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Sample records for neoplastic non-random transformation

  1. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  2. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rhim, J S

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to investigate the progression of events that lead normal human cells in culture to become neoplastic in response to carcinogenic agents have been aided by the development of the suitable in vitro model systems. For initial human cell transformation studies, a flat, nontumorigenic clonal line, originally derived from a human osteosarcoma (HOS), was used. When treated with chemical carcinogens such as N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 3-methyl-cholanthrene (3MC), the HOS cells underwent morphological alterations and acquired tumorigenic properties. These cell lines were very useful inasmuch as a non-ras cellular transforming gene, met, and an activated H-ras oncogene have been isolated from MNNG-transformed and 3MC-transformed HOS lines, respectively, by DNA transfection procedure. Alteration of p53 gene in chemically transformed HOS cell lines has recently been shown. Although carcinogens cause human cancer, normal human cells in culture have proven difficult to achieve. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in culture has recently been achieved by a stepwise fashion-immortalization and conversion of the immortalized cells to tumorigenic cells. One of the critical initial events in the progression of normal human cells to tumor cells is the escape from cellular senescence. With few exceptions, normal human cells require immortalization to provide a practical system for transformation studies. Thus, the role of carcinogenic agents in the development of human cancers is now being defined using a variety of human cells. The neoplastic transformation in human cell cultures is reviewed. In doing so, this author attempts to put into perspective the history of human cell transformation by carcinogenic agents, and to discuss the current state of the art in transformation of human cells in culture; thus providing insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the conversion of normal cells to a neoplastic state of growth.

  3. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis by the human protooncogene MYC.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, G M; Moscovici, G; Moscovici, C; Bishop, J M

    1990-01-01

    Damage to the protooncogene MYC has been implicated in the genesis of diverse human tumors, but the tumorigenic potential of the isolated gene has been disputed. Here we report the use of a retroviral vector to test the potency of human MYC for neoplastic transformation in avian cells. We found that sustained and abundant expression of MYC can transform both embryonic fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells and elicit granulocytic leukemias in chickens. Transformation by MYC is accompanied by changes in diverse aspects of cellular phenotype, including morphology, ability to grow in suspension, rate of proliferation, the structure of the cytoskeleton, and the composition of the extracellular matrix. Nevertheless, the biological potency of MYC is inherently constrained when compared to that of the retroviral oncogene v-myc. Our findings enlarge on previous descriptions of neoplastic transformation by MYC and sustain the view that ungoverned expression of the gene can contribute to the genesis of human tumors. Images PMID:2156260

  4. Cellular neoplastic transformation induced by 916 MHz microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wang, Minglian; Zeng, Yi; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2012-08-01

    There has been growing concern about the possibility of adverse health effects resulting from exposure to microwave radiations, such as those emitted by mobile phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular neoplastic transformation effects of electromagnetic fields. 916 MHz continuous microwave was employed in our study to simulate the electromagnetic radiation of mobile phone. NIH/3T3 cells were adopted in our experiment due to their sensitivity to carcinogen or cancer promoter in environment. They were divided randomly into one control group and three microwave groups. The three microwave groups were exposed to 916 MHz EMF for 2 h per day with power density of 10, 50, and 90 w/m(2), respectively, in which 10 w/m(2) was close to intensity near the antenna of mobile phone. The morphology and proliferation of NIH/3T3 cells were examined and furthermore soft agar culture and animal carcinogenesis assay were carried out to determine the neoplastic promotion. Our experiments showed NIH/3T3 cells changed in morphology and proliferation after 5-8 weeks exposure and formed clone in soft agar culture after another 3-4 weeks depending on the exposure intensity. In the animal carcinogenesis study, lumps developed on the back of SCID mice after being inoculated into exposed NIH/3T3 cells for more than 4 weeks. The results indicate that microwave radiation can promote neoplastic transformation of NIH/3T3cells.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  6. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation: Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui-Hsu Yang, Tracy; Craise, Laurie M.; Mei, Man-Tong; Tobias, Cornelius A.

    Experimental data on molecular mechanisms are essential for understanding the bioeffects of radiation and for developing biophysical models, which can help in determining the shape of dose-response curves at very low doses, e.g., doses less than 1 cGy. Although it has been shown that ionizing radiation can cause neoplastic cell transformation directly, that high-LET heavy ions in general can be more effective than photons in transforming cells, and that the radiogenic cell transformation is a multi-step processes, we know very little about the molecular nature of lesions important for cell transformation, the relationship between lethal and transformational damages, and the evolution of initial damages into final chromosomal aberrations which alter the growth control of cells. Using cultured mouse embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) as a model system, we have collected quantitative data on dose-response curves for heavy ions with various charges and energies. An analysis of these quantitative data suggested that two DNA breaks formed within 80 Å may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 Å may be lethal. Through studies with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, we have found that DNA double strand breaks, including both blunt- and cohesive-ended breaks, can cause cell transformation in vitro. These results indicate that DNA double strand breaks can be important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship is similar for HGPRT gene mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, suggesting common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects. The high RBE of high-LET radiation for cell killing and neoplastic cell transformation is most likely related to its effectiveness in producing DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells. At

  7. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Craise, L M; Mei, M T; Tobias, C A

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data on molecular mechanisms are essential for understanding the bioeffects of radiation and for developing biophysical models, which can help in determining the shape of dose-response curves at very low doses, e.g., doses less than 1 cGy. Although it has been shown that ionizing radiation can cause neoplastic cell transformation directly, that high-LET heavy ions in general can be more effective than photons in transforming cells, and that the radiogenic cell transformation is a multi-step process [correction of processes], we know very little about the molecular nature of lesions important for cell transformation, the relationship between lethal and transformational damages, and the evolution of initial damages into final chromosomal aberrations which alter the growth control of cells. Using cultured mouse embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) as a model system, we have collected quantitative data on dose-response curves for heavy ions with various charges and energies. An analysis of these quantitative data suggested that two DNA breaks formed within 80 angstroms may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 angstroms may be lethal. Through studies with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, we have found that DNA double strand breaks, including both blunt- and cohesive-ended breaks, can cause cell transformation in vitro. These results indicate that DNA double strand breaks can be important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship is similar for HGPRT gene mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, suggesting common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects. The high RBE of high-LET radiation for cell killing and neoplastic cell transformation is most likely related to its effectiveness in producing DNA double

  8. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  10. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) and neoplastic transformation: effect of PARP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Donà, Francesca; Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Raineri, Tatiana; Ricotti, Roberta; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, Anna Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and poly(ADP-ribosylation) play essential roles in several biological processes, among which neoplastic transformation and telomere maintenance. In this paper, we review the poly(ADP-ribosylation) process together with the highly appealing use of PARP inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. In addition, we report our results concerning poly(ADP-ribosylation) in a cellular model system for neoplastic transformation developed in our laboratory. Here we show that PARP-1 and PARP-2 expression increases during neoplastic transformation, together with the basal levels of poly(ADP-ribosylation). Furthermore, we demonstrate a greater effect of the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on cellular viability in neoplastically transformed cells compared to normal fibroblasts and we show that prolonged 3AB administration to tumorigenic cells causes a decrease in telomere length. Taken together, our data support an active involvement of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in neoplastic transformation and telomere length maintenance and confirm the relevant role of poly(ADP-ribosylation) inhibition for the treatment of cancer.

  11. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  12. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  13. Neoplastic transformation of hamster embyro cells by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Han, Z; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, F; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Kato, T; Ikenaga, M

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the induction of morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by low doses of heavy ions with different linear energy transfer (LET), ranging from 13 to 400 keV/micrometer. Exponentially growing cells were irradiated with 12C or 28Si ion beams generated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), inoculated to culture dishes, and transformed colonies were identified when the cells were densely stacked and showed a crisscross pattern. Over the LET range examined, the frequency of transformation induced by the heavy ions increased sharply at very low doses no greater than 5 cGy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy ions relative to 250 kVp X-rays showed an initial increase with LET, reaching a maximum value of about 7 at 100 keV/micrometer, and then decreased with the further increase in LET. Thus, we confirmed that high LET heavy ions are significantly more effective than X-rays for the induction of in vitro cell transformation.

  14. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major deleterious late effects of ionizing radiation is related to the induction of neoplasms. In the present report recent experimental results on neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions are presented, and possible means to circumvent the carcinogenic effect of space radiation are discussed. Biological effects observed in experiments involving the use of energetic heavy ions accelerated at the Bevalac suggest that many of the biological effects observed in earlier space flight experiments may be due to space radiation, particularly cosmic rays. It is found that the effect of radiation on cell transformation is dose-rate dependent. The frequency of neoplastic transformation for a given dose decreases with a decrease of dose rate of Co-60 gamma rays. It is found that various chemical agents give radiation protection, including DMSO.

  15. Repair of neoplastic transformation damage following protracted exposures to /sup 60/Co. gamma. -rays

    SciTech Connect

    Han, A.; Hill, C.K.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The incidences of neoplastic transformation induced by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays in exponentially growing mouse embryo 10T1/2 cells were measured following acute and protracted exposures. Delivery of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays at a low dose rate (0.1, 0.5, 2.5 rad/min) compared with a high dose rate (100 rad/min) results in appreciable, dose rate dependent reductions in cell killing and, independent of the effect on cell survival, reduces significantly the incidence of neoplastic transformation. Exposure of exponentially growing 10T1/2 cells to a dose of ..gamma..-rays in five equal daily fractions also significantly reduces transformation frequency, compared with delivery in a single dose, throughout the dose range examined (25 to 300 rads). The initial parts of the induction curves are fitted quite well by a linear dose dependence. The slopes of the regression lines for multifractionation delivery or irradiation at 0.1 rad/min, are one-third and one-half, respectively, of those for single exposures at a high dose rate. Increasing the interfraction interval up to 48 hours, or reduction of the dose per fraction further reduce incidence of neoplastic transformation. We conclude that protracted exposures of low LET radiation result in a net error-free repair of subtransformation damage.

  16. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

    2011-03-29

    We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker

  17. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: Effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism. PMID:25309063

  18. Upregulation of Twist in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma is associated with neoplastic transformation and distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hiu‐Fung; Chan, Yuen‐Piu; Wong, Michelle Lok‐Yee; Kwok, Wei‐Kei; Chan, Ka‐Kui; Lee, Pin‐Yin; Srivastava, Gopesh; Law, Simon Ying‐Kit; Wong, Yong‐Chuan; Wang, Xianghong; Chan, Kwok‐Wah

    2007-01-01

    Background The antiapoptotic and epithelial–mesenchymal transition activities of Twist have been implicated in the neoplastic transformation and the development of metastasis, respectively. Upregulation of Twist, described in several types of human cancer, also acts as a prognostic marker of poor outcome. Aim To investigate Twist expression in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its prognostic value in a Chinese cohort of patients with oesophageal SCC. Methods Twist expression in primary oesophageal SCC of 87 Chinese patients was investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Twist protein level in one immortalised normal oesophageal epithelial cell line and six oesophageal SCC cell lines was measured by western blot analysis. Twist mRNA level in 30 pairs of frozen specimens of primary oesophageal SCC and non‐neoplastic oesophageal epithelium from the upper resection margin of corresponding oesophagectomy specimen was also determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription‐PCR. Results It was found that Twist was upregulated in oesophageal SCC cell lines, and its mRNA and protein levels were both increased in oesophageal SCC and the non‐neoplastic oesophageal epithelium (p<0.001). In addition, a high level of Twist expression in oesophageal SCC was significantly associated with a greater risk for the patient of developing distant metastasis within 1 year of oesophagectomy (OR 3.462, 95% CI 1.201 to 9.978; p = 0.022). Conclusions Our results suggest that upregulation of Twist plays a role in the neoplastic transformation to oesophageal SCC and subsequent development of distant metastasis. Twist may serve as a useful prognostic marker for predicting the development of distant metastasis in oesophageal SCC. PMID:16822877

  19. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-10-07

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism.

  20. A link between c-Myc-mediated transcriptional repression and neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L A; Dolde, C; Barrett, J; Wu, C S; Dang, C V

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the transcription factor c-Myc contributes to oncogenesis by altering the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, but its precise function in neoplasia remains ambiguous. The ability of c-Myc to bind the sequence CAC(G/A)TG and transactivate appears to be linked to its transforming activity; however, c-Myc also represses transcription in vitro through a pyrimidine-rich cis element termed the initiator (Inr). In transfection experiments using the adenoviral major late (adML) promoter, which contains two Myc binding sites and an Inr, we determined that c-Myc represses transcription through the initiator in vivo. This activity requires the dimerization domain and amino acids 106 to 143, which are located within the transactivation domain and are necessary for neoplastic transformation. We studied a lymphoma-derived c-Myc substitution mutation at 115-Phe, which is within the region required for transcriptional suppression, and found the mutant more effective than wild-type c-Myc in transforming rodent fibroblasts and in suppressing the adML promoter. Our studies of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function c-Myc mutations suggest a link between c-Myc-mediated neoplastic transformation and transcriptional repression through the Inr. PMID:8601634

  1. A link between c-Myc-mediated transcriptional repression and neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, L A; Dolde, C; Barrett, J; Wu, C S; Dang, C V

    1996-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that the transcription factor c-Myc contributes to oncogenesis by altering the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, but its precise function in neoplasia remains ambiguous. The ability of c-Myc to bind the sequence CAC(G/A)TG and transactivate appears to be linked to its transforming activity; however, c-Myc also represses transcription in vitro through a pyrimidine-rich cis element termed the initiator (Inr). In transfection experiments using the adenoviral major late (adML) promoter, which contains two Myc binding sites and an Inr, we determined that c-Myc represses transcription through the initiator in vivo. This activity requires the dimerization domain and amino acids 106 to 143, which are located within the transactivation domain and are necessary for neoplastic transformation. We studied a lymphoma-derived c-Myc substitution mutation at 115-Phe, which is within the region required for transcriptional suppression, and found the mutant more effective than wild-type c-Myc in transforming rodent fibroblasts and in suppressing the adML promoter. Our studies of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function c-Myc mutations suggest a link between c-Myc-mediated neoplastic transformation and transcriptional repression through the Inr.

  2. Relocalization of cell adhesion molecules during neoplastic transformation of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Studying neoplastic transformation of telomerase immortalized human fibroblasts (cen3tel), we found that the transition from normal to tumorigenic cells was associated with the loss of growth contact inhibition, the acquisition of an epithelial-like morphology and a change in actin organization, from stress fibers to cortical bundles. We show here that these variations were paralleled by an increase in N-cadherin expression and relocalization of different adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin, α-catenin, p-120 and β-catenin. These proteins presented a clear membrane localization in tumorigenic cells compared to a more diffuse, cytoplasmic distribution in primary fibroblasts and non-tumorigenic immortalized cells, suggesting that tumorigenic cells could form strong cell-cell contacts and cell contacts did not induce growth inhibition. The epithelial-like appearance of tumorigenic cells did not reflect a mesenchymal-epithelial transition; in fact, cen3tel cells expressed vimentin and did not express cytokeratins at all transformation stages. Moreover, they did not express epithelial proteins such as occluding and claudin-1. In contrast, ZO-1 showed higher levels and a more defined membrane localization in tumorigenic cells compared to non-tumorigenic cells; this confirms its role in adherens junction formation in mesenchymal cells and is in agreement with the strong cell-cell contact formation by neoplastically transformed cells. Finally, we found α-catenin and ZO-1 nuclear localization in non-transformed cells, suggestive of possible additional roles of these proteins besides cell junction formation.

  3. Differential Methylation of the HPV 16 Upstream Regulatory Region during Epithelial Differentiation and Neoplastic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Vinokurova, Svetlana; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses are squamous epitheliotropic viruses that may cause cervical and other cancers. HPV replication depends on squamous epithelial differentiation. Transformation of HPV-infected cells goes along with substantial alteration of the viral gene expression profile and preferentially occurs at transformation zones usually at the uterine cervix. Methylation of the viral genome may affect regulatory features that control transcription and replication of the viral genome. Therefore, we analyzed the methylation pattern of the HPV16 upstream regulatory region (URR) during squamous epithelial differentiation and neoplastic transformation and analyzed how shifts in the HPV URR methylome may affect viral gene expression and replication. HPV 16 positive biopsy sections encompassing all stages of an HPV infection (latent, permissive and transforming) were micro-dissected and DNA was isolated from cell fractions representing the basal, intermediate, and superficial cell layers, each, as well as from transformed p16INK4a-positive cells. We observed fundamental changes in the methylation profile of transcription factor binding sites in the HPV16 upstream regulatory region linked to the squamous epithelial differentiation stage. Squamous epithelial transformation indicated by p16INK4a overexpression was associated with methylation of the distal E2 binding site 1 leading to hyper-activation of the HPV 16 URR. Adjacent normal but HPV 16-infected epithelial areas retained hyper-methylated HPV DNA suggesting that these viral genomes were inactivated. These data suggest that distinct shifts of the HPV 16 methylome are linked to differentiation dependent transcription and replication control and may trigger neoplastic transformation. PMID:21915330

  4. Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation12

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Neale, Geoffrey; Ye, Jianming; Paul, Leena; Kuliyev, Emin; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L; Washington, M Kay; Rehg, Jerold; Finkelstein, David B; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness. PMID:26992918

  5. Adaptive Response Against Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation In Vitro Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was to establish a dose response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells in vitro under experimental conditions were an adaptive response, if it were induced, would have an opportunity to be expressed. During the first two years of the grant an exhaustive series of experiments were performed and the resulting data were reported at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society and then Subsequently published. The data showed that an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation was seen up to doses of 10cGy of Cs-137 gamma rays. At dose of 30, 50 and 100 cGy the transformation frequencies were above background. This indicated that for this system, under the specific experimental conditions used, there was a threshold of somewhere between 10 and 30 cGy. The results also indicated some unexpected, though very interesting, correlations with relative risk estimates made from human epidemiologic studies.

  6. Time-caloric restriction inhibits the neoplastic transformation of cirrhotic liver in rats treated with diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Molina-Aguilar, Christian; Guerrero-Carrillo, María de Jesús; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier; Olguin-Reyes, Sitlali; Castro-Belio, Thania; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Rivera-Zavala, Julieta Berenice; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2017-08-01

    Hepatocellular cancer is the most common type of primary liver cancer. Cirrhosis is the main risk factor that generates this malady. It has been proven that caloric restriction protocols and restricted feeding schedules are protective in experimental carcinogenic models. We tested the influence of a time-caloric restriction protocol (2 h of food access during the daytime for 18 weeks) in an experimental model of cirrhosis-hepatocarcinoma produced by weekly administration of diethylnitrosamine. Our results indicate that time-caloric restriction reduced hepatomegaly and prevented the increase in blood leukocytes promoted by diethylnitrosamine. Strikingly, time-caloric restriction preserved functional and histological characteristics of the liver in fibrotic areas compared to the cirrhotic areas of the Ad Libitum-fed group. Tumoural masses in the restricted group were well differentiated; consider a neoplastic or early stage of HCC. However, time-caloric restriction enhanced collagen deposits. With regard to the cancerous process, food restriction prevented systemic inflammation and an increase in carcinoembryonic antigen, and it favoured the occurrence of diffuse multinodular tumours. Histologically, it prevented hepatocyte inflammation response, the regenerative process, and neoplastic transformation. Time-caloric restriction stimulated circadian synchronization in fibrotic and cancerous liver sections, and it increased BMAL1 clock protein levels. We conclude that time-caloric restriction prevents fibrosis from progressing into cirrhosis, thus avoiding chronic inflammation and regenerative processes. It also prevents, probably through circadian entrainment and caloric restriction, the neoplastic transformation of tumoural lesions induced by diethylnitrosamine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Neoplastic transformation of cells by soluble but not particulate forms of metals used in orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Doran, A; Law, F C; Allen, M J; Rushton, N

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in cell culture techniques have made it possible to study the cellular mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and to apply these methods as screening tools in vitro. This study investigated and compared the ability of the metals most commonly used in orthopedic implants to induce toxicity and neoplastic transformation in the C3H10T1/2 mouse fibroblast cell line. Eight metals (cobalt, chromium, nickel, iron, molybdenum, aluminium, vanadium and titanium) and their alloys (stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloy and titanium alloy) were tested, both as soluble salts and as solid particles. There were marked differences between the various metals in terms of both toxicity and transforming ability. Significant increases in the incidence of cell transformation were seen with soluble forms of cobalt, chromium, nickel and molybdenum but not with iron, aluminium, vanadium or titanium. For most of the metals. transforming ability was directly related to toxicity, although this correlation did not hold for either molybdenum or vanadium. The physical form of the metal was critically important in determining its effects, and transformation occurred only with soluble metal salts.

  8. Dose protraction studies with low- and high-LET radiations on neoplastic cell transformation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the low- and high-LET radiation (by X-rays, Co-60, and heavy ions) on the transformation of neoplastic cells were studied using cultured C3H10T1/2 mouse embryo cells. The transformed colonies in the confluent cell monolayers were recognized as focuses composed of highly polar fibroblastic multilayered criss-cross arrays of densely stained cells. For the low-LET radiation, there was a decrease in cell killing and cell transformation frequency when cells were irradiated with fractionated doses and at a low dose rate, indicating that cultured mammalian cells can repair both subtransformation and potential transformation lesions. No sparing effect, however, was found for the high-LET radiation. An enhancement of cell transformation was observed for low-dose/rate argon (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micron) and iron particles (600 MeV/u; 200 keV/micron). The molecular mechanism for this enhancement effect is not known.

  9. Dose protraction studies with low- and high-LET radiations on neoplastic cell transformation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the low- and high-LET radiation (by X-rays, Co-60, and heavy ions) on the transformation of neoplastic cells were studied using cultured C3H10T1/2 mouse embryo cells. The transformed colonies in the confluent cell monolayers were recognized as focuses composed of highly polar fibroblastic multilayered criss-cross arrays of densely stained cells. For the low-LET radiation, there was a decrease in cell killing and cell transformation frequency when cells were irradiated with fractionated doses and at a low dose rate, indicating that cultured mammalian cells can repair both subtransformation and potential transformation lesions. No sparing effect, however, was found for the high-LET radiation. An enhancement of cell transformation was observed for low-dose/rate argon (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micron) and iron particles (600 MeV/u; 200 keV/micron). The molecular mechanism for this enhancement effect is not known.

  10. Measuring neoplastic transformation in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Brown, William; Wax, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is a promising technique which combines the depth resolution of low coherence interferometry with the sensitivity of light scattering spectroscopy for probing the health of epithelial tissue layers. Our new fLCI system configuration utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source and a 4-f interferometer which re-images light scattered from the sample onto the detection plane. The system employs an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire depth resolved profiles from 252 adjacent spatial points without the need for any scanning. The limited spatial coherence of the light source requires the resolution of adjacent spatial points for the generation of depth information. Depth-resolved spectral information is recovered by performing a short-time Fourier transform on the detected spectra, similar to spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain information about the neoplastic transformation of the probed cells. Previous studies have demonstrated fLCI as an excellent technique for probing the scatterer morphology of simple phantoms and of in vitro cancer cell monolayers. We now seek to assess the ability of the new fLCI system to measure the health of subsurface tissue layers using the hamster cheek pouch model. Seven hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. We expect our results to establish the feasibility of fLCI to distinguish between healthy and dysplastic epithelial tissues in the hamster cheek pouch.

  11. Enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity, an early stage in the neoplastic transformation of human epidermal keratinocytes in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Parshad, R.; Price, F.M.; Peterson, W.D. Jr.; Rhim, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    A deficiency in DNA repair, manifest as enhanced chromatid radiosensitivity during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, together with a proliferative stimulus such as that provided by active oncogenes may be necessary and sufficient for the malignant neoplastic transformation of human keratinocytes in culture. Normal epidermal keratinocytes established as continuous cell lines by transfection with pSV3-neo or infection with adeno 12-SV40 hybrid virus developed enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity after 18 passages in culture. In contrast to cells from primary or secondary culture, these cells could be transformed to malignant neoplastic cells by infection with Kirsten murine sarcoma virus containing the Ki-ras oncogene or in one line by the chemical carcinogen, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; both of these agents produced a marked proliferative response. Cytological heterogeneity and karyotypic instability characterized the cells during their progression to neoplasia. These results are interpreted in terms of a mechanism for neoplastic transformation.

  12. The shape of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro: evidence for an adaptive response against neoplastic transformation at low doses of low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Redpath, J L; Liang, D; Taylor, T H; Christie, C; Elmore, E

    2001-12-01

    A dose-response curve for gamma-radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells over the dose range 0.1 cGy to 1 Gy is presented. In the experimental protocol used, the spontaneous (background) frequency of neoplastic transformation of sham-irradiated cultures was compared to that of cultures which had been irradiated with (137)Cs gamma radiation and either plated immediately or held for 24 h at 37 degrees C prior to plating, for assay for neoplastic transformation. The pooled data from a minimum of three repeat large-scale experiments at each dose demonstrated a reduced transformation frequency for the irradiated compared to the sham-irradiated cells for doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 cGy for the delayed-plating arm. The probability of this happening by chance is given by 1/2(n), where n is the number of observations (5); i.e., 1/32 congruent with 0.031. This is indicative of an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation at least up to a dose of 10 cGy of gamma radiation. The high-dose data obtained at 30 and 50 cGy and 1 Gy showed a good fit to a linear extrapolation through the sham-irradiated, zero-dose control. The delayed-plating data at 10 cGy and below showed a statistically significant divergence from this linear extrapolation.

  13. Diagnostic ultrasound is unable to enhance the rate of neoplastic transformation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tolsma, S S; Madsen, E L; Chmiel, J; Martin, A O; Bouck, N P

    1991-11-01

    The ability of diagnostic pulsed ultrasound to induce heritable genetic damage of the type that could result in neoplasia was assayed using BHK21/cl 13 hamster cells or normal human fibroblasts as targets. Using an exposure apparatus carefully designed to minimize beam attenuation and reflection, cavitation, and heating, cells were exposed from 20 seconds to 40 minutes either to clinical machines operating at maximum power, or to a highly focused nonclinical transducer at 2900 W/cm2, or to 200 shocks from a lithotripter. No evidence of an increase in the frequency of neoplastically transformed BHK cells or in the frequency of mutant human cells was seen over those found in matched sham-exposed controls.

  14. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  15. Possible error-prone repair of neoplastic transformation induced by fission-spectrum neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.K.; Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-07-18

    We have examined the effect of fission-spectrum neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, delivered either as acute or protracted irradiation, on the incidence of neoplastic transformation in the C3H 1OT1/2 mouse embryo cell line. Acute exposures were delivered at 10 to 38 rads/min, protracted exposures at 0.086 or 0.43 rad/min. The total doses for both ranged from 2.4 to 350 rads. In the low dose region (2.4 to 80 rads), there was a large enhancement in transformation frequency when the neutrons were delivered at the low dose rates compared with the high dose rates, but the survival of the cells was not significantly different between the two exposure conditions. Analysis of the initial parts of the curves shows that the regression line for protracted doses is about 9 times steeper than that for single acute exposures. Finally, the possibility is discussed that an error-prone repair process may be causing the enhanced transformation frequency by protracted neutron exposures. 12 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Leslie Redpath

    2007-01-17

    The objective of the research was to examine mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of low doses (<10 cGy) of low-LET radiation on the endpoint of neoplastic transformation in vitro. The findings indicated a role for upregulation of DNA repair but not of antioxidants.

  17. Identification of the neoplastically transformed cells in Marek's disease herpesvirus-induced lymphomas: recognition by the monoclonal antibody AV37.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Shane C; Davison, T Fred

    2002-07-01

    Understanding the interactions between herpesviruses and their host cells and also the interactions between neoplastically transformed cells and the host immune system is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of herpesvirus oncology. However, this has been difficult as no animal models of herpesvirus-induced oncogenesis in the natural host exist in which neoplastically transformed cells are also definitively identified and may be studied in vivo. Marek's disease (MD) herpesvirus (MDV) of poultry, although a recognized natural oncogenic virus causing T-cell lymphomas, is no exception. In this work, we identify for the first time the neoplastically transformed cells in MD as the CD4(+) major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I(hi), MHC class II(hi), interleukin-2 receptor alpha-chain-positive, CD28(lo/-), phosphoprotein 38-negative (pp38(-)), glycoprotein B-negative (gB(-)), alphabeta T-cell-receptor-positive (TCR(+)) cells which uniquely overexpress a novel host-encoded extracellular antigen that is also expressed by MDV-transformed cell lines and recognized by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) AV37. Normal uninfected leukocytes and MD lymphoma cells were isolated directly ex vivo and examined by flow cytometry with MAb recognizing AV37, known leukocyte antigens, and MDV antigens pp38 and gB. CD28 mRNA was examined by PCR. Cell cycle distribution and in vitro survival were compared for each lymphoma cell population. We demonstrate for the first time that the antigen recognized by AV37 is expressed at very low levels by small minorities of uninfected leukocytes, whereas particular MD lymphoma cells uniquely express extremely high levels of the AV37 antigen; the AV37(hi) MD lymphoma cells fulfill the accepted criteria for neoplastic transformation in vivo (protection from cell death despite hyperproliferation, presence in all MD lymphomas, and not supportive of MDV production); the lymphoma environment is essential for AV37(+) MD lymphoma cell survival; pp38 is

  18. Neoplastic transformation of rat liver epithelial cells is enhanced by non-transferrin-bound iron

    PubMed Central

    Messner, Donald J; Kowdley, Kris V

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron overload is associated with liver toxicity, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. While most iron circulates in blood as transferrin-bound iron, non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) also becomes elevated and contributes to toxicity in the setting of iron overload. The mechanism for iron-related carcinogenesis is not well understood, in part due to a shortage of suitable experimental models. The primary aim of this study was to investigate NTBI-related hepatic carcinogenesis using T51B rat liver epithelial cells, a non-neoplastic cell line previously developed for carcinogenicity and tumor promotion studies. Methods T51B cells were loaded with iron by repeated addition of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) to the culture medium. Iron internalization was documented by chemical assay, ferritin induction, and loss of calcein fluorescence. Proliferative effects were determined by cell count, toxicity was determined by MTT assay, and neoplastic transformation was assessed by measuring colony formation in soft agar. Cyclin levels were measured by western blot. Results T51B cells readily internalized NTBI given as FAC. Within 1 week of treatment at 200 μM, there were significant but well-tolerated toxic effects including a decrease in cell proliferation (30% decrease, p < 0.01). FAC alone induced little or no colony formation in soft agar. In contrast, FAC addition to cells previously initiated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) resulted in a concentration dependent increase in colony formation. This was first detected at 12 weeks of FAC treatment and increased at longer times. At 16 weeks, colony formation increased more than 10 fold in cells treated with 200 μM FAC (p < 0.001). The iron chelator desferoxamine reduced both iron uptake and colony formation. Cells cultured with 200 μM FAC showed decreased cyclin D1, decreased cyclin A, and increased cyclin B1. Conclusion These results establish NTBI as a tumor promoter in T51B rat liver

  19. Analysis of the multistage process of neoplastic transformation of human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Normal human cells in culture have never been neoplastically transformed by carcinogens. One explanation is that the life span of the cells is too short for them to acquire the necessary changes. To test this, we transfected diploid fibroblasts with a plasmid carrying v-myc gene and a selectable marker. A drug resistant clone expressing v-myc was passaged to the end of its life span. A few cells continued to proliferate and gave rise to a diploid, infinite life span that has normal growth control and in nontumorigenic. Analysis indicated that one more change, in addition to unregulated expression of v-myc, was involved in generating these cells. They spontaneously gave rise to a near-diploid strain with a stable karyotype of 34 chromosomes, including 2 markers. This strain, MSU-1.1, grows more rapidly, is less dependent on growth factors, but does not form large colonies in agar and is not tumorigenic. At least two additional changes were involved in generating this strain. To determine the number and kinds of additional changes required to transform MSU-1.1 cells to oncogenes in vectors engineering for overexpression, and selected for focus-formation. The focus-derived cells were growth factor independent, formed large colonies in agar, and produced sarcomas with a short latency. These malignant cells had acquired two additional changes, but no change in karyotype. Exposure of MSU-1.1 cells to carcinogens and selection for foci also yielded malignant cells. Those analyzed to date show loss of 1 or 2 more chromosomes and of p53 function.

  20. Radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of C3H10T1/2 cells is suppressed by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, M.; Terasima, T.; Seki, M. )

    1989-12-01

    X-ray induced transformation of C3H10T1/2 cells was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by administration of ascorbic acid after irradiation (0.1-20 micrograms/ml for the first week) in the culture medium. The dose-response curve was shifted about 60% downward and was slightly steeper in the presence of ascorbic acid (5 micrograms/ml for the first week) than in its absence. The 1-week treatment procedure revealed that cells initiated by radiation remained susceptible to ascorbic acid until the time of morphological phenotype expression. The neoplastically transformed phenotype expressed after incubation for 8 weeks could no longer be suppressed by ascorbic acid even after culture transfer. Similarly, the neoplastically transformed phenotype suppressed for 8 weeks by ascorbic acid treatment was not subsequently expressed in the absence of ascorbic acid. On the basis of the oxygen-detoxifying nature of ascorbic acid, we postulated that expression of the neoplastically transformed phenotype is promoted by reactive oxygen species and peroxy radicals generated in cells during the whole assay period. The data may be useful as a guide for chemopreventive efforts against radiation carcinogenesis.

  1. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications.

  2. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential.

  3. Inhibition of chemically-induced neoplastic transformation by a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin derivative.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Frey, Dean A; McLaws, Mark D; Østerlie, Marianne; Lockwood, Samuel F; Bertram, John S

    2005-09-01

    Carotenoids have been implicated in numerous epidemiological studies as being protective against cancer at many sites, and their chemopreventive properties have been confirmed in laboratory studies. Astaxanthin (AST), primarily a carotenoid of marine origin, responsible for the pink coloration of salmon, shrimp and lobster, has received relatively little attention. As with other carotenoids, its highly lipophilic properties complicate delivery to model systems. To overcome this issue we have synthesized a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin (pAST) derivative with aqueous dispersibility of 25.21 mg/ml. pAST was delivered to C3H/10T1/2 cells in an aqueous/ethanol solution and compared with non-esterified AST dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. We show pAST to (i) upregulate connexin 43 (Cx43) protein expression; (ii) increase the formation of Cx43 immunoreactive plaques; (iii) upregulate gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); and (iv) cause 100% inhibition of methylcholanthrene-induced neoplastic transformation at 10(-6) M. In all these assays, pAST was superior to non-esterified AST itself; in fact, pAST exceeded the potency of all other previously tested carotenoids in this model system. Cleavage of pAST to non-esterified (free) AST and uptake into cells was also verified by HPLC; however, levels of free AST were approximately 100-fold lower than in cells treated with AST itself, suggesting that pAST possesses intrinsic activity. The dual properties of water dispersibility (enabling parenteral administration in vivo) and increased potency should prove extremely useful in the future development of cancer chemopreventive agents.

  4. Observation of radiation-specific damage in human cells exposed to depleted uranium: dicentric frequency and neoplastic transformation as endpoints.

    PubMed

    Miller, A C; Xu, J; Stewart, M; Brooks, K; Hodge, S; Shi, L; Page, N; McClain, D

    2002-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalised human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha-particle) and chemical (metal) component. Since DU has a low specific activity in comparison to natural uranium, it is not considered to be a significant radiological hazard. The potential contribution of radiation to DU-induced biological effects is unknown and the involvement of radiation in DU-induced biological effects could have significant implications for current risk estimates for internalised DU exposure. Two approaches were used to address this question. The frequency of dicentrics was measured in HOS cells following DU exposure in vitro. Data demonstrated that DU exposure (50 microM, 24 h) induced a significant elevation in dicentric frequency in vitro in contrast to incubation with the heavy metals, nickel and tungsten which did not increase dicentric frequency above background levels. Using the same concentration (50 microM) of three uranyl nitrate compounds that have different uranium isotopic concentrations and therefore, different specific activities, the effect on neoplastic transformation in vitro was examined. HOS cells were exposed to one of three-uranyl nitrate compounds (238U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.33 microCi.g-1; DU-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.44 microCi.g-1; and 235U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 2.2 microCi.g-1) delivered at a concentration of 50 microM for 24 h. Results showed, at equal uranium concentration, there was a specific activity dependent increase in neoplastic transformation frequency. Taken together these data suggest that radiation can play a role in DU-induced biological effects in vitro.

  5. Neoplastic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells: a study with fractionated doses of monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Saran, A; Pazzaglia, S; Pariset, L; Rebessi, S; Broerse, J J; Zoetelief, J; Di Majo, V; Coppola, M; Covelli, V

    1994-05-01

    As most occupational and environmental exposures to ionizing radiation are at low dose rates or in small dose fractions, risk estimation requires that the effects of the temporal distribution of dose are taken into account. Previous in vitro studies of oncogenic transformation, as well as in vivo studies of carcinogenesis induced by high-LET radiation, yielded controversial results concerning the presence of an inverse dose-rate effect. The present study tested the influence of one scheme of dose fractionation of monoenergetic neutrons on neoplastic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells. Neutrons of 0.5, 1.0 and 6.0 MeV were used. Cells were exposed to doses of 0.25 and 0.5 Gy, given acutely or in five fractions at 2-h intervals. The acute and fractionated irradiations with each energy were done on the same day. No significant difference between the two irradiation modes was found for both cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation at all energies. These results are in agreement with our data for fractionated fission-spectrum neutrons from the RSV-TAPIRO reactor.

  6. Early changes in proteome levels upon acute deltamethrin exposure in mammalian skin system associated with its neoplastic transformation potential.

    PubMed

    George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2013-01-01

    Deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, used extensively for pest control has been reported to cause adverse health effects including carcinogenic/toxic effects in animals but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the effect of deltamethrin after short exposure on early protein expression changes involved in neoplastic transformation in mouse skin, validated the results in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells and thereby explore the possible underlying mechanism. Deltamethrin (4 mg/kg b.wt) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, 0.05 mg/kg b.wt) were topically applied on Swiss albino mice, respectively. The comparative protein expression profiles with vehicle control were generated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. 2-DE maps of deltamethrin and B[a]P treated mouse skin showed 20 and 24 significant (2 fold change, p < 0.05) differentially expressed protein spots, against vehicle controls. However, comparison between them showed relatively similar expression level of 20 spots. Among them, 5 proteins (carbonic anhydrase III, peroxiredoxin-2, calcyclin, superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], ubiquitin) are of particular significance as these are involved in cancer-related key processes. Deregulation of these was confirmed at protein and mRNA levels by immunoblotting and RT-PCR in mouse skin and HaCaT cells. Therefore, we conclude that these preliminarily identified proteins might be responsible for the neoplastic transformation of mouse skin epidermal cells and HaCaT cells by deltamethrin. This study proposes complementary mechanism where inhibition of proteasome activator protein (PA200) is responsible for accumulation of ubiquitinated-calcyclin, regulates deltamethrin-induced neoplastic changes in mouse skin and HaCaT cells.

  7. Different Roles of Negative and Positive Components of the Circadian Clock in Oncogene-induced Neoplastic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Katamune, Chiharu; Koyanagi, Satoru; Shiromizu, Shoya; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shimba, Shigeki; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-05-13

    In mammals, circadian rhythms in physiological function are generated by a molecular oscillator driven by transcriptional-translational feedback loop consisting of negative and positive regulators. Disruption of this circadian clock machinery is thought to increase the risk of cancer development, but the potential contributions of each component of circadian clock to oncogenesis have been little explored. Here we reported that negative and positive transcriptional regulators of circadian feedback loop had different roles in oncogene-induced neoplastic transformation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts prepared from animals deficient in negative circadian clock regulators, Period2 (Per2) or Cryptochrome1/2 (Cry1/2), were prone to transformation induced by co-expression of H-ras(V12) and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT). In contrast, mouse embryonic fibroblasts prepared from mice deficient in positive circadian clock regulators, Bmal1 or Clock, showed resistance to oncogene-induced transformation. In Per2 mutant and Cry1/2-null cells, the introduction of oncogenes induced expression of ATF4, a potent repressor of cell senescence-associated proteins p16INK4a and p19ARF. Elevated levels of ATF4 were sufficient to suppress expression of these proteins and drive oncogenic transformation. Conversely, in Bmal1-null and Clock mutant cells, the expression of ATF4 was not induced by oncogene introduction, which allowed constitutive expression of p16INK4a and p19ARF triggering cellular senescence. Although genetic ablation of either negative or positive transcriptional regulators of the circadian clock leads to disrupted rhythms in physiological functions, our findings define their different contributions to neoplastic cellular transformation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Guanidine Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Monanchora pulchra Show Cytotoxic Properties and Prevent EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.; Tabakmakher, Kseniya M.; Hauschild, Jessica; Shchekaleva, Regina K.; Otte, Katharina; Guzii, Alla G.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Kudryashova, Ekaterina K.; Fedorov, Sergey N.; Shubina, Larisa K.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Honecker, Friedemann; Stonik, Valentin A.; von Amsberg, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Guanidine alkaloids from sponges Monanchora spp. represent diverse bioactive compounds, however, the mechanisms underlying bioactivity are very poorly understood. Here, we report results of studies on cytotoxic action, the ability to inhibit EGF-induced neoplastic transformation, and the effects on MAPK/AP-1 signaling of eight rare guanidine alkaloids, recently isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra, namely: monanchocidin A (1), monanchocidin B (2), monanchomycalin C (3), ptilomycalin A (4), monanchomycalin B (5), normonanchocidin D (6), urupocidin A (7), and pulchranin A (8). All of the compounds induced cell cycle arrest (apart from 8) and programmed death of cancer cells. Ptilomycalin A-like compounds 1–6 activated JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, following AP-1 activation and caused p53-independent programmed cell death. Compound 7 induced p53-independent cell death without activation of AP-1 or caspase-3/7, and the observed JNK1/2 activation did not contribute to the cytotoxic effect of the compound. Alkaloid 8 induced JNK1/2 (but not ERK1/2) activation leading to p53-independent cell death and strong suppression of AP-1 activity. Alkaloids 1–4, 7, and 8 were able to inhibit the EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ Cl41 cells. Our results suggest that investigated guanidine marine alkaloids hold potential to eliminate human cancer cells and prevent cancer cell formation and spreading. PMID:27428983

  9. Guanidine Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Monanchora pulchra Show Cytotoxic Properties and Prevent EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A; Tabakmakher, Kseniya M; Hauschild, Jessica; Shchekaleva, Regina K; Otte, Katharina; Guzii, Alla G; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Kudryashova, Ekaterina K; Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Honecker, Friedemann; Stonik, Valentin A; von Amsberg, Gunhild

    2016-07-15

    Guanidine alkaloids from sponges Monanchora spp. represent diverse bioactive compounds, however, the mechanisms underlying bioactivity are very poorly understood. Here, we report results of studies on cytotoxic action, the ability to inhibit EGF-induced neoplastic transformation, and the effects on MAPK/AP-1 signaling of eight rare guanidine alkaloids, recently isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra, namely: monanchocidin A (1), monanchocidin B (2), monanchomycalin C (3), ptilomycalin A (4), monanchomycalin B (5), normonanchocidin D (6), urupocidin A (7), and pulchranin A (8). All of the compounds induced cell cycle arrest (apart from 8) and programmed death of cancer cells. Ptilomycalin A-like compounds 1-6 activated JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, following AP-1 activation and caused p53-independent programmed cell death. Compound 7 induced p53-independent cell death without activation of AP-1 or caspase-3/7, and the observed JNK1/2 activation did not contribute to the cytotoxic effect of the compound. Alkaloid 8 induced JNK1/2 (but not ERK1/2) activation leading to p53-independent cell death and strong suppression of AP-1 activity. Alkaloids 1-4, 7, and 8 were able to inhibit the EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P⁺ Cl41 cells. Our results suggest that investigated guanidine marine alkaloids hold potential to eliminate human cancer cells and prevent cancer cell formation and spreading.

  10. Increased Frequency of Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation in Progeny of Bystander Cells from Cultures Exposed to Densely Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2011-01-01

    An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon) or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV). An increase (P<0.05) in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons. PMID:21738697

  11. Multistep nature of X-ray-induced neoplastic transformation in golden hamster embryo cells: expression of transformed phenotypes and stepwise changes in karyotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, F.; Watanabe, M.; Nikaido, O.

    1989-04-15

    We have examined the expression of transformed phenotypes and genetic changes associated with the expression of each transformed phenotype after X-ray irradiation. Unirradiated cells grown at a constant growth rate until 8 passages (population doubling number, 15) exhibited little morphological change and ceased to divide thereafter. X-irradiated cells escaped from senescence and showed morphological alteration and anchorage independence after a population doubling number of 20. The acquisition of tumorigenicity in nude mice was observed much later (35 population doublings after irradiation). From cytogenetic analysis, all anchorage-independent clones were consistently found to have trisomy of chromosome 7. Furthermore, cells derived from tumors contained three copies of chromosome 9q in addition to the trisomy of chromosome 7. We have not detected any augmented expression of v-Ha-ras- and v-myc-related oncogenes with RNA dot-blot analysis and could not find activation of any type of oncogenes by NIH3T3 transfection experiments. Our studies demonstrated that X-ray-induced neoplastic transformation is a multistep phenomenon and that the numerical change of specific chromosomes may play an important role in the expression of each transformed phenotype. The results suggest that different endogenous oncogenes, other than the ras gene family and myc oncogene, could be responsible for the progressive nature of neoplastic transformation.

  12. Mycalamide A Shows Cytotoxic Properties and Prevents EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation through Inhibition of Nuclear Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.; Fedorov, Sergey N.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Shubina, Larisa K.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Stonik, Valentin A.; Honecker, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    Mycalamide A, a marine natural compound previously isolated from sponges, is known as a protein synthesis inhibitor with potent antitumor activity. However, the ability of this compound to prevent malignant transformation of cells has never been examined before. Here, for the first time, we report the isolation of mycalamide A from ascidian Polysincraton sp. as well as investigation of its cancer preventive properties. In murine JB6 Cl41 P+ cells, mycalamide A inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic transformation, and induced apoptosis at subnanomolar or nanomolar concentrations. The compound inhibited transcriptional activity of the oncogenic nuclear factors AP-1 and NF-κB, a potential mechanism of its cancer preventive properties. Induction of phosphorylation of the kinases MAPK p38, JNK, and ERK was also observed at high concentrations of mycalamide A. The drug shows promising potential for both cancer-prevention and cytotoxic therapy and should be further developed. PMID:22822368

  13. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  14. Large-scale meta-analysis of cancer microarray data identifies common transcriptional profiles of neoplastic transformation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Daniel R.; Yu, Jianjun; Shanker, K.; Deshpande, Nandan; Varambally, Radhika; Ghosh, Debashis; Barrette, Terrence; Pandey, Akhilesh; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have used DNA microarrays to identify the gene expression signatures of human cancer, yet the critical features of these often unmanageably large signatures remain elusive. To address this, we developed a statistical method, comparative metaprofiling, which identifies and assesses the intersection of multiple gene expression signatures from a diverse collection of microarray data sets. We collected and analyzed 40 published cancer microarray data sets, comprising 38 million gene expression measurements from >3,700 cancer samples. From this, we characterized a common transcriptional profile that is universally activated in most cancer types relative to the normal tissues from which they arose, likely reflecting essential transcriptional features of neoplastic transformation. In addition, we characterized a transcriptional profile that is commonly activated in various types of undifferentiated cancer, suggesting common molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells progress and avoid differentiation. Finally, we validated these transcriptional profiles on independent data sets. PMID:15184677

  15. Role of H-Ras/ERK signaling in carbon nanotube-induced neoplastic-like transformation of human mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Stueckle, Todd A.; Park, Jino; Tse, William; Dinu, Cerasela-Zoica; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and deployment of engineered nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various commercial and biomedical applications have raised concerns about their potential adverse health effects, especially their long-term effects which have not been well addressed. We demonstrated here that prolonged exposure of human mesothelial cells to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) induced neoplastic-like transformation as indicated by anchorage-independent cell growth and increased cell invasiveness. Such transformation was associated with an up-regulation of H-Ras and activation of ERK1/2. Downregulation of H-Ras by siRNA or inactivation of ERK by chemical inhibitor effectively inhibited the aggressive phenotype of SWCNT-exposed cells. Integrin alpha V and cortactin, but not epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcriptional regulators, were up-regulated in the SWCNT-exposed cells, suggesting their role in the aggressive phenotype. Cortactin expression was shown to be controlled by the H-Ras/ERK signaling. Thus, our results indicate a novel role of H-Ras/ERK signaling and cortactin in the aggressive transformation of human mesothelial cells by SWCNT. PMID:24971065

  16. Specific aneusomies in Chinese hamster cells at different stages of neoplastic transformation, initiated by nitrosomethylurea

    PubMed Central

    Fabarius, Alice; Willer, Andreas; Yerganian, George; Hehlmann, Ruediger; Duesberg, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Aneuploidy is ubiquitous in cancer, and its phenotypes are inevitably dominant and abnormal. In view of these facts we recently proposed that aneuploidy is sufficient for carcinogenesis generating cancer-specific aneusomies via a chain reaction of autocatalytic aneuploidizations. According to this hypothesis a carcinogen initiates carcinogenesis via a random aneuploidy. Aneuploidy then generates transformation stage-specific aneusomies and further random aneusomies autocatalytically, because it renders chromosome segregation and repair mechanisms error-prone. The hypothesis predicts that several specific aneusomies can cause the same cancers, because several chromosomes also cooperate in normal differentiation. Here we describe experiments on the Chinese hamster (CH) that confirm this hypothesis. (i) Random aneuploidy was detected before transformation in up to 90% of CH embryo cells treated with the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea (NMU). (ii) Several specific aneusomies were found in 70–100% of the aneuploid cells from colonies transformed with NMU in vitro and from tumors generated by NMU-transformed cells in syngeneic animals. Among the aneuploid in vitro transformed cells, 79% were trisomic for chromosome 3, and 59% were monosomic for chromosome 10, compared with 8% expected for random distribution of any aneusomy among the 12 CH chromosomes. Moreover, 52% shared both trisomy 3 and monosomy 10 compared with 0.6% expected for random distribution of any two aneusomies. Among the tumor cells, 65% were trisomic for chromosome 3, 51% were trisomic for chromosome 5, and 30% shared both trisomies. Aneuploid cells without these specific aneusomies may contain minor transformation-specific aneusomies or may be untransformed. (iii) Random aneusomies and structurally altered chromosomes increased with the generations of transformed cells to the point where their origins became unidentifiable in tumors. We conclude that specific aneusomies are necessary for carcinogenesis

  17. MDM2 regulates a novel form of incomplete neoplastic transformation of Theileria parva infected lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Kajino, Kiichi; Hattori, Masakazu; Wallace, Maura; Morrison, Ivan; Greene, Mark I; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-02-01

    Our efforts are concerned with identifying features of incomplete malignant transformation caused by non viral pathogens. Theileria parva (T. parva) is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that can cause a fatal lymphoproliferative disease in cattle. The T. parva-infected lymphocytes display a transformed phenotype and proliferate in culture media like the other tumor cells, however those cells will return to normal after antiprotozoal treatment reflecting the incomplete nature of transformation. To identify signaling pathways involved in this form of transformation of T. parva-infected cells, we screened a library of anticancer compounds. Among these, TIBC, a specific inhibitor of MDM2, markedly inhibited proliferation of T. parva-infected lymphocytes and promoted apoptosis. Therefore we analyzed MDM2 function in T. parva-infected cells. Several T. parva-infected cell lines showed increased expression level of MDM2 with alternatively spliced isoforms compared to the lymphoma cells or ConA blasts. In addition, buparvaquone affected MDM2 expression in T. parva transformed cells. Moreover, p53 protein accumulation and function were impaired in T. parva-infected cells after cisplatin induced DNA damage despite the increased p53 transcription level. Finally, the treatment of T. parva-infected cells with boronic-chalcone derivatives TIBC restored p53 protein accumulation and induced Bax expression. These results suggest that the overexpression of MDM2 is closely linked to the inhibition of p53-dependent apoptosis of T. parva-infected lymphocytes. Aberrant expression of host lymphocyte MDM2 induced by cytoplasmic existence of T. parva, directly and/or indirectly, is associated with aspects of this type of transformation of T. parva-infected lymphocytes. This form of transformation shares features of oncogene induced malignant phenotype acquisition.

  18. Mobile phone base station radiation does not affect neoplastic transformation in BALB/3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hirose, H; Suhara, T; Kaji, N; Sakuma, N; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2008-01-01

    A large-scale in vitro study focusing on low-level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system was conducted to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields affect malignant transformation or other cellular stress responses. Our group previously reported that DNA strand breaks were not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) radiation up to 800 mW/kg from mobile radio base stations employing the IMT-2000 cellular system. In the current study, BALB/3T3 cells were continuously exposed to 2.1425 GHz W-CDMA RF fields at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 80 and 800 mW/kg for 6 weeks and malignant cell transformation was assessed. In addition, 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-treated cells were exposed to RF fields in a similar fashion, to assess for effects on tumor promotion. Finally, the effect of RF fields on tumor co-promotion was assessed in BALB/3T3 cells initiated with MCA and co-exposed to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). At the end of the incubation period, transformation dishes were fixed, stained with Giemsa, and scored for morphologically transformed foci. No significant differences in transformation frequency were observed between the test groups exposed to RF signals and the sham-exposed negative controls in the non-, MCA-, or MCA plus TPA-treated cells. Our studies found no evidence to support the hypothesis that RF fields may affect malignant transformation. Our results suggest that exposure to low-level RF radiation of up to 800 mW/kg does not induce cell transformation, which causes tumor formation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Inhibition of HMGI-C protein synthesis suppresses retrovirally induced neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Manfioletti, G; Santoro, M; Bandiera, A; Visconti, R; Giancotti, V; Fusco, A

    1995-01-01

    Elevated expression of the three high-mobility group I (HMGI) proteins (HMGI, HMGY, and HMGI-C) has previously been correlated with the presence of a highly malignant phenotype in epithelial and fibroblastic rat thyroid cells and in experimental thyroid, lung, mammary, and skin carcinomas. Northern (RNA) blot and run-on analyses demonstrated that the induction of HMGI genes in transformed thyroid cells occurs at the transcriptional level. An antisense methodology to block HMGI-C protein synthesis was then used to analyze the role of this protein in the process of thyroid cell transformation. Transfection of an antisense construct for the HMGI-C cDNA into normal thyroid cells, followed by infection with transforming myeloproliferative sarcoma virus or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, generated cell lines that expressed significant levels of the retroviral transforming oncogenes v-mos or v-ras-Ki and removed the dependency on thyroid-stimulating hormones. However, in contrast with untransfected cells or cells transfected with the sense construct, those containing the antisense construct did not demonstrate the appearance of any malignant phenotypic markers (growth in soft agar and tumorigenicity in athymic mice). A great reduction of the HMGI-C protein levels and the absence of the HMGI(Y) proteins was observed in the HMGI-C antisense-transfected, virally infected cells. Therefore, the HMGI-C protein seems to play a key role in the transformation of these thyroid cells. PMID:7862147

  20. Appalachian mountaintop mining particulate matter induces neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells and promotes tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Chen, Michael; Knuckles, Travis; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Juhua; Ellis, Emily; Hendryx, Michael; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-11-04

    Epidemiological studies suggest that living near mountaintop coal mining (MTM) activities is one of the contributing factors for high lung cancer incidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term carcinogenic potential of MTM particulate matter (PMMTM) exposure on human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results show that chronic exposure (3 months) to noncytotoxic, physiological relevant concentration (1 μg/mL) of PMMTM, but not control particle PMCON, induced neoplastic transformation, accelerated cell proliferation, and enhanced cell migration of the exposed lung cells. Xenograft transplantation of the PMMTM-exposed cells in mice caused no apparent tumor formation, but promoted tumor growth of human lung carcinoma H460 cells, suggesting the tumor-promoting effect of PMMTM. Chronic exposure to the main inorganic chemical constituent of PMMTM, molybdenum but not silica, similarly induced cell transformation and tumor promotion, suggesting the contribution of molybdenum, at least in part, in the PMMTM effects. These results provide new evidence for the carcinogenic potential of PMMTM and support further risk assessment and implementation of exposure control for PMMTM.

  1. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of this project was to investigate mechanisms underlying the adaptive response seen following exposure of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells to low doses of low LET radiation. It was proposed to investigate the contributions of three possible mechanisms. These were: 1. Upregulation of cellular antioxidant status. 2. Upregulation of DNA repair. 3. Upregulation of gap junction intracellular communication. We have completed the study of the role of upregulation of reduced glutathione (GSH) as a possible mechanism underlying our observed suppression of transformation frequency at low radiation doses. We have also completed our study of the possible role of upregulation of DNA repair in the observed adaptive response against neoplastic transformation. We concluded that upregulation of DNA repair may be more important in modulating transformation at the higher dose. A manuscript describing the above studies has been submitted published in Carcinogenesis 24:1961-1965, 2003. Finally, we have completed two studies of the possible role of upregulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in modulating transformation frequency at low doses of low LET radiation. This research was published in Radiation Research 162:646-654, 2004. In order to optimize the opportunity for GJIC, we then carried out a study where confluent cultures were irradiated. The results indicated, that while the degree of low dose suppression was somewhat reduced compared to that seen for subconfluent cultures, it was not completely absent. This research has been submitted for publication. Our research program was of sufficient interest to generate two invited reviews, and five invited presentations.

  2. Hormone-regulatable neoplastic transformation induced by a Jun-estrogen receptor chimera

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Ulrich; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Goller, Martin E.; Vogt, Peter K.

    1997-01-01

    The v-jun oncogene encodes a nuclear DNA binding protein that functions as a transcription factor and is part of the activator protein 1 complex. Oncogenic transformation by v-jun is thought to be mediated by the aberrant expression of specific target genes. To identify such Jun-regulated genes and to explore the mechanisms by which Jun affects their expression, we have fused the full-length v-Jun and an amino-terminally truncated form of v-Jun to the hormone-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor. The two chimeric proteins function as ligand-inducible transactivators. Expression of the fusion proteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts causes estrogen-dependent transformation. PMID:9356460

  3. Neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells requires the junB and fra-1 gene induction which is dependent on the HMGI-C gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Vallone, D; Battista, S; Pierantoni, G M; Fedele, M; Casalino, L; Santoro, M; Viglietto, G; Fusco, A; Verde, P

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the high mobility group I (HMGI)-C chromatin component was shown previously to be essential for the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype in retrovirally transformed thyroid cell lines. To identify possible targets of the HMGI-C gene product, we have analyzed the AP-1 complex in normal, fully transformed and antisense HMGI-C-expressing rat thyroid cells. We show that neoplastic transformation is associated with a drastic increase in AP-1 activity, which reflects multiple compositional changes. The strongest effect is represented by the dramatic junB and fra-1 gene induction, which is prevented in cell lines expressing the antisense HMGI-C. These results indicate that the HMGI-C gene product is essential for the junB and fra-1 transcriptional induction associated with neoplastic transformation. The inhibition of Fra-1 protein synthesis by stable transfection with a fra-1 antisense RNA vector significantly reduces the malignant phenotype of the transformed thyroid cells, indicating a pivotal role for the fra-1 gene product in the process of cellular transformation. PMID:9311991

  4. Diffusion and Binding of Mismatch Repair Protein, MSH2, in Breast Cancer Cells at Different Stages of Neoplastic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Sigley, Justin; Jarzen, John; Scarpinato, Karin; Guthold, Martin; Pu, Tracey; Nelli, Daniel; Low, Josiah; Bonin, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The interior of cells is a highly complex medium, containing numerous organelles, a matrix of different fibers and a viscous, aqueous fluid of proteins and small molecules. The interior of cells is also a highly dynamic medium, in which many components move, either by active transport or passive diffusion. The mobility and localization of proteins inside cells can provide important insights into protein function and also general cellular properties, such as viscosity. Neoplastic transformation affects numerous cellular properties, and our goal was to investigate the diffusional and binding behavior of the important mismatch repair (MMR) protein MSH2 in live human cells at various stages of neoplastic transformation. Toward this end, noncancerous, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic mammary epithelial cells were transfected with EGFP and EGFP-tagged MSH2. MSH2 forms two MMR proteins (MutSα and MutSβ) and we assume MSH2 is in the complex MutSα, though our results are similar in either case. Unlike the MutS complexes that bind to nuclear DNA, EGFP diffuses freely. EGFP and MutSα-EGFP diffusion coefficients were determined in the cytoplasm and nucleus of each cell type using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Diffusion coefficients were 14-24 μm2/s for EGFP and 3-7 μm2/s for MutSα-EGFP. EGFP diffusion increased in going from noncancerous to immortal cells, indicating a decrease in viscosity, with smaller changes in subsequent stages. MutSα produces an effective diffusion coefficient that, coupled with the free EGFP diffusion measurements, can be used to extract a pure diffusion coefficient and a pseudo-equilibrium constant K*. The MutSα nuclear K* increased sixfold in the first stage of cancer and then decreased in the more advanced stages. The ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic K*for MutSα increased almost two orders of magnitude in going from noncancerous to immortal cells, suggesting that this quantity may be a sensitive metric for recognizing the

  5. Diffusion and Binding of Mismatch Repair Protein, MSH2, in Breast Cancer Cells at Different Stages of Neoplastic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sigley, Justin; Jarzen, John; Scarpinato, Karin; Guthold, Martin; Pu, Tracey; Nelli, Daniel; Low, Josiah

    2017-01-01

    The interior of cells is a highly complex medium, containing numerous organelles, a matrix of different fibers and a viscous, aqueous fluid of proteins and small molecules. The interior of cells is also a highly dynamic medium, in which many components move, either by active transport or passive diffusion. The mobility and localization of proteins inside cells can provide important insights into protein function and also general cellular properties, such as viscosity. Neoplastic transformation affects numerous cellular properties, and our goal was to investigate the diffusional and binding behavior of the important mismatch repair (MMR) protein MSH2 in live human cells at various stages of neoplastic transformation. Toward this end, noncancerous, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic mammary epithelial cells were transfected with EGFP and EGFP-tagged MSH2. MSH2 forms two MMR proteins (MutSα and MutSβ) and we assume MSH2 is in the complex MutSα, though our results are similar in either case. Unlike the MutS complexes that bind to nuclear DNA, EGFP diffuses freely. EGFP and MutSα-EGFP diffusion coefficients were determined in the cytoplasm and nucleus of each cell type using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Diffusion coefficients were 14–24 μm2/s for EGFP and 3–7 μm2/s for MutSα-EGFP. EGFP diffusion increased in going from noncancerous to immortal cells, indicating a decrease in viscosity, with smaller changes in subsequent stages. MutSα produces an effective diffusion coefficient that, coupled with the free EGFP diffusion measurements, can be used to extract a pure diffusion coefficient and a pseudo-equilibrium constant K*. The MutSα nuclear K* increased sixfold in the first stage of cancer and then decreased in the more advanced stages. The ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic K*for MutSα increased almost two orders of magnitude in going from noncancerous to immortal cells, suggesting that this quantity may be a sensitive metric for recognizing

  6. Ultraviolet light action spectra for neoplastic transformation and lethality of Syrian hamster embryo cells correlate with spectrum for pyrimidine dimer formation in cellular DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Doniger, J; Jacobson, E D; Krell, K; DiPaolo, J A

    1981-01-01

    Action spectra were determined for neoplastic transformation, production of pyrimidine dimers, and lethality in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Of wavelengths between 240 and 313 nm, the most effective were 265 and 270. The relative sensitivities per quantum for transformation, pyrimidine dimer production, and lethality were essentially the same at each of the wavelengths tested. This action spectrum for transformation, which is relevant to carcinogenesis, is similar to spectra obtained previously by measuring other cellular responses in either microbial or mammalian systems. Because the action spectra for cytotoxicity and transformation are the same as the spectrum for dimer production, DNA is suggested as the target for all these processes. PMID:6941297

  7. Neoplastic-like transformation effect of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes compared to asbestos on human lung small airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying; Stueckle, Todd A.; Mishra, Anurag; Derk, Raymond; Meighan, Terence; Castranova, Vincent; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are biopersistent and can cause lung damage. With similar fibrous morphology and mode of exposure to asbestos, a known human carcinogen, growing concern has arisen for elevated risk of CNT-induced lung carcinogenesis; however, relatively little is known about the long-term carcinogenic effect of CNT. Neoplastic transformation is a key early event leading to carcinogenesis. We studied the ability of single- and multi-walled CNTs to induce neoplastic transformation of human lung epithelial cells compared to asbestos. Long-term (6-month) exposure of the cells to occupationally relevant concentrations of CNT in culture caused a neoplastic-like transformation phenotype as demonstrated by increased cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, invasion and angiogenesis. Whole-genome expression signature and protein expression analyses showed that single- and multi-walled CNTs shared similar signaling signatures which were distinct from asbestos. These results provide novel toxicogenomic information and suggest distinct particle-associated mechanisms of neoplasia promotion induced by CNTs and asbestos. PMID:23634900

  8. Neoplastic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells after exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA and 847.74 MHz CDMA radiations.

    PubMed

    Roti Roti JL; Malyapa, R S; Bisht, K S; Ahern, E W; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Straube, W L

    2001-01-01

    The effect of radiofrequency (RF) radiation in the cellular phone communication range (835.62 MHz frequency division multiple access, FDMA; 847.74 MHz code division multiple access, CDMA) on neoplastic transformation frequency was measured using the in vitro C3H 10T(1/2) cell transformation assay system. To determine if 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA radiations have any genotoxic effects that induce neoplastic transformation, C3H 10T(1/2) cells were exposed at 37 degrees C to either of the above radiations [each at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.6 W/kg] or sham-exposed at the same time for 7 days. After the culture medium was changed, the cultures were transferred to incubators and refed with fresh growth medium every 7 days. After 42 days, the cells were fixed and stained with Giemsa, and transformed foci were scored. To determine if exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA radiation has any epigenetic effects that can promote neoplastic transformation, cells were first exposed to 4.5 Gy of X rays to induce the transformation process and then exposed to the above radiations (SAR = 0.6 W/kg) in temperature-controlled irradiators with weekly refeeding for 42 days. After both the 7-day RF exposure and the 42-day RF exposure after X irradiation, no statistically significant differences in the transformation frequencies were observed between incubator controls, the sham-exposed (maintained in irradiators without power to the antenna), and the 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA-exposed groups.

  9. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis associated with overexpression of imup-1 and imup-2 genes in cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoo, Zae Young . E-mail: jaewoong64@hanmail.net; Jung, Boo Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ryeul; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Ahn, Jung Yong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Youl Hee; Park, Jae Hak; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2006-10-27

    Immortalization-upregulated protein 1 (IMUP-1) and immortalization-upregulated protein 2 (IMUP-2) genes have been recently cloned and are known to be involved in SV40-mediated immortalization. IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 genes were strongly expressed in various cancer cell lines and tumors, suggesting the possibility that they might be involved in tumorigenicity. To directly elucidate the functional role of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 on neoplastic transformation and tumorigenicity, we stably transfected IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 into NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Cellular characteristics of the neoplastic transformation were assessed by transformation foci, growth in soft agar, and tumor development in nude mice. We found that IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 overexpressing cells showed altered growth properties, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and inducing tumor in nude mice. Furthermore, IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 transformants proliferated in reduced serum and shortened cell cycle. These results suggest that ectopic overexpression of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 may play an important role in acquiring a transformed phenotype, tumorigenicity in vivo, and be related to cellular proliferation.

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  11. Neoplastic transformation of BALB/3T3 cells and cell cycle of HL-60 cells are inhibited by mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice and mango juice extracts.

    PubMed

    Percival, Susan S; Talcott, Stephen T; Chin, Sherry T; Mallak, Anne C; Lounds-Singleton, Angela; Pettit-Moore, Jennifer

    2006-05-01

    The mango, Mangifera indica L., is a fruit with high levels of phytochemicals, suggesting that it might have chemopreventative properties. In this study, whole mango juice and juice extracts were screened for antioxidant and anticancer activity. Antioxidant activity of the mango juice and juice extracts was measured by 3 standard in vitro methods. The results of the 3 methods were in general agreement, although different radicals were measured in each. Anticancer activity was measured by examining the effect on cell cycle kinetics and the ability to inhibit chemically induced neoplastic transformation of mammalian cell lines. Incubation of HL-60 cells with whole mango juice and mango juice fractions resulted in an inhibition of the cell cycle in the G(0)/G(1) phase. A fraction of the eluted mango juice with low peroxyl radical scavenging ability was most effective in arresting cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase. Whole mango juice was effective in reducing the number of transformed foci in the neoplastic transformation assay in a dose-dependent manner. These techniques provide valuable screening tools for health benefits derived from mango phytochemicals.

  12. Focus formation and neoplastic transformation by herpes simplex virus type 2 inactivated intracellularly by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and near UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, M.M.; Aurelian, L.; Ts'o, P.O.

    1981-01-01

    The induction of focus formation in low serum and of neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells was examined after the expression of herpes simplex virus type 2 functions. Syrian hamster embryo cells infected at a high multiplicity (5 PFU/cell) with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled herpes simplex virus type 2 (11% substitution of thymidine residues) were exposed to near UV light irradiation at various times postinfection. This procedure specifically inactivated the viral genome, while having little, if any, effect on the unlabeled cellular DNA. Focus formation in 1% serum and neoplastic transformation were observed in cells exposed to virus inactivated before infection, but the frequency was enhanced (15- to 27-fold) in cells in which the virus was inactivated at 4 to 8 h postinfection. Only 2 to 45 independently isolated foci were capable of establishing tumorigenic lines. The established lines exhibited phenotypic alterations characteristic of a transformed state, including reduced serum requirement, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity. They retained viral DNA sequences and, even at relatively late passage, expressed viral antigens, including ICP 10.

  13. MicroRNA-191, by promoting the EMT and increasing CSC-like properties, is involved in neoplastic and metastatic properties of transformed human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenchao; Ji, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Liu, Yawei; Shi, Le; Liu, Yi; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yue; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Jiang, Rongrong; Zhang, Jianping; Liu, Qizhan

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. A common interest in lung cancer research is the identification of biomarkers for early diagnosis and accurate prognosis. There is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in lung cancer. To explore new biomarkers of chemical exposure in risk assessment of chemical carcinogenesis and lung cancer, we analyzed miRNA expression profiles of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells malignantly transformed by arsenite. High-throughput microarray analysis showed that 51 miRNAs were differentially expressed in transformed HBE cells relative to normal HBE cells. In particular, miR-191 was up-regulated in transformed cells. In HBE cells, arsenite induced increases of miR-191 and WT1 levels, decreased BASP1 expression, and activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, effects that were blocked by miR-191 knockdown. In addition, a luciferase reporter assay indicated that BASP1 is a direct target of miR-191. By inhibiting the expression of BASP1, miR-191 increased the expression of WT1 to promote activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In transformed cells, inhibition of miR-191 expression blocked the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties of cells and decreased their migratory capacity and neoplastic properties. Thus, these results demonstrate that miR-191 modulates the EMT and the CSC-like properties of transformed cells and indicate that it is an onco-miR involved in the neoplastic and metastatic properties of transformed cells.

  14. Chromosome 11 aneusomy in esophageal cancers and precancerous lesions- an early event in neoplastic transformation: An interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization study from south India

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ponnala, Shivani; Reddy, Hemakumar M; Sistla, Radha; Jesudasan, Rachel A; Ahuja, Yog Raj; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To detect aneusomic changes with respect to chromosome 11 copy number in esophageal precancers and cancers wherein the generation of cancer-specific phenotypes is believed to be associated with specific chromosomal aneuploidies. METHODS: We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on esophageal tissue paraffin sections to analyze changes in chromosome 11 copy number using apotome-generated images by optical sectioning microscopy. Sections were prepared from esophageal tumor tissue, tissues showing preneoplastic changes and histologically normal tissues (control) obtained from patients referred to the clinic for endoscopic evaluation. RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that aneusomy was seen in all the cancers and preneoplastic tissues, while none of the controls showed aneusomic cells. There was no increase in aneusomy from precancers to cancers. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that evaluation of chromosome 11 aneusomy in esophageal tissue using FISH with an appropriate signal capture-analysis system, can be used as an ancillary molecular marker predictive of early neoplastic changes. Future studies can be directed towards the genes on chromosome 11, which may play a role in the neoplastic transformation of esophageal precancerous lesions to cancers. PMID:17278214

  15. The RBE of 3.4 MeV alpha-particles and 0.565 MeV neutrons relative to 60Co gamma-rays for neoplastic transformation of human hybrid cells and the impact of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg-Schwager, M; Spieren, S; Pralle, E; Giesen, U; Brede, H J; Thiemig, M; Frankenberg, D

    2010-01-01

    The neoplastic transformation of human hybrid CGL1 cells is affected by perturbations from external influences such as serum batch and concentration, the number of medium changes during the 21-day expression period and cell seeding density. Nevertheless, for doses up to 1.5 Gy, published transformation frequencies for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations (gamma-rays, MeV electrons or photons) are in good agreement, whereas for higher doses larger variations are reported. The (60)Co gamma-ray data here for doses up to 1.5 Gy, using a low-yield serum batch and only one medium change, are in agreement with published frequencies of neoplastic transformation of human hybrid cells. For 3.4 MeV alpha-particles (LET = 124 keV/mum) and 0.565 MeV monoenergetic neutrons relative to low doses of (60)Co gamma-rays, a maximum relative biological effectiveness (RBE(M)) of 2.8 +/- 0.2 and 1.5 +/- 0.2, respectively, was calculated. Surprisingly, at higher doses of (60)Co gamma-rays lower frequencies of neoplastic transformation were observed. This non-monotonic dose relationship for neoplastic transformation by (60)Co gamma-rays is likely due to the lack of a G2/M arrest observed at low doses resulting in higher transformation frequencies per dose, whereas the lower frequencies per dose observed for higher doses are likely related to the induction of a G2/M arrest.

  16. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli-Mediated Accumulation of Abasic DNA Lesions Lead to Cigarette Smoke Condensate-Induced Neoplastic Transformation of Normal Breast Epithelial Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Aruna S; Panda, Harekrushna; Pampo, Christine A; Siemann, Dietmar W; Gairola, C Gary; Hromas, Robert; Narayan, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a multifunctional protein having diverse cellular functions including cell migration, cell-cell adhesion, cell cycle control, chromosomal segregation, and apoptosis. Recently, we found a new role of APC in base excision repair (BER) and showed that it interacts with DNA polymerase β and 5′-flap endonuclease 1 and interferes in BER. Previously, we have also reported that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increases expression of APC and enhances the growth of normal human breast epithelial (MCF10A) cells in vitro. In the present study, using APC overexpression and knockdown systems, we have examined the molecular mechanisms by which CSC and its major component, Benzo[α]pyrene, enhances APC-mediated accumulation of abasic DNA lesions, which is cytotoxic and mutagenic in nature, leading to enhanced neoplastic transformation of MCF10A cells in an orthotopic xenograft model. PMID:23555190

  17. Rat Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase η Suppresses the Neoplastic Phenotype of Retrovirally Transformed Thyroid Cells through the Stabilization of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Trapasso, Francesco; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Boccia, Angelo; Stella, Antonella; Visconti, Roberta; Bruni, Paola; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Santoro, Massimo; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    The r-PTPη gene encodes a rat receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase whose expression is negatively regulated by neoplastic cell transformation. Here we first demonstrate a dramatic reduction in DEP-1/HPTPη (the human homolog of r-PTPη) expression in a panel of human thyroid carcinomas. Subsequently, we show that the reexpression of the r-PTPη gene in highly malignant rat thyroid cells transformed by retroviruses carrying the v-mos and v-ras-Ki oncogenes suppresses their malignant phenotype. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that r-PTPη caused G1 growth arrest and increased the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 protein level by reducing the proteasome-dependent degradation rate. We propose that the r-PTPη tumor suppressor activity is mediated by p27Kip1 protein stabilization, because suppression of p27Kip1 protein synthesis using p27-specific antisense oligonucleotides blocked the growth-inhibitory effect induced by r-PTPη. Furthermore, we provide evidence that in v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-transformed thyroid cells, the p27Kip1 protein level was regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway and that r-PTPη regulated p27Kip1 stability by preventing v-mos- or v-ras-Ki-induced MAP kinase activation. PMID:11094075

  18. Neoplastic transformation of C3H mouse embryo 10T1/2 cells by 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthaswamy, H.N.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA radiation (PUVA) on cell killing and induction of transformation was studied in the C3H mouse embryo 10T1/2 cell line. Dose-response data for both survival and transformation were obtained as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration and UVA dose. PUVA treatment caused cell death and induced transformation in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with 8-MOP alone (10 micrograms/ml) or UVA alone (90 J/m2) had no effect on either cell killing or transformation. The product of 8-MOP concentration and UVA dose calculated at 10% survival and 10(-3) transformation frequency levels were quite similar regardless of 8-MOP concentration or UVA dose. This suggests that there exists a simple reciprocal relationship between 8-MOP concentration and UVA dose. Both type II and type III foci induced by PUVA treatment were tumorigenic in vivo. These data provide further evidence for the carcinogenicity of PUVA treatment. In addition, the system described here could serve as a valuable model for studying the relationships between transformation and the specific cellular and molecular lesions induced by PUVA treatment.

  19. Drm/Gremlin transcriptionally activates p21(Cip1) via a novel mechanism and inhibits neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Athanasiou, Meropi; Gu, Qiuping; Blair, Donald G

    2002-08-02

    Drm/Gremlin, a member of the Dan family of BMP antagonists, is known to function in early embryonic development, but is also expressed in a tissue-specific fashion in adults and is significantly downregulated in transformed cells. In this report, we demonstrate that overexpression of Drm in the tumor-derived cell lines Daoy (primitive neuroectodermal) and Saos-2 (osteoblastic), either under ecdysone-inducible or constitutive promoters, significantly inhibits tumorigenesis. Furthermore, Drm overexpression in these cells increases the level of p21(Cip1) protein and reduces the level of phosphorylated p42/44 MAP kinase. Finally, our data indicate that Drm can induce p21(Cip1) transcriptionally via a novel pathway that is independent of p53 and the p38 and p42/44 MAP kinases. These results provide evidence that Drm can function as a novel transformation suppressor and suggest that this may occur through its affect on the levels of p21(Cip1) and phosphorylated p42/44 MAPK.

  20. Nuclear Factor kappa B is central to Marek’s Disease herpesvirus induced neoplastic transformation of CD30 expressing lymphocytes in-vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Marek’s Disease (MD) is a hyperproliferative, lymphomatous, neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the oncogenic Gallid herpesvirus type 2 (GaHV-2; MDV). Like several human lymphomas the neoplastic MD lymphoma cells overexpress the CD30 antigen (CD30hi) and are in minority, while the n...

  1. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  2. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a six month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. PMID:22521957

  3. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stueckle, Todd A; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A 'pro-cancer' gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment.

  4. Regulation of the pituitary tumor transforming gene by insulin-like-growth factor-I and insulin differs between malignant and non-neoplastic astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chamaon, Kathrin; Kirches, Elmar; Kanakis, Dimitrios; Braeuninger, Stefan; Dietzmann, Knut; Mawrin, Christian . E-mail: christian.mawrin@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de

    2005-05-27

    The reasons for overexpression of the oncogene pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) in tumors are still not fully understood. A possible influence of the insulin-like growth factor I (Igf-I) may be of interest, since enhanced Igf-I signalling was reported in various human tumors. We examined the influence of Igf-I and insulin on PTTG expression in human astrocytoma cells in comparison to proliferating non-neoplastic rat embryonal astrocytes. PTTG mRNA expression and protein levels were increased in malignant astrocytes treated with Igf-I or insulin, whereas in rat embryonic astrocytes PTTG expression and protein levels increased only when cells were exposed to Igf-I. Enhanced transcription did not occur after treatment with inhibitors of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), blocking the two basic signalling pathways of Igf-I and insulin. In addition to this transcriptional regulation, both kinases directly bind to PTTG, suggesting a second regulatory route by phosphorylation. However, the interaction of endogenous PTTG with MAPK and PI3K, as well as PTTG phosphorylation were independent from Igf-I or insulin. The latter results were also found in human testis, which contains high PTTG levels as well as in nonneoplastic astrocytes. This suggest, that PI3K and MAPK signalling is involved in PTTG regulation not only in malignant astrocytomas but also in non-tumorous cells.

  5. A radiation-induced acute apoptosis involving TP53 and BAX precedes the delayed apoptosis and neoplastic transformation of CGL1 human hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Marc S; Mayhugh, Brendan M; McDowell, Berry; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Smith, Martin L; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A

    2005-06-01

    Exposing CGL1 (HeLa x fibroblast) hybrid cells to 7 Gy of X rays results in the onset of a delayed apoptosis in the progeny of the cells 10 to 12 cell divisions postirradiation that correlates with the emergence of neoplastically transformed foci. The delayed apoptosis begins around day 8 postirradiation and lasts for 11 days. We now demonstrate that the delayed apoptosis is also characterized by the appearance of approximately 50-kb apoptotic DNA fragments and caspase 3 activation postirradiation. In addition, we confirm that stabilization of TP53 and transactivation of pro-apoptosis BAX also occurs during the delayed apoptosis and show that anti-apoptosis BCL-X(L) is down-regulated. To test whether the delayed apoptosis was due to a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response in CGL1 cells, studies of acute apoptosis were completed. After irradiation, CGL1 cells underwent an acute wave of apoptosis that involves TP53 stabilization, transactivation of BAX gene expression, and a rapid caspase activation that ends by 96 h postirradiation. In addition, the acute onset of apoptosis correlates with transactivation of a standard wild-type TP53-responsive reporter (pG13-CAT) in CGL1 cells after radiation exposure. We propose that the onset of the delayed apoptosis is not the result of a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response pathway but rather is a consequence of X-ray-induced genomic instability arising in the distant progeny of the irradiated cells.

  6. RET/PTC1-Driven Neoplastic Transformation and Proinvasive Phenotype of Human Thyrocytes Involve Met Induction and β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation1

    PubMed Central

    Cassinelli, Giuliana; Favini, Enrica; Degl'Innocenti, Debora; Salvi, Alessandro; De Petro, Giuseppina; Pierotti, Marco A; Zunino, Franco; Borrello, Maria Grazia; Lanzi, Cinzia

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the RET gene by chromosomal rearrangements generating RET/PTC oncogenes is a frequent, early, and causative event in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We have previously shown that, in human primary thyrocytes, RET/PTC1 induces a transcriptional program including the MET proto-oncogene. In PTCs, β-catenin is frequently mislocated to the cytoplasm nucleus. We investigated the interplay between Ret/ptc1 signaling and Met in regulating the proinvasive phenotype and β-catenin localization in cellular models of human PTC. Here, we show that Met protein is expressed and is constitutively active in human thyrocytes exogenously expressing RET/PTC1 as well as a mutant (Y451F) devoid of the main Ret/ptc1 multidocking site. Both in transformed thyrocytes and in the human PTC cell line TPC-1, Ret/ptc1-Y451-dependent signaling and Met cooperated to promote a proinvasive phenotype. Accordingly, gene/functional silencing of either RET/PTC1 or MET abrogated early branching morphogenesis in TPC-1 cells. The same effect was obtained by blocking the common downstream effector Akt. Y451 of Ret/ptc1 was required to promote proliferation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, suggesting that these oncogene-driven effects are Met-independent. Pharmacologic inhibition of Ret/ptc1 and Met tyrosine kinases by the multitarget small molecule RPI-1 blocked cell proliferation and invasive ability and dislocated β-catenin from the nucleus. Altogether, these results support that Ret/ptc1 cross talks with Met at transcriptional and signaling levels and promotes β-catenin transcriptional activity to drive thyrocyte neoplastic transformation. Such molecular network, promoting disease initiation and acquisition of a proinvasive phenotype, highlights new options to design multitarget therapeutic strategies for PTCs. PMID:19107227

  7. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P.; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo. PMID:26936995

  8. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesia S; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-04-05

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo.

  9. Cooperation of c-raf-1 and c-myc protooncogenes in the neoplastic transformation of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Mark, G E; Malan-Shibley, L; Graziano, S; Amstad, P; Harris, C C

    1989-01-01

    Overexpression of c-raf-1 and the myc family of protooncogenes is primarily associated with small cell carcinoma, which accounts for approximately 25% of human lung cancer. To determine the functional significance of the c-raf-1 and/or c-myc gene expression in lung carcinogenesis and to delineate the relationship between protooncogene expression and tumor phenotype, we introduced both protooncogenes, alone or in combination, into human bronchial epithelial cells. Two retroviral recombinants, pZip-raf and pZip-myc, containing the complete coding sequences of the human c-raf-1 and murine c-myc genes, respectively, were constructed and transfected into simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B); this was followed by selection for G418 resistance. BEAS-2B cells expressing both the transfected c-raf-1 and c-myc sequences formed large cell carcinomas in athymic nude mice with a latency of 4-21 weeks, whereas either pZip-raf- or pZip-myc-transfected cells were nontumorigenic after 12 months. Cell lines established from tumors (designated RMT) revealed the presence of the cotransfected c-raf-1 and c-myc sequences and expressed morphological, chromosomal, and isoenzyme markers, which identified BEAS-2B cells as the progenitor line of the tumors. A significant increase in the mRNA levels of neuron-specific enolase was detected in BEAS-2B cells containing both the c-raf-1 and c-myc genes and derived tumor cell lines. The data demonstrate that the concomitant expression of the c-raf and c-myc protooncogenes causes neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells resulting in large cell carcinomas with certain neuroendocrine markers. The presented model system should be useful in studies of molecular events involved in multistage lung carcinogenesis. Images PMID:2557616

  10. Inhibition of Neoplastic Transformation and Chemically-Induced Skin Hyperplasia in Mice by Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula Si-Wu-Tang

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mandy M.; Huang, Kevin M.; Yeung, Steven; Chang, Andy; Zhang, Suhui; Mei, Nan; Parsa, Cyrus; Orlando, Robert; Huang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Exploring traditional medicines may lead to the development of low-cost and non-toxic cancer preventive agents. Si-Wu-Tang (SWT), comprising the combination of four herbs, Rehmanniae, Angelica, Chuanxiong, and Paeoniae, is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines for women’s diseases. In our previous studies, the antioxidant Nrf2 pathways were strongly induced by SWT in vitro and in vivo. Since Nrf2 activation has been associated with anticarcinogenic effects, the purpose of this study is to evaluate SWT’s activity of cancer prevention. In the Ames test, SWT demonstrated an antimutagenic activity against mutagenicity induced by the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). In JB6 P+ cells, a non-cancerous murine epidermal model for studying tumor promotion, SWT inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic transformation. The luciferase reporter gene assays demonstrated that SWT suppressed EGF-induced AP-1 and TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation, which are essential factors involved in skin carcinogenesis. In a DMBA-induced skin hyperplasia assay in ‘Sensitivity to Carcinogenesis’ (SENCAR) mice, both topical and oral SWT inhibited DMBA-induced epidermal hyperplasia, expression of the proliferation marker Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and H-ras mutations. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that SWT prevents tumor promoter and chemical-induced carcinogenesis in vitro and in vivo, partly by inhibiting DNA damage and blocking the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB. PMID:28335476

  11. Cooperation of bcl-2 and myc in the neoplastic transformation of normal rat liver epithelial cells is related to the down-regulation of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    DeoCampo, N D; Wilson, M R; Trosko, J E

    2000-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate several rat liver epithelial cell clones containing the human bcl-2 and myc/bcl-2 genes in order to study their potential cooperative effect on neoplastic transformation and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) and to test the hypothesis that the loss of GJIC leads to tumorigenesis. Using anchorage-independent growth as a surrogate marker for neoplastic transformation, we transfected both normal rat liver epithelial cells, WB-F344, and a WB-F344 cell line overexpressing v-myc with human bcl-2 cDNA. Those cell lines that only expressed v-myc or human bcl-2 were unable to form colonies in soft agar. However, those cell lines that overexpressed both v-myc and human bcl-2 showed varying ability to form colonies in soft agar, which did not correlate with their human bcl-2 expression level. In order to test if there was a correlation between cell line growth in soft agar and the ability to communicate through gap junctions, we performed scrape load dye transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays. Our results show that v-myc and human bcl-2 can cooperate in the transformation of normal cells, but the degree to which the cells are transformed is dependent on the cells' ability to communicate through gap junctions.

  12. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Fast and non-invasive, diagnostic techniques based on fluorescence spectroscopy have the potential to link the biochemical and morphologic properties of tissues to individual patient care. One of the most widely explored applications of fluorescence spectroscopy is the detection of endoscopically invisible, early neoplastic growth in epithelial tissue sites. Currently, there are no effective diagnostic techniques for these early tissue transformations. If fluorescence spectroscopy can be applied successfully as a diagnostic technique in this clinical context, it may increase the potential for curative treatment, and thus, reduce complications and health care costs. Steady-state, fluorescence measurements from small tissue regions as well as relatively large tissue fields have been performed. To a much lesser extent, time-resolved, fluorescence measurements have also been explored for tissue characterization. Furthermore, sources of both intrinsic (endogenous fluorophores) and extrinsic fluorescence (exogenous fluorophores) have been considered. The goal of the current report is to provide a comprehensive review on steady-state and time-resolved, fluorescence measurements of neoplastic and non-neoplastic, biologic systems of varying degrees of complexity. First, the principles and methodology of fluorescence spectroscopy are discussed. Next, the endogenous fluorescence properties of cells, frozen tissue sections and excised and intact bulk tissues are presented; fluorescence measurements from both animal and human tissue models are discussed. This is concluded with future perspectives. PMID:10933071

  13. Neoplastic diseases of marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Carballal, María J; Barber, Bruce J; Iglesias, David; Villalba, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Two types of prevalent neoplastic diseases have been described in marine bivalves of commercial interest: disseminated neoplasia (DN) and gonadal neoplasia. The first involves the excessive proliferation of abnormal cells with unknown origin (probably of hemic source in some cases/species), disseminating through the circulatory system and infiltrating the connective tissue of various organs; the second consists of an abnormal proliferation of undifferentiated germinal cells of the gonad. These two types of bivalve neoplasia fit the criteria of malignant tumors: pleomorphic and undifferentiated cells, rapid and invasive growth, abundance of mitotic figures, metastasis and progressive development often resulting in the death of the affected individual. Different causes have been suggested regarding etiology: genetic alterations, virus, retrotranspons, and contaminants, although it could depend on the mollusk species; evidence of horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells as the cause of DN spreading in clam Mya arenaria populations has been recently reported. In some species and populations, the neoplastic disorders affect only a few individuals, but in others reach high prevalence. Among the diagnostic methods, DN has been detected by histology and cytologic examination of hemolymph, and with developed specific antibodies. Recently, flow cytometry has also been applied, allowing detecting DNA quantity alteration. Several studies reported many genes and pathways critically involved in neoplastic transformation in Mya arenaria, Mytilus spp. and Ostrea edulis. These genetic studies will allow the development of diagnosis by PCR which can be used in biomonitoring studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  15. Cell cycle-dependent intervention by benzamide of carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation and in vitro poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of nuclear proteins in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kun, E; Kirsten, E; Milo, G E; Kurian, P; Kumari, H L

    1983-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were subjected to nutritionally induced G1 block, followed by release and subsequent entry into S phase, and exposed to nontoxic concentrations of carcinogens in early S phase. Cell transformation occurred as determined by early morphologic cell alterations, anchorage-independent colony formation, cell invasiveness, and augmentation of Ab 376 human malignancy-specific cell-surface antigenic determinant. Methylazoxymethanol acetate was the most potent transforming agent at doses that were negative in toxicity tests. Benzamide (10 microM intracellular concentration), a specific inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, prevented transformation in a cell cycle-specific manner, maximal prevention coinciding with early S phase, also characteristic of maximal susceptibility to transformation. Neither an interference of carcinogen deoxyguanosine nucleoside adduct formation nor a chemical reaction between benzamide and carcinogens was detected. Methylazoxymethanol acetate at transforming but nontoxic dose partially inhibited poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation to about the same extent as benzamide. However, simultaneous exposure of cells to both agents in early S phase, resulting in the prevention of transformation, augmented poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation above the controls. Enzymatic activities ran parallel with the formation of DNA-associating polymer-nonhistone protein adducts that are assumed to regulate the physiological function of chromatin at the structural level. Images PMID:6196785

  16. Interval process model and non-random vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ni, B. Y.; Liu, N. Y.; Han, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops an interval process model for time-varying or dynamic uncertainty analysis when information of the uncertain parameter is inadequate. By using the interval process model to describe a time-varying uncertain parameter, only its upper and lower bounds are required at each time point rather than its precise probability distribution, which is quite different from the traditional stochastic process model. A correlation function is defined for quantification of correlation between the uncertain-but-bounded variables at different times, and a matrix-decomposition-based method is presented to transform the original dependent interval process into an independent one for convenience of subsequent uncertainty analysis. More importantly, based on the interval process model, a non-random vibration analysis method is proposed for response computation of structures subjected to time-varying uncertain external excitations or loads. The structural dynamic responses thus can be derived in the form of upper and lower bounds, providing an important guidance for practical safety analysis and reliability design of structures. Finally, two numerical examples and one engineering application are investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of the interval process model and corresponding non-random vibration analysis method.

  17. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  18. Non-random patterns in viral diversity.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Simon J; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-09-22

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely.

  19. Resistance to neoplastic transformation of ex-vivo expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells after exposure to supramaximal physical and chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Antonella; Starc, Nadia; Biagini, Simone; Tomao, Luigi; Pitisci, Angela; Algeri, Mattia; Sirleto, Pietro; Novelli, Antonio; Grisendi, Giulia; Candini, Olivia; Carella, Cintia; Dominici, Massimo; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2016-01-01

    The risk of malignant transformation of ex-vivo expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (huMSCs) has been debated in the last years; however, the biosafety of these cells after exposure to supramaximal physical and chemical stress has never been systematically investigated. We established an experimental in vitro model to induce supramaximal physical (ionizing radiation, IR) and chemical (starvation) stress on ex-vivo expanded bone marrow (BM)-derived huMSCs and investigated their propensity to undergo malignant transformation. To this aim, we examined MSC morphology, proliferative capacity, immune-phenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and genetic profile before and after stressor exposure. Furthermore, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying MSC response to stress. MSCs were isolated from 20 healthy BM donors and expanded in culture medium supplemented with 5% platelet lysate (PL) up to passage 2 (P2). At this stage, MSCs were exposed first to escalating doses of IR (30, 100, 200 Gy) and then to starvation culture conditions (1% PL). With escalating doses of radiation, MSCs lost their typical spindle-shaped morphology, their growth rate markedly decreased and eventually stopped (at P4-P6) by reaching early senescence. Irradiated and starved MSCs maintained their typical immune-phenotype, ability to differentiate into adipocytes/osteoblasts and to inhibit mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation. The study of the genetic profile of irradiated/starved MSCs did not show any alteration. While the induction of supramaximal stress triggered production of ROS and activation of DNA damage response pathway via multiple mechanisms, our data indicate that irradiated/starved MSCs, although presenting altered morphology/growth rate, do not display increased propensity for malignant transformation. PMID:27764806

  20. Plasma sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Kumar, S S; Reddy, H; Semenya, K A; Hardy, R E

    1987-01-01

    The several types of neoplastic transformations are accompanied by alterations in the composition of cell glycoproteins, which are major structural components of cell surfaces. One such observed alteration is in the level of sialic acid on the cell surface. In the present investigation, plasma sialic acid levels were measured in normal volunteers and neoplastic patients using thiobarbituric acid spectrophotometric methods. The mean plasma sialic acid level from 124 normal volunteers was 3.0 mumol/ml. The mean for 20 non-malignant patients was 3.2 mumol/ml. Such observed mean values of sialic acid were 3.7 mumol/ml in 64 breast cancer patients, 5.1 mumol/ml in 22 lung cancer patients, 4.1 mumol/ml in 20 colon patients, and 5.0 mumol/ml in 26 patients having ovarian, cervix, pancreas, prostate, thyroid, uterine, squamous cell, esophageal and endometrial cancers. Serial determinations of plasma sialic acid in 15 patients correlated well with the progression and regression of disease. These results indicate that plasma sialic acid levels are elevated over control levels in the different types of cancer patients studied. Assay of plasma sialic acid is not sensitive enough to be used for screening, but could be used as a prognostic determinant in a variety of neoplastic conditions.

  1. SAG/ROC2/Rbx2 is a novel activator protein-1 target that promotes c-Jun degradation and inhibits 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingyang; Tan, Mingjia; Sun, Yi

    2007-04-15

    SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene) was first identified as a stress-responsive protein that, when overexpressed, inhibited apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. SAG was later found to be the second family member of ROC1 or Rbx1, a RING component of SCF and DCX E3 ubiquitin ligases. We report here that SAG/ROC2/Rbx2 is a novel transcriptional target of activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 bound both in vitro and in vivo to two consensus binding sites in a 1.3-kb region of the mouse SAG promoter. The SAG promoter activity, as measured by luciferase reporter assay, was dependent on these sites. Consistently, endogenous SAG is induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) with an induction time course following the c-Jun induction in both mouse epidermal JB6-Cl.41 and human 293 cells. TPA-mediated SAG induction was significantly reduced in JB6-Cl.41 cells overexpressing a dominant-negative c-Jun, indicating a requirement of c-Jun/AP-1. On the other hand, SAG seemed to modulate the c-Jun levels. When overexpressed, SAG remarkably reduced both basal and TPA-induced c-Jun levels, whereas SAG small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing increased substantially the levels of both basal and TPA-induced c-Jun. Consistently, SAG siRNA silencing reduced c-Jun polyubiquitination and blocked c-Jun degradation induced by Fbw7, an F-box protein of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase. Finally, SAG overexpression inhibited, whereas SAG siRNA silencing enhanced, respectively, the TPA-induced neoplastic transformation in JB6-Cl.41 preneoplastic model. Thus, AP-1/SAG establishes an autofeedback loop, in which on induction by AP-1, SAG promotes c-Jun ubiquitination and degradation, thus inhibiting tumor-promoting activity of AP-1.

  2. Non-Neoplastic and Neoplastic Pleural Endpoints Following Fiber Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Broaddus, V. Courtney; Everitt, Jeffrey I.; Black, Brad; Kane, Agnes B.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos fibers is associated with non-neoplastic pleural diseases including plaques, fibrosis, and benign effusions, as well as with diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma. Translocation and retention of fibers are fundamental processes in understanding the interactions between the dose and dimensions of fibers retained at this anatomic site and the subsequent pathological reactions. The initial interaction of fibers with target cells in the pleura has been studied in cellular models in vitro and in experimental studies in vivo. The proposed biological mechanisms responsible for non-neoplastic and neoplastic pleural diseases and the physical and chemical properties of asbestos fibers relevant to these mechanisms are critically reviewed. Understanding mechanisms of asbestos fiber toxicity may help us anticipate the problems from future exposures both to asbestos and to novel fibrous materials such as nanotubes. Gaps in our understanding have been outlined as guides for future research. PMID:21534088

  3. Metabolomic profiling of neoplastic lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaojie; Ji, Li-Juan; Chen, Jin-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Most cancers develop upon the accumulation of genetic alterations that provoke and sustain the transformed phenotype. Several metabolomic approaches now allow for the global assessment of intermediate metabolites, generating profound insights into the metabolic rewiring associated with malignant transformation. The metabolomic profiling of neoplastic lesions growing in mice, irrespective of their origin, can provide invaluable information on the mechanisms underlying oncogenesis, tumor progression, and response to therapy. Moreover, the metabolomic profiling of tumors growing in mice may result in the identification of novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, which is of great clinical significance. Several methods can be applied to the metabolomic profiling of neoplastic lesions in mice, including mass spectrometry-based techniques (e.g., gas chromatography-, capillary electrophoresis-, or liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance. Here, we compare and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of all these techniques to provide a concise and reliable guide for readers interested in this active area of investigation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glyoxalase I drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via argpyrimidine-modified Hsp70, miR-21 and SMAD signalling in human bronchial cells BEAS-2B chronically exposed to crystalline silica Min-U-Sil 5: Transformation into a neoplastic-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Gambelunghe, Angela; Muzi, Giacomo; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Glyoxalase I (Glo1) is the main scavenging enzyme of methylglyoxal (MG), a potent precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are known to control multiple biological processes, including epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a multistep phenomenon associated with cell transformation, playing a major role in a variety of diseases, including cancer. Crystalline silica is a well-known occupational health hazard, responsible for a great number of human pulmonary diseases, such as silicosis. There is still much debate concerning the carcinogenic role of crystalline silica, mainly due to the lack of a causal demonstration between silica exposure and carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that EMT might play a role in crystalline silica-induced lung neoplastic transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether, and by means of which mechanism, the antiglycation defence Glo1 is involved in Min-U-Sil 5 (MS5) crystalline silica-induced EMT in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells chronically exposed, and whether this is associated with the beginning of a neoplastic-like transformation process. By using gene silencing/overexpression and scavenging/inhibitory agents, we demonstrated that MS5 induced hydrogen peroxide-mediated c-Jun-dependent Glo1 up-regulation which resulted in a decrease in the Argpyrimidine-modified Hsp70 protein level which triggered EMT in a novel mechanism involving miR-21 and SMAD signalling. The observed EMT was associated with a neoplastic-like phenotype. The results obtained provide a causal in vitro demonstration of the MS5 pro-carcinogenic transforming role and more importantly they provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in this process, thus opening new paths in research concerning the in vivo study of the carcinogenic potential of crystalline silica.

  5. Inferring linkage disequilibrium from non-random samples†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Linkage disequilibrium (LD) plays a fundamental role in population genetics and in the current surge of studies to screen for subtle genetic variants affecting complex traits. Methods widely implemented in LD analyses require samples to be randomly collected, which, however, are usually ignored and thus raise the general question to the LD community of how the non-random sampling affects statistical inference of genetic association. Here we propose a new approach for inferring LD using a sample un-randomly collected from the population of interest. Results Simulation study was conducted to mimic generation of samples with various degrees of non-randomness from the simulated populations of interest. The method developed in the paper outperformed its rivals in adequately estimating the disequilibrium parameters in such sampling schemes. In analyzing a 'case and control' sample with β-thalassemia, the current method presented robustness to non-random sampling in contrast to two commonly used methods. Conclusions Through an intensive simulation study and analysis of a real dataset, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method to non-randomness in sampling schemes and the significant improvement of the method to provide accurate estimates of the disequilibrium parameter. This method provides a route to improve statistical reliability in association studies. PMID:20504300

  6. [Neoplastic polyps of the colon].

    PubMed

    Gallo Reynoso, S; Candelaria Hernández, M G

    1992-01-01

    We report all patients with neoplastic polyps endoscopically excised during 10 years, performed in different hospitals in Mexico City. All ages, both sexes and socio-economic levels were seen in several endoscopy services both, public and private. We find 190 patients (100 females) with 268 polyps and a mean age of 54.5 (range 18-86). Tubulo-villous adenomas have the less frequency (8%). Villous adenomas were the largest and had a 11% frequency, almost all were confined to recto-sigmoid region its mean age was 6 years. Villous adenomas were the most frequent (69%) distributed in all colonic segments, its mean age was 54.5 years with the widest range (18-80 years); they have highest dysplasia rate (8.1%). Carcinomas arising in polyps were all located in recto-sigmoid region, with female predominance (2.3:1) and oldest mean age of presentation (66.3 years). Neoplastic polyps in Mexico City general population has a low frequency; endoscopic polypectomy is safe and had a low morbi-mortality rate.

  7. Reversal of the Neoplastic State in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Meins, Frederick

    1977-01-01

    Crown-gall transformation involves the gradual and progressive activation of several biosynthetic capacities of the normal cell. These changes in cellular heredity, although extremely stable, are nonetheless potentially reversible and leave the cell totipotent. There is growing evidence that tumor-inducing principle is a self-replicating entity similar to a plasmid. Thus, it could be argued that tumor progression involves changes in the number or state of these entities in the cell. Studies of CDF habituation bear directly on this problem. Conversion of a cell division factor (CDF)-requiring normal cell to the CDF-autotrophic state is a key event in transformation. The fact that CDF habituation is progressive, occurs in the absence of agents of bacterial origin, and has an epigenetic basis indicates that it is not necessary to invoke either somatic mutation or the addition of foreign genes to account for tumor stability and progression in crown-gall. This conclusion provides further support for the hypothesis that, in the words of Braun,78 “... the cancer problem is basically a problem of anomolous differentiation... Neoplastic growth, like developmental processes, stems from epigenetic modifications against a constant cellular genome.” PMID:596424

  8. Cerebral neoplastic angioendotheleosis complicated by hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicki, A. S.; Gibbs, J. M.; Lidov, H. G.; Lolin, Y.; Thomas, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    This is a case report of a 67 year old man who presented with a fluctuating level of consciousness and myoclonic jerks caused in part by hypercalcaemia. The diagnosis of cerebral neoplastic angioendotheleosis was only made later on brain biopsy and is the first report of the occurrence of hypercalcaemia in neoplastic angioendotheleosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1924030

  9. Neoplastic diseases in Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Mzayek, F; Asfar, T; Rastam, S; Maziak, W

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of occurrence and distribution of different types of neoplastic diseases in Aleppo, Syria, during one year. The study was set in Aleppo Governorate, Syria with a population of 2.7 million. Information about newly diagnosed cases of cancer was obtained from pathology labs ( =12) and general hospitals ( =5) in the city between August 1998 and August 1999. Pre-piloted charts were distributed to the labs and one of the labs staff was instructed on how to fill them. Information about benign tumours was also gathered. Between August 1998 and August 1999, 1802 new cases of cancer were diagnosed in Aleppo Governorate (970 in men and 832 in women), giving an overall crude incidence rate of 72.8 per 100 000 person-years for this population. The mean age of patients diagnosed with malignant tumours was 51.2 +/- 21.3 and 47.6 +/- 18.5 for males and females, respectively. In males, age-adjusted incidence rates were higher for bladder, leukaemia and lung cancers, in that order. In females age-adjusted incidence rates were higher for breast, uterus (+ cervix) and leukaemia. In conclusion, the presented data represent the first attempt to use standardized methodology to arrive at approximate estimates of the rate of occurrence of different cancers in Aleppo, Syria, and to characterize their patterns and distribution within the population. It calls for the importance of establishing a reliable cancer registry in Syria.

  10. Human retroviruses and neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M H

    1993-11-01

    Human retroviral infections result in significant neoplastic disease. Human T cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is associated with the development of acute T cell leukemia with characteristic hypercalcemia and skin lesions after many years of chronic infection of CD4+ cells. HTLV-I also produces myelopathy. A minor T cell immunodeficiency occurs in HTLV-I acute T cell leukemia with associated strongyloidiasis and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Human T cell lymphotropic virus II (HTLV-II) is found to be endemic in Amerindians and intravenous drug users (IVDUs) and has been linked to some cases of hairy-cell leukemia. HTLV-II infects the CD8+ population, with significant cell-associated viremia. Clinical neurological disease is rare, with one patient with myelopathy having been described. Immunodeficiency does not seem to occur. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) produces aggressive large cell and Burkitt's lymphoma in as many as 10% of HIV-1-infected patients. More than 20% of homosexual men infected with HIV-1 develop Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The pathogenesis of KS is better understood through studying KS-like cell lines that induce angiogenic factors. In some patients HIV-1 and HTLV-I or HTLV-II infections occur concomitantly. HIV-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of HTLV-I and produces unusual skin diseases when combined with HTLV-II. Immunodeficiency occurs in all HIV-1-infected patients.

  11. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination and extension of non-random prepayment... § 421.505 Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review. (a) Timeframe that a provider or supplier must be on non-random prepayment complex medical review. There is no minimum...

  12. Non-random DNA fragmentation in next-generation sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poptsova, Maria S.; Il'Icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Khodikov, Mingian V.; Oparina, Nina Y.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.; Grokhovsky, Sergei L.

    2014-03-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology is based on cutting DNA into small fragments, and their massive parallel sequencing. The multiple overlapping segments termed ``reads'' are assembled into a contiguous sequence. To reduce sequencing errors, every genome region should be sequenced several dozen times. This sequencing approach is based on the assumption that genomic DNA breaks are random and sequence-independent. However, previously we showed that for the sonicated restriction DNA fragments the rates of double-stranded breaks depend on the nucleotide sequence. In this work we analyzed genomic reads from NGS data and discovered that fragmentation methods based on the action of the hydrodynamic forces on DNA, produce similar bias. Consideration of this non-random DNA fragmentation may allow one to unravel what factors and to what extent influence the non-uniform coverage of various genomic regions.

  13. Inbreeding avoidance through non-random mating in sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Frommen, Joachim G; Bakker, Theo C M

    2006-06-22

    Negative effects of inbreeding are well documented in a wide range of animal taxa. Hatching success and survival of inbred offspring is reduced in many species and inbred progeny are often less attractive to potential mates. Thus, individuals should avoid mating with close kin. However, experimental evidence for inbreeding avoidance through non-random mating in vertebrates is scarce. Here, we show that gravid female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) when given the choice between a courting familiar brother and a courting unfamiliar non-sib prefer to mate with the non-sib and thus avoid the disadvantages of incest. We controlled for differences in males' body size and red intensity of nuptial coloration. Thus, females adjust their courting behaviour to the risk of inbreeding.

  14. Inbreeding avoidance through non-random mating in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Frommen, Joachim G; Bakker, Theo C.M

    2006-01-01

    Negative effects of inbreeding are well documented in a wide range of animal taxa. Hatching success and survival of inbred offspring is reduced in many species and inbred progeny are often less attractive to potential mates. Thus, individuals should avoid mating with close kin. However, experimental evidence for inbreeding avoidance through non-random mating in vertebrates is scarce. Here, we show that gravid female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) when given the choice between a courting familiar brother and a courting unfamiliar non-sib prefer to mate with the non-sib and thus avoid the disadvantages of incest. We controlled for differences in males' body size and red intensity of nuptial coloration. Thus, females adjust their courting behaviour to the risk of inbreeding. PMID:17148370

  15. Capsule endoscopy in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele; de Franchis, Roberto

    2008-09-14

    Until recently, diagnosis and management of small-bowel tumors were delayed by the difficulty of access to the small bowel and the poor diagnostic capabilities of the available diagnostic techniques. An array of new methods has recently been developed, increasing the possibility of detecting these tumors at an earlier stage. Capsule endoscopy (CE) appears to be an ideal tool to recognize the presence of neoplastic lesions along this organ, since it is non-invasive and enables the entire small bowel to be visualized. High-quality images of the small-bowel mucosa may be captured and small and flat lesions recognized, without exposure to radiation. Recent studies on a large population of patients undergoing CE have reported small-bowel tumor frequency only slightly above that reported in previous surgical series (range, 1.6%-2.4%) and have also confirmed that the main clinical indication to CE in patients with small-bowel tumors is obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The majority of tumors identified by CE are malignant; many were unsuspected and not found by other methods. However, it remains difficult to identify pathology and tumor type based on the lesion's endoscopic appearance. Despite its limitations, CE provides crucial information leading in most cases to changes in subsequent patient management. Whether the use of CE in combination with other new diagnostic (MRI or multidetector CT enterography) and therapeutic (Push-and-pull enteroscopy) techniques will lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms, ultimately resulting in a survival advantage and in cost savings, remains to be determined through carefully-designed studies.

  16. Degradation of type IV collagen by neoplastic human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sheela, S.; Barrett, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    An assay for the degradation of type IV (basement membrane) collagen was developed as a biochemical marker for neoplastic cells from chemically transformed human skin fibroblasts. Type IV collagen was isolated from basement membrane of Syrian hamster lung and type I collagen was isolated from rat tails; the collagens were radioactively labelled by reductive alkylation. The abilities of normal (KD) and chemically transformed (Hut-11A) human skin fibroblasts to degrade the collagens were studied. A cell-associated assay was performed by growing either normal or transformed cells in the presence of radioactively labelled type IV collagen and measuring the released soluble peptides in the medium. This assay also demonstrated that KD cells failed to synthesize an activity capable of degrading type IV collagen whereas Hut-11A cells degraded type IV collagen in a linear manner for up to 4 h. Human serum at very low concentrations, EDTA and L-cysteine inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas protease inhibitors like phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, N-ethyl maleimide or soybean trypsin inhibitor did not inhibit the enzyme from Hut-11A cells. These results suggest that the ability to degrade specifically type IV collagen may be an important marker for neoplastic human fibroblasts and supports a role for this collagenase in tumor cell invasion.

  17. Non-random chromosome arrangement in triploid endosperm nuclei.

    PubMed

    Baroux, Célia; Pecinka, Ales; Fuchs, Jörg; Kreth, Gregor; Schubert, Ingo; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2017-02-01

    The endosperm is at the center of successful seed formation in flowering plants. Being itself a product of fertilization, it is devoted to nourish the developing embryo and typically possesses a triploid genome consisting of two maternal and one paternal genome complement. Interestingly, endosperm development is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms conferring parent-of-origin-dependent effects that influence seed development. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we have previously described an endosperm-specific heterochromatin fraction, which increases with higher maternal, but not paternal, genome dosage. Here, we report a detailed analysis of chromosomal arrangement and association frequency in endosperm nuclei. We found that centromeric FISH signals in isolated nuclei show a planar alignment that may results from a semi-rigid, connective structure between chromosomes. Importantly, we found frequent pairwise association of centromeres, chromosomal segments, and entire arms of chromosomes in 3C endosperm nuclei. These associations deviate from random expectations predicted by numerical simulations. Therefore, we suggest a non-random chromosomal organization in the triploid nuclei of Arabidopsis endosperm. This contrasts with the prevailing random arrangement of chromosome territories in somatic nuclei. Based on observations on a series of nuclei with varying parental genome ratios, we propose a model where chromosomes associate pairwise involving one maternal and one paternal complement. The functional implications of this predicted chromosomal arrangement are discussed.

  18. Non-random cratering flux in recent time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed periodic cycles of mass mortality have been linked to periodic changes in the impact flux on Earth. Such changes in the impact flux, however, also should be recorded on the Moon. Previous studies have concluded that the impact flux on the Moon over the last 1 to 2 billion years has been reasonably constant, but sudden changes in the impact flux over time intervals as short as 30 my could not be detected in these studies unless the added crater population greatly exceeded the cumulative cratering record. Consequently this study focuses only on bright-rayed craters larger than 1 km thereby not only limiting the study to recent craters but also largely eliminating contamination by secondary craters. Preservation of ray patterns and other fine-scale surface textures in the ejecta provides first-order culling of craters younger than Tycho, i.e., about 100 my. Although a periodic change in the impact flux in the Earth-Moon system cannot yet be confirmed from the data, a non-random component appears to exist with an increased flux around 7 and 15 my. The concentrations in different quadrants of the lunar hemisphere would be consistent with a shower of debris generally smaller than 0.5 km.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Human Cells Change during Neoplastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin; Guo, Xinyi; Bonin, Keith; Scarpinato, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Using an AFM with a spherical probe of 5.3 μm, we determined mechanical properties of individual human mammary epithelial cells that have progressed through four stages of neoplastic transformation: normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic. Measurements on cells in all four stages were taken over both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Moreover, the measurements were made for cells outside of a colony (isolated), on the periphery of a colony, and inside a colony. By fitting the AFM force vs. indentation curves to a Hertz model, we determined the Young's modulus, E. We found a distinct contrast in the influence a cell's colony environment has on its stiffness depending on whether the cells are normal or cancer cells. We also found that cells become softer as they advance to the tumorigenic stage and then stiffen somewhat in the final step to metastatic cells. For cells averaged over all locations the stiffness values of the nuclear region for normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic cells were (mean +/- sem) 880 +/- 50, 940+/-50, 400 +/- 20, and 600 +/-20 Pa respectively. Cytoplasmic regions followed a similar trend. These results point to a complex picture of the mechanical changes that occur as cells undergo neoplastic transformation. This work is supported by NSF Materials and Surface Engineering grant CMMI-1152781.

  20. Utilizing protein structure to identify non-random somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human cancer is caused by the accumulation of somatic mutations in tumor suppressors and oncogenes within the genome. In the case of oncogenes, recent theory suggests that there are only a few key “driver” mutations responsible for tumorigenesis. As there have been significant pharmacological successes in developing drugs that treat cancers that carry these driver mutations, several methods that rely on mutational clustering have been developed to identify them. However, these methods consider proteins as a single strand without taking their spatial structures into account. We propose an extension to current methodology that incorporates protein tertiary structure in order to increase our power when identifying mutation clustering. Results We have developed iPAC (identification of Protein Amino acid Clustering), an algorithm that identifies non-random somatic mutations in proteins while taking into account the three dimensional protein structure. By using the tertiary information, we are able to detect both novel clusters in proteins that are known to exhibit mutation clustering as well as identify clusters in proteins without evidence of clustering based on existing methods. For example, by combining the data in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer, our algorithm identifies new mutational clusters in well known cancer proteins such as KRAS and PI3KC α. Further, by utilizing the tertiary structure, our algorithm also identifies clusters in EGFR, EIF2AK2, and other proteins that are not identified by current methodology. The R package is available at: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.12/bioc/html/iPAC.html. Conclusion Our algorithm extends the current methodology to identify oncogenic activating driver mutations by utilizing tertiary protein structure when identifying nonrandom somatic residue mutation clusters. PMID:23758891

  1. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  2. Reducing bias in survival under non-random temporary emigration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peñaloza, Claudia L.; Kendall, William L.; Langtimm, Catherine Ann

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive monitoring, temporary emigration from the sampling area can induce bias severe enough for managers to discard life-history parameter estimates toward the terminus of the times series (terminal bias). Under random temporary emigration unbiased parameters can be estimated with CJS models. However, unmodeled Markovian temporary emigration causes bias in parameter estimates and an unobservable state is required to model this type of emigration. The robust design is most flexible when modeling temporary emigration, and partial solutions to mitigate bias have been identified, nonetheless there are conditions were terminal bias prevails. Long-lived species with high adult survival and highly variable non-random temporary emigration present terminal bias in survival estimates, despite being modeled with the robust design and suggested constraints. Because this bias is due to uncertainty about the fate of individuals that are undetected toward the end of the time series, solutions should involve using additional information on survival status or location of these individuals at that time. Using simulation, we evaluated the performance of models that jointly analyze robust design data and an additional source of ancillary data (predictive covariate on temporary emigration, telemetry, dead recovery, or auxiliary resightings) in reducing terminal bias in survival estimates. The auxiliary resighting and predictive covariate models reduced terminal bias the most. Additional telemetry data was effective at reducing terminal bias only when individuals were tracked for a minimum of two years. High adult survival of long-lived species made the joint model with recovery data ineffective at reducing terminal bias because of small-sample bias. The naïve constraint model (last and penultimate temporary emigration parameters made equal), was the least efficient, though still able to reduce terminal bias when compared to an unconstrained model. Joint analysis of several

  3. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  4. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... complex medical review. 421.505 Section 421.505 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Review § 421.505 Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review. (a) Timeframe that a provider or supplier must be on non-random prepayment complex medical review. There is...

  5. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  6. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  7. Somatic mutation and cell differentiation in neoplastic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Collart, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    In brief, the authors suggest that tumor formation may result from continuous expression of growth facilitating genes that, as a result of irreversible changes during the initiation step, are placed under the control of genes expressed during normal differentiation. Thus, to understand carcinogenesis, we must decipher the processes that lead to the acquisition of a mature phenotype in both normal and tumor cells and characterize the growth dependency of tumor cells to inducers of cell differentiation. Furthermore, the growth of a variety of tumors may be controlled through the use of inducers of maturation that activate genes located beyond the gene that is altered during tumor initiation. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Organoids as Models for Neoplastic Transformation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer models strive to recapitulate the incredible diversity inherent in human tumors. A key challenge in accurate tumor modeling lies in capturing the panoply of homo- and heterotypic cellular interactions within the context of a three-dimensional tissue microenvironment. To address this challenge, researchers have developed organotypic cancer models (organoids) that combine the 3D architecture of in vivo tissues with the experimental facility of 2D cell lines.

  9. [The risk of neoplastic processes transformation in cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, V I; Krikunova, L I; Mkrtchian, L S; Liubina, L V; Beziaeva, G P; Panarina, L V; Zamuliaeva, I A

    2014-01-01

    There was performed a comparative analysis of quantitative load and physical status of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in groups of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)--25 people and cervical cancer (CC)--85 people. According to the analysis there were selected criteria appropriate to a combination of adverse factors that characterized HPV- infection and at the same time estimated both quantitative load and physical status of the virus: high viral load (> 6,5 lg copies of HPV DNA per 100000 cells) in episomal form or low load (< 6,5 lg copies of HPV DNA per 100000 cells) in integrated form of the virus. According to calculations a relative chance of appearing of CC in CIN patients with unfavorable combination of factors was 7,5 times higher than in other patients.

  10. CONDITIONAL NEOPLASMS AND SUBTHRESHOLD NEOPLASTIC STATES

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Kidd, John G.

    1941-01-01

    The "warts" which tar elicits on rabbit skin (papillomas, carcinomatoids, frill horns) are true tumors, benign growths expressive of slight yet irreversible deviations of epidermal cells from the normal. The neoplastic condition gives the cells a superiority over their neighbors when both are submitted to the same encouraging influences, and then they proliferate into tumors. Their state entails such disabilities, though, that they are unable to maintain themselves under ordinary circumstances, and consequently growths composed of them disappear when no longer aided. Often the neoplastic cells resume the normal aspect and habit of life long before the tumor mass is gone; and they may persist as part of an apparently normal epidermis, retaining their neoplastic potentialities for months after all signs of the growth have disappeared. In these instances it can be made to appear again, sometimes repeatedly, by non-carcinogenic stimulation of the skin (wound healing, turpentining). There is reason however to suppose that in the end the tumor cells, unless helped, die or are cast off. It is plain that the neoplastic state does not necessarily connote independence of behavior or success in tumor formation. On the contrary it may render cells unable to survive or endow them with powers which they can exert only under favoring conditions. This is the case with the cells composing the tar warts of rabbits. In the lack of such conditions the cells of these growths do not manifest themselves but remain in a subthreshold neoplastic state, whereas if aided they form neoplasms. The deviations from the normal represented by the benign tar tumors of rabbits are slight and limited in character, but further deviations in larger variety may be superimposed upon them, with result in malignant tumors, growths possessed of a greater, though not always absolute, independence. Tar cancers usually come about in this way, by successive, step-like deviations from the normal, and so also do

  11. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  12. Neoplastic Reprogramming of Patient-Derived Adipose Stem Cells by Prostate Cancer Cell-Associated Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Yang, Yijun; Thomas, Raju; Ranjan, Manish; Mondal, Debasis; Moroz, Krzysztof; Fang, Zhide; Rezk, Bashir M.; Moparty, Krishnarao; Sikka, Suresh C.; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are often recruited to tumor sites but their functional significance in tumor growth and disease progression remains elusive. Herein we report that prostate cancer (PC) cell microenvironment subverts PC patient adipose-derived stem cells (pASCs) to undergo neoplastic transformation. Unlike normal ASCs, the pASCs primed with PC cell conditioned media (CM) formed prostate-like neoplastic lesions in vivo and reproduced aggressive tumors in secondary recipients. The pASC tumors acquired cytogenetic aberrations and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) and expressed epithelial, neoplastic, and vasculogenic markers reminiscent of molecular features of PC tumor xenografts. Our mechanistic studies revealed that PC cell-derived exosomes are sufficient to recapitulate formation of prostate tumorigenic mimicry generated by CM-primed pASCs in vivo. In addition to down-regulation of the large tumor suppressor homolog2 (Lats2) and the programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4), a neoplastic transformation inhibitor, the tumorigenic reprogramming of pASCs was associated with trafficking by PC cell-derived exosomes of oncogenic factors, including H-ras and K-ras transcripts, oncomiRNAs miR-125b, miR-130b, and miR-155 as well as the Ras superfamily of GTPases Rab1a, Rab1b, and Rab11a. Our findings implicate a new role for PC cell-derived exosomes in clonal expansion of tumors through neoplastic reprogramming of tumor tropic ASCs in cancer patients. PMID:24715691

  13. Neoplastic reprogramming of patient-derived adipose stem cells by prostate cancer cell-associated exosomes.

    PubMed

    Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Yang, Yijun; Thomas, Raju; Ranjan, Manish; Mondal, Debasis; Moroz, Krzysztof; Fang, Zhide; Rezk, Bashir M; Moparty, Krishnarao; Sikka, Suresh C; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B

    2014-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are often recruited to tumor sites but their functional significance in tumor growth and disease progression remains elusive. Herein we report that prostate cancer (PC) cell microenvironment subverts PC patient adipose-derived stem cells (pASCs) to undergo neoplastic transformation. Unlike normal ASCs, the pASCs primed with PC cell conditioned media (CM) formed prostate-like neoplastic lesions in vivo and reproduced aggressive tumors in secondary recipients. The pASC tumors acquired cytogenetic aberrations and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and expressed epithelial, neoplastic, and vasculogenic markers reminiscent of molecular features of PC tumor xenografts. Our mechanistic studies revealed that PC cell-derived exosomes are sufficient to recapitulate formation of prostate tumorigenic mimicry generated by CM-primed pASCs in vivo. In addition to downregulation of the large tumor suppressor homolog2 and the programmed cell death protein 4, a neoplastic transformation inhibitor, the tumorigenic reprogramming of pASCs was associated with trafficking by PC cell-derived exosomes of oncogenic factors, including H-ras and K-ras transcripts, oncomiRNAs miR-125b, miR-130b, and miR-155 as well as the Ras superfamily of GTPases Rab1a, Rab1b, and Rab11a. Our findings implicate a new role for PC cell-derived exosomes in clonal expansion of tumors through neoplastic reprogramming of tumor tropic ASCs in cancer patients. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  14. CD44 and the adhesion of neoplastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Z; Jothy, S

    1997-01-01

    and in predicting tumour behaviour. It can also contribute to better understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to neoplastic transformation. Images PMID:9231152

  15. Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Radiological Findings of Neoplastic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rigakos, Georgios; Liakou, Chrysoula I; Felipe, Naillid; Orkoulas-Razis, Dennis; Razis, Evangelia

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis is a complication of solid and hematological malignancies. It consists of the spread of malignant cells to the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space and their dissemination within the cerebrospinal fluid. A literature review was conducted to summarize the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, laboratory values, and imaging findings of neoplastic meningitis. Neoplastic meningitis is an event in the course of cancer with a variable clinical presentation and a wide differential diagnosis. In general, characteristic findings on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and the presence of malignant cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remain the cornerstones of diagnosis. However, both modalities do not always confirm the diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis despite a typical clinical picture. Clinicians treating patients with cancer should be aware of the possibility of neoplastic meningitis, especially when multilevel neurological symptoms are present. Neoplastic meningitis can be an elusive diagnosis, so clinician awareness is important so that this malignant manifestation is recognized in a timely manner.

  16. Neoplastic Meningitis Due to Lung, Breast, and Melanoma Metastases.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis, a central nervous system (CNS) complication of cancer metastatic to the meninges and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is relevant to oncologists due to the impact of the disease on patient quality of life and survival rates. A review of the literature of articles published in English was conducted with regard to neoplastic meningitis. The incidence of neoplastic meningitis is increasing because patients with cancer are surviving longer in part because of the use of novel therapies with poor CNS penetration. Up to 5% of patients with solid tumors develop neoplastic meningitis during the disease course (breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma being the predominantly causative cancers). The rate of median survival in patients with untreated neoplastic meningitis is 1 to 2 months, although it can be as long as 5 months in some cases. Therapeutic options for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis include systemic therapy (cancer-specific, CNS-penetrating chemotherapy or targeted therapies), intra-CSF administration of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa) and CNS site-specific radiotherapy. Determining whom to treat with neoplastic meningitis remains challenging and, in part, relates to the extent of systemic disease, the neurological burden of disease, the available systemic therapies, and estimated rates of survival. The prognosis of neoplastic meningitis remains poor. The increasing use of novel, targeted therapies and immunotherapy in solid tumors and its impact on neoplastic meningitis remains to be determined and is an area of active research. Thus, well conducted trials are needed.

  17. PAX-2 expression in non-neoplastic, primary neoplastic, and metastatic neoplastic tissue: A comprehensive immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qihui Jim; Ozcan, Ayhan; Hamilton, Candice; Shen, Steven S; Coffey, Donna; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Truong, Luan D

    2010-07-01

    PAX-2 is a transcription factor that controls the development of the kidney, organs deriving from the mesonephric (Wolffian) duct, and those related to the Müllerian duct. Although PAX-2 is shown to be a sensitive marker for tumors derived from these organs, but whether it is specific, that is, whether other tumor types also express PAX-2, has not been systematically evaluated in either primary or metastatic tumors. Tissue sections from 937 normal or reactive tissue samples, 759 primary neoplasms, and 332 metastatic neoplasms were submitted to PAX-2 immunostain. Among the non-neoplastic tissue, PAX-2 was expressed in glomerular parietal epithelial cells, renal collecting duct cells, atrophic renal tubular cells, epithelial cells of ovarian surface, fallopian tube, endocervix, endometrium, seminal vesicle, and lymphocytes. Among the primary neoplasms, PAX-2 was noted in 104/122 (85%) of renal cell carcinoma, 31/95 carcinomas of Müllerian origin, 17/17 (100%) lymphomas, 4/4 (100%) nephrogenic adenomas, and 1/16 (6%) benign parathyroid tumors, but was negative in 477 other tumors. Among the metastatic tumors, PAX-2 was noted in 70/95 (74%) metastatic renal cell carcinomas, 14/20 (70%) metastatic tumors of Müllerian origin, 1/20 (5%) metastatic colon carcinoma of lymph nodes, 1/62 (2%) metastatic breast carcinoma of lymph nodes, but was not seen in the remaining 247 metastatic tumors. PAX-2 expression in non-neoplastic mature tissue is limited to the organs whose embryonic development depends on this transcription factor. PAX-2 is a sensitive and specific marker for tumors of renal or Müllerian origin in both primary and metastatic contexts.

  18. Observations on non-random distribution of spores of Henneguya spp. (Cnidaria: Myxosporea: Myxobolidae) within plasmodia.

    PubMed

    Eiras, Jorge C; Cruz, Manuel; Cruz, Cristina; Saraiva, Aurelia; Adriano, Edson A; Szekely, Csaba; Molnar, Kalman

    2017-06-20

    Species of the cnidarian genus Henneguya Thélohan, 1892 (Myxosporea: Myxobolidae) are histozoic parasites commonly found in freshwater and, more rarely, in marine fish. The development of these parasites in fish tissues includes the formation of plasmodia within which occurs the sporogony originating spores with two caudal processes, which are usually randomly distributed within the plasmodia. In this report the authors present some cases of non-random distribution of the spores of six species of Henneguya within their plasmodia. Two different patterns of non-random distribution were found based on a literature survey. These patterns and their origin are discussed. Apparently this non-random distribution of the spores is due to both internal and external factors.

  19. [Non-neoplastic polyps of the colon].

    PubMed

    Gallo Reynoso, S; Candelaria Hernández, M G

    1993-01-01

    Non-neoplastic colon polyps are benign lesions with normal histology components, we present our experience with colonoscopy polypectomy in 10 years. We resected 187 polyps in 96 patients (50 males) with medium age of 49.3 years and range 2-82. Most common indication was hemorrhage (37%) taking out the hyperplastic polyps who were found in asymptomatic patients with the highest frequency (41%). Juvenile polyps follows with 25%. 71% polyps were unique but hamaetomatous polyps of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome were multiple (39%). Juvenile (retention) polyps were found among the youngest patients (average 13.2 years) and frequently had hemorrhage (21-25). Lipomas were found in elder patients (range 52.5 years). We had no major complications with hemorrhage or mortality, minor complications were found in 3.09%.

  20. Spinal Tuberculosis Resembling Neoplastic Lesions on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculous spondylitis is one of the commonest forms of skeletal tuberculosis in developing countries like India causing significant morbidity due to compression of spinal cord and adjacent nerve roots. Diagnosis and intervention at early stage can prevent permanent damage such as spinal deformity and neurological deficits. Aim The purpose of this study was to demonstrate atypical MRI features in cases of tubercular spondylitis resembling neoplastic lesions and to stress that tuberculous spondylitis should be one of the differential diagnoses in any spinal pathology especially in developing countries. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study done in the patients diagnosed as tuberculous spondylitis on 0.2 T Siemens MRI between June 2011 and December 2014 in a tertiary care hospital in India. Total 529 cases of tubercular spinal lesions were diagnosed. Out of which only 59 patients showed atypical features on MR imaging which resembled neoplastic lesions were included in the study. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytology, histopathology, serology and corroborative findings. Results Lumbo-sacral region involvement (30.5%) is the commonest in our study followed by dorsal and cervical region. Multiple level lesions are seen in 14 cases (23.7%). All the 59 (100%) cases show no involvement of intervetebral disc. Posterior appendage involvement seen in 32 cases (54.2%). Soft tissue component seen in Intraspinal (37.2%) and paraspinal (45.7%) compartments. Cord compression seen in 19 cases (32.2%), out which only 7 cases (11.8%) shows cord oedema. Conclusion On MRI, tubercular spondylitis may have variable pictures on imaging. For any spinal and paraspinal lesions, we should also consider the possibility of tubercular aetiology along with other. Since early diagnosis avoids unnecessary delay in the treatment thereby reducing morbidity and possible complications. PMID:26675162

  1. Non-random structures in universal compression and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, A. V.; Allahverdyan, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the hypothesis of information panspermia assigned recently among possible solutions of the Fermi paradox ("where are the aliens?"). It suggests that the expenses of alien signaling can be significantly reduced, if their messages contained compressed information. To this end we consider universal compression and decoding mechanisms ( e.g. the Lempel-Ziv-Welch algorithm) that can reveal non-random structures in compressed bit strings. The efficiency of the Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter for detection of non-randomness is illustrated, along with the Zipf's law. The universality of these methods, i.e. independence from data details, can be principal in searching for intelligent messages.

  2. “High-resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps”

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Justin S; Shukla, Richa; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The progression from adenoma to cancer is a well known phenomenon. Current clinical practice favors colonoscopy as the preferred modality for colorectal cancer screening. Many novel endoscopic technologies are emerging for the purposes of performing “optical biopsy” to allow real-time histologic diagnosis of polyps. High resolution microendoscopy is a low-cost endoscopic technology that has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating neoplastic and non-neoplastic polyps. With the ability to make real-time conclusions based on the endoscopic appearance of polyps, it is becoming increasingly possible to decrease the rate of unnecessary polypectomies and utilize a “resect and discard” strategy to decrease costs of pathology evaluation. Future directions for this technology include surveillance of premalignant conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, the low cost and relative ease of use of this technology lends itself to widespread applicability. PMID:26381310

  3. Expression of a fms-related oncogene in carcinogen-induced neoplastic epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.; Nettesheim, P.; Barrett, J.C.; Gilmer, T.M.

    1987-04-01

    Following carcinogen exposure in vitro, normal rat tracheal epithelial cells are transformed in a multistage process in which the cultured cells become immortal and ultimately, neoplastic. Five cell lines derived from tumors produced by neoplastically transformed rat tracheal epithelial cells were examined for the expression of 11 cellular oncogenes previously implicated in pulmonary or epithelial carcinogenesis. RNA homologous to fms was expressed at a level 5-19 times higher than normal tracheal epithelial cells in three of five of the tumor-derived lines. All three lines expressing high levels of fms-related RNA gave rise to invasive tumors of epithelial origin when injected into nude mice. Increased expression of the fms-related mRNA was not due to gene amplification, and no gene rearrangement was detected by Southern analyses. RNA blot analysis using a 3' v-fms probe detected a 9.5-kilobase message in the three tumor-derived lines, whereas both normal rat aveolar macrophages and the human choriocarcinoma line BeWo expressed a fms transcript of approx. = 4 kilobases. The authors conclude from these data that the gene expressed as a 9.5-kilobase transcript in these neoplastic epithelial cells is a member of a fms-related gene family but may be distinct from the gene that encodes the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) receptor.

  4. Orbital ultrasonography in the diagnosis of neoplastic extraocular muscle enlargement.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Giovanni H; Livingston, Kym; Liu, Grant T; Shindler, Kenneth S; Volpe, Nicholas J; Pistilli, Maxwell; Mehta, Sonul; Tamhankar, Madhura A

    2017-10-01

    Neoplastic infiltration of the extraocular muscle (EOM) is a rare condition which can pose a diagnostic dilemma due to its rarity and overlapping ultrasonographic features with orbital myositis. The ultrasonographic features of neoplastic enlargement of EOM have not been systematically studied and previously have been described in only a few case reports. Orbital ultrasonography, in conjunction with the pattern of ocular misalignment, was assessed for its potential role in identifying patients with neoplastic EOM enlargement. Retrospective chart review of patients with neoplasm and myositis. The clinical features of 8 patients with neoplastic infiltration of the EOM were compared to 15 patients with myositis. In the neoplastic group the width of the EOM was (10.5 mm) almost twice the normal width of the muscle with myositis (p < 0.001). All the muscles in the neoplastic category were low to medium reflective. Paretic deviation was seen in 4/8(50%), purely restrictive in 2/8 (25%) and combined pattern in 2/8 (25%) were noted. In the myositis group the average EOM enlargement was 5.8 mm and all muscles showed low reflectivity. Although ultrasonographic features overlapped between the 2 groups paretic deviations were more common in the neoplastic group versus the myositis group (50% versus 7%). Neoplastic muscle enlargement tends to be larger with paretic deviations of ocular motility seen clinically. These findings in a patient with EOM enlargement should raise the suspicion of neoplasm as the etiology and further work up should be considered.

  5. Non-random species loss in a forest herbaceous layer following nitrogen addition

    Treesearch

    Christopher A. ​Walter; Mary Beth Adams; Frank S. Gilliam; William T. Peterjohn

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) additions have decreased species richness (S) in hardwood forest herbaceous layers, yet the functional mechanisms for these decreases have not been explicitly evaluated.We tested two hypothesized mechanisms, random species loss (RSL) and non-random species loss (NRSL), in the hardwood forest herbaceous layer of a long-term, plot-scale...

  6. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... prepayment complex medical review for that provider or supplier may be extended. However, if the number of... complex medical review. 421.505 Section 421.505 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 421.505 Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review. (a) Timeframe...

  7. Expression of Cytokeratin-19 and Thyroperoxidase in Relation to Morphological Features in Non-Neoplastic and Neoplastic Lesions of Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Revathishree; Noorunnisa, Naseen; Durairaj, Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a protein involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. TPO gene suppression and mutation were involved in thyroid tumours. CK-19 plays important role in the structural integrity of epithelial cells. Reduced TPO expression with increased CK-19 immunoreactivity has been implicated as a marker for differentiating non neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Aim To study the histopathological features of thyroid lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic role of thyroperoxidase and CK-19 in non-neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of 65 thyroid specimens was studied for detailed histopathological examination and Expression of Immunohistochemical Markers Cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) and Thyroperoxidase. Results TPO IHC marker was expressed by non-neoplastic and benign lesions of thyroid but not in malignancy. CK-19 was expressed 100% in papillary carcinoma of thyroid and its variants, focal and weak staining noted in goitre and hyperplastic areas. Conclusion Most of the non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions were diagnosed based on histopathological features. When the histopathological diagnosis are equivocal, immunohistochemical markers aids in diagnosing malignancy. Diffuse and strong TPO expression indicates non-neoplastic thyroid lesions whereas diffused and strong CK-19 expression indicates thyroid malignancy. PMID:27504290

  8. Vitamins A and E in neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Broccio, M; Dellarovere, F; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Artemisia, A; Pirrone, G; Broccio, G

    1997-01-01

    Vitamins A and E play an important role against 'free radicals' (FRs). Their antioxidant action is evident in neoplastic disease (ND) that is known to have a FRs pathology. This finding has been supported by previous research showing increased lipid peroxidation of the erythrocyte membrane with increased permeability and higher hemoglobin susceptibility to oxidative stress. Connections exist between the two vitamins and FRs lipid peroxidation of the membranes. In order to study A and E vitamin behaviour in ND, they were assayed in the sera of 88 cancer patients versus 94 healthy subjects. In the 88 cancer cases, without considering variables such as age, sex and smoking habits, the average amount of vitamin A was 47.44+/-19.60 mu g/dl versus 71.77+/-18.30 in controls (P<0.0001). The average amount of vitamin E was 1144.42+/-507.45 in ND versus 1497.45+/-397.74 in controls (P<0.0001). The two vitamins were simultaneously assayed in the same serum by high pressure liquid chromatography. The method is rapid and gave exact and repeatable results. Reasons for vitamin decrease are discussed.

  9. [Non-neoplastic hypercalcitoninemia. Pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Saint-André, J P; Guyétant, S

    1996-01-01

    Normal C-cells are classically concentrated between the upper and middle thirds of each thyroid lobe and account for less than 1% of the thyroid gland volume. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH), defined as the presence of at least 3 low-power magnification (x100) microscopic fields containing more than 50 C-cells and at least 40 cells/cm2 was first described in a familial context of MEN2. It was then observed in many other conditions, especially in association with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or with thyroid tumors other than medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In members of a MEN2 family, carrying a RET mutation, CCH is constant and associated with micro-MTC. At least 20% of patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or with a thyroid tumor other than MTC have CCH that, in a few cases, is associated with hypercalcitoninemia. 20 % normal subjects meet quantitative criteria of CCH. Patients belonging to a MEN2 family, without a RET mutation but presenting hypercalcitoninemia, could belong to this group. HCC appears to be a pre-neoplastic condition only in patients carrying a RET mutation. Under other circumstances, HCC may be either a reactive or even a normal condition.

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Non-Neoplastic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tokito, Akinori; Jougasaki, Michihisa

    2016-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent endopeptidases belonging to the metzincin superfamily. There are at least 23 members of MMPs ever reported in human, and they and their substrates are widely expressed in many tissues. Recent growing evidence has established that MMP not only can degrade a variety of components of extracellular matrix, but also can cleave and activate various non-matrix proteins, including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, contributing to both physiological and pathological processes. In normal conditions, MMP expression and activity are tightly regulated via interactions between their activators and inhibitors. Imbalance among these factors, however, results in dysregulated MMP activity, which causes tissue destruction and functional alteration or local inflammation, leading to the development of diverse diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, neurodegenerative disease, as well as cancer. This article focuses on the accumulated evidence supporting a wide range of roles of MMPs in various non-neoplastic diseases and provides an outlook on the therapeutic potential of inhibiting MMP action. PMID:27455234

  11. Microscopical examination of the localisation patterns of two novel rhodamine derivatives in normal and neoplastic colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Atlamazoglou, V; Yova, D; Kavantzas, N; Loukas, S

    2001-01-01

    Tissue characterisation by fluorescence imaging, using exogenous fluorophores, is a promising method for cancer detection. Histochemical alterations in the composition of mucins, when neoplastic transformations occur, could be exploited to derive more selective fluoroprobes indicative of early malignant transformation. The aim of this work was to develop and examine tumour selective fluoroprobes for colon cancer diagnosis, as well as to determine the morphological components where selective dye accumulation has occurred. Two novel fluoroprobes: rhodamine B-L-leucine amide and rhodamine B-phenylboronic acid were synthesised and examined together with Mayer's mucicarmine, alexa 350-wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and tetramethyl rhodamine-concanavalin A (ConA). Fluorescence microscopy studies were performed with deparaffinised human colon sections, using an epifluorescence microscope equipped with a colour CCD camera. The intense accumulation of the novel fluoroprobes was localised in the amorphous material in the lumen of neoplastic crypts. To gain insight into the localisation patterns, mucicarmine, alexa 350-WGA and tetramethyl rhodamine-ConA were used. Alexa 350-WGA reacted primarily with mucin secreted in the malignant crypt lumen suggesting that this material is rich in sialic acid and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues. These derivatives clearly and consistently distinguished non-neoplastic from neoplastic human colon tissue sections. The intense accumulation at the altered mucins indicates that they could be used as fluoroprobes of biochemical alterations for carcinoma detection.

  12. Rare thyroid non-neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are usually defined as entities affecting less than 1 person per 2,000. About 7,000 different rare entities are distinguished and, among them, rare diseases of the thyroid gland. Although not frequent, they can be found in the everyday practice of endocrinologists and should be considered in differential diagnosis. Rare non-neoplastic thyroid diseases will be discussed. Congenital hypothyroidism's frequency is relatively high and its early treatment is of vital importance for neonatal psychomotor development; CH is caused primarily by thyroid dysgenesis (85%) or dyshormonogenesis (10-15%), although secondary defects - hypothalamic and pituitary - can also be found; up to 40% of cases diagnosed on neonatal screening are transient. Inherited abnormalities of thyroid hormone binding proteins (TBG, TBP and albumin) include alterations in their concentration or affinity for iodothyronines, this leads to laboratory test abnormalities, although usually with normal free hormones and clinical euthyroidism. Thyroid hormone resistance is most commonly found in THRB gene mutations and more rarely in THRA mutations; in some cases both genes are unchanged (non-TR RTH). Recently the term 'reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones' was introduced, which encompass not only iodothyronine receptor defects but also their defective transmembrane transport or metabolism. Rare causes of hyperthyroidism are: activating mutations in TSHR or GNAS genes, pituitary adenomas, differentiated thyroid cancer or gestational trophoblastic disease; congenital hyperthyroidism cases are also seen, although less frequently than CH. Like other organs and tissues, the thyroid can be affected by different inflammatory and infectious processes, including tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. In most of the rare thyroid diseases genetic factors play a key role, many of them can be classified as monogenic disorders. Although there are still some limitations, progress has been made in our understanding of

  13. The mortal strand hypothesis: non-random chromosome inheritance and the biased segregation of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    If a eukaryotic cell is to reproduce, it must duplicate its genetic information in the form of DNA, and faithfully segregate that information during a complex process of cell division. During this division process, the resulting cells inherit one, and only one, copy of each chromosome. Over thirty years ago, it was predicted that the segregation of sister chromosomes could occur non-randomly, such that a daughter cell would preferentially inherit one of the two sister chromosomes according to some characteristic of that chromosome's template DNA strand. Although this prediction has been confirmed in studies of various cell-types, we know little of both the mechanism by which the asymmetric inheritance occurs and the significance it has to cells. In this essay, we propose a new model of non-random chromosome segregation-the mortal strand hypothesis-and discuss tests of the model that will provide insight into the molecular choreography of this intriguing phenomenon. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Checklists of Methodological Issues for Review Authors to Consider When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, George A.; Shea, Beverley; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Sterne, Jonathan; Tugwell, Peter; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest from review authors about including non-randomized studies (NRS) in their systematic reviews of health care interventions. This series from the Ottawa Non-Randomized Studies Workshop consists of six papers identifying methodological issues when doing this. Aim: To format the guidance from the preceding…

  15. Checklists of Methodological Issues for Review Authors to Consider When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, George A.; Shea, Beverley; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Sterne, Jonathan; Tugwell, Peter; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest from review authors about including non-randomized studies (NRS) in their systematic reviews of health care interventions. This series from the Ottawa Non-Randomized Studies Workshop consists of six papers identifying methodological issues when doing this. Aim: To format the guidance from the preceding…

  16. Meta-analyses including non-randomized studies of therapeutic interventions: a methodological review.

    PubMed

    Faber, Timor; Ravaud, Philippe; Riveros, Carolina; Perrodeau, Elodie; Dechartres, Agnes

    2016-03-22

    There is an increasing number of meta-analyses including data from non-randomized studies for therapeutic evaluation. We aimed to systematically assess the methods used in meta-analyses including non-randomized studies evaluating therapeutic interventions. For this methodological review, we searched MEDLINE via PubMed, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 for meta-analyses including at least one non-randomized study evaluating therapeutic interventions. Etiological assessments and meta-analyses with no comparison group were excluded. Two reviewers independently assessed the general characteristics and key methodological components of the systematic review process and meta-analysis methods. One hundred eighty eight meta-analyses were selected: 119 included both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized studies of interventions (NRSI) and 69 only NRSI. Half of the meta-analyses (n = 92, 49%) evaluated non-pharmacological interventions. "Grey literature" was searched for 72 meta-analyses (38%). An assessment of methodological quality or risk of bias was reported in 135 meta-analyses (72%) but this assessment considered the risk of confounding bias in only 33 meta-analyses (18%). In 130 meta-analyses (69%), the design of each NRSI was not clearly specified. In 131 (70%), whether crude or adjusted estimates of treatment effect for NRSI were combined was unclear or not reported. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed in 182 meta-analyses (97%) and further explored in 157 (84%). Reporting bias was assessed in 127 (68%). Some key methodological components of the systematic review process-search for grey literature, description of the type of NRSI included, assessment of risk of confounding bias and reporting of whether crude or adjusted estimates were combined-are not adequately carried out or reported in meta-analyses including NRSI.

  17. Revisiting the impacts of non-random extinction on the tree-of-life.

    PubMed

    Davies, T Jonathan; Yessoufou, Kowiyou

    2013-08-23

    The tree-of-life represents the diversity of living organisms. Species extinction and the concomitant loss of branches from the tree-of-life is therefore a major conservation concern. There is increasing evidence indicating that extinction is phylogenetically non-random, such that if one species is vulnerable to extinction so too are its close relatives. However, the impact of non-random extinctions on the tree-of-life has been a matter of recent debate. Here, we combine simulations with empirical data on extinction risk in mammals. We demonstrate that phylogenetically clustered extinction leads to a disproportionate loss of branches from the tree-of-life, but that the loss of their summed lengths is indistinguishable from random extinction. We argue that under a speciational model of evolution, the number of branches lost might be of equal or greater consequences than the loss of summed branch lengths. We therefore suggest that the impact of non-random extinction on the tree-of-life may have been underestimated.

  18. When do host-parasite interactions drive the evolution of non-random mating?

    PubMed

    Nuismer, Scott L; Otto, Sarah P; Blanquart, François

    2008-09-01

    Interactions with parasites may promote the evolution of disassortative mating in host populations as a mechanism through which genetically diverse offspring can be produced. This possibility has been confirmed through simulation studies and suggested for some empirical systems in which disassortative mating by disease resistance genotype has been documented. The generality of this phenomenon is unclear, however, because existing theory has considered only a subset of possible genetic and mating scenarios. Here we present results from analytical models that consider a broader range of genetic and mating scenarios and allow the evolution of non-random mating in the parasite as well. Our results confirm results of previous simulation studies, demonstrating that coevolutionary interactions with parasites can indeed lead to the evolution of host disassortative mating. However, our results also show that the conditions under which this occurs are significantly more fickle than previously thought, requiring specific forms of infection genetics and modes of non-random mating that do not generate substantial sexual selection. In cases where such conditions are not met, hosts may evolve random or assortative mating. Our analyses also reveal that coevolutionary interactions with hosts cause the evolution of non-random mating in parasites as well. In some cases, particularly those where mating occurs within groups, we find that assortative mating evolves sufficiently to catalyze sympatric speciation in the interacting species.

  19. Neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Matsubara, Takao; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The development of fever is a common complication in the clinical course of cancer. If all other potential causes of fever are excluded, the possibility of neoplastic fever should be considered. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 195 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma (111 men and 84 women; mean age, 55 years) were admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Tsu, Japan). Episodes of fever were observed in 58 patients (30%), of whom 11 (5.5%) had neoplastic fever (mean maximum temperature, 38.9°C). The causes of neoplastic fever were as follows: Primary tumor (n=3), local recurrence (n=1), metastasis (n=5), and local recurrence with metastasis (n=2). Of the 11 patients, 9 were treated with naproxen and 8 exhibited a complete response, with their temperature normalizing to <37.3°C within 24 h. The 2 patients who were not treated with naproxen underwent surgical tumor resection, which resulted in prompt and complete lysis of the fever. In conclusion, neoplastic fever occurred in 5.5% of the 195 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas investigated herein. Naproxen may be effective for treating neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma; however, radical tumor treatment may have to be considered to achieve permanent lysis of the fever. PMID:27900101

  20. The Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP1 Promotes Neoplastic Growth by Inhibiting Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sciacovelli, Marco; Guzzo, Giulia; Morello, Virginia; Frezza, Christian; Zheng, Liang; Nannini, Nazarena; Calabrese, Fiorella; Laudiero, Gabriella; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo; Defilippi, Paola; Bernardi, Paolo; Rasola, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report that the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1, which is induced in most tumor types, is required for neoplastic growth and confers transforming potential to noncancerous cells. TRAP1 binds to and inhibits succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), the complex II of the respiratory chain. The respiratory downregulation elicited by TRAP1 interaction with SDH promotes tumorigenesis by priming the succinate-dependent stabilization of the proneoplastic transcription factor HIF1α independently of hypoxic conditions. These findings provide a mechanistic clue to explain the switch to aerobic glycolysis of tumors and identify TRAP1 as a promising antineoplastic target. PMID:23747254

  1. Melanocytic nevi and non-neoplastic hyperpigmentations.

    PubMed

    Clemente, C

    2017-06-01

    This is the first of three chapters that will be progressively published on Pathologica as updating activity of the Italian Study Group of Dermatopathology (GISD), Italian Society of Pathology and Cytology (SIAPeC IAP). The first chapter concerns non-neoplastic hyperpigmented skin lesions and nevi, the second will address the topics of dysplastic nevus, borderline and low malignant potential melanocytic proliferations and the third melanoma in its variants and differential diagnoses with a supplement on the immunohistochemistry and molecular support to diagnostic and prognostic definition of nevi and melanomas. Although we believe that great advances were made in the application of ancillary genetic, immunohistochemical and molecular techniques, for the diagnosis and biological characterization of melanocytic tumors the morphology still remains the gold standard. These chapters are not intended as substitutes or even claim to be compared to the numerous and valuable texts that are also recently published, but they want to present, concisely and quickly available, all of those traits that we believe essential to the histopathological evaluation of a melanocytic lesion. No morphological parameter is exclusive and individually sufficient to make the correct diagnosis of nevus or melanoma but to reach a final conclusive and appropriate interpretation a set of morphological characters must be evaluated and compared. I was lucky enough to be able to examine several thousand cases and to draw lessons from each of these increasing my diagnostic experience. I had a great lesson by my teacher and good friend Prof. Martin C. Mihm Jr of Boston, dermato-pathologist with undisputed international reputation, who, with great passion, patience and friendship, transferred me much of his experience and knowledge and for which I always thank him. Special thanks I would like to address Dr. Agostino Crupi, dermatologist, skin-oncologist and brilliant dermatoscopist who taught me how the

  2. Cell movement and shape are non-random and determined by intracellular, oscillatory rotating waves in Dictyostelium amoebae.

    PubMed

    Killich, T; Plath, P J; Hass, E C; Xiang, W; Bultmann, H; Rensing, L; Vicker, M G

    1994-01-01

    We present evidence for a mechanism of eukaryotic cell movement. The pseudopodial dynamics and shape of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae were investigated using computer-supported video microscopy. An examination of the cell periphery by the novel method of serial circular maps revealed explicit, classical wave patterns, which indicate the existence of intrinsic intracellular oscillations. The patterns are generated by the transit of self-organized, super-positioned, harmonic modes of rotating oscillatory waves (ROWS). These waves are probably associated with the dynamics of intracellular actin polymerisation and depolymerisation. A Karhunen-Loève expansion was conducted on one cell during 10 min of locomotion using points each 10 degrees around the cell's boundary. The results show that only 2-3 modes are necessary to describe the most essential features of cell movement and shape. Based on this analysis, a wave model was developed, which accurately simulates the dynamics of cell movement and shape during this time. The model was tested by reconstructing the cell's dynamical form by means of the Karhunen-Loève transform. No difference was detected between this reconstruction and the actual cell outline. Although cell movement and shape have hitherto been viewed as random, our results demonstrate that ROWS determine the spatio-temporal expression of pseudopodia, and consequently govern cell shape and movement, non-randomly.

  3. WT1 expression in salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas: a reliable marker of the neoplastic myoepithelium.

    PubMed

    Langman, Gerald; Andrews, Claire L; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2011-02-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign salivary gland neoplasm with a diverse morphology. This is considered to be a function of the neoplastic myoepithelium, which shows histological and immunophenotypical variability. Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1) protein, involved in bidirectional mesenchymal-epithelial transition, has been detected by reverse transcription PCR in salivary gland tumors showing myoepithelial-epithelial differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivity of WT1 in pleomorphic adenomas and to compare the pattern of staining with p63 and calponin, two reliable markers of myoepithelial cells. A total of 31 cases of pleomorphic adenoma were selected. The myoepithelium was classified as myoepithelial-like (juxtatubular and spindled), modified myoepithelium (myxoid, chondroid and plasmacytoid) and transformed myoepithelium (solid epithelioid, squamous and basaloid cribriform). Immunohistochemistry for WT1, p63 and calponin was assessed in each myoepithelial component, as well as in nonneoplastic myoepithelial cells and inner tubular epithelial cells. There was no immunostaining of tubular epithelial cells by any of the markers. In contrast to p63 and calponin, WT1 did not react with normal myoepithelial cells. Cytoplasmic WT1 staining was present in all pleomorphic adenomas, and in 29 cases (94%), >50% of neoplastic myoepithelial cells were highlighted. p63 and calponin stained the myoepithelium in 30 tumors. In comparison, 50% of cells were positive in 21 (68%) and 9 (29%) cases of p63 and calponin, respectively. Staining with WT1 showed less variability across the spectrum of myoepithelial differentiation with the difference most marked in the transformed myoepithelium. WT1 is a sensitive marker of the neoplastic myoepithelial cell in pleomorphic adenomas. The role of this protein in influencing the mesenchymal-epithelial state of cells suggests that WT1 and the myoepithelial cell have an important role in the histogenesis of

  4. Regulatory Considerations Of Waste Emplacement Within The WIPP Repository: Random Versus Non-Random Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S. C.; Patterson, R. L.; Gross, M.; Lickliter, K.; Stein, J. S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. As part of that responsibility, DOE must comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) radiation protection standards in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 191 and 194. This paper addresses compliance with the criteria of 40 CFR Section 194.24(d) and 194.24(f) that require DOE to either provide a waste loading scheme for the WIPP repository or to assume random emplacement in the mandated performance and compliance assessments. The DOE established a position on waste loading schemes during the process of obtaining the EPA's initial Certification in 1998. The justification for utilizing a random waste emplacement distribution within the WIPP repository was provided to the EPA. During the EPA rulemaking process for the initial certification, the EPA questioned DOE on whether waste would be loaded randomly as modeled in long-term performance assessment (PA) and the impact, if any, of nonrandom loading. In response, DOE conducted an impact assessment for non-random waste loading. The results of this assessment supported the contention that it does not matter whether random or non-random waste loading is assumed for the PA. The EPA determined that a waste loading plan was unnecessary because DOE had assumed random waste loading and evaluated the potential consequences of non-random loading for a very high activity waste stream. In other words, the EPA determined that DOE was not required to provide a waste loading scheme because compliance is not affected by the actual distribution of waste containers in the WIPP.

  5. Correction of confounding bias in non-randomized studies by appropriate weighting.

    PubMed

    Schmoor, Claudia; Gall, Christine; Stampf, Susanne; Graf, Erika

    2011-03-01

    In non-randomized studies, the assessment of a causal effect of treatment or exposure on outcome is hampered by possible confounding. Applying multiple regression models including the effects of treatment and covariates on outcome is the well-known classical approach to adjust for confounding. In recent years other approaches have been promoted. One of them is based on the propensity score and considers the effect of possible confounders on treatment as a relevant criterion for adjustment. Another proposal is based on using an instrumental variable. Here inference relies on a factor, the instrument, which affects treatment but is thought to be otherwise unrelated to outcome, so that it mimics randomization. Each of these approaches can basically be interpreted as a simple reweighting scheme, designed to address confounding. The procedures will be compared with respect to their fundamental properties, namely, which bias they aim to eliminate, which effect they aim to estimate, and which parameter is modelled. We will expand our overview of methods for analysis of non-randomized studies to methods for analysis of randomized controlled trials and show that analyses of both study types may target different effects and different parameters. The considerations will be illustrated using a breast cancer study with a so-called Comprehensive Cohort Study design, including a randomized controlled trial and a non-randomized study in the same patient population as sub-cohorts. This design offers ideal opportunities to discuss and illustrate the properties of the different approaches. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs. PMID:20049342

  7. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs.

  8. In vivo diagnostic accuracy of high resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Shah, Brijen; Young, Yuki; Chang, Shannon S.; Shukla, Richa; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitchaml, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a low-cost, “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of the HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps and compare it to that of high-definition white-light endoscopy (WLE) with histopathology as the gold standard. Three endoscopists prospectively detected a total of 171 polyps from 94 patients that were then imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). HRME had a significantly higher accuracy (94%), specificity (95%), and positive predictive value (87%) for the determination of neoplastic colorectal polyps compared to WLE (65%, 39%, and 55%, respectively). When looking at small colorectal polyps (less than 10 mm), HRME continued to significantly outperform WLE in terms of accuracy (95% vs. 64%), specificity (98% vs. 40%) and positive predictive value (92% vs. 55%). These trends continued when evaluating diminutive polyps (less than 5 mm) as HRME's accuracy (95%), specificity (98%), and positive predictive value (93%) were all significantly greater than their WLE counterparts (62%, 41%, and 53%, respectively). In conclusion, this in vivo study demonstrates that HRME can be a very effective modality in the differentiation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. A combination of standard white-light colonoscopy for polyp detection and HRME for polyp classification has the potential to truly allow the endoscopist to selectively determine which lesions can be left in situ, which lesions can simply be discarded, and which lesions need formal histopathologic analysis. PMID:24296752

  9. Role of neoplastic monocyte-derived fibrocytes in primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Newberry, Kate J.; Knez, Liza; Post, Sean M.; Ahn, Jihae; Levine, Ross L.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a fatal neoplastic disease characterized by clonal myeloproliferation and progressive bone marrow (BM) fibrosis thought to be induced by mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated by overproduced growth factors. However, tissue fibrosis in other diseases is associated with monocyte-derived fibrocytes. Therefore, we sought to determine whether fibrocytes play a role in the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF. In this study, we show that BM from patients with PMF harbors an abundance of clonal, neoplastic collagen- and fibronectin-producing fibrocytes. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with myelofibrosis patients’ BM cells developed a lethal myelofibrosis-like phenotype. Treatment of the xenograft mice with the fibrocyte inhibitor serum amyloid P (SAP; pentraxin-2) significantly prolonged survival and slowed the development of BM fibrosis. Collectively, our data suggest that neoplastic fibrocytes contribute to the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF, and inhibiting fibrocyte differentiation with SAP may interfere with this process. PMID:27481130

  10. [Non-neoplastic changes in the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Franz, P; Swoboda, H; Quint, C

    1994-05-01

    Non-neoplastic disorders of the salivary glands are divided into the following groups: malformations, salivary gland cysts, sialadenosis, sialolithiasis, sialadenitis, HIV-associated salivary gland disease, oncocytosis and necrotizing sialometaplasia (salivary gland infarction). Clinically, an etiological classification of sialadenitis is mandatory. Sialadenosis is distinguishable from sialadenitis by its clinical, radiological, and morphological characteristics. Non-neoplastic cysts make up about 6% of diseases of the salivary glands. Mucoceles represent the majority of these cysts (75%). HIV-associated salivary gland disease includes lymphoepithelial lesions and cysts involving the salivary gland tissue and/or intraglandular lymph nodes, and Sjögren's syndrome-like conditions, diffuse interstitial lymphocytosis syndrome, and other reported lesions of the major salivary glands. The diagnosis, differential diagnosis, symptoms and treatment of different non-neoplastic salivary gland disorders are discussed.

  11. Non-random brood mixing suggests adoption in a colonial cichlid.

    PubMed

    Schaedelin, Franziska C; van Dongen, Wouter F D; Wagner, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Parental care of unrelated offspring is widespread but not well understood. We used 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate the relatedness of fry and parentally caring adults in a 118-nest colony of the socially and genetically monogamous cichlid fish Neolamprologus caudopunctatus in Lake Tanganyika. There was a high proportion of brood mixing, with 59% of 32 broods containing fry unrelated to both parents, and 18% of all 291 sampled fry being unrelated to the breeding pair. There was no evidence of kin selection for adoption because the genetic and foster parents were not more related than expected by chance. Parentage was assigned to 12 adopted fry from 10 broods. Distances traversed by fry varied markedly, from less than one to over 40 meters. The larger distances suggest that at least some brood mixing was instigated by parents transporting portions of their broods in their mouths, as occurs in some cichlids. Further evidence of non-random brood mixing was that foreign fry did not differ in size from their foster siblings within broods, even though they were significantly larger than fry produced by the tending pairs within the colony. These findings suggest that at least some foreign fry had dispersed non-randomly and were adopted by their foster parents. Enlarged broods are known to provide reduced per capita predation, making it potentially adaptive for breeders to adopt unrelated offspring.

  12. Non-random species loss in a forest herbaceous layer following nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Walter, Christopher A; Adams, Mary Beth; Gilliam, Frank S; Peterjohn, William T

    2017-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) additions have decreased species richness (S) in hardwood forest herbaceous layers, yet the functional mechanisms for these decreases have not been explicitly evaluated. We tested two hypothesized mechanisms, random species loss (RSL) and non-random species loss (NRSL), in the hardwood forest herbaceous layer of a long-term, plot-scale, fertilization experiment in the central Appalachian Mountains, USA. Using a random thinning algorithm, we simulated changes in species densities under RSL and compared the simulated densities to the observed densities among N-fertilized (+N), N-fertilized and limed (+N+L), and reference (REF) plots in regenerating forest stands. We found a lower S in the +N treatment across all survey years and determined that the reduction in S was a function of NRSL. Furthermore, non-random effects were observed in certain species, as they occurred at densities that were either higher or lower than expected due to RSL. Differential advantages were also observed among species between +N and +N+L treatments, suggesting that species responded to either the fertilization or acidification effects of N, though no consistent pattern emerged. Species nitrophily status was not a useful trait for predicting specific species losses, but was a significant factor when averaged across all treatments and sampling years. Our results provide strong evidence that declines in S in the forest herbaceous layer under N fertilization are due largely to NRSL and not simply a function of species rarity. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-06

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces.

  14. Epigenetic remodelling of gene expression profiles of neoplastic and normal tissues: immunotherapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Coral, S; Covre, A; JMG Nicolay, H; Parisi, G; Rizzo, A; Colizzi, F; Dalla Santa, S; Fonsatti, E; Fratta, E; Sigalotti, L; Maio, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic remodelling of cancer cells is an attractive therapeutic strategy and distinct DNA hypomethylating agents (DHA) are being actively evaluated in patients with hemopoietic or solid tumours. However, no studies have investigated the modulation of gene expression profiles (GEP) induced by DHA in transformed and benign tissues. Such information is mandatory to clarify the fine molecular mechanism(s) underlying the clinical efficacy of DHA, to identify appropriate therapeutic combinations, and to address safety issues related to their demethylating potential in normal tissues. Thus, utilising a syngeneic mouse model, we investigated the remodelling of GEP of neoplastic and normal tissues induced by systemic administration of DHA. Methods: The murine mammary carcinoma cells TS/A were injected s.c. into female BALB/c mice that were treated i.p. with four cycles of the DHA 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-AZA-CdR) at a fractioned daily dose of 0.75 mg kg−1 (q8 h × 3 days, every week). Whole mouse transcriptomes were analysed by microarrays in neoplastic and normal tissues from control and treated mice. Results were processed by bioinformatic analyses. Results: In all, 332 genes were significantly (P⩽0.05; FC⩾4) modulated (294 up and 38 downregulated) in neoplastic tissues from 5-AZA-CdR-treated mice compared with controls. In decreasing order of magnitude, changes in GEP significantly (P⩽0.05) affected immunologic, transport, signal transduction, spermatogenesis, and G–protein–coupled receptor protein signalling pathways. Epigenetic remodelling was essentially restricted to tumour tissues, leaving substantially unaltered normal ones. Conclusion: The ability of 5-AZA-CdR to selectively target tumour GEP and its major impact on immune-related genes, strongly support the clinical use of DHA alone or combined with immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:22910318

  15. Radiation injury of the normal and neoplastic prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, D.G.; Egbert, B.M.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1982-09-01

    Tissue samples from 40 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma treated by radiation therapy were evaluated simultaneously by three observers to establish criteria for distinguishing residual tumor from radiation-induced atypia. Sections from 10 patients irradiated for nonprostatic pelvic neoplasms served as controls in addition to pretreatment biopsies from the determinate group. Patients had been treated by external x-irradiation, the majority receiving 6200-7400 rad to the prostate and pelvis over 7 to 8 weeks. Positive (tumor) biopsy incidence in the determinate group was 80% at 18 months, 40% at 36 months, and 43% in later samples. The following features were characteristic of radiation injury in the prostate: decreased ratio of the number of tumor glands to stroma, atrophy and squamous-like metaplasia of non-neoplastic glands with or without atypia, stromal fibrosis, arterial lumenal narrowing due to myointimal proliferation, foam cells within vessel walls, and fibrosis and atrophy of seminal vesicles. Criteria not useful for diagnosing radiation injury included architectural pattern or differentiation of tumor, cytologic features of tumor cells, inflammatory infiltrate, and ratio of normal glands to stroma. Ionizing radiation produced characteristic lesions in neoplastic and non-neoplastic prostatic glands, stroma, and blood vessels, and the sum of these changes was a reliable indicator of prior radiotherapy. An understanding of the morphologic effects of radiation injury of the prostate allowed distinction between residual prostatic adenocarcinoma and radiation-induced atypia of non-neoplastic glands.

  16. Non-random mating in classical lekking grouse species: seasonal and diurnal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, L. J. S.; DeIuliis, G.; Hansell, R. I. C.; Kozlovic, D. R.; Sokolowski, M. B.

    This paper is the first to integrate both field and theoretical approaches to demonstrate that fertility benefits can be a direct benefit to females mating on the classical lek. Field data collected for male sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), a classical lekking species, revealed potential fertility benefits for selective females. Adult males and individuals occupying centrally located territories on the lek were found to have significantly larger testes than juveniles and peripheral individuals. Further, using empirical data from previously published studies of classical lekking grouse species, time-series analysis was employed to illustrate that female mating patterns, seasonal and daily, were non-random. We are the first to show that these patterns coincide with times when male fertility is at its peak.

  17. Non-random food-web assembly at habitat edges increases connectivity and functional redundancy.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Frost, Carol M; Didham, Raphael K; Rand, Tatyana A; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2017-04-01

    Habitat fragmentation dramatically alters the spatial configuration of landscapes, with the creation of artificial edges affecting community structure and dynamics. Despite this, it is not known how the different food webs in adjacent habitats assemble at their boundaries. Here we demonstrate that the composition and structure of herbivore-parasitoid food webs across edges between native and plantation forests are not randomly assembled from those of the adjacent communities. Rather, elevated proportions of abundant, interaction-generalist parasitoid species at habitat edges allowed considerable interaction rewiring, which led to higher linkage density and less modular networks, with higher parasitoid functional redundancy. This was despite high overlap in host composition between edges and interiors. We also provide testable hypotheses for how food webs may assemble between habitats with lower species overlap. In an increasingly fragmented world, non-random assembly of food webs at edges may increasingly affect community dynamics at the landscape level.

  18. Task-partitioning in insect societies: Non-random direct material transfers affect both colony efficiency and information flow.

    PubMed

    Grüter, Christoph; Schürch, Roger; Farina, Walter M

    2013-06-21

    Task-partitioning is an important organisational principle in insect colonies and is thought to increase colony efficiency. In task-partitioning, tasks such as the collection of resources are divided into subtasks in which the material is passed from one worker to another. Previous models have assumed that worker-worker interactions are random, but experimental evidence suggests that receivers can have preferences to handle familiar materials. We used an agent-based simulation model to explore how non-random interactions during task-partitioning with direct transfer affect colony work efficiency. Because task-partitioning also allows receivers and donors to acquire foraging related information we analysed the effect of non-random interactions on informative interaction patterns. When receivers non-randomly rejected donors offering certain materials, donors overall experienced increased time delays, hive stay durations and a decreased number of transfer partners. However, the number of transfers was slightly increased, which can improve the acquisition and quality of information for donors. When receivers were non-randomly attracted to donors offering certain materials, donors experienced reduced transfer delays, hive stay durations and an increased number of simultaneous receivers. The number of transfers is slightly decreased. The effects of the two mechanisms "non-random rejection" and "non-random attraction" are biggest if the number of foragers and receivers is balanced. In summary, our results show that colony ergonomics are improved if receivers do not reject donors and if mechanisms exist that help receivers detect potential donors, such as learning the odour of the transferred food. Finally, our simulations suggest that non-random interactions can potentially affect the foraging patterns of colonies in changing environments.

  19. Non-random domain organization of the Arabidopsis genome at the nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Cheng, Yingjuan; Hu, Bo; Ma, Xiaoli; Wu, Rui; Wang, Jiawei; Liu, Chang

    2017-04-06

    The nuclear space is not a homogeneous biochemical environment. Many studies have demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of a gene is linked to its positioning within the nuclear space. Following the discovery of lamin-associated domains (LADs), which are transcriptionally repressed chromatin regions, the non-random positioning of chromatin at the nuclear periphery and its biological relevance have been studied extensively in animals. However, it remains unknown whether comparable chromatin organizations exist in plants. Here, using a strategy employing restriction enzyme-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation, we present genome-wide identification of non-random domain organization of chromatin at the peripheral zone of Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. We show that in various tissues, 10%-20% of the regions on the chromosome arms are anchored at the nuclear periphery, and these regions largely overlap between different tissues. Unlike LADs in animals, the identified domains in plants are not gene-poor or A/T-rich. These domains are enriched with silenced protein-coding genes, transposable element genes, and heterochromatic marks, which collectively define a repressed environment. In addition, these domains strongly correlate with our genome-wide chromatin interaction dataset (Hi-C) by largely explaining the patterns of chromatin compartments, revealed on Hi-C maps. Moreover, our results reveal a spatial compartment of different DNA methylation pathways that regulate silencing of transposable elements, where the CHH methylation of transposable elements located at the nuclear periphery and in the interior are preferentially mediated by CMT2 and DRM, respectively. Taken together, the results demonstrate functional partitioning of the Arabidopsis genome in the nuclear space.

  20. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in normal and neoplastic breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a persistent life-long infection, and can cause severe pathology in the fetus and the immunocompromised host[1]. Breast milk is the primary route of transmission in humans worldwide, and breast epithelium is thus a likely site of persistent infection and/or reactivation, though this phenomenon has not previously been demonstrated. Increasing evidence indicates HCMV infection can modulate signaling pathways associated with oncogenesis. We hypothesized that persistent HCMV infection occurs in normal adult breast epithelium and that persistent viral expression might be associated with normal and neoplastic ductal epithelium. Methods Surgical biopsy specimens of normal breast (n = 38) breast carcinoma (n = 39) and paired normal breast from breast cancer patients (n = 21) were obtained. Specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, PCR and DNA sequencing for evidence of HCMV antigens and nucleic acids. Results We detected HCMV expression specifically in glandular epithelium in 17/27 (63%) of normal adult breast cases evaluated. In contrast, HCMV expression was evident in the neoplastic epithelium of 31/32 (97%) patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases evaluated (p = 0.0009). Conclusions These findings are the first to demonstrate that persistent HCMV infection occurs in breast epithelium in a significant percentage of normal adult females. HCMV expression was also evident in neoplastic breast epithelium in a high percentage of normal and neoplastic breast tissues obtained from breast cancer patients, raising the possibility that viral infection may be involved in the neoplastic process. PMID:21429243

  1. KIT-D816V-independent oncogenic signaling in neoplastic cells in systemic mastocytosis: role of Lyn and Btk activation and disruption by dasatinib and bosutinib.

    PubMed

    Gleixner, Karoline V; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hörmann, Gregor; Rix, Uwe; Bennett, Keiryn L; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Meyer, Renata A; Pickl, Winfried F; Gotlib, Jason; Horny, Hans-Peter; Reiter, Andreas; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, Gerlinde; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Valent, Peter

    2011-08-18

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) either presents as a malignant neoplasm with short survival or as an indolent disease with normal life expectancy. In both instances, neoplastic mast cells (MCs) harbor D816V-mutated KIT, suggesting that additional oncogenic mechanisms are involved in malignant transformation. We here describe that Lyn and Btk are phosphorylated in a KIT-independent manner in neoplastic MCs in advanced SM and in the MC leukemia cell line HMC-1. Lyn and Btk activation was not only detected in KIT D816V-positive HMC-1.2 cells, but also in the KIT D816V-negative HMC-1.1 subclone. Moreover, KIT D816V did not induce Lyn/Btk activation in Ba/F3 cells, and deactivation of KIT D816V by midostaurin did not alter Lyn/Btk activation. siRNAs against Btk and Lyn were found to block survival in neoplastic MCs and to cooperate with midostaurin in producing growth inhibition. Growth inhibitory effects were also obtained with 2 targeted drugs, dasatinib which blocks KIT, Lyn, and Btk activation in MCs, and bosutinib, a drug that deactivates Lyn and Btk without blocking KIT activity. Together, KIT-independent signaling via Lyn/Btk contributes to growth of neoplastic MCs in advanced SM. Dasatinib and bosutinib disrupt Lyn/Btk-driven oncogenic signaling in neoplastic MC, which may have clinical implications and explain synergistic drug interactions.

  2. Final checkup of neoplastic DNA replication: evidence for failure in decision-making at the mitotic cell cycle checkpoint G(1)/S.

    PubMed

    Prindull, Gregor

    2008-11-01

    Processing of epigenomic transcriptional information by cell cycle phase G(1) and decision-making at checkpoint G(1)/S are the final organizational steps preceding gene replication in transcriptional reorientation programs (i.e., switches from proliferation to cycle arrest and neoplastic transformation). Further analyses of cycle progression will open up new approaches in antineoplastic therapy. The following bibliographic databases were consulted: Central Medical Library Cologne, PubMed (English), the last search was done on April 23,2008 and key words searched were: cell cycle, cell memory, DNA methylation, embryonal/neoplastic stem cells, enzyme-modulated chromatin, G(1)-G(1)/S checkpoint, genomic/epigenomics, genomic viral DNA, histones, telomere/telomerases, transcription factors, neoplastic transformation, senescence. Gene transcription and epigenomic surveillance form a functional entity. In proliferation programs, transcriptional information is mediated by chromatin and DNA methylation, analyzed and processed in G(1) phase, and converged on the parental checkpoint G(1)/S for final decision-making on DNA replication. Genomic reorientation appears to be associated with transcriptional instability, which normally is corrected, possibly during the G(2)/M phase, to new levels of epigenomic equilibria. We speculate that daughter stem cells inherit persistent neoplasm-specific transcriptional instabilities through failure of the parental G(1)/S checkpoint. Foreign, silenced, potentially oncogenic DNA sequences, i.e. regular components of the human genome such as endogenous retroviruses, could conceivably be activated for expression in neoplastic transformation by epigenomic histone deacetylase/acetyl transferase/histone methyltransferase-mixed lineage leukemia deregulations. Failure of cell cycle G(1)/S decision-making for DNA replication is the final and possibly a major cause in neoplastic transformation. Therefore, further analysis of the dynamics of G(1)-G(1

  3. Micro-Raman spectroscopy Detects Individual Neoplastic and Normal Hematopoietic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D; Zwerdling, T; Lane, S M; Ihara, K; Huser, T

    2005-01-18

    Current methods for identifying neoplastic cells and discerning them from their normal counterparts are often non-specific, slow, biologically perturbing, or a combination, thereof. Here, we show that single-cell micro-Raman spectroscopy averts these shortcomings and can be used to discriminate between unfixed normal human lymphocytes and transformed Jurkat and Raji lymphocyte cell lines based on their biomolecular Raman signatures. We demonstrate that single-cell Raman spectra provide a highly reproducible biomolecular fingerprint of each cell type. Characteristic peaks, mostly due to different DNA and protein concentrations, allow for discerning normal lymphocytes from transformed lymphocytes with high confidence (p << 0.05). Spectra are also compared and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to demonstrate that normal and transformed cells form distinct clusters that can be defined using just two principal components. The method is shown to have a sensitivity of 98.3% for cancer detection, with 97.2% of the cells being correctly classified as belonging to the normal or transformed type. These results demonstrate the potential application of confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy as a clinical tool for single cell cancer detection based on intrinsic biomolecular signatures, therefore eliminating the need for exogenous fluorescent labeling.

  4. Effect of non-random dispersal strategies on spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2010-01-01

    1. Random dispersal leads to spatial coexistence via two mechanisms (emigration-mediated and source-sink), both of which involve the movement of organisms from areas of higher to lower fitness. What is not known is whether such coexistence would occur if organisms dispersed non-randomly, using cues such as density and habitat quality to gauge fitness differences between habitats. Here, I conduct a comparative analysis of random and non-random dispersal strategies in a foodweb with a basal resource, top predator, and two intermediate consumers that exhibit a trade-off between competitive ability and predator susceptibility. 2. I find a striking contrast between density- and habitat-dependent dispersal in their effects on spatial coexistence. Dispersal in response to competitor and predator density facilitates coexistence while dispersal in response to habitat quality (resource productivity and predator pressure) inhibits it. Moreover, density-dependent dispersal changes species' distribution patterns from interspecific segregation to interspecific aggregation, while habitat-dependent dispersal preserves the interspecific segregation observed in the absence of dispersal. Under density-dependent dispersal, widespread spatial coexistence results in an overall decline in the abundance of the inferior competitor that is less susceptible to predation and an overall increase in the abundance of the superior competitor that is more susceptible to predation. Under habitat-dependent dispersal, restricted spatial coexistence results in species' abundances being essentially unchanged from those observed in the absence of dispersal. 3. A key outcome is that when the superior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the inferior competitor does not, spatial coexistence is possible in both resource-poor and resource-rich habitats. However, when the inferior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the superior competitor does not, spatial

  5. Diagnostic Tests in Neoplastic Meningitis: Lessons Learnt from Three Patients.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Visana, Devshi R; Bharucha, Nadir E

    2014-09-01

    Neoplastic meningitis (NM) poses diagnostic challenges and investigations need to be chosen carefully. We present three cases of NM with distinct learning points. In case 1, MRI was diagnostic of melanosis; in case 2, ventricular CSF showed malignant cells when lumbar CSF repeatedly failed to show them; and in the third, whole body PET scan diagnosed the tumour when other tests were negative. A comparative evaluation of various diagnostic modalities used in suspected NM is provided.

  6. Dpp signaling and the induction of neoplastic tumors by caspase-inhibited apoptotic cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Garijo, Ainhoa; Martín, Francisco A.; Struhl, Gary; Morata, Ginés

    2005-01-01

    In Drosophila, stresses such as x-irradiation or severe heat shock can cause most epidermal cells to die by apoptosis. Yet, the remaining cells recover from such assaults and form normal adult structures, indicating that they undergo extra growth to replace the lost cells. Recent studies of cells in which the cell death pathway is blocked by expression of the caspase inhibitor P35 have raised the possibility that dying cells normally regulate this compensatory growth by serving as transient sources of mitogenic signals. Caspase-inhibited cells that initiate apoptosis do not die. Instead, they persist in an “undead” state in which they ectopically express the signaling genes decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg) and induce abnormal growth and proliferation of surrounding tissue. Here, using mutations to abolish Dpp and/or Wg signaling by such undead cells, we show that Dpp and Wg constitute opposing stimulatory and inhibitory signals that regulate this excess growth and proliferation. Strikingly, we also found that, when Wg signaling is blocked, unfettered Dpp signaling by undead cells transforms their neighbors into neoplastic tumors, provided that caspase activity is also blocked in the responding cells. This phenomenon may provide a paradigm for the formation of neoplastic tumors in mammalian tissues that are defective in executing the cell death pathway. Specifically, we suggest that stress events (exposure to chemical mutagens, viral infection, or irradiation) that initiate apoptosis in such tissues generate undead cells, and that imbalances in growth regulatory signals sent by these cells can induce the oncogenic transformation of neighboring cells. PMID:16314564

  7. Dpp signaling and the induction of neoplastic tumors by caspase-inhibited apoptotic cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garijo, Ainhoa; Martín, Francisco A; Struhl, Gary; Morata, Ginés

    2005-12-06

    In Drosophila, stresses such as x-irradiation or severe heat shock can cause most epidermal cells to die by apoptosis. Yet, the remaining cells recover from such assaults and form normal adult structures, indicating that they undergo extra growth to replace the lost cells. Recent studies of cells in which the cell death pathway is blocked by expression of the caspase inhibitor P35 have raised the possibility that dying cells normally regulate this compensatory growth by serving as transient sources of mitogenic signals. Caspase-inhibited cells that initiate apoptosis do not die. Instead, they persist in an "undead" state in which they ectopically express the signaling genes decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg) and induce abnormal growth and proliferation of surrounding tissue. Here, using mutations to abolish Dpp and/or Wg signaling by such undead cells, we show that Dpp and Wg constitute opposing stimulatory and inhibitory signals that regulate this excess growth and proliferation. Strikingly, we also found that, when Wg signaling is blocked, unfettered Dpp signaling by undead cells transforms their neighbors into neoplastic tumors, provided that caspase activity is also blocked in the responding cells. This phenomenon may provide a paradigm for the formation of neoplastic tumors in mammalian tissues that are defective in executing the cell death pathway. Specifically, we suggest that stress events (exposure to chemical mutagens, viral infection, or irradiation) that initiate apoptosis in such tissues generate undead cells, and that imbalances in growth regulatory signals sent by these cells can induce the oncogenic transformation of neighboring cells.

  8. Non-random assembly of bacterioplankton communities in the subtropical north pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Alexander; Hayakawa, Darin H; Rappé, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    The exploration of bacterial diversity in the global ocean has revealed new taxa and previously unrecognized metabolic potential; however, our understanding of what regulates this diversity is limited. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data from bacterial small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes we show that, independent of depth and time, a large fraction of bacterioplankton co-occurrence patterns are non-random in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG). Pair-wise correlations of all identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed a high degree of significance, with 6.6% of the pair-wise co-occurrences being negatively correlated and 20.7% of them being positive. The most abundant OTUs, putatively identified as Prochlorococcus, SAR11, and SAR116 bacteria, were among the most correlated OTUs. As expected, bacterial community composition lacked statistically significant patterns of seasonality in the mostly stratified water column except in a few depth horizons of the sunlit surface waters, with higher frequency variations in community structure apparently related to populations associated with the deep chlorophyll maximum. Communities were structured vertically into epipelagic, mesopelagic, and bathypelagic populations. Permutation-based statistical analyses of T-RFLP data and their corresponding metadata revealed a broad range of putative environmental drivers controlling bacterioplankton community composition in the NPSG, including concentrations of inorganic nutrients and phytoplankton pigments. Together, our results suggest that deterministic forces such as environmental filtering and interactions among taxa determine bacterioplankton community patterns, and consequently affect ecosystem functions in the NPSG.

  9. Non-Random Assembly of Bacterioplankton Communities in the Subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Hayakawa, Darin H.; Rappé, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration of bacterial diversity in the global ocean has revealed new taxa and previously unrecognized metabolic potential; however, our understanding of what regulates this diversity is limited. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data from bacterial small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes we show that, independent of depth and time, a large fraction of bacterioplankton co-occurrence patterns are non-random in the oligotrophic North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG). Pair-wise correlations of all identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed a high degree of significance, with 6.6% of the pair-wise co-occurrences being negatively correlated and 20.7% of them being positive. The most abundant OTUs, putatively identified as Prochlorococcus, SAR11, and SAR116 bacteria, were among the most correlated OTUs. As expected, bacterial community composition lacked statistically significant patterns of seasonality in the mostly stratified water column except in a few depth horizons of the sunlit surface waters, with higher frequency variations in community structure apparently related to populations associated with the deep chlorophyll maximum. Communities were structured vertically into epipelagic, mesopelagic, and bathypelagic populations. Permutation-based statistical analyses of T-RFLP data and their corresponding metadata revealed a broad range of putative environmental drivers controlling bacterioplankton community composition in the NPSG, including concentrations of inorganic nutrients and phytoplankton pigments. Together, our results suggest that deterministic forces such as environmental filtering and interactions among taxa determine bacterioplankton community patterns, and consequently affect ecosystem functions in the NPSG. PMID:21747815

  10. Prospective non-randomized study on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin in flexible urethrocystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cano-García, María Carmen; Casares-Pérez, Rosario; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study is to analyze whether there is a need for antibiotic prophylaxis in this outpatient procedure. Prospective observational non-randomized study including 100 patients divided into two groups: - Group 1: 48 patients receiving 500 mg of ciprofloxacin prophylaxis 1 hour before urethrocystoscopy; - Group 2: 52 patients without antibiotic prophylaxis. Before inclusion of the patients in the study, we checked the absence of urinary tract infection by means of a urinalysis obtained 3 days before the procedure. We analyze: cystoscopy indication, cystoscopy results, presence of comorbidities, urinalysis 7 days after the procedure, and urinary symptoms within 7 days of the procedure. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 and the statistical significance was p=0.05. The average age of patients in group 1 was 66.7±12.4 versus 65.6±10.8 years in group 2 (p=0.6). There are no differences in the percentage of men/women included in the groups. 14% of patients of group 1 and 12% of group 2 presented bacteriuria, without showing any significant differences. In the multivariate study, it is observed that neither age, nor diabetes, smoking, lower urinary tract symptoms, nor immunosuppression are related with the onset of bacteriuria in the groups. We do not consider the use of ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis for flexible cystoscopy is appropriate in this area of health, since it does not reduce the presence of urinary infection or bacteriuria.

  11. Non-random nectar unloading interactions between foragers and their receivers in the honeybee hive.

    PubMed

    Goyret, Joaquín; Farina, Walter M

    2005-09-01

    Nectar acquisition in the honeybee Apis mellifera is a partitioned task in which foragers gather nectar and bring it to the hive, where nest mates unload via trophallaxis (i.e. mouth-to-mouth transfer) the collected food for further storage. Because forager mates exploit different feeding places simultaneously, this study addresses the question of whether nectar unloading interactions between foragers and hive-bees are established randomly, as it is commonly assumed. Two groups of foragers were trained to exploit a different scented food source for 5 days. We recorded their trophallaxes with hive-mates, marking the latter ones according to the forager group they were unloading. We found non-random probabilities for the occurrence of trophallaxes between experimental foragers and hive-bees, instead, we found that trophallactic interactions were more likely to involve groups of individuals which had formerly interacted orally. We propose that olfactory cues present in the transferred nectar promoted the observed bias, and we discuss this bias in the context of the organization of nectar acquisition: a partitioned task carried out in a decentralized insect society.

  12. Non-random base composition in codons of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Prusak, Beata; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome b is the central catalytic subunit of the quinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase of complex III of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system and is essential to the viability of most eukaryotic cells. Partial cytochrome b gene sequences of 14 species representing mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians are presented here including some species typical for Poland. For the analysed species a comparative analysis of the natural variation in the gene was performed. This information has been used to discuss some aspects of gene sequence - protein function relationships. Review of relevant literature indicates that similar comparisons have been made only for basic mammalian species. Moreover, there is little information about the Polish-specific species. We observed that there is a strong non-random distribution of nucleotides in the cytochrome b sequence in all tested species with the highest differences at the third codon position. This is also the codon position of the strongest compositional bias. Some tested species, representing distant systematic groups, showed unique base composition differing from the others. The quail, frog, python and elk prefer C over A in the light DNA strand. Species belonging to the artiodactyls stand out from the remaining ones and contain fewer pyrimidines. The observed overall rate of amino acid identity is about 61%. The region covering Q(o) center as well as histidines 82 and 96 (heme ligands) are totally conserved in all tested species. Additionally, the applied method and the sequences can also be used for diagnostic species identification by veterinary and conservation agencies.

  13. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  14. Non-random decay of chordate characters causes bias in fossil interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, Mark A

    2010-02-11

    Exceptional preservation of soft-bodied Cambrian chordates provides our only direct information on the origin of vertebrates. Fossil chordates from this interval offer crucial insights into how the distinctive body plan of vertebrates evolved, but reading this pre-biomineralization fossil record is fraught with difficulties, leading to controversial and contradictory interpretations. The cause of these difficulties is taphonomic: we lack data on when and how important characters change as they decompose, resulting in a lack of constraint on anatomical interpretation and a failure to distinguish phylogenetic absence of characters from loss through decay. Here we show, from experimental decay of amphioxus and ammocoetes, that loss of chordate characters during decay is non-random: the more phylogenetically informative are the most labile, whereas plesiomorphic characters are decay resistant. The taphonomic loss of synapomorphies and relatively higher preservation potential of chordate plesiomorphies will thus result in bias towards wrongly placing fossils on the chordate stem. Application of these data to Cathaymyrus (Cambrian period of China) and Metaspriggina (Cambrian period of Canada) highlights the difficulties: these fossils cannot be placed reliably in the chordate or vertebrate stem because they could represent the decayed remains of any non-biomineralized, total-group chordate. Preliminary data suggest that this decay filter also affects other groups of organisms and that 'stem-ward slippage' may be a widespread but currently unrecognized bias in our understanding of the early evolution of a number of phyla.

  15. Non-random nectar unloading interactions between foragers and their receivers in the honeybee hive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyret, Joaquín; Farina, Walter M.

    2005-09-01

    Nectar acquisition in the honeybee Apis mellifera is a partitioned task in which foragers gather nectar and bring it to the hive, where nest mates unload via trophallaxis (i.e. mouth-to-mouth transfer) the collected food for further storage. Because forager mates exploit different feeding places simultaneously, this study addresses the question of whether nectar unloading interactions between foragers and hive-bees are established randomly, as it is commonly assumed. Two groups of foragers were trained to exploit a different scented food source for 5 days. We recorded their trophallaxes with hive-mates, marking the latter ones according to the forager group they were unloading. We found non-random probabilities for the occurrence of trophallaxes between experimental foragers and hive-bees, instead, we found that trophallactic interactions were more likely to involve groups of individuals which had formerly interacted orally. We propose that olfactory cues present in the transferred nectar promoted the observed bias, and we discuss this bias in the context of the organization of nectar acquisition: a partitioned task carried out in a decentralized insect society.

  16. Plasticity-Driven Self-Organization under Topological Constraints Accounts for Non-random Features of Cortical Synaptic Wiring

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Daniel; Triesch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of cortical connectivity is vital to understanding cortical function. Experimental data strongly suggest that local recurrent connectivity in the cortex is significantly non-random, exhibiting, for example, above-chance bidirectionality and an overrepresentation of certain triangular motifs. Additional evidence suggests a significant distance dependency to connectivity over a local scale of a few hundred microns, and particular patterns of synaptic turnover dynamics, including a heavy-tailed distribution of synaptic efficacies, a power law distribution of synaptic lifetimes, and a tendency for stronger synapses to be more stable over time. Understanding how many of these non-random features simultaneously arise would provide valuable insights into the development and function of the cortex. While previous work has modeled some of the individual features of local cortical wiring, there is no model that begins to comprehensively account for all of them. We present a spiking network model of a rodent Layer 5 cortical slice which, via the interactions of a few simple biologically motivated intrinsic, synaptic, and structural plasticity mechanisms, qualitatively reproduces these non-random effects when combined with simple topological constraints. Our model suggests that mechanisms of self-organization arising from a small number of plasticity rules provide a parsimonious explanation for numerous experimentally observed non-random features of recurrent cortical wiring. Interestingly, similar mechanisms have been shown to endow recurrent networks with powerful learning abilities, suggesting that these mechanism are central to understanding both structure and function of cortical synaptic wiring. PMID:26866369

  17. Outcome of Percutaneous Release of Tennis Elbow: A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kishor; Kharel, Krishna; Byanjankar, Subin; Shrestha, Rahul; Sharma, Jay R; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow is a common disorder of the upper extremity. It can be treated conservatively in the majority of patients, but some resistant cases eventually can be treated by percutaneous release with good functional outcome. Materials and methods This non-randomized control trial was conducted at the Department of Orthopaedics Surgery in a tertiary care hospital from July 2015 to June 2016 on 50 patients who underwent percutaneous release of the common extensor origin using an 18 gauge hypodermic needle. These patients did not respond to conservative treatment including rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and local steroid injections. The outcome was graded as Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor. Results Fifty patients (50 elbows) were included in the study. Thirty-two patients were female (64%), and 18 were male (36%). The right side was affected in 37 patients (74%) and left side in 13 (26%). The time taken to achieve a completely pain-free elbow ranged from one day to two months (average of 26.2 days). Those who did not achieve a pain-free elbow had a residual pain of 1.5 to six on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (average 2.32). Excellent outcome was noticed in 24 patients (48%); Good result in eight patients (36% ); Fair in four patients (eight percent) and Poor in four patients (eight percent). Conclusion Tennis elbow probably results from the degenerative tear of the common extensor origin, and a percutaneous tenotomy using an 18 gauge hypodermic needle is a simple, safe, patient-friendly, efficient, and easily reproducible method of treating tennis elbow in those who are resistant to conservative treatment, and it can be done as an outpatient procedure. PMID:28168130

  18. The nucleoid protein Dps binds genomic DNA of Escherichia coli in a non-random manner.

    PubMed

    Antipov, S S; Tutukina, M N; Preobrazhenskaya, E V; Kondrashov, F A; Patrushev, M V; Toshchakov, S V; Dominova, I; Shvyreva, U S; Vrublevskaya, V V; Morenkov, O S; Sukharicheva, N A; Panyukov, V V; Ozoline, O N

    2017-01-01

    Dps is a multifunctional homododecameric protein that oxidizes Fe2+ ions accumulating them in the form of Fe2O3 within its protein cavity, interacts with DNA tightly condensing bacterial nucleoid upon starvation and performs some other functions. During the last two decades from discovery of this protein, its ferroxidase activity became rather well studied, but the mechanism of Dps interaction with DNA still remains enigmatic. The crucial role of lysine residues in the unstructured N-terminal tails led to the conventional point of view that Dps binds DNA without sequence or structural specificity. However, deletion of dps changed the profile of proteins in starved cells, SELEX screen revealed genomic regions preferentially bound in vitro and certain affinity of Dps for artificial branched molecules was detected by atomic force microscopy. Here we report a non-random distribution of Dps binding sites across the bacterial chromosome in exponentially growing cells and show their enrichment with inverted repeats prone to form secondary structures. We found that the Dps-bound regions overlap with sites occupied by other nucleoid proteins, and contain overrepresented motifs typical for their consensus sequences. Of the two types of genomic domains with extensive protein occupancy, which can be highly expressed or transcriptionally silent only those that are enriched with RNA polymerase molecules were preferentially occupied by Dps. In the dps-null mutant we, therefore, observed a differentially altered expression of several targeted genes and found suppressed transcription from the dps promoter. In most cases this can be explained by the relieved interference with Dps for nucleoid proteins exploiting sequence-specific modes of DNA binding. Thus, protecting bacterial cells from different stresses during exponential growth, Dps can modulate transcriptional integrity of the bacterial chromosome hampering RNA biosynthesis from some genes via competition with RNA polymerase

  19. The nucleoid protein Dps binds genomic DNA of Escherichia coli in a non-random manner

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, F. A.; Toshchakov, S. V.; Dominova, I.; Shvyreva, U. S.; Vrublevskaya, V. V.; Morenkov, O. S.; Panyukov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Dps is a multifunctional homododecameric protein that oxidizes Fe2+ ions accumulating them in the form of Fe2O3 within its protein cavity, interacts with DNA tightly condensing bacterial nucleoid upon starvation and performs some other functions. During the last two decades from discovery of this protein, its ferroxidase activity became rather well studied, but the mechanism of Dps interaction with DNA still remains enigmatic. The crucial role of lysine residues in the unstructured N-terminal tails led to the conventional point of view that Dps binds DNA without sequence or structural specificity. However, deletion of dps changed the profile of proteins in starved cells, SELEX screen revealed genomic regions preferentially bound in vitro and certain affinity of Dps for artificial branched molecules was detected by atomic force microscopy. Here we report a non-random distribution of Dps binding sites across the bacterial chromosome in exponentially growing cells and show their enrichment with inverted repeats prone to form secondary structures. We found that the Dps-bound regions overlap with sites occupied by other nucleoid proteins, and contain overrepresented motifs typical for their consensus sequences. Of the two types of genomic domains with extensive protein occupancy, which can be highly expressed or transcriptionally silent only those that are enriched with RNA polymerase molecules were preferentially occupied by Dps. In the dps-null mutant we, therefore, observed a differentially altered expression of several targeted genes and found suppressed transcription from the dps promoter. In most cases this can be explained by the relieved interference with Dps for nucleoid proteins exploiting sequence-specific modes of DNA binding. Thus, protecting bacterial cells from different stresses during exponential growth, Dps can modulate transcriptional integrity of the bacterial chromosome hampering RNA biosynthesis from some genes via competition with RNA polymerase

  20. Evidence for non-random sampling in randomised, controlled trials by Yuhji Saitoh.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, J B; Loadsman, J A

    2017-01-01

    A large number of randomised trials authored by Yoshitaka Fujii have been retracted, in part as a consequence of a previous analysis finding a very low probability of random sampling. Dr Yuhji Saitoh co-authored 34 of those trials and he was corresponding author for eight of them. We found a number of additional randomised, controlled trials that included baseline data, with Saitoh as corresponding author, that Fujii did not co-author. We used Monte Carlo simulations to analyse the baseline data from 32 relevant trials in total as well as an outcome (muscle twitch recovery ratios) reported in several. We also compared a series of muscle twitch recovery graphs appearing in a number of Saitoh's publications. The baseline data in 14/32 randomised, controlled trials had p < 0.01, of which seven p values were < 0.001. Eight trials reported four ratios of the time for the return of muscle activity after neuromuscular blockade, the distributions of which were homogeneous: the p values for the observed Q statistics were 0.0055, 0.031, 0.016 and 0.0071. Comparison of graphs revealed multiple coincident or near-coincident curves across a large number of publications, a finding also inconsistent with random sampling. Combining the continuous and categorical probabilities of the 32 included trials, we found a very low likelihood of random sampling: p = 1.27 × 10(-8) (1 in 100,000,000). The high probability of non-random sampling and the repetition of lines in multiple graphs suggest that further scrutiny of Saitoh's work is warranted. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Functional Redundancy Patterns Reveal Non-Random Assembly Rules in a Species-Rich Marine Assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, Nicolas; Kulbicki, Michel; Chabanet, Pascale; Vigliola, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between species and the functional diversity of assemblages is fundamental in ecology because it contains key information on functional redundancy, and functionally redundant ecosystems are thought to be more resilient, resistant and stable. However, this relationship is poorly understood and undocumented for species-rich coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we used underwater visual censuses to examine the patterns of functional redundancy for one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages, the coral reef fishes of New Caledonia, South Pacific. First, we found that the relationship between functional and species diversity displayed a non-asymptotic power-shaped curve, implying that rare functions and species mainly occur in highly diverse assemblages. Second, we showed that the distribution of species amongst possible functions was significantly different from a random distribution up to a threshold of ∼90 species/transect. Redundancy patterns for each function further revealed that some functions displayed fast rates of increase in redundancy at low species diversity, whereas others were only becoming redundant past a certain threshold. This suggested non-random assembly rules and the existence of some primordial functions that would need to be fulfilled in priority so that coral reef fish assemblages can gain a basic ecological structure. Last, we found little effect of habitat on the shape of the functional-species diversity relationship and on the redundancy of functions, although habitat is known to largely determine assemblage characteristics such as species composition, biomass, and abundance. Our study shows that low functional redundancy is characteristic of this highly diverse fish assemblage, and, therefore, that even species-rich ecosystems such as coral reefs may be vulnerable to the removal of a few keystone species. PMID:22039543

  2. [Efficacy evaluation on knee osteoarthritis treated with acupuncture: non-randomized concurrent control trial].

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhong; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Shao-Jie; Bai, Wen; Yang, Jia-Yi; Li, Hu; Sun, Ye; Liu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and efficacy sustainable time of acupuncture in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The non-randomized concurrent control trial was adopted. One hundred and ninety-three cases of KOA were divided into an immediate acupuncture group (group A, 97 cases) and a delayed acupunc-weeks at the end of treatment. In group B, the same acupuncture therapy was applied after waiting 4 weeks. The acupoints in the two groups were Liangqiu (ST 34), Dubi (ST 35), Zusanli (ST 36), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Yinlingquan (SP 9), Xuehai (SP 10), Xiyan (EX-LE 4), Xiyangguan (GB 33). WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis) was used for the assessment of the primary index and VAS (visual analogue scale) was for the secondary index. The evaluation was accomplished by the patients at the beginning of trial, on the 4th and 8th weeks. In each group, 72 patients finished the trial and the data of the lost cases were included in the final data analysis. In the 4th week of trial, WOMAC score was (25. 8+/-22.0) in group A difference (P<0. 001). VAS scorewas (31. 8+/-24. and was (43.8+/-22.2) in group B, indicating the significant 6) in group A and was (56. 6 +/-25. 8) in group B, indicating very significant difference (P<0. 001). In the 8th week, the efficacy was reduced slightly in the follow-up of group A, but it was improved apparently as compared Acupuncture relieves joint pain and improves joint function obviously.by th patiĩeffr,a Mtaetfti-?an tf ri-with that before treatment. Acupuncture relieves joint pain and improves joint function obviously.The effect of acupuncture is still sustainable in 4 weeks after terminating the treatment.

  3. The business case for bariatric surgery revisited: a non-randomized case-control study.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Allaire, Benjamin T; Globe, Denise; Dixon, John B

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies reporting that bariatric surgery (including laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and [laparoscopic Roux-en-Y] Gastric Bypass (LRYGB)) is cost-saving relied on a comparison sample of those with a morbid obesity (MO) diagnosis code, a high cost group who may not be reflective of those who opt for the procedures. We re-estimate net costs and time to breakeven using an alternative sample that does not rely on this code. Non-randomized case-control study using medical claims data from a commercial database in the USA. LAGB and LRYGB claimants were propensity score matched to two control samples: one restricted to those with a MO diagnosis code and one without this restriction. When using the MO sample, costs for LAGB and LRYGB are recovered in 1.5 (Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.45 to 1.55) and 2.25 years (CI: 2.07 to 2.43), and 5 year savings are $78,980 (CI: 62,320 to 100,550) for LAGB and $61,420 (CI: 44,710 to 82,870) for LRYGB. Without the MO requirement, time to breakeven for LAGB increases to 5.25 (CI: 4.25 to 10+) years with a 5 year net cost of $690 (CI: 6,800 to 8.400). For LRYGB, time to breakeven exceeds 10 years and 5 year net costs are $18,940 (CI: 10,390 to 26,740). The net costs and time to breakeven resulting from bariatric surgery are likely less favorable than has been reported in prior studies, and especially for LRYGB, with a time to breakeven of more than twice the 5.25 year estimate for LAGB.

  4. Strategies for improving postpartum contraceptive use: evidence from non-randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laureen M; Grey, Thomas W; Chen, Mario; Hiller, Janet E

    2014-11-27

    Nearly two-thirds of women in their first postpartum year have an unmet need for family planning. Adolescents often have repeat pregnancies within a year of giving birth. Women may receive counseling on family planning both antepartum and postpartum. Decisions about contraceptive use made right after counseling may differ considerably from actual postpartum use. In earlier work, we found limited evidence of effectiveness from randomized trials on postpartum contraceptive counseling. For educational interventions, non-randomized studies may be conducted more often than randomized trials. We reviewed non-randomized studies of educational strategies to improve postpartum contraceptive use. Our intent was to examine associations between specific interventions and postpartum contraceptive use or subsequent pregnancy. We searched for eligible non-randomized studies until 3 November 2014. Sources included CENTRAL, PubMed, POPLINE, and Web of Science. We also sought current trials via ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP. For additional citations, we examined reference lists of relevant reports and reviews. The studies had to be comparative, i.e., have intervention and comparison groups. The educational component could be counseling or another behavioral strategy to improve contraceptive use among postpartum women. The intervention had to include contact within six weeks postpartum. The comparison condition could be another behavioral strategy to improve contraceptive use, usual care, other health education, or no intervention. Our primary outcomes were postpartum contraceptive use and subsequent pregnancy. Two authors evaluated abstracts for eligibility and extracted data from included studies. We computed the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous outcomes and the mean difference (MD) for continuous measures, both with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). Where studies used adjusted analyses for continuous outcomes, we presented the results as reported by the investigators

  5. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non-randomness

  6. Leaf odour cues enable non-random foraging by mammalian herbivores.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Patrick B; Stutz, Rebecca S; Price, Catherine J; Banks, Peter B; McArthur, Clare

    2017-08-21

    Searching for food is the first critical stage of foraging, and search efficiency is enhanced when foragers use cues from foods they seek. Yet we know little about food cues used by one major group of mammals, the herbivores, a highly-interactive component of most ecosystems. How herbivores forage and what disrupts this process both have significant ecological and evolutionary consequences beyond the animals themselves. Our aim was to investigate how free-ranging mammalian herbivores exploit leaf odour cues to find food plants amongst a natural and complex vegetation community. Our study system comprised the native "deer equivalent" of eastern Australian forests, the swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor, and seedlings of Eucalyptus, the foundation tree genus in these ecosystems. We quantified how foraging wallabies responded to odour cues from plants manipulated in several ways: varying the quantity of visually concealed leaves, comparing damaged vs. undamaged leaves, and whole plants vs. those with suppressed cues. The rate of discovery of leaves by wallabies increased with odour cue magnitude, yet animals were extremely sensitive to even a tiny odour source of just a few leaves. Whole seedlings were discovered faster if their leaves were damaged. Wallabies found whole seedlings and those with suppressed visual cues equally rapidly, day and night. Seedlings with very little odour were discovered mainly by day, as nocturnal foraging success was severely disrupted. This study shows how leaf odour attracts mammalian herbivores to food plants, enabling non-random search for even tiny odour sources. As damaged leaves enhanced discovery, we suggest that the benefit of attracting natural enemies to invertebrate herbivores feeding on plants (potential "cry for help") may be offset by a cost - increased browsing by mammalian herbivores. This cost should be incorporated into multi-trophic plant-animal studies. Finally, the breakdown in capacity to find plants at night suggests

  7. Patterns of microRNA Expression in Non-Human Primate Cells Correlate with Neoplastic Development In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Teferedegne, Belete; Murata, Haruhiko; Quiñones, Mariam; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They play a critical role in developmental and physiological processes and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including cancer. To identify miRNA signatures associated with different stages of neoplastic development, we examined the expression profile of 776 primate miRNAs in VERO cells (a neoplastically transformed cell line being used for the manufacture of viral vaccines), progenitor primary African green monkey kidney (pAGMK) cells, and VERO cell derivatives: spontaneously immortalized, non-tumorigenic, low-passage VERO cells (10-87 LP); tumorigenic, high-passage VERO cells (10-87 HP); and a cell line (10-87 T) derived from a 10-87 HP cell tumor xenograft in athymic nude mice. When compared with pAGMK cells, the majority of miRNAs were expressed at lower levels in 10-87 LP, 10-87 HP, and 10-87 T cells. We identified 10 up-regulated miRNAs whose level of expression correlated with VERO cell evolution from a non-tumorigenic phenotype to a tumorigenic phenotype. The overexpression of miR-376a and the polycistronic cluster of miR-376a, miR-376b and miR-376c conferred phenotypic changes to the non-tumorigenic 10-87 LP cells that mimic the tumorigenic 10-87 HP cells. Thirty percent of miRNAs that were components of the identified miRNAs in our spontaneously transformed AGMK cell model are also dysregulated in a variety of human tumors. These results may prove to be relevant to the biology of neoplastic development. In addition, one or more of these miRNAs could be biomarkers for the expression of a tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:21203544

  8. Patterns of microRNA expression in non-human primate cells correlate with neoplastic development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Teferedegne, Belete; Murata, Haruhiko; Quiñones, Mariam; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M

    2010-12-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They play a critical role in developmental and physiological processes and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including cancer. To identify miRNA signatures associated with different stages of neoplastic development, we examined the expression profile of 776 primate miRNAs in VERO cells (a neoplastically transformed cell line being used for the manufacture of viral vaccines), progenitor primary African green monkey kidney (pAGMK) cells, and VERO cell derivatives: spontaneously immortalized, non-tumorigenic, low-passage VERO cells (10-87 LP); tumorigenic, high-passage VERO cells (10-87 HP); and a cell line (10-87 T) derived from a 10-87 HP cell tumor xenograft in athymic nude mice. When compared with pAGMK cells, the majority of miRNAs were expressed at lower levels in 10-87 LP, 10-87 HP, and 10-87 T cells. We identified 10 up-regulated miRNAs whose level of expression correlated with VERO cell evolution from a non-tumorigenic phenotype to a tumorigenic phenotype. The overexpression of miR-376a and the polycistronic cluster of miR-376a, miR-376b and miR-376c conferred phenotypic changes to the non-tumorigenic 10-87 LP cells that mimic the tumorigenic 10-87 HP cells. Thirty percent of miRNAs that were components of the identified miRNAs in our spontaneously transformed AGMK cell model are also dysregulated in a variety of human tumors. These results may prove to be relevant to the biology of neoplastic development. In addition, one or more of these miRNAs could be biomarkers for the expression of a tumorigenic phenotype.

  9. Lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in neoplastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Heth, Jason A.; Muraszko, Karin M.; Fan, Xing; Bar, Eli E.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    During normal development, heterogeneous expression of Notch ligands can result in pathway suppression in the signal-sending cell, a process known as lateral inhibition. It is unclear if an analogous phenomenon occurs in malignant cells. We observed significant induction of Notch ligands in glioblastoma neurospheres and pancreatic carcinoma cells cultured in low oxygen, suggesting that this phenomenon could occur around hypoxic regions. To model lateral inhibition in these tumors, the ligand Jagged1 was overexpressed in glioblastoma and pancreatic carcinoma cells, resulting in overall induction of pathway targets. However, when ligand high and ligand low cells from a single line were co-cultured and then separated, we noted suppression of Notch pathway targets in the former and induction in the latter, suggesting that neoplastic lateral inhibition can occur. We also found that repression of Notch pathway targets in signal-sending cells may occur through the activity of a Notch ligand intracellular domain, which translocates into the nucleus. Understanding how this neoplastic lateral inhibition process functions in cancer cells may be important in targeting ligand driven Notch signaling in solid tumors. PMID:25557173

  10. [Assessment of neoplastic pancreatic focal injury by multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Gaspar, Alberto Motta; Morató López Alberto, Emilio; Valenzuela Tamaris, Jorge; Castillo González, Federico Armando

    2012-01-01

    pancreatic focal neoplastic lesions (PFNL) should be characterized through image methods to differentiate from no neoplastic lesions, suggesting one or more probable diagnosis, and staging of malignant lesions, in order to help define the estrategy of medial or surgical management. The multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) offers multiple properties and advantages that enable adequate characterization of the PFNL. The objective of this study is to evaluate de usefulness of MDCT in characterizing PFNL. a descriptive, retrospective caseseries study has been conducted. It consisted of reviewing MDCT studies in which PFNL were found, over a period of 4 years 11 months from January 2006 to November 2010. we obtained 54 cases of PFNL which were characterized by MDCT; 75.9% for a specific diagnosis, and were categorized as indeterminate 24.1%, considering more than one possible diagnosis. The most frequent PFNL type was pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in 51.9%. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms accounted for 16.7%. MDCT is useful for identifying and characterizing LFNP, this means the possibility of establishing one or more diagnostic possibilities and guide medical management.

  11. Characterization of integrin receptors in normal and neoplastic human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, W.; Baur, I.; Schuppan, D.; Roggendorf, W.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the immunohistochemical expression of integrin alpha and beta chains in the normal and neoplastic human brain. Normal astrocytes expressed alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, beta 1, and beta 4 chains in some areas facing major interstitial tissues, but they were consistently negative for the other integrins examined (alpha 4, alpha 5, alpha V, alpha L, alpha M, alpha X, beta 2, beta 3). Neoplastic astrocytes in vivo and in vitro showed increased expression of alpha 3 and beta 1, and some also of alpha 5, alpha V, beta 3, and beta 4. Neoexpression of alpha 4 and reduced levels of beta 4 were detected in glioblastoma vascular proliferations compared with normal endothelial cells. Oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, choroid plexus papilloma, pituitary adenoma, and meningioma cells showed the same integrin pattern as their normal counterparts. Adhesion assays using the astrocytoma cell lines U-138 MG and U-373 MG revealed strong attachment to collagen types I to VI and undulin, which was inhibited by antibodies to beta 1, but not by those to alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and alpha V. We conclude that astrocytomas show increased levels or neoexpression of various integrins and strong attachment to various extracellular matrix components, which appears to be almost exclusively mediated by beta 1-integrins. Images Figure 1 PMID:8317546

  12. [Telomeres and telomerase activity: their role in aging and in neoplastic development].

    PubMed

    Cottliar, A S; Slavutsky, I R

    2001-01-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, composed of tandem repeats of a repetitive DNA sequence (TTAGGG)n and associated proteins. They have a number of important functions including the protection of chromosomes from end-to-end fusion and degradation. When telomeres become critically short, telomere separation in mitosis cannot be performed properly leading to metaphase telomeric associations (tas) and chromosome instability. This instability can be relevant for neoplastic transformation because it increases the probability of errors that can generate genetic changes critical in the multistep process of transformation, like gene amplification and loss of heterozygosity. The mechanisms involved in tas are unknown, but it could be because of failure in the enzymatic activity of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme with an RNA template that directs synthesis of telomeric repeats at chromosome extremities, producing telomeric length stabilization. A progressive telomere shortening with ageing has been shown to occur both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have shown an association between the presence of tas and telomeric shortening, and also a correlation between telomere reduction and increased telomerase activity in both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. The evidence that most human malignancies have telomerase activity would indicate that telomerase could be a prevalent and specific tumor marker, and thus may be a novel and excellent target for anti-cancer therapy.

  13. Altered Expression of Yes-associated Protein and β-Catenin in Non-neoplastic and Neoplastic Gastric Surface Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Kim, Jin Man; Sul, Hae-Joung; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether differential expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) and β-catenin is important in gastric carcinogenesis. A total of 284 paraffin-embedded samples collected from 232 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were used to evaluate YAP and β-catenin expression by immunohistochemistry, and the experimental findings were compared against those for gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. Nuclear YAP expression gradually increased from non-neoplastic epithelia to tubular or papillary adenocarcinomas (TPADs) and decreased in signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC). Cytoplasmic β-catenin expression increased from non-neoplastic epithelia to high-grade dysplasia and was decreased in TPAD and SRCC. YAP-overexpressing cell lines exhibited marked tumor cell invasion, whereas YAP-depleted cells showed reduced invasion. Nuclear YAP and cytoplasmic β-catenin play important roles in carcinogenesis, and the differential patterns YAP and β-catenin expression between TPAD and SRCC imply the existence of different carcinogenic pathways in these conditions. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Cortical atrophy patterns in multiple sclerosis are non-random and clinically relevant.

    PubMed

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Daams, Marita; Tijms, Betty M; Wink, Alle Meije; Balk, Lisanne J; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Pouwels, Petra J W

    2016-01-01

    of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral sensorimotor cortex and bilateral insula), and global cortical thickness. The final model predicting average cognition (adjusted R(2) = 0.469; P < 0.001) consisted of age, the loadings of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral temporal pole), overall white matter lesion load and normal-appearing white matter integrity. Although white matter pathology measures were part of the final clinical regression models, they explained limited incremental variance (to a maximum of 4%). Several cortical atrophy patterns relevant for multiple sclerosis were found. This suggests that cortical atrophy in multiple sclerosis occurs largely in a non-random manner and develops (at least partly) according to distinct anatomical patterns. In addition, these cortical atrophy patterns showed stronger associations with clinical (especially cognitive) dysfunction than global cortical atrophy. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Home based telemedicine intervention for patients with uncontrolled hypertension: - a real life - non-randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control of blood pressure is frequently inadequate in spite of availability of several classes of well tolerated and effective antihypertensive drugs. Several factors, including the use of suboptimal doses of drugs, inadequate or ineffective treatments and poor drug compliance may be the reason for this phenomenon. The aim of the current non- randomized study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Home-Based Telemedicine service in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Methods 74 patients were enrolled in a Home Based Telemedicine group and 94 patients in the Usual Care group. At baseline and at the end of the study, patients in both groups were seen in a cardiology office. Patients in Home Based Telemedicine group additionally were followed by a physician-nurse, through scheduled and unscheduled telephone appointments. These patients also received a blood pressure measuring device that could transmit the readings to a central data monitor via secure data connection. Results During the study period (80 ± 25 days), a total of 17401 blood pressure measurements were taken in the Home Based Telemedicine group corresponding to 236 ± 136 readings per patient and a mean daily measurement of 3 ± 1.7. The scheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the nurse) equaled to 5.2 ± 4.3/patient (370 in total) and the unscheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the patients) were 0.4 ± 0.9/patient (30 in total). The mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 153 ± 19 mmHg to 130 ± 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 89 ± 10 mmHg to 76 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.0001). In the Usual Care group, the mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 156 ± 16 mmHg to 149 ± 17 mmHg (p < 0.05) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 90 ± 8 mmHg to 86 ± 9 mmHg (p < 0.05). The changes in drug

  16. Growth factors and their relationship to neoplastic and paraneoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Badawi, R A; Birns, J; Watson, T; Kalra, L

    2005-04-01

    Growth factors are extracellular signaling molecules that act in an autocrine and paracrine fashion to regulate growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cells. Dysregulation of the growth factor networks is intimately related to the molecular pathogenesis of neoplastic and paraneoplastic disease. Increasing knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying growth factors and their actions on cell cycling, cell division, and cell death is shedding light on new therapeutic avenues for molecular targeting of tumors. Epidermal growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor both offer examples of how growth factor biology and its relationship to cancer can be harnessed to create effective clinical therapeutic tools such as monoclonal antibodies. This approach heralds a future in which rational molecular oncological therapy may increasingly become the norm.

  17. [Clinical manifestations of hematological non-neoplastic diseases in Dentistry].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2012-06-02

    Systemic disease can cause clinical manifestations in the oral and maxillofacial area, which is important to recognize because it could be the first symptom of an undiagnosed illness. There are different oral signs that could suggest the clinician a blood disorder, such as pallor, petechiae, ecchymosis, ulcerations, gingival hypertrophy or spontaneous gingival bleeding. In addition, blood disorders will determine the dental management of these patients and the protocol for limiting possible complications that may arise due to the treatment itself. This paper reviews the oral manifestations and dental management of non-neoplastic alterations of red cells, white cells and hemostasis, with emphasis on two-way relationship that must exist between the dentist and the patient's hematologist for making a treatment plan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Neoplastic meningitis as the presentation of occult primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M T; Slatkin, N; D'Angelo, M; Ketonen, L; Johnson, M D; Rosenblum, M; Creasy, J; Tulipan, N; Walker, R

    1993-10-01

    Seven children and young adults initially presented with subacute meningitis and/or increased intracranial pressure. The diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis secondary to a primitive neuroectodermal neoplasm was delayed by the absence of an obvious primary tumor. The neuroradiologic appearance was that of a basimeningeal infiltrative process, complicated by communicating hydrocephalus or "pseudotumor cerebri." Myelography was important in the diagnosis of disseminated meningeal malignancy in four cases. Cerebrospinal fluid cytologic diagnosis was insensitive but ultimately confirmed in five cases. All seven patients experienced progressive disease despite neuraxis radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy; six have died. Systemic dissemination to bone and/or peritoneum occurred in three patients while on therapy. In two, a primary parenchymal brain or spinal cord tumor could not be identified at postmortem examination. The presentation of a primitive neuroectodermal tumor as subacute meningitis without an evident primary tumor heralds an aggressive and refractory neoplasm.

  19. Modeling dynamic reciprocity: Engineering three-dimensional culture models of breast architecture, function, and neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand why cancer develops as well as predict the outcome of pharmacological treatments, we need to model the structure and function of organs in culture so that our experimental manipulations occur under physiological contexts. This review traces the history of the development of a prototypic example, the three-dimensional (3D) model of the mammary gland acinus. We briefly describe the considerable information available on both normal mammary gland function and breast cancer generated by the current model and present future challenges that will require an increase in its complexity. We propose the need for engineered tissues that faithfully recapitulate their native structures to allow a greater understanding of tissue function, dysfunction, and potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:15963732

  20. Cerebral chemical dominance and neural regulation of cell division, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, and genomic function.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    The study assessed the isoprenoid pathway, digoxin synthesis, and neurotransmitter patterns in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance, neurogenetic disorders, and neoplasms. The HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, tyrosine catabolites, and RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity were measured in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance. The digoxin status, membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity, and serum magnesium were assessed in Huntington's disease, trisomy 21, glioblastoma multiforme, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (high grade lymphoma). The results showed that right hemispheric, chemically dominant individuals had elevated digoxin synthesis, increased tryptophan catabolites, and reduced tyrosine catabolites, and membrane Na+-K+ ATPase with hypomagnesemia. Left hemispheric, chemically dominant individuals had the opposite patterns. In neurogenetic disorders and neo plasms also hyperdigoxinemia induced membrane Na+-K+ ATPase inhibition, and hypomagnesemia similar to right hemispheric chemical dominance could be demonstrated. The role of hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin secretion play a key role in the regulation of cell differentiation/proliferation and genomic function. Ninety-five percent of the patients with neurogenetic disorders and neoplasms were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by dichotic listening test. However, all of them had biochemical patterns similar to right hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation to cerebral dominance detected by handness/dichotic listening test.

  1. Age-Related DNA Methylation Changes and Neoplastic Transformation of the Human Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Nhe1 and Kpn1 and then sub-cloned into the pGL3-Basic vector. The methylated promoter constructs were used for transient transfection assays...endothelial cells. J Cell Biol 2001; 152:1087-98. Sprouty1 5’-flanking region into the Kpn1/ Nhe1 site of the promot- erless and enhancerless firefly...and Nhe1 digestion and subcloned into the pGL3-Basic vector. Every construct was sequenced to ensure correct orientation and sequence integrity

  2. LDOC1 silenced by cigarette exposure and involved in oral neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Pan, Kao-Lu; Tang, Ya-Chu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Shen, Mei-Ya; Cheng, Ying-Min; Huang, Tze-Ta; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we identified global epigenetic aberrations in smoking-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We hypothesized that cigarette exposure triggers OSCC through alteration of the methylome of oral cells. Here we report that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) significantly changes the genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine content and nuclear accumulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3A in human untransformed oral cells. By using integrated analysis of cDNA and methylation arrays of the smoking-associated dysplastic oral cell line and OSCC tumors, respectively, we identified four epigenetic targets—UCHL1, GPX3, LXN, and LDOC1—which may be silenced by cigarette. Results of quantitative methylation-specific PCR showed that among these four genes, LDOC1 promoter was the most sensitive to CSC. LDOC1 promoter hypermethylation and gene silencing followed 3 weeks of CSC treatment. LDOC1 knockdown led to a proliferative response and acquired clonogenicity of untransformed oral cells. Immunohistochemistry showed that LDOC1 was downregulated in 53.3% (8/15) and 57.1% (20/35) of premalignant oral tissues and early stage OSCCs, respectively, whereas 76.5% (13/17) of normal oral tissues showed high LDOC1 expression. Furthermore, the microarray data showed that LDOC1 expression had decreased in the lung tissues of current smokers compared with that in those of never smokers and had significantly decreased in the lung tumors of smokers compared with that in normal lung tissues. Our data suggest that CSC-induced promoter methylation may contribute to LDOC1 downregulation, thereby conferring oncogenic features to oral cells. These findings also imply a tumor suppressor role of LDOC1 in smoking-related malignancies such as OSCC and lung cancer. PMID:26317789

  3. LDOC1 silenced by cigarette exposure and involved in oral neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Pan, Kao-Lu; Tang, Ya-Chu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Shen, Mei-Ya; Cheng, Ying-Min; Huang, Tze-Ta; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-09-22

    Previously, we identified global epigenetic aberrations in smoking-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We hypothesized that cigarette exposure triggers OSCC through alteration of the methylome of oral cells. Here we report that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) significantly changes the genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine content and nuclear accumulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3A in human untransformed oral cells. By using integrated analysis of cDNA and methylation arrays of the smoking-associated dysplastic oral cell line and OSCC tumors, respectively, we identified four epigenetic targets--UCHL1, GPX3, LXN, and LDOC1--which may be silenced by cigarette. Results of quantitative methylation-specific PCR showed that among these four genes, LDOC1 promoter was the most sensitive to CSC. LDOC1 promoter hypermethylation and gene silencing followed 3 weeks of CSC treatment. LDOC1 knockdown led to a proliferative response and acquired clonogenicity of untransformed oral cells. Immunohistochemistry showed that LDOC1 was downregulated in 53.3% (8/15) and 57.1% (20/35) of premalignant oral tissues and early stage OSCCs, respectively, whereas 76.5% (13/17) of normal oral tissues showed high LDOC1 expression. Furthermore, the microarray data showed that LDOC1 expression had decreased in the lung tissues of current smokers compared with that in those of never smokers and had significantly decreased in the lung tumors of smokers compared with that in normal lung tissues. Our data suggest that CSC-induced promoter methylation may contribute to LDOC1 downregulation, thereby conferring oncogenic features to oral cells. These findings also imply a tumor suppressor role of LDOC1 in smoking-related malignancies such as OSCC and lung cancer.

  4. Age-Related DNA Methylation Changes and Neoplastic Transformation of the Human Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    ent with the demethylating agent, 5-azadC and the histone deacetylase inhibitor. Nl Ca N l Ca N l Ca N l Ca N l Ca N l Ca N l Ca 0 20 40 60 80 100...sign ificant ro le in controlling extracellular matrix remodeling and has been previously shown to be methylated in urine sediment of prostate

  5. Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells Induce Tumor Progression of Neoplastic Hepatocytes in a TGF-β Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    MIKULA, M.; PROELL, V.; FISCHER, A.N.M.; MIKULITS, W.

    2010-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular carcinomas from malignant hepatocytes is frequently associated with intra- and peritumoral accumulation of connective tissue arising from activated hepatic stellate cells. For both tumorigenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling executes key roles and therefore is considered as a hallmark of these pathological events. By employing cellular transplantation we show that the interaction of neoplastic MIM-R hepatocytes with the tumor microenvironment, containing either activated hepatic stellate cells (M1-4HSCs) or myofibroblasts derived thereof (M-HTs), induces progression in malignancy. Cotransplantation of MIM-R hepatocytes with M-HTs yielded strongest MIM-R generated tumor formation accompanied by nuclear localization of Smad2/3 as well as of β-catenin. Genetic interference with TGF-β signaling by gain of antagonistic Smad7 in MIM-R hepatocytes diminished epithelial dedifferentiation and tumor progression upon interaction with M1-4HSCs or M-HTs. Further analysis showed that tumors harboring disrupted Smad signaling are devoid of nuclear β-catenin accumulation, indicating a crosstalk between TGF-β and β-catenin signaling. Together, these data demonstrate that activated HSCs and myofibroblasts directly govern hepatocarcinogenesis in a TGF-β dependent fashion by inducing autocrine TGF-β signaling and nuclear β-catenin accumulation in neoplastic hepatocytes. These results indicate that intervention with TGF-β signaling is highly promising in liver cancer therapy. PMID:16883581

  6. Oncogenic Kit signals on endolysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum are essential for neoplastic mast cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Yuuki; Toyoshima, Shota; Wakamatsu, Ei; Suzuki, Shunichi; Ogawa, Shuhei; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Kit is a receptor-type tyrosine kinase found on the plasma membrane. It can transform mast cells through activating mutations. Here, we show that a mutant Kit from neoplastic mast cells from mice, Kit(D814Y), is permanently active and allows cells to proliferate autonomously. It does so by activating two signalling pathways from different intracellular compartments. Mutant Kit from the cell surface accumulates on endolysosomes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which requires Kit’s kinase activity. Kit(D814Y) is constitutively associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but the complex activates Akt only on the cytoplasmic surface of endolysosomes. It resists destruction because it is under-ubiquitinated. Kit(D814Y) also appears in the endoplasmic reticulum soon after biosynthesis, and there, can activate STAT5 aberrantly. These mechanisms of oncogenic signalling are also seen in rat and human mast cell leukemia cells. Thus, oncogenic Kit signalling occurs from different intracellular compartments, and the mutation acts by altering Kit trafficking as well as activation. PMID:25493654

  7. [Pain in hospitalized teenagers suffering from neoplastic disease. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Kram, Mirosława; Kurylak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a quantitative and qualitative assessment of pain in hospitalised teenagers suffering from neoplastic disease. Pain is a regular finding in patients with neoplasms and is classified according to its location, intensity, and type (character). Pain is a kind of stress that triggers mechanisms of psychological coping, interferes with activities of daily living, impairs social interactions, and adversely affects the psyche. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and psychosocial context of pain in teenagers suffering from neoplastic disease. We examined 40 patients with neoplasms aged 12 to 20 years. We recorded the location, duration, intensity, and character of pain, the impact of pain on activities of daily living, and ways of coping with pain. The following scales were used: visual analog scale (VAS), numerical rating scale (NRS), activities of daily living scale, pain questionnaire, pain coping questionnaire. The results were analyzed statistically using quantitative, percentage, and rank tests. On the day of the examination, the patients reported pain in the lower limbs (27.5%), head (25%), and chest (17.5%). The intensity of pain was 5.75 on the VAS scale. Pain usually interfered with learning (4.22 on the 0-10 scale) and had a negative effect on mood (5.9 on the 0-10 scale). In describing their pain, the patients used words of the sensory (piercing, pulsating, shooting, stabbing) and emotional (tormenting, troublesome, disgusting) categories. The most common ways of coping with pain included: wishing that the pain disappeared (95% of children), telling parents about the pain (95%), asking for a drug (92.5%), and going to sleep (72.5%). The general health of the patients was established on the basis of the Karnofsky scale index which showed that 57.5% of them were in the upper and 42.5% were in middle categories of health. All patients experienced pain which was chiefly the side-effect of chemotherapy and the

  8. The use of neoplastic donors to increase the donor pool.

    PubMed

    Fiaschetti, P; Pretagostini, R; Stabile, D; Peritore, D; Oliveti, A; Gabbrielli, F; Cenci, S; Ricci, A; Vespasiano, F; Grigioni, W F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the experience of the Centre-Sud Transplant Organization (OCST) area using cadaveric donor with neoplastic diseases to evaluate the possibility of transmission to recipients. From January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2010, the neoplastic risk has been reported to be 5.4% (377/4654 referred donors). In 2003, the number of donors with a tumor and their mean age were respectively: 60 (10.3%) and 59.6 ± 19.9; 2004: 33 (5.2%) and 61.4 ± 15.9; 2005: 32 (6%) and 62.8 ± 15.5; 2006: 46 (7%) and 60.7 ± 19.1; 2007: 51 (7%) and 58.9 ± 16; in 2008: 58 (7%) and 59.7 ± 19.6; 2009: 47 (7%) and 57 ± 26; 2010: 49 (7%) and 64 ± 16. The organ most affected by tumor has been the central nervous system (18%). The tumor was diagnosed before in 325 (86%) cases, versus during organ retrieval in 48 (12.7%) donor operations but before, which four cases (1%) occured after transplantation. According to the histological types and grades, 28 evaluated donors (8.2%) were suitable for transplantation. The histological types were: thyroid carcinoma (n = 3); prostate carcinoma (n = 8), renal clear cell carcinoma (n = 7), oncocytoma (n = 1), meningiomas (n = 2), dermofibrosarcoma (n = 1); verrucous carcinoma of the vulva (n = 1), colon adenocarcinoma (n = 1), grade II astrocytoma (n = 1), adrenal gland tumor (n = 1), gastric GIST (n = 1), oligodendroglioma (n = 1). Forty-five organs were retrieved (22 livers, 19 kidneys, 3 hearts, and 1 pancreas) and transplanted into 44 recipients with 1 liver-kidney combined transplantation. Four recipients died due to causes not related to the tumor. No donor-transmitted tumor was detected among the recipients. Donation is absolutely not indicated in cases of tumors with high metastatic potential and high grades. Performing an accurate evaluation of the donor, taking into account the histological grade, currently can allow, organ retrieval and transplantation with an acceptable risk.

  9. Prenatal exposure to BPA alters the epigenome of the rat mammary gland and increases the propensity to neoplastic development.

    PubMed

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Wadia, Perinaaz R; Murray, Tessa J; Settles, Matthew L; Treitman, Jo D; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) may play a causal role in the increased breast cancer incidence which has been observed in Europe and the US over the last 50 years. The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) leaches from plastic food/beverage containers and dental materials. Fetal exposure to BPA induces preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the adult rat mammary gland. Previous results suggest that BPA acts through the estrogen receptors which are detected exclusively in the mesenchyme during the exposure period by directly altering gene expression, leading to alterations of the reciprocal interactions between mesenchyme and epithelium. This initiates a long sequence of altered morphogenetic events leading to neoplastic transformation. Additionally, BPA induces epigenetic changes in some tissues. To explore this mechanism in the mammary gland, Wistar-Furth rats were exposed subcutaneously via osmotic pumps to vehicle or 250 µg BPA/kg BW/day, a dose that induced ductal carcinomas in situ. Females exposed from gestational day 9 to postnatal day (PND) 1 were sacrificed at PND4, PND21 and at first estrus after PND50. Genomic DNA (gDNA) was isolated from the mammary tissue and immuno-precipitated using anti-5-methylcytosine antibodies. Detection and quantification of gDNA methylation status using the Nimblegen ChIP array revealed 7412 differentially methylated gDNA segments (out of 58207 segments), with the majority of changes occurring at PND21. Transcriptomal analysis revealed that the majority of gene expression differences between BPA- and vehicle-treated animals were observed later (PND50). BPA exposure resulted in higher levels of pro-activation histone H3K4 trimethylation at the transcriptional initiation site of the alpha-lactalbumin gene at PND4, concomitantly enhancing mRNA expression of this gene. These results show that fetal BPA exposure triggers changes in the postnatal and adult mammary gland epigenome and alters gene expression patterns

  10. PAX 8 expression in non-neoplastic tissues, primary tumors, and metastatic tumors: a comprehensive immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Ayhan; Shen, Steven S; Hamilton, Candice; Anjana, Kundu; Coffey, Donna; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Truong, Luan D

    2011-06-01

    /cell-specific expression is maintained during both neoplastic transformation and metastasis. PAX 8 is a sensitive and specific marker for tumors of renal, Müllerian, or thyroid origin in both primary and metastatic sites.

  11. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A.; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)−/− mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apcmin+/− mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial–mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the “field change” milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  12. Apoptosis: its role in pituitary development and neoplastic pituitary tissue.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, M F; Carvalho, L R S; Bronstein, M D

    2014-04-01

    Apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death, is a phenomenon in which different stimuli trigger cellular mechanisms that culminate in death, in the absence of inflammatory cell response. Two different activation pathways are known, the intrinsic pathway (or mitochondrial) and extrinsic (or death-receptor pathway), both pathways trigger enzymatic reactions that lead cells to break up and be phagocytized by neighboring cells. This process is a common occurrence in physiological and pathological states, participating in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and remodeling of organs. In the early steps of pituitary gland formation, numerous apoptotic cells are detected in the separation of Rathke's pouch from the roof of oral ectoderm. In the distal part of the gland, which will form the adenohypophysis, the ratio of apoptosis was significantly lower. However, there is evidence that neoplastic pituitary cells undergo unbalance in genes that control apoptosis leading to uncontrolled cell growth. No direct evidence of apoptosis was found in the drugs used for tumors producing prolactin and growth hormone. In conclusion, an unbalancing in the apoptosis process is the boundary between development and tumor growth.

  13. Hedgehog signaling in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Adriana P; Lewis, Michael T

    2010-09-01

    The hedgehog signal transduction network is a critical regulator of metazoan development. Inappropriate activation of this network is implicated in several different cancers, including breast. Genetic evidence in mice as well as molecular biological studies in human cells clearly indicate that activated signaling can lead to mammary hyperplasia and, in some cases, tumor formation. However, the exact role(s) activated hedgehog signaling plays in the development or progression of breast cancer also remain unclear. In this review, we have discussed recent data regarding the mechanism(s) by which the hedgehog network may signal in the mammary gland, as well as the data implicating activated signaling as a contributing factor to breast cancer development. Finally, we provide a brief update on the available hedgehog signaling inhibitors with respect to ongoing clinical trials, some of which will include locally advanced or metastatic breast cancers. Given the growing intensity with which the hedgehog signaling network is being studied in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland, a more complete understanding of this network should allow more effective targeting of its activities in breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  14. Usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography in evaluation of paracardiac neoplastic masses.

    PubMed

    Lestuzzi, C; Nicolosi, G L; Mimo, R; Pavan, D; Zanuttini, D

    1992-07-15

    Mediastinal paracardiac tumors may cause both cardiovascular complications and problems in differential diagnosis of cardiac diseases. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may give an additional new window to mediastinal neoplasms, but only a few studies have been reported. TEE was performed in 70 patients with paracardiac neoplastic masses. The procedure was indicated to solve particular clinical problems in 20 patients, and as a prospective study on 50 unselected patients with mediastinal neoplasms. Twenty-three patients underwent follow-up studies; a total of 101 echocardiograms were recorded. The procedure was tolerated well or very well by most patients, and provided additional anatomic or hemodynamic data in every patient in group a and in 45 of 50 in group b. The additional data were relevant for clinical management in 14 of 20 patients in group a, and in 3 of 45 in group b. Based on the results of this study, TEE is useful in association with other radiologic techniques in patients with paracardiac neoplasms. As an imaging technique, it may represent a reliable alternative to computed tomography whenever the latter is not feasible.

  15. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Hardy, R E

    1990-01-15

    Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) was assayed in normal volunteers, patients with non-malignant diseases, and a variety of cancer patients. Mean plasma LSA in 50 normal volunteers, 16 patients with non-malignant diseases, 54 breast cancer, 17 lung cancer, 15 colon cancer, 7 ovarian cancer, 5 prostate cancer, 4 leukemia, 4 gastrointestinal, 3 thyroid cancer, 3 pancreas cancer and 2 adrenal cancer patients were 17.7, 23.2, 58, 85, 56.7, 46.2, 56.7, 53.3, 31.1, 33.2 and 119.5 mg/dl, respectively. None of the normal volunteers had elevated plasma LSA values. Plasma LSA level was not significantly different in male and female volunteers. Two out of 114 different cancer patients had plasma LSA levels within normal range exhibiting 98.2% sensitivity of the assay. Plasma LSA, which is relatively simple to assay, may be used as a tumor marker in wide variety of neoplastic diseases.

  16. [Genetic alterations in preneoplastic and neoplastic injuries of the gallbladder].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jonathan; García, Patricia; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2010-05-01

    This article aims to review the most relevant morphological and molecular aspects involved in gallbladder (GB) cancer. In Chile, gallbladder cancer is the main cause of death due to cancer, among women older than 40 years. However, there is almost none information about the morphological changes and the genetic alterations involved in the beginning and development of this neoplasia. Two carcinogenic ways have been described. The sequence adenoma-carcinoma is accepted to be less frequent and important. The most important is the sequence where a metaplasia evolves to displasia that progresses to carcinoma in situ and finally it becomes invasive. This progress requires 10 to 15 years approximately. During this time, a continue progression of injuries have been described. Molecular research studies show genetic anomalies in some genes which are temporary events in preneoplastic injuries of the gallbladder. Some of them even exist before the first morphological changes, while the expression of tumor suppressor genes like p53, adhesion molecules and oncogenes, among others, can be related to late GB carcinogenesis. The K-ras gene seems to play a role in this neoplasia, mainly in those that present an abnormal biliopancreatic union. The microsatelital instability has been found in a small subset of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. The existence of methylation in the promotor gene areas has been related to the cellular proliferation, invasion and metastasis and also in cases of chronic cholecystitis, suggesting that this epigenetic phenomenon represents a crucial early event in GB carcinogenesis.

  17. Aging promotes neoplastic disease through effects on the tissue microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Doratiotto, Silvia; Sini, Marcella; Fanti, Maura; Cadoni, Erika; Serra, Monica; Laconi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the complex relationship between aging and cancer will provide important tools for the prevention and treatment of neoplasia. In these studies, the hypothesis was tested that aging may fuel carcinogenesis via alterations imposed in the tissue microenvironment. Preneoplastic hepatocytes isolated from liver nodules were orthotopically injected into either young or old syngeneic rats and their fate was followed over time using the dipeptidyl-peptidase type IV (DPPIV) system to track donor-derived-cells. At 3 months post-Tx, the mean size of donor-derived clusters was 11±3 cells in young vs. 42±8 in old recipients. At 8 months post-Tx, no visible lesion were detected in any of 21 young recipients, while 17/18 animals transplanted at old age displayed hepatic nodules, including 7 large tumors. All tumors expressed the DPPIV marker enzyme, indicating that they originated from transplanted cells. Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was common in liver of 18-month old animals, while it was a rare finding in young controls. Finally, both mRNA and IL6 protein were found to be increased in the liver of aged rats compared to young controls. These results are interpreted to indicate that the microenvironment of the aged liver promotes the growth of pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. PMID:27929382

  18. Kron's biliary prosthetic bypass in the treatment of neoplastic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Kron, B; Reynier, J

    1985-01-01

    After experimental study in the dog, which showed the material to be highly reliable, an original method of biliary bypass using a silicone prosthesis in the treatment of neoplastic jaundice is introduced. This prosthesis allows the bile duct to be bypassed regardless of the location of the obstacle. This method was used in 150 patients; recession was sufficiently good in 84 of them to confirm good tolerance and the excellence of the results. In fact, good results were recorded in 95% of cases of cancer of the hilum, which is all the more remarkable in consideration of the difficulties involved in these operations. The main postoperative complications are bile fistulas which resolve spontaneously if the precaution of extensively draining the zones of intubation is taken; postoperative comfort is excellent; no constraint is necessary and the operative risk is moderate, this is particularly desirable in patients in a poor general condition. A short prosthesis makes transtumoral intubation possible, and a long prosthesis allows implantation in the digestive tract: stomach, duodenum or first intestinal loop. Postoperative persistence of jaundice is rare if a prosthesis of sufficient diameter is used and if no major bile duct or part of the liver is excluded. Cholangitis is exceptional and indicative of an excluded biliary area.

  19. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-07

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

  20. Detecting neoplastic development in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Robles, Francisco; Chen, Xiaoxin; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is an optical technique that recovers depth-resolved spectroscopic information about scatterers. The current fLCI system utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source, a 4-f interferometer, and an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire spectra from 256 adjacent spatial points. This configuration permits the acquisition of ultrahigh depth resolution Fourier domain OCT images without the need for any beam scanning. fLCI has traditionally obtained depth-resolved spectral information by performing a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) on the detected spectra, similar to the processing techniques of spectroscopic OCT. We now employ a dual Gaussian window processing method which simultaneously obtains high spectral and temporal resolution, thus avoiding the resolution trade-off normally associated with the STFT. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain structural information about the probed scatterers. We now verify fLCI's ability to distinguish between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissue using the hamster cheek pouch model. Thirty hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. Our results will further establish fLCI as an effective method for distinguishing between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissues.

  1. Emperipolesis-like invasion of neoplastic lymphocytes into hepatocytes in feline T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kanae, Y; Kagawa, Y; Ano, N; Nomura, K; Ozaki, K; Narama, I

    2011-05-01

    Twelve cases of feline malignant lymphoma with emperipolesis-like invasion of neoplastic lymphocytes were examined microscopically, immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. Intracytoplasmic invasion of neoplastic cells varied in severity between the cases, between hepatic lobules and between areas within the lobules. The number of infiltrating neoplastic cells ranged from one to several per hepatocyte. Neoplastic cells exhibited widely varying morphology from case-to-case and cell-to-cell within each case, and contained eosinophilic cytoplasmic granules in four cases. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that neoplastic cells in 11 of the 12 cases expressed one or both T-cell markers (CD3 and TIA-1). Diagnosis of T-cell lymphoma was also confirmed by assessment of clonality by polymerase chain reaction. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that the neoplastic lymphocytes were contained within an invagination of the cell membrane of the hepatocyte, rather than directly infiltrating into the cytoplasm of the cell. There was no evidence that the invasive neoplastic lymphocytes had a cytotoxic effect.

  2. Cognitive functioning following one-year natalizumab treatment: A non-randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rorsman, I; Petersen, C; Nilsson, P C

    2017-09-13

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can have serious impact on social and occupational functioning. Natalizumab reduces relapse rates, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions, and progression of disability. Previous studies on cognitive functioning have not based inclusion on cognitive performance criteria. The aim of the present study was to determine any potential natalizumab-related cognitive effects on MS patients performing below normal limits on neuropsychological testing. Patients starting natalizumab (n = 21) and a quasi-control group of stable MS patients (n = 13) on first line disease modifying treatment were included following neuropsychological assessment demonstrating subnormal cognitive performance. Assessment, using ten cognitive variables, was repeated after 12 months. Symptoms of fatigue, anxiety and depression were also examined. Raw scores on the cognitive tests were transformed into Z-scores based on published age-corrected normative data. Between-group analyses on difference Z-scores (baseline - follow-up) yielded significant results on Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test-2 (PASAT-2) (P = .008), with the natalizumab group showing larger improvement than quasi control patients. On PASAT-2, 28,5% from the natalizumab group demonstrated >1 SD improvement, indicative of clinically meaningful change, compared with none in the quasi control group. Patients receiving natalizumab showed within-group improvements on six of the ten cognitive variables. There were no group differences in symptoms of fatigue, anxiety or depression. The results demonstrate improvement in information processing speed following 12-months of natalizumab treatment. The results are interpreted as reflection of anti-inflammatory properties of natalizumab rather than retest- or long-term restorative effects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Differentiation of pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome) from physiologic/non-neoplastic hypercortisolism (formerly known as pseudo-Cushing's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Findling, James W; Raff, Hershel

    2017-05-01

    Endogenous hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome) usually implies the presence of a pathologic condition caused by either an ACTH-secreting neoplasm or autonomous cortisol secretion from a benign or malignant adrenal neoplasm. However, sustained or intermittent hypercortisolism may also accompany many medical disorders that stimulate physiologic/non-neoplastic activation of the HPA axis (formerly known as pseudo-Cushing's syndrome); these two entities may share indistinguishable clinical and biochemical features. A thorough history and physical examination is often the best (and sometimes only) way to exclude pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism. The presence of alcoholism, renal failure, poorly controlled diabetes and severe neuropsychiatric disorders should always raise suspicion that the presence of hypercortisolism may be related to physiologic/non-neoplastic Cushing's syndrome. As late-night salivary cortisol and low-dose dexamethasone suppression have good sensitivity and negative predictive value, normal studies exclude Cushing's syndrome of any form. However, these tests have imperfect specificity and additional testing over time with clinical follow-up is often needed. When there is persistent diagnostic uncertainty, secondary tests such as the DDAVP stimulation test and the dexamethasone-CRH test may provide evidence for the presence or absence of an ACTH-secreting tumor. This review will define and characterize the numerous causes of physiologic/non-neoplastic hypercortisolism and provide a rational clinical and biochemical approach to distinguish it from pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism (true Cushing's syndrome). © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Survival following Ommaya reservoir placement for neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Marie; Rughani, Anand; Lin, Chih-Ta; Cushing, Deborah A; Florman, Jeffrey E; Wu, Julian K

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM) following Ommaya reservoir placement in order to determine whether any patient factors are associated with longer survival. NM is a devastating late manifestation of cancer, and given its dismal prognosis, identifying appropriate patients for Ommaya reservoir placement is difficult. The authors performed a retrospective review of 80 patients who underwent Ommaya reservoir placement at three medical centers from September 2001 through September 2012. The primary outcome was death. Differences in survival were assessed with Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. The Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression modeling were performed to identify factors associated with survival. The primary diagnoses were solid organ, hematologic, and primary central nervous system tumors in 53.8%, 41.3%, and 5%, respectively. The median overall survival was 72.5 days (95% confidence interval 36-122) with 30% expiring within 30 days and only 13.8% surviving more than 1 year. There were no differences in median overall survival between sites (p=0.37) despite differences in time from diagnosis of NM to Ommaya reservoir placement (p<0.001). Diagnosis of hematologic malignancy was inversely associated with death within 90 days (p=0.04; odds ratio 0.34), older age was associated with death within 90 days (p=0.05; odds ratio 1.5, per 10 year increase in age). The prognosis of NM remains poor despite the available treatment with intraventricular chemotherapy. There exists significant variability in treatment algorithms among medical centers and consideration of this variability is crucial when interpreting existing series of Ommaya reservoir use in the treatment of patients with NM.

  5. The origin of aging: imperfectness-driven non-random damage defines the aging process and control of lifespan.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2013-09-01

    Physicochemical properties preclude ideal biomolecules and perfect biological functions. This inherent imperfectness leads to the generation of damage by every biological process, at all levels, from small molecules to cells. The damage is too numerous to be repaired, is partially invisible to natural selection, and manifests as aging. I propose that the inherent imperfectness of biological systems is the true root of the aging process. Because each biomolecule generates specific forms of damage, the cumulative damage is largely non-random and is indirectly encoded in the genome. I consider this concept in light of other proposed theories of aging and integrate these disparate ideas into a single model. I also discuss the evolutionary significance of damage accumulation and strategies for reducing damage. Finally, I suggest ways to test this integrated model of aging.

  6. The Origin of Aging: Imperfectness-Driven Non-Random Damage Defines the Aging Process and Control of Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties preclude ideal biomolecules and perfect biological functions. This inherent imperfectness leads to the generation of damage by every biological process, at all levels, from small molecules to cells. The damage is too numerous to be repaired, is partially invisible to natural selection and manifests as aging. I propose that it is the inherent imperfectness of biological systems that is the true root of the aging process. As each biomolecule generates specific forms of damage, the cumulative damage is largely non-random and is indirectly encoded in the genome. I consider this concept in light of other proposed theories of aging and integrate these disparate ideas into a single model. I also discuss the evolutionary significance of damage accumulation and strategies for reducing damage. Finally, I suggest ways to test this integrated model of aging. PMID:23769208

  7. Seizures associated with tranexamic acid for cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Ando, Tomo; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether tranexamic acid (TXA) therapy for adult cardiac surgery is associated with an increase in the risk of seizures, and we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized observational studies. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through December 2016 using PubMed and OVID. Eligible studies were RCTs and non-randomized observational studies on TXA versus control (no TXA, placebo, or active control such as low-dose TXA, aprotinin, and epsilon aminocaproic acid) enrolling adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery and reporting the postoperative incidence of seizures as an outcome. Study-specific estimates were combined using inverse variance-weighted averages of logarithmic odds ratios (ORs) in the random-effects model. Of 90 potentially relevant articles screened initially, 16 reports of eligible studies were identified and included. A pooled analysis of all 16 studies (enrolling 45,235 patients) demonstrated that TXA therapy was associated with a statistically significant increase in the seizures incidence (OR=4.13; 95% CI: 2.59 to 6.57; P<0.00001). A subgroup analysis indicated a statistically significant increase in the seizures incidence with TXA therapy in all subgroups of 5 RCTs, 5 adjusted observational studies, and 6 unadjusted observational studies with no statistically significant subgroup differences (P=0.36; I2=1.5%). The results of the present meta-analysis of 16 studies enrolling 45,235 patients confirmed that TXA therapy for adult cardiac surgery is associated with a 4.1-fold increase in the risk of seizure.

  8. [Limitations of colonic lavage in the cytopathological diagnosis of inflammatory and neoplastic lesions].

    PubMed

    Villanacci, V; Grigolato, P G; Bonardi, M; Gattamelata, M; Moreschetti, R; Ghirardi, M; Di Fabio, F; Nascimbeni, R; Salerni, B

    2003-04-01

    The authors describe the personal experience on colonic lavage cytology in neoplastic or inflammatory diseases. Although the presence of false negative results in the lesions of right colon, the method could be useful in the diagnosis of selected cases.

  9. Onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary pathologies and suspected for paraneoplastic neurological syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michalak, S; Cofta, S; Piatek, A; Rybacka, J; Wysocka, E; Kozubski, W

    2009-12-07

    Onconeuronal antibodies are important diagnostic tool in patients with suspicion of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). However, their role in PNS pathophysiology and specificity for particular neurological manifestation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with pulmonary pathologies and suspected for PNS. Twenty one patients with pulmonary pathologies were selected from the database of 525 consecutive patients with suspicion of PNS. Patients' sera were screened for the presence of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies by means of indirect immunofluorescence; the presence was confirmed by Western blotting. Clinical data were obtained from medical records, hospital data base, and questionnaire-based direct telephone contact with patients. Among 21 patients, aged 54 +/-11, with pulmonary pathologies, the most frequent neurological manifestations were neuropathies. Typical PNS included paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) and limbic encephalitis (LE). We found cases with multiple onconeuronal antibodies (anti-Ri and anti-Yo) and coexisting PNS (PCD/LE). Well-defined onconeuronal antibodies were identified in 23.8% of patients. Among antineuronal antibodies, the most frequent were anti-MAG (23.8%). ROC curves analysis revealed high sensitivity of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies for typical PNS and lower for pulmonary malignancies. Tests for antibodies are highly sensitive for the diagnosis of typical paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Anti-myelin and anti-MAG antibodies are associated with non-neoplastic pulmonary diseases. Patients with well-defined onconeuronal antibodies require careful screening and follow-up, because the PNS diagnosis indicates a high probability of an underlying malignancy.

  10. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-07-01

    bloodstream infections of Salmonella typhimurium and Capno-cytophaga canimorsus in Hodgkin's disease patients seems likely due to a particular mechanism which infection by these species is favored. The specific nature of these mechanisms remains to be determined. The recovery of any unusual bacterium from blood should warrant a careful consideration of the possibility of underlying disease, especially cancer. Microbiologists should advise clinicians of the unusual nature of the identified organism and provide the counsel that certain neoplastic processes, often accompanied by neutropenia, render the human host susceptible to invasion by almost any bacterium. The recovery of such organisms as C. septicum or S. bovis should prompt the clinician to aggressively seek to identify an occult neoplasm if one has not yet been diagnosed.

  11. Recovery of uncommon bacteria from blood: association with neoplastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, J L; Koneman, E W

    1995-01-01

    bloodstream infections of Salmonella typhimurium and Capno-cytophaga canimorsus in Hodgkin's disease patients seems likely due to a particular mechanism which infection by these species is favored. The specific nature of these mechanisms remains to be determined. The recovery of any unusual bacterium from blood should warrant a careful consideration of the possibility of underlying disease, especially cancer. Microbiologists should advise clinicians of the unusual nature of the identified organism and provide the counsel that certain neoplastic processes, often accompanied by neutropenia, render the human host susceptible to invasion by almost any bacterium. The recovery of such organisms as C. septicum or S. bovis should prompt the clinician to aggressively seek to identify an occult neoplasm if one has not yet been diagnosed. PMID:7553569

  12. Transformational Learners: Transformational Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    Transformational learning, according to Mezirow (1981), involves transforming taken-for-granted frames of reference into more discriminating, flexible "habits of mind". In teacher education, transformative learning impacts on the development of students' action theories, self-efficacy and professional attributes. Although considered…

  13. The Transformations of Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Francis Y.

    2000-01-01

    Harris's original idea of transformations has been changed several times in Chomsky's work. This article explicates these transformations, arguing that though their motivations are highly understandable, these transformations are not necessary for understanding the workings of natural languages. (Author/VWL)

  14. Use of a nitinol stent to palliate a colorectal neoplastic obstruction in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Culp, William T. N.; MacPhail, Catriona M.; Perry, James A.; Jensen, Tracey D.

    2015-01-01

    Case Description A 12-year-old castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated for clinical signs associated with colorectal obstruction. Clinical Findings The dog had a 2-week history of tenesmus and hematochezia. On rectal examination, an annular colorectal mass was palpable extending orad into the pelvic canal. The original diagnosis of the colorectal mass was a mucosal adenoma. The dog was maintained on a low-residue diet and fecal softeners for a period of 13 months after initial diagnosis. At that time, medical management was no longer effective. Treatment and Outcome Placement of a colonic stent was chosen to palliate the clinical signs associated with colorectal obstruction. By use of fluoroscopic and colonoscopic guidance, a nitinol stent was placed intraluminally to open the obstructed region. Placement of the stent resulted in improvement of clinical signs, although tenesmus and obstipation occurred periodically after stent placement. At 212 days after stent placement, the patient had extensive improvement in clinical signs with minimal complications; however, clinical signs became severe at 238 days after stent placement, and the dog was euthanized. Histologic evaluation of the rectal tumor from samples obtained during necropsy revealed that the tumor had undergone malignant transformation to a carcinoma in situ. Clinical Relevance A stent was successfully placed in the colon and rectum to relieve obstruction associated with a tumor originally diagnosed as a benign neoplasm. Placement of colorectal stents may be an option for the palliation of colorectal obstruction secondary to neoplastic disease; however, clinical signs may persist, and continuation of medical management may be necessary. PMID:21756178

  15. Insights on Neoplastic Stem Cells from Gel-Based Proteomics of Childhood Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, William E.; Eedala, Sruthi; Jadhav, Y.L. Avinash; Labhan, Manbir S.; Pericherla, Vidya C.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood germ cell tumors (cGCTs), believed to arise from transformed primordial germ cells by an unknown mechanism, provide a unique model system for investigating cell signaling, pluripotency and the microenvironment of neoplastic stem cells (NSCs) in vivo. This is the first report of proteomics of cGCTs. Procedure Four dysgerminomas (DYSs) and four childhood endodermal sinus tumors (cESTs), resembling self-renewing and differentiating NSCs, respectively, were selected. Proteomic studies were performed by 2-DE, SDS-PAGE and cLC/MS/MS with protein database searching. Results 2-DE: 9 of 941spots were differentially regulated with greater than a 2-fold change in spot volume for at least 3 of 4 gels in each group. 2 of 9 spots had p-values for the t-test analysis of comparisons less than 0.001, while the remaining spots had p-values from 0.013 to 0.191. Top-ranked proteins were identified in 9 of 9 spots with 4.0 to 38% sequence coverage. APOA1, CRK and PDIA3 were up-regulated in cESTs. TFG, TYMP, VCP, RBBP, FKBP4 and BiP were up-regulated in DYSs. SDS-PAGE: Up-regulation of NF45 and FKBP4 was observed in 4 of 4 cESTs and DYSs, respectively. The fold-changes observed correspond with characteristic genetic changes. Conclusion Differential regulation of FKBP4 and NF45, combined with previous research on immunosuppressant binding, suggests that glucocorticoid receptor signaling merits further investigation in cGCTs and NSCs. PMID:21793190

  16. bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression in normal and neoplastic human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Delia, D; Aiello, A; Soligo, D; Fontanella, E; Melani, C; Pezzella, F; Pierotti, M A; Della Porta, G

    1992-03-01

    The present study provides immunobiochemical and molecular data on the differentiation-linked expression of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene in normal and neoplastic myeloid cells. Using a recently developed monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to the bcl-2 molecule, staining of normal bone marrow myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes, but neither monocytes nor most polymorphonuclear cells, was demonstrated. By two-color flow cytometric analysis, bcl-2 was evidenced in CD33+ and CD33+/CD34+ myeloid cells as well as in the more primitive CD33-/CD34+ population. The leukemic cell lines HL-60, KG1, GM-1, and K562 were bcl-2 positive together with 11 of 14 acute myeloid leukemias (AML) and three of three chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) in blast crises; six of seven CML were negative. Among myelodysplastic cases, augmentation of the bcl-2 positive myeloblastic compartment was found in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) and in transformation (RAEB-t). Western blots of myeloid leukemias and control lymphocytes extracts evidenced an anti-bcl-2 immunoreactive band of the expected size (26 Kd). Moreover, the HL-60 and KG1 cell lines, both positive for the bcl-2 protein, exhibited the appropriate size bcl-2 mRNA (7.5 Kb). These findings clearly indicate that the bcl-2 gene is operative in myeloid cells and that the anti-bcl-2 MoAb identifies its product and not a cross-reactive epitope. Induction of HL-60 differentiation toward the monocytic and granulocytic pathways was accompanied by a marked decrease in bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels; bivariate flow cytometric analysis showed that the fraction becoming bcl-2 negative was in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These data establish that the bcl-2 proto-oncogene is expressed on myeloid cells and their progenitors and is regulated in a differentiation-linked manner.

  17. Neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions in aging mice of unique and common inbred strains contribution to modeling of human neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, H; Lechowska-Piskorowska, J; Krysiak, E; Strzalkowska, A; Unrug-Bielawska, K; Grygalewicz, B; Skurzak, H M; Pienkowska-Grela, B; Gajewska, M

    2014-05-01

    The evaluation of spontaneous lesions in classical inbred strains of mice has become increasingly important because genetically engineered mice (GEMs) are created on these backgrounds. Novel inbred strains-genetically diverse from classic strains-are valuable both as a new background for GEM mice and to increase the genetic variation found in laboratory mice. Newly arising spontaneous genetic alterations in commonly used strains may also lead to new and valuable mouse models of disease. This report evaluates gross and histological lesions in relatively new, classic, and rarely explored mouse inbred strains. Pathological lesions of 1273 mice from 12 inbred strains (129S1/SvW, A.CA-H2(f) /W, AKR/W, BALB/cW, BN/aW, C57BL/6 W, C57BL/10 W, C3H/W, C3H (wad) /W, CBA/W, DBA/2 W, and WOM/W) are reported. BN/aW, WOM/W, and C3H (wad) /W are novel inbred strains produced and maintained in the Department of Genetics and Laboratory Animal Breeding at the Center of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. Both neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions were examined. The prevalence of lung neoplasms was significantly higher in A.CA-H2(f) /W (33.3%) and BALB/cW (33.8%) mice (P < .01). The prevalence of liver neoplasms was significantly higher in the CBA/W strain (P < .01). Mammary gland neoplasms arose at a greater frequency in C3H/W mice (P < .01). The occurrence of uterine neoplasms was higher in DBA/W and 129S1/SvW mice. AKR/W and WOM/W mice developed T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma with high frequency (110/121 [90.9%] and 159/175 [90.9%], respectively) before 1 year of age. The occurrence of nonneoplastic lesions in the kidneys of BN/aW mice was increased (P < .01).

  18. Alternative regimens of magnesium sulfate for treatment of preeclampsia and eclampsia: a systematic review of non-randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Jeremy J; Niedle, Polina S; Vogel, Joshua P; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Bohren, Meghan; Tunçalp, Özge; Gülmezoglu, Ahmet Metin

    2016-02-01

    The optimal dosing regimen of magnesium sulfate for treating preeclampsia and eclampsia is unclear. Evidence from the Cochrane review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was inconclusive due to lack of relevant data. To complement the evidence from the Cochrane review, we assessed available data from non-randomized studies on the comparative efficacy and safety of alternative magnesium sulfate regimens for the management of preeclampsia and eclampsia. Sources included Medline, EMBASE, Popline, CINAHL, Global Health Library, African Index Medicus, Biological abstract, BIOSIS and reference lists of eligible studies. We selected non-randomized study designs including quasi-RCTs, cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies that compared magnesium sulfate regimens in women with preeclampsia or eclampsia. Of 6178 citations identified, 248 were reviewed in full text and five studies of low to very low quality were included. Compared with standard regimens, lower-dose regimens appeared equally as good in terms of preventing seizures [odds ratio (OR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46-2.28, 899 women, four studies], maternal morbidity (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.32-0.71, 796 women, three studies), and fetal and/or neonatal mortality (OR 0.87, 95%CI 0.38-2.00, 800 women, four studies). Comparison of loading dose only with maintenance dose regimens showed no differences in seizure rates (OR 0.99, 95%CI 0.22-4.50, 146 women, two studies), maternal morbidity (OR 0.53, 95%CI 0.15-1.93, 146 women, two studies), maternal mortality (OR 0.63, 95%CI 0.05-7.50, 146 women, two studies), and fetal and/or neonatal mortality (OR 0.49, 95%CI 0.23-1.03, 146 women, two studies). Lower-dose and loading dose-only regimens could be as safe and efficacious as standard regimens; however, this evidence comes from low to very low quality studies and further high quality studies are needed. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. The incidence of deafness is non-randomly distributed among families segregating for Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1).

    PubMed Central

    Morell, R; Friedman, T B; Asher, J H; Robbins, L G

    1997-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is caused by autosomal dominant mutations, and is characterised by pigmentary anomalies and various defects of neural crest derived tissues. It accounts for over 2% of congenital deafness. WS shows high variability in expressivity within families and differences in penetrance of clinical traits between families. While mutations in the gene PAX3 seem to be responsible for most, if not all, WS type 1, it is still not clear what accounts for the reduced penetrance of deafness. Stochastic events during development may be the factors that determine whether a person with a PAX3 mutation will be congenitally deaf or not. Alternatively, genetic background or non-random environmental factors or both may be significant. We compared the likelihoods for deafness in affected subjects from 24 families with reported PAX3 mutations, and in seven of the families originally described by Waardenburg. We found evidence that stochastic variation alone does not explain the differences in penetrances of deafness among WS families. Our analyses suggest that genetic background in combination with certain PAX3 alleles may be important factors in the aetiology of deafness in WS. Images PMID:9192262

  20. Systems-level chromosomal parameters represent a suprachromosomal basis for the non-random chromosomal arrangement in human interphase nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fatakia, Sarosh N.; Mehta, Ishita S.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2016-01-01

    Forty-six chromosome territories (CTs) are positioned uniquely in human interphase nuclei, wherein each of their positions can range from the centre of the nucleus to its periphery. A non-empirical basis for their non-random arrangement remains unreported. Here, we derive a suprachromosomal basis of that overall arrangement (which we refer to as a CT constellation), and report a hierarchical nature of the same. Using matrix algebra, we unify intrinsic chromosomal parameters (e.g., chromosomal length, gene density, the number of genes per chromosome), to derive an extrinsic effective gene density matrix, the hierarchy of which is dominated largely by extrinsic mathematical coupling of HSA19, followed by HSA17 (human chromosome 19 and 17, both preferentially interior CTs) with all CTs. We corroborate predicted constellations and effective gene density hierarchy with published reports from fluorescent in situ hybridization based microscopy and Hi-C techniques, and delineate analogous hierarchy in disparate vertebrates. Our theory accurately predicts CTs localised to the nuclear interior, which interestingly share conserved synteny with HSA19 and/or HSA17. Finally, the effective gene density hierarchy dictates how permutations among CT position represents the plasticity within its constellations, based on which we suggest that a differential mix of coding with noncoding genome modulates the same. PMID:27845379

  1. Non-random spatial coupling induces desynchronization, chaos and multistability in a predator-prey-resource system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenta; Yoshida, Takehito

    2012-05-07

    The metacommunity perspective has attracted much attention recently, but the understanding of how dispersal between local communities alters their ecological dynamics is still limited, especially regarding the effect of non-random, unequal dispersal of organisms. This is a study of a three-trophic-level (predator-prey-resource) system that is connected by different manners of dispersal. The model is based on a well-studied experimental system cultured in chemostats (continuous flow-through culture), which consists of rotifer predator, algal prey and nutrient. In the model, nutrient dispersal can give rise to multistability when the two systems are connected by nutrient dispersal, whereas three-trophic-level systems tend to show a rich dynamical behavior, e.g. antisynchronous or asynchronous oscillations including chaos. Although the existence of multistability was already known in two-trophic-level (predator-prey) systems, it was confined to a small range of dispersal rate. In contrast, the multistability in the three-trophic-level system is found in a broader range of dispersal rate. The results suggest that, in three-trophic-level systems, the dispersal of nutrient not only alters population dynamics of local systems but can also cause regime shifts such as a transition to different oscillation phases.

  2. Systems-level chromosomal parameters represent a suprachromosomal basis for the non-random chromosomal arrangement in human interphase nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fatakia, Sarosh N; Mehta, Ishita S; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2016-11-15

    Forty-six chromosome territories (CTs) are positioned uniquely in human interphase nuclei, wherein each of their positions can range from the centre of the nucleus to its periphery. A non-empirical basis for their non-random arrangement remains unreported. Here, we derive a suprachromosomal basis of that overall arrangement (which we refer to as a CT constellation), and report a hierarchical nature of the same. Using matrix algebra, we unify intrinsic chromosomal parameters (e.g., chromosomal length, gene density, the number of genes per chromosome), to derive an extrinsic effective gene density matrix, the hierarchy of which is dominated largely by extrinsic mathematical coupling of HSA19, followed by HSA17 (human chromosome 19 and 17, both preferentially interior CTs) with all CTs. We corroborate predicted constellations and effective gene density hierarchy with published reports from fluorescent in situ hybridization based microscopy and Hi-C techniques, and delineate analogous hierarchy in disparate vertebrates. Our theory accurately predicts CTs localised to the nuclear interior, which interestingly share conserved synteny with HSA19 and/or HSA17. Finally, the effective gene density hierarchy dictates how permutations among CT position represents the plasticity within its constellations, based on which we suggest that a differential mix of coding with noncoding genome modulates the same.

  3. Compensatory load redistribution in Labrador retrievers when carrying different weights--a non-randomized prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Bockstahler, Barbara; Tichy, Alexander; Aigner, Patricia

    2016-06-07

    Retrievers are dogs particularly bred to retrieve birds or other small game, for the retrieval, the dogs are typically sent to the place where the shot game has fallen or to search the field for the wounded but still live game in order to return them to the hunter as quickly as possible. Examples of game animals are pheasants, mallard ducks and rabbits. For training, dummies with a variety of weights are used to simulate the retrieval of various types of game. The aim of this non-randomized prospective study was to investigate if peak vertical force, vertical impulse and paw pressure contact area are increased in the forelimbs when carrying different weights, and if the symmetrical weight distribution between contralateral limb pairs is disturbed. Ten actively working Labrador retrievers were walked over a pressure plate with or without carrying 0.5, 2.0 and 4.0 kg dummies. The aim of this study was to determine if vertical ground reaction forces and paw pressure contact area are increased in the forelimbs when carrying different weights, and if symmetrical weight distribution is disturbed between contralateral limb pairs. Peak vertical force and vertical impulse were significantly increased in the forelimbs and decreased in the hindlimbs in all weight carrying conditions. These results demonstrate the significant effects of carrying weight in the mouth on the ground reaction forces, which likely produce additional stress on the forelimb joints. Carry of game or a dummy is likely to alter the forelimb load distribution.

  4. Does balneotherapy with low radon concentration in water influence the endocrine system? A controlled non-randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Berhés, István; Kovács, Tibor; Kávási, Norbert; Somlai, János; Bender, Tamás

    2009-08-01

    Radon bath is a well-established modality of balneotherapy for the management of degenerative musculoskeletal disorders. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether baths of relatively low (80 Bq/l) radon concentration have any influence on the functioning of the endocrine system. In the study, a non-randomized pilot study, 27 patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders received 30-min radon baths (of 31-32 degrees C temperature and 80 Bq/l average radon concentration) daily, for 15 days. Twenty-five patients with matching pathologies were subjected to balneotherapy according to the same protocol, using thermal water with negligible radon content (6 Bq/l). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and dehydroepiandrosterone levels were measured before and after a balneotherapy course of 15 sessions. Comparison of the accumulated data using the Wilcoxon test did not reveal any significant difference between pre- and post-treatment values or between the two patient groups. It is noted that while the beneficial effects of balneotherapy with radon-containing water on degenerative disorders is widely known, only few data have been published in the literature on its effect on endocrine functions. The present study failed to demonstrate any substantial effect of thermal water with relatively low radon content on the functioning of the endocrine system.

  5. Non-random distribution of amino acids in the transmembrane segments of human type I single span membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Landolt-Marticorena, C; Williams, K A; Deber, C M; Reithmeier, R A

    1993-02-05

    The distribution of amino acids in the transmembrane segments and flanking regions of 115 human type I single span (amino terminus extracellular and carboxyl terminus cytosolic) plasma membrane proteins was found to be non-random. In this sample, Ile was preferentially localized to the amino-terminal region of the hydrophobic transmembrane segments, followed by Val, while Leu predominated in the carboxyl-terminal half of the segment. Although Gly residues were preferentially located in the transmembrane segment, this residue was excluded from the carboxyl-terminal and adjacent boundary regions. Aromatic residues (Tyr, Trp and Phe) occurred preferentially at the cytoplasmic boundary, with Trp also favored at the extracellular boundary. The extracellular flanking sequence amino-terminal to the transmembrane segment was enriched in residues predicted to initiate helix formation (Pro, Asn and Ser), while Arg and Lys were enriched in the cytoplasmic flank where they may function as topological determinants. The positional preferences of these particular amino acids within the transmembrane segment and flanking regions suggests that, in addition to lipid-protein interactions, these residues may participate in specific protein-protein interactions. A consensus sequence motif for type I membrane proteins is proposed and its role in the biosynthesis, folding, assembly and function of these segments is discussed.

  6. Non-random distribution and co-localization of purine/pyrimidine-encoded information and transcriptional regulatory domains.

    PubMed

    Povinelli, C M

    1992-01-01

    In order to detect sequence-based information predictive for the location of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory domains, the frequencies and distributions of the 36 possible purine/pyrimidine reverse complement hexamer pairs was determined for test sets of real and random sequences. The distribution of one of the hexamer pairs (RRYYRR/YYRRYY, referred to as M1) was further examined in a larger set of sequences (> 32 genes, 230 kb). Predominant clusters of M1 and the locations of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory domains were found to be associated and non-randomly distributed along the DNA consistent with a periodicity of approximately 1.2 kb. In the context of higher ordered chromatin this would align promoters, enhancers and the predominant clusters of M1 longitudinally along one face of a 30 nm fiber. Using only information about the distribution of the M1 motif, 50-70% of a sequence could be eliminated as being unlikely to contain transcriptional regulatory domains with an 87% recovery of the regulatory domains present.

  7. Randomly and Non-Randomly Missing Renal Function Data in the Strong Heart Study: A Comparison of Imputation Methods.

    PubMed

    Shara, Nawar; Yassin, Sayf A; Valaitis, Eduardas; Wang, Hong; Howard, Barbara V; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Umans, Jason G

    2015-01-01

    Kidney and cardiovascular disease are widespread among populations with high prevalence of diabetes, such as American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Studying these conditions simultaneously in longitudinal studies is challenging, because the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases result in missing data, and these data are likely not missing at random. When such data are merely excluded, study findings may be compromised. In this article, a subset of 2264 participants with complete renal function data from Strong Heart Exams 1 (1989-1991), 2 (1993-1995), and 3 (1998-1999) was used to examine the performance of five methods used to impute missing data: listwise deletion, mean of serial measures, adjacent value, multiple imputation, and pattern-mixture. Three missing at random models and one non-missing at random model were used to compare the performance of the imputation techniques on randomly and non-randomly missing data. The pattern-mixture method was found to perform best for imputing renal function data that were not missing at random. Determining whether data are missing at random or not can help in choosing the imputation method that will provide the most accurate results.

  8. Pre-operative factors that can predict neoplastic polypoid lesions of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Byung Hyo; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Jang Eon; Cho, Jai Young; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, So Yeon

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the preoperative factors that can predict neoplastic polypoid lesions of the gallbladder (PLGs) as well as malignant PLGs. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on the 210 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent cholecystectomy due to a PLG larger than 10 mm, as was determined by preoperative trans-abdominal ultrasonography or endoscopic ultrasonography. We analyzed the medical, laboratory, radiologic data and the pathologic results. RESULTS: In 210 cases, 146 had non-neoplastic polyps (69.5%) and 64 cases were neoplastic polyps (30.5%). An older age (≥ 65 years), the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the size of polyp (≥ 15 mm) were revealed to be independent predictive variables for neoplastic polyps with odd ratios (OR) of 2.27 (P = 0.044), 2.64 (P = 0.021) and 4.94 (P < 0.01), respectively. Among the neoplastic PLGs, an older age (≥ 65 years), the presence of DM and polyp size (≥ 15 mm) were associated with malignancy with ORs of 4.97 (P = 0.005), 6.13 (P = 0.001) and 20.55 (P < 0.001), respectively. CONCLUSION: Among patients with PLGs larger than 10 mm in size, higher risk groups such as elderly patients more than 65 years old, those with DM or a large polyp size (≥ 15 mm) should be managed by cholecystectomy. PMID:21633532

  9. Flat neoplastic lesions of the colon and rectum detected by high-resolution video endoscopy and chromoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, E; Watanabe, M; Slezak, P; Rubio, C

    1995-08-01

    Because small flat colorectal neoplastic lesions (i.e., flat adenomas and flat adenocarcinomas) may be as translucent as the surrounding mucosa, they can remain undetected at conventional endoscopy. By combining high-resolution video endoscopy and chromoscopy, we detected 109 colorectal flat neoplastic lesions in 55 of 232 patients studied. Forty-three (78%) of the 55 patients with flat neoplastic lesions were over 60 years of age. No flat neoplastic lesions were seen in patients under 40 years of age. Flat neoplastic lesions were more frequent in men (35%) than in women (15%). Seventy-seven (71%) of the 109 flat neoplastic lesions measured 0.5 cm or less, 23 (21%) between 0.6 and 1.0 cm, and 9 (8%) more than 1.0 cm. Low-grade dysplasia and high-grade dysplasia were found in 94 (86%) and 13 (12%) of the flat neoplastic lesions, respectively. Adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 3 (3%) flat lesions: 1 (1%) carcinoma originating in a flat adenoma and 2 (2%) adenocarcinomas without recognizable adenomatous elements. No adenocarcinomas were seen in lesions measuring 1.0 cm or less. Fourteen flat neoplastic lesions had a central depression at endoscopy. Flat neoplastic lesions with central depression more frequently showed high-grade dysplasia (43%) than did flat neoplastic lesions without central depression (7%). Central depression in flat neoplastic lesions should be considered a possible endoscopic marker for severe dysplasia. Our results suggest that flat neoplastic lesions occur more frequently than previously reported in Scandinavia. Flat adenomas may play an important role in the histogenesis of colorectal cancer.

  10. Issues Relating to Confounding and Meta-analysis When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews on the Effects of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Simon G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding caused by selection bias is often a key difference between non-randomized studies (NRS) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions. Key methodological issues: In this third paper of the series, we consider issues relating to the inclusion of NRS in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions. We discuss…

  11. Issues Relating to Confounding and Meta-analysis When Including Non-Randomized Studies in Systematic Reviews on the Effects of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Simon G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding caused by selection bias is often a key difference between non-randomized studies (NRS) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions. Key methodological issues: In this third paper of the series, we consider issues relating to the inclusion of NRS in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions. We discuss…

  12. 2015 update on the diagnosis and management of neoplastic pericardial disease.

    PubMed

    Lestuzzi, Chiara; Berretta, Massimiliano; Tomkowski, Witold

    2015-04-01

    The best approach in diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic pericardial disease has not been defined yet. The authors report the most recent literature about the new diagnostic techniques that are useful to improve the diagnosis. The literature about the therapeutic options is critically reviewed, in order to give suggestions of use to the clinical practice. Pericardial effusion may require urgent drainage; the solid component, however, becomes predominant in some cases. Neoplastic pericardial disease should be assessed following oncologic criteria evaluation of the neoplastic burden; outcome classified as complete or partial response, stable or progressive disease and - in cases with progression - event-free survival. Systemic chemotherapy may be effective in lymphomas and possibly in breast carcinomas. Intrapericardial chemotherapy with systemic chemotherapy is the treatment of choice in lung cancer. Pericardial window with systemic chemotherapy is also effective in preventing the accumulation of large amount of fluid.

  13. Computer-aided detection of early neoplastic lesions in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Sommen, Fons; Zinger, Svitlana; Curvers, Wouter L; Bisschops, Raf; Pech, Oliver; Weusten, Bas L A M; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; de With, Peter H N; Schoon, Erik J

    2016-07-01

    Early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus is difficult to detect and often overlooked during Barrett's surveillance. An automatic detection system could be beneficial, by assisting endoscopists with detection of early neoplastic lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a computer system to detect early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Based on 100 images from 44 patients with Barrett's esophagus, a computer algorithm, which employed specific texture, color filters, and machine learning, was developed for the detection of early neoplastic lesions in Barrett's esophagus. The evaluation by one endoscopist, who extensively imaged and endoscopically removed all early neoplastic lesions and was not blinded to the histological outcome, was considered the gold standard. For external validation, four international experts in Barrett's neoplasia, who were blinded to the pathology results, reviewed all images. The system identified early neoplastic lesions on a per-image analysis with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.83. At the patient level, the system achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.87, respectively. A trade-off between the two performance metrics could be made by varying the percentage of training samples that showed neoplastic tissue. The automated computer algorithm developed in this study was able to identify early neoplastic lesions with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that automated detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus is feasible. Further research is required to improve the accuracy of the system and prepare it for real-time operation, before it can be applied in clinical practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. An Engineered Bivalent Neuregulin Protects Against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity with Reduced Pro-Neoplastic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Murthy, Ashwin C.; Hawkins, Jessica F.; Wortzel, Joshua R.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Alvarez, Luis M.; Gannon, Joseph; Macrae, Calum A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Doxorubicin (DOXO) is an effective anthracycline chemotherapeutic, but its use is limited by cumulative dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Neuregulin-1β (NRG1B) is an ErbB receptor family ligand that is effective against DOXO-induced cardiomyopathy in experimental models but is also pro-neoplastic. We previously showed that an engineered bivalent neuregulin-1β (NN) has reduced pro-neoplastic potential compared to the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain of NRG1B (NRG), an effect mediated by receptor biasing towards ErbB3 homotypic interactions uncommonly formed by native NRG1B. Here, we hypothesized that a newly formulated, covalent NN would be cardioprotective with reduced pro-neoplastic effects compared to NRG. Methods and Results NN was expressed as a maltose-binding protein fusion in E. coli. As established previously, NN stimulated anti-neoplastic or cytostatic signaling and phenotype in cancer cells, whereas NRG stimulated pro-neoplastic signaling and phenotype. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM), NN and NRG induced similar downstream signaling. NN, like NRG, attenuated the double-stranded DNA breaks associated with DOXO exposure in NRCM and human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. NN treatment significantly attenuated DOXO-induced decrease in fractional shortening as measured by blinded echocardiography in mice in a chronic cardiomyopathy model (57.7% ± 0.6% vs. 50.9% ± 2.6%, P=0.004), whereas native NRG had no significant effect (49.4% ± 3.7% vs. 50.9% ± 2.6%, P=0.813). Conclusions NN is a cardioprotective agent that promotes cardiomyocyte survival and improves cardiac function in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. Given the reduced pro-neoplastic potential of NN versus NRG, NN has translational potential for cardioprotection in cancer patients receiving anthracyclines. PMID:23757312

  15. Nucleic acid distribution pattern as a possible biomarker for metabolic activities of neoplastic cells: a digitally-aided fluorescence microscopy study on normal and neoplastic lymphocytes of acute and chronic canine lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Isitor, Godwin N; Campbell, Mervyn; Nayak, Shivananda B

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolic states of neoplastic cells are increasingly being relied upon for diagnostic and prognostic assessment of neoplastic conditions. The nucleic acid distribution pattern of cells in general, in terms of degree of condensation of the nuclear chromatin and overall spread of the nucleic acid within the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, can reflect the metabolic state of the cell. This simple but logical concept appears not be put into consideration to date as numerous attempts are being made towards formulating reliable biomarkers for rapid diagnosis, prognosis and subsequent therapeutic interventions for neoplastic conditions. We comparatively evaluated nucleic acid distribution patterns of normal lymphocytes and neoplastic cells of lymphocytic lineage, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. Results The results demonstrate distinctiveness in the pattern of nucleic acid distribution for the normal lymphocytes and three lymphocytic neoplastic cell-types of canine lymphocytic leukemia that are categorized as small, intermediate and large neoplastic lymphocytes. Variably-shaped cytoplasmic processes laden with single-stranded nucleic acids (SSNA) were observed for the small and intermediate-sized neoplastic lymphocytes, compared with large neoplastic lymphocytes and the normal lymphocytes; the latter two categories of cells being virtually devoid of similar processes. Prominent cytoplasmic and nuclear clumps of SSNA, indicative of a higher rate of metabolic activity, were also observed within the neoplastic cells compared with fewer and narrower SSNA of the normal cells. Conclusion The comparative relative increases of SSNA in cytoplasmic processes and other cellular areas of small and intermediate-sized neoplastic lymphocytes is reflective of greater metabolic activity in neoplastic cells in general compared with their normal cellular counterparts. PMID:19432993

  16. Distinction between neoplastic and radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, with emphasis on the role of EMG

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, C.M. Jr.; Thomas, J.E.; Cascino, T.L.; Litchy, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The results of clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic studies are retrospectively reviewed for 55 patients with neoplastic and 35 patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. The presence or absence of pain as the presenting symptom, temporal profile of the illness, presence of a discrete mass on CT of the plexus, and presence of myokymic discharges on EMG contributed significantly to the prediction of the underlying cause of the brachial plexopathy. The distribution of weakness and the results of nerve conduction studies were of no help in distinguishing neoplastic from radiation-induced brachial plexopathy.

  17. The absorption of ultraviolet light by cell nuclei. A technique for identifying neoplastic change

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, C.R.; Booker, D.; Wright, R.D. )

    1989-11-01

    A technique for measuring the absorption of 260-nm ultraviolet light by cell nuclei is described. The results of such measurements of normal thyroid epithelial cells and benign and malignant thyroid neoplastic cells demonstrate a progressive increase in absorbance that correlates with the histologic appearance of neoplasia. The possible theoretic basis for this phenomenon is explored. The increased nuclear absorbance observed in neoplastic cells is hypothesized to result from the disruption of hydrogen bonds between the DNA base pairs, which allows unwinding of the double helix and loss of the normal control of mitosis.

  18. Non-randomized controlled prospective study on perioperative levels of stress and dysautonomia during dental implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Morino, Miyuki; Masaki, Chihiro; Seo, Yoshinori; Mukai, Chisato; Mukaibo, Taro; Kondo, Yusuke; Shiiba, Shunji; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Hosokawa, Ryuji

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pre- and postoperative autonomic activities and changes in salivary stress biomarkers between patients who received only local anesthesia and those who received local anesthesia together with intravenous sedation in dental implant surgery. A total of 21 patients were enrolled in this non-randomized controlled prospective study; 7 subjects underwent implant surgery under local anesthesia with intravenous sedation and 14 subjects underwent surgery under only local anesthesia. Stress was evaluated by measuring salivary levels of chromogranin A (CgA) and a spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) at baseline (on a day other than the day of surgery), 1h preoperatively, and 1h postoperatively. HRV analysis yields low- (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, the LF/HF ratio, and the component coefficient of variance (CCV[HF]), which provide indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulatory activity. CgA levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) at baseline in patients who received sedation than those who did not, but CgA levels did not differ prior to surgery. Also, the values of most parameters, including LF, HF, LF/HF (L/H), and CCV(HF), did not significantly differ between groups or among the three time points. Only ΔL/H and ΔCCV(HF) were significantly lower (p<0.05) at 1h preoperatively in patients who received sedation than those who received only local anesthesia. CgA levels were high in both groups immediately before surgery, and thus CgA values immediately before surgery may not be a reliable indicator of the need for intravenous sedation. Also, spectral analysis of HRV, especially ΔL/H and ΔCCV(HF), could be useful for assessing tension and anxiety. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Exceptional Diversity, Non-Random Distribution, and Rapid Evolution of Retroelements in the B73 Maize Genome

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Cristian; Upshaw, Naadira; Jogi, Ansuya; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Westerman, Richard P.; SanMiguel, Phillip J.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent comprehensive sequence analysis of the maize genome now permits detailed discovery and description of all transposable elements (TEs) in this complex nuclear environment. Reiteratively optimized structural and homology criteria were used in the computer-assisted search for retroelements, TEs that transpose by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, with the final results verified by manual inspection. Retroelements were found to occupy the majority (>75%) of the nuclear genome in maize inbred B73. Unprecedented genetic diversity was discovered in the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon class of retroelements, with >400 families (>350 newly discovered) contributing >31,000 intact elements. The two other classes of retroelements, SINEs (four families) and LINEs (at least 30 families), were observed to contribute 1,991 and ∼35,000 copies, respectively, or a combined ∼1% of the B73 nuclear genome. With regard to fully intact elements, median copy numbers for all retroelement families in maize was 2 because >250 LTR retrotransposon families contained only one or two intact members that could be detected in the B73 draft sequence. The majority, perhaps all, of the investigated retroelement families exhibited non-random dispersal across the maize genome, with LINEs, SINEs, and many low-copy-number LTR retrotransposons exhibiting a bias for accumulation in gene-rich regions. In contrast, most (but not all) medium- and high-copy-number LTR retrotransposons were found to preferentially accumulate in gene-poor regions like pericentromeric heterochromatin, while a few high-copy-number families exhibited the opposite bias. Regions of the genome with the highest LTR retrotransposon density contained the lowest LTR retrotransposon diversity. These results indicate that the maize genome provides a great number of different niches for the survival and procreation of a great variety of retroelements that have evolved to differentially occupy and exploit this

  20. Telomere Disruption Results in Non-Random Formation of De Novo Dicentric Chromosomes Involving Acrocentric Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M.; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E.; Bridger, Joanna M.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the α-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same α-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment. PMID:20711355

  1. A school intervention for mental health literacy in adolescents: effects of a non-randomized cluster controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background “Mental health for everyone” is a school program for mental health literacy and prevention aimed at secondary schools (13–15 yrs). The main aim was to investigate whether mental health literacy, could be improved by a 3-days universal education programme by: a) improving naming of symptom profiles of mental disorder, b) reducing prejudiced beliefs, and c) improving knowledge about where to seek help for mental health problems. A secondary aim was to investigate whether adolescent sex and age influenced the above mentioned variables. A third aim was to investigate whether prejudiced beliefs influenced knowledge about available help. Method This non-randomized cluster controlled trial included 1070 adolescents (53.9% boys, M age14 yrs) from three schools in a Norwegian town. One school (n = 520) received the intervention, and two schools (n = 550) formed the control group. Pre-test and follow-up were three months apart. Linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations models were employed for analysis. Results Mental health literacy improved contingent on the intervention, and there was a shift towards suggesting primary health care as a place to seek help. Those with more prejudiced beleifs did not suggest places to seek help for mental health problems. Generally, girls and older adolescents recognized symptom profiles better and had lower levels of prejudiced beliefs. Conclusions A low cost general school program may improve mental health literacy in adolescents. Gender specific programs and attention to the age and maturity of the students should be considered when mental health literacy programmes are designed and tried out. Prejudice should be addressed before imparting information about mental health issues. PMID:24053381

  2. Botulinum toxin injection versus lateral internal sphincterotomy in the treatment of chronic anal fissure: a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Giral, Adnan; Memişoğlu, Kemal; Gültekin, Yücel; İmeryüz, Neşe; Kalaycı, Cem; Ulusoy, Nefise B; Tözün, Nurdan

    2004-01-01

    Background Although lateral internal sphincterotomy is the gold-standard treatment for chronic anal fissure, intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin seems to be a reliable new option. The aim of this non-randomized study is to compare the effect of lateral internal sphincterotomy and botulinum toxin injection treatments on the outcome and reduction of anal sphincter pressures in patients with chronic anal fissure. Methods Patients with chronic anal fissure were treated with either botulinum toxin injection or lateral internal sphincterotomy by their own choice. Maximal resting pressure and maximal squeeze pressure measurements were performed before and 2 weeks after treatments by anal manometry. Patients were followed for fissure relapse during 14 months. Results Twenty-one consecutive outpatients with posterior chronic anal fissure were enrolled. Eleven patients underwent surgery and ten patients received botulinum toxin injection treatment. Before the treatment, anal pressures were found to be similar in both groups. After the treatment, the maximal resting pressures were reduced from 104 ± 22 mmHg to 86 ± 15 mmHg in the surgery group (p < 0.05) and from 101 ± 23 mmHg to 83 ± 24 mmHg in the botulinum toxin group (p < 0.05). The mean maximal squeeze pressures were reduced from 70 ± 27 mmHg to 61 ± 32 mmHg (p > 0.05) in the surgery group, and from 117 ± 62 mmHg to 76 ± 34 (p < 0.01) in the botulinum toxin group. The fissures were healed in 70 percent of patients in the botulinum group and 82 percent in the surgery group (p > 0.05). There were no relapses during the 14 months of follow up. Conclusion Lateral internal sphincterotomy and botulinum toxin injection treatments both seem to be equally effective in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. PMID:15035674

  3. Deep sequencing of the murine Igh repertoire reveals complex regulation of non-random V gene rearrangement frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nancy M.; Loguercio, Salvatore; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Degner, Stephanie C.; Torkamani, Ali; Su, Andrew I.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Artyomov, Maxim; Feeney, Ann J.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse antibody repertoire is formed through the rearrangement of V, D, and J segments at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) loci. The C57BL/6 murine Igh locus has over 100 functional VH gene segments that can recombine to a rearranged DJH. While the non-random usage of VH genes is well documented, it is not clear what elements determine recombination frequency. To answer this question we conducted deep sequencing of 5′-RACE products of the Igh repertoire in pro-B cells, amplified in an unbiased manner. ChIP-seq results for several histone modifications and RNA polymerase II binding, RNA-seq for sense and antisense non-coding germline transcripts, and proximity to CTCF and Rad21 sites were compared to the usage of individual V genes. Computational analyses assessed the relative importance of these various accessibility elements. These elements divide the Igh locus into four epigenetically and transcriptionally distinct domains, and our computational analyses reveal different regulatory mechanisms for each region. Proximal V genes are relatively devoid of active histone marks and non-coding RNA in general, but having a CTCF site near their RSS is critical, suggesting that being positioned near the base of the chromatin loops is important for rearrangement. In contrast, distal V genes have higher levels of histone marks and non-coding RNA, which may compensate for their poorer RSSs and for being distant from CTCF sites. Thus, the Igh locus has evolved a complex system for the regulation of V(D)J rearrangement that is different for each of the four domains that comprise this locus. PMID:23898036

  4. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  5. A prospective, non-randomized study of home use of mifepristone for medical abortion in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Chong, Erica; Frye, Laura J; Castle, Jen; Dean, Gillian; Kuehl, Laurel; Winikoff, Beverly

    2015-09-01

    To determine the acceptability of taking mifepristone at home for early medical abortion in the United States. This prospective, non-randomized, open-label study at six Planned Parenthood centers gave women with pregnancies up to 63 days' gestation seeking medical abortion the choice of taking mifepristone in the center or at home. Participants were interviewed at a follow-up visit 1-2 weeks after mifepristone administration to assess their experience with the option they selected. Four-hundred women were enrolled between April 2013 and June 2014 of which 32% (n=128) chose to take mifepristone at home. Abortion success rates did not differ between home and center users (96% and 97%). Among home users, 82% reported taking the mifepristone at the time they planned with their provider and no participant took it after 63 days' gestation. The most common reason cited for selecting home use was scheduling flexibility and significantly more home users took misoprostol on the weekend (50% vs. 36%, p=.02). Home users were more likely than center users to report missing no days of work due to the abortion (47% vs. 28%, p=.08). Ninety-nine percent of home users reported that they would take mifepristone at home again and 96% would recommend home use to a friend. Offering this option did not increase the service delivery burden on study providers, who would recommend home use in the future for most participants. Home use of mifepristone is a highly acceptable practice for which there is current demand, and it should be offered as part of routine medical abortion services. Offering the option of home use of mifepristone to medical abortion patients can provide women and clinics with more flexibility while maintaining a safe, effective and acceptable service. These results provide support for telemedicine or pharmacy distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant neoplastic omental cyst masquerading as ascites: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkadir, Adekunle Y; Olatoke, Samuel A; Uwaezuoke, Stanley; Yusuf, Ibrahim F; Braimoh, Kolawole T

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cystic lesion of the omentum and mesentery are rare. The incidence of both cyst types has been variously reported to vary from 1/27,000-100,000 hospital admission. Omental cysts occur three to ten times less frequently than mesenteric cyst. Preoperative diagnosis is infrequently made because of lack of characteristic symptoms and signs. Case presentation We present our diagnostic and management challenges in a 43-year-old man with an unusually giant omental cyst confirmed as fibrosarcoma at histology. The cyst gave the abdomen an anteroposterior diameter of about 74 cm that could not be penetrated sufficiently by X-ray photons to produce diagnostic image even at maximum attainable output. Patient benefited from surgical excision. The removed cyst contained about 35 litres of fluid. Conclusion Neglected omental cysts as in this case may grow to enormous size, undergo malignant transformation and poses serious diagnostic and surgical challenges. PMID:19918526

  7. Hyaluronidases and hyaluronan synthases expression is inversely correlated with malignancy in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, affecting prognosis

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, V.K.; Rocha, T.P.; Moreira, AL.; Soares, F.A.; Takagaki, T.; Carvalho, L.; Nicholson, A.G.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    We collected a series of 136 lung/bronchial and 56 matched lung parenchyma tissue samples from patients who underwent lung/bronchial biopsies and presented invasive carcinoma after lung surgery. The lung/bronchial samples included basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, moderate dysplasia, adenomatous hyperplasia, severe dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Matched lung parenchyma tissue samples included 25 squamous cell carcinomas and 31 adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze for the distribution of hyaluronidase (Hyal)-1 and −3, and hyaluronan synthases (HAS)-1, −2, and −3. Hyal-1 showed significantly higher expression in basal cell hyperplasia than in moderate dysplasia (P=0.01), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.0001), or severe dysplasia (P=0.03). Lower expression of Hyal-3 was found in atypical adenomatous hyperplasia than in basal cell hyperplasia (P=0.01) or moderate dysplasia (P=0.02). HAS-2 was significantly higher in severe dysplasia (P=0.002) and in squamous metaplasia (P=0.04) compared with basal cell hyperplasia. HAS-3 was significantly expressed in basal cell hyperplasia compared with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.05) and severe dysplasia (P=0.02). Lower expression of HAS-3 was found in severe dysplasia compared with squamous metaplasia (P=0.01) and moderate dysplasia (P=0.01). Epithelial Hyal-1 and −3 and HAS-1, −2, and −3 expressions were significantly higher in pre-neoplastic lesions than in neoplastic lesions. Comparative Cox multivariate analysis controlled by N stage and histologic tumor type showed that patients with high HAS-3 expression in pre-neoplastic cells obtained by lung/bronchial biopsy presented a significantly higher risk of death (HR=1.19; P=0.04). We concluded that localization of Hyal and HAS in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions was inversely related to malignancy, which implied that visualizing these factors could be a useful diagnostic

  8. Detection of retinoid receptors in non-neoplastic canine lymph nodes and in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    de Mello Souza, Carlos H.; Valli, Victor E.O.; Kitchell, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the difference in retinoid receptor expression between non-neoplastic lymph nodes and nodal lymphoma in dogs. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 32 canine lymph nodes. The lymph nodes had been previously diagnosed as non-neoplastic (6 normal and 7 hyperplastic lymph nodes) and B- and T-cell lymphoma (19 cases). Immunohistochemistry for retinoic acid receptors and retinoid-X receptors (and their subtypes α, β, and γ) was performed in all cases. In addition, immunohistochemistry for CD3 and CD79a was performed in all lymphoma cases. Non-neoplastic lymphocytes were negative for all retinoid receptors. Retinoic acid receptor-γ was detected in 100% of B-cell lymphoma and 78% of T-cell lymphoma, while retinoid X receptor-γ was positive in 78% of T-cell lymphoma cases. When normal lymph node architecture was still present, a contrast between retinoid-negative benign cells and retinoid-positive malignant cells was clear. Retinoid receptors were expressed in neoplastic, but not in benign lymphocytes, suggesting their value for both diagnosis and treatment of canine lymphoma. PMID:24381339

  9. Cell cannibalism by malignant neoplastic cells: three cases in dogs and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Cazzini, Paola; Camus, Melinda; Doria-Torra, Georgina; Marco Valle, Alberto Jesús; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Cell cannibalism refers to the engulfment of cells by nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Studies in human medicine have demonstrated a relationship between the presence of cell cannibalism by neoplastic cells and a poor outcome, and have shown a positive correlation with the presence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. The biologic significance of cell cannibalism is unknown, but it is proposed that it may represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune evasion as a survival strategy in cases of unfavorable microenvironmental conditions. This report describes clinical and morphologic features of 3 cases of dogs with malignant neoplasia in which the presence of cellular cannibalism was observed in cytologic and histologic specimens. In the 1(st) case, a dog with a primary tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma with metastasis to retropharyngeal lymph nodes had neoplastic epithelial cells engulfing neutrophils noted in cytologic examination of the lymph nodes. In the 2(nd) case, neoplastic epithelial cells were seen engulfing each other in fine-needle aspirates from a primary mammary carcinoma with lung metastasis. In the 3(rd) case, poorly differentiated neoplastic mast cells from a recurrent, metastatic grade III mast cell tumor were observed cannibalizing eosinophils. A brief review of the literature describing known cell-into-cell relationships and the possible biologic significance and mechanisms involved in this phenomenon is provided. The relationship between cell cannibalism and distant metastasis should be explored in further studies, as it may prove to be a criterion of malignancy, as it is proposed in human medicine.

  10. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic. PMID:24362926

  11. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  12. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  13. Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians: a non-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McElwaine, Kathleen M; Freund, Megan; Campbell, Elizabeth M; Knight, Jenny; Bowman, Jennifer A; Wolfenden, Luke; McElduff, Patrick; Bartlem, Kate M; Gillham, Karen E; Wiggers, John H

    2014-10-01

    Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. The intervention's impact on

  14. Effectiveness of a 'Global Postural Reeducation' program for persistent Low Back Pain: a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this non-randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) program as compared to a Stabilization Exercise (SE) program in subjects with persistent low back pain (LBP) at short- and mid-term follow-up (ie. 3 and 6 months). Methods According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 100 patients with a primary complaint of persistent LBP were enrolled in the study: 50 were allocated to the GPR group and 50 to the SE group. Primary outcome measures were Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were lumbar Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Fingertip-to-floor test (FFT). Data were collected at baseline and at 3/6 months by health care professionals unaware of the study. An intention to treat approach was used to analyze participants according to the group to which they were originally assigned. Results Of the 100 patients initially included in the study, 78 patients completed the study: 42 in the GPR group and 36 in the SE group. At baseline, the two groups did not differ significantly with respect to gender, age, BMI and outcome measures. Comparing the differences between groups at short- and mid-term follow-up, the GPR group revealed a significant reduction (from baseline) in all outcome measures with respect to the SE group. The ordered logistic regression model showed an increased likelihood of definitive improvement (reduction from baseline of at least 30% in RMDQ and VAS scores) for the GPR group compared to the SE group (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.7 to 5.7). Conclusions Our findings suggest that a GPR intervention in subjects with persistent LBP induces a greater improvement on pain and disability as compared to a SE program. These results must be confirmed by further studies with higher methodological standards, including randomization, larger sample size, longer follow-up and subgrouping of the LBP subjects. Trial registration NCT

  15. Family-centered rounds in Pakistani pediatric intensive care settings: non-randomized pre- and post-study design.

    PubMed

    Ladak, Laila Akbar; Premji, Shahirose Sadrudin; Amanullah, Muhammad Muneer; Haque, Anwarul; Ajani, Khairulnissa; Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid

    2013-06-01

    Involvement of family in bedside rounds is one strategy to implement family-centered care to help families get clear information about their child, and be actively involved in decision-making about care. However in developing countries such as Pakistan, daily bedside rounds include the physician, residents, medical students and a nurse/technician. Parents are not currently a part of these rounds. To assess whether family-centered rounds improve parents' and health care professionals' satisfaction, decrease patient length of stay, and improve time utilization when compared to traditional practice rounds in a population with a low literacy rate, socioeconomic status, and different cultural values and beliefs. A non-randomized before-after study design. A private hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. A convenience sample of 82 parents, whose children were hospitalized for a minimum of 48h, and 25 health care professionals able to attend two consecutive rounds. During the before phase, traditional bedside rounds were practiced; and during after phase, family-centered rounds were practiced. Parents and health care professionals completed a questionnaire on the second day of rounds. An observational form facilitated data collection on length of stay and time utilization during. Parents' ratings during the family-centered rounds were significantly higher for some parental satisfaction items: evidence of team work (p=0.007), use of simple language during the rounds (p=0.002), feeling of inclusion in discussion at rounds (p=0.03), decision making (p=0.01), and preference for family-centered rounds (p=<0.001). No significant differences were found in health care professionals' satisfaction between rounds. Patient length of stay was significantly reduced in the family-centered rounds group, while no significant difference was found in the duration of rounds. Family-centered rounds served as an opportunity for parents to correct/add to patient history or documentation. Parents were

  16. High-resolution characterization of sequence signatures due to non-random cleavage of cell-free DNA.

    PubMed

    Chandrananda, Dineika; Thorne, Natalie P; Bahlo, Melanie

    2015-06-17

    High-throughput sequencing of cell-free DNA fragments found in human plasma has been used to non-invasively detect fetal aneuploidy, monitor organ transplants and investigate tumor DNA. However, many biological properties of this extracellular genetic material remain unknown. Research that further characterizes circulating DNA could substantially increase its diagnostic value by allowing the application of more sophisticated bioinformatics tools that lead to an improved signal to noise ratio in the sequencing data. In this study, we investigate various features of cell-free DNA in plasma using deep-sequencing data from two pregnant women (>70X, >50X) and compare them with matched cellular DNA. We utilize a descriptive approach to examine how the biological cleavage of cell-free DNA affects different sequence signatures such as fragment lengths, sequence motifs at fragment ends and the distribution of cleavage sites along the genome. We show that the size distributions of these cell-free DNA molecules are dependent on their autosomal and mitochondrial origin as well as the genomic location within chromosomes. DNA mapping to particular microsatellites and alpha repeat elements display unique size signatures. We show how cell-free fragments occur in clusters along the genome, localizing to nucleosomal arrays and are preferentially cleaved at linker regions by correlating the mapping locations of these fragments with ENCODE annotation of chromatin organization. Our work further demonstrates that cell-free autosomal DNA cleavage is sequence dependent. The region spanning up to 10 positions on either side of the DNA cleavage site show a consistent pattern of preference for specific nucleotides. This sequence motif is present in cleavage sites localized to nucleosomal cores and linker regions but is absent in nucleosome-free mitochondrial DNA. These background signals in cell-free DNA sequencing data stem from the non-random biological cleavage of these fragments. This

  17. Home based telemedicine intervention for patients with uncontrolled hypertension--a real life non-randomized study.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, Palmira; Scalvini, Simonetta; Bertacchini, Fabio; Rivadossi, Francesca; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza

    2014-06-12

    Control of blood pressure is frequently inadequate in spite of availability of several classes of well tolerated and effective antihypertensive drugs. Several factors, including the use of suboptimal doses of drugs, inadequate or ineffective treatments and poor drug compliance may be the reason for this phenomenon. The aim of the current non- randomized study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Home-Based Telemedicine service in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. 74 patients were enrolled in a Home Based Telemedicine group and 94 patients in the Usual Care group. At baseline and at the end of the study, patients in both groups were seen in a cardiology office. Patients in Home Based Telemedicine group additionally were followed by a physician-nurse, through scheduled and unscheduled telephone appointments. These patients also received a blood pressure measuring device that could transmit the readings to a central data monitor via secure data connection. During the study period (80 ± 25 days), a total of 17401 blood pressure measurements were taken in the Home Based Telemedicine group corresponding to 236 ± 136 readings per patient and a mean daily measurement of 3 ± 1.7. The scheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the nurse) equaled to 5.2 ± 4.3/patient (370 in total) and the unscheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the patients) were 0.4 ± 0.9/patient (30 in total). The mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 153 ± 19 mmHg to 130 ± 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 89 ± 10 mmHg to 76 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.0001). In the Usual Care group, the mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 156 ± 16 mmHg to 149 ± 17 mmHg (p < 0.05) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 90 ± 8 mmHg to 86 ± 9 mmHg (p < 0.05). The changes in drug therapy initiated following telephone contacts were 1.81 ± 1.73 per patient. The addition of a structured

  18. Generation and Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Low Frequency Ultrasound to Determine the Sonic Sensitivity of Untreated and Treated Neoplastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D.; Zoino, Joseph N.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency ultrasound in the 20 to 60 kHz range is a novel physical modality by which to induce selective cell lysis and death in neoplastic cells. In addition, this method can be used in combination with specialized agents known as sonosensitizers to increase the extent of preferential damage exerted by ultrasound against neoplastic cells, an approach referred to as sonodynamic therapy (SDT). The methodology for generating and applying low frequency ultrasound in a preclinical in vitro setting is presented to demonstrate that reproducible cell destruction can be attained in order to examine and compare the effects of sonication on neoplastic and normal cells. This offers a means by which to reliably sonicate neoplastic cells at a level of consistency required for preclinical therapeutic assessment. In addition, the effects of cholesterol-depleting and cytoskeletal-directed agents on potentiating ultrasonic sensitivity in neoplastic cells are discussed in order to elaborate on mechanisms of action conducive to sonochemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26274053

  19. Galectin-1 is a useful marker for detecting neoplastic squamous cells in oral cytology smears.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yuri; Kondo, Yuko; Sakai, Manabu; Sato, Sunao; Kishino, Mitsunobu

    2016-06-01

    Cytologic diagnoses in the oral region are very difficult due to the small amount of cells in smears, which are also exposed to many stimulating factors and often show atypical changes. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is a β-galactoside binding protein that modulates tumor progression. Gal1 is very weakly expressed in normal cells, but is often overexpressed in neoplastic lesions. The aim of the present study was to determine whether it is possible to differentiate reactive changes from neoplastic changes in oral cytology smears based on the expression of Gal1. A total of 155 tissue biopsy specimens and 61 liquid-based cytology specimens were immunostained by an anti-Gal1 antibody, and Gal1 expression levels were subsequently evaluated. These samples consisted of oral squamous cell carcinomas, epithelial dysplasia, and oral mucosal diseases. The positive and negative expressions of Gal1 were examined in 37 specimens collected by scalpel and cytobrush biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Gal1 were also evaluated in smears. In tissue sections, the positive ratio of Gal1 in neoplastic lesions was high (72.3%). In cytology specimens, the positive ratio of Gal1 was higher in neoplastic lesions (79.0%) than in those negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (22.2%). A correlation was found between immunocytochemical Gal1 expression and immunohistochemical Gal1 expression (P < .001). The sensitivity (75.0%), specificity (75.0%), and positive predictive value (91.3%) of Gal1 were also high in smears. In conclusion, Gal1 may be a useful marker for determining whether morphologic changes in cells are reactive or neoplastic.

  20. High-resolution sonography for distinguishing neoplastic gallbladder polyps and staging gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Young; Baek, Jee Hyun; Eun, Hyo Won; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purposes of this study were to compare staging accuracy of high-resolution sonography (HRUS) with combined low- and high-MHz transducers with that of conventional sonography for gallbladder cancer and to investigate the differences in the imaging findings of neoplastic and nonneoplastic gallbladder polyps. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Our study included 37 surgically proven gallbladder cancer (T1a = 7, T1b = 2, T2 = 22, T3 = 6), including 15 malignant neoplastic polyps and 73 surgically proven polyps (neoplastic = 31, nonneoplastic = 42) that underwent HRUS and conventional transabdominal sonography. Two radiologists assessed T-category and predefined polyp findings on HRUS and conventional transabdominal sonography. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square and McNemar tests. RESULTS. The diagnostic accuracy for the T category was T1a = 92-95%, T1b = 89-95%, T2 = 78-86%, and T3 = 84-89%, all with good agreement (κ = 0.642) using HRUS. The diagnostic accuracy for differentiating T1 from T2 or greater than T2 was 92% and 89% on HRUS and 65% and 70% with conventional transabdominal sonography. Statistically common findings for neoplastic polyps included size greater than 1 cm, single lobular surface, vascular core, hypoechoic polyp, and hypoechoic foci (p < 0.05). The value of HRUS in the differential diagnosis of a gallbladder polyp was more clearly depicted internal echo foci than conventional transabdominal sonography (39 vs 21). A polyp size greater than 1 cm was independently associated with a neoplastic polyp (odds ratio = 7.5, p = 0.02). The AUC of a polyp size greater than 1 cm was 0.877. The sensitivity and specificity were 66.67% and 89.13%, respectively. CONCLUSION. HRUS is a simple method that enables accurate T categorization of gallbladder carcinoma. It provides high-resolution images of gallbladder polyps and may have a role in stratifying the risk for malignancy.

  1. Run Charts Revisited: A Simulation Study of Run Chart Rules for Detection of Non-Random Variation in Health Care Processes

    PubMed Central

    Anhøj, Jacob; Olesen, Anne Vingaard

    2014-01-01

    Background A run chart is a line graph of a measure plotted over time with the median as a horizontal line. The main purpose of the run chart is to identify process improvement or degradation, which may be detected by statistical tests for non-random patterns in the data sequence. Methods We studied the sensitivity to shifts and linear drifts in simulated processes using the shift, crossings and trend rules for detecting non-random variation in run charts. Results The shift and crossings rules are effective in detecting shifts and drifts in process centre over time while keeping the false signal rate constant around 5% and independent of the number of data points in the chart. The trend rule is virtually useless for detection of linear drift over time, the purpose it was intended for. PMID:25423037

  2. The role of "closed abdomen" hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in the palliative treatment of neoplastic ascites from peritoneal carcinomatosis: report of a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Orgiano, L; Pani, F; Astara, G; Madeddu, C; Marini, S; Manca, A; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the results of a single-center experience in the management of "closed abdomen" hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) using a sophisticated technical device (EXIPER®) in the palliative setting of neoplastic ascites from peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with advanced cancer of different primary sites. The study was an open, prospective, single-center, non-randomized study conducted at the Department of Medical Oncology 1, University of Cagliari, Italy, from May 2006 to October 2012. Fifteen patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were treated with HIPEC: 5 males and 10 females (age range 51-82, median 62 years), for a total of 30 procedures (5 patients were treated more than once). Malignant ascites were from ovarian, uterine cervical, colorectal, gastric, malignant pleural mesothelioma, and unknown primary cancer. Main endpoints were increase of free interval between two consecutive procedures, progressive reduction of ascites volumes and improvement of quality of life assessed with ECOG performance status and EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire, and improvement of immunologic function. Twelve patients were completely evaluable while three patients were "lost" to follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated. The mean free interval between two consecutive drainages increased from 11.2 to 39.5 days. The mean ascites volume drained decreased from 7.8 to 1.8 l. ECOG PS improved in the majority of patients and EORTC QLQ-C30 scores in all patients as well as immunologic function. In September 2015, only one patient was still alive. Our study shows that good results may be achieved in terms of symptom palliation and improvement of quality of life in very advanced cancer patients with MA from PC. The treatment was generally well tolerated considering the limited treatment options available for these patients.

  3. Narrow band imaging to differentiate neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal polyps in real time: a meta-analysis of diagnostic operating characteristics

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Sarah K; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P A; Soetikno, Roy M; Kaltenbach, Tonya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have reported on the use of narrow band imaging (NBI) colonoscopy to differentiate neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. It has potential to replace pathological diagnosis of diminutive polyps. We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the real-time diagnostic operating characteristics of NBI colonoscopy. Methods We searched PubMed, SCOPUS and Cochrane databases and abstracts. We used a two-level bivariate meta-analysis following a random effects model to summarise the data and fit hierarchical summary receiver-operating characteristic (HSROC) curves. The area under the HSROC curve serves as an indicator of the diagnostic test strength. We calculated summary sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV). We assessed agreement of surveillance interval recommendations based on endoscopic diagnosis compared to pathology. Results For NBI diagnosis of colorectal polyps, the area under the HSROC curve was 0.92 (95% CI 0.90 to 0.94), based on 28 studies involving 6280 polyps in 4053 patients. The overall sensitivity was 91.0% (95% CI 87.6% to 93.5%) and specificity was 82.6% (95% CI 79.0% to 85.7%). In eight studies (n=2146 polyps) that used high-confidence diagnostic predictions, sensitivity was 93.8% and specificity was 83.3%. The NPVs exceeded 90% when 60% or less of all polyps were neoplastic. Surveillance intervals based on endoscopic diagnosis agreed with those based on pathology in 92.6% of patients (95% CI 87.9% to 96.3%). Conclusions NBI diagnosis of colorectal polyps is highly accurate—the area under the HSROC curve exceeds 0.90. High-confidence predictions provide >90% sensitivity and NPV. It shows high potential for real-time endoscopic diagnosis. PMID:23300139

  4. CD56(bright)perforin(low) noncytotoxic human NK cells are abundant in both healthy and neoplastic solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via afferent lymph.

    PubMed

    Carrega, Paolo; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Di Carlo, Emma; Morandi, Barbara; Paul, Petra; Rizzello, Valeria; Cipollone, Giuseppe; Navarra, Giuseppe; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2014-04-15

    As limited information is available regarding the distribution and trafficking of NK cells among solid organs, we have analyzed a wide array of tissues derived from different human compartments. NK cells were widely distributed in most solid tissues, although their amount varied significantly depending on the tissue/organ analyzed. Interestingly, the distribution appeared to be subset specific, as some tissues were preferentially populated by CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells, with others by the CD56(dim)perforin(high) cytotoxic counterpart. Nevertheless, most tissues were highly enriched in CD56(bright)perforin(low) cells, and the distribution of NK subsets appeared in accordance with tissue gene expression of chemotactic factors, for which receptors are differently represented in the two subsets. Remarkably, chemokine expression pattern of tissues was modified after neoplastic transformation. As a result, although the total amount of NK cells infiltrating the tissues did not significantly change upon malignant transformation, the relative proportion of NK subsets infiltrating the tissues was different, with a trend toward a tumor-infiltrating NK population enriched in noncytotoxic cells. Besides solid tissues, CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells were also detected in seroma fluids, which represents an accrual of human afferent lymph, indicating that they may leave peripheral solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via lymphatic vessels. Our results provide a comprehensive mapping of NK cells in human tissues, demonstrating that discrete NK subsets populate and recirculate through most human tissues and that organ-specific chemokine expression patterns might affect their distribution. In this context, chemokine switch upon neoplastic transformation might represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  5. Autonomy of the epithelial phenotype in human ovarian surface epithelium: changes with neoplastic progression and with a family history of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dyck, H G; Hamilton, T C; Godwin, A K; Lynch, H T; Maines-Bandiera, S; Auersperg, N

    1996-12-20

    Epithelial ovarian carcinomas originate in the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). In culture, OSE undergoes epithelio-mesenchymal conversion, an event mimicking a wound response, while ovarian carcinomas retain complex epithelial characteristics. To define the onset of this increased epithelial autonomy in ovarian neoplastic progression, we examined mesenchymal conversion in OSE from 25 women with no family histories (NFH-OSE) and 13 women with family histories (FH-OSE) of breast/ovarian cancer (including 8 with mutated BRCA1 or 17q linkage) and in 8 ovarian cancer lines. After 3-6 passages in monolayer culture, most NFH-OSE exhibited reduced keratin expression and high collagen type III expression. In contrast, keratin remained high but collagen expression was lower in p. 3-6 FH-OSE. This difference was lost in SV40-transformed lines, which all resembled FH-OSE. Most carcinoma lines remained epithelial and did not undergo mesenchymal conversion. In 3-dimensional (3-D) sponge culture, NFH-OSE cells dispersed and secreted abundant extracellular matrix (ECM). FH-OSE remained epithelial and did not secrete ECM. ECM production was also reduced in SV40-transformed lines. Carcinoma lines in 3-D formed epithelial cysts, aggregates and papillae and lacked ECM. Sponge contraction (a mesenchymal characteristic) was greater in NFH-OSE than in FH-OSE both before and after SV40 transformation and was absent in the cancer lines. Our results suggest that increased autonomy of epithelial characteristics is an early indicator of ovarian neoplastic progression and that phenotypic changes indicative of such autonomy are found already in overtly normal OSE from women with histories of familial breast/ovarian cancer.

  6. Delivery of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in bioadhesive hydrogel stimulates migration of dendritic cells in models of human papillomavirus-associated (pre)neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pascale; Evrard, Brigitte; Maillard, Catherine; Franzen-Detrooz, Elizabeth; Delattre, Luc; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnes; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    Because of the central role of dendritic cells and/or Langerhans cells(DC/LC) in the induction of cellular immune responses, pharmacological agents that modulate the recruitment of these cells might have a clinical interest. The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of several pharmaceutical formulations to topically deliver granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated genital (pre)neoplastic lesions. The formulations were evaluated for their bioactivity and for their potential to recruit DC in organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes. We found that a bioadhesive polycarbophil gel (Noveon) at pH 5.5 is able to maintain the bioactivity of GM-CSF at 4 or 37 degrees C for at least 7 days, whereas a decreased activity of GM-CSF was observed when the molecule is included in other polymer gels. GM-CSF incorporated in the polycarbophil gel was also a potent factor in enhancing the colonization of DC into organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes since the infiltration of DC in the in vitro-formed (pre)neoplastic epithelium was very low under basal conditions and dramatically increased in the presence of GM-CSF gel. We next demonstrated that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel induces the recruitment of human DC in a human (pre)neoplastic epithelium grafted into NOD/SCID mice. The efficacy of GM-CSF in this formulation was equivalent to that observed with liquid GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel could play an important role in the recruitment of DC/LC in mucosal surfaces and be useful as a new immunotherapeutic approach for genital HPV-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions.

  7. Expression of keratin and vimentin intermediate filaments in rabbit bladder epithelial cells at different stages of benzo(a)pyrene-induced neoplastic progression

    SciTech Connect

    Summerhayes, I.C.; Cheng, Y.S.E.; Sun, T.T.; Chen, L.B.

    1981-07-01

    Rabbit bladder epithelium, grown on collagen gels and exposed to the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, produced nontumorigenic altered foci as well as tumorigenic epithelial cell lines during 120 to 180 d in culture. Immunofluorescence studies revealed extensive keratin filaments in both primary epithelial cells and benzo(a)pyrene-induced altered epithelial foci but showed no detectable vimentin filaments. The absence of vimentin expression in these cells was confirmed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In contrast, immunofluorescence staining of the cloned benzo(a)pyrene-transformed rabbit bladder epithelial cell line, RBC-1, revealed a reduction in filamentous keratin concomitant with the expression of vimentin filaments. The epithelial nature of this cell line was established by the observation that cells injected into nude mice formed well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. Frozen sections of such tumors showed strong staining with antikeratins antibodies, but no detectable staining with antivimentin antibodies. These results demonstrated a differential expression of intermediate filament type in cells at different stages of neoplastic progression and in cells maintained in different growth environments. It is apparent that the expression of intermediate filaments throughout neoplastic progression is best studied by use of an in vivo model system in parallel with culture studies.

  8. In vitro and in vivo studies on potentiation of cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs or cobalt 60 gamma ray by interferon on human neoplastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tanaka, H.; Kanamori, T.; Nobuhara, M.; Kimoto, T.

    1984-11-15

    A possibility that interferon may potentiate the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs or /sup 60/Co gamma ray on human neoplastic cells was studied by in vitro and in vivo experimental procedures. The human neoplastic cells used were HeLa (uterine cervical cancer) and WI-38 CT-1 (embryonic lung fibroblasts transformed in culture by /sup 60/Co gamma ray) cells. As normal human cells, WI-38 cells were used. Interferon was a preparation of beta-type produced by human fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity was determined by colony formation for in vitro experiments and by tumor growth for animal experiments. Of 17 anticancer drugs, the cytotoxic effects of six drugs, namely, peplomycin, bleomycin, aclacinomycin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and Adriamycin (doxorubicin) were potentiated by concomitant application of interferon. The cytolethal effects of /sup 60/Co gamma ray were also enhanced by interferon. The growth of tumor induced by transplantation of HeLa cells into a nude mouse was remarkably reduced by combination therapy of interferon and 5-FU. The current results indicate a possibility that combined therapy of certain types of anticancer drugs or /sup 60/Co gamma ray with interferon may be effective in treatment of cancer patients.

  9. Fatal cases of Theileria annulata infection in calves in Portugal associated with neoplastic-like lymphoid cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Orvalho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Pereira, Isadora; Malta, Manuel; Mariano, Isabel; Carvalho, Tânia; Baptista, Rui; Shiels, Brian R.; Peleteiro, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate fifteen cases of acute lethal infection of calves (≤ 4 months of age) by the protozoan parasite Theileria (T.) annulata in the south of Portugal. Calves developed multifocal to coalescent nodular skin lesions, similar to multicentric malignant lymphoma. Infestation with ticks (genus Hyalomma) was intense. Theileria was seen in blood and lymph node smears, and T. annulata infection was confirmed by isolation of schizont-transformed cells and sequencing of hypervariable region 4 of the 18S rRNA gene. At necropsy, hemorrhagic nodules or nodules with a hemorrhagic halo were seen, particularly in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal and cardiac muscles, pharynx, trachea and intestinal serosa. Histologically, nodules were formed by large, round, lymphoblastoid neoplastic-like cells. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) identified these cells as mostly CD3 positive T lymphocytes and MAC387 positive macrophages. A marker for B lymphocytes (CD79αcy) labeled very few cells. T. annulata infected cells in these nodules were also identified by IHC through the use of two monoclonal antibodies (1C7 and 1C12) which are diagnostic for the parasite. It was concluded that the pathological changes observed in the different organs and tissues were caused by proliferation of schizont-infected macrophages, which subsequently stimulate a severe uncontrolled proliferation of uninfected T lymphocytes. PMID:20195062

  10. Nuclear morphometry and ploidy of normal and neoplastic haemocytes in mussels

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Francesca; De Vico, Gionata; Landini, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) in bivalves has been reported in association with mass mortality events in various species of molluscs. The aim of this work was to quantify the nuclear morphometry and DNA content of neoplastic cells of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis affected by HN using nuclear densitometry in Feulgen-stained preparations. The results were also compared with a population of normal mussel haemocytes. We captured 256 images of 3 different neoplasia stages and 120 images of normal haemocytes; thus, a total of 120,166 nuclei were analysed. We extracted 21 morphological parameters from normal and neoplastic nuclei. Eighteen of these parameters were different (P<0.05). Among those (expressed in pixel units—inter-pixel distance of 0.45 micrometres—as: normal vs. neoplastic) nuclear area (117.1±94.1 vs. 423.1±226.9), perimeter (44.9±14.0 vs. 79.0±21.3) and (IOD) integrated optical density (13.47±34.5 vs. 177.1±150.8) were relevant features to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. Those differences allowed identifying two distinctive populations of neoplastic nuclei, occasionally in the same individuals at a given phase of the disease. Moreover, neoplastic haemocytes in less extended lesions showed a ploidy value of 6.2 n along with the presence of a second population of circulating cells with a DNA content of 10.7n. In samples with moderate disease only one peak at 7n was observed. Finally, in more severe conditions, a further ploidy peak of 7.8n was recorded, accompanied by a shallow but broad peak of 31n. This latter extreme value is thought to be due to the presence of giant multinucleated cells where individual nuclei overlap in space and cannot be discerned individually. Computer-based imaging allowed the direct visualization of the cell populations and simultaneous collection of ploidy data as well as morphological features of nuclei. PMID:28282459

  11. Karyotype alteration generates the neoplastic phenotypes of SV40-infected human and rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Mathew; Duesberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 50 years of research, it remains unclear how the DNA tumor viruses SV40 and Polyoma cause cancers. Prevailing theories hold that virus-coded Tumor (T)-antigens cause cancer by inactivating cellular tumor suppressor genes. But these theories don't explain four characteristics of viral carcinogenesis: (1) less than one in 10,000 infected cells become cancer cells, (2) cancers have complex individual phenotypes and transcriptomes, (3) recurrent tumors without viral DNA and proteins, (4) preneoplastic aneuploidies and immortal neoplastic clones with individual karyotypes. As an alternative theory we propose that viral carcinogenesis is a form of speciation, initiated by virus-induced aneuploidy. Since aneuploidy destabilizes the karyotype by unbalancing thousands of genes it catalyzes chain reactions of karyotypic and transcriptomic evolutions. Eventually rare karyotypes evolve that encode cancer-specific autonomy of growth. The low probability of forming new autonomous cancer-species by random karyotypic and transcriptomic variations predicts individual and clonal cancers. Although cancer karyotypes are congenitally aneuploid and thus variable, they are stabilized or immortalized by selections for variants with cancer-specific autonomy. Owing to these inherent variations cancer karyotypes are heterogeneous within clonal margins. To test this theory we analyzed karyotypes and phenotypes of SV40-infected human, rat and mouse cells developing into neoplastic clones. In all three systems we found (1) preneoplastic aneuploidies, (2) neoplastic clones with individual clonal but flexible karyotypes and phenotypes, which arose from less than one in 10,000 infected cells, survived over 200 generations, but were either T-antigen positive or negative, (3) spontaneous and drug-induced variations of neoplastic phenotypes correlating 1-to-1 with karyotypic variations. Since all 14 virus-induced neoplastic clones tested contained individual clonal karyotypes and

  12. Nuclear morphometry and ploidy of normal and neoplastic haemocytes in mussels.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; De Vico, Gionata; Landini, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) in bivalves has been reported in association with mass mortality events in various species of molluscs. The aim of this work was to quantify the nuclear morphometry and DNA content of neoplastic cells of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis affected by HN using nuclear densitometry in Feulgen-stained preparations. The results were also compared with a population of normal mussel haemocytes. We captured 256 images of 3 different neoplasia stages and 120 images of normal haemocytes; thus, a total of 120,166 nuclei were analysed. We extracted 21 morphological parameters from normal and neoplastic nuclei. Eighteen of these parameters were different (P<0.05). Among those (expressed in pixel units-inter-pixel distance of 0.45 micrometres-as: normal vs. neoplastic) nuclear area (117.1±94.1 vs. 423.1±226.9), perimeter (44.9±14.0 vs. 79.0±21.3) and (IOD) integrated optical density (13.47±34.5 vs. 177.1±150.8) were relevant features to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. Those differences allowed identifying two distinctive populations of neoplastic nuclei, occasionally in the same individuals at a given phase of the disease. Moreover, neoplastic haemocytes in less extended lesions showed a ploidy value of 6.2 n along with the presence of a second population of circulating cells with a DNA content of 10.7n. In samples with moderate disease only one peak at 7n was observed. Finally, in more severe conditions, a further ploidy peak of 7.8n was recorded, accompanied by a shallow but broad peak of 31n. This latter extreme value is thought to be due to the presence of giant multinucleated cells where individual nuclei overlap in space and cannot be discerned individually. Computer-based imaging allowed the direct visualization of the cell populations and simultaneous collection of ploidy data as well as morphological features of nuclei.

  13. A pre-neoplastic epigenetic field defect in HCV-infected liver at transcription factor binding sites and polycomb targets.

    PubMed

    Wijetunga, N A; Pascual, M; Tozour, J; Delahaye, F; Alani, M; Adeyeye, M; Wolkoff, A W; Verma, A; Greally, J M

    2017-04-06

    epigenetic events occur before neoplastic transformation, resulting in what may be a pharmacologically reversible epigenetic field defect in HCV-infected liver.

  14. The role of gap junctions in inflammatory and neoplastic disorders (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pui; Laxton, Victoria; Srivastava, Saurabh; Chan, Yin Wah Fiona; Tse, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexin proteins, mediating both electrical and biochemical signals between cells. The ability of gap junction proteins to regulate immune responses, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and carcinogenesis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory and neoplastic disorders in different organ systems. Alterations in gap junction profile and expression levels are observed in hyperproliferative skin disorders, lymphatic vessel diseases, inflammatory lung diseases, liver injury and neoplastic disorders. It is now recognized that the therapeutic effects mediated by traditional pharmacological agents are dependent upon gap junction communication and may even act by influencing gap junction expression or function. Novel strategies for modulating the function or expression of connexins, such as the use of synthetic mimetic peptides and siRNA technology are considered. PMID:28098880

  15. The role of gap junctions in inflammatory and neoplastic disorders (Review).

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui; Laxton, Victoria; Srivastava, Saurabh; Chan, Yin Wah Fiona; Tse, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexin proteins, mediating both electrical and biochemical signals between cells. The ability of gap junction proteins to regulate immune responses, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and carcinogenesis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory and neoplastic disorders in different organ systems. Alterations in gap junction profile and expression levels are observed in hyperproliferative skin disorders, lymphatic vessel diseases, inflammatory lung diseases, liver injury and neoplastic disorders. It is now recognized that the therapeutic effects mediated by traditional pharmacological agents are dependent upon gap junction communication and may even act by influencing gap junction expression or function. Novel strategies for modulating the function or expression of connexins, such as the use of synthetic mimetic peptides and siRNA technology are considered.

  16. High-resolution imaging of neoplastic lesions using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Constantinos; Goodman, Annekathryn; Boppart, Stephen A.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Jesser, Christine; Stamper, Debra L.; Brezinski, Mark E.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-04-01

    A technology capable of imaging tissue, at or near the cellular level, could lead to the detection of neoplasias at earlier stages than currently possible. This could significantly improve patient outcomes, since once cancer becomes metastatic, cure is difficult. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a recently developed imaging technology, has ben shown to achieve resolution in the cellular and subcellular range, and it could improve the diagnostic range of clinical imaging procedures. To assess the clinical applicability of OCT, neoplastic specimens from the urinary, gastrointestinal and female reproductive tract were imaged. Sharp differentiation of structures included the mucosa/submucosal/muscularis boundaries, epithelium, glands, supportive tissue, and intramural cysts. The ability of optical coherence tomography to image tissue microstructure at or near the cellular level make it a potentially powerful technology for minimally invasive assessment of tissue microstructure. The resolution of optical coherence tomography, which is greater than any current clinical imaging modality, make it particularly attractive for the assessment of early neoplastic changes.

  17. Do the BEAF insulator proteins regulate genes involved in cell polarity and neoplastic growth?

    PubMed

    Hart, Craig M

    2014-05-15

    It was reported that a chromosome with the BEAF(NP6377) (NP6377) allele leads to a loss of cell polarity and neoplastic growth in Drosophila melanogaster when homozygous (Gurudatta et al., 2012). We had previously generated the BEAF(AB-KO) (AB-KO) allele by homologous recombination and did not note these phenotypes (Roy et al., 2007). Both alleles are null mutations. It was unclear why two null alleles of the same gene would give different phenotypes. To resolve this, we performed genetic tests to explore the possibility that the chromosome with the NP6377 allele contained other, second site mutations that might account for the different phenotypes. We found that the chromosome with NP6377 has at least two additional mutations. At least one of these, possibly in combination with the NP6377 allele, is presumably responsible for the reported effects on gene expression, cell polarity and neoplastic growth.

  18. Euclidean and fractal geometry of microvascular networks in normal and neoplastic pituitary tissue.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Grizzi, Fabio; Gaetani, Paolo; Goglia, Umberto; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Mortini, Pietro; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo

    2008-07-01

    In geometrical terms, tumour vascularity is an exemplary anatomical system that irregularly fills a three-dimensional Euclidean space. This physical characteristic and the highly variable shapes of the vessels lead to considerable spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the delivery of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, and the removal of metabolites. Although these biological characteristics are well known, quantitative analyses of newly formed vessels in two-dimensional histological sections still fail to view their architecture as a non-Euclidean geometrical entity, thus leading to errors in visual interpretation and discordant results from different laboratories concerning the same tumour. We here review the literature concerning microvessel density estimates (a Euclidean-based approach quantifying vascularity in normal and neoplastic pituitary tissues) and compare the results. We also discuss the limitations of Euclidean quantitative analyses of vascularity and the helpfulness of a fractal geometry-based approach as a better means of quantifying normal and neoplastic pituitary microvasculature.

  19. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Patrícia F.; Fantoni, Denise T.; Miranda, Bruna C.; Matera, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates. PMID:26981315

  20. [Morphometric analysis of nuclear variations in normal and neoplastic mammary ductal cells].

    PubMed

    Parada, D; Farías, R M; García-Tamayo, J

    1999-12-01

    Morphometry is a method to detect changes in a variety of tissues through quantitative elements. The purpose of this study was to examine several nuclear morphologic characteristics in normal and neoplastic mammary ductal cells using a multivariable method and expression of estrogen receptors by immunohistochemical techniques. A total of 1879 nuclei were examined by a computerized program, following the detection of estrogen receptors. Nuclear area, perimeter, diameter, maximal and minimal radio were obtained in 439 normal ductal nuclei. The mean nuclear area was 14.45 with a range between 10.88 and 17.90. Variables showed adequate statistical correlation (r > 0.5). A total of 1440 neoplastic nuclei were classified as grades I, II and III, and a statistical significative difference was found between these three groups. We conclude that the nuclear area is a reliable variable for statistical correlation being the ductal nuclei anisotropic objects.

  1. Expression of adrenomedullin 2/intermedin in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Murakami, Osamu; Hirose, Takuo; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka; Arai, Yoichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2008-07-01

    Adrenomedullin 2/intermedin (AM2/IMD) is a new member of calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide family. AM is expressed in various tumors including adrenocortical tumors and modulates tumor growth. The AM2/IMD expression has not been studied, however, in adrenal tumors. The expression of AM2/IMD and AM was therefore studied in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues by immunocytochemistry (ICC). Immunoreactive (IR)-AM2/IMD was measured by RIA. Furthermore, the expression of AM2/IMD and its receptor components, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2, and 3 mRNA in these tissues was studied by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). ICC showed that AM2/IMD and AM immunoreactivities were localized in adrenocortical tumors and pheochromocytomas. AM2/IMD and AM immunoreactivities were detected in medulla of attached non-neoplastic tissues, while the degree of immunoreactivity for AM2/IMD and AM in cortices of attached adrenals was relatively weak or undetectable. RIA detected IR-AM2/IMD in adrenal tumors (0.414+/-0.12 to 0.786+/-0.27 pmol/g wet weight, mean+/-S.E.M.) and attached adrenal tissues (0.397+/-0.052 pmol/g wet weight). Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography showed one broad peak eluted in the similar position to synthetic AM2/IMD with several minor peaks. RT-PCR showed expression of AM2/IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3 mRNA in tissues of adrenal tumors and attached adrenal glands. In conclusion, AM2/IMD is expressed in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues and may play (patho-)physiological roles in normal and neoplastic adrenals as an autocrine/paracrine regulator.

  2. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  3. Heat shock protein 70 and nitric oxide concentrations in non-tumorous and neoplastic canine mammary tissues: preliminary results - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Szczubiał, Marek; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Łopuszyński, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    The concentrations of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and nitric oxide ions (NO), measured as nitrite, were determined in canine mammary tumours and nontumorous mammary gland tissues. The concentrations of Hsp70 and NO were significantly higher in both benign and malignant tumours than in non-tumorous mammary tissues. Hsp70 concentration decreased with the increase in the grade of histological malignancy. A strong positive correlation was found between the concentrations of Hsp70 and NO in the benign tumours as well as in grade I and grade II malignant tumours. The results indicate that the process of neoplastic transformation in the canine mammary gland is related to a significant increase in Hsp70 and NO concentration in tumour tissues, and an interdependence between Hsp70 and nitrite ion production can be observed.

  4. The Drosophila TNF receptor Grindelwald couples loss of cell polarity and neoplastic growth.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ditte S; Colombani, Julien; Palmerini, Valentina; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; Boone, Emilie; Röthlisberger, Michael; Toggweiler, Janine; Basler, Konrad; Mapelli, Marina; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Léopold, Pierre

    2015-06-25

    Disruption of epithelial polarity is a key event in the acquisition of neoplastic growth. JNK signalling is known to play an important part in driving the malignant progression of many epithelial tumours, although the link between loss of polarity and JNK signalling remains elusive. In a Drosophila genome-wide genetic screen designed to identify molecules implicated in neoplastic growth, we identified grindelwald (grnd), a gene encoding a transmembrane protein with homology to members of the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. Here we show that Grnd mediates the pro-apoptotic functions of Eiger (Egr), the unique Drosophila TNF, and that overexpression of an active form of Grnd lacking the extracellular domain is sufficient to activate JNK signalling in vivo. Grnd also promotes the invasiveness of Ras(V12)/scrib(-/-) tumours through Egr-dependent Matrix metalloprotease-1 (Mmp1) expression. Grnd localizes to the subapical membrane domain with the cell polarity determinant Crumbs (Crb) and couples Crb-induced loss of polarity with JNK activation and neoplastic growth through physical interaction with Veli (also known as Lin-7). Therefore, Grnd represents the first example of a TNFR that integrates signals from both Egr and apical polarity determinants to induce JNK-dependent cell death or tumour growth.

  5. Local bone marrow renin-angiotensin system in primitive, definitive and neoplastic haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C; Beyazit, Yavuz

    2013-03-01

    The locally active ligand peptides, mediators, receptors and signalling pathways of the haematopoietic BM (bone marrow) autocrine/paracrine RAS (renin-angiotensin system) affect the essential steps of definitive blood cell production. Haematopoiesis, erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, formation of monocytic and lymphocytic lineages, thrombopoiesis and other stromal cellular elements are regulated by the local BM RAS. The local BM RAS is present and active even in primitive embryonic haematopoiesis. ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) is expressed on the surface of the first endothelial and haematopoietic cells, forming the marrow cavity in the embryo. ACE marks early haematopoietic precursor cells and long-term blood-forming CD34(+) BM cells. The local autocrine tissue BM RAS may also be active in neoplastic haematopoiesis. Critical RAS mediators such as renin, ACE, AngII (angiotensin II) and angiotensinogen have been identified in leukaemic blast cells. The local tissue RAS influences tumour growth and metastases in an autocrine and paracrine fashion via the modulation of numerous carcinogenic events, such as angiogenesis, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, immune responses, cell signalling and extracellular matrix formation. The aim of the present review is to outline the known functions of the local BM RAS within the context of primitive, definitive and neoplastic haematopoiesis. Targeting the actions of local RAS molecules could represent a valuable therapeutic option for the management of neoplastic disorders.

  6. Neoplastic lesions in CADASIL syndrome: report of an autopsied Japanese case.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wael Abdo; Udaka, Naoka; Ueda, Akihiko; Ando, Yukio; Ito, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common heritable causes of stroke and dementia in adults. The gene involved in the pathogenesis of CADASIL is Notch3; in which mutations affect the number of cysteine residues in its extracellular domain, causing its accumulation in small arteries and arterioles of the affected individuals. Besides the usual neurological and vascular findings that have been well-documented in CADASIL patients, this paper additionally reports multiple neoplastic lesions that were observed in an autopsy case of CADASIL patient; that could be related to Notch3 mutation. The patient was a 62 years old male, presented with a past history of neurological manifestations, including gait disturbance and frequent convulsive attacks. He was diagnosed as CADASIL syndrome with Notch3 Arg133Cys mutation. He eventually developed hemiplegia and died of systemic convulsions. Autopsy examination revealed-besides the vascular and neurological lesions characteristic of CADASIL- multiple neoplastic lesions in the body; carcinoid tumorlet and diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuro-endocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the lungs, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), prostatic adenocarcinoma (ADC) and adenomatoid tumor of the epididymis. This report describes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions that were found in a case of CADASIL patient that could be related to Notch3 gene mutations.

  7. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  8. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  9. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome induced by neoplastic meningitis in a patient receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Yohei; Takata, Takuma; Ikarashi, Toshihiko; Iino, Noriaki; Kazama, Junichiro J; Narita, Ichiei

    2013-11-18

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is characterized by neurological symptoms resulting from cerebral edema, which occurs as a consequence of hemodialysis. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome most often occurs in patients who have just started hemodialysis, during hemodialysis, or soon after hemodialysis; although it may also occur in patients who are under maintenance hemodialysis with pre-existing neurological disease. A 70-year-old woman, who had been receiving maintenance hemodialysis for one year, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer by ascites cytological examination. Two years later, she reported severe headache and nausea during hemodialysis and was diagnosed with dialysis disequilibrium syndrome. Although brain images revealed mild hydrocephalus without any mass lesions, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells were detected in her cerebrospinal fluid. These findings indicated that DDS was induced by neoplastic meningitis due to ovarian cancer metastasis. Neoplastic meningitis should be considered and excluded in hemodialysis patients with dialysis disequilibrium syndrome and malignancy by cytological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid even if cerebral imaging shows no obvious lesions. This is the first reported case of dialysis disequilibrium syndrome induced by neoplastic meningitis in a patient receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

  10. Phenotypic diversity of neoplastic chondrocytes and extracellular matrix gene expression in cartilaginous neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, T.; Dertinger, S.; Vornehm, S. I.; Dudhia, J.; von der Mark, K.; Kirchner, T.

    1997-01-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is characterized by distinct cellular phenotypes, which can be identified by specific extracellular matrix gene expression profiles. By applying in situ analysis on the mRNA and protein level in a series of benign and malignant human chondrogenic neoplasms, we were able to identify for the first time different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes in vivo: 1) mature chondrocytes, which synthesized the characteristic cartilaginous extracellular tumor matrix, 2) cells resembling hypertrophic chondrocytes of the fetal growth plate, 3) cells resembling so-called dedifferentiated chondrocytes, and 4) well differentiated chondrocytic cells, which expressed type I collagen, indicating the presence of post-hypertrophic differentiated neoplastic chondrocytes. Chondrocytes exhibiting a range of phenotypes were found to be present in the same neoplasm. The different observed phenotypes, including the dedifferentiated phenotype, were in contrast to the anaplastic cells of high-grade chondrosarcomas. Comparison of expression data with tumor morphology revealed a relationship between the cellular phenotypes, the tumor matrix composition, and the matrix and cell morphology within the neoplasms. The distinctly different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes are the basis of the characteristic high biochemical and morphological heterogeneity of chondroid neoplasms and shed light on their biological and clinical behavior. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9176404

  11. Oncogenic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells by acute and protracted exposures to monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Miller, R C; Hall, E J

    1991-10-01

    An in vitro assay was used to assess cell killing and induction of neoplastic transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells exposed to X rays and a range of monoenergetic neutrons administered at various dose rates. Curves for cell survival and induction of neoplastic transformation showed nonlinearity for cells exposed to acute graded doses of X rays, while irradiation of cells with 0.05 to 1.5 Gy of 0.23-, 0.35-, 0.45-, 0.70-, 0.96-, 5.90-, and 13.7-MeV neutrons resulted in a linear response as a function of dose for both neoplastic transformation and killing. When compared to results obtained with 250-kVp X rays, all neutron energies were more effective at both cell killing and induction of neoplastic transformation. When expressed as maximum biological effectiveness (RBEM), both cell survival and induction of neoplastic transformation showed an initial increase with neutron energy (maximal at 0.35 MeV), followed by a decrease in effectiveness with further increases in energy. These responses are consistent with microdosimetric predictions in that recoil protons from neutron interaction are shifted to lower lineal energies as neutron energies increase. To examine the effects of temporal distribution of dose on neutron-induced neoplastic transformation, cells were exposed to either a single dose or five equal dose fractions spread over 8 h. As a function of dose for single or fractionated exposures to 0.5 Gy or 0.23-, 0.35-, 0.45-, 5.9-, or 13.7-MeV neutrons, neither a sparing nor an enhancing effect was seen with survival. Similarly, the frequency of induction of neoplastic transformation was independent of dose fractionation for all but 5.9-MeV neutrons. The enhancing effects of exposure to fractionated doses of 5.9-MeV neutrons were further studied by comparing exposures for a range of doses given singly, in five fractions over 8 h, or continuously for 8 h. Results reaffirm the enhancing effects of dose fractionation on the induction of oncogenic transformation for 5

  12. Localization of collagen modifying enzymes on fibroblastic reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Rintaro; Aung, Naing Ye; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Suto, Aya; Tamazawa, Nobuyuki; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the localization of collagen modifying enzymes (CMEs) on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues and various malignant lymphomas. The expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1), lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was frequently observed on FRCs and FDCs in the germinal center (GC), except for the mantle zone. The expression of CMEs was lower in most lymphomas than in their respective postulated normal counterparts. The ratio of transglutaminase II(+) FRCs/CD35(+) FDCs was also lower in follicular lymphomas (FL) than in other lymphomas. The mRNAs of some CMEs (P4H1, prolyl 4-hydroxylase 3, LH3, and heat shock protein 47) were confirmed in almost all lymphomas. These results indicate that lymphoma cell proliferation suppresses/decreases the number of CMEs expressing FRCs and FDCs in most lymphomas.

  13. Localization of collagen modifying enzymes on fibroblastic reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ohe, Rintaro; Aung, Naing Ye; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Suto, Aya; Tamazawa, Nobuyuki; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the localization of collagen modifying enzymes (CMEs) on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues and various malignant lymphomas. The expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1), lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was frequently observed on FRCs and FDCs in the germinal center (GC), except for the mantle zone. The expression of CMEs was lower in most lymphomas than in their respective postulated normal counterparts. The ratio of transglutaminase II+ FRCs/CD35+ FDCs was also lower in follicular lymphomas (FL) than in other lymphomas. The mRNAs of some CMEs (P4H1, prolyl 4-hydroxylase 3, LH3, and heat shock protein 47) were confirmed in almost all lymphomas. These results indicate that lymphoma cell proliferation suppresses/decreases the number of CMEs expressing FRCs and FDCs in most lymphomas. PMID:26700650

  14. Simultaneous induction of non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions with highly proliferative hepatocytes following dietary exposure of rats to tocotrienol for 2 years.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Masako; Umemura, Takashi; Kijima, Aki; Inoue, Tomoki; Okamura, Toshiya; Kuroiwa, Yuichi; Ishii, Yuji; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2009-11-01

    It was recently shown that 1-year chronic exposure of rats to tocotrienol (TT) induced highly proliferative liver lesions, nodular hepatocellular hyperplasia (NHH), and independently increased the number of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive hepatocytes. Focusing attention on the pathological intrinsic property of NHH, a 104-week carcinogenicity study was performed in male and female Wistar Hannover rats given TT at concentrations of 0, 0.4 or 2% in the diet. The high-dose level was adjusted to 1% in both sexes from week 51 because the survival rate of the high-dose males dropped to 42% by week 50. At necropsy, multiple cyst-like nodules were observed, as in the chronic study, but were further enlarged in size, which consequently formed a protuberant surface with a partly pedunculated shape in the liver at the high dose in both sexes. Unlike the chronic study, NHH was not always accompanied by spongiosis, and instead angiectasis was prominent in some nodules. However, several findings in the affected hepatocytes such as minimal atypia, no GST-P immunoreactivity and heterogeneous proliferation, implied that NHH did not harbor neoplastic characteristics from increased exposure despite sustained high cell proliferation. On the other hand, in the high-dose females, the incidence of hepatocellular adenomas was significantly higher than in the control. There was no TT treatment-related tumor induction in any other organs besides the liver. Thus, the overall data clearly suggested that NHH is successively enlarged by further long-term exposure to TT, but does not become neoplastic. In contrast, TT induces low levels of hepatocellular adenomas in female rats.

  15. Computer-generated surface and tone enhancements to distinguish neoplastic from non-neoplastic colon polyps less than 1 cm in diameter.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming-Lun; Lee, Yi-Chia; Chen, Chieh-Chang; Fang, Yu-Jen; Lee, Ji-Yuh; Lin, Tzu-Ling; Lin, Long-Wei; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2012-03-01

    Computer-generated enhancements, which can highlight the surface and color of a colonic lesion, may be helpful to predict the histology; however, it remains unclear whether this technology can distinguish neoplastic from non-neoplastic colon polyps when the polyps are <1 cm without magnification. Images of colorectal polyps less than 1 cm in diameter were obtained from 54 patients who underwent non-magnified colonoscopy with surface enhancement (SE) and tone enhancement (TE). We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in the prediction of histology. Inter- and intra-observer consistency was evaluated by inviting four endoscopists to rate 45 static images. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy following the sequence of SE, TE colon, and TE pit pattern modes were 87.7% (95% confidence interval 81.3-94.1%), 84.1% (76.9-91.3%), and 86.1% (79.4-92.8%), respectively. For each modality, the results were 75.0% (68.7-81.3%), 82.7% (77.2-88.2%), and 77.2% (71.1-83.3%) for SE; 71.1% (64.5-77.7%), 78.8 (72.8-84.8), and 73.3% (66.8-79.8%) for TE colon mode; and 75.0% (68.7-81.3%), 80.8% (75.0-86.8%), and 76.7% (70.5-82.9%) for TE pit pattern mode. Their inter- and intra-observer agreements were all fair (κ range 0.522-0.568) and good (0.605-0.694), respectively. When the same rater evaluated the same lesion under different modalities, eight of 45 (18%) polyps yielded discordant interpretations, and the possibility of incorrect diagnoses was the highest with the TE colon mode. Computer-generated enhancements are satisfactory in predicting the histology of small colon polyps without the need for magnification. This advantage is mostly related to the pit pattern enhancement.

  16. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  17. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  18. Involvement of epigenetics and EMT related miRNA in arsenic induced neoplastic transformation and their potential clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Michailidi, Christina; Hayashi, Masamichi; Datta, Sayantan; Sen, Tanusree; Zenner, Kaitlyn; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola; Brait, Mariana; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Baras, Alexander; VandenBussche, Christopher; Argos, Maria; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ahsan, Habibul; Hahn, Noah M.; Netto, George J.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to toxicants leads to cumulative molecular changes that overtime increase a subject’s risk of developing urothelial carcinoma (UC). To assess the impact of arsenic exposure at a time progressive manner, we developed and characterized a cell culture model and tested a panel of miRNAs in urine samples from arsenic exposed subjects, UC patients and controls. To prepare an in vitro model, we chronically exposed an immortalized normal human bladder cell line (HUC1) to arsenic. Growth of the HUC1 cells was increased in a time dependent manner after arsenic treatment and cellular morphology was changed. In soft agar assay, colonies were observed only in arsenic treated cells and the number of colonies gradually increased with longer periods of treatment. Similarly, invaded cells in invasion assay were observed only in arsenic treated cells. Withdrawal of arsenic treatment for 2.5 months did not reverse the tumorigenic properties of arsenic treated cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated decreased PTEN and increased AKT and mTOR in arsenic treated HUC1 cells. Levels of miR-200a, miR-200b, and miR-200c were down-regulated in arsenic exposed HUC1 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, in human urine, miR-200c and miR-205 were inversely associated with arsenic exposure (P=0.005 and 0.009, respectively). Expression of miR-205 discriminated cancer cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC=0.845). Our study suggests that exposure to arsenic rapidly induces a multifaceted dedifferentiation program and miR-205 has potential to be used as a marker of arsenic exposure as well as a maker of early UC detection. PMID:25586904

  19. Functional Interactions Between c-Src and HER1 Potentiate Neoplastic Transformation: Implications for the Etiology of Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    neoplasms , including carcinomas of the breast, lung, colon, cytosis [1",21*°,22"°1, and the other is to affect esophagus, skin, parotid, cervix, and...gastric tissues, as well morphogenetic remodeling of the cell by phosphorylating as in neuroblastomas and myeloproliferative disorders. In proteins that...implicated c-Src as an etiological agent for the develop- ment of neuroblastomas, myeloproliferative disorders (including myeloid leukemia), and carcinomas

  20. First evidence of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels in human parathyroid glands: possible involvement in neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Laura; Cetani, Filomena; Da Valle, Ylenia; Pardi, Elena; Ciregia, Federica; Donadio, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Piano, Ilaria; Borsari, Simona; Jaber, Ali; Caputo, Antonella; Basolo, Fulvio; Giannaccini, Gino; Marcocci, Claudio; Lucacchini, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The parathyroid glands play an overall regulatory role in the systemic calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate the presence of the Ca(2+) channels transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 5 and TRPV6 in human parathyroid glands. Semi-quantitative and quantitative PCR was carried out to evaluate the presence of TRPV5 and TRPV6 mRNAs in sporadic parathyroid adenomas and normal parathyroid glands. Western blot and immunocytochemical assays were used to assess protein expression, cellular localization and time expression in primary cultures from human parathyroid adenoma. TRPV5 and TRPV6 transcripts were then identified both in normal and pathological tissues. Predominant immunoreactive bands were detected at 75-80 kD for both vanilloid channels. These channels co-localized with the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) on the membrane surface, but immunoreactivity was also detected in the cytosol and around the nuclei. Our data showed that western blotting recorded an increase of protein expression of both channels in adenoma samples compared with normal glands suggesting a potential relation with the cell calcium signalling pathway and the pathological processes of these glands.

  1. Endoscopic versus microscopic transsphenoidal surgery in the treatment of pituitary tumors: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Rodrigo V S; Silva, Carla Maria D M; Tagliarini, Jose Vicente; Zanini, Marco Antonio; Romero, Flavio R; Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Nunes, Vania Dos Santos

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized controlled trials that compared pure endoscopic with microscopic transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in the resection of pituitary tumors. Embase, PubMed, Lilacs, and Central Cochrane were used as our data sources. The outcomes were total tumor resection, achievement of biochemical control of functioning adenomas, hospital stay and surgery complications. The randomized trials were analyzed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Two randomized and three prospective controlled non-randomized studies were included. Two studies, including 68 patients, evaluated total tumor resection and the meta-analysis did not show differences between the groups [RR: 1.45 (95% CI: 0.87, 2.44)]. Three studies involving 65 patients analyzed the achievement of biochemical control and no statistical difference was found [RR: 0.94 (95% CI: 0.7, 1.26)]. All five studies compared the frequency of postoperative complications between intervention and control group and meta-analysis favored for a low rate of postoperative complications in the endoscopic TSS group [(RR: 0.37 (95% CI: 0.16, 0.83)]. Due to the low evidence level and low number of observations, the results of our meta-analysis should not be viewed as a final proof of inferiority or superiority of one approach in relation to the other. More data including higher numbers of observations are needed.

  2. Exposure of Prostate to Lipopolysaccharide and Hypoxia Potentiates Neoplastic Behavior and Risk for Prostate Carcinogenesis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Omabe, Maxwell; Omabe, Kenneth; Okwuegbu, Martin; Grace, Ogo; Okoro, Desmond Uchenna

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies showed that men from tropical countries have higher burden of prostate cancer similar to data from USA. We developed a translational model to examine whether exposure to microbial inflammation-inducing molecule lipopolysacchride LPS was associated with prostatic cell transformation to more proliferative phenotype as indicated by PSA secretion. Immunocompetent adult mice were divided into two groups; the first group received a local prostate inoculation with E. coli, while the second group received inoculation with sterile solution of saline as vehicle. At the end of 6 days, the PSA values were measured and compared. In the second experiment, two groups of animals were involved. The test group received two drops of the hydrogen peroxide orally for six to seven days to induce hypoxia, while the control group received normal saline. Blood samples were evaluated for serum level of PSA. Result showed a 2-fold increase in level of PSA compared to the control mice in the E. coli inoculated-LPS exposed animals. In addition, exposure of the animals to hypoxic stress resulted in 3.5 fold increase in the serum PSA compared to the control group, which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, our data shows that chronic prostatic infection and exposure to inflammatory stimulus, especially LPS, may alter the phenotype of prostate epithelial cells for increased PSA secretion, a known cancer-like behavior; this is mediated by compromised redox state and oxidative stress injury. We propose that exposure of the prostate epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promotes chronic inflammation and risk of neoplastic behavior of the prostate in vivo; this may explain the high rate of prostate cancer in tropics.

  3. Exposure of Prostate to Lipopolysaccharide and Hypoxia Potentiates Neoplastic Behavior and Risk for Prostate Carcinogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Omabe, Maxwell; Omabe, Kenneth; Okwuegbu, Martin; Grace, Ogo; Okoro, Desmond Uchenna

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies showed that men from tropical countries have higher burden of prostate cancer similar to data from USA. We developed a translational model to examine whether exposure to microbial inflammation-inducing molecule lipopolysacchride LPS was associated with prostatic cell transformation to more proliferative phenotype as indicated by PSA secretion. Immunocompetent adult mice were divided into two groups; the first group received a local prostate inoculation with E. coli, while the second group received inoculation with sterile solution of saline as vehicle. At the end of 6 days, the PSA values were measured and compared. In the second experiment, two groups of animals were involved. The test group received two drops of the hydrogen peroxide orally for six to seven days to induce hypoxia, while the control group received normal saline. Blood samples were evaluated for serum level of PSA. Result showed a 2-fold increase in level of PSA compared to the control mice in the E. coli inoculated-LPS exposed animals. In addition, exposure of the animals to hypoxic stress resulted in 3.5 fold increase in the serum PSA compared to the control group, which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, our data shows that chronic prostatic infection and exposure to inflammatory stimulus, especially LPS, may alter the phenotype of prostate epithelial cells for increased PSA secretion, a known cancer-like behavior; this is mediated by compromised redox state and oxidative stress injury. We propose that exposure of the prostate epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promotes chronic inflammation and risk of neoplastic behavior of the prostate in vivo; this may explain the high rate of prostate cancer in tropics. PMID:27379259

  4. Neoplastic meningitis: a retrospective review of clinical presentations, radiological and cerebrospinal fluid findings.

    PubMed

    Jearanaisilp, Sorrawit; Sangruji, Tumthip; Danchaivijitr, Chotipat; Danchaivijitr, Nasuda

    2014-08-01

    To review the clinical, radiological, and laboratory presentations of patients with neoplastic meningitis. Patients with neoplastic meningitis were recruited by a retrospective search of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytopathological report database of Siriraj Hospital between 1997 and 2006. Clinical information and CSF result of these patients were extracted from their medical records. Neuroimagings were reviewed by a neuroradiologist. The present study revealed 40 cases of neoplastic meningitis, which comprised of 17 cases with carcinomatous meningitis (CM) and 23 lymphoma/leukemia meningitis (LM) cases. In patients with CM, the majority (70%) had adenocarcinoma of lung or breast. Three of 17 cases with unknown primary tumor had carcinomatous meningitis as an initial presentation. In LM most of the cases (70%) were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The most common symptom among patients with CM and LM was headache follow by cranial nerve palsy. In CM cases, CSF cytology was positive in the first specimen in 15 cases (82.35%) and in 22 from 23 cases (95.7%) in LM cases. Overall CSF showed pleocytosis in 36 cases (90%), most of which were lymphocyte predominant. The most common findings from brain imagings were leptomeningeal enhancement and hydrocephalus. The common primary sites were lung and breast cancer in the CM group and ALL and NHL in the LM group. The common symptoms were headache and cranial nerve palsy. Routine CSF examination was abnormal in virtually all cases. Positive CSF cytology was a gold standard for a diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. High index of suspicious and awareness were required to avoid miss diagnosis.

  5. Neoplastic alterations induced in mammalian skin following mancozeb exposure using in vivo and in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpa; George, Jasmine; Singh, Richa; Bhui, Kulpreet; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2011-03-01

    Mancozeb, ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate fungicides, has been well documented in the literature as a multipotent carcinogen, but the underlying mechanism remains unrevealed. Thus, mancozeb has been selected in this study with the objective to decipher the molecular mechanism that culminates in carcinogenesis. We employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to generate a comparative proteome profile of control and mancozeb (200 mg/kg body weight) exposed mouse skin. Although many differentially expressed proteins were found, among them, two significantly upregulated proteins, namely, S100A6 (Calcyclin) and S100A9 (Calgranulin-B), are known markers of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation, which suggested their role in mancozeb-induced neoplastic alterations. Therefore, we verified these alterations in the human system by using HaCaT cells as an in vitro model for human skin keratinocyte carcinogenesis. Upregulation of these two proteins upon mancozeb (0.5 μg/mL) exposure in HaCaT cells indicated its neoplastic potential in human skin also. This potential was confirmed by increase in number of colonies in colony formation and anchorage-independent growth assays. Modulation of S100A6/S100A9 targets, elevated phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Elk1, nuclear factor- kappa B and cell division cycle 25 C phosphatase, and cyclin D1 and cyclooxygenase-2 upregulation was seen. In addition, PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced cell proliferation induced by mancozeb, confirming the involvement of ERK1/2 signaling. Conclusively, we herein present the first report asserting that the mechanism involving S100A6 and S100A9 regulated ERK1/2 signaling underlies the mancozeb-induced neoplastic potential in human skin.

  6. Surgical resection of neoplastic cervical spine lesions in relation to the vertebral artery V2 segment

    PubMed Central

    Al Barbarawi, Mohamed; Odat, Ziad; Alheis, Mwaffaq; Qudsieh, Suhair; Qudsieh, Tareq

    2010-01-01

    Neoplastic cervical spine lesions are seen infrequently by the spinal surgeon. The surgical management of these tumors, particularly with associated neurovascular compromise, is challenging in terms of achieving proper resection and spinal stabilization and ensuring no subsequent recurrence or failure of fixation. In this report we highlight some of the problems encountered in the surgical management of tumors involving the cervical spine with techniques applied for gross total resection of the tumor without compromising the vertebral arteries. Ten patients with neoplastic cervical spine lesions were managed in our study. The common cardinal presentation was neck and arm pain with progressive cervical radiculo-myelopathy. All patients had plain X-rays, computer tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. Digital subtraction or magnetic resonance angiograms were performed on both vertebral arteries when the pathology was found to be in proximity to the vertebral artery. When a tumor blush with feeders was evident, endovascular embolization to minimize intraoperative bleeding was also considered. A single approach or a combined anterior cervical approach for corpectomy and cage-with-plate fixation and posterior decompression for resection of the rest of the tumor with spinal fixation was then accomplished as indicated. All cases made a good neurological recovery and had no neural or vascular complications. On the long-term follow-up of the survivors there was no local recurrence or surgical failure. Only three patients died: two from the primary malignancy and one from pulmonary embolism. This report documents a safe and reliable way to deal with neoplastic cervical spine lesions in proximity to vertebral arteries with preservation of both arteries. PMID:21577335

  7. Low plasma selenium concentration is associated with elevated risk to neoplastic polyps of the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.C.; Hixson, L.G.; Sampliner, R.E. ); Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the relationship of selenium (Se) status and polyps incidence in a sequential series of 100 patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopies at the Tucson VA Hospital. Se was measured in plasma samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction using a reduced palladium matrix modified. The activities of the Se-dependent enzyme glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) were measured using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as substrate in all plasma samples and in colonic mucosal biopsies obtained from some patients. The mean plasma Se concentration of patients without polyps was 134 ng/ml. Mean plasma Se levels of patients with only diminutive or large polyps were 127 ng/ml and 125 ng/ml; while patients with polyps of both sizes had a mean plasma Se level of 121 ng/ml. Patients with no reported history of cancer, neoplastic polyps or prior colonoscopy, showed an inverse association of plasma Se level and risk of benign colonic neoplasms. The age-adjusted odds ratio for neoplastic polyps was 3.8 for patients with plasma Se levels below vs. above the median value. This association was stronger for patients under 68 yrs of age than for older patients. Activities of SeGSHpx in plasma or colonic mucosa were not related to plasma Se level; however, smokers showed greater SeGSHpx activities than non-smokers. This study is the first to detect an association of Se status and risk to neoplastic polyps of the colon.

  8. Miss rate of colorectal neoplastic polyps and risk factors for missed polyps in consecutive colonoscopies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Jung, Yoon Suk; Jeong, Woo Shin; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Park, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Kyuyong; Park, Dong Il

    2017-07-01

    Colonoscopic polypectomy is the best diagnostic and therapeutic tool to detect and prevent colorectal neoplasms. However, previous studies have reported that 17% to 28% of colorectal polyps are missed during colonoscopy. We investigated the miss rate of neoplastic polyps and the factors associated with missed polyps from quality-adjusted consecutive colonoscopies. We reviewed the medical records of patients who were found to have colorectal polyps at a medical examination center of the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between March 2012 and February 2013. Patients who were referred to a single tertiary academic medical center and underwent colonoscopic polypectomy on the same day were enrolled in our study. The odds ratios (ORs) associated with polyp-related and patient-related factors were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. A total of 463 patients and 1,294 neoplastic polyps were analyzed. The miss rates for adenomas, advanced adenomas, and carcinomas were 24.1% (312/1,294), 1.2% (15/1,294), and 0% (0/1,294), respectively. Flat/sessile-shaped adenomas (adjusted OR, 3.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.40-5.46) and smaller adenomas (adjusted OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 2.84- 11.15 for ≤5 mm; adjusted OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.60-6.30 for 6-9 mm, respectively) were more frequently missed than pedunculated/sub-pedunculated adenomas and larger adenomas. In patients with 2 or more polyps compared with only one detected (adjusted OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.55-3.61 for 2-4 polyps; adjusted OR, 11.52; 95% CI, 4.61-28.79 for ≥5 polyps, respectively) during the first endoscopy, the risk of missing an additional polyp was significantly higher. One-quarter of neoplastic polyps was missed during colonoscopy. We encourage endoscopists to detect smaller and flat or sessile polyps by using the optimal withdrawal technique.

  9. Transformed Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Blombery, Piers; Seymour, John F

    2016-12-01

    Transformed lymphoma is a complex syndrome that encompasses an array of different underlying low-grade lymphoproliferative conditions transforming into more aggressive disease as manifest by morphologic, clinical, and genetic features. Over the last decade, advances in chemoimmunotherapy have led to new options. Knowledge surrounding the genetic changes driving the process of transformation is leading to novel targeted therapies. This article focuses on the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and follicular lymphoma into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  10. Loss of chromosome Y in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: age related or neoplastic phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anurag; Parihar, Mayur; Remani, Arun S; Mishra, Deepak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in the bone marrow has long been considered as an age-related phenomenon with an incidence of more than 25% in males beyond the age of 80 years. Though reported as an acquired abnormality in myeloid neoplasms, it has rarely been described in B-lymphoblastic leukemia which primarily is a disease of the young. We describe here in three cases of pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia with LOY. Conventional cytogenetic studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using centromeric probes for chromosome X and Y on peripheral blood samples ruled out constitutional LOY in all the three cases favoring it to be a neoplastic phenomenon.

  11. Low Concentration of Quercetin Antagonizes the Cytotoxic Effects of Anti-Neoplastic Drugs in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Hui; Ma, Ding; Chen, Gang; Weng, Danhui

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of Quercetin in ovarian cancer treatment remains controversial, and the mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of Quercetin in combination with Cisplatin and other anti-neoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, along with the molecular mechanism of action. Methods Quercetin treatment at various concentrations was examined in combination with Cisplatin, taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fu in human epithelial ovarian cancer C13* and SKOV3 cells. CCK8 assay and Annexin V assay were for cell viability and apoptosis analysis, immunofluorescence assay, DCFDA staining and realtime PCR were used for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced injury detection and endogenous antioxidant enzymes expression. Athymic BALB/c-nu nude mice were injected with C13*cells to obtain a xenograft model for in vivo studies. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to evaluate the ROS-induced injury and SOD1 activity of xenograft tumors. Results Contrary to the pro-apoptotic effect of high concentration (40 µM–100 µM) of Quercetin, low concentrations (5 µM–30 µM) of Quercetin resulted in varying degrees of attenuation of cytotoxicity of Cisplatin treatment when combined with Cisplatin. Similar anti-apoptotic effects were observed when Quercetin was combined with other anti-neoplastic agents: Taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu). Low concentrations of Quercetin were observed to suppress ROS-induced injury, reduce intracellular ROS level and increase the expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suggesting a ROS-mediated mechanism of attenuating anti-neoplastic drugs. In xenogeneic model, Quercetin led to a substantial reduction of therapeutic efficacy of Cisplatin along with enhancing the endogenous antioxidant enzyme expression and reducing ROS-induced damage in xenograft tumor tissue. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that Quercetin at low concentrations attenuate the

  12. [Cancer procoagulant activity in serum and neoplastic tissue in cases of cervical and uterine carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jóźwik, Maciej; Jóźwik, Marcin; Zalewska, Beata; Panek, Grzegorz; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Skrzydlewski, Zdzisław

    2004-09-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a sulfhydryl proteinase thought to be synthesized mainly by neoplastic cells. Consequently, increased CP activity in blood serum was interpreted as being associated with the presence of a proliferative process in the host's body. To date, CP activity has not been systematically studied in cases of genital carcinoma. The present study is aimed at evaluation of CP activity in women with genital carcinoma. A case-controlled study backed up by histopathological examination. Peripheral blood was sampled preoperatively in a sterile manner from an antecubital vein, from 16 women with cervical carcinoma and 15 women with uterine carcinoma. Blood for the reference group of 12 healthy women was obtained in an identical manner after an overnight fast. The CP activity in serum was determined using the coagulative method according to Gordon and Benson, and was expressed as coagulation time in seconds (s). The CP activity in 10% tissue homogenates (in saline) of genital cancer was determined by the chromogenic method according to Colucci et al. The mean CP activity in serum of women with cervical carcinoma (78.28 +/- 15.25 s) and of women with uterine carcinoma (79.63 +/- 12.02 s) was significantly different (P < 0.0001) from the respective values found in healthy women (281.33 +/- 43.19 s). The CP activity in neoplastic tissue was 28.50 +/- 6.40 nmol pNa/mL for cervical carcinoma, and 28.31 +/- 3.92 nmol pNa/mL for uterine carcinoma, both values being significantly higher (P < 0.0009) than the activity found in the normal tissues. There was no established relationship between neoplastic CP activity and FIGO staging of the disease. This is the first study to demonstrate the concomitant presence of CP activity in serum and neoplastic tissue of women with genital carcinoma. These patients have decreased coagulation time and thus are likely to develop coagulation disturbances in the course of their cancer. There may be a role for CP as a tumor marker of

  13. Mediastinal sarcoidosis mimicking lymph malignancy recurrence after anti-neoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    El Hammoumi, Massine; El Marjany, Mohamed; Moussaoui, Driss; Doudouh, Aberahim; Mansouri, Hamid; Kabiri, El Hassane

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our work is to promote the awareness about the development of sarcoidosis after antineoplastic therapy in order to avoid diagnostic errors with FDG-PET/CT findings. We report the observation of three women with breast, cervix and stomach treated cancers who developed a sarcoidosis after the end of anti-neoplastic therapy. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is in pinpointing the organs candidates for diagnostic biopsy and not distinguishing between the malignancy and granulomatous or inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Uptake and distribution of fluorescently labeled cobalamin in neoplastic and healthy breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Michelle J.; McGreevy, James M.; Holden, Joseph A.; West, Frederick G.; Grissom, Charles B.

    2000-05-01

    Fluorescent analogs of cobalamin (vitamin B12) have been developed as diagnostic markers of cancer cells. These compounds are recognized by transcobalamin, a cobalamin transport protein, with high affinity, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. The cellular sequestration and gross distribution of fluorescent cobalamin bioconjugates in breast tissue is being examined by epifluorescence microscopy. The distribution of each compound is being evaluated in proliferative and non-proliferative tissue, i.e. normal tissue and breast carcinoma. The results of preliminary studies suggest that fluorescent analogs of cobalamin may be a useful tool in therapeutic breast operations to define tumor margins and to distinguish neoplastic breast tissue from healthy breast tissue.

  15. Detection of neoplastic meningitis in a patient with gastric cancer by thallium-201 SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Yasuyo; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Terashima, Mari; Shinkai, Takayuki; Ueno, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    We describe the usefulness of thallium-201 SPECT in a patient with neoplastic meningitis (NM) from gastric carcinoma. Thallium-201 SPECT is of value for the diagnosis of cancer; retention of thallium-201 on delayed images strongly suggests malignancy. NM is a lethal, major neurologic complication of cancer. The standard for the diagnosis of NM is cytologic confirmation of malignant cells in CSF, but cytologic results are often negative (estimated false negative rate, 50%), even when NM is strongly suspected clinically. In patients with equivocal findings, our findings suggest that thallium-201 SPECT is one helpful tool for the detection of NM, particularly when associated with signet-ring cell carcinoma.

  16. Neoplastic diseases of the spermatic cord: an overview of pathological features, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Dagur, Gautam; Gandhi, Jason; Kapadia, Kailash; Inam, Rafid; Smith, Noel L; Joshi, Gargi; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular tumors found with the spermatic cord, known as neoplasms, are usually identified to be benign. However, the accurate and timely diagnosis of spermatic cord masses is highly crucial, especially when most results are often overlooked or unclear. In this review, we discuss the anatomy and embryology of the spermatic cord. Upon rooting these fundamental concepts, we discuss an array of benign and malignant neoplastic tumors, including their origin, pathological features, clinical evaluation and management, as well as other case-specific characteristics of unique presentation. Many of these neoplasms are based on local neurological, vascular, muscular, bone, soft tissue, or lymphatic origin, while others have metastasized from particular areas of the body.

  17. Coexpression of intermediate filaments in normal and neoplastic human tissues: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Coggi, G; Dell'Orto, P; Braidotti, P; Coggi, A; Viale, G

    1989-01-01

    The current view that coexpression of intermediate filaments (IFs) must be considered a bizarre and unpredictable phenomenon, which seriously jeopardizes the use of their localization in diagnostic applications, is critically reviewed in light of the evidence so far acquired by investigations in vivo and in vitro. A less dogmatic approach, which considers IF expression the result of a series of interactions between cells and their microenvironment instead of a function of their histogenesis, not only justifies the complex variety of coexpressions observed in normal and neoplastic tissues but also confirms the usefulness of IF expression in diagnostic applications and offers new opportunities for investigations, with special regard to immunoelectron microscopy.

  18. [Palliative biliary-digestive bypass with a Kehr tube for neoplastic surgical cholestatic jaundice].

    PubMed

    Revetria, P; Bonardi, L; Gambetta, G; Ferro, A; Bertino, C

    1993-03-31

    The authors, in some rare cases of surgical neoplastic icterus operation, had to adopt a technique of biliary-digestive bypass with prosthesis on account of the technical-anatomical and general conditions of the patients. That prosthesis has been made out of the typical Keher's duct which can be generally found in every general surgery. The above mentioned authors describe the operations they have carried out, their directions and the results of six cases which have been treated with a technique similar to Kron's.

  19. Clusterin expression in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses and pituitary adenomas: cytoplasmic clusterin localization in adenohypophysis is related to aging.

    PubMed

    Ekici, A Işin Doğan; Eren, Bülent; Türkmen, Nursel; Comunoğlu, Nil; Fedakar, Recep

    2008-01-01

    Clusterin is a circulating multifunctional glycoprotein produced in several kinds of epithelial and neuronal cells. Clusterin is upregulated during different physiological and pathological states, such as senescence, type-2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease, and in various neoplasms. Herein, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of clusterin in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis of human autopsy subjects and pituitary adenomas. We also investigated the association of clusterin increase with age in adenohypophysis of autopsy subjects. Immunohistochemically, clusterin was found positive in the cytoplasm of all adenoma cases, and in the cytoplasm of parenchymal cells, stellate cells, mixed cell follicles and in colloidal material inside of the follicles of non-neoplastic adenohypophysis as well. Clusterin expression in pituitary adenomas was found significantly higher than in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses. In addition, in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis, a significant increase in clusterin expression levels between young (or=61 years) subjects (p < 0.00001, analysis of variance [ANOVA]) was found. In addition to clusterin accumulation, presence of calcification (p < 0.045, ANOVA) and presence of large follicles with colloid accumulation (p < 0.004, ANOVA) were also statistically significant factors related to aging in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that clusterin expression was found in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis and in upregulated amounts in pituitary adenomas. This study also demonstrated that in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses, increase of clusterin positive cells; histopathological findings of calcification or presence colloidal material accumulation in large follicles were associated with age. To our knowledge, immunohistochemical localization of clusterin in pituitary adenomas was not reported previously.

  20. Aberrant p53 protein expression is associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Florine; Biermann, Katharina; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Verheij, Joanne; Kalisvaart, Marit; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Stoop, Hans A; Walter, Laurens; Kuipers, Ernst J; Spaander, Manon C W; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-12-01

    The value of surveillance for patients with Barrett's oesophagus (BO) is under discussion given the overall low incidence of neoplastic progression and lack of discriminative tests for risk stratification. Histological diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) is the only accepted predictor for progression to date, but has a low predictive value. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the value of p53 immunohistochemistry for predicting neoplastic progression in patients with BO. We conducted a case-control study within a prospective cohort of 720 patients with BO. Patients who developed high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) were classified as cases and patients without neoplastic progression were classified as controls. P53 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in more than 12 000 biopsies from 635 patients and was scored independently by two expert pathologists who were blinded to long-term outcome. During follow-up, 49 (8%) patients developed HGD or OAC. P53 overexpression was associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with BO after adjusting for age, gender, Barrett length and oesophagitis (adjusted relative risks (RR(a)) 5.6; 95% CI 3.1 to 10.3), but the risk was even higher with loss of p53 expression (RR(a) 14.0; 95% CI 5.3 to 37.2). The positive predictive value for neoplastic progression increased from 15% with histological diagnosis of LGD to 33% with LGD and concurrent aberrant p53 expression. Aberrant p53 protein expression is associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with BO and appears to be a more powerful predictor of neoplastic progression than histological diagnosis of LGD.

  1. Dietary polyacetylenes, falcarinol and falcarindiol, isolated from carrots prevents the formation of neoplastic lesions in the colon of azoxymethane-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Kobaek-Larsen, Morten; El-Houri, Rime B; Christensen, Lars P; Al-Najami, Issam; Fretté, Xavier; Baatrup, Gunnar

    2017-03-22

    Falcarinol (FaOH) and falcarindiol (FaDOH) are found in many food plants of the Apiaceae family. Carrots are a major dietary source of these polyacetylenes. Feeding azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rats with carrots and purified FaOH have previously been shown to inhibit neoplastic transformations in the colon. FaOH and FaDOH have also shown to have a synergistic effect in vitro, resulting in a significant increased cytotoxic activity. Based on these findings the antineoplastic effect of FaOH and FaDOH (purity > 99%) was investigated in the AOM-induced rat model. Twenty rats received rat diet containing 7 μg FaOH per g feed and 7 μg FaDOH per g feed and 20 rats were controls receiving only rat diet. Then carcinogenesis was induced in all 40 rats with the carcinogen AOM. All animals received the designated diet for 2 weeks before AOM induction and continued on the designated diet throughout the experiment. Rats were euthanized 18 weeks after the first AOM injection and macroscopic polyp/cancers were measured, harvested and stained for histology. The difference in sizes of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were analysed in a Wilcoxon rank sum test, in which the median number of small ACF was 218 in controls and 145 in polyacetylene treated rats (P < 0.001). Fifteen control rats and 8 treated rats had macroscopic tumors (P = 0.027). The number of tumors larger than 3 mm were 6 and 1 in control and treated rats, respectively (P = 0.032). In conclusion dietary supplements with FaOH and FaDOH reduced the number of neoplastic lesions as well as the growth rate of the polyps suggesting a preventive effect of FaOH and FaDOH on the development of colorectal cancer.

  2. MicroRNA-19a/b mediates grape seed procyanidin extract-induced anti-neoplastic effects against lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jenny T; Xue, Bingye; Smoake, Jane; Lu, Qing-Yi; Park, Heesung; Henning, Susanne M; Burns, Windie; Bernabei, Alvise; Elashoff, David; Serio, Kenneth J; Massie, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Oncomirs are microRNAs (miRNA) associated with carcinogenesis and malignant transformation. They have emerged as potential molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy. We hypothesize that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSE) exerts antineoplastic effects through modulations of oncomirs and their downstream targets. We found that GSE significantly down-regulated oncomirs miR-19a and -19b in a variety of lung neoplastic cells. GSE also increased mRNA and protein levels of insulin-like growth factor II receptor (IGF-2R) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), both predicted targets of miR-19a and -19b. Furthermore, GSE significantly increased PTEN activity and decreased AKT phosphorylation in A549 cells. Transfection of miR-19a and -19b mimics reversed the up-regulations of IGF2R and PTEN gene expression and abrogated the GSE induced anti-proliferative response. Additionally, oral administration of leucoselect phytosome, comprised of standardized grape seed oligomeric procyanidins complexed with soy phospholipids, to athymic nude mice via gavage, significantly down-regulated miR-19a, -19b and the miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) expressions, increased IGF-2R, PTEN, decreased phosphorylated-AKT in A549 xenograft tumors, and markedly inhibited tumor growth. To confirm the absorption of orally administered GSE, plasma procyanidin B1 levels, between 60 and 90 min after gavage of leucoselect phytosome (400 mg/kg), were measured by LC/MS at week 2 and 8 of treatment; the estimated concentration that was associated with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) (1.3 μg/mL) in vitro was much higher than the IC50 (0.032-0.13 μg/ml) observed in vivo. Our findings reveal novel antineoplastic mechanisms by GSE and support the clinical translation of leucoselect phytosome as an anti-neoplastic and chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Repair-dependent cell radiation survival and transformation: an integrated theory.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, John C

    2014-09-07

    The repair-dependent model of cell radiation survival is extended to include radiation-induced transformations. The probability of transformation is presumed to scale with the number of potentially lethal damages that are repaired in a surviving cell or the interactions of such damages. The theory predicts that at doses corresponding to high survival, the transformation frequency is the sum of simple polynomial functions of dose; linear, quadratic, etc, essentially as described in widely used linear-quadratic expressions. At high doses, corresponding to low survival, the ratio of transformed to surviving cells asymptotically approaches an upper limit. The low dose fundamental- and high dose plateau domains are separated by a downwardly concave transition region. Published transformation data for mammalian cells show the high-dose plateaus predicted by the repair-dependent model for both ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. For the neoplastic transformation experiments that were analyzed, the data can be fit with only the repair-dependent quadratic function. At low doses, the transformation frequency is strictly quadratic, but becomes sigmodial over a wider range of doses. Inclusion of data from the transition region in a traditional linear-quadratic analysis of neoplastic transformation frequency data can exaggerate the magnitude of, or create the appearance of, a linear component. Quantitative analysis of survival and transformation data shows good agreement for ultraviolet radiation; the shapes of the transformation components can be predicted from survival data. For ionizing radiations, both neutrons and x-rays, survival data overestimate the transforming ability for low to moderate doses. The presumed cause of this difference is that, unlike UV photons, a single x-ray or neutron may generate more than one lethal damage in a cell, so the distribution of such damages in the population is not accurately described by Poisson statistics. However, the complete

  4. Sirtuin 1 stimulates the proliferation and the expression of glycolysis genes in pancreatic neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Andreia V.; Mawson, Amanda; Gill, Anthony; Arshi, Mehreen; Warmerdam, Max; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Eling, Nils; Lie, Triyana; Kuster, Evelyne; Camargo, Simone; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wu, Jianmin; Rooman, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a feature of neoplasia and tumor growth. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a lysine deacetylase of multiple targets including metabolic regulators such as p53. SIRT1 regulates metaplasia in the pancreas. Nevertheless, it is unclear if SIRT1 affects the development of neoplastic lesions and whether metabolic gene expression is altered. To assess neoplastic lesion development, mice with a pancreas-specific loss of Sirt1 (Pdx1-Cre;Sirt1-lox) were bred into a KrasG12D mutant background (KC) that predisposes to the development of pancreatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Similar grade PanIN lesions developed in KC and KC;Sirt1-lox mice but specifically early mucinous PanINs occupied 40% less area in the KC;Sirt1-lox line, attributed to reduced proliferation. This was accompanied by reduced expression of proteins in the glycolysis pathway, such as GLUT1 and GAPDH. The stimulatory effect of SIRT1 on proliferation and glycolysis gene expression was confirmed in a human PDAC cell line. In resected PDAC samples, higher proliferation and expression of glycolysis genes correlated with poor patient survival. SIRT1 expression per se was not prognostic but low expression of Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulator 2 (CCAR2), a reported SIRT1 inhibitor, corresponded to poor patient survival. These findings open perspectives for novel targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27494892

  5. A core of kinase-regulated interactomes defines the neoplastic MDSC lineage

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Isabel; Liechtenstein, Therese; Arasanz, Hugo; Lozano, Teresa; Casares, Noelia; Chaikuad, Apirat; Knapp, Stefan; Guerrero-Setas, David; Escors, David; Kochan, Grazyna; Santamaría, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) differentiate from bone marrow precursors, expand in cancer-bearing hosts and accelerate tumor progression. MDSCs have become attractive therapeutic targets, as their elimination strongly enhances anti-neoplastic treatments. Here, immature myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), MDSCs modeling tumor-infiltrating subsets or modeling non-cancerous (NC)-MDSCs were compared by in-depth quantitative proteomics. We found that neoplastic MDSCs differentially expressed a core of kinases which controlled lineage-specific (PI3K-AKT and SRC kinases) and cancer-induced (ERK and PKC kinases) protein interaction networks (interactomes). These kinases contributed to some extent to myeloid differentiation. However, only AKT and ERK specifically drove MDSC differentiation from myeloid precursors. Interfering with AKT and ERK with selective small molecule inhibitors or shRNAs selectively hampered MDSC differentiation and viability. Thus, we provide compelling evidence that MDSCs constitute a distinct myeloid lineage distinguished by a “kinase signature” and well-defined interactomes. Our results define new opportunities for the development of anti-cancer treatments targeting these tumor-promoting immune cells. PMID:26320174

  6. Effect of Octenisept antiseptic on bioburden of neoplastic ulcers in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopata, M; Ciupińska, M; Głowacka, A; Muszyński, Z; Tomaszewska, E

    2008-01-01

    To assess the effect of octenidine dihydrochloride (Octenisept, Schülke & Mayr) on the clinical condition and bacterial flora in neoplastic ulcers. Twenty-one patients with advanced cancer and neoplastic ulcers were included in the study. Octenisept-moistened gauze dressings were applied to the ulcers three times daily. The clinical and bacteriological status of the wounds were assessed at baseline and after three weeks of treatment. Thirty-three bacterial strains were cultured at baseline. After three weeks of treatment, the tests were repeated on 16 patients. Clinical observations confirmed an improvement in the clinical condition of the ulcers, characterised by a reduction in necrosis, exudate levels, erythema and oedema. According to the bacteriological assessment, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Proteus mirabilis were eradicated from the wounds. Enterococcus faecalis persisted in two patients, Escherichia coli in one patient and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in another patient. Octenispet was an effective antimicrobial: Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis were eradicated in all ulcers. After three weeks of treatment, none of the ulcers developed an infection and there was an improvement in their clinical condition.

  7. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  8. Evaluation of impact of immunocytochemical techniques in cytological diagnosis of neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, A; Bussolati, G

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study (1984-87) on the immunocytochemical identification of cancer cells in effusions using HMFG2 monoclonal antibody, and in addition, monoclonal anti-CEA and B72.3 antibodies in cases of suspected mesothelioma, was undertaken. On the basis of cytology alone, of a total of 2362 pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions, 525 cases were diagnosed as positive and 1485 as negative for neoplastic cells, while in 352 (15%) specimens from 307 patients the diagnosis was doubtful. Sections of the embedded sediment of doubtful cases were tested with HMFG2 antibody and proved positive in 215 cases, negative in 108, and inconclusive in 29. The results were checked by following the clinical outcome of the cases. The method was specific in identifying cancer cells in cases at best diagnosed as suspicious on the basis of cytology alone; this represents a clear diagnostic gain. Sensitivity of the test, however, was relatively low (41%). Combined cytological and immunocytochemical characteristics (CEA negative and only some of the neoplastic cells positive with HMFG2 and B72.3 monoclonal antibodies) permitted diagnosis on the effusions of most cases of mesothelioma. The impact of the diagnosis on the progress of the disease was not appreciable as no difference in outcome was noted, irrespective of whether cancer cells had been recognised. The occurrence of an effusion remains an ominous sign in most patients treated for cancer. Images PMID:2685053

  9. [The role of the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in the control of cancer in Peru].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Miriam Rosario; Regalado-Rafael, Roxana; Navarro, Jeannie Magalli; Montanez, Dayana Melissa; Abugattas, Julio Elías; Vidaurre, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    With a mortality rate that constitutes the second nationwide, the estimated incidence of cancer in Peru is 150 cases x 100 000 inhabitants. Around 75% of the cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mainly in Lima. In this context, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) has promoted the decentralization of oncological care creating regional institutes of neoplastic diseases, oncological units and prevention centers. In addition, INEN has designed, developed and implemented the Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, which, since 2011, has allowed for more than 7000 centers around the country to allocate resources to the prevention, promotion and early detection of the most frequent cancers in Peru. With the financial support of the state's health insurance system, the basic strategic central points were integrated to provide low-income cancer patients with comprehensive medical care. Through this way, and within the framework of a state policy integrated to and articulated with the health sector, the National Plan for Comprehensive Medical Care for Cancer Patients and the Improvement in the Access to Oncological Services in Peru, known as "The Hope Plan", was born. This article elaborates on the role that INEN plays in the control of cancer as a public health issue, highlighting the importance of the Strategic Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control and its role in the "The Hope Plan".

  10. Practical Immunohistochemistry in Neoplastic Pathology of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract, and Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Kim, Christopher J; Koo, Jamie; Zhou, Wendi; Choi, Eunice K; Arcega, Ramir; Chen, Zongming Eric; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Lanjing; Lin, Fan

    2017-09-01

    - Immunomarkers with diagnostic, therapeutic, or prognostic values have been increasingly used to maximize the benefits of clinical management of patients with neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. - To review the characteristics of immunomarkers that are commonly used in surgical pathology practice for neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas, and to summarize the clinical usefulness of immunomarkers that have been discovered in recent years in these fields. - Data sources include literature review, authors' research data, and personal practice experience. - Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool for the accurate diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. Useful immunomarkers are available to help distinguish malignant neoplasms from benign conditions, determine organ origins, and subclassify neoplasms that are morphologically and biologically heterogeneous. Specific immunomarkers are also available to help guide patient treatment and assess disease aggressiveness, which are keys to the success of personalized medicine. Pathologists will continue to play a critical role in the discovery, validation, and application of new biomarkers, which will ultimately improve patient care.

  11. Efficacy Evaluation of SAVE for the Diagnosis of Superficial Neoplastic Lesion.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farah; Mohammed, Shahed K; Bui, Francis Minhthang; Wahid, Khan A

    2017-01-01

    The detection of non-polypoid superficial neoplastic lesions using current standard of white light endoscopy surveillance and random biopsy is associated with high miss rate. The subtle changes in mucosa caused by the flat and depressed neoplasms often go undetected and do not qualify for further investigation, e.g., biopsy and resection, thus increasing the risk of cancer advancement. This paper presents a screening tool named the saliency-aided visual enhancement (SAVE) method, with an objective of highlighting abnormalities in endoscopic images to detect early lesions. SAVE is a hybrid system combining image enhancement and saliency detection. The method provides both qualitative enhancement and quantitative suspicion index for endoscopic image regions. A study to evaluate the efficacy of SAVE to localize superficial neoplastic lesion was performed. Experimental results for average overlap index >0.7 indicated that SAVE was successful to localize the lesion areas. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve obtained for SAVE was 94.91%. A very high sensitivity (100%) was achieved with a moderate specificity (65.45%). Visual inspection showed a comparable performance of SAVE with chromoendoscopy to highlight mucosal irregularities. This paper suggests that SAVE could be a potential screening tool that can substitute the application of burdensome chromoendoscopy technique. SAVE method, as a simple, easy-to-use, highly sensitive, and consistent red flag technology, will be useful for early detection of neoplasm in clinical applications.

  12. The spectrum of oculocutaneous disease: Part II. Neoplastic and drug-related causes of oculocutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Day, Antoinette; Abramson, Amanda K; Patel, Mahir; Warren, Richard B; Menter, M Alan

    2014-05-01

    There are a multitude of diseases that commonly affect both the skin and the eye. Part II of this 2-part series reviews the oculocutaneous manifestations of neoplasms, both benign and malignant, and adverse drug reactions affecting the skin and the eye. Though rare, a number of neoplasms that primarily involve the skin, such as melanoma and basal cell carcinoma, can metastasize to the eye, leading to permanent damage if not properly treated. In addition, periocular neoplasms can irritate the conjunctiva and lid, reducing a patient's ability to see clearly. Neoplastic diseases, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and multiple myeloma, can also lead to permanent changes in the eye if not discovered and managed promptly. Furthermore, there are a multitude of drugs, including those commonly used by dermatologists, which can result in permanent damage to the eye. With proper knowledge of the ocular manifestations and treatment recommendations described in this 2-part series, dermatologists with the assistance of their ophthalmology colleagues can help avoid the complications, including permanent blindness, associated with infectious, inflammatory, genetic, neoplastic, and drug-related conditions. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Non-neoplastic enlargement of salivary glands: clinico-histologic analysis].

    PubMed

    González Guevara, Martha Beatriz; Torres Tejero, Marco Antonio; Martínez Mata, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study on non-neoplastic enlargement of the salivary glands at the Oral Histopathology Diagnostic Center of the Autonomous Metropolitan University at Xochimilco (UAM-Xochimilco) in Mexico during a period of 24 years (1979-2003). From 5,625 biopsies received and analyzed, a total of 461 (8.2%) were non-neoplastic enlargement of the salivary glands; for each case, we registered demographic data as well as clinic characteristics. These lesions were characterized as a heterogeneous group of pathologic entities among which we included local, obstructive, infectious, and immunopathologic lesions. The most frequent lesion was the extravasation cyst in 341 (74%) cases, followed by chronic sialoadenitis and Sjögren's syndrome with 54 (11.7%) and 41 (8.8%) cases, respectively, and at a lesser percentage mucous retention cyst, sialosis, benign lymphoepithelial lesions and those related with sialolytes. Females were affected more frequently; mean age was second to third life decades. These lesions were most frequently localized on inferior labial mucosa.

  14. Endoscopic risk factors for neoplastic progression in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bureo Gonzalez, Angela; Bergman, Jacques JGHM

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus is a precursor lesion for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, which generally has a poor prognosis. Patients diagnosed with Barrett’s oesophagus therefore undergo regular endoscopic surveillance to detect neoplastic lesions at a curable stage. The efficacy of endoscopic surveillance of Barrett’s oesophagus patients is, however, hampered by difficulties to detect early neoplasia endoscopically, biopsy sampling error, inter-observer variability in histological assessment and the relatively low overall progression rate. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of Barrett’s surveillance may be improved by using endoscopic and clinical characteristics to risk-stratify Barrett’s patients to high- and low-risk categories. Recent national and international surveillance guidelines have incorporated Barrett’s length and presence of low-grade dysplasia in the advised surveillance intervals. In this review we will discuss endoscopic characteristics that may be associated with neoplastic progression in Barrett’s oesophagus and that may be used to tailor surveillance in Barrett’s patients. PMID:27733907

  15. Angiogenic Signalling Pathways Altered in Gliomas: Selection Mechanisms for More Aggressive Neoplastic Subpopulations with Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bulnes, Susana; Bengoetxea, Harkaitz; Ortuzar, Naiara; Argandoña, Enrike G.; Garcia-Blanco, Álvaro; Rico-Barrio, Irantzu; Lafuente, José V.

    2012-01-01

    The angiogenesis process is a key event for glioma survival, malignancy and growth. The start of angiogenesis is mediated by a cascade of intratumoural events: alteration of the microvasculature network; a hypoxic microenvironment; adaptation of neoplastic cells and synthesis of pro-angiogenic factors. Due to a chaotic blood flow, a consequence of an aberrant microvasculature, tissue hypoxia phenomena are induced. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 is a major regulator in glioma invasiveness and angiogenesis. Clones of neoplastic cells with stem cell characteristics are selected by HIF-1. These cells, called “glioma stem cells” induce the synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor. This factor is a pivotal mediator of angiogenesis. To elucidate the role of these angiogenic mediators during glioma growth, we have used a rat endogenous glioma model. Gliomas induced by prenatal ENU administration allowed us to study angiogenic events from early to advanced tumour stages. Events such as microvascular aberrations, hypoxia, GSC selection and VEGF synthesis may be studied in depth. Our data showed that for the treatment of gliomas, developing anti-angiogenic therapies could be aimed at GSCs, HIF-1 or VEGF. The ENU-glioma model can be considered to be a useful option to check novel designs of these treatment strategies. PMID:22852079

  16. Sensitivity of neoplastic cells to senescence unveiled under standard cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jolanta; Ksiazkiewcz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Peciak, Joanna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Lipinski, Marek; Olczak, Michal; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    Cancer cells are typically defined as infinitely proliferating, whereas normal cells (except stem cells) are considered as being programmed to become senescent. Our data show that this characterization is misleading. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification, TP53 sequencing, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for MUC1 and SCGB2A2 and immunocytochemistry, together with senescence detection assay and real-time microscopic observations were used to analyze primary neoplastic cells isolated from prostate, breast and colorectal tumors, as well as stable cancer cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB-468, SW962, SK-MEL28, NCI-H1975 and NCI-H469). In all cases of primary cancer cell cultures, in vitro conditions rapidly revealed senescence in the majority of cells. Two out of six stable cancer cell lines did not exhibit any senescence-associated-β-Galactosidase-positive cells. Interestingly, four cell lines had small sub-populations of senescent cells (single SA-β-Gal-positive cells). Primary neoplastic cells from different types of cancer (prostate, breast, colon cancer) appear to be senescent in vitro. Apparently, cancer cell lines that have been used for many years in drug-testing analyses have constantly been misleading researchers in terms of the general sensitivity of cancer cells to senescence. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Neoplastic and nonneoplastic liver lesions induced by dimethylnitrosamine in Japanese medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, K R; DeAngelo, A B; George, M H; Law, J M

    2012-03-01

    Small fish models have been used for decades in carcinogenicity testing. Demonstration of common morphological changes associated with specific mechanisms is a clear avenue by which data can be compared across divergent phyletic levels. Dimethylnitrosamine, used in rats to model human alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatic neoplasia, is also a potent hepatotoxin and carcinogen in fish. We recently reported some striking differences in the mutagenicity of DMN in lambda cII transgenic medaka fish vs. Big Blue(®) rats, but the pre-neoplastic and neoplastic commonalities between the two models are largely unknown. Here, we focus on these commonalities, with special emphasis on the TGF-β pathway and its corresponding role in DMN-induced hepatic neoplasia. Similar to mammals, hepatocellular necrosis, regeneration, and dysplasia; hepatic stellate cell and "spindle cell" proliferation; hepatocellular and biliary carcinomas; and TGF-β1 expression by dysplastic hepatocytes all occurred in DMN-exposed medaka. Positive TGF-β1 staining increased with increasing DMN exposure in bile preductular epithelial cells, intermediate cells, immature hepatocytes and fewer mature hepatocytes. Muscle specific actin identified hepatic stellate cells in DMN-exposed fish. Additional mechanistic comparisons between animal models at different phyletic levels will continue to facilitate the interspecies extrapolations that are so critical to toxicological risk assessments.

  18. Pyruvate attenuates the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine independently from oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Meixensberger, Jürgen; Gaunitz, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Here we analyzed whether the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine, which inhibits glycolytic ATP production, can be antagonized by ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation fueled by pyruvate. Therefore, glioblastoma cells were cultivated in medium supplemented with glucose, galactose or pyruvate and in the presence or absence of carnosine. CPI-613 was employed to inhibit the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and 2,4-dinitrophenol to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation. Energy metabolism and viability were assessed by cell based assays and histochemistry. ATP in cell lysates and dehydrogenase activity in living cells revealed a strong reduction of viability under the influence of carnosine when cells received glucose or galactose but not in the presence of pyruvate. CPI-613 and 2,4-dinitrophenol reduced viability of cells cultivated in pyruvate, but no effect was seen in the presence of glucose. No effect of carnosine on viability was observed in the presence of glucose and pyruvate even in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol or CPI-613. In conclusion, glioblastoma cells produce ATP from pyruvate via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the absence of a glycolytic substrate. In addition, pyruvate attenuates the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine, even when ATP production via tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is blocked. We also observed an inhibitory effect of carnosine on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a stimulating effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol on glycolytic ATP production. PMID:27811375

  19. Histological classification of the neoplastic changes arising in ulcerative colitis: a new proposal in Japan.

    PubMed

    Konishi, F; Wakasa, H; Kino, I; Watanabe, H; Nagura, H; Muto, T

    1995-11-01

    Patients with total ulcerative colitis with a longstanding course of the disease have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinoma. Colonoscopic surveillance to detect precancerous tissue and/or cancer in these patients has been carried out in countries with a high incidence of ulcerative colitis. Riddell's classification has been widely used for the interpretation of biopsy specimens obtained from the colonoscopic surveillance. In Japan, however, there are problems in accepting Riddell's classification, mainly because the intramucosal carcinomas diagnosed by Japanese histopathologists are included in the category of high-grade dysplasia in Riddell's classification. Based on the results of a meticulous slide review carried out by seven histopathologists in this study, a new classification is proposed: UC-I, inflammatory change; UC-II, indefinite; UC-IIa, probably inflammatory; UC-IIb, probably neoplastic; UC-III, neoplastic but not carcinomatous; and UC-IV, carcinoma. Intramucosal carcinomas is included in the category UC-IV. We consider that the diagnosis of intramucosal carcinoma is to be made when there is a high grade of cytological and structural atypia consistent with carcinoma. Interobserver and intraobserver variability with this classification was acceptable. We believe this new classification will be widely use in cancer surveillance in ulcerative colitis in Japan.

  20. Methanol extract of the ethnopharmaceutical remedy Smilax spinosa exhibits anti-neoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Seelinger, Mareike; Popescu, Ruxandra; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Unger, Christine; Wallnöfer, Bruno; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Diaz, Rene; Jäger, Walter; Frisch, Richard; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Plants have been the source of several effective drugs for the treatment of cancer and over 60% of anticancer drugs originate from natural sources. Therefore, extracts of the rhizome of Smilax spinosa, an ethnomedicinal plant from Guatemala which is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, were investigated regarding their anti-neoplastic activities. By using several solvents the methanol extract was by far the most potent against HL60 cell proliferation (50% inhibition at 60 µg/ml). Furthermore, fractionation of this extract yielded fraction F2, which exhibited enforced pro-apoptotic activity, and activated CYP1A1. Proteins that are relevant for cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as proto-oncogenes were investigated by western blotting. This revealed that the methanol extract increased the levels of p21 and this may have caused cell cycle attenuation. The derivative fraction F2 induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, which correlated with the inhibition of Stat3 phosphorylation and concomitant induction of caspase 9, then caspase 8 and caspase 3. In summary, the methanol extract and the derivative fraction F2 of S. spinosa showed anti-neoplastic effects in HL-60 cells and CYP1A1 activation in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells but not in estrogen-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Based on our data Smilax spinosa may be a promising source for novel anticancer agents.

  1. Hypercobalaminaemia is associated with hepatic and neoplastic disease in cats: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When increased serum cobalamin concentrations are encountered clinically they are usually attributed to parenteral supplementation, dietary factors, or otherwise ignored. However, recently, hypercobalaminaemia has been associated with numerous diseases in humans, most notably neoplastic and hepatic disorders. The aim of this retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study was to determine the significance of increased cobalamin in cats. Results In total, 237 records were retrieved and 174 cats, of various ages and sexes met the inclusion criteria. A total of 42 cats had increased serum cobalamin concentration, and had not received prior supplementation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that increased serum cobalamin concentration was positively related to pedigree breed (pedigree breeds more likely to have increased cobalamin concentration, odds ratio [OR] 4.24, 95% CI 1.78-10.15, P = 0.001), to having liver disease (OR 9.91, 95% CI 3.54-27.68), and to having a solid neoplasm (OR 8.54, 95% CI 1.10-66.45). Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that increased serum cobalamin concentrations should not be ignored in cats with no history of supplementation, and investigation for underlying hepatic or neoplastic disease is warranted. PMID:25103858

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Human Pancreatic Tissues.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marco; Kim, Haeryoung; Blackford, Amanda; Sharma, Rajni; Goggins, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Studies have proposed pro-oncogenic effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists in the pancreas by promoting GLP-1R overactivation in pancreatic cells. However, the expression of GLP-1R in normal and neoplastic pancreatic cells remains poorly defined, and reliable methods for detecting GLP-1R in tissue specimens are needed. We used RNA in situ hybridization to quantify glp-1r RNA in surgically resected human pancreatic specimens, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), preinvasive intraepithelial lesions (pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia), and non-neoplastic ductal, acinar, and endocrine cells. A mixed-effect linear regression model was used to investigate the relationship between glp-1r signals and all cells, ordered by increasing grade of dysplasia. All cell types had evidence of glp-1r transcripts, with the highest expression in endocrine cells and lowest in ductal cells. The slope of the fitted line was not significantly different from zero (0.07; 95% confidence interval, -0.0094 to 0.244; P = 0.39), suggesting that progression from normal cells to PDAC is not associated with a parallel increase in glp-1r RNA. A series of pairwise comparisons between all cell types with respect to their glp-1r expression showed no significant difference in glp-1r in cancer, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and acinar and ductal cells. Our study supports the lack of evidence for GLP-1R overexpression in PDAC.

  3. On Determining the Effects of Therapy on Disease Damage in Non- randomized Studies with Multiple Treatments: A study of Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses predicting damage in patients with juvenile myositis after treatment with various medications. These data were taken from medical records and not randomized. Investigators advocate using propensity scores for analysis of such non-randomized studies in order to reduce the effect of selection of treatment. Thus far, the studies have typically been comparing drug administration versus no drug after including a propensity score to compensate for potential bias in selecting patients for use of the agent. In this study, we use propensity scoring for multiple treatments given singly or in combination. We study two methods. We use a multiple logistic regression model with continuous propensity scores and a model that develops strata based on the dichotomous treatment assignment (received drug or not). We find the multiple logistic regression models predict damage better than the dichotomous model. In many cases, the propensity score also accounts for the effect of the treatment. PMID:20209035

  4. A 4-Mb deletion in the region Xq27.3-q28 is associated with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.R.; Han, L.P.; Michalickova, K.

    1994-09-01

    A girl with severe Hunter disease was found to have a submicroscopic deletion distrupting the IDS locus in the region Xq27.3-q28 together with non-random inactivation of the non-mutant X chromosome. Southern analysis of DNA from the parents and from hamster-patient somatic cell hybrids containing only the mutant X chromosome revealed that the deletion represented a de novo mutation involving the paternal X chromosome. Methylation-sensitive RFLP analysis of DNA from maternal fibroblasts and lymphocytes showed methylation patterns consistent with random X-inactivation, indicating that the non-random X-inactivation in the patient was not inherited and was likely a direct result of the Xq27.3-q28 deletion. A 15 kb EcoRI junction fragment, identified in patient DNA using IDS cDNA probes, was cloned from a size-selected patient DNA library. Clones containing the deletion junction were restriction mapped and fragments were subcloned and used to isolate normal sequence on either side of the deletion from normal X chromosome libraries. Comparison of the sequences from normal and mutant X chromosome clones straddling the deletion breakpoint showed that the mutation had occurred by recombination between Alu repeats. Screening of YAC contigs containing normal X chromosome sequence from the region of the mutation, using probes from either side of the deletion breakpoint, showed that the deletion was approximately 4 Mb in size. Probing of mutant DNA with 16 STSs distributed throughout the region of the deletion confirmed that the mutation is a simple deletion with no complex rearrangements of islands of retained DNA. A search for sequences at Xq27.3-q28 involved in X chromosome inactivation is in progress.

  5. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  7. Fourier Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Fourier transformation is a very important tool for signal analysis but also helpful to simplify the solution of differential equations or the calculation of convolution integrals. An important numerical method is the discrete Fourier transformation which can be used for trigonometric interpolation and also as a numerical approximation to the continuous Fourier integral. It can be realized efficiently by Goertzel's algorithm or the family of fast Fourier transformation methods. For real valued even functions the computationally simpler discrete cosine transformation can be applied. Several computer experiments demonstrate the principles of trigonometric interpolation and nonlinear filtering.

  8. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  9. Immunoexpression of the COX-2, p53, and caspase-3 proteins in colorectal adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Renan Brito; Pires, Andréa Rodrigues Cordovil; Soares, Thélia Maria Santos; Rodrigues, Simone Rabello de Souza; Campos, Mariane Antonieta Menino; Toloi, Giovanna Canato; Waisberg, Jaques

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the immunoexpression of the COX-2, p53, and caspase-3 proteins in colorectal adenomas and non-neoplastic mucosa. Methods: 72 individuals were subjected to colonoscopy, which provided 50 samples of adenomas and 45 samples of non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. The tissue samples were obtained via the tissue microarray technique and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using primary anti-p53, anti-COX-2, and anti-caspase-3 antibodies. The positivity and intensity of the immunoreaction were classified. The analyzed variables were as follows: site of the adenomas in the colon, degree of dysplasia, size, and score of positivity and intensity of immunoexpression of the p-53, caspase-3, and COX-2 proteins. Results: The immunoexpression of mutated protein p53 was positive in 30 (60%) adenoma samples and negative in 20 (40%) adenoma samples. The immunoexpression of mutated protein p53 was negative in 39 (86.6%) samples and positive in 6 (13.3%) samples of the non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa (p<0.0001). Significant differences were seen between both the largest size (p=0.006) and the highest degree of dysplasia (p<0.0001) of the adenomas and the intensity of immunoexpression of mutated protein p53. The positivity and intensity of immunoexpression of COX-2 (p=0.14) and caspase-3 (p=0.23) showed no significant differences between the adenomas and the non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. Conclusion: Mutated protein p53 was hyperexpressed in the adenomas compared with the non-neoplastic mucosa. Greater size and greater degree of dysplasia in the adenomas were associated with higher expression of mutated protein p53. The immunoexpression of COX-2 and caspase-3 in the adenomas did not exhibit a correlation with the anatomical-pathological features of the tumors and did not differ from the corresponding expression levels in the non-neoplastic mucosa. PMID:24488384

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 proteins in normal and neoplastic lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, S.; Bodrug, S.; Gascoyne, R.; Berean, K.; Krajewska, M.; Reed, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Bcl-2 protein blocks programmed cell death and becomes overproduced in many follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphomas as the result of t(14; 18) translocations involving the Bcl-2 gene. Mcl-1 is a recently discovered gene whose encoded protein has significant homology with Bcl-2 but whose function remains unknown. In this study, we compared the in vivo patterns of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 protein production in normal and neoplastic lymph node biopsies by immunohistochemical means using specific polyclonal antisera. Intracellular Mcl-1 immunoreactivity was located primarily in the cytosol in a punctate pattern and was also seen in association with the nuclear envelope in many cases, similar to the results obtained for Bcl-2, which resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane, nuclear envelope, and endoplasmic reticulum. In 4 of 4 reactive tonsils and 28 of 28 nodes with reactive follicular hyperplasia, reciprocal patterns of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 protein expression were observed. Bcl-2 immunostaining was highest in mantle zone lymphocytes and absent from most germinal center cells, whereas Mcl-1 immunoreactivity was highest in germinal center lymphocytes and absent from mantle zone lymphocytes. Mcl-1 was also expressed in some interfollicular lymphocytes, particularly those that had the appearance of activated lymphocytes. Similar to the patterns of Bcl-2 and mcl-1 expression seen in reactive nodes, Mcl-1 protein was largely absent from the malignant cells in 2 of 2 mantle cell lymphomas, whereas strong Bcl-2 immunostaining was found in these cells. In contrast to normal nodes, however, the neoplastic follicles of t(14;18) containing follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphomas immunostained positively for both Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 in 24 of 27 cases. Intense immunostaining for Mcl-1 was also observed in Reed-Sternberg cells in 2 of 2 cases of Hodgkin's disease but Bcl-2 immunoreactivity was present at much lower levels. These findings demonstrate that the levels of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 proteins are

  11. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for the treatment of neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Białek, Andrzej; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Karpińska, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Wojciech; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the indications, resection rate, and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract at a European referral center. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the ESD procedures performed in our center for mucosal neoplastic and submucosal lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The duration of the procedure, en bloc and complete (R0) resection rates, and complication rates were evaluated. Variables were reported as mean ± SD or simple proportions. Univariate analysis and comparisons of procedure times and resection rates were performed using Mann-Whitney U tests, or χ2 tests for dichotomous variables. RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2011, ESD was performed in a total of 103 patients (46.7% male, mean age 64.0 ± 12.7 years). The indications for the procedure were epithelial tumor (n = 54), submucosal tumor (n = 42), or other (n = 7). The total en bloc resection rate was 90.3% (93/103) and R0 resection rate 80.6% (83/103). The median speed of the procedure was 15.0 min/cm2. The complete resection rate was lower for submucosal tumors arising from the muscle layer (68%, 15/22, P < 0.05). Resection speed was quicker for submucosal tumors localized in the submucosal layer than for lesions arising from the muscularis propria layer (8.1 min/cm2 vs 17.9 min/cm2, P < 0.05). The R0 resection rate and speed were better in the last 24 mo (90.1%, 49/54 and 15.3 min/cm2) compared to the first 3 years of treatment (73.5%, 36/49, P < 0.05 and 22.0 min/cm2, P < 0.05). Complications occurred in 14.6% (n = 15) of patients, including perforation in 5.8% (n = 6), pneumoperitoneum in 3.9% (n = 4), delayed bleeding in 1.9% (n = 2), and other in 2.9% (n = 3). Only one patient with delayed perforation required surgical treatment. During the mean follow-up of 26 ± 15.3 mo, among patients with R0 resection, recurrence occurred in one patient (1.2%). CONCLUSION: ESD is an effective and safe method for resection of

  12. Validation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging for normal and neoplastic breast tissues via surgical pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. E.; Albanese, K. E.; Lakshmanan, M. N.; McCall, S. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    This study intends to validate the sensitivity and specificity of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging (CACSSI) by comparison to standard histological preparation and pathologic analysis methods used to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast tissues. A composite overlay of the CACSSI rendered image and pathologist interpreted stained sections validate the ability of CACSSI to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast structures ex-vivo. Via comparison to pathologist annotated slides, the CACSSI system may be further optimized to maximize sensitivity and specificity for differentiation of breast carcinomas.

  13. Review Article: The Role of Molecular Pathological Epidemiology in the Study of Neoplastic and Non-neoplastic Diseases in the Era of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Wang, Molin; Nishi, Akihiro; Lochhead, Paul; Qian, Zhi Rong; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Nan, Hongmei; Yoshida, Kazuki; Milner, Danny A; Chan, Andrew T; Field, Alison E; Camargo, Carlos A; Williams, Michelle A; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-07-01

    Molecular pathology diagnostics to subclassify diseases based on pathogenesis are increasingly common in clinical translational medicine. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative transdisciplinary science based on the unique disease principle and the disease continuum theory. While it has been most commonly applied to research on breast, lung, and colorectal cancers, MPE can investigate etiologic heterogeneity in non-neoplastic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, drug toxicity, and immunity-related and infectious diseases. This science can enhance causal inference by linking putative etiologic factors to specific molecular biomarkers as outcomes. Technological advances increasingly enable analyses of various -omics, including genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, microbiome, immunomics, interactomics, etc. Challenges in MPE include sample size limitations (depending on availability of biospecimens or biomedical/radiological imaging), need for rigorous validation of molecular assays and study findings, and paucities of interdisciplinary experts, education programs, international forums, and standardized guidelines. To address these challenges, there are ongoing efforts such as multidisciplinary consortium pooling projects, the International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology Meeting Series, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-MPE guideline project. Efforts should be made to build biorepository and biobank networks, and worldwide population-based MPE databases. These activities match with the purposes of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K), Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON), and Precision Medicine Initiatives of the United States National Institute of Health. Given advances in biotechnology, bioinformatics, and computational/systems biology, there are wide open opportunities in MPE to contribute to public

  14. The Role of Molecular Pathological Epidemiology in the Study of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Diseases in the Era of Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Wang, Molin; Nishi, Akihiro; Lochhead, Paul; Qian, Zhi Rong; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Nan, Hongmei; Yoshida, Kazuki; Milner, Danny A; Chan, Andrew T.; Field, Alison E.; Camargo, Carlos A; Williams, Michelle A; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular pathology diagnostics to subclassify diseases based on pathogenesis are increasingly common in clinical translational medicine. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative transdisciplinary science based on the unique disease principle and the disease continuum theory. While it has been most commonly applied to research on breast, lung, and colorectal cancers, MPE can investigate etiologic heterogeneity in non-neoplastic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, drug toxicity, and immunity-related and infectious diseases. This science can enhance causal inference by linking putative etiologic factors to specific molecular biomarkers as outcomes. Technological advances increasingly enable analyses of various -omics, including genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, microbiome, immunomics, interactomics, etc. Challenges in MPE include sample size limitations (depending on availability of biospecimens or biomedical / radiological imaging), need for rigorous validation of molecular assays and study findings, and paucities of interdisciplinary experts, education programs, international forums, and standardized guidelines. To address these challenges, there are ongoing efforts such as multidisciplinary consortium pooling projects, the International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE) Meeting Series, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE)-MPE guideline project. Efforts should be made to build biorepository and biobank networks, and worldwide population-based MPE databases. These activities match with the purposes of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K), Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON), and Precision Medicine Initiatives of the United States National Institute of Health. Given advances in biotechnology, bioinformatics, and computational / systems biology, there are wide open opportunities in MPE to

  15. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  16. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  17. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  18. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  19. Exploring processes of organization of normal and neoplastic epithelial tissues in gradient culture.

    PubMed

    Leighton, J

    1994-09-01

    The biology of animal cells in culture is often studied in individual cells or in sheets of cells. The relevance of such studies to the intact animal is unclear, since the spatial conditions encountered by cells in animals is one of dense three-dimensional masses of cells, with limits to migration, and with gradients both of diffusion of metabolites and of morphologic maturation. These spatial requisites have gradually been met in culture. A brief account describes sponge matrix culture for three-dimensional growth and unilaminar, bilaminar, and radial histophysiologic gradient cultures. Some of the common neoplastic abnormalities of surface epithelial tissues are considered. Proposals for investigating the histokinetic mechanisms regulating some epithelial tissue processes are suggested. In the most recent development of gradient culture methods, a thin permeable transparent collagen membrane is intrinsically strengthened by producing a waffle membrane pattern for histophysiologic gradient culture.

  20. DICER1-pleuropulmonary blastoma familial tumor predisposition syndrome: a unique constellation of neoplastic conditions.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kris Ann; Yang, Jiandong; Doros, Leslie; Williams, Gretchen M; Harris, Anne; Stewart, Douglas R; Messinger, Yoav; Field, Amanda; Dehner, Louis P; Hill, D Ashley

    2014-03-01

    Germline mutations in DICER1 are associated with increased risk for a wide variety of neoplastic conditions, including pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), cystic nephroma, nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, botryoid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, ciliary body medulloepithelioma, pineoblastoma, pituitary blastoma and nodular thyroid hyperplasia or thyroid carcinoma. These tumors may be seen in isolation or in constellation with other characteristic tumor types in individuals or family members. Here we describe the medical history of a child with a heterozygous, loss of function germline DICER1 mutation and multiple tumors associated with the syndrome.. Although germline mutations in DICER1 are rare, tumors of these types will be seen by practicing pathologists and should prompt consideration of an underlying DICER1 mutation.

  1. DICER1-pleuropulmonary blastoma familial tumor predisposition syndrome: a unique constellation of neoplastic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiandong; Doros, Leslie; Williams, Gretchen M.; Harris, Anne; Stewart, Douglas R.; Messinger, Yoav; Field, Amanda; Dehner, Louis P.; Hill, D Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in DICER1 are associated with increased risk for a wide variety of neoplastic conditions, including pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), cystic nephroma, nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, botryoid embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, ciliary body medulloepithelioma, pineoblastoma, pituitary blastoma and nodular thyroid hyperplasia or thyroid carcinoma. These tumors may be seen in isolation or in constellation with other characteristic tumor types in individuals or family members. Here we describe the medical history of a child with a heterozygous, loss of function germline DICER1 mutation and multiple tumors associated with the syndrome.. Although germline mutations in DICER1 are rare, tumors of these types will be seen by practicing pathologists and should prompt consideration of an underlying DICER1 mutation. PMID:25356068

  2. The origin of pre-neoplastic metaplasia in the stomach: Chief cells emerge from the Mist

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek; Mills, Jason C.

    2011-11-15

    The digestive-enzyme secreting, gastric epithelial chief (zymogenic) cell is remarkable and underappreciated. Here, we discuss how all available evidence suggests that mature chief cells in the adult, mammalian stomach are postmitotic, slowly turning over cells that arise via a relatively long-lived progenitor, the mucous neck cell, The differentiation of chief cells from neck cells does not involve cell division, and the neck cell has its own distinct pattern of gene expression and putative physiological function. Thus, the ontogeny of the normal chief cell lineage exemplifies transdifferentiation. Furthermore, under pathophysiogical loss of acid-secreting parietal cell, the chief cell lineage can itself trasndifferentiate into a mucous cell metaplasia designated Spasmolytic Polypeptide Expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Especially in the presence of inflammation, this metaplastic lineage can regain proliferative capacity and, in humans may also further differentiate into intestinal metaplasia. The results indicate that gastric fundic lineages display remarkable plasticity in both physiological ontogeny and pathophysiological pre-neoplastic metaplasia.

  3. The origin of pre-neoplastic metaplasia in the stomach: chief cells emerge from the Mist.

    PubMed

    Goldenring, James R; Nam, Ki Taek; Mills, Jason C

    2011-11-15

    The digestive-enzyme secreting, gastric epithelial chief (zymogenic) cell is remarkable and underappreciated. Here, we discuss how all available evidence suggests that mature chief cells in the adult, mammalian stomach are postmitotic, slowly turning over cells that arise via a relatively long-lived progenitor, the mucous neck cell, The differentiation of chief cells from neck cells does not involve cell division, and the neck cell has its own distinct pattern of gene expression and putative physiological function. Thus, the ontogeny of the normal chief cell lineage exemplifies transdifferentiation. Furthermore, under pathophysiogical loss of acid-secreting parietal cell, the chief cell lineage can itself trasndifferentiate into a mucous cell metaplasia designated Spasmolytic Polypeptide Expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Especially in the presence of inflammation, this metaplastic lineage can regain proliferative capacity and, in humans may also further differentiate into intestinal metaplasia. The results indicate that gastric fundic lineages display remarkable plasticity in both physiological ontogeny and pathophysiological pre-neoplastic metaplasia.

  4. Regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by the Lgl neoplastic tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Marta; Parsons, Linda M; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Richardson, Helena E

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved neoplastic tumor suppressor protein, Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl), plays roles in cell polarity and tissue growth via regulation of the Hippo pathway. In our recent study, we showed that in the developing Drosophila eye epithelium, depletion of Lgl leads to increased ligand-dependent Notch signaling. lgl mutant tissue also exhibits an accumulation of early endosomes, recycling endosomes, early-multivesicular body markers and acidic vesicles. We showed that elevated Notch signaling in lgl− tissue can be rescued by feeding larvae the vesicle de-acidifying drug chloroquine, revealing that Lgl attenuates Notch signaling by limiting vesicle acidification. Strikingly, chloroquine also rescued the lgl− overgrowth phenotype, suggesting that the Hippo pathway defects were also rescued. In this extraview, we provide additional data on the regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by Lgl, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Lgl depletion contributes to signaling pathway defects and tumorigenesis. PMID:25789785

  5. Compact energy dispersive X-ray microdiffractometer for diagnosis of neoplastic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, C.; Malezan, A.; Poletti, M. E.; Perez, R. D.

    2017-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray microdiffractometer with capillary optics has been developed for characterizing breast cancer. The employment of low divergence capillary optics helps to reduce the setup size to a few centimeters, while providing a lateral spatial resolution of 100 μm. The system angular calibration and momentum transfer resolution were assessed by a detailed study of a polycrystalline reference material. The performance of the system was tested by means of the analysis of tissue-equivalent samples previously characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction. In addition, a simplified correction model for an appropriate comparison of the diffraction spectra was developed and validated. Finally, the system was employed to evaluate normal and neoplastic human breast samples, in order to determine their X-ray scatter signatures. The initial results indicate that the use of this compact energy dispersive X-ray microdiffractometer combined with a simplified correction procedure is able to provide additional information to breast cancer diagnosis.

  6. [Computerized tomography guided biopsy in the diagnosis of neoplastic and inflammatory lesions of the pelvis].

    PubMed

    Rimondi, E; Busacca, M; Moio, A; Molinari, M; Nigrisoli, M; Trentani, F; Trentani, P; Tigani, D

    2001-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of percutaneous CT-guided biopsy in the diagnosis and therapeutic planning of neoplastic and flogistic diseases of the pelvis. From July 1990 to December 1999 193 patients (113 males, 80 females: mean age 49, standard deviation 16) were submitted to CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of the pelvic region; 117 biopsies (61%) were performed at iliac, pubic and ischial segments and 76 (39%) at sacral region; 107 patients were admitted to the hospital and 86 were in clinic. Needles were 8 G (4 mm), 10 to 15 cm long. Approach to pelvic lesions was performed according to the specific site. Lesions of the lateral pelvic region have always been approached through the lateral surgical incision according to Enneking. Lesions of the posterior pelvic region have always been approached by the introduction of the needle along the posterior surgical incision according to Enneking. Lesions of the anterior region have always been approached through the anterior surgical incision according to Enneking. From July 1990 to May 1997 pelvic percutaneous biopsies have been carried out with a CT Sytec 3000. From May 1997 to December 1999 the device was replaced by a High Speed CTi. The introduction of spiral CT allowed reduction of performance mean time from 45 minutes (standard deviation 15) to 30 minutes (standard deviation 10). In 154 patients (80%) we observed a neoplastic, inflammatory or not classified degeneration. In 8 patients (4%) the retrieved material ended to be inadequate for a diagnosis. In 31 patients (16%) no disease was revealed at the histological examination. Such patients with negative histological examination have been kept under clinical and radiological control in the following period in order to verify the manifestation or the presence of an alteration previously not observed. On 31-3-2000 none of them had been submitted to a new percutaneous biopsy of the pelvic region. The overall mean accuracy has been 96% considering the negative patients as

  7. [Chemotherapy and NSAIDs in neoplastic disease. Role of anti-secretory preventive therapy].

    PubMed

    Annibale, Bruno; Panzuto, Francesco

    2003-11-01

    The patients treated by chemotherapy should be considered at high-risk for developing serious lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract. Several factors should be considered during the initial management of these patients, such as the presence and the staging of the malignancy, the cytotoxic effects of the antiblastic drugs, the co-administration of NSAIDs and corticosteroids, and the possible co-existence of Helicobacter pylori infection, hiatal hernia, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In order to prevent gastro-duodenal damage, the optimal approach first has to include an accurate clinical and pharmacological evaluation. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy should also be performed in neoplastic patients undergoing chemotherapy before starting treatment. Proton pump inhibitors can play a major role in these patients to prevent gastro-duodenal damages, and to relieve dyspeptic symptoms.

  8. Microenvironment-dependent growth of pre-neoplastic and malignant plasma cells in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rituparna; Strowig, Till; Verma, Rakesh; Koduru, Srinivas; Hafemann, Anja; Hopf, Stephanie; Kocoglu, Mehmet H.; Borsotti, Chiara; Zhang, Lin; Branagan, Andrew; Eynon, Elizabeth; Manz, Markus G.; Flavell, Richard A.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2016-01-01

    Most human cancers including myeloma are preceded by a precursor state. There is an unmet need for in vivo models to study the interaction of human preneoplastic cells in the bone marrow microenvironment with non-malignant cells. Here, we genetically humanized mice to permit the growth of primary human pre-neoplastic and malignant plasma cells together with non-malignant cells in vivo [?]. Growth was largely restricted to the bone marrow, mirroring the pattern in patients. Xenografts captured the genomic complexity of parental tumors and revealed additional somatic changes. Moreover, xenografts from patients with preneoplastic gammopathy showed progressive growth, suggesting that the clinical stability of these lesions may in part be due to growth controls extrinsic to tumor cells. These data demonstrate a new approach to investigate the entire spectrum of human plasma cell neoplasia and illustrate the utility of humanized models for understanding the functional diversity of human tumors [?]. PMID:27723723

  9. Neoplastic diseases of the spermatic cord: an overview of pathological features, evaluation, and management

    PubMed Central

    Dagur, Gautam; Gandhi, Jason; Kapadia, Kailash; Inam, Rafid; Smith, Noel L.; Joshi, Gargi

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular tumors found with the spermatic cord, known as neoplasms, are usually identified to be benign. However, the accurate and timely diagnosis of spermatic cord masses is highly crucial, especially when most results are often overlooked or unclear. In this review, we discuss the anatomy and embryology of the spermatic cord. Upon rooting these fundamental concepts, we discuss an array of benign and malignant neoplastic tumors, including their origin, pathological features, clinical evaluation and management, as well as other case-specific characteristics of unique presentation. Many of these neoplasms are based on local neurological, vascular, muscular, bone, soft tissue, or lymphatic origin, while others have metastasized from particular areas of the body. PMID:28217455

  10. Bioactive substances with anti-neoplastic efficacy from marine invertebrates: Porifera and Coelenterata

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Peter; Vetvicka, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    An ever increasing demand for new lead compounds in the pharmaceutical industry has led scientists to search for natural bioactive products. Based on this extensive research, marine invertebrates now represent a rich source of novel substances with significant anti-neoplastic activities. As the current approach of synthesizing new and chemically modifying old drugs seems to have slowed down, and the identification of new anticancer drugs is not too promising, a new approach is clearly needed. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date data on these newer compounds. Based on the data summarized in this short review, it is clear that marine invertebrates represent an extremely important source of compounds with potential anti-cancer effects. Considering that we tested only a tiny number of Porifera and Coelenterata, the best is yet to come. PMID:22087433

  11. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Progress in the detection of neoplastic progress and cancer by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker Schut, Tom C.; Stone, Nicholas; Kendall, Catherine A.; Barr, Hugh; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is important because of the improved survival rates when the cancer is treated early. We study the application of NIR Raman spectroscopy for detection of dysplasia because this technique is sensitive to the small changes in molecular invasive in vivo detection using fiber-optic probes. The result of an in vitro study to detect neoplastic progress of esophageal Barrett's esophageal tissue will be presented. Using multivariate statistics, we developed three different linear discriminant analysis classification models to predict tissue type on the basis of the measured spectrum. Spectra of normal, metaplastic and dysplasia tissue could be discriminated with an accuracy of up to 88 percent. Therefore Raman spectroscopy seems to be a very suitable technique to detect dysplasia in Barrett's esophageal tissue.

  13. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Methods Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. Results The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). Conclusion The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues. PMID:26761548

  14. Cytokeratin 17: an adjunctive marker of invasion in squamous neoplastic lesions of the anus.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Primiani, Andrea; Doyle, Leona A; Linskey, Katy R; Duncan, Lyn M; Odze, Robert D; Zukerberg, Lawrence R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is often preceded by anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), may be challenging in small biopsies. Cytokeratin 17 (CK17) is a basal/myoepithelial cell keratin induced in activated keratinocytes and associated with disease progression in SCC of the uterine cervix, esophagus, and oral cavity. We investigated the utility of CK17 in diagnosing invasion in anal squamous neoplastic lesions. Immunohistochemical staining for CK17 was evaluated in 11 AINs, 12 invasive SCCs, 8 invasive SCCs with basaloid features (BSCC), and 2 invasive pure basaloid carcinomas. The pattern of staining was scored as surface/central, peripheral/rim, diffuse, or absent. All cases of invasive SCC and BSCC stained positive for CK17. Eleven of 12 (92%) SCCs showed diffuse staining, and 1 of 12 (8%) showed peripheral staining. Six of 8 (75%) BSCCs showed diffuse staining, and 2 of 8 (25%) showed peripheral staining. Both pure basaloid carcinomas were negative for CK17. One of 11 (9%) AINs was diffusely positive for CK17; all other AINs had surface or absent CK17. Of the 6 patients with concurrent AIN and invasive carcinoma, superficial expression of CK17 was present in 1 AIN, whereas all invasive components showed diffuse staining. The sensitivity and specificity of CK17 for identifying invasion in SCC and BSCC was 100% and 91%, respectively. Peripheral or diffuse staining for CK17 is a useful marker of invasion in anal squamous neoplastic lesions. A potential pitfall in the utility of CK17 is that the pure basaloid variant of anal carcinoma is negative for CK17.

  15. Association between diverticulosis and colonic neoplastic lesions in individuals with a positive faecal immunochemical test

    PubMed Central

    Ridola, Lorenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Boggi, Roberto; Napoli, Massimo; Tomao, Silverio; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between diverticulosis and colonic neoplastic lesions has been suggested, but data in literature are conflicting. This study aimed to investigate such a relationship in patients participating in a colorectal cancer screening program who underwent high-quality colonoscopy. Methods Data from consecutive individuals 50–75 years of age with a positive faecal immunological test were considered. Diverticulosis was categorised as present or absent. The prevalence of neoplastic lesions (adenoma, advanced adenoma, and cancer) between individuals with and those without diverticula was compared. A multivariate analysis was performed. Results Overall, data from 970 consecutive individuals were evaluated, and diverticulosis was detected in 354 (36.5%) cases. At least one adenoma was detected in 490 (50.5%) people, at least one advanced adenoma in 264 (27.2%), multiple adenoma in 71 (7.3%), whilst a cancer was diagnosed in 48 (4.9%) cases. At univariate analysis, the adenoma detection rate in patients with diverticula was significantly higher than in controls (55.9% vs 47.4%; p = 0.011). At multivariate analysis, presence of diverticulosis was an independent risk factor for both adenoma detection rate (OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.14–2.18; p = 0.006) and advanced adenoma (OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.10–2.24; p = 0.013), but not for colorectal cancer. Conclusions In a colorectal screening setting, the adenoma detection rate was significantly higher in individuals with diverticulosis than in controls. PMID:28405332

  16. Expression of truncated bile salt-dependent lipase variant in pancreatic pre-neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emmanuelle; Crenon, Isabelle; Silvy, Françoise; Del Grande, Jean; Mougel, Alice; Barea, Dolores; Fina, Frederic; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Lombardo, Dominique; Mas, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a dismal disease. The lack of specific symptoms still leads to a delay in diagnosis followed by death within months for most patients. Exon 11 of the bile salt-dependent lipase (BSDL) gene encoding variable number of tandem repeated (VNTR) sequences has been involved in pancreatic pathologies. We hypothesized that BSDL VNTR sequences may be mutated in PDAC. The amplification of BSDL VNTR from RNA extracted from pancreatic SOJ-6 cells allowed us to identify a BSDL amplicon in which a cytosine residue is inserted in a VNTR sequence. This insertion gives rise to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated protein and to a modification of the C-terminal amino-acid sequence; that is PRAAHG instead of PAVIRF. We produced antibodies directed against these sequences and examined pancreatic tissues from patients with PDAC and PanIN. Albeit all tissues were positive to anti-PAVIRF antibodies, 72.2% of patient tissues gave positive reaction with anti-PRAAHG antibodies, particularly in dysplastic areas of the tumor. Neoplastic cells with ductal differentiation were not reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies. Some 70% of PanIN tissues were also reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies, suggesting that the C insertion occurs early during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Data suggest that anti-PRAAHG antibodies were uniquely reactive with a short isoform of BSDL specifically expressed in pre-neoplastic lesions of the pancreas. The detection of truncated BSDL reactive to antibodies against the PRAAHG C-terminal sequence in pancreatic juice or in pancreatic biopsies may be a new tool in the early diagnosis of PDAC. PMID:27602750

  17. Effect of carcinogen dose on the dynamics of neoplastic development in rat tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Terzaghi, M.; Nettesheim, P.; Riester, L.

    1982-11-01

    The aim was to analyze carcinogen dose effects on the development of carcinogen-altered preneoplastic epithelial cell populations following exposure to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Upon exposure to carcinogen, cells appear in the tracheal epithelium which are distinguishable by an enhanced in vitro growth capacity. Cultures established from carcinogen-exposed cells form expanding epithelial foci (EF). Designated EF-forming units (EFFU), these clonogenic units often escape senescence permanently and may become neoplastic after repeated subculturing. Clonogenic units give rise to subculturable progeny (EFFU/sub s/) and to progeny which became anchorage independent (EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//). In the tracheal cell culture system, anchorage-independent growth is highly correlated with oncogenicity in vivo. Tracheas were exposed in vivo for 4 weeks to DMBA in doses ranging from 5 to 335 ..mu..g. Exposure to DMBA resulted in a 100- to 500-fold increase in frequency of EFFU, but no definitive carcinogen dose-response effect was detected on the number of clonogenic cells forming EF or subculturable EF, although there was some indication that the latter might be increasing with increasing dose. There was a marked carcinogen dose effect on the frequency and rate of appearance of EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//. The data suggest that the carcinogen dose affects either the rate of growth of EFFU/sub x,ag/sup +//, the cell compartment with neoplastic potential, or the conversion rate of EFFU/sub s/ to EFFU/sub s,ag/sup +//.

  18. Differential microRNA expression tracks neoplastic progression in inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Ziad; Rai, Shesh N.; Eichenberger, M. Robert; Barnes, Christopher; Dworkin, Amy M.; Weller, Clayton; Cohen, Eric; Roberts, Henry; Keskey, Bobby; Petras, Robert E.; Crawford, Nigel P.S.; Galandiuk, Susan

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious complications faced by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the potential development of colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a compelling need to enhance the accuracy of cancer screening of IBD patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that play important roles in CRC oncogenesis. In this study, we report differential miRNA expression in IBD patients with associated CRC, from non-neoplastic tissue to dysplasia and eventually cancer. In addition, we identify and examine the role of dysregulated miRNAs in the TP53 pathway. In our CD patients, six miRNAs were up-regulated from non-neoplastic tissue to dysplasia, but down-regulated from dysplasia to cancer (miR-122, miR-181a, miR-146b-5p, let-7e, miR-17, miR-143) (p<0.001). Six differentially expressed miRNAs affected the TP53 pathway (miR-122, miR-214, miR-372, miR-15b, let-7e, miR-17) (p<0.001). Using two human colon cancer cell lines (HT-29 and HCT-116), E2F1, an upstream regulator of TP53, was down-regulated in both cell lines transfected with let-7e (p<0.05) as well as in HCT-116 cells transfected with miR-17 (p<0.05). Additionally, cyclin G, a cell-cycle regulator miR-122 target was down-regulated in both cell lines (p<0.05). Unique differentially expressed miRNAs were observed in CD-associated CRC progression. Six of these miRNAs had a tumorigenic effect on the TP53 pathway; the effect of three of which was studied using cell lines. PMID:22241525

  19. Expression of connexins 26 and 43 in canine hyperplastic and neoplastic mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Torres, L N; Matera, J M; Vasconcellos, C H; Avanzo, J L; Hernandez-Blazquez, F J; Dagli, M L Z

    2005-09-01

    Gap junctions are the only communicating junctions found in animal tissues and are composed of proteins known as connexins. Alterations in connexin expression have been associated with oncogenesis; reported studies in rodent and human mammary glands, which normally express connexins 26 and 43, confirm these alterations in malignancies. Mammary neoplasms represent the second most frequent neoplasm in dogs, and since there are no reports on the study of connexins in canine mammary glands, the present study investigated the expression of connexins 26 and 43 in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic mammary glands of this species, to verify if altered patterns of connexin staining are related to higher cell proliferation and malignant phenotypes. A total of 4 normal, 8 hyperplastic mammary glands, 9 benign, and 51 malignant mammary gland neoplasms were submitted for the immunostaining of connexins 26 and 43, E-cadherin, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Normal, hyperplastic, and benign neoplastic mammary glands showed a punctate pattern for connexin 26 and 43 staining and an intercellular E-cadherin staining. Malignant neoplasms, especially the most aggressive cases with high cell proliferation rates, presented either fewer gap junction spots on the cell membranes or increased cytoplasmic immunostaining. Malignant tumors also expressed a less intense immunostaining of E-cadherin; the expression of this adhesion molecule is important for the transportation of connexins to cell membranes and in forming communicating gap junctions. Deficient expression of E-cadherin could be related to the aberrant connexin localization and may contribute to the malignant phenotype. In conclusion, the expression and distribution of connexins and E-cadherin are inversely correlated to cell proliferation in malignant mammary neoplasms of dogs and may well be related to their more aggressive histologic type and biologic behavior.

  20. Vitamin A and the biosynthesis of sulphated mucopolysaccharides. Experiments with rats and cultured neoplastic mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D. B.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. The uptake and incorporation of [35S]sulphate into mucopolysaccharides by colon and duodenum in vitro are unaffected by the vitamin A status of the animals. 2. Uptake and incorporation in vivo are unaffected at 4hr. after injection of [35S]sulphate, but at later times are decreased in some tissues of vitamin A-deficient animals. 3. The rate of removal of 35S from blood, its rate of appearance in urine, the plasma concentration of sulphate and the uronic acid content of several tissues are not significantly altered in vitamin A deficiency. 4. These results, and direct measurement of 35S in mucopolysaccharides at various times after injection of [35S]sulphate, suggest that the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides is unaffected but that their turnover is increased in vitamin A deficiency. 5. Neither the growth rate of, nor the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into heparin by, P815Y and HC cultured neoplastic mast cells is decreased when the horse serum necessary for growth is treated with ultraviolet light or is replaced by serum from vitamin A-deficient rats. 6. The addition of citral is no more toxic to growth rate or to incorporation of 35S than is the addition of vitamin A itself. 7. It is concluded that neoplastic mast cells in culture do not require vitamin A for growth or for the synthesis of heparin. 8. None of these results is compatible with the view that vitamin A or a derivative is directly involved in the biosynthesis of sulphated mucopolysaccharides. PMID:4237718

  1. Phenotypic heterogeneity, novel diagnostic markers, and target expression profiles in normal and neoplastic human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Mirkina, Irina; George, Tracy I; Sotlar, Karl; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2010-09-01

    Mast cells (MC) are specialized immune cells that play a key role in anaphylactic reactions. Growth, differentiation, and function of these cells are regulated by a complex network of cytokines, surface receptors, signaling molecules, the microenvironment, and the genetic background. A number of previous and more recent data suggest that MC are heterogeneous in terms of cytokine-regulation, expression of cytoplasmic and cell surface antigens, and response to ligands. MC heterogeneity is often organ-specific and is considered to be related to MC plasticity, disease-associated factors, and the maturation stage of the cells. The stem cell factor (SCF) receptor KIT (CD117) is expressed on all types of MC independent of maturation and activation-status. In systemic mastocytosis (SM), KIT is often expressed in MC in a mutated and constitutively activated form. In these patients, MC aberrantly display CD2 and CD25, diagnostic markers of neoplastic MC in all SM variants. In advanced SM, MC co-express substantial amounts of CD30, whereas CD2 expression on MC may be decreased compared to indolent SM. Other surface molecules, such as CD63 or CD203c, are overexpressed on neoplastic MC in SM, and are further upregulated upon cross-linking of the IgE receptor. Some of the cell surface antigens expressed on MC or their progenitors may serve as therapeutic targets in the future. These targets include CD25, CD30, CD33, CD44, and CD117/KIT. The current article provides an overview on cell surface antigens and target receptors expressed by MC in physiologic and reactive tissues, and in patients with SM, with special reference to phenotypic heterogeneity and clinical implications.

  2. Renal cell carcinoma with venous neoplastic thrombosis: a ten years review.

    PubMed

    Pirola, Giacomo Maria; Saredi, Giovanni; Damiano, Giuseppe; Marconi, Alberto Mario

    2013-12-31

    To review the 10-year experience of our urological unit in the surgical management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with neoplastic tumor thrombosis focusing on postoperative survival. We underwent a retrospective analysis of the patients treated for this pathology during the last decade 2002-2012, stratifying them by tumor thrombus level and histological subtype. Kaplan-Meyer curves were used to assess survival. Overall, 67 patients underwent surgery for RCC with neoplastic tumoral thrombosis in the period under review. 60 were clear cell RCC, 4 were urothelial papillary tumors of the renal pelvis and 3 were rare histotypes, as a nefroblastoma, a spinocellular tumor of the renal pelvis and an unclassifiable renal carcinoma. Thrombus level was I in 40 cases, II in 17, III in 2 and IV in 8 patients. We report the main postoperative complications and our survival data, with mean follow up of 36 months. Tumor stage is the most important variable in predicting survival. Patients with N0M0 disease had 70% survival at 36 months, instead of 20% for those with primitive metastatic tumor. Our survival results fit with the main reports in literature and our surgical management was completely in keeping with international guidelines. We did not observe relevany post-operative complications, except of hemorrhagic ones that occurred in 6 patients (9% of total) and were always successfully managed. Eighteen patients (26.87% of total) underwent caval filter positioning, without evidence of complications during its positioning or removal. Life expectancy was particularly low for the cases of RCC without clear cell histotype (7 cases in our series, 10.4% of total) that always was less than one year from surgery.

  3. Non-neoplastic mortality of European workers who produce man made vitreous fibres

    PubMed Central

    Sali, D.; Boffetta, P.; Andersen, A.; Cherrie, J. W.; Claude, J. C.; Hansen, J.; Olsen, J. H.; Pesatori, A. C.; Plato, N.; Teppo, L.; Westerholm, P.; Winter, P.; Saracci, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study mortality from non-neoplastic diseases among European workers who produce man made vitreous fibres (MMVF). METHODS: 11,373 male workers were studied, who were employed for at least 1 year in the production of rock or slag wool (RSW), glass wool (GW), and continuous filament (CF) in 13 factories from seven European countries. Workers were followed up from the beginning of production, between 1933 and 1950 to 1990-2 and contributed 256,352 person-years of observation. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated with national mortalities for reference; an internal exposure-response analyses based on multivariate Poisson regression models was also conducted. RESULTS: Mortality from bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma was not increased (SMR 1.03, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.82 to 1.28). In RSW workers, there was no overall increase in mortality from non-malignant renal diseases (SMR 0.97, 95% CI 0.36 to 2.11), although there was the suggestion of an increase in risk with duration of employment. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease was not increased overall (SMR 1.03, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.11), but RSW and CF workers with > or = 30 years since first employment had a higher risk. RSW and CF workers showed an increased mortality from external causes, mainly motor vehicle accidents and suicide, which was higher among workers with a short duration of employment. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality from most non-neoplastic diseases does not seem to be related to employment in the MMVF industry. The results on mortality from ischaemic heart disease and non- malignant renal diseases, however, warrant further investigations.   PMID:10615294

  4. NeuN expression correlates with reduced mitotic index of neoplastic cells in central neurocytomas.

    PubMed

    Englund, C; Alvord, E C; Folkerth, R D; Silbergeld, D; Born, D E; Small, R; Hevner, R F

    2005-08-01

    In the developing brain, neuronal differentiation is associated with permanent exit from the mitotic cycle. This raises the possibility that neuronal differentiation may suppress proliferative activity, even in neoplastic cells. As a first step towards understanding the relation between neuronal differentiation and mitotic cycling in brain tumours, we studied the expression of NeuN (a neuronal marker) and Ki-67 (a mitotic marker) by double-labelling immuno-fluorescence in 16 brain tumours with neuronal differentiation. The tumours included a series of 11 central neurocytomas, and five single cases of other tumour types. In the central neurocytomas, NeuN(+) cells had a 15-fold lower Ki-67 labelling index, on average, than did NeuN(-) cells (P < 0.01). In the other tumours (one extraventricular neurocytoma, one desmoplastic medulloblastoma, one olfactory neuroblastoma, one ganglioglioma and one anaplastic ganglioglioma), the Ki-67 labelling index was always at least fourfold lower in NeuN(+) cells than in NeuN(-) cells. These results indicate that neuronal differentiation is associated with a substantial decrease of proliferative activity in neoplastic cells of central neurocytomas, and suggest that the same may be true across diverse types of brain tumours. However, tumours with extensive neuronal differentiation may nevertheless have a high overall Ki-67 labelling index, if the mitotic activity of NeuN(-) cells is high. The correlation between NeuN expression and reduced mitotic activity in neurocytoma cells is consistent with the hypothesis that neuronal differentiation suppresses proliferation, but further studies will be necessary to determine causality and investigate underlying mechanisms.

  5. Enzymic capacities of purine de Novo and salvage pathways for nucleotide synthesis in normal and neoplastic tissues.

    PubMed

    Natsumeda, Y; Prajda, N; Donohue, J P; Glover, J L; Weber, G

    1984-06-01

    amidophosphoribosyltransferase. The purine phosphoribosyltransferase activities were also higher than that of amidophosphoribosyltransferase in Lewis lung carcinoma (8.2- to 32-fold), human renal cell carcinoma (3.5- to 22-fold), and hepatocellular carcinoma (3.4- to 30-fold). The high activities and the high affinity to PRPP of the purine phosphoribosyltransferases might explain the lack of linkage of the behavior of these enzymic activities with proliferation in normal, regenerating, differentiating, or neoplastic tissues. In contrast, the specific activity of the amidophosphoribosyltransferase, which is lower than that of the salvage enzymes, is linked with transformation as it is increased in all examined tumors.4

  6. [Transformation toughening

    SciTech Connect

    Rafa, M.J.

    1993-04-19

    In NiAl, we have succeeded in determining the complete Ginzburg-Landau strain free energy function necessary to model the cubic to tetragonal martensite transformation in a sample of any size. We believe that this is the first time that the parameters of a Ginzburg-Landau functional and the complete strain spinodal for any three-dimensional displacive transformation were used in simulating the transformation near a crack tip under Mode I loading; the transformation pattern and toughening are different from standard transformation toughening theories. Furthermore, the strain spinodal has an approximately conical shape which can be specified by two material dependent experimentally accessible parameters, rather than the ellipsoidal shape in standard theories. Stress induced martensitic transformation in a polycrystalline sample of NiAl was simulated. In the ZrO[sub 2] system, first principles calculations to determine the semi-empirical potentials for simulating the cubic-tetragonal and tetragonal-monoclinic transformations have been started by doing a more elaborate total energy calculation.In the Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] system, we have discovered that the first principles calculations and semi-empirical potentials have just been completed byanother group in England which we will use instead to base our molecular dynamics simulations on.

  7. Lightweight transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Swallom, D.W.; Enos, G.

    1990-05-01

    The technical effort described in this report relates to the program that was performed to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight transformer for Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) mission requirements. The objectives of this program were two-fold: (1) design and fabricate a lightweight transformer using liquid hydrogen as the coolant; and (2) test the completed transformer assembly with a low voltage, dc power source. Although the full power testing with liquid helium was not completed, the program demonstrated the viability of the design approach. The lightweight transformer was designed and fabricated, and low and moderate power testing was completed. The transformer is a liquid hydrogen cooled air core transformer that uses thin copper for its primary and secondary windings. The winding mass was approximately 12 kg, or 0.03 kg/kW. Further refinements of the design to a partial air core transformer could potentially reduce the winding mass to as low as 4 or 5 kg, or 0.0125 kg/kW. No attempt was made on this program to reduce the mass of the related structural components or cryogenic container. 8 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation patterns for ALVEs and TVB genes in a neoplastic disease susceptible and resistant chicken model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chicken endogenous virus, ALVE (Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup E), is inherited as LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons, which is negatively correlated with fitness and disease resistance, and any changes in DNA methylation pattern may thus contribute to the susceptibility to neoplastic diseas...

  9. Historical control data of neoplastic lesions in the Wistar Hannover Rat among eight 2-year carcinogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Carlus, Marine; Elies, Laëtitia; Fouque, Marie-Claude; Maliver, Pierre; Schorsch, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Incidences of neoplastic lesions were evaluated in untreated Hannover Wistar Rats RjHan: WI (470 males and 470 females) used as control animals in eight carcinogenicity studies. All these studies were performed in a similar environment either for the in vivo and the postmortem evaluation. The major neoplastic lesions were found in the endocrine, integumentary and reproductive systems. Pituitary adenoma was the most frequent neoplasm and occurred in 33.9% of the males and 54.6% of the female rats. The other most frequent tumors in males were thyroid C-cell adenoma (8.6%), pancreatic islet cell adenoma (8.1%), subcutaneous fibrosarcoma (6.6%), subcutaneous fibroma (4.7%), benign pheochromocytoma (3.4%), and cutaneous keratoacanthoma (3.4%). In females, the other highest incidences were mammary fibroadenoma (29%), uterine endometrial stromal polyp (18.1%), mammary adenocarcinoma (14.2%), mammary fibroadenoma with atypia (13.7%), thyroid C-cell adenoma (7.5%), benign thymoma (3.7%), and subcutaneous fibrosarcoma (3.6%). All these data were compared to previously published historical control data. This retrospective analysis was undergone in order to illustrate the result of a stable organization which guarantees a robust historical data base for neoplastic and non neoplastic findings.

  10. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  11. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2011-12-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® takes an in-depth look at the Magnet® model component transformational leadership. The author examines the expectations for Magnet organizations around this component. What are the qualities that make a nursing leader truly transformational, and what is the best approach to successfully lead a healthcare organization through today's volatile healthcare environment?

  12. The effects of a stress inoculation training program for civil servants in Japan: a pilot study of a non-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kawaharada, Mariko; Yoshioka, Eiji; Saijo, Yasuaki; Fukui, Tomonori; Ueno, Takeji; Kishi, Reiko

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a stress inoculation training program for civil servants through a non-randomized trial. We divided 140 civil servants into two groups (an intervention group and a waiting list control group), and carried out three sessions with the intervention group at intervals of four weeks. The sessions included lectures on responses to stress and coping skills, problem-solving training, group discussions and self-monitoring. Data from 65 subjects in the intervention group and 63 subjects in the waiting list group were analyzed using two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The intervention group showed statistically significant development of problem-solving skills and positive cognition, with a significant effect remaining one month after the intervention. The effect sizes in the intervention group showed a small-to-medium change in problem-solving coping and small changes in positive cognitive coping. However, no interventional effects were seen in terms of response to stress and health competence. As the number of existing studies on job stress management for workers is limited, further research in this field is necessary, including examination of the frequency and methods of intervention sessions, the effects of intervention by gender, etc.

  13. Bifidobacterium bifidum OLB6378 Simultaneously Enhances Systemic and Mucosal Humoral Immunity in Low Birth Weight Infants: A Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Yanagi, Takahide; Nakahara, Sayuri; Furukawa, Ouki; Tsutsui, Hidemi; Koshida, Shigeki

    2017-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation has been part of the discussion on methods to enhance humoral immunity. Administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum OLB6378 (OLB6378) reduced the incidence of late-onset sepsis in infants. In this non-randomized study, we aimed to determine the effect of administration of live OLB6378 on infants’ humoral immunity. Secondly, we tried to elucidate whether similar effects would be observed with administration of non-live OLB6378. Low birth weight (LBW) infants weighing 1500–2500 g were divided into three groups: Group N (no intervention), Group L (administered live OLB6378 concentrate), and Group H (administered non-live OLB6378 concentrate). The interventions were started within 48 h after birth and continued until six months of age. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels (IgG at one month/IgG at birth) were significantly higher in Group L than in Group N (p < 0.01). Group H exhibited significantly higher serum IgG levels (p < 0.01) at one month of age and significantly higher intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels (p < 0.05) at one and two months of age than Group N. No difference was observed in the mortality or morbidity between groups. Thus, OLB6378 administration in LBW infants enhanced humoral immunity, and non-live OLB6378, which is more useful as a food ingredient, showed a more marked effect than the viable bacteria. PMID:28245626

  14. Does implementing a development plan for user participation in a mental hospital change patients' experience? A non-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rise, Marit B; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2015-10-01

    Governments in several countries attempt to strengthen user participation through instructing health-care organizations to implement user participation initiatives. There is, however, little knowledge on the effect on patients' experience from comprehensive plans for enhancing user participation in whole health service organizations. To investigate whether implementing a development plan intending to enhance user participation in a mental hospital had any effect on the patients' experience of user participation. A non-randomized controlled study including patients in three mental hospitals in Central Norway, one intervention hospital and two control hospitals. A development plan intended to enhance user participation was implemented in the intervention hospital as a part of a larger reorganizational process. The plan included establishment of a patient education centre and a user office, purchase of user expertise, appointment of contact professionals for next of kin and improvement of the centre's information and the professional culture. Perceptions of Care, Inpatient Treatment Alliance Scale and questions made for this study. A total of 1651 patients participated. Implementing a development plan in a mental hospital intending to enhance user participation had no significant effect on the patients' experience of user participation. The lack of effect can be due to inappropriate initiatives or challenges in implementation processes. Further research should ensure that initiatives and implementation processes are appropriate to impact the patients' experience. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Non-random occurrence of Robertsonian translocations in the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus): is it related to quantitative variation in the minor satellite?

    PubMed

    Cazaux, Benoîte; Catalan, Josette; Claude, Julien; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, shows extraordinary chromosomal diversity driven by fixation of Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. The high frequency of this rearrangement, which involves the centromeric regions, has been ascribed to the architecture of the satellite sequence (high quantity and homogeneity). This promotes centromere-related translocations through unequal recombination and gene conversion. A characteristic feature of Rb variation in this subspecies is the non-random contribution of different chromosomes to the translocation frequency, which, in turn, depends on the chromosome size. Here, the association between satellite quantity and Rb frequency was tested by PRINS of the minor satellite which is the sequence involved in the translocation breakpoints. Five chromosomes with different translocation frequencies were selected and analyzed among wild house mice from 8 European localities. Using a relative quantitative measurement per chromosome, the analysis detected a large variability in signal size most of which was observed between individuals and/or localities. The chromosomes differed significantly in the quantity of the minor satellite, but these differences were not correlated with their translocation frequency. However, the data uncovered a marginally significant correlation between the quantity of the minor satellite and chromosome size. The implications of these results on the evolution of the chromosomal architecture in the house mouse are discussed.

  16. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, with techniques such as the k-filtering technique. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis as is necessary with single spacecraft missions, it does require weak stationarity of the time series, and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phase. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  17. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random-phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single-spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed for temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, using techniques such as k filtering. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis it requires both weak stationarity of the time series and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phases. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random-phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  18. An Ant Colony Optimization algorithm for solving the fixed destination multi-depot multiple traveling salesman problem with non-random parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhani, T.; Hertono, G. F.; Handari, B. D.

    2017-07-01

    The Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) is the extension of the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) in which the shortest routes of m salesmen all of which start and finish in a single city (depot) will be determined. If there is more than one depot and salesmen start from and return to the same depot, then the problem is called Fixed Destination Multi-depot Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MMTSP). In this paper, MMTSP will be solved using the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithm. ACO is a metaheuristic optimization algorithm which is derived from the behavior of ants in finding the shortest route(s) from the anthill to a form of nourishment. In solving the MMTSP, the algorithm is observed with respect to different chosen cities as depots and non-randomly three parameters of MMTSP: m, K, L, those represents the number of salesmen, the fewest cities that must be visited by a salesman, and the most number of cities that can be visited by a salesman, respectively. The implementation is observed with four dataset from TSPLIB. The results show that the different chosen cities as depots and the three parameters of MMTSP, in which m is the most important parameter, affect the solution.

  19. Links between fear of humans, stress and survival support a non-random distribution of birds among urban and rural habitats

    PubMed Central

    Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Carrete, Martina; Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Cabezas, Sonia; Marchant, Tracy A.; Bortolotti, Gary R.; Tella, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Urban endocrine ecology aims to understand how organisms cope with new sources of stress and maintain allostatic load to thrive in an increasingly urbanized world. Recent research efforts have yielded controversial results based on short-term measures of stress, without exploring its fitness effects. We measured feather corticosterone (CORTf, reflecting the duration and amplitude of glucocorticoid secretion over several weeks) and subsequent annual survival in urban and rural burrowing owls. This species shows high individual consistency in fear of humans (i.e., flight initiation distance, FID), allowing us to hypothesize that individuals distribute among habitats according to their tolerance to human disturbance. FIDs were shorter in urban than in rural birds, but CORTf levels did not differ, nor were correlated to FIDs. Survival was twice as high in urban as in rural birds and links with CORTf varied between habitats: while a quadratic relationship supports stabilizing selection in urban birds, high predation rates may have masked CORTf-survival relationship in rural ones. These results evidence that urban life does not constitute an additional source of stress for urban individuals, as shown by their near identical CORTf values compared with rural conspecifics supporting the non-random distribution of individuals among habitats according to their behavioural phenotypes. PMID:26348294

  20. Links between fear of humans, stress and survival support a non-random distribution of birds among urban and rural habitats.

    PubMed

    Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Carrete, Martina; Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Cabezas, Sonia; Marchant, Tracy A; Bortolotti, Gary R; Tella, José L

    2015-09-08

    Urban endocrine ecology aims to understand how organisms cope with new sources of stress and maintain allostatic load to thrive in an increasingly urbanized world. Recent research efforts have yielded controversial results based on short-term measures of stress, without exploring its fitness effects. We measured feather corticosterone (CORTf, reflecting the duration and amplitude of glucocorticoid secretion over several weeks) and subsequent annual survival in urban and rural burrowing owls. This species shows high individual consistency in fear of humans (i.e., flight initiation distance, FID), allowing us to hypothesize that individuals distribute among habitats according to their tolerance to human disturbance. FIDs were shorter in urban than in rural birds, but CORTf levels did not differ, nor were correlated to FIDs. Survival was twice as high in urban as in rural birds and links with CORTf varied between habitats: while a quadratic relationship supports stabilizing selection in urban birds, high predation rates may have masked CORTf-survival relationship in rural ones. These results evidence that urban life does not constitute an additional source of stress for urban individuals, as shown by their near identical CORTf values compared with rural conspecifics supporting the non-random distribution of individuals among habitats according to their behavioural phenotypes.

  1. Design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health programme on microfinance clients in India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Somen

    2013-10-12

    Microfinance is the provision of financial services for the poor. Health program through microfinance has the potential to address several access barriers to health. We report the design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health program on the members of two microfinance organizations from Karnataka and Gujarat states of India. Villages identified for roll-out of health services with microfinance were pair-matched with microfinance only villages. A quantitative survey at inception and twelve months post health intervention compare the primary outcome (incidence of childhood diarrhea), and secondary outcome (place of last delivery, toilet at home, and out-of-pocket expenditure on treatment). At baseline, the intervention and comparison communities were similar except for out-of-pocket expenditure on health. Low reported use of toilet at home indicates the areas are heading towards a sanitation crisis. This should be an area of program priority for the microfinance organizations. While respondents primarily rely on their savings for meeting treatment expenditure, borrowing from friends, relatives, and money-lenders remains other important source of meeting treatment expenditure in the community. Programs need to prioritize steps to ensure awareness about national health insurance schemes, entitlement to increase service utilization, and developing additional health financing safety nets for financing outpatient care, that are responsible for majority of health-debt. Finally we discuss implications of such programs for national policy makers.

  2. Design and Baseline Findings of a Multi-site Non-randomized Evaluation of the Effect of a Health Programme on Microfinance Clients in India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somen

    2014-01-01

    Microfinance is the provision of financial services for the poor. Health program through microfinance has the potential to address several access barriers to health. We report the design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health program on the members of two microfinance organizations from Karnataka and Gujarat states of India. Villages identified for roll-out of health services with microfinance were pair-matched with microfinance only villages. A quantitative survey at inception and twelve months post health intervention compare the primary outcome (incidence of childhood diarrhea), and secondary outcome (place of last delivery, toilet at home, and out-of-pocket expenditure on treatment). At baseline, the intervention and comparison communities were similar except for out-of-pocket expenditure on health. Low reported use of toilet at home indicates the areas are heading towards a sanitation crisis. This should be an area of program priority for the microfinance organizations. While respondents primarily rely on their savings for meeting treatment expenditure, borrowing from friends, relatives, and money-lenders remains other important source of meeting treatment expenditure in the community. Programs need to prioritize steps to ensure awareness about national health insurance schemes, entitlement to increase service utilization, and developing additional health financing safety nets for financing outpatient care, that are responsible for majority of health-debt. Finally we discuss implications of such programs for national policy makers. PMID:24373263

  3. Hexon Modification to Improve the Activity of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors against Neoplastic and Stromal Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q. Andreas; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety. PMID:25692292

  4. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  5. Intracellular mechanisms mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Paul W; Shah, Sumit

    2005-01-01

    Tocotrienols and tocopherols represent the two subgroups that make up the vitamin E family of compounds. However, tocotrienols display significantly more potent apoptotic activity in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells than tocopherols. Studies were conducted to determine the intracellular mechanism(s) mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. An initial step in apoptosis is the activation of 'initiator' caspases (caspase-8 or -9) that subsequently activate 'effector' caspases (caspase-3, -6 and -7) and induce apoptosis. Treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol (20 microM) resulted in a time-dependent increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity. Combined treatment with specific caspase-8 or caspase-3 inhibitors completely blocked alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis and caspase-8 or caspase-3 activity, respectively. In contrast, alpha-tocotrienol treatment had no effect on caspase-9 activation, and combined treatment with a specific caspase-9 inhibitor did not block alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in (+)SA cells. Since caspase-8 activation is associated with the activation of death receptors, such as Fas, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, studies were conducted to determine the exact death receptor(s) and ligand(s) involved in mediating tocotrienol-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Treatment with Fas-ligand (FasL), Fas-activating antibody, or TRAIL failed to induce cell death in (+)SA neoplastic mammary epithelial cells, suggesting that these cells are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol did not alter the intracellular levels of Fas, FasL, or Fas-associated death domain (FADD) in these cells. Western blot analysis also showed that alpha-tocotrienol did not induce FasL or FADD translocation from the cytosolic to membrane fraction in these cells. Finally

  6. Differential roles of ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra G; Hawthorne, Michael; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; Torres, Karen E O; Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L; Kopelovich, Levy

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments were performed to determine the roles of estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland. In wild-type mice, in vivo administration of estradiol (E) + progesterone (P) stimulated mammary ductal growth and alveolar differentiation. Mammary glands from mice in which the ERβ gene has been deleted (βERKO mice) demonstrated normal ductal growth and differentiation in response to E + P. By contrast, mammary glands from mice in which the ERα gene has been deleted (αERKO mice) demonstrated only rudimentary ductal structures that did not differentiate in response to E + P. EGF demonstrates estrogen-like activity in the mammary glands of αERKO mice: treatment of αERKO mice with EGF + P (without E) supported normal mammary gland development, induced expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and increased levels of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR30) protein. Mammary gland development in βERKO mice treated with EGF + P was comparable to that of wild-type mice receiving EGF + P; EGF had no statistically significant effects on the induction of PR or expression of GPR30 in mammary glands harvested from either wild-type mice or βERKO mice. In vitro exposure of mammary glands to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced preneoplastic mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in glands from wild-type mice and βERKO mice, but failed to induce MAL in mammary glands from αERKO mice. Microarray analysis of DMBA-treated mammary glands identified 28 functional pathways whose expression was significantly different in αERKO mice versus both βERKO and wild-type mice; key functions that were differentially expressed in αERKO mice included cell division, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The data demonstrate distinct roles for ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland, and suggest that EGF can mimic the ERα-mediated effects of E in this organ.

  7. Expression of serum albumin and of alphafetoprotein in murine normal and neoplastic primitive embryonic structures.

    PubMed

    Trojan, J; Naval, X; Johnson, T; Lafarge-Frayssinet, C; Hajeri-Germond, M; Farges, O; Pan, Y; Uriel, J; Abramasky, O; Ilan, J

    1995-12-01

    Alphafetoprotein (AFP), a major serum protein synthesized during the embryo-fetal and postnatal period (in the yolk sac, then in the liver), is also an oncoprotein. The intracellular presence of AFP and of serum albumin (SA) in normal and neoplastic neural crest and neural tube derivatives was previously demonstrated. In this work we have studied the comparative expression of AFP and SA in primitive neuroectoblastic structures of mouse embryos (6 and 7 days "post coitum") and mouse teratocarcinomas (derived from the PCC4 cell line). Using immunofluorescence technique, antibodies to SA gave a positive reaction in embryos of 7 days, while AFP was not detected during this period. By mRNA in situ hybridization, SA mRNA gave a strong signal in both 6 and 7 day embryos, whereas AFP mRNA gave a weak signal only in 7-day embryos. The distribution of SA and AFP and their mRNAs was investigated in primitive neuroectoblastic structures of the teratocarcinomas by in situ hybridization and immunostaining. Only SA protein was detectable by immunostaining. SA mRNA gave a strong signal in differentiating structures as well as in undifferentiated cell clusters. AFP mRNA was observed only in differentiating structure. Dot-blot hybridization indicated that the level of SA transcripts was at least 6-fold higher than that of AFP transcripts in the teratocarcinomas investigated. In teratocarcinoma-bearing mice injected intraperitoneally with 125I-radiolabeled SA and AFP, significant accumulations of both SA and AFP were demonstrated in the tumors, SA being about 3-fold higher than that of AFP after normalization to quantity of uptake in liver. External in vivo photoscanning confirmed this relationship of accumulated radiolabeled proteins. The last observation could be useful in vivo for diagnosis of teratocarcinoma. We conclude that the expression of SA relative to AFP and the external cellular uptake of SA relative to AFP are similar in normal embryonic developing tissues and in the

  8. Multiparametric flow cytometry profiling of neoplastic plasma cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans E; Bøgsted, Martin; Klausen, Tobias W; Gimsing, Peter; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjaersgaard, Erik; Damgaard, Tina; Voss, Pia; Knudsen, Lene M; Mylin, Anne K; Nielsen, Johan Lanng; Björkstrand, Bo; Gruber, Astrid; Lenhoff, Stig; Remes, Kari; Dahl, Inger Marie; Fogd, Kirsten; Dybkaer, Karen

    2010-09-01

    The clinical impact of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) in multiple myeloma (MM) is still unclear and under evaluation. Further progress relies on multiparametric profiling of the neoplastic plasma cell (PC) compartment to provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation. The primary aim of this study was to perform global analysis of CD expression on the PC compartment and subsequently to evaluate the prognostic impact. Secondary aims were to study the diagnostic and predictive impact. The design included a retrospective analysis of MFC data generated from diagnostic bone marrow (BM) samples of 109 Nordic patients included in clinical trials within NMSG. Whole marrow were analyzed by MFC for identification of end-stage CD45(-) /CD38(++) neoplastic PC and registered the relative numbers of events and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) staining for CD19, CD20, CD27, CD28, CD38, CD44, CD45, CD56, and isotypes for cluster analysis. The median MFC-PC number was 15%, and the median light microscopy (LM)-PC number was 35%. However, the numbers were significant correlated and the prognostic value with an increased relative risk (95% CI) of 3.1 (1.7-5.5) and 2.9 (1.4-6.2), P < 0.0003 and P < 0.004 of MFC-PC and LM-PC counts, respectively. Unsupervised clustering based on global MFI assessment on PC revealed two clusters based on CD expression profiling. Cluster I with high intensity for CD56, CD38, CD45, right-angle light-scatter signal (SSC), forward-angle light-scatter signal (FSC), and low for CD28, CD19, and a Cluster II, with low intensity of CD56, CD38, CD45, SSC, FSC, and high for CD28, CD19 with a median survival of 39 months and 19 months, respectively (P = 0.02). The MFC analysis of MM BM samples produces diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information useful in clinical practice, which will be prospectively validated within the European Myeloma Network (EMN). © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society. Copyright © 2010 International

  9. Protein p16 as a marker of dysplastic and neoplastic alterations in cervical epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Volgareva, Galina; Zavalishina, Larisa; Andreeva, Yulia; Frank, Georgy; Krutikova, Ella; Golovina, Darya; Bliev, Alexander; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Ermilova, Valeriya; Kisseljov, Fjodor

    2004-01-01

    Background Cervical carcinomas are second most frequent type of women cancer. Success in diagnostics of this disease is due to the use of Pap-test (cytological smear analysis). However Pap-test gives significant portion of both false-positive and false-negative conclusions. Amendments of the diagnostic procedure are desirable. Aetiological role of papillomaviruses in cervical cancer is established while the role of cellular gene alterations in the course of tumor progression is less clear. Several research groups including us have recently named the protein p16INK4a as a possible diagnostic marker of cervical cancer. To evaluate whether the specificity of p16INK4a expression in dysplastic and neoplastic cervical epithelium is sufficient for such application we undertook a broader immunochistochemical registration of this protein with a highly p16INK4a-specific monoclonal antibody. Methods Paraffin-embedded samples of diagnostic biopsies and surgical materials were used. Control group included vaginal smears of healthy women and biopsy samples from patients with cervical ectopia. We examined 197 samples in total. Monoclonal antibody E6H4 (MTM Laboratories, Germany) was used. Results In control samples we did not find any p16INK4a-positive cells. Overexpression of p16INK4a was detected in samples of cervical dysplasia (CINs) and carcinomas. The portion of p16INK4a-positive samples increased in the row: CIN I – CIN II – CIN III – invasive carcinoma. For all stages the samples were found to be heterogeneous with respect to p16INK4a-expression. Every third of CINs III and one invasive squamous cell carcinoma (out of 21 analyzed) were negative. Conclusions Overexpression of the protein p16INK4a is typical for dysplastic and neoplastic epithelium of cervix uteri. However p16INK4a-negative CINs and carcinomas do exist. All stages of CINs and carcinomas analyzed are heterogeneous with respect to p16INK4a expression. So p16INK4a-negativity is not a sufficient reason to

  10. Neoplastic cells obtained from Hodgkin's disease are potent stimulators of human primary mixed lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Bostick-Bruton, F; Sauder, D N; Scala, G; Diehl, V

    1983-06-01

    Neoplastic cells obtained from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease have been maintained in culture since 1978. These tumor cells have been shown to have the cytologic features, cytochemical staining, and cell surface markers of Reed-Sternberg cells. In this study we demonstrate that the cell line termed L428 is a potent stimulator of the primary human mixed lymphocyte reaction. Significant proliferation occurred when mononuclear leukocytes obtained from normal donors were stimulated with radiated L428 cells at responder:stimulator ratios varying from 200:1 to 20:1. Proliferative responses occurred between days 3 and 6 of the cultures with maximal proliferation on day 5. Under optimal culture conditions, mean net proliferative response of 14 normal donors was 51,000 +/- 10,600 dpm. The mixed lymphocyte response was totally blocked by concentrations of monoclonal anti-Ia antibody that had no effect on concanavalin A-induced proliferation. However, the mixed lymphocyte response was not blocked by an anti-K562 cell monoclonal antibody of the same immunoglobulin subclass that binds to the L428 cells. Antigen processing by responder monocytes or Ia-positive cells was not required for the MLC. When responder T cells from two normals were depleted of Ia-bearing cells and monocytes, the mixed lymphocyte reaction between the two normals was eliminated, yet the stimulation of each normal by the L428 cells was not reduced. The cells that proliferated in response to stimulation by the L428 cells were T cells, primarily of the helper subset. No IL 1 activity could be detected in concentrated supernatants of L428 cultures after stimulation of L428 cells by mitogens, phorbol esters, or muramyl dipeptide, or in the MLC. All of these cultures contain fetal calf serum. However, the L428 cells are capable of producing IL 1, because IL 1 was detected when the L428 cells were stimulated with LPS in the absence of fetal calf serum. These neoplastic cells, obtained

  11. Psychoanalytic transformations.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Fernando

    2007-12-01

    The author describes how Bion took Freud's conception of dreams as a form of thought and used it as the basis of his theory of transformations. Bion developed an expanded theory of 'dream thought', understood as a process of selection and transformation of sensory and emotional experiences. In this theory, the work of analysis is in turn conceived as a process not only of deciphering symbols, of revealing already existing unconscious meanings, but also of symbol production--of a process for generating thoughts and conferring meaning on experiences that have never been conscious and never been repressed because they have never been 'thought'. Analysis, in its specific operational sense, becomes a system of transformation whereby unconscious somatopsychic processes acquire the conditions for representability and become capable of translation into thoughts, words and interpretations. The rules of transformation applied by the patient in his representations and those applied by the analyst in his interpretations have the same importance for the analytic process as those described by Freud for the process of dreaming. The author discusses the broad categories of transformation adduced by Bion (rigid motion, projective, and in hallucinosis) and introduces some further distinctions within them.

  12. Active vitamin D potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of calcium in the colon: A cross talk through the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Höbaus, Julia; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Prinz-Wohlgenannt, Maximilian; Graça, João; Price, Sally A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse correlation between dietary calcium (Ca(2+)) and vitamin D intake and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been shown in vitro that the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) can upregulate expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In the colon, CaSR has been suggested to regulate proliferation of colonocytes. However, during tumorigenesis colonic CaSR expression is downregulated and we hypothesized that the loss of CaSR could influence the anti-tumorigenic effects of Ca(2+) and vitamin D. Our aim was to assess the impact of CaSR expression and function on the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 in colon cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that in the healthy colon of mice, high vitamin D diet (2500 IU/kg diet) increased expression of differentiation and apoptosis markers, decreased expression of proliferation markers and significantly upregulated CaSR mRNA expression, compared with low vitamin D diet (100 IU/kg diet). To determine the role of CaSR in this process, we transfected Caco2-15 and HT29 CRC cells with wild type CaSR (CaSR-WT) or a dominant negative CaSR mutant (CaSR-DN) and treated them with 1,25-D3 alone, or in combination with CaSR activators (Ca(2+) and NPS R-568). 1,25-D3 enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of Ca(2+) and induced differentiation and apoptosis only in cells with a functional CaSR, which were further enhanced in the presence of NPS R-568, a positive allosteric modulator of CaSR. The mutant CaSR inhibited the anti-tumorigenic effects of 1,25-D3 suggesting that the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 are, at least in part, mediated by the CaSR. Taken together, our data provides molecular evidence to support the epidemiological observation that both, vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. This article is part of a Special Issue

  13. High-dose therapy autotransplantation/intensification vs continued standard chemotherapy in multiple myeloma in first remission. Results of a non-randomized study from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Bladé, J; Esteve, J; Rives, S; Martínez, C; Rovira, M; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Marín, P; Carreras, E; Montserrat, E

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) responding to initial chemotherapy who received intensification with high-dose therapy/autotransplantation (HDT) as compared to that of those who were continued on standard chemotherapy. From 1 January 1990 to 30 June 1998, 64 patients with MM who were younger than 65 years achieved a response to initial chemotherapy. Due to referral reasons, patients preference or inclusion in trials, 31 patients received HDT as early intensification while 33 were continued on standard chemotherapy. The presenting features were similar in both groups, except for the median age, which was lower in the HDT group (53 vs 58 years, P = 0.007). Complete response negative immunofixation - (CR) was achieved in 12 of 31 (39%) patients intensified with HDT and in two of 33 (6%) patients who were continued on conventional chemotherapy (P = 0.002). Event-free survival (EFS) was significantly longer in the HDT group (median, 43 vs 21 months; P = 0.007). Overall survival (OS) was not significantly different between groups (median, 62 vs 38 months; P = 0.21). However, patients in the HDT group who achieved CR had an EFS (median, 51 vs 31 months; P = 0.03) as well as an OS (median, not reached vs 50 months; P = 0.0006) significantly longer than those achieving a lower degree of response. In conclusion, this non-randomized study shows that early HDT increases CR rate and prolongs EFS. In addition, these results highlight CR as a crucial step for achieving long-lasting disease control and prolonged survival in patients with MM.

  14. Spiritual Care Therapy on Quality of Life in Cancer Patients and Their Caregivers: A Prospective Non-randomized Single-Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sankhe, A; Dalal, K; Agarwal, V; Sarve, P

    2017-04-01

    Spiritual care is still in infancy stage all over the globe including India. The present study was an original study evaluating the role of spiritual care in cancer patients and their primary caregivers regarding their spiritual and general well-being. The study was a prospective, non-randomized single-group study involving cancer patients undergoing surgery and their primary caregivers. Functional assessment of cancer therapy-general and functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-spiritual care was evaluated during the admission and at the time of discharge, two, four  and 6 months following discharge from the hospital. Descriptive statistics was used for demographic details and repeated measure ANOVA with Dunn's test was used for analysis of changes in the scores. A total of 107 (63 males and 44 females) patients with a mean (SD) of age 51 (13) years were recruited in the study. Similarly, for each patient one of their primary caregivers was recruited with their mean (SD) age of 39.4 (12.7) years. A total of 11/107 (10.3%) patients died and nine out of 107 (8.4%) were lost to follow-up eventually during the study period. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) increase in the scores at all the follow-up periods in both the patient and their relative groups. To conclude, we found out that spiritual care on the basis of MATCH guideline improved the level of not only spiritual well-being but general well-being also in both the patients and their primary caregivers. Control group could have improved scientific validity of study in accessing effect of spiritual care. Authors believe that more robust comparative study on each principle against all five MATCH principles in future will add scientific validity and clear the various ambiguities in spiritual care.

  15. Evaluation of an educational "toolbox" for improving nursing staff competence and psychosocial work environment in elderly care: results of a prospective, non-randomized controlled intervention.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, J E; Hasson, H

    2007-07-01

    Lack of professional development opportunities among nursing staff is a major concern in elderly care and has been associated with work dissatisfaction and staff turnover. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies evaluating the effects of educational interventions on nursing competence and work satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of an educational "toolbox" intervention on nursing staff ratings of their competence, psychosocial work environment and overall work satisfaction. The study was a prospective, non-randomized, controlled intervention. Nursing staff in two municipal elderly care organizations in western Sweden. In an initial questionnaire survey, nursing staff in the intervention municipality described several areas in which they felt a need for competence development. Measurement instruments and educational materials for improving staff knowledge and work practices were then collated by researchers and managers in a "toolbox." Nursing staff ratings of their competence and work were measured pre and post-intervention by questionnaire. Staff ratings in the intervention municipality were compared to staff ratings in the reference municipality, where no toolbox was introduced. Nursing staff ratings of their competence and psychosocial work environment, including overall work satisfaction, improved significantly over time in the intervention municipality, compared to the reference group. Both competence and work environment ratings were largely unchanged among reference municipality staff. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction effect between municipalities over time for nursing staff ratings of participation, leadership, performance feedback and skills' development. Staff ratings for these four scales improved significantly in the intervention municipality as compared to the reference municipality. Compared to a reference municipality, nursing staff ratings of their competence and the

  16. Relative labelling index: a novel stereological approach to test for non-random immunogold labelling of organelles and membranes on transmission electron microscopy thin sections.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, T M; Lucocq, J M; Griffiths, G

    2002-02-01

    Simple and efficient protocols for quantifying immunogold labelling of antigens localized in different cellular compartments (organelles or membranes) and statistically evaluating resulting labelling distributions are presented. Two key questions are addressed: (a) is compartmental labelling within an experimental group (e.g. control or treated) consistent with a random distribution? and (b) do labelling patterns vary between groups (e.g. control vs. treated)? Protocols rely on random sampling of cells and compartments. Numbers of gold particles lying on specified organelle compartments provide an observed frequency distribution. By superimposing test-point lattices on cell profiles, design-based stereology is used to determine numbers of points lying on those same compartments. Random points hit compartments with probabilities determined by their relative sizes and so provide a convenient internal standard, namely, the expected distribution if labelling is purely random. By applying test-line lattices, and counting sites at which these intersect membrane traces, analogous procedures provide observed and expected labelling distributions for different classes of membranes. Dividing observed golds by expected golds provides a relative labelling index (RLI) for each compartment and, for random labelling, the predicted RLI = 1. In contrast to labelling densities of organelles (golds microm(-2) or membranes (golds microm(-1)), RLI values are estimated without needing to know lattice constants (area per point or length per intersection) or specimen magnification. Gold distributions within a group are compared by chi-squared analysis to test if the observed distribution differs significantly from random and, if it is non-random, to identify compartments which are preferentially labelled (RLI > 1). Contingency table analysis allows labelling distributions in different groups of cells to be compared. Protocols are described and illustrated using worked specimen examples and

  17. Two-stage revision surgery with preformed spacers and cementless implants for septic hip arthritis: a prospective, non-randomized cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outcome data on two-stage revision surgery for deep infection after septic hip arthritis are limited and inconsistent. This study presents the medium-term results of a new, standardized two-stage arthroplasty with preformed hip spacers and cementless implants in a consecutive series of adult patients with septic arthritis of the hip treated according to a same protocol. Methods Nineteen patients (20 hips) were enrolled in this prospective, non-randomized cohort study between 2000 and 2008. The first stage comprised femoral head resection, debridement, and insertion of a preformed, commercially available, antibiotic-loaded cement hip spacer. After eradication of infection, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted in the second stage. Patients were assessed for infection recurrence, pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) and hip joint function (Harris Hip score). Results The mean time between first diagnosis of infection and revision surgery was 5.8 ± 9.0 months; the average duration of follow up was 56.6 (range, 24 - 104) months; all 20 hips were successfully converted to prosthesis an average 22 ± 5.1 weeks after spacer implantation. Reinfection after total hip joint replacement occurred in 1 patient. The mean VAS pain score improved from 48 (range, 35 - 84) pre-operatively to 18 (range, 0 - 38) prior to spacer removal and to 8 (range, 0 - 15) at the last follow-up assessment after prosthesis implantation. The average Harris Hip score improved from 27.5 before surgery to 61.8 between the two stages to 92.3 at the final follow-up assessment. Conclusions Satisfactory outcomes can be obtained with two-stage revision hip arthroplasty using preformed spacers and cementless implants for prosthetic hip joint infections of various etiologies. PMID:21575241

  18. Effectiveness of a peer-led HIV prevention intervention in secondary schools in Rwanda: results from a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the HIV epidemic is levelling off in sub-Saharan Africa, it remains at an unacceptably high level. Young people aged 15-24 years remain particularly vulnerable, resulting in a regional HIV prevalence of 1.4% in young men and 3.3% in young women. This study assesses the effectiveness of a peer-led HIV prevention intervention in secondary schools in Rwanda on young people’s sexual behavior, HIV knowledge and attitudes. Methods In a non-randomized longitudinal controlled trial, fourteen schools were selected in two neighboring districts in Rwanda Bugesera (intervention) and Rwamagana (control). Students (n = 1950) in eight intervention and six control schools participated in three surveys (baseline, six and twelve months in the intervention). Analysis was done using linear and logistic regression using generalized estimation equations adjusted for propensity score. Results The overall retention rate was 72%. Time trends in sexual risk behavior (being sexually active, sex in last six months, condom use at last sex) were not significantly different in students from intervention and control schools, nor was the intervention associated with increased knowledge, perceived severity or perceived susceptibility. It did significantly reduce reported stigma. Conclusions Analyzing this and other interventions, we identified several reasons for the observed limited effectiveness of peer education: 1) intervention activities (spreading information) are not tuned to objectives (changing behavior); 2) young people prefer receiving HIV information from other sources than peers; 3) outcome indicators are not adequate and the context of the relationship in which sex occurs and the context in which sex occurs is ignored. Effectiveness of peer education may increase through integration in holistic interventions and redefining peer educators’ role as focal points for sensitization and referral to experts and services. Finally, we argue that a narrow focus on

  19. Effects of a settings-based intervention to promote student wellbeing and reduce smoking in vocational schools: A non-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed