignant polyps, and >200-fold increased in the cancers. Thus, increases in DNA methyltransferase gene expression precede development of colonic neoplasia and continue during progression of colonic neoplasms. These increases may play a role in the genetic instability of cancer and mark early events in cell transformation.

  10. Biolistics Transformation of Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Caroline A.; Jones, Huw D.

    We present a complete, step-by-step guide to the production of transformed wheat plants using a particle bombardment device to deliver plasmid DNA into immature embryos and the regeneration of transgenic plants via somatic embryogenesis. Currently, this is the most commonly used method for transforming wheat and it offers some advantages. However, it will be interesting to see whether this position is challenged as facile methods are developed for delivering DNA by Agrobacterium tumefaciens or by the production of transformants via a germ-line process (see other chapters in this book).

  11. TRANSFORMATION TOUGHENING IN CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A. G.; Marshall, D. B.; Burlingame, N. H.

    1980-12-01

    The origin of transformation toughening in ceramics is examined using two separate approaches: one based on the stress field ahead of the crack and the other on the changes in thermodynamic potential during a crack increment. Both approaches yield essentially similar predictions of trends in toughness with particle size, temperature, composition, etc. The stress intensity analysis provides fully quantitative predictions of the toughness. These indicate that the shielding of the crack by the transformation zone only develops in the presence of a transformed wake, leading to R-curve behavior.

  12. Fludarabine- (C2-methylhydroxyphosphoramide)- [anti-IGF-1R]: Synthesis and Selectively “Targeted”Anti-Neoplastic Cytotoxicity against Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma (A549)

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, CP; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many if not most conventional small molecular weight chemotherapeutics are highly potent against many forms of neoplastic disease. Unfortunately, majority of an administered dose unintentionally diffuses passively into normal tissues and healthy organ systems following intravenous administration. One strategy for both increasing potency and reducing dose-limited sequela is the selective “targeted” delivery of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Materials and Methods The fludarabine-(C2- methylhydroxyphosphoramide)-[anti-IGF-1R] was synthesized by initially reacting fludarabine with a carbodiimide to form a fludarabine carbodiimide phosphate ester intermediate that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive fludarabine- (C2-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-IGF-1R immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive fludarabine- (C2-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate resulting in the synthesis of covalent fludarabine-(C2-methylhydroxyphosphoramide)- [anti-IGF-1R] immunochemotherapeutic. Residual fludarabine and un-reacted reagents were removed by serial microfiltration (MWCO 10,000) and monitored by analytical-scale HP-TLC. Retained IGF-1R binding-avidity of fludarabine-(C2- methylhydroxyphosphoramide)-[anti-IGF-1R] was established by cell-ELISA using pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell (A549) which over-expresses IGF-1R and EGFR. Anti-neoplastic cytotoxic potency of fludarabine-(C2-methylhydroxyphosphoramide)-[anti- IGF-1R] was determined against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) using an MTT-based vitality stain methodology. Results The fludarabine molar-incorporation-index for fludarabine- (C2-methylhydroxyphosphoramide)-[anti-IGF-R1] was 3.67:1 while non-covalently bound fludarabine was not detected by analytical scale HP-TLC following serial micro-filtration. Size-separation fludarabine-(C2-methylhydroxyphosphoramide)-[anti- IGF-1R] by SDS-PAGE with chemo luminescent autoradiography detected only a single

  13. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Combined application of optical methods to increase the information content of optical coherent tomography in diagnostics of neoplastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, R. V.; Sapozhnikova, V. V.; Shakhova, N. M.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Zagainova, E. V.; Petrova, S. A.

    2002-11-01

    A combined application of optical methods [optical coherent tomography (OCT), cross-polarisation optical coherent tomography, and fluorescence spectroscopy] is proposed for obtaining information on morphological and biochemical changes occurring in tissues in norm and pathology. It is shown that neoplastic and scar changes in esophagus can be distinguished using a combination of polarisation and standard OCT due to the difference between the depolarising properties of the tissues caused by the structural properties of collagenic fibres in stroma. It is shown that OCT combined with fluorescence spectroscopy with the use of 5-aminolevulinic acid is promising for determining the boundaries of carcinoma of the uterine cervix and vulva. It is found that the tumour boundary detected by optical methods coincides with the morphological boundary and extends beyond colposcopically determined boundary by about 2 mm.

  14. Mucosal intra-epithelial lymphocytes in enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, ulcerative jejunitis, and refractory celiac disease constitute a neoplastic population.

    PubMed

    Bagdi, E; Diss, T C; Munson, P; Isaacson, P G

    1999-07-01

    Loss of response to a gluten-free diet (refractory sprue) and ulcerative jejunitis are complications of celiac disease that may progress to enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Both conditions are characterized by the presence of a nonlymphomatous monoclonal T-cell population in the enteropathic mucosa. In EATL, a similar monoclonal population that shows clonal identity with the lymphoma itself is also present in the enteropathic mucosa. In this study we show that in all three circumstances the monoclonal T-cell population is constituted by cytologically normal, noninvasive intraepithelial T lymphocytes that share an identical aberrant immunophenotype with EATL. Patients with refractory sprue and/or ulcerative jejunitis are, therefore, suffering from a neoplastic T-cell disorder for which hematological treatment strategies need to be devised.

  15. Disseminated neoplastic cells in Mytilus trossulus: verification of host species origin by (16S-like) rRNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Gee, A; Specht, J M; Kerk, D; Moore, J D; Drum, A S; Elston, R A

    1994-02-01

    Disseminated neoplasia is a leukemia-like disease that occurs in many species of bivalve molluscs worldwide, including the bay mussel (Mytilus trossulus). The etiology of the disease is undetermined, but an early report proposed that the anomalous bivalve cells were actually an invasive parasite rather than cancerous cells of host origin. Comparison of partial sequences of small subunit rRNA from normal and putative cancer cells was performed to resolve this issue. These studies showed a close phylogenetic relationship of the different forms of cancer cells to each other (similarity coefficient, 0.982), to the normal hemocytes (similarity coefficient, 0.990, 0.992), and to the oyster, Crassostrea virginica (similarity coefficient, 0.895-0.927). A large phylogenetic distance separates all 3 mussel hemocyte types from several representative protists (similarity coefficient, 0.702-0.761). These results indicate that the disseminated neoplastic cells in mussels are indeed proliferative host cells and not unicellular parasites.

  16. The treatment by V.A.T.S. and M.A.C. of secondary neoplastic pleural effusion in the old patient (> 70 years).

    PubMed

    Griffo, S; Gravino, E; Luciano, A; Ferrante, G

    2005-01-01

    A secondary malignant pleural effusion is a common event in the evolution of some tumours. It is frequent in advanced phase, above all the breast cancer in the woman and the cancer of the lung in the man, but such pathology can interest also extra-thoracic cancers (ovary, colon, prostate, etc.) and the malignant lymphoma. In the majority of cases in order to obtain a good control of the effusion entity with reduction of the respiratory symptoms and improvement of the quality of life, palliative local therapy is indispensable. Numerous methods and substances have been proposed in the time for the treatment of the N.P.E. The talc pleurodesis executed in the old patients (> 70 years) by means of the V.A.T.S. "one trough" and "Monitored Anaesthesia Care" (MAC) has shown valid procedure for the control of the secondary neoplastic pleural effusion, with little uneasiness for the patients, reduced complications and a sure effectiveness. PMID:16450517

  17. Agrobacterium-produced and exogenous cytokinin-modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Wang, Ming-Hsuan; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Li, Yi-Ho; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Liao, Yu-Chen; Lin, Shao-Kai; Lai, Erh-Min

    2010-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes neoplastic growths, called 'crown gall', via the transfer and integration of transferred DNA (T-DNA) from the bacterium into the plant genome. We characterized an acetosyringone (AS)-induced tumour-inducing (Ti) plasmid gene, tzs (trans-zeatin synthesizing), that is responsible for the synthesis of the plant hormone cytokinin in nopaline-type A. tumefaciens strains. The loss of Tzs protein expression and trans-zeatin secretions by the tzs frameshift (tzs-fs) mutant is associated with reduced tumorigenesis efficiency on white radish stems and reduced transformation efficiencies on Arabidopsis roots. Complementation of the tzs-fs mutant with a wild-type tzs gene restored wild-type levels of trans-zeatin secretions and transformation efficiencies. Exogenous application of cytokinin during infection increased the transient transformation efficiency of Arabidopsis roots infected by strains lacking Tzs, which suggests that the lower transformation efficiency resulted from the lack of Agrobacterium-produced cytokinin. Interestingly, although the tzs-fs mutant displayed reduced tumorigenesis efficiency on several tested plants, the loss of Tzs enhanced tumorigenesis efficiencies on green pepper and cowpea. These data strongly suggest that Tzs, by synthesizing trans-zeatin at early stage(s) of the infection process, modulates plant transformation efficiency by A. tumefaciens. PMID:20696005

  18. Advances in the Natural transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgacem, F. B. M.; Silambarasan, R.

    2012-11-01

    The literature review of the Natural transform and the existing definitions and connections to the Laplace and Sumudu transforms are discussed in this communication. Along with the complex inverse Natural transform and Heaviside's expansion formula, the relation of Bessel's function to Natural transform (and hence Laplace and Sumudu transforms) are defined.

  19. Uncaria tomentosa Exerts Extensive Anti-Neoplastic Effects against the Walker-256 Tumour by Modulating Oxidative Stress and Not by Alkaloid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg−1) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  20. Uncaria tomentosa exerts extensive anti-neoplastic effects against the Walker-256 tumour by modulating oxidative stress and not by alkaloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida Dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg(-1)) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties.

  1. Transmembrane potential of GlyCl-expressing instructor cells induces a neoplastic-like conversion of melanocytes via a serotonergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Blackiston, Douglas; Adams, Dany S; Lemire, Joan M; Lobikin, Maria; Levin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that coordinate stem cell behavior within the host is a high priority for developmental biology, regenerative medicine and oncology. Endogenous ion currents and voltage gradients function alongside biochemical cues during pattern formation and tumor suppression, but it is not known whether bioelectrical signals are involved in the control of stem cell progeny in vivo. We studied Xenopus laevis neural crest, an embryonic stem cell population that gives rise to many cell types, including melanocytes, and contributes to the morphogenesis of the face, heart and other complex structures. To investigate how depolarization of transmembrane potential of cells in the neural crest's environment influences its function in vivo, we manipulated the activity of the native glycine receptor chloride channel (GlyCl). Molecular-genetic depolarization of a sparse, widely distributed set of GlyCl-expressing cells non-cell-autonomously induces a neoplastic-like phenotype in melanocytes: they overproliferate, acquire an arborized cell shape and migrate inappropriately, colonizing numerous tissues in a metalloprotease-dependent fashion. A similar effect was observed in human melanocytes in culture. Depolarization of GlyCl-expressing cells induces these drastic changes in melanocyte behavior via a serotonin-transporter-dependent increase of extracellular serotonin (5-HT). These data reveal GlyCl as a molecular marker of a sparse and heretofore unknown cell population with the ability to specifically instruct neural crest derivatives, suggest transmembrane potential as a tractable signaling modality by which somatic cells can control stem cell behavior at considerable distance, identify a new biophysical aspect of the environment that confers a neoplastic-like phenotype upon stem cell progeny, reveal a pre-neural role for serotonin and its transporter, and suggest a novel strategy for manipulating stem cell behavior. PMID:20959630

  2. Morphological, Histochemical, Immunohistochemical, and Ultrastructural Characterization of Tumors and Dysplastic and Non-Neoplastic Lesions Arising in BK Virus/tat Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, Giuseppe; Trabanelli, Cecilia; Merlin, Michela; Caputo, Antonella; Lanfredi, Massimo; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Corallini, Alfredo

    1999-01-01

    To study the role in AIDS pathogenesis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, a transactivator of viral and cellular genes, we generated transgenic mice with a recombinant DNA containing BK virus (BKV) early region and the HIV-1 tat gene, directed by its own promoter-enhancer. DNA hybridization revealed that the transgene is stably maintained in all organs of transgenic mice as a tandem insertion in a number of copies ranging from 5 to 20 per cell. In addition, tat and BKV RNA were expressed in all tissues. Transgenic mice developed three types of lesions: 1) tumors, 2) hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions, and 3) non-neoplastic lesions. Tumors of different histotypes, such as lymphomas, adenocarcinomas of skin glands, leiomyosarcomas, skin squamous cell carcinomas, hepatomas, hepatocarcinomas, and cavernous liver hemangiomas, developed in 29% of transgenic animals. The majority of tumors were malignant, invasive, and producing metastases. Conversely, tumors of only two histotypes (lymphomas and adenocarcinomas of skin glands) appeared in control mice. Hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions were more frequent in transgenic than in control mice and involved the skin or its adnexes, the liver and the rectum, indicating multiple targets for the activity of the transgene. Pyelonephritis, frequently complicated with hydronephrosis, inflammatory eye lesions, and amyloid depositions represented the most frequent non-neoplastic lesions detected in transgenic mice. Many of the pathological findings observed in this animal model are comparable to similar lesions appearing in AIDS patients, suggesting a relevant role for Tat in the pathogenesis of such lesions during the course of AIDS. PMID:10233861

  3. A murine monoclonal antibody, MoAb HMSA-5, against a melanosomal component highly expressed in early stages, and common to normal and neoplastic melanocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Der, J. E.; Dixon, W. T.; Jimbow, K.; Horikoshi, T.

    1993-01-01

    The melanosome is a secretory organelle unique to the melanocyte and its neoplastic counterpart, malignant melanoma. The synthesis and assembly of these intracytoplasmic organelles is not yet fully understood. We have developed a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against melanosomes isolated from human melanocytes (newborn foreskin) cultured in the presence of 12-O tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). This MoAb, designated HMSA-5 (Human Melanosome-Specific Antigen-5) (IgG1), recognised a cytoplasmic antigen in both normal human melanocytes and neoplastic cells, such as common and dysplastic melanocytic nevi, and malignant melanoma. None of the carcinoma or sarcoma specimens tested showed positive reactivity with MoAb HMSA-5. Under immunoelectron microscopy, immuno-gold deposition was seen on microvesicles associated with melanosomes, and a portion of the ER-Golgi complexes. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that the HMSA-5 reactive antigen was a glycoprotein of M(r) 69 to 73 kDa. A pulse-chase time course study showed that the amount of antigen detected by MoAb HMSA-5 decreased over a 24 h period without significant expression on the cell surface, or corresponding appearance of the antigen in the culture supernatant. This glycoprotein appears to play a role in the early stages of melanosomal development, and the HMSA-5 reactive epitope may be lost during subsequent maturation processes. Importantly, HMSA-5 can be identified in all forms of human melanocytes, hence it can be considered a new common melanocytic marker even on routine paraffin sections. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:7678981

  4. Protein Kinase Cδ Targets Mitochondria, Alters Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Induces Apoptosis in Normal and Neoplastic Keratinocytes When Overexpressed by an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Lorenzo, Patricia S.; Bogi, Krisztina; Blumberg, Peter M.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) is associated with resistance to terminal cell death in epidermal tumor cells, suggesting that activation of PKCδ in normal epidermis may be a component of a cell death pathway. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an adenovirus vector carrying an epitope-tagged PKCδ under a cytomegalovirus promoter to overexpress PKCδ in normal and neoplastic keratinocytes. While PKCδ overexpression was detected by immunoblotting in keratinocytes, the expression level of other PKC isozymes, including PKCα, PKCɛ, PKCζ, and PKCη, did not change. Calcium-independent PKC-specific kinase activity increased after infection of keratinocytes with the PKCδ adenovirus. Activation of PKCδ by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at a nanomolar concentration was lethal to normal and neoplastic mouse and human keratinocytes overexpressing PKCδ. Lethality was inhibited by PKC selective inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-32-0432. TPA-induced cell death was apoptotic as evidenced by morphological criteria, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) assay, DNA fragmentation, and increased caspase activity. Subcellular fractionation indicated that PKCδ translocated to a mitochondrial enriched fraction after TPA activation, and this finding was confirmed by confocal microscopy of cells expressing a transfected PKCδ-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. Furthermore, activation of PKCδ in keratinocytes altered mitochondrial membrane potential, as indicated by rhodamine-123 fluorescence. Mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone and antimycin A, reduced TPA-induced cell death in PKCδ-overexpressing keratinocytes. These results indicate that PKCδ can initiate a death pathway in keratinocytes that involves direct interaction with mitochondria and alterations of mitochondrial function. PMID:10567579

  5. Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook.

  6. A Classical Science Transformed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    1979-01-01

    Describes how satellites and other tools of space technology have transformed classical geodesy into the science of space geodynamics. The establishment and the activities of the French Center for Geodynamic and Astronomical Research Studies (CERGA) are also included. (HM)

  7. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  8. Optical nonsubsampled contourlet transform.

    PubMed

    Han, Liang; Zhang, Wen-Li; Pu, Xiujuan; Cheng, Wanqi; Liu, Xia

    2016-09-20

    The nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) is a fully shift-invariant, multiscale, and multidirectional expansion implemented in optics using the Fourier transform of its filters. In this paper, we propose a novel optical NSCT filter design method and the corresponding post-processing method to avoid the use of holographic techniques. The novel optical NSCT filter has real and non-negative Fourier transforms. The input image is placed in the input plane of the VanderLugt 4f correlator, and these real and non-negative Fourier transform NSCT filters are placed in the frequency plane of the VanderLugt 4f correlator. Next, the NSCT result is captured by a CCD in the output plane of the VanderLugt 4f correlator, and its perfect reconstruction is theoretically possible, which is demonstrated by both simulation and optical experiment. PMID:27661604

  9. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  10. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  11. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  12. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees.

  13. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  14. Selection of Transformed Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Huw D.; Sparks, Caroline A.

    The low frequency and randomness of transgene integration into host cells, combined with the significant challenges of recovering whole plants from those rare events, makes the use of selectable marker genes routine in plant transformation experiments. For research applications that are unlikely to be grown in the field, strong herbicide- or antibiotic resistance is commonly used. Here we use genes conferring resistance to glufosinate herbicides as an example of a selectable marker in wheat transformation by either Agrobacterium or biolistics.

  15. Nontensorial Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Meca, C.; Barceló, C.

    2016-06-01

    We present an alternative version of transformation optics that allows us to mold the flow of light without rotating or scaling the electromagnetic fields. The resulting media experience unusual force densities, are nonreciprocal, and exhibit loss or gain. Because of these singular features, a variety of effects and devices unreachable by standard transformation optics can be achieved, including reflectionless light compression, optical modes with arbitrary in-plane polarization, and special isolators.

  16. Floral Transformation of Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sujata; Loar, Star; Steber, Camille; Zale, Janice

    A method is described for the floral transformation of wheat using a protocol similar to the floral dip of Arabidopsis. This method does not employ tissue culture of dissected embryos, but instead pre-anthesis spikes with clipped florets at the early, mid to late uninucleate microspore stage are dipped in Agrobacterium infiltration media harboring a vector carrying anthocyanin reporters and the NPTII selectable marker. T1 seeds are examined for color changes induced in the embryo by the anthocyanin reporters. Putatively transformed seeds are germinated and the seedlings are screened for the presence of the NPTII gene based on resistance to paromomycin spray and assayed with NPTII ELISAs. Genomic DNA of putative transformants is digested and analyzed on Southern blots for copy number to determine whether the T-DNA has integrated into the nucleus and to show the number of insertions. The non-optimized transformation efficiencies range from 0.3 to 0.6% (number of transformants/number of florets dipped) but the efficiencies are higher in terms of the number of transformants produced/number of seeds set ranging from 0.9 to 10%. Research is underway to maximize seed set and optimize the protocol by testing different Agrobacterium strains, visual reporters, vectors, and surfactants.

  17. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  18. Improvement of the BALB/c-3T3 cell transformation assay: a tool for investigating cancer mechanisms and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Poburski, Doerte; Thierbach, René

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cancer preventive or therapeutic substances as well as carcinogenic risk assessment of chemicals is nowadays mostly dependent on animal studies. In vitro cell transformation assays mimic different stages of the in vivo neoplastic process and represent an excellent alternative to study carcinogenesis and therapeutic options. In the BALB/c-3T3 two-stage transformation assay cells are chemically transformed by treatment with MCA and TPA, along with the final Giemsa staining of morphological aberrant foci. In addition to the standard method we can show, that it is possible to apply other chemicals in parallel to identify potential preventive or therapeutic substances during the transformation process. Furthermore, we successfully combined the BALB/c cell transformation assay with several endpoint applications for protein analysis (immunoblot, subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence) or energy parameter measurements (glucose and oxygen consumption) to elucidate cancer mechanisms in more detail. In our opinion the BALB/c cell transformation assay proves to be an excellent model to investigate alterations in key proteins or energy parameters during the different stages of transformation as well as therapeutic substances and their mode of action. PMID:27611302

  19. Improvement of the BALB/c-3T3 cell transformation assay: a tool for investigating cancer mechanisms and therapies.

    PubMed

    Poburski, Doerte; Thierbach, René

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cancer preventive or therapeutic substances as well as carcinogenic risk assessment of chemicals is nowadays mostly dependent on animal studies. In vitro cell transformation assays mimic different stages of the in vivo neoplastic process and represent an excellent alternative to study carcinogenesis and therapeutic options. In the BALB/c-3T3 two-stage transformation assay cells are chemically transformed by treatment with MCA and TPA, along with the final Giemsa staining of morphological aberrant foci. In addition to the standard method we can show, that it is possible to apply other chemicals in parallel to identify potential preventive or therapeutic substances during the transformation process. Furthermore, we successfully combined the BALB/c cell transformation assay with several endpoint applications for protein analysis (immunoblot, subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence) or energy parameter measurements (glucose and oxygen consumption) to elucidate cancer mechanisms in more detail. In our opinion the BALB/c cell transformation assay proves to be an excellent model to investigate alterations in key proteins or energy parameters during the different stages of transformation as well as therapeutic substances and their mode of action. PMID:27611302

  20. Improvement of the BALB/c-3T3 cell transformation assay: a tool for investigating cancer mechanisms and therapies.

    PubMed

    Poburski, Doerte; Thierbach, René

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cancer preventive or therapeutic substances as well as carcinogenic risk assessment of chemicals is nowadays mostly dependent on animal studies. In vitro cell transformation assays mimic different stages of the in vivo neoplastic process and represent an excellent alternative to study carcinogenesis and therapeutic options. In the BALB/c-3T3 two-stage transformation assay cells are chemically transformed by treatment with MCA and TPA, along with the final Giemsa staining of morphological aberrant foci. In addition to the standard method we can show, that it is possible to apply other chemicals in parallel to identify potential preventive or therapeutic substances during the transformation process. Furthermore, we successfully combined the BALB/c cell transformation assay with several endpoint applications for protein analysis (immunoblot, subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence) or energy parameter measurements (glucose and oxygen consumption) to elucidate cancer mechanisms in more detail. In our opinion the BALB/c cell transformation assay proves to be an excellent model to investigate alterations in key proteins or energy parameters during the different stages of transformation as well as therapeutic substances and their mode of action.

  1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation: rice transformation.

    PubMed

    Slamet-Loedin, Inez H; Chadha-Mohanty, Prabhjit; Torrizo, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium is a common soil bacterium with natural capacity for trans-kingdom transfer of genetic information by transferring its T-DNA into the eukaryotic genome. In agricultural plant biotechnology, combination of non-phytopathogenic strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens with modified T-DNA and vir-genes in a binary vector system is the most widely utilized system for genetic improvement in diverse plant species and for gene function validation. Here we have described a highly efficient A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation system for indica and japonica rice cultivars based on an immature embryo system.

  2. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  3. Characterization of preneoplastic and neoplastic rat mesothelial cell lines: the involvement of TETs, DNMTs, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine

    PubMed Central

    Roulois, David; Deshayes, Sophie; Guilly, Marie-Noëlle; Nader, Joëlle S.; Liddell, Charly; Robard, Myriam; Hulin, Philippe; Ouacher, Amal; Le Martelot, Vanessa; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Grégoire, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is one of the worst cancers in terms of clinical outcome, urging the need to establish and characterize new preclinical tools for investigation of the tumorigenic process, improvement of early diagnosis and evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. For these purposes, we characterized a collection of 27 cell lines established from F344 rats, after 136 to 415 days of induction with crocidolite asbestos administered intraperitoneally. Four mesotheliomas were distinguished from 23 preneoplastic mesothelial cell lines (PN) according to their propensity to generate tumors after orthotopic transplantation into syngeneic rats, their growth pattern, and the expression profile of three genes. PN cell lines were further discriminated into groups / subgroups according to morphology in culture and the expression profiles of 14 additional genes. This approach was completed by analysis of positive and negative immunohistochemical MM markers in the four tumors, of karyotype alterations in the most aggressive MM cell line in comparison with a PN epithelioid cell line, and of human normal mesothelial and mesothelioma cells and a tissue array. Our results showed that both the rat and human MM cell lines shared in common a dramatic decrease in the relative expression of Cdkn2a and of epigenetic regulators, in comparison with PN and normal human mesothelial cells, respectively. In particular, we identified the involvement of the relative expression of the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) family of dioxygenases and Dnmt3a in relation to the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine level in malignant transformation and the acquisition of metastatic potential. PMID:27129173

  4. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  5. Characterization of preneoplastic and neoplastic rat mesothelial cell lines: the involvement of TETs, DNMTs, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Roulois, David; Deshayes, Sophie; Guilly, Marie-Noëlle; Nader, Joëlle S; Liddell, Charly; Robard, Myriam; Hulin, Philippe; Ouacher, Amal; Le Martelot, Vanessa; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Grégoire, Marc; Blanquart, Christophe; Pouliquen, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is one of the worst cancers in terms of clinical outcome, urging the need to establish and characterize new preclinical tools for investigation of the tumorigenic process, improvement of early diagnosis and evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. For these purposes, we characterized a collection of 27 cell lines established from F344 rats, after 136 to 415 days of induction with crocidolite asbestos administered intraperitoneally. Four mesotheliomas were distinguished from 23 preneoplastic mesothelial cell lines (PN) according to their propensity to generate tumors after orthotopic transplantation into syngeneic rats, their growth pattern, and the expression profile of three genes. PN cell lines were further discriminated into groups / subgroups according to morphology in culture and the expression profiles of 14 additional genes. This approach was completed by analysis of positive and negative immunohistochemical MM markers in the four tumors, of karyotype alterations in the most aggressive MM cell line in comparison with a PN epithelioid cell line, and of human normal mesothelial and mesothelioma cells and a tissue array. Our results showed that both the rat and human MM cell lines shared in common a dramatic decrease in the relative expression of Cdkn2a and of epigenetic regulators, in comparison with PN and normal human mesothelial cells, respectively. In particular, we identified the involvement of the relative expression of the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) family of dioxygenases and Dnmt3a in relation to the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine level in malignant transformation and the acquisition of metastatic potential. PMID:27129173

  6. Phase Transformations and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    Phase transformations have been cited as responsible for, or at least involved in, "deep" earthquakes for many decades (although the concept of "deep" has varied). In 1945, PW Bridgman laid out in detail the string of events/conditions that would have to be achieved for a solid/solid transformation to lead to a faulting instability, although he expressed pessimism that the full set of requirements would be simultaneously achieved in nature. Raleigh and Paterson (1965) demonstrated faulting during dehydration of serpentine under stress and suggested dehydration embrittlement as the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes. Griggs and Baker (1969) produced a thermal runaway model of a shear zone under constant stress, culminating in melting, and proposed such a runaway as the origin of deep earthquakes. The discovery of Plate Tectonics in the late 1960s established the conditions (subduction) under which Bridgman's requirements for earthquake runaway in a polymorphic transformation could be possible in nature and Green and Burnley (1989) found that instability during the transformation of metastable olivine to spinel. Recent seismic correlation of intermediate-depth-earthquake hypocenters with predicted conditions of dehydration of antigorite serpentine and discovery of metastable olivine in 4 subduction zones, suggests strongly that dehydration embrittlement and transformation-induced faulting are the underlying mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes, respectively. The results of recent high-speed friction experiments and analysis of natural fault zones suggest that it is likely that similar processes occur commonly during many shallow earthquakes after initiation by frictional failure.

  7. Translating and Transforming Care

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Alex; Moore, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how the Disability Living Allowance claim form, used in the United Kingdom to allocate £13 billion of disability benefits, translates and transforms disability and care. Twenty-two people with acquired brain injury and their main informal caregivers (n = 44) were video-recorded filling in the disability claim form. Participants disagreed on 26% of the questions, revealing two types of problems. Translation problems arose as participants struggled to provide categorical responses to ambiguous questions and were unable to report contextual variability in care needs or divergences of perception. Transformation problems arose as participants resisted the way in which the form positioned them, forcing them to conceptualize their relationship in terms of dependency and burden. The disability claim form co-opts claimants to translate care and disability into bureaucratically predefined categories, and it transforms the care relationship that it purports to document. PMID:25792487

  8. On spinors transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinich, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We begin showing that for even dimensional vector spaces V all automorphisms of their Clifford algebras are inner. So all orthogonal transformations of V are restrictions to V of inner automorphisms of the algebra. Thus under orthogonal transformations P and T—space and time reversal—all algebra elements, including vectors v and spinors φ, transform as v → xvx-1 and φ → xφx-1 for some algebra element x. We show that while under combined PT spinor φ → xφx-1 remains in its spinor space, under P or T separately φ goes to a different spinor space and may have opposite chirality. We conclude with a preliminary characterization of inner automorphisms with respect to their property to change, or not, spinor spaces.

  9. Transformational plasmon optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate efficiently molding surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) based on transformation optics. SPPs are surface modes of electromagnetic waves tightly bound at metal-dielectric interfaces, which allow us to scale optics beyond the diffraction limit. Taking advantage of transformation optics, here we show that the propagation of SPPs can be manipulated in a prescribed manner by careful control of the dielectric material properties adjacent to a metal. Since the metal properties are completely unaltered, this methodology provides a practical way for routing light at very small scales. For instance, our approach enables SPPs to travel at uneven and curved surfaces over a broad wavelength range, where SPPs would normally suffer significant scattering losses. In addition, a plasmonic 180 degrees waveguide bend and a plasmonic Luneburg lens with simple designs are presented. The unique design flexibility of the transformational plasmon optics introduced here may open a new door to nano optics and downscaling of photonic circuits.

  10. Transformation based endorsement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudkamp, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Evidential reasoning techniques classically represent support for a hypothesis by a numeric value or an evidential interval. The combination of support is performed by an arithmetic rule which often requires restrictions to be placed on the set of possibilities. These assumptions usually require the hypotheses to be exhausitive and mutually exclusive. Endorsement based classification systems represent support for the alternatives symbolically rather than numerically. A framework for constructing endorsement systems is presented in which transformations are defined to generate and update the knowledge base. The interaction of the knowledge base and transformations produces a non-monotonic reasoning system. Two endorsement based reasoning systems are presented to demonstrate the flexibility of the transformational approach for reasoning with ambiguous and inconsistent information.

  11. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  12. The quantum Arnold transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, V.; Cossío, F.; Guerrero, J.; López-Ruiz, F. F.

    2011-02-01

    Using a quantum version of the Arnold transformation of classical mechanics, all quantum dynamical systems whose classical equations of motion are non-homogeneous linear second-order ordinary differential equations, including systems with friction linear in velocity, can be related to the quantum free-particle dynamical system. This transformation provides a basic (Heisenberg-Weyl) algebra of quantum operators, along with well-defined Hermitian operators which can be chosen as evolution-like observables and complete the entire Schrödinger algebra. It also proves to be very helpful in performing certain computations quickly, to obtain, for example, wavefunctions and closed analytic expressions for time-evolution operators.

  13. Genetic Transformation of Switchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Yajun; Ge, Yaxin; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a highly productive warm-season C4 species that is being developed into a dedicated biofuel crop. This chapter describes a protocol that allows the generation of transgenic switchgrass plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Embryogenic calluses induced from caryopses or inflorescences were used as explants for inoculation with A. tumefaciens strain EHA105. Hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph) was used as the selectable marker and hygromycin was used as the selection agent. Calluses resistant to hygromycin were obtained after 5-6 weeks of selection. Soil-grown switchgrass plants were regenerated about 6 months after callus induction and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  14. Malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells by a colon-derived long noncoding RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Rankin, Carl R.; Levy, Shawn; Snoddy, Jay R.; Zhang, Bing; Washington, Mary Kay; Thomson, J. Michael; Whitehead, Robert H.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Non-coding RNAs are found in the colonic crypt progenitor compartment. •Colonocytes transformed by ncNRFR are highly invasive and metastatic. •ncNRFR has a region similar to the miRNA, let-7 family. •ncNRFR expression alters let-7 activity as measured by reporter construct. •ncNRFR expression upregulates let-7b targets. -- Abstract: Recent progress has been made in the identification of protein-coding genes and miRNAs that are expressed in and alter the behavior of colonic epithelia. However, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colonic homeostasis is just beginning to be explored. By gene expression profiling of post-mitotic, differentiated tops and proliferative, progenitor-compartment bottoms of microdissected adult mouse colonic crypts, we identified several lncRNAs more highly expressed in crypt bottoms. One identified lncRNA, designated non-coding Nras functional RNA (ncNRFR), resides within the Nras locus but appears to be independent of the Nras coding transcript. Stable overexpression of ncNRFR in non-transformed, conditionally immortalized mouse colonocytes results in malignant transformation, as determined by growth in soft agar and formation of highly invasive tumors in nude mice. Moreover, ncNRFR appears to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor let-7. These results suggest precise regulation of ncNRFR is necessary for proper cell growth in the colonic crypt, and its misregulation results in neoplastic transformation.

  15. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    another institution. These data indicate that overexpression of GHRH gene is an event associated with the neoplastic progression and clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph adenomas. More generally, these data merge essential elements of the hypothalamic and pituitary hypotheses of pituitary tumorigenesis, providing for a more unified concept of neoplastic progression in the pituitary. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9284826

  16. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Arreola, Fara; Martinez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the…

  17. Transforming American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.; Mackey, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors accept as a given the National Education Technology Plan's vision of a transformed education system powered by technology such that learners receive personalized and engaging learning experiences, and where assessment, teaching, infrastructure, and productivity are redefined. The article analyzes this vision of a…

  18. Is Distance Learning Transformational?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Is distance learning transformational? The author heard this question posed to a panel of faculty members during Distance Education Week activities. After reflecting upon her own students' reaction to her syllabus, her answer to the question changed from an initial, enthusiastic "yes" to a reflective "maybe," given the most favorable environment.…

  19. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  20. Transformative Change Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, D. D.; Kirby, C.; Witt, M. A.; Richie, D.; Mix, S.; Feldbaum, M.; Liu, S.; Mason, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Transformative Change Initiative (TCI) is dedicated to assisting community colleges to scale up innovation in the form of guided pathways, programs of study, and evidence-based strategies to improve student outcomes and program, organization, and system performance. The impetus for TCI is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and…

  1. Transforming Education with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2011-01-01

    In this EL interview, Karen Cator, the director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education, talks about ways to realize the potential of technology to transform education. She discusses what students need: their own digital devices for classroom use, the ability to use the information they access, the skills to…

  2. Global Transformations and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Rex R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines worldwide political, economic, and social transformations and their impact on agriculture, focusing on biotechnology. Discusses rise of international corporations and accompanying constraints on government power. Sees trend toward increasing agribusiness role in world food and agricultural sectors. Calls for broader views and research in…

  3. The fast Hartley transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Mark H.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of testing the fast Hartley transform (FHT) and comparing it with the fast Fourier transform (FFT). All the definitions and equations in this paper are quoted and cited from the series of references. The author of this report developed a FORTRAN program which computes the Hartley transform. He tested the program with a generalized electromagnetic pulse waveform and verified the results with the known value. Fourier analysis is an essential tool to obtain frequency domain information from transient time domain signals. The FFT is a popular tool to process many of today's audio and electromagnetic signals. System frequency response, digital filtering of signals, and signal power spectrum are the most practical applications of the FFT. However, the Fourier integral transform of the FFT requires computer resources appropriate for the complex arithmetic operations. On the other hand, the FHT can accomplish the same results faster and requires fewer computer resources. The FHT is twice as fast as the FFT, uses only half the computer resources, and so could be more useful than the FFT in typical applications such as spectral analysis, signal processing, and convolution. This paper presents a FORTRAN computer program for the FHT algorithm along with a brief description and compares the results and performance of the FHT and the FFT algorithms.

  4. Transformer Impedance Reflection Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2014-01-01

    Questions often arise as to how a device attached to a transformer can draw power from the electrical power grid since it seems that the primary and secondary are not connected to one another. However, a closer look at how the primary and secondary are linked together magnetically and a consideration of the role of Lenz's law in this linkage…

  5. Transformative Mixed Methods Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Paradigms serve as metaphysical frameworks that guide researchers in the identification and clarification of their beliefs with regard to ethics, reality, knowledge, and methodology. The transformative paradigm is explained and illustrated as a framework for researchers who place a priority on social justice and the furtherance of human rights.…

  6. Beyond Reform: Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jill

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is not a reform movement. To reform is to make a thing again; reformation implies a stasis that doesn't deliver enough for the educational future. This issue of Horace demonstrates that Essential schools and the districts and networks that support them are at various points in the journey of transformation,…

  7. The generalized Levinger transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, M.; Maroulas, J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present new results relating the numerical range of a matrix A with the generalized Levinger transformation , where HA and SA, are, respectively the Hermitian and skew-Hermitian parts of A. Using these results, we then derive expressions for eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the perturbed matrix , for a fixed matrix E and [alpha], [beta] are real parameters.

  8. Transforming Young Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of transformational change pervade the field of business but are rare in work with young people at risk--those most in need of deep change. Instead, the nation seems preoccupied with punishing or medicating problem behavior. Some propose the alternative of "rehabilitation," but that term means "to restore to former…

  9. Improved Transformation of Anthurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to increase transformation efficiency and yields of transgenic Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex. André hybrids were sought while effecting gene transfer for resistance to the two most important pests, bacterial blight (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae) and nematodes (Radopholus simili...

  10. Rainbow Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions. Polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg exhibit a sharply defined rainbow structure, the shape of which is determined mostly by single scattering properties of cloud particles, and therefore, can be modeled using the Mie theory. Fitting the observed rainbow with such a model (computed for a parameterized family of particle size distributions) has been used for cloud droplet size retrievals. We discovered that the relationship between the rainbow structures and the corresponding particle size distributions is deeper than it had been commonly understood. In fact, the Mie theory-derived polarized reflectance as a function of reduced scattering angle (in the rainbow angular range) and the (monodisperse) particle radius appears to be a proxy to a kernel of an integral transform (similar to the sine Fourier transform on the positive semi-axis). This approach, called the rainbow Fourier transform (RFT), allows us to accurately retrieve the shape of the droplet size distribution by the application of the corresponding inverse transform to the observed polarized rainbow. While the basis functions of the proxy-transform are not exactly orthogonal in the finite angular range, this procedure needs to be complemented by a simple regression technique, which removes the retrieval artifacts. This non-parametric approach does not require any a priori knowledge of the droplet size distribution functional shape and is computationally fast (no look-up tables, no fitting, computations are the same as for the forward modeling).

  11. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  12. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  13. The novel immunosuppressive enzyme IL4I1 is expressed by neoplastic cells of several B-cell lymphomas and by tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Carbonnelle-Puscian, Amélie; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Baia, Maryse; Martin-Garcia, Nadine; Allory, Yves; Haioun, Corinne; Crémades, Anne; Abd-Alsamad, Issam; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Gaulard, Philippe; Castellano, Flavia; Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported a strong IL4I1 gene expression in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and recently identified the protein as a secreted L-phenylalanine oxidase, physiologically expressed by myeloid cells, which inhibits T cell proliferation in vitro. Here, we analyzed the pattern of IL4I1 protein expression in 315 human lymphoid and non lymphoid malignancies. Besides PMBL, IL4I1 expression in tumors was very frequent. IL4I1 was detected in tumor-associated macrophages from most of the tumors and in neoplastic cells from follicular lymphoma, classic and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphomas and small lymphocytic lymphoma, three of which are germinal center-derived. IL4I1-positive tumor cells were also detected in rare cases of solid cancers, mainly mesothelioma. The enzymatic activity paralleled protein expression, suggesting that IL4I1 is functional in vivo. Depending on the tumor type, IL4I1 may impact on different infiltrating lymphocyte populations with consequences on tumor evolution. In the particular case of follicular lymphoma cells, which are susceptible to antitumor cytotoxic T cells killing but depend on interactions with local T helper cells for survival, a high level of IL4I1 expression seems associated with the absence of bone marrow involvement and a better outcome. These findings plead for an evaluation of IL4I1 as a prognosis factor. PMID:19436310

  14. USP6 and CDH11 Oncogenes Identify the Neoplastic Cell in Primary Aneurysmal Bone Cysts and Are Absent in So-Called Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Andre M.; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Inwards, Carrie Y.; Medeiros, Fabiola; Derr, Victoria; Hsi, Bae-Li; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.

    2004-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a locally recurrent bone lesion that has been regarded as a reactive process. Recently, a neoplastic basis in primary ABC was evidenced by demonstration of clonal chromosome band 17p13 translocations that place the USP6 (TRE2 or TRE17) oncogene under the regulatory influence of the highly active CDH11 promoter. Herein, we report CDH11 and/or USP6 rearrangements in 36 of 52 primary ABCs (69%), of which 10 had CDH11-USP6 fusion, 23 had variant USP6 rearrangements without CDH11 rearrangement, and three had variant CDH11 rearrangements without USP6 rearrangement. USP6 and CDH11 rearrangements were restricted to spindle cells in the ABC and were not found in multinucleated giant cells, inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, or osteoblasts. CDH11 and USP6 rearrangements did not correlate with recurrence-free survival, or with other clinicopathological features. CDH11 and USP6 rearrangements were not found in any of 17 secondary ABC associated with giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, and fibrous dysplasia. These findings demonstrate that primary ABC are mesenchymal neoplasms exhibiting USP6 and/or CDH11 oncogenic rearrangements. By contrast, secondary ABC lack CDH11 and USP6 rearrangements, and although morphological mimics of primary ABC, appear to represent a non-specific morphological pattern of a diverse group of non-ABC neoplasms. PMID:15509545

  15. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-09-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  16. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  17. [Outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization among patients with neoplastic disease: a clinico-epidemiological study of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Sakai, C; Satoh, Y; Ohkusu, K; Kumagai, K; Ishii, A

    2001-11-01

    MRSA infection or colonization developed in eleven patients with neoplastic disease including malignant lymphoma (5 cases), soft tissue sarcoma (2 cases), acute myeloblastic leukemia (one), myelodysplastic syndrome (one), multiple myeloma (one), and mesothelioma (one) at our ward from October to December 1999. The infections were pneumonia (six cases), enteritis (three), bacteremia (one), and wound infection (one). Ten of 11 cases received antimicrobial agent (s) during one month before isolation of MRSA, suggesting selection of MRSA. Five cases improved and survived, but six cases died of infection. At the isolation of MRSA, the neutrophil count (NC) of the alive cases was 1, 500/microliter or more but the NC of five cases who died was less than 1,000/microliter, especially less than 100/microliter in three cases who had just received a cancer chemotherapy. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, performed in 9 cases, showed an identical DNA-pattern of MRSA in 7 cases, indicating a nosocomial infection. Our method to prevent spread of MRSA targeting solely the patients with MRSA infection was obviously unsatisfactory. We should target also the cases of MRSA colonization and make an effort to wash hands more vigorously. Furthermore, radical reformation such as increasing single sick-rooms drastically and increasing the number of nursing staff is also required.

  18. The novel immunosuppressive enzyme IL4I1 is expressed by neoplastic cells of several B-cell lymphomas and by tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle-Puscian, A; Copie-Bergman, C; Baia, M; Martin-Garcia, N; Allory, Y; Haioun, C; Crémades, A; Abd-Alsamad, I; Farcet, J-P; Gaulard, P; Castellano, F; Molinier-Frenkel, V

    2009-05-01

    We previously reported a strong IL4I1 gene expression in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and recently identified the protein as a secreted L-phenylalanine oxidase, physiologically expressed by myeloid cells, which inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. Here, we analyzed the pattern of IL4I1 protein expression in 315 human lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies. Besides PMBL, IL4I1 expression in tumors was very frequent. IL4I1 was detected in tumor-associated macrophages from most of the tumors and in neoplastic cells from follicular lymphoma, classic and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphomas and small lymphocytic lymphoma, three of which are germinal center derived. IL4I1-positive tumor cells were also detected in rare cases of solid cancers, mainly mesothelioma. The enzymatic activity paralleled protein expression, suggesting that IL4I1 is functional in vivo. Depending on the tumor type, IL4I1 may impact on different infiltrating lymphocyte populations with consequences on tumor evolution. In the particular case of follicular lymphoma cells, which are susceptible to antitumor cytotoxic T cells killing but depend on interactions with local T helper cells for survival, a high level of IL4I1 expression seems associated with the absence of bone marrow involvement and a better outcome. These findings plead for an evaluation of IL4I1 as a prognosis factor. PMID:19436310

  19. Identification of differential anti-neoplastic activity of copper bis(thiosemicarbazones) that is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Christian; Al-Eisawi, Zaynab; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2015-11-01

    Bis(thiosemicarbazones) and their copper (Cu) complexes possess unique anti-neoplastic properties. However, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the structure-activity relationships of twelve bis(thiosemicarbazones) to elucidate factors regarding their anti-cancer efficacy. Importantly, the alkyl substitutions at the diimine position of the ligand backbone resulted in two distinct groups, namely, unsubstituted/monosubstituted and disubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazones). This alkyl substitution pattern governed their: (1) Cu(II/I) redox potentials; (2) ability to induce cellular (64)Cu release; (3) lipophilicity; and (4) anti-proliferative activity. The potent anti-cancer Cu complex of the unsubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazone) analog, glyoxal bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was attenuated by Cu sequestration by a non-toxic Cu chelator, tetrathiomolybdate, and the anti-oxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Fluorescence microscopy suggested that the anti-cancer activity of Cu(GTSM) was due, in part, to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). For the first time, this investigation highlights the role of ROS and LMP in the anti-cancer activity of bis(thiosemicarbazones).

  20. Telomere length in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and its relationship to H. pylori infection, degree of gastritis, and NSAID use.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Okubo, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. We measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and assessed its relationship to H. pylori-related gastritis, DNA methylation, ulcer disease, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) usage. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 151 cancer-free subjects including 49 chronic NSAID users and 102 nonusers. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured by real-time PCR. H. pylori infection status, histological severity of gastritis, and serum pepsinogens (PGs) were also investigated. E-cadherin (CDH1) methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Average relative telomere length of H. pylori-infected subjects was significantly shortened when compared to H. pylori-negative subjects (p = 0.002) and was closely associated with all histological parameter of gastritis (all p values <0.01) and CDH1 methylation (p = 0.0002). In H. pylori-negative subjects, NSAID users presented significantly shorter telomere length than nonusers (p = 0.028). Shorter telomere length was observed in duodenal and gastric ulcer patients compared with non-ulcer subjects among NSAID users. Telomere shortening is closely associated with severity of H. pylori-induced gastritis and CDH1 methylation status. Also, telomere shortening is accelerated by NSAID usage especially in H. pylori-negative subjects.

  1. Dynamically tunable transformation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Meca, Carlos; Barceló, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the introduction of transformation thermodynamics has provided a way to design thermal media that alter the flow of heat according to any spatial deformation, enabling the construction of novel devices such as thermal cloaks or concentrators. However, in its current version, this technique only allows static deformations of space. Here, we develop a space–time theory of transformation thermodynamics that incorporates the possibility of performing time-varying deformations. This extra freedom greatly widens the range of achievable effects, providing an additional degree of control for heat management applications. As an example, we design a reconfigurable thermal cloak that can be opened and closed dynamically, therefore being able to gradually adjust the temperature distribution of a given region.

  2. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  3. Microbial transformation of sesquiterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Haq N; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Hassan, Zahid; Ahmad, Viqar U

    2009-08-01

    Biotransformations are useful methods for producing medicinal and agricultural chemicals from both active and inactive natural products with the introduction of chemical functions into remote sites of the molecules. Research on microbial biotransformations of commonly available sesquiterpenoids into more valuable derivatives has always been of interest because of their economical potential to the perfume, food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Fungal transformations of sesquiterpenoids have been less frequently studied compared with many other natural products. In recent years, however, much attention has been given to the exploitation of new products with enhanced biological activity using microorganisms. This review, covering the period from 1990 to 2006, summarizes our knowledge of the biotransformations of sesquiterpenoids by various fungi. Such transformations could lead to the discovery of new reaction pathways that might be useful in the design of new value-added products.

  4. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  5. A DC Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2013-01-01

    A component level dc transformer is described in which no alternating currents or voltages are present. It operates by combining features of a homopolar motor and a homopolar generator, both de devices, such that the output voltage of a de power supply can be stepped up (or down) with a corresponding step down (or up) in current. The basic theory for this device is developed, performance predictions are made, and the results from a small prototype are presented. Based on demonstrated technology in the literature, this de transformer should be scalable to low megawatt levels, but it is more suited to high current than high voltage applications. Significant development would be required before it could achieve the kilovolt levels needed for de power transmission.

  6. Transforming the optical landscape.

    PubMed

    Pendry, J B; Luo, Yu; Zhao, Rongkuo

    2015-05-01

    Electromagnetism provides us with some of the most powerful tools in science, encompassing lasers, optical microscopes, magnetic resonance imaging scanners, radar, and a host of other techniques. To understand and develop the technology requires more than a set of formal equations. Scientists and engineers have to form a vivid picture that fires their imaginations and enables intuition to play a full role in the process of invention. It is to this end that transformation optics has been developed, exploiting Faraday's picture of electric and magnetic fields as lines of force, which can be manipulated by the electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability of surrounding materials. Transformation optics says what has to be done to place the lines of force where we want them to be.

  7. Transforming revenue management.

    PubMed

    Silveria, Richard; Alliegro, Debra; Nudd, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Healthcare organizations that want to undertake a patient administrative/revenue management transformation should: Define the vision with underlying business objectives and key performance measures. Strategically partner with key vendors for business process development and technology design. Create a program organization and governance infrastructure. Develop a corporate design model that defines the standards for operationalizing the vision. Execute the vision through technology deployment and corporate design model implementation.

  8. Transforming revenue management.

    PubMed

    Silveria, Richard; Alliegro, Debra; Nudd, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Healthcare organizations that want to undertake a patient administrative/revenue management transformation should: Define the vision with underlying business objectives and key performance measures. Strategically partner with key vendors for business process development and technology design. Create a program organization and governance infrastructure. Develop a corporate design model that defines the standards for operationalizing the vision. Execute the vision through technology deployment and corporate design model implementation. PMID:18990839

  9. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  10. Laminated piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A laminated piezoelectric transformer is provided using the longitudinal vibration modes for step-up voltage conversion applications. The input portions are polarized to deform in a longitudinal plane and are bonded to an output portion. The deformation of the input portions is mechanically coupled to the output portion, which deforms in the same longitudinal direction relative to the input portion. The output portion is polarized in the thickness direction relative its electrodes, and piezoelectrically generates a stepped-up output voltage.

  11. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  12. Transforming data into information.

    PubMed

    Beck, M B; Lin, Z

    2003-01-01

    In spite of a long history of automated instruments being deployed in the water industry, only recently has the difficulty of extracting timely insights from high-grade, high-volume data sets become an important problem. Put simply, it is now relatively easy to be "data-rich", much less easy to become information-rich". Whether the availability of so many data arises from "technological push" or the "demand pull" of practical problem solving is not the subject of discussion. The paper focuses instead on two issues: first, an outline of a methodological framework, based largely on the algorithms of (on-line) recursive estimation and involving a sequence of transformations to which the data can be subjected; and second, presentation and discussion of the results of applying these transformations in a case study of a biological system of wastewater treatment. The principal conclusion is that the difficulty of transforming data into information may lie not so much in coping with the high sampling intensity enabled by automated monitoring networks, but in coming to terms with the complexity of the higher-order, multi-variable character of the data sets, i.e., in interpreting the interactions among many contemporaneously measured quantities.

  13. Function transformation without reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, Franćois; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-05-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  14. 60. VIEW OF THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER VAULT. THIS CURRENT TRANSFORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. VIEW OF THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER VAULT. THIS CURRENT TRANSFORMER WAS USED TO SENSE HIGH CURRENT BEING GENERATED ON GENERATOR NUMBER 3 AND REDUCE IT TO A LOWER, EXACT ANALOG VALUE THAT COULD BE SAFELY HANDLED AND MONITORED WITH THE CONTROL CIRCUITRY. THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER IS LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CONNECTING BUS ABOVE THE TRANSFORMER WAS REMOVED FOR SALVAGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  15. Multipath Transformational Development of User Interfaces with Graph Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbourg, Quentin; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    In software engineering, transformational development is aimed at developing computer systems by transforming a coarse-grained specification of a system to its final code through a series of transformation steps. Transformational development is known to bring benefits such as: correctness by construction, explicit mappings between development steps, and reversibility of transformations. No comparable piece exists in the literature that provides a formal system applying transformational development in the area of user interface engineering. This chapter defines such a system. For this purpose, a mathematical system for expressing specifications and transformation rules is introduced. This system is based on graph transformations. The problem of managing the transformation rules is detailed, e.g., how to enable a developer to access, define, extend, restrict or relax, test, verify, and apply appropriate transformations. A tool supporting this development paradigm is also described and exemplified. Transformational development, applied to the development of user interfaces of interactive systems, allows reusability of design knowledge used to develop user interfaces and fosters incremental development of user interfaces by applying alternative transformations.

  16. Malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by the brain glioma niche in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuping; Zou, Xifeng; Duan, Deyi; Liu, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Normal human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can develop neoplastic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties after coculture with transformed hESCs in vitro. In the present study, the influence of the tumor microenvironment on malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was studied after allografting a mixture of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled BMSCs and C6 glioma cells into the rat brain to understand the influence of the cellular environment, especially the tumor environment, on the transformation of grafted BMSCs in the rat brain. We performed intracerebral transplantation in the rat brain using EGFP-labeled BMSCs coinjected with C6 tumor cells. After transplantation, the EGFP-labeled cells were isolated from the tumor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the characteristics of the recovered cells were investigated. Glioma-specific biomarkers of the sorted cells and the biological characteristics of the tumors were analyzed. The BMSCs isolated from the cografts were transformed into glioma CSCs, as indicated by the marked expression of the glioma marker GFAP in glioma cells, and of Nestin and CD133 in neural stem cells and CSCs, as well as rapid cell growth, decreased level of the tumor suppressor gene p53, increased level of the oncogene murine double minute gene 2 (MDM2), and recapitulation of glioma tissues in the brain. These data suggest that BMSCs can be transformed into CSCs, which can be further directed toward glioma formation under certain conditions, supporting the notion that the tumor microenvironment is involved in transforming normal BMSCs into glial CSCs. PMID:26590986

  17. Synthesis of Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] Utilizing a UV-Photoactivated Gemcitabine Intermediate: Cytotoxic Anti-Neoplastic Activity against Chemotherapeutic-Resistant Mammary Adenocarcinoma SKBr-3

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Cody P.; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a pyrimidine nucleoside analog that becomes triphosphorylated intracellularly where it competitively inhibits cytidine incorporation into DNA strands. Another mechanism-of-action of gemcitabine (diphosphorylated form) involves irreversible inhibition of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase thereby preventing deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Functioning as a potent chemotherapeutic gemcitabine promote decreases in neoplastic cell proliferation and apoptosis which is frequently found to be effective for the treatment of several leukemias and a wide spectrum of carcinomas. A brief plasma half-life in part due to rapid deamination and chemotherapeutic-resistance restricts the utility of gemcit-abine in clinical oncology. Selective “targeted” delivery of gemcitabine represents a potential molecular strategy for simultaneously prolonging its plasma half-life and minimizing innocient tissues and organ systems exposure to chemotherapy. The molecular design and an organic chemistry based synthesis reaction is described that initially generates a UV-photoactivated gemcitabine intermediate. In a subsequent phase of the synthesis method the UV-photoactivated gemcitabine intermediate is covalently bonded to a monoclonal immunoglobulin yielding an end-product in the form of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Analysis by SDS-PAGE/chemiluminescent auto-radiography did not detect evidence of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] polymerization or degradative fragmentation while cell-ELISA demonstrated retained binding-avidity for HER2/neu trophic membrane receptor complexes highly over-expressed by chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3). Compared to chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3), the covalent immunochemotherapeutic, gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] is anticipated to exert greater levels of cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency against other neoplastic cell types like pancreatic carcinoma, small-cell lung

  18. Transformational Leadership, Integrity, and Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Transformational leadership enjoys widespread appeal among student affairs professionals. National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and American College Personnel Association (ACPA) conferences frequently feature speakers who promote transformational leadership's two primary tenets: (1) change is the central purpose of…

  19. The Transformation of Disabilities Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the five major characteristics of the transformation era and describes how intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities organizations can apply specific transformation strategies associated with each characteristic. Collectively, the characteristics and strategies provide a framework for transformation…

  20. Involvement of HIF-2α-mediated inflammation in arsenite-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is a well established human carcinogen that causes diseases of the lung. Some studies have suggested a link between inflammation and lung cancer; however, it is unknown if arsenite-induced inflammation causally contributes to arsenite-caused malignant transformation of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation during neoplastic transformation induced in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells by chronic exposure to arsenite. The results showed that, on acute or chronic exposure to arsenite, HBE cells over-expressed the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The data also indicated that HIF-2α was involved in arsenite-induced inflammation. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-8 were essential for the malignant progression of arsenite-transformed HBE cells. Thus, these experiments show that HIF-2α mediates arsenite-induced inflammation and that such inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. The results provide a link between the inflammatory response and the acquisition of a malignant transformed phenotype by cells chronically exposed to arsenite and thus establish a previously unknown mechanism for arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite induces inflammation. • Arsenite-induced the increases of IL-6 and IL-8 via HIF-2α. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.