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Sample records for nephron stn study

  1. Effects of antidromic and orthodromic activation of STN afferent axons during DBS in Parkinson's disease: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guiyeom; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that subthalamic nucleus (STN)-Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) may exert at least part of its therapeutic effect through the antidromic suppression of pathological oscillations in the cortex in 6-OHDA treated rats and in parkinsonian patients. STN-DBS may also activate STN neurons by initiating action potential propagation in the orthodromic direction, similarly resulting in suppression of pathological oscillations in the STN. While experimental studies have provided strong evidence in support of antidromic stimulation of cortical neurons, it is difficult to separate relative contributions of antidromic and orthodromic effects of STN-DBS. The aim of this computational study was to examine the effects of antidromic and orthodromic activation on neural firing patterns and beta-band (13-30 Hz) oscillations in the STN and cortex during DBS of STN afferent axons projecting from the cortex. High frequency antidromic stimulation alone effectively suppressed simulated beta activity in both the cortex and STN-globus pallidus externa (GPe) network. High frequency orthodromic stimulation similarly suppressed beta activity within the STN and GPe through the direct stimulation of STN neurons driven by DBS at the same frequency as the stimulus. The combined effect of both antidromic and orthodromic stimulation modulated cortical activity antidromically while simultaneously orthodromically driving STN neurons. While high frequency DBS reduced STN beta-band power, low frequency stimulation resulted in resonant effects, increasing beta-band activity, consistent with previous experimental observations. The simulation results indicate effective suppression of simulated oscillatory activity through both antidromic stimulation of cortical neurons and direct orthodromic stimulation of STN neurons. The results of the study agree with experimental recordings of STN and cortical neurons in rats and support the therapeutic potential of stimulation of cortical neurons.

  2. Proximal Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jia L.; Li, Xiao C.

    2013-01-01

    The kidney plays a fundamental role in maintaining body salt and fluid balance and blood pressure homeostasis through the actions of its proximal and distal tubular segments of nephrons. However, proximal tubules are well recognized to exert a more prominent role than distal counterparts. Proximal tubules are responsible for reabsorbing approximately 65% of filtered load and most, if not all, of filtered amino acids, glucose, solutes, and low molecular weight proteins. Proximal tubules also play a key role in regulating acid-base balance by reabsorbing approximately 80% of filtered bicarbonate. The purpose of this review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives into current understanding of proximal tubules of nephrons, with an emphasis on the ultrastructure, molecular biology, cellular and integrative physiology, and the underlying signaling transduction mechanisms. The review is divided into three closely related sections. The first section focuses on the classification of nephrons and recent perspectives on the potential role of nephron numbers in human health and diseases. The second section reviews recent research on the structural and biochemical basis of proximal tubular function. The final section provides a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives in the physiological regulation of proximal tubular transport by vasoactive hormones. In the latter section, attention is particularly paid to new insights and perspectives learnt from recent cloning of transporters, development of transgenic animals with knockout or knockin of a particular gene of interest, and mapping of signaling pathways using microarrays and/or physiological proteomic approaches. PMID:23897681

  3. Comparative study of microelectrode recording-based STN location and MRI-based STN location in low to ultra-high field (7.0 T) T2-weighted MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhagen, Rens; Schuurman, P. Richard; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Fiorella Contarino, M.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Bour, Lo J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. The correspondence between the anatomical STN and the STN observed in T2-weighted MRI images used for deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting remains unclear. Using a new method, we compared the STN borders seen on MRI images with those estimated by intraoperative microelectrode recordings (MER). Approach. We developed a method to automatically generate a detailed estimation of STN shape and the location of its borders, based on multiple-channel MER measurements. In 33 STNs of 19 Parkinson patients, we quantitatively compared the dorsal and lateral borders of this MER-based STN model with the STN borders visualized by 1.5 T (n = 14), 3.0 T (n = 10) and 7.0 T (n = 9) T2-weighted MRI. Main results. The dorsal border was identified more dorsally on coronal T2 MRI than by the MER-based STN model, with a significant difference in the 3.0 T (range 0.97-1.19 mm) and 7.0 T (range 1.23-1.25 mm) groups. The lateral border was significantly more medial on 1.5 T (mean: 1.97 mm) and 3.0 T (mean: 2.49 mm) MRI than in the MER-based STN; a difference that was not found in the 7.0 T group. Significance. The STN extends further in the dorsal direction on coronal T2 MRI images than is measured by MER. Increasing MRI field strength to 3.0 T or 7.0 T yields similar discrepancies between MER and MRI at the dorsal STN border. In contrast, increasing MRI field strength to 7.0 T may be useful for identification of the lateral STN border and thereby improve DBS targeting.

  4. Oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and its inhibition by c-phycocyanin: a study on urolithic rats.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur Muhammed; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Subramhanya, Karthik Harve; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Rajesh, Nachiappa Ganesh; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2006-03-01

    The assumption of oxidative stress as a mechanism in oxalate induced renal damage suggests that antioxidants might play a beneficial role against oxalate toxicity. An in vivo model was used to investigate the effect of C-phycocyanin (from aquatic micro algae; Spirulina spp.), a known antioxidant, against calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two of the 4 groups of Wistar albino rats (n = 6 in each) by intraperitoneally injecting sodium oxalate (70 mg/kg body weight). A pretreatment of phycocyanin (100 mg/kg body weight) as a single oral dosage was given, one hour prior to oxalate challenge. An untreated control and drug control (phycocyanin alone) were employed. Phycocyanin administration resulted in a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the thiol content of renal tissue and RBC lysate via increasing glutathione and reducing malondialdehyde levels in the plasma of oxalate induced rats (p < 0.001), indicating phycocyanin's antioxidant effect on oxalate mediated oxidative stress. Administering phycocyanin after oxalate treatment significantly increased catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.001) in RBC lysate suggesting phycocyanin as a free radical quencher. Assessing calcium oxalate crystal retention in renal tissue using polarization microscopy and renal ultrastructure by electron microscopy reveals normal features in phycocyanin-- pretreated groups. Thus the study presents positive pharmacological implications of phycocyanin against oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and warrants further work to tap this potential aquatic resource for its medicinal application.

  5. Synchronization phenomena in nephron-nephron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Yip, Kay-Pong; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data for tubular pressure oscillations in rat kidneys are analyzed in order to examine the different types of synchronization that can arise between neighboring functional units. For rats with normal blood pressure, the individual unit (the nephron) typically exhibits regular oscillations in its tubular pressure and flow variations. For such rats, both in-phase and antiphase synchronization can be demonstrated in the experimental data. For spontaneously hypertensive rats, where the pressure variations in the individual nephrons are highly irregular, signs of chaotic phase and frequency synchronization can be observed. Accounting for a hemodynamic as well as for a vascular coupling between nephrons that share a common interlobular artery, we develop a mathematical model of the pressure and flow regulation in a pair of adjacent nephrons. We show that this model, for appropriate values of the parameters, can reproduce the different types of experimentally observed synchronization.

  6. Lengths of nephron tubule segments and collecting ducts in the CD-1 mouse kidney: an ontogeny study.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sarah L; Moritz, Karen M; Bertram, John F; Singh, Reetu R

    2016-11-01

    The kidney continues to mature postnatally, with significant elongation of nephron tubules and collecting ducts to maintain fluid/electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of this project was to develop methodology to estimate lengths of specific segments of nephron tubules and collecting ducts in the CD-1 mouse kidney using a combination of immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology (vertical uniform random sections with cycloid arc test system). Lengths of tubules were determined at postnatal day 21 (P21) and 2 and 12 mo of age and also in mice fed a high-salt diet throughout adulthood. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify individual tubule segments [aquaporin-1, proximal tubules (PT) and thin descending limbs of Henle (TDLH); uromodulin, distal tubules (DT); aquaporin-2, collecting ducts (CD)]. All tubular segments increased significantly in length between P21 and 2 mo of age (PT, 602% increase; DT, 200% increase; TDLH, 35% increase; CD, 53% increase). However, between 2 and 12 mo, a significant increase in length was only observed for PT (76% increase in length). At 12 mo of age, kidneys of mice on a high-salt diet demonstrated a 27% greater length of the TDLH, but no significant change in length was detected for PT, DT, and CD compared with the normal-salt group. Our study demonstrates an efficient method of estimating lengths of specific segments of the renal tubular system. This technique can be applied to examine structure of the renal tubules in combination with the number of glomeruli in the kidney in models of altered renal phenotype.

  7. Stn1-Ten1 is an Rpa2-Rpa3-like complex at telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jia; Yu, Eun Young; Yang, Yuting; Confer, Laura A; Sun, Steven H; Wan, Ke; Lue, Neal F; Lei, Ming

    2010-09-02

    In budding yeast, Cdc13, Stn1, and Ten1 form a heterotrimeric complex (CST) that is essential for telomere protection and maintenance. Previous bioinformatics analysis revealed a putative oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold at the N terminus of Stn1 (Stn1N) that shows limited sequence similarity to the OB fold of Rpa2, a subunit of the eukaryotic ssDNA-binding protein complex replication protein A (RPA). Here we present functional and structural analyses of Stn1 and Ten1 from multiple budding and fission yeast. The crystal structure of the Candida tropicalis Stn1N complexed with Ten1 demonstrates an Rpa2N-Rpa3-like complex. In both structures, the OB folds of the two components pack against each other through interactions between two C-terminal helices. The structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 (Stn1C) was found to comprise two related winged helix-turn-helix (WH) motifs, one of which is most similar to the WH motif at the C terminus of Rpa2, again supporting the notion that Stn1 resembles Rpa2. The crystal structure of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Stn1N-Ten1 complex exhibits a virtually identical architecture as the C. tropicalis Stn1N-Ten1. Functional analyses of the Candida albicans Stn1 and Ten1 proteins revealed critical roles for these proteins in suppressing aberrant telomerase and recombination activities at telomeres. Mutations that disrupt the Stn1-Ten1 interaction induce telomere uncapping and abolish the telomere localization of Ten1. Collectively, our structural and functional studies illustrate that, instead of being confined to budding yeast telomeres, the CST complex may represent an evolutionarily conserved RPA-like telomeric complex at the 3' overhangs that works in parallel with or instead of the well-characterized POT1-TPP1/TEBP{alpha}-{beta} complex.

  8. Closed-loop stimulation of a delayed neural fields model of parkinsonian STN-GPe network: a theoretical and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Detorakis, Georgios Is.; Chaillet, Antoine; Palfi, Stéphane; Senova, Suhan

    2015-01-01

    Several disorders are related to pathological brain oscillations. In the case of Parkinson's disease, sustained low-frequency oscillations (especially in the β-band, 13–30 Hz) correlate with motor symptoms. It is still under debate whether these oscillations are the cause of parkinsonian motor symptoms. The development of techniques enabling selective disruption of these β-oscillations could contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms, and could be exploited for treatments. A particularly appealing technique is Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). With clinical electrical DBS, electrical currents are delivered at high frequency to a region made of potentially heterogeneous neurons (the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the case of Parkinson's disease). Even more appealing is DBS with optogenetics, which is until now a preclinical method using both gene transfer and deep brain light delivery and enabling neuromodulation at the scale of one given neural network. In this work, we rely on delayed neural fields models of STN and the external Globus Pallidus (GPe) to develop, theoretically validate and test in silico a closed-loop stimulation strategy to disrupt these sustained oscillations with optogenetics. First, we rely on tools from control theory to provide theoretical conditions under which sustained oscillations can be attenuated by a closed-loop stimulation proportional to the measured activity of STN. Second, based on this theoretical framework, we show numerically that the proposed closed-loop stimulation efficiently attenuates sustained oscillations, even in the case when the photosensitization effectively affects only 50% of STN neurons. We also show through simulations that oscillations disruption can be achieved when the same light source is used for the whole STN population. We finally test the robustness of the proposed strategy to possible acquisition and processing delays, as well as parameters uncertainty. PMID:26217171

  9. Amantadine improves gait in PD patients with STN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hiu-Fai; Kukkle, Prashanth L; Merello, Marcelo; Lim, Shen-Yang; Poon, Yu-Yan; Moro, Elena

    2013-03-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), axial symptoms such as speech, gait, and balance impairment often become levodopa-unresponsive and they are difficult to manage, even in patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). We anecdotally observed that oral administration of amantadine was very effective in treating both residual and stimulation-induced axial symptoms after bilateral STN-DBS in one PD patient. Therefore, we conducted a prospective multicenter observational study to evaluate the effects of amantadine on speech, gait and balance in PD patients with STN-DBS and incomplete axial benefit. Primary outcomes were changes in speech (UPDRS III, item 18), gait (item 29) and postural stability (item 30) with amantadine treatment compared to baseline. Secondary outcome was the patients' subjective scoring of axial symptoms with amantadine compared to baseline. Forty-six PD patients with STN-DBS were enrolled in the study and followed for 10.35 ± 8.21 months (median: 9.00; range: 1-31). The mean daily dose of amantadine was 273.44 ± 47.49 mg. Gait scores significantly improved (from 1.51 ± 0.89 to 1.11 ± 0.92, P = 0.015) with amantadine treatment, whereas postural stability and speech scores were similar before and after treatment. Thirty-five (76.1%) patients reported subjective improvement in speech, gait or balance with amantadine, whereas thirty (65.2%) patients reported improvement in gait and balance. In conclusion, our data suggest that amantadine may have new beneficial effects on axial symptoms in PD patients with STN-DBS.

  10. Stn1–Ten1 is an Rpa2–Rpa3-like complex at telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Yu, Eun Young; Yang, Yuting; Confer, Laura A.; Sun, Steven H.; Wan, Ke; Lue, Neal F.; Lei, Ming

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, Cdc13, Stn1, and Ten1 form a heterotrimeric complex (CST) that is essential for telomere protection and maintenance. Previous bioinformatics analysis revealed a putative oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold at the N terminus of Stn1 (Stn1N) that shows limited sequence similarity to the OB fold of Rpa2, a subunit of the eukaryotic ssDNA-binding protein complex replication protein A (RPA). Here we present functional and structural analyses of Stn1 and Ten1 from multiple budding and fission yeast. The crystal structure of the Candida tropicalis Stn1N complexed with Ten1 demonstrates an Rpa2N–Rpa3-like complex. In both structures, the OB folds of the two components pack against each other through interactions between two C-terminal helices. The structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 (Stn1C) was found to comprise two related winged helix–turn–helix (WH) motifs, one of which is most similar to the WH motif at the C terminus of Rpa2, again supporting the notion that Stn1 resembles Rpa2. The crystal structure of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Stn1N–Ten1 complex exhibits a virtually identical architecture as the C. tropicalis Stn1N–Ten1. Functional analyses of the Candida albicans Stn1 and Ten1 proteins revealed critical roles for these proteins in suppressing aberrant telomerase and recombination activities at telomeres. Mutations that disrupt the Stn1–Ten1 interaction induce telomere uncapping and abolish the telomere localization of Ten1. Collectively, our structural and functional studies illustrate that, instead of being confined to budding yeast telomeres, the CST complex may represent an evolutionarily conserved RPA-like telomeric complex at the 3′ overhangs that works in parallel with or instead of the well-characterized POT1–TPP1/TEBPα–β complex. PMID:20008938

  11. Long-term Follow-up of Kidney Transplant Recipients in the Spare-the-Nephron-Trial.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Pearson, Thomas C; Patel, Anita; Peddi, V Ram; Kalil, Roberto; Scandling, John; Chan, Lawrence; Baliga, Prabhakar; Melton, Larry; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant; Waid, Thomas; Schaefer, Heidi; Youssef, Nasser; Anandagoda, Lali; McCollum, David; Lawson, Sibylle; Gordon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In the Spare-the-Nephron (STN) Study, kidney transplant recipients randomized about 115 days posttransplant to convert from CNI (calcineurin inhibitor)/MMF to sirolimus (SRL)/MMF had a significantly greater improvement in measured GFR (mGFR) at 12 months compared with those kept on CNI/MMF. The difference at 24 months was not statistically significant. From 14 top enrolling centers, 128 of 175 patients identified with a functioning graft at 2 years consented to enroll in an observational, noninterventional extension study to collect retrospectively and prospectively annual follow-up data for the interval since baseline (completion of the parent STN study at 24 months posttransplant). Overall, 11 patients died, including 5 (7.6%) in the SRL/MMF group and 6 (9.7%) in the CNI/MMF group. Twenty-two grafts have been lost including 10 (15.2%) in the SRL/MMF arm and 12 (19.4%) in the CNI/MMF arm. Death and chronic rejection were the most common causes of graft loss in both arms. There were modestly more cardiovascular events in the MMF/SRL group. Estimated creatinine clearance (Cockcroft-Gault) from baseline out to 6 additional years (8 years posttransplant, ITT analysis, SRL/MMF, n = 34; CNI/MMF, n = 26) was 63.2 ± 28.5 mL/min/1.73 m in the SRL/MMF group and 59.2 ± 27.2 mL/min/1.73 m in the CNI/MMF group and was not statistically significant, but there is a clinically meaningful trend for improved long-term renal function in the SRL/MMF group compared with the CNI/MMF group. The long-term decision for immunosuppression needs to be carefully individualized.

  12. NEW NEPHRON DEVELOPMENT IN FISH FROM POLLUTED WATERS: A POSSIBLE BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence has shown that fish have the ability to develop new nephrons following renal injury. This study evaluated the usefulness of quantifying developing nephrons in mature fish as an ecotoxicological assessment tool. Histological sections of kidney were prepared from At...

  13. The nephron (pro)renin receptor: function and significance.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is a multifunctional protein that is part of the renin-angiotensin system and is an important accessory molecule for the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The PRR is widely expressed in the kidney with relatively high abundance in the distal nephron. Determining the physiological relevance of the PRR has been challenging due to early lethality in whole animal and cell-specific PRR knockout models. Recently, viable renal cell-specific PRR knockout mice have been developed; these studies suggest that PRR in the nephron can modulate renal function via angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent and -independent cell signaling pathways. In this mini-review, we highlight new developments in nephron PRR function in health and in pathophysiological conditions.

  14. Maternal Fat Feeding Augments Offspring Nephron Endowment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hokke, Stacey; Puelles, Victor G.; Armitage, James A.; Fong, Karen; Bertram, John F.; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing consumption of a high fat 'Western' diet has led to a growing number of pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity. Maternal overnutrition and obesity have health implications for offspring, yet little is known about their effects on offspring kidney development and renal function. Female C57Bl6 mice were fed a high fat diet (HFD, 21% fat) or matched normal fat diet (NFD, 6% fat) for 6 weeks prior to pregnancy and throughout gestation and lactation. HFD dams were overweight and glucose intolerant prior to mating but not in late gestation. Offspring of NFD and HFD dams had similar body weights at embryonic day (E)15.5, E18.5 and at postnatal day (PN)21. HFD offspring had normal ureteric tree development and nephron number at E15.5. However, using unbiased stereology, kidneys of HFD offspring were found to have 20–25% more nephrons than offspring of NFD dams at E18.5 and PN21. Offspring of HFD dams with body weight and glucose profiles similar to NFD dams prior to pregnancy also had an elevated nephron endowment. At 9 months of age, adult offspring of HFD dams displayed mild fasting hyperglycaemia but similar body weights to NFD offspring. Renal function and morphology, measured by transcutaneous clearance of FITC-sinistrin and stereology respectively, were normal. This study demonstrates that maternal fat feeding augments offspring nephron endowment with no long-term consequences for offspring renal health. Future studies assessing the effects of a chronic stressor on adult mice with augmented nephron number are warranted, as are studies investigating the molecular mechanisms that result in high nephron endowment. PMID:27547968

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the rat nephron.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Erik I; Grann, Birgitte; Kristoffersen, Inger B; Skriver, Elisabeth; Thomsen, Jesper S; Andreasen, Arne

    2014-03-15

    This study gives a three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of rat nephrons and their connections to collecting ducts. Approximately 4,500 2.5-μm-thick serial sections from the renal surface to the papillary tip were obtained from each of 3 kidneys of Wistar rats. Digital images were recorded and aligned into three image stacks and traced from image to image. Short-loop nephrons (SLNs), long-loop nephrons (LLNs), and collecting ducts (CDs) were reconstructed in 3D. We identified a well-defined boundary between the outer stripe and the inner stripe of the outer medulla corresponding to the transition of descending thick limbs to descending thin limbs and between the inner stripe and the inner medulla, i.e., the transition of ascending thin limbs into ascending thick limbs of LLNs. In all nephrons, a mosaic pattern of proximal tubule (PT) cells and descending thin limb (DTL) cells was observed at the transition between the PT and the DTL. The course of the LLNs revealed tortuous proximal "straight" tubules and winding of the DTLs within the outer half of the inner stripe. The localization of loop bends of SLNs in the inner stripe of the outer medulla and the bends of LLNs in the inner medulla reflected the localization of their glomeruli; i.e., the deeper the glomerulus, the deeper the bend. Each CD drained approximately three to six nephrons with a different pattern than previously established in mice. This information will provide a basis for evaluation of structural changes within nephrons as a result of physiological or pharmaceutical intervention.

  16. Nephron Number, Hypertension, and CKD: Physiological and Genetic Insight from Humans and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexiang; Garrett, Michael R

    2017-01-27

    The kidneys play a vital role in the excretion of waste products and the regulation of electrolytes, maintenance of acid-base balance, regulation of blood pressure, and production of several hormones. Any alteration in the structure of the nephron (basic functional unit of the kidney) can have a major impact on the kidney's ability to work efficiently. Progressive decline in kidney function can lead to serious illness and ultimately death if not treated by dialysis or transplantation. While there have been numerous studies that implicate lower nephron numbers as being an important factor in influencing susceptibility to develop hypertension and chronic kidney disease, a direct association has been difficult to establish because of three main limitations: (1) the large variation in nephron number observed in the human population; (2) no established reliable non-invasive methods to determine nephron complement; and (3) to-date, nephron measurements have been done after death which doesn't adequately account for potential loss of nephrons with age or disease. In this review, we will provide an overview of kidney structure/function, discuss the current literature for both humans and other species linking nephron deficiency and cardio-renal complications, as well as, describe the major molecular signaling factors involved in nephrogenesis that modulate variation in nephron number. As more detailed knowledge about the molecular determinants of nephron development and the role of nephron endowment in the cardio-renal system is obtained, it will hopefully provide clinicians the ability to accurately identify people at risk to develop CKD/hypertension and lead to a shift in patient care from disease treatment to prevention.

  17. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Donald J; Toma, Ildiko; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2009-04-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism control afferent arteriolar diameter in each nephron and regulate blood flow. Both mechanisms generate self-sustained oscillations, the oscillations interact, TGF modulates the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation, and the oscillations synchronize; a 5:1 frequency ratio is the most frequent. TGF oscillations synchronize in nephron pairs supplied from a common cortical radial artery, as do myogenic oscillations. We propose that electrotonic vascular signal propagation from one juxtaglomerular apparatus interacts with similar signals from other nephrons to produce synchronization. We tested this idea in tubular-vascular preparations from mice. Vascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with a fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye; fluorescence intensity was measured with confocal microscopy. Perfusion of the thick ascending limb activated TGF and depolarized afferent arteriolar smooth muscle cells. The depolarization spread to the cortical radial artery and other afferent arterioles and declined with distance from the perfused juxtaglomerular apparatus, consistent with electrotonic vascular signal propagation. With a mathematical model of two coupled nephrons, we estimated the conductance of nephron coupling by fitting simulated vessel diameters to experimental data. With this value, we simulated nephron pairs to test for synchronization. In single-nephron simulations, the frequency of the TGF oscillation varied with nephron length. Coupling nephrons of different lengths forced TGF frequencies of both pair members to converge to a common value. The myogenic oscillations also synchronized, and the synchronization between the TGF and the myogenic oscillations showed an increased stability against parameter perturbations. Electronic vascular signal propagation is a plausible mechanism for nephron synchronization. Coupling increased the stability of the various oscillations.

  18. STN vs. GPi Deep Brain Stimulation: Translating the Rematch into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nolan R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    When formulating a deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment plan for a patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD), two critical questions should be addressed: 1- Which brain target should be chosen to optimize this patient’s outcome? and 2- Should this patient’s DBS operation be unilateral or bilateral? Over the past two decades, two targets have emerged as leading contenders for PD DBS; the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internus (GPi). While the GPi target does have a following, most centers have uniformly employed bilateral STN DBS for all Parkinson’s disease cases (Figure 1). This bilateral STN “one-size-fits-all” approach was challenged by an editorial entitled “STN vs. GPi: The Rematch,” which appeared in the Archives of Neurology in 2005. Since 2005, a series of well designed clinical trials and follow-up studies have addressed the question as to whether a more tailored approach to DBS therapy might improve overall outcomes. Such a tailored approach would include the options of targeting the GPi, or choosing a unilateral operation. The results of the STN vs. GPi ‘rematch’ studies support the conclusion that bilateral STN DBS may not be the best option for every Parkinson’s disease surgical patient. Off period motor symptoms and tremor improve in both targets, and with either unilateral or bilateral stimulation. Advantages of the STN target include more medication reduction, less frequent battery changes, and a more favorable economic profile. Advantages of GPi include more robust dyskinesia suppression, easier programming, and greater flexibility in adjusting medications. In cases where unilateral stimulation is anticipated, the data favor GPi DBS. This review summarizes the accumulated evidence regarding the use of bilateral vs. unilateral DBS and the selection of STN vs. GPi DBS, including definite and possible advantages of different targets and approaches. Based on this evidence, a more patient-tailored, symptom specific

  19. Towards Automated Three-Dimensional Tracking of Nephrons through Stacked Histological Image Sets

    PubMed Central

    Bhikha, Charita; Andreasen, Arne; Christensen, Erik I.; Letts, Robyn F. R.; Pantanowitz, Adam; Rubin, David M.; Thomsen, Jesper S.; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    An automated approach for tracking individual nephrons through three-dimensional histological image sets of mouse and rat kidneys is presented. In a previous study, the available images were tracked manually through the image sets in order to explore renal microarchitecture. The purpose of the current research is to reduce the time and effort required to manually trace nephrons by creating an automated, intelligent system as a standard tool for such datasets. The algorithm is robust enough to isolate closely packed nephrons and track their convoluted paths despite a number of nonideal, interfering conditions such as local image distortions, artefacts, and interstitial tissue interference. The system comprises image preprocessing, feature extraction, and a custom graph-based tracking algorithm, which is validated by a rule base and a machine learning algorithm. A study of a selection of automatically tracked nephrons, when compared with manual tracking, yields a 95% tracking accuracy for structures in the cortex, while those in the medulla have lower accuracy due to narrower diameter and higher density. Limited manual intervention is introduced to improve tracking, enabling full nephron paths to be obtained with an average of 17 manual corrections per mouse nephron and 58 manual corrections per rat nephron. PMID:26170896

  20. Prorenin receptor is critical for nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Kidd, Laura; Bushnell, Daniel; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M; Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2016-01-15

    Deficient nephrogenesis is the major factor contributing to renal hypoplasia defined as abnormally small kidneys. Nephron induction during kidney development is driven by reciprocal interactions between progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme (CM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The prorenin receptor (PRR) is a receptor for renin and prorenin, and an accessory subunit of the vacuolar proton pump H(+)-ATPase. Global loss of PRR is lethal in mice and PRR mutations are associated with a high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and X-linked mental retardation in humans. To circumvent lethality of the ubiquitous PRR mutation in mice and to determine the potential role of the PRR in nephrogenesis, we generated a mouse model with a conditional deletion of the PRR in Six2(+) nephron progenitors and their epithelial derivatives (Six2(PRR-/-)). Targeted ablation of PRR in Six2(+) nephron progenitors caused a marked decrease in the number of developing nephrons, small cystic kidneys and podocyte foot process effacement at birth, and early postnatal death. Reduced congenital nephron endowment resulted from premature depletion of nephron progenitor cell population due to impaired progenitor cell proliferation and loss of normal molecular inductive response to canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling within the metanephric mesenchyme. At 2 months of age, heterozygous Six2(PRR+/-) mice exhibited focal glomerulosclerosis, decreased kidney function and massive proteinuria. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a cell-autonomous requirement for the PRR within nephron progenitors for progenitor maintenance, progression of nephrogenesis, normal kidney development and function.

  1. Simulating calcium salt precipitation in the nephron using chemical speciation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Allen L; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez; Jackson, Graham; Tiselius, Hans-Göran

    2011-08-01

    Theoretical modeling of urinary crystallization processes affords opportunities to create and investigate scenarios which would be extremely difficult or impossible to achieve in in vivo experiments. Researchers have previously hypothesized that calcium renal stone formation commences in the nephron. In the present study, concentrations of urinary components and pH ranges in different regions of the nephron were estimated from concentrations in blood combined with a knowledge of the renal handling of individual ions. These were used in the chemical speciation program JESS to determine the nature of the solution complexes in the different regions of the nephron and the saturation index (SI) of the stone-forming salts calcium oxalate (CaOx), brushite (Bru), hydroxyapatite (HAP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP). The effect of independent precipitation of each of the latter on the SI values of other salts was also investigated. HAP was the only salt which was supersaturated throughout the nephron. All of the other salts were supersaturated only in the middle and distal regions of the collecting duct. Supersaturations were pH sensitive. When precipitation of CaOx, Bru and OCP was simulated in the distal part of the collecting duct, little or no effect on the SI values of the other stone forming salts was observed. However, simulation of HAP precipitation caused all other salts to become unsaturated. This suggests that if HAP precipitates, a pure stone comprising this component will ensue while if any of the other salts precipitates, a mixed CaOx/CaP stone will be formed. Application of Ostwald's Rule of Stages predicts that the mixed stone is likely to be CaOx and Bru. Our modelling demonstrates that precipitation of stone-forming salts in the nephron is highly dependent on the delicate nature of the chemical equilibria which prevail and which are themselves highly dependent on pH and component concentrations.

  2. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF SEATTLE PM 2.5 USING STN ORGANIC CARBON PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the Source Apportionment of Seattle PM2.5 Using STN Organic Carbon Peaks study will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annual Conference in Austin, Texas (Oct 17 - 21, 2005). Receptor modeling results from Seattle us...

  3. Brittle Dyskinesia Following STN but not GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Ashok; Foote, Kelly D.; Oyama, Genko; Kwak, Joshua; Zeilman, Pam R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of difficult to manage dyskinesia associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). A small subset of STN DBS patients experience troublesome dyskinesia despite optimal programming and medication adjustments. This group of patients has been referred to by some practitioners as brittle STN DBS-induced dyskinesia, drawing on comparisons with brittle diabetics experiencing severe blood sugar regulation issues and on a single description by McLellan in 1982. We sought to describe, and also to investigate how often the “brittle” phenomenon occurs in a relatively large DBS practice. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved patient database was reviewed, and all STN and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS patients who had surgery at the University of Florida from July 2002 to July 2012 were extracted for analysis. Results There were 179 total STN DBS patients and, of those, four STN DBS (2.2%) cases were identified as having dyskinesia that could not be managed without the induction of an “off state,” or by the precipitation of a severe dyskinesia despite vigorous stimulation and medication adjustments. Of 75 GPi DBS cases reviewed, none (0%) was identified as having brittle dyskinesia. One STN DBS patient was successfully rescued by bilateral GPi DBS. Discussion Understanding the potential risk factors for postoperative troublesome and brittle dyskinesia may have an impact on the initial surgical target selection (STN vs. GPI) in DBS therapy. Rescue GPi DBS therapy may be a viable treatment option, though more cases will be required to verify this observation. PMID:24932426

  4. Differential modulation of STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence by movement and levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, J; Özkurt, T E; Butz, M; Homburger, M; Elben, S; Hartmann, C J; Vesper, J; Wojtecki, L; Schnitzler, A

    2013-03-01

    Previous research suggests that oscillatory coupling between cortex, basal ganglia and muscles plays an important role in motor behavior. Furthermore, there is evidence that oscillatory coupling is altered in patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we performed simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG), local field potential (LFP) and electromyogram (EMG) recordings in PD patients selected for therapeutic subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. Patients were recorded (i) after withdrawal of anti-parkinsonian medication (OFF) and (ii) after levodopa administration (ON). We analyzed STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence during static forearm contraction and repetitive hand movement in order to evaluate modulations of coherence by movement and medication. Based on previous results from studies investigating resting state coherence in PD patients, we selected primary motor cortex (M1) and superior temporal gyrus (STG) as regions of interest. We found beta coherence between M1 and STN to be suppressed by administration of levodopa. M1-muscular coherence was strongly reduced in the alpha and beta band during repetitive movement compared to static contraction, but was unaffected by administration of levodopa. Strong STG-STN but not STG-muscular coherence could be observed in the alpha band. Coherence with STG was modulated neither by movement nor by medication. Finally, we found both M1-STN and M1-muscular beta coherence to be negatively correlated with UPDRS akinesia and rigidity sub-scores in the OFF state. The present study provides new insights into the functional roles of STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence and their relationship to PD symptoms. The results indicate that STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coupling are correlated, but can be modulated independently. Moreover, they show differences in their frequency-specific topography. We conclude that they represent partly independent sub-loops within the motor

  5. Analysis of Nephron Composition and Function in the Adult Zebrafish Kidney

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish model has emerged as a relevant system to study kidney development, regeneration and disease. Both the embryonic and adult zebrafish kidneys are composed of functional units known as nephrons, which are highly conserved with other vertebrates, including mammals. Research in zebrafish has recently demonstrated that two distinctive phenomena transpire after adult nephrons incur damage: first, there is robust regeneration within existing nephrons that replaces the destroyed tubule epithelial cells; second, entirely new nephrons are produced from renal progenitors in a process known as neonephrogenesis. In contrast, humans and other mammals seem to have only a limited ability for nephron epithelial regeneration. To date, the mechanisms responsible for these kidney regeneration phenomena remain poorly understood. Since adult zebrafish kidneys undergo both nephron epithelial regeneration and neonephrogenesis, they provide an outstanding experimental paradigm to study these events. Further, there is a wide range of genetic and pharmacological tools available in the zebrafish model that can be used to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate renal regeneration. One essential aspect of such research is the evaluation of nephron structure and function. This protocol describes a set of labeling techniques that can be used to gauge renal composition and test nephron functionality in the adult zebrafish kidney. Thus, these methods are widely applicable to the future phenotypic characterization of adult zebrafish kidney injury paradigms, which include but are not limited to, nephrotoxicant exposure regimes or genetic methods of targeted cell death such as the nitroreductase mediated cell ablation technique. Further, these methods could be used to study genetic perturbations in adult kidney formation and could also be applied to assess renal status during chronic disease modeling. PMID:25145398

  6. The Student Telescope Network (STN) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannahoe, Ryan M.; Stencel, Robert E.; Bisque, Steve; Rice, Mike

    2003-02-01

    support of this effort, and acknowleedge in-kind support from the estate of William Herschel Womble. Details at website www.du.edu/~rstencel/stn.htm.

  7. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-Frs2α signaling is critical for nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Valeria; Walker, Kenneth A; Bushnell, Daniel; Schaefer, Caitlin; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Puri, Pawan; Bates, Carlton M

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies using transgenic Pax3cre mice have revealed roles for fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) and Fgfr substrate 2α (Frs2α) signaling in early metanephric mesenchyme patterning and in ureteric morphogenesis. The role of Fgfr/Frs2α signaling in nephron progenitors is unknown. Thus, we generated mouse models using BAC transgenic Six2EGFPcre (Six2cre) mediated deletion of Fgfrs and/or Frs2α in nephron progenitors. Six2cre mediated deletion of Fgfr1 or Fgfr2 alone led to no obvious kidney defects. Six2creFgfr1(flox/flox)Fgfr2(flox/flox) (Fgfr1/2(NP-/-)) mice generate a discernable kidney; however, they develop nephron progenitor depletion starting at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and later demonstrate severe cystic dysplasia. To determine the role of Frs2α signaling downstream of Fgfr2 in Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) mice, we generated Six2cre(,)Fgfr1(flox/flox)Fgfr2(LR/LR) (Fgfr1(NP-/-)Fgfr2(LR/LR)) mice that have point mutations in the Frs2α binding site of Fgfr2. Like Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) mice, Fgfr1(NP-/-)Fgfr2(LR/LR) develop nephron progenitor depletion, but it does not start until E14.5 and older mice have less severe cystic dysplasia than Fgfr1/2(NP-/-) To determine the role of Frs2α alone in nephron progenitors, we generated Six2creFrs2'A(flox/flox) (Frs2a(NP-/-)) mice. Frs2a(NP-/-)mice also develop nephron progenitor depletion and renal cysts, although these occurred later and were less severe than in the other Six2cre mutant mice. The nephron progenitor loss in all Six2cre mutant lines was associated with decreased Cited1 expression and increased apoptosis versus controls. FAC-sorted nephron progenitors in Six2cre Frs2'A(flox/flox) mice demonstrated evidence of increased Notch activity versus controls, which likely drives the progenitor defects. Thus, Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 have synergistic roles in maintaining nephron progenitors; furthermore, Fgfr signaling in nephron progenitors appears to be mediated predominantly by Frs2α.

  9. Coordinated reset stimulation in a large-scale model of the STN-GPe circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Martin; Hauptmann, Christian; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of populations of neurons is a hallmark of several brain diseases. Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a model-based stimulation technique which specifically counteracts abnormal synchrony by desynchronization. Electrical CR stimulation, e.g., for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), is administered via depth electrodes. In order to get a deeper understanding of this technique, we extended the top-down approach of previous studies and constructed a large-scale computational model of the respective brain areas. Furthermore, we took into account the spatial anatomical properties of the simulated brain structures and incorporated a detailed numerical representation of 2 · 104 simulated neurons. We simulated the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus externus (GPe). Connections within the STN were governed by spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). In this way, we modeled the physiological and pathological activity of the considered brain structures. In particular, we investigated how plasticity could be exploited and how the model could be shifted from strongly synchronized (pathological) activity to strongly desynchronized (healthy) activity of the neuronal populations via CR stimulation of the STN neurons. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of specific stimulation parameters especially the electrode position on the stimulation outcome. Our model provides a step forward toward a biophysically realistic model of the brain areas relevant to the emergence of pathological neuronal activity in PD. Furthermore, our model constitutes a test bench for the optimization of both stimulation parameters and novel electrode geometries for efficient CR stimulation. PMID:25505882

  10. Comparative phosphoproteome profiling reveals a function of the STN8 kinase in fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow (CEF)

    PubMed Central

    Reiland, Sonja; Finazzi, Giovanni; Endler, Anne; Willig, Adrian; Baerenfaller, Katja; Grossmann, Jonas; Gerrits, Bertran; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rochaix, Jean-David; Baginsky, Sacha

    2011-01-01

    Important aspects of photosynthetic electron transport efficiency in chloroplasts are controlled by protein phosphorylation. Two thylakoid-associated kinases, STN7 and STN8, have distinct roles in short- and long-term photosynthetic acclimation to changes in light quality and quantity. Although some substrates of STN7 and STN8 are known, the complexity of this regulatory kinase system implies that currently unknown substrates connect photosynthetic performance with the regulation of metabolic and regulatory functions. We performed an unbiased phosphoproteome-wide screen with Arabidopsis WT and stn8 mutant plants to identify unique STN8 targets. The phosphorylation status of STN7 was not affected in stn8, indicating that kinases other than STN8 phosphorylate STN7 under standard growth conditions. Among several putative STN8 substrates, PGRL1-A is of particular importance because of its possible role in the modulation of cyclic electron transfer. The STN8 phosphorylation site on PGRL1-A is absent in both monocotyledonous plants and algae. In dicots, spectroscopic measurements with Arabidopsis WT, stn7, stn8, and stn7/stn8 double-mutant plants indicate a STN8-mediated slowing down of the transition from cyclic to linear electron flow at the onset of illumination. This finding suggests a possible link between protein phosphorylation by STN8 and fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow during this critical step of photosynthesis, when the carbon assimilation is not commensurate to the electron flow capacity of the chloroplast. PMID:21768351

  11. Nephron induction revisited: from caps to condensates.

    PubMed

    Sariola, Hannu

    2002-01-01

    Conversion of mesenchyme to epithelium in the metanephric kidney is clearly a multimolecular, multistep and partly redundant process. The present short review focuses on a neglected morphological aspect of kidney differentiation: the development of two transitory mesenchymal condensations that precede epithelial differentiation of nephrons. The first appearing condensate covers the tips of the collecting ducts and is termed a cap condensate. In the early kidney rudiment this structure has been referred to as a primary or early condensate. A few cells of the cap condensate (maybe only four to six cells), situated at the lateral edge of the cap, start proliferating rapidly and form a pretubular aggregate (or pretubular condensate), which converts to secretory nephron epithelia and finally segregates to different tubule segments. Throughout nephrogenesis, the cap condensates and pretubular aggregates are clearly distinguishable structures that show only partly overlapping gene expression profiles. Apart from being the source for the pretubular aggregates, the role of the cap condensate is unknown. It is now proposed that the cap regulates ureteric branching morphogenesis.

  12. FGF/EGF signaling regulates the renewal of early nephron progenitors during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aaron C; Adams, Derek; de Caestecker, Mark; Yang, Xuehui; Friesel, Robert; Oxburgh, Leif

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that nephron progenitor cells of the embryonic kidney are arranged in a series of compartments of an increasing state of differentiation. The earliest progenitor compartment, distinguished by expression of CITED1, possesses greater capacity for renewal and differentiation than later compartments. Signaling events governing progression of nephron progenitor cells through stages of increasing differentiation are poorly understood, and their elucidation will provide key insights into normal and dysregulated nephrogenesis, as well as into regenerative processes that follow kidney injury. In this study, we found that the mouse CITED1(+) progenitor compartment is maintained in response to receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ligands that activate both FGF and EGF receptors. This RTK signaling function is dependent on RAS and PI3K signaling but not ERK. In vivo, RAS inactivation by expression of sprouty 1 (Spry1) in CITED1(+) nephron progenitors results in loss of characteristic molecular marker expression and in increased death of progenitor cells. Lineage tracing shows that surviving Spry1-expressing progenitor cells are impaired in their subsequent epithelial differentiation, infrequently contributing to epithelial structures. These findings demonstrate that the survival and developmental potential of cells in the earliest embryonic nephron progenitor cell compartment are dependent on FGF/EGF signaling through RAS.

  13. Maintenance of very long telomeres by recombination in the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme telomeric turnover, telomeric circles, and concerted telomeric amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianing; McEachern, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Some cancers utilize the recombination-dependent process of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to maintain long heterogeneous telomeres. Here, we studied the recombinational telomere elongation (RTE) of the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant. We found that the total amount of the abundant telomeric DNA in stn1-M1 cells is subject to rapid variation and that it is likely to be primarily extrachromosomal. Rad50 and Rad51, known to be required for different RTE pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were not essential for the production of either long telomeres or telomeric circles in stn1-M1 cells. Circles of DNA containing telomeric repeats (t-circles) either present at the point of establishment of long telomeres or introduced later into stn1-M1 cells each led to the formation of long tandem arrays of the t-circle's sequence, which were incorporated at multiple telomeres. These tandem arrays were extraordinarily unstable and showed evidence of repeated rounds of concerted amplification. Our results suggest that the maintenance of telomeres in the stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme turnover of telomeric sequences from processes including both large deletions and the copying of t-circles.

  14. Comparison of weight changes following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS for advanced PD.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric M; Kurundkar, Ashish; Cutter, Gary R; Huang, He; Guthrie, Barton L; Watts, Ray L; Walker, Harrison C

    2011-09-01

    Unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) result in weight gain in the initial postoperative months, but little is known about the changes in weight following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS over longer time intervals. A case-control comparison evaluated weight changes over 2 years in 43 consecutive unilateral STN DBS patients, among whom 25 elected to undergo staged bilateral STN DBS, and 21 age-matched and disease severity matched PD controls without DBS. Regression analyses incorporating age, gender, and baseline weight in case or control were conducted to assess weight changes 2 years after the initial unilateral surgery. Unilateral STN DBS and staged bilateral STN DBS patients gained 3.9 ± 2.0 kg and 5.6 ± 2.1 kg versus their preoperative baseline weight (P < 0.001, respectively) while PD controls without DBS lost 0.8 ± 1.1 kg. Although bilateral STN DBS patients gained 1.7 kg more than unilateral STN DBS patients at 2 years, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.885). Although there was a trend toward greater weight gain in staged bilateral STN DBS patients versus unilateral patients, we found no evidence for an equivalent or synergistic increase in body weight following placement of the second DBS electrode.

  15. Repair after nephron ablation reveals limitations of neonatal neonephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tögel, Florian; Freedman, Benjamin S.; Iatrino, Rossella; Grinstein, Mor; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2017-01-01

    The neonatal mouse kidney retains nephron progenitor cells in a nephrogenic zone for 3 days after birth. We evaluated whether de novo nephrogenesis can be induced postnatally beyond 3 days. Given the long-term implications of nephron number for kidney health, it would be useful to enhance nephrogenesis in the neonate. We induced nephron reduction by cryoinjury with or without contralateral nephrectomy during the neonatal period or after 1 week of age. There was no detectable compensatory de novo nephrogenesis, as determined by glomerular counting and lineage tracing. Contralateral nephrectomy resulted in additional adaptive healing, with little or no fibrosis, but did not also stimulate de novo nephrogenesis. In contrast, injury initiated at 1 week of age led to healing with fibrosis. Thus, despite the presence of progenitor cells and ongoing nephron maturation in the newborn mouse kidney, de novo nephrogenesis is not inducible by acute nephron reduction. This indicates that additional nephron progenitors cannot be recruited after birth despite partial renal ablation providing a reparative stimulus and suggests that nephron number in the mouse is predetermined at birth. PMID:28138555

  16. Reduced nephron endowment due to fetal uninephrectomy impairs renal sodium handling in male sheep.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reetu R; Denton, Kate M; Bertram, John F; Jefferies, Andrew J; Moritz, Karen M

    2010-03-09

    Reduced nephron endowment is associated with development of renal and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized this may be attributable to impaired sodium homoeostasis by the remaining nephrons. The present study investigated whether a nephron deficit, induced by fetal uninephrectomy at 100 days gestation (term=150 days), resulted in (i) altered renal sodium handling both under basal conditions and in response to an acute 0.9% saline load (50 ml.kg-1 of body weight.30 min-1); (ii) hypertension and (iii) altered expression of renal channels/transporters in male sheep at 6 months of age. Uninephrectomized animals had significantly elevated arterial pressure (90.1+/-1.6 compared with 77.8+/-2.9 mmHg; P<0.001), while glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (per g of kidney weight) were 30% lower than that of the sham animals. Total kidney weight was similar between the groups. Renal gene expression of apical NHE3 (type 3 Na+/H+ exchanger), ENaC (epithelium Na+ channel) beta and gamma subunits and basolateral Na+/K+ ATPase beta and gamma subunits were significantly elevated in uninephrectomized animals, while ENaC alpha subunit expression was reduced. Urine flow rate and sodium excretion increased in both groups in response to salt loading, but this increase in sodium excretion was delayed by approximately 90 min in the uninephrectomized animals, while total sodium output was 12% in excess of the infused load (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study shows that animals with a congenital nephron deficit have alterations in tubular sodium channels/transporters and cannot rapidly correct for variations in sodium intake probably contributing to the development of hypertension. This suggests that people born with a nephron deficit should be monitored for early signs of renal and cardiovascular disease.

  17. Distinct effects of dopamine vs STN stimulation therapies in associative learning and retention in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne; Mollion, Hélène; Thobois, Stephane; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has been provided in Parkinson's disease patients of cognitive impairments including visual memory and learning which can be partially compensated by dopamine medication or subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The effects of these two therapies can differ according to the learning processes involving the dorsal vs ventral part of the striatum. Here we aimed to investigate and compare the outcomes of dopamine vs stimulation treatment in Parkinson patient's ability to acquire and maintain over successive days their performance in visual working memory. Parkinson patients performed conditional associative learning embedded in visual (spatial and non spatial) working memory tasks over two consecutive days either ON or OFF dopaminergic drugs or STN stimulation depending on the group of patients studied. While Parkinson patients were more accurate and faster in memory tasks ON vs OFF stimulation independent of the day of testing, performance in medicated patients differed depending on the medication status during the initial task acquisition. Patients who learnt the task ON medication the first day were able to maintain or even improve their memory performance both OFF and ON medication on the second day after consolidation. These effects were observed only in patients with dopamine replacement with or without motor fluctuations. This enhancement in memory performance after having learnt under dopamine medication and not under STN stimulation was mostly significant in visuo-spatial working memory tasks suggesting that dopamine replacement in the depleted dorsal striatum is essential for retention and consolidation of learnt skill.

  18. Improved laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery for renal cell carcinoma based on the precise anatomy of the nephron

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gang; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate a method of laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery (LNSS) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) based on the precise anatomy of the nephron, and to decrease the incidence of hemorrhage and urinary leakage. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 31 patients who presented to the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army (Beijing, China) were treated for RCC. The mean tumor size was 3.4±0.7 cm in diameter (range, 1.2–6.0 cm). During surgery, the renal artery was blocked, and subsequently, an incision in the renal capsule and renal cortex was performed, at 3–5 mm from the tumor edge. Subsequent to the incision of the renal parenchyma, scissors with blunt and sharp edge were used to separate the base of the tumor from the normal renal medulla, in the direction of the ray medullary in the renal pyramids. The basal blood vessels were incised following the hemostasis of the region using bipolar coagulation. The minor renal calyces were stripped carefully and the wound was closed with an absorbable sutures. The arterial occlusion time, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding volume, post-operative drainage volume, pathological results and complications were recorded. The surgery was successful for all patients. The estimated average intraoperative bleeding volume was 55.7 ml, the average surgical duration was 95.5 min, the average arterial occlusion time was 21.2 min, the average post-operative drainage volume was 92.3 ml and the average post-operative length of hospital stay was 6.1 days. No hemorrhage or urinary leakage was observed in the patients following the surgery. LNSS for RCC based on the precise anatomy of the nephron was concluded to be effective and feasible. The surgery is useful for the complete removal of tumors and guarantees a negative margin, which may also decrease the incidence of hemorrhage and urinary leakage following surgery. PMID:27895733

  19. The Fate of Nephrons in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy: Adult Recovery is Limited by Nephron Number Despite Early Release of Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sergio, Maria; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.; Forbes, Michael S.; Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary tract obstruction and reduced nephron number often occur together as a result of maldevelopment of kidneys and urinary tract. We wished to determine the role of nephron number on the adaptation of remaining nephrons of mice subjected to neonatal partial unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) and followed through adulthood. Materials and Methods Wild-type (WT) and Os/+ mice (with 50% fewer nephrons) were subjected to sham operation or partial UUO in the first 2 days of life. Additional mice underwent release of UUO at 7 days. All kidneys were harvested at 3 weeks (weaning) or 6 weeks (adulthood). Glomerular number and area, glomerulotubular junction integrity, proximal tubular volume fraction, and interstitial fibrosis were measured by histomorphometry. Results In the obstructed kidney, UUO caused additional nephron loss in Os/+ but not WT mice. Glomerular growth from 3 to 6 weeks was impaired by ipsilateral UUO and was not preserved by release in WT or Os/+. Proximal tubular growth was impaired and interstitial collagen was increased by ipsilateral UUO in all mice. These were attenuated by release of UUO in WT mice, but were not restored in Os/+ mice. UUO increased interstitial collagen in the contralateral kidney; release of UUO enhanced tubular growth and reduced interstitial collagen. Conclusions We conclude that UUO in early postnatal development impairs adaptation to reduced nephron number and induces additional nephron loss despite release of obstruction. Premature and low birth weight infants with congenital obstructive nephropathy are likely at increased risk for progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:25912494

  20. Compensatory stepping in Parkinson's disease is still a problem after deep brain stimulation randomized to STN or GPi

    PubMed Central

    St George, R. J.; Carlson-Kuhta, P.; King, L. A.; Burchiel, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. This study examined whether DBS randomized to the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 11) or globus pallidus interna (GPi; n = 10) improved compensatory stepping to recover balance after a perturbation. The standing surface translated backward, forcing subjects to take compensatory steps forward. Kinematic and kinetic responses were recorded. PD-DBS subjects were tested off and on their levodopa medication before bilateral DBS surgery and retested 6 mo later off and on DBS, combined with off and on levodopa medication. Responses were compared with PD-control subjects (n = 8) tested over the same timescale and 17 healthy control subjects. Neither DBS nor levodopa improved the stepping response. Compensatory stepping in the best-treated state after surgery (DBS+DOPA) was similar to the best-treated state before surgery (DOPA) for the PD-GPi group and the PD-control group. For the PD-STN group, there were more lateral weight shifts, a delayed foot-off, and a greater number of steps required to recover balance in DBS+DOPA after surgery compared with DOPA before surgery. Within the STN group five subjects who did not fall during the experiment before surgery fell at least once after surgery, whereas the number of falls in the GPi and PD-control groups were unchanged. DBS did not improve the compensatory step response needed to recover from balance perturbations in the GPi group and caused delays in the preparation phase of the step in the STN group. PMID:26108960

  1. Role of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Ahmad N; Karim, Omer

    2015-03-01

    This review examines studies of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and its emerging role and advantages in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a technology that combines the use of second-generation contrast agents consisting of microbubbles with existent ultrasound techniques. Until now, this novel technology has aided surgeons with procedures involving the liver. However, with recent advances in the CEUS technique and the introduction of robotics in nephron-sparing surgery, CEUS has proven to be efficacious in answering several clinical questions with respect to the kidneys. In addition, the introduction of the microbubble-based contrast agents has increased the image quality and signal uptake by the ultrasound probe. This has led to better, enhanced scanning of the macro and microvasculature of the kidneys, making CEUS a powerful diagnostic modality. This imaging method is capable of further lowering the learning curve and warm ischemia time (WIT) during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery, with its increased level of capillary perfusion and imaging. CEUS has the potential to increase the sensitivity and specificity of intra-operative images, and can significantly improve the outcome of robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery by increasing the precision and diagnostic insight of the surgeon. The purpose of this article is to review the practical and potential uses of CEUS as an intra-operative imaging technique during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

  2. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF SEATTLE PM 2.5: A COMPARISON OF IMPROVE AND ENHANCED STN DATA SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seattle, WA, STN and IMPROVE data sets with STN temperature resolved carbon peaks were analyzed with both the PMF and Unmix receptor models. In addition, the IMPROVE trace element data was combined with the major STN species to examine the role of IMPROVE metals. To compare the ...

  3. Stn1 is critical for telomere maintenance and long-term viability of somatic human cells

    PubMed Central

    Boccardi, Virginia; Razdan, Neetu; Kaplunov, Jessica; Mundra, Jyoti J; Kimura, Masayuki; Aviv, Abraham; Herbig, Utz

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of telomere maintenance pathways leads to accelerated entry into cellular senescence, a stable proliferative arrest that promotes aging-associated disorders in some mammals. The budding yeast CST complex, comprising Cdc13, Stn1, and Ctc1, is critical for telomere replication, length regulation, and end protection. Although mammalian homologues of CST have been identified recently, their role and function for telomere maintenance in normal somatic human cells are still incompletely understood. Here, we characterize the function of human Stn1 in cultured human fibroblasts and demonstrate its critical role in telomere replication, length regulation, and function. In the absence of high telomerase activity, shRNA-mediated knockdown of hStn1 resulted in aberrant and fragile telomeric structures, stochastic telomere attrition, increased telomere erosion rates, telomere dysfunction, and consequently accelerated entry into cellular senescence. Oxidative stress augmented the defects caused by Stn1 knockdown leading to almost immediate cessation of cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of hTERT suppressed some of the defects caused by hStn1 knockdown suggesting that telomerase can partially compensate for hStn1 loss. Our findings reveal a critical role for human Stn1 in telomere length maintenance and function, supporting the model that efficient replication of telomeric repeats is critical for long-term viability of normal somatic mammalian cells. PMID:25684230

  4. Stn1 is critical for telomere maintenance and long-term viability of somatic human cells.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Virginia; Razdan, Neetu; Kaplunov, Jessica; Mundra, Jyoti J; Kimura, Masayuki; Aviv, Abraham; Herbig, Utz

    2015-06-01

    Disruption of telomere maintenance pathways leads to accelerated entry into cellular senescence, a stable proliferative arrest that promotes aging-associated disorders in some mammals. The budding yeast CST complex, comprising Cdc13, Stn1, and Ctc1, is critical for telomere replication, length regulation, and end protection. Although mammalian homologues of CST have been identified recently, their role and function for telomere maintenance in normal somatic human cells are still incompletely understood. Here, we characterize the function of human Stn1 in cultured human fibroblasts and demonstrate its critical role in telomere replication, length regulation, and function. In the absence of high telomerase activity, shRNA-mediated knockdown of hStn1 resulted in aberrant and fragile telomeric structures, stochastic telomere attrition, increased telomere erosion rates, telomere dysfunction, and consequently accelerated entry into cellular senescence. Oxidative stress augmented the defects caused by Stn1 knockdown leading to almost immediate cessation of cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of hTERT suppressed some of the defects caused by hStn1 knockdown suggesting that telomerase can partially compensate for hStn1 loss. Our findings reveal a critical role for human Stn1 in telomere length maintenance and function, supporting the model that efficient replication of telomeric repeats is critical for long-term viability of normal somatic mammalian cells.

  5. High glucose promotes nascent nephron apoptosis via NF-kappaB and p53 pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chenier, Isabelle; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Tran, Stella; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2011-01-01

    A hyperglycemic environment in utero reduces kidney size and nephron number due to nascent nephron apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. The present study investigated whether the nascent nephron apoptosis promoted by high glucose is mediated via the transcription factor NF-κB and p53 signaling pathways. Neonatal mouse kidneys from the offspring of nondiabetic, diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic dams were used for in vivo studies, and MK4 cells, an embryonic metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cell line, were used for in vitro studies. Neonatal kidneys of the offspring of diabetic mothers exhibited an increased number of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, enhanced NF-κB activation, and nuclear translocation of its subunits (p50 and p65 subunits) as well as phosphorylation (Ser 15) of p53 compared with kidneys of offspring of nondiabetic mothers. Insulin treatment of diabetic dams normalized these parameters in the offspring. In vitro, high-glucose (25 mM) induced ROS generation and significantly increased MK4 cell apoptosis and caspase-3 activity via activation of NF-κB pathway, with p53 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation compared with normal glucose (5 mM). These changes in a high-glucose milieu were prevented by transient transfection of small interfering RNAs for dominant negative IκBα or IKK or p53. Our data demonstrate that high glucose-induced nascent nephron apoptosis is mediated, at least in part, via ROS generation and the activation of NF-κB and p53 pathways.

  6. Gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson disease: different or additive effects on gait induced by levodopa and chronic STN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lubik, S; Fogel, W; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; König, J; Jost, W H

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to observe the effects on gait parameters induced by STN stimulation and levodopa medication in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in order to determine different or additive effects. Therefore we examined 12 patients with advanced Parkinson disease after bilateral implantation of DBS into the STN. We assessed the motor score of the UPDRS and quantitative gait analysis under 4 treatment conditions: with and without stimulation as well as with and without levodopa. The mean improvement of the UPDRS motor score was almost the same with levodopa and DBS. Combining both therapies we saw a further improvement of the motor score. Gait parameters of patients with PD treated either with levodopa or STN stimulation were greatly improved. A significant difference between levodopa and STN stimulation could only be shown for the parameters velocity and step length. These parameters improved more with levodopa than with stimulation. The combination of both therapeutic methods showed the best results on the UPDRS motor score and gait parameters.

  7. Coupled CFD-PBE Predictions of Renal Stone Size Distributions in the Nephron in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Griffin, Elise; Thompson, David

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a deterministic model is developed to assess the risk of critical renal stone formation for astronauts during space travel. A Population Balance Equation (PBE) model is used to compute the size distribution of a population of nucleating, growing and agglomerating renal calculi as they are transported through different sections of the nephron. The PBE model is coupled to a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that solves for steady state flow of urine and transport of renal calculi along with the concentrations of ionic species, calcium and oxalate, in the nephron using an Eulerian two-phase mathematical framework. Parametric simulation are performed to study stone size enhancement and steady state volume fraction distributions in the four main sections of the nephron under weightlessness conditions. Contribution of agglomeration to the stone size distribution and effect of wall friction on the stone volume fraction distributions are carefully examined. Case studies using measured astronaut urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations in microgravity as input indicate that under nominal conditions the largest stone sizes developed in Space will be still considerably below the critical range for problematic stone development. However, results also indicate that the highest stone volume fraction occurs next to the tubule and duct walls. This suggests that there is an increased potential for wall adhesion with the possibility of evolution towards critical stone sizes.

  8. A molecular map of G protein alpha chains in microdissected rat nephron segments.

    PubMed Central

    Senkfor, S I; Johnson, G L; Berl, T

    1993-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanine nucleotide binding proteins regulate many receptor-mediated signals. Heterogeneity of biochemical and functional properties in nephron segments could be due to differences in G protein expression. To ascertain whether such heterogeneity of G proteins is present in various nephron segments, this study examines the distribution and relative abundance of G protein alpha chains in microdissected medullary thick ascending limb, cortical collecting tubules, outer medullary collecting tubules, proximal inner medullary tubules, and distal inner medullary tubules. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions were employed using oligonucleotides encoding highly conserved regions of all known alpha chains. The cDNA was sequenced for alpha chain identification. The alpha i2 versus alpha s distribution was different in the outer medullary collecting tubules, when compared with the medullary thick ascending limb (P < 0.001) or the cortical collecting tubule, the proximal inner medullary tubules, and the distal inner medullary tubules (P < 0.05). These latter four segments did not significantly differ from each other. A similar analysis was applied to the frequently used line of kidney cells, LLC-PK1, whose exact cellular origin remains unclear. Interestingly, we detected both alpha i2 and alpha i3, while only alpha i2 was detected in the rat distal nephron. No alpha o or alpha z reverse transcription PCR products were detected. In contrast alpha 11 and alpha 14 members of the more recently described alpha q family were detected in the outer medullary collecting tubules and the proximal inner medullary tubules, respectively. We conclude that the majority of nephron segments have a relatively constant distribution of G protein alpha chains. Images PMID:8349818

  9. Progression of renal fibrosis in congenital CKD model rats with reduced number of nephrons.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2017-02-06

    A congenital reduction in the number of nephrons is a critical risk factor for both onset of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and show progressive CKD. This study used an immunohistological method to assess glomerular and interstitial pathogenesis in male HPK rats aged 35-210days. CD68 positive-macrophages were found to infiltrate into glomeruli in HPK rats aged 35 and 70days and to infiltrate into interstitial tissue in rats aged 140 and 210days. HPK rats aged 35 and 70days showed glomerular hypertrophy, loss of normal linear immunostaining of podocine, and increased expression of PDGFr-β, TGF-β, collagens, and fibronectin, with all of these alterations gradually deteriorating with age. α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts were rarely detected in glomerular tufts, whereas α-SMA-positive glomerular parietal epithelium (GPE) cells were frequently observed along Bowman's capsular walls. The numbers of PDGFr-β-positive fibroblasts in interstitial tissue were increased in rats aged 35days and older, whereas interstitial fibrosis, characterized by the increased expression of tubular PDGF-BB, the appearance of myofibroblasts doubly positive for PDGFr-β and α-SMA, and increased expression of collagens and fibronectin, were observed in rats aged 70 and older. These results clearly indicate that congenital CKD with only 20% of nephrons cause renal fibrosis in rats.

  10. Localization of connexin 30 in the luminal membrane of cells in the distal nephron.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Fiona; Chambrey, Régine; Eladari, Dominique; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2005-12-01

    Several isoforms of the gap junction protein connexin (Cx) have been identified in a variety of tissues that communicate intercellular signals between adjacent cells. In the kidney, Cx37, Cx40, and Cx43 are localized in the vasculature, glomerulus, and tubular segments in a punctuate pattern, typical of classic gap junction channels. We performed immunohistochemistry in the mouse, rat, and rabbit kidney to study the localization of Cx30 protein, a new member of the Cx family. The vasculature, glomerulus, and proximal nephron segments were devoid of staining in all three species. Unexpectedly, Cx30 was found throughout the luminal membrane of select cells in the distal nephron. Expression of Cx30 was highest in the rat, which also showed some diffuse cytosolic labeling, continuous from the medullary thick ascending limb to the collecting duct system, and with the highest level in the distal convoluted tubule. Labeling in the mouse and rabbit was much less, limited to intercalated cells in the connecting segment and cortical collecting duct, where the apical signal was particularly strong. A high-salt-containing diet and culture medium upregulated Cx30 expression in the rat inner medulla and in M1 cells, respectively. The distinct, continuous labeling of the luminal plasma membrane and upregulation by high salt suggest that Cx30 may function as a hemichannel involved in the regulation of salt reabsorption in the distal nephron.

  11. Direct Isolation and Characterization of Human Nephron Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Da Sacco, Stefano; Thornton, Matthew E; Petrosyan, Astgik; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Grubbs, Brendan H; De Filippo, Roger E; Perin, Laura

    2016-09-09

    : Mature nephrons originate from a small population of uninduced nephrogenic progenitor cells (NPs) within the cap mesenchyme. These cells are characterized by the coexpression of SIX2 and CITED1. Many studies on mouse models as well as on human pluripotent stem cells have advanced our knowledge of NPs, but very little is known about this population in humans, since it is exhausted before birth and strategies for its direct isolation are still limited. Here we report an efficient protocol for direct isolation of human NPs without genetic manipulation or stepwise induction procedures. With the use of RNA-labeling probes, we isolated SIX2(+)CITED1(+) cells from human fetal kidney for the first time. We confirmed their nephrogenic state by gene profiling and evaluated their nephrogenic capabilities in giving rise to mature renal cells. We also evaluated the ability to culture these cells without complete loss of SIX2 and CITED1 expression over time. In addition to defining the gene profile of human NPs, this in vitro system facilitates studies of human renal development and provides a novel tool for renal regeneration and bioengineering purposes.

  12. Augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by both the proximal and distal nephron maintains chloride-deplete metabolic alkalosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, D E

    1989-01-01

    Whether augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by renal tubular epithelium contributes to the maintenance of chloride-deplete metabolic alkalosis is not clear. This study used free-flow micropuncture to investigate bicarbonate reabsorption by surface nephron segments in a rat model of diuretic-induced alkalosis compared to control. The proximal and distal nephron of the alkalotic animals had higher values for both delivered load to and absolute reabsorption from these segments. The proximal tubules of alkalotic and control animals had similar values for the slopes of the linear regression of delivered load vs. reabsorption and for the bicarbonate tubular fluid to plasma (TF/P) ratio at the late proximal tubule. By contrast, the corresponding analysis for the distal segment of alkalotic animals revealed a greater slope (0.98 vs. 0.81, P less than 0.003) and a smaller bicarbonate TF/P ratio at the late distal tubule (0.10 vs. 0.16, P less than 0.006). The data indicate that augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by both the proximal and distal nephron contributes to maintaining the alkalosis of this model. The data suggest primary stimulation of bicarbonate reabsorption in the distal nephron and load-dependent reabsorption in the proximal tubule. PMID:2808701

  13. Development of a Manipulative for Nephron Physiology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giffen, Zane C.; Carvalho, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Some physiological concepts, such as physiology of filtration and absorption in the different nephron segments, are so detailed that they can be a challenge to be memorized. This article describes an exercise that solidifies learning as students manipulate, using paper models, "transporters" and "electrolytes" in the…

  14. Articulatory Changes in Vowel Production following STN DBS and Levodopa Intake in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martel Sauvageau, Vincent; Roy, Johanna-Pascale; Cantin, Léo; Prud'Homme, Michel; Langlois, Mélanie; Macoir, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) and levodopa intake on vowel articulation in dysarthric speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Vowel articulation was assessed in seven Quebec French speakers diagnosed with idiopathic PD who underwent STN DBS. Assessments were conducted on- and off-medication, first prior to surgery and then 1 year later. All recordings were made on-stimulation. Vowel articulation was measured using acoustic vowel space and formant centralization ratio. Results. Compared to the period before surgery, vowel articulation was reduced after surgery when patients were off-medication, while it was better on-medication. The impact of levodopa intake on vowel articulation changed with STN DBS: before surgery, levodopa impaired articulation, while it no longer had a negative effect after surgery. Conclusions. These results indicate that while STN DBS could lead to a direct deterioration in articulation, it may indirectly improve it by reducing the levodopa dose required to manage motor symptoms. These findings suggest that, with respect to speech production, STN DBS and levodopa intake cannot be investigated separately because the two are intrinsically linked. Along with motor symptoms, speech production should be considered when optimizing therapeutic management of patients with PD. PMID:26558134

  15. Mutations in STN1 cause Coats plus syndrome and are associated with genomic and telomere defects.

    PubMed

    Simon, Amos J; Lev, Atar; Zhang, Yong; Weiss, Batia; Rylova, Anna; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Barel, Ortal; Cesarkas, Keren; Soudack, Michalle; Greenberg-Kushnir, Noa; Rhodes, Michele; Wiest, David L; Schiby, Ginette; Barshack, Iris; Katz, Shulamit; Pras, Elon; Poran, Hana; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Ribakovsky, Elena; Simon, Carlos; Hazou, Wadi; Sidi, Yechezkel; Lahad, Avishay; Katzir, Hagar; Sagie, Shira; Aqeilan, Haifa A; Glousker, Galina; Amariglio, Ninette; Tzfati, Yehuda; Selig, Sara; Rechavi, Gideon; Somech, Raz

    2016-07-25

    The analysis of individuals with telomere defects may shed light on the delicate interplay of factors controlling genome stability, premature aging, and cancer. We herein describe two Coats plus patients with telomere and genomic defects; both harbor distinct, novel mutations in STN1, a member of the human CTC1-STN1-TEN1 (CST) complex, thus linking this gene for the first time to a human telomeropathy. We characterized the patients' phenotype, recapitulated it in a zebrafish model and rescued cellular and clinical aspects by the ectopic expression of wild-type STN1 or by thalidomide treatment. Interestingly, a significant lengthy control of the gastrointestinal bleeding in one of our patients was achieved by thalidomide treatment, exemplifying a successful bed-to-bench-and-back approach.

  16. Mutations in STN1 cause Coats plus syndrome and are associated with genomic and telomere defects

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Amos J.; Lev, Atar; Zhang, Yong; Weiss, Batia; Rylova, Anna; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Cesarkas, Keren; Rhodes, Michele; Schiby, Ginette; Barshack, Iris; Katz, Shulamit; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Ribakovsky, Elena; Simon, Carlos; Hazou, Wadi; Katzir, Hagar; Sagie, Shira; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with telomere defects may shed light on the delicate interplay of factors controlling genome stability, premature aging, and cancer. We herein describe two Coats plus patients with telomere and genomic defects; both harbor distinct, novel mutations in STN1, a member of the human CTC1–STN1–TEN1 (CST) complex, thus linking this gene for the first time to a human telomeropathy. We characterized the patients’ phenotype, recapitulated it in a zebrafish model and rescued cellular and clinical aspects by the ectopic expression of wild-type STN1 or by thalidomide treatment. Interestingly, a significant lengthy control of the gastrointestinal bleeding in one of our patients was achieved by thalidomide treatment, exemplifying a successful bed-to-bench-and-back approach. PMID:27432940

  17. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  18. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  19. Activation of the Stt7/STN7 Kinase through Dynamic Interactions with the Cytochrome b6f Complex1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shapiguzov, Alexey; Chai, Xin; Fucile, Geoffrey; Longoni, Paolo; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have the ability to adapt to changes in light quality by readjusting the cross sections of the light-harvesting systems of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI). This process, called state transitions, maintains the redox poise of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain and ensures a high photosynthetic yield when light is limiting. It is mediated by the Stt7/STN7 protein kinase, which is activated through the cytochrome b6f complex upon reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Its probable major substrate, the light-harvesting complex of PSII, once phosphorylated, dissociates from PSII and docks to PSI, thereby restoring the balance of absorbed light excitation energy between the two photosystems. Although the kinase is known to be inactivated under high-light intensities, the molecular mechanisms governing its regulation remain unknown. In this study we monitored the redox state of a conserved and essential Cys pair of the Stt7/STN7 kinase and show that it forms a disulfide bridge. We could not detect any change in the redox state of these Cys during state transitions and high-light treatment. It is only after prolonged anaerobiosis that this disulfide bridge is reduced. It is likely to be mainly intramolecular, although kinase activation may involve a transient covalently linked kinase dimer with two intermolecular disulfide bonds. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have mapped one interaction site of the kinase on the Rieske protein of the cytochrome b6f complex. PMID:26941194

  20. Nephron Deficiency and Predisposition to Renal Injury in a Novel One-Kidney Genetic Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexiang; Johnson, Ashley C; Williams, Jan M; White, Tiffani; Chade, Alejandro R; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruisheng; Roman, Richard J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kyle, Patrick B; Solberg-Woods, Leah; Garrett, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have reported up to 40% of patients born with a single kidney develop hypertension, proteinuria, and in some cases renal failure. The increased susceptibility to renal injury may be due, in part, to reduced nephron numbers. Notably, children who undergo nephrectomy or adults who serve as kidney donors exhibit little difference in renal function compared with persons who have two kidneys. However, the difference in risk between being born with a single kidney versus being born with two kidneys and then undergoing nephrectomy are unclear. Animal models used previously to investigate this question are not ideal because they require invasive methods to model congenital solitary kidney. In this study, we describe a new genetic animal model, the heterogeneous stock-derived model of unilateral renal agenesis (HSRA) rat, which demonstrates 50%-75% spontaneous incidence of a single kidney. The HSRA model is characterized by reduced nephron number (more than would be expected by loss of one kidney), early kidney/glomerular hypertrophy, and progressive renal injury, which culminates in reduced renal function. Long-term studies of temporal relationships among BP, renal hemodynamics, and renal function demonstrate that spontaneous single-kidney HSRA rats are more likely than uninephrectomized normal littermates to exhibit renal impairment because of the combination of reduced nephron numbers and prolonged exposure to renal compensatory mechanisms (i.e., hyperfiltration). Future studies with this novel animal model may provide additional insight into the genetic contributions to kidney development and agenesis and the factors influencing susceptibility to renal injury in individuals with congenital solitary kidney.

  1. Using STN DBS and medication reduction as a strategy to treat pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bandini, Fabio; Primavera, Alberto; Pizzorno, Matteo; Cocito, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    We describe two patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who developed clinical criteria of pathological gambling addiction in the setting of increased dopamine replacement therapy (levodopa and dopamine agonist medications). The second patient showed also signs of dopamine dysregulation syndrome, with an addiction to dopaminergic medication. Neither patients responded to the standard therapy for gambling behavior, but dramatically improved after bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) and early postoperative withdrawal of dopaminergic therapy. The possible therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on such a disabling behavior needs to be investigated prospectively.

  2. [Laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery for Wilms tumor: description of two cases].

    PubMed

    López, L; Copete, M; Villamizar, P

    2016-01-25

    Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for Wilms tumor. The research progress of the large study groups worldwide has reduced mortality. However, searching to minimize morbidity, the minimally invasive approach has been applied in selected patients. This article describes two cases of Wilms tumor managed with laparoscopic nephron sparing surgery. The case 1 with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and bilateral disease, and the case 2 non-syndromic unilateral. The approach was intraperitoneally, without intraoperative complications. The follow-up to 18 months (case 1) and six months (case 2) did not have recurrence or metastatic disease.

  3. Morphology and histochemistry of juvenile American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nephrons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Hyndman, Kelly A; Cox, Ashley; Lawler, Ashley; Mathavan, Ketan; Guillette, Louis J

    2009-10-01

    Here we present a detailed morphological description of the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) kidney and nephron. We present a series of histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical markers that clearly define the seven regions of the alligator nephron. The alligator kidney is composed of many paired (mirrored) lobules on each kidney (lobe). Single nephrons span the width of lobules three times. The fine structure of glomeruli, lying in rows spanning the height of the lobule, is resolved by periodic acid methionine silver (PAMS) and periodic acid Schiff's (PAS) histochemistry. Glomeruli are connected to the proximal tubule (PT) via a neck segment. The PT is alcian blue-negative, making it distinct from the distal tubule (DT), connecting segment (CS), and collecting duct (CD). The PT is clearly identifiable by a PAS-positive brush border membrane. The PT is connected to the DT via an intermediate segment (IS) that makes a 180 degrees turn to connect these tubules. PAMS-positive material is found in the lumens of the PT, IS, and DT. Also, PAMS-positive granules are found in the DT, CS, and CD. Immunolocalization of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase to the basolateral membrane of the DT, CS, and CD suggests a role of this enzyme in driving primary and secondary transport processes in these segments, including bicarbonate transport into the lumen of the DT (leading to an alkaline urine). Through the techniques described here, we have identified a series of distinct markers to be used by pathologists, veterinarians, and researchers to easily identify alligator nephron segments. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Role of STN1 and DNA Polymerase α in Telomere Stability and Genome-Wide Replication in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Derboven, Elisa; Ekker, Heinz; Kusenda, Branislav; Bulankova, Petra; Riha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    The CST (Cdc13/CTC1-STN1-TEN1) complex was proposed to have evolved kingdom specific roles in telomere capping and replication. To shed light on its evolutionary conserved function, we examined the effect of STN1 dysfunction on telomere structure in plants. STN1 inactivation in Arabidopsis leads to a progressive loss of telomeric DNA and the onset of telomeric defects depends on the initial telomere size. While EXO1 aggravates defects associated with STN1 dysfunction, it does not contribute to the formation of long G-overhangs. Instead, these G-overhangs arise, at least partially, from telomerase-mediated telomere extension indicating a deficiency in C-strand fill-in synthesis. Analysis of hypomorphic DNA polymerase α mutants revealed that the impaired function of a general replication factor mimics the telomeric defects associated with CST dysfunction. Furthermore, we show that STN1-deficiency hinders re-replication of heterochromatic regions to a similar extent as polymerase α mutations. This comparative analysis of stn1 and pol α mutants suggests that STN1 plays a genome-wide role in DNA replication and that chromosome-end deprotection in stn1 mutants may represent a manifestation of aberrant replication through telomeres. PMID:25299252

  5. A Shunt Model of the Inner Medullary Nephron with Pre-Bend Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, M. T.; Hegarty, A. F.; Thomas, S. R.

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of the renal medulla face the problem of representing water and solute transfer among tens of thousands of nephrons and blood vessels of various lengths, arranged in countercurrent fashion. Published models fall into two broad categories with respect to this issue: multi-nephron models, which explicitly represent a large number of individual nephrons, or lumped models with virtual shunts that represent the turning back of nephrons and vessels at varying depths. Shunt models have the advantage of a compact description and relatively rapid execution time but are ill-suited to faithfully represent features such as prebend transitions of epithelial permeabilities in nephrons of different lengths. A new shunt model approach that can accommodate pre-bend transitions of nephrons at all medullary depths is presented in this work together with the results of simulation of predicted flows and concentrations.

  6. Unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 permit the distal nephron to modulate potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Terker, Andrew S; Zhang, Chong; Erspamer, Kayla J; Gamba, Gerardo; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2016-01-01

    Dietary potassium deficiency activates thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransport along the distal nephron. This may explain, in part, the hypertension and cardiovascular mortality observed in individuals who consume a low-potassium diet. Recent data suggest that plasma potassium affects the distal nephron directly by influencing intracellular chloride, an inhibitor of the with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)-Ste20p-related proline- and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) pathway. As previous studies used extreme dietary manipulations, we sought to determine whether the relationship between potassium and NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is physiologically relevant and clarify the mechanisms involved. We report that modest changes in both dietary and plasma potassium affect NCC in vivo. Kinase assay studies showed that chloride inhibits WNK4 kinase activity at lower concentrations than it inhibits activity of WNK1 or WNK3. Also, chloride inhibited WNK4 within the range of distal cell chloride concentration. Mutation of a previously identified WNK chloride-binding motif converted WNK4 effects on SPAK from inhibitory to stimulatory in mammalian cells. Disruption of this motif in WNKs 1, 3, and 4 had different effects on NCC, consistent with the three WNKs having different chloride sensitivities. Thus, potassium effects on NCC are graded within the physiological range, which explains how unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 enable it to mediate effects of potassium on NCC in vivo.

  7. Insulin activates single amiloride-blockable Na channels in a distal nephron cell line (A6).

    PubMed

    Marunaka, Y; Hagiwara, N; Tohda, H

    1992-09-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effect of insulin on an amiloride-blockable Na channel in the apical membrane of a distal nephron cell line (A6) cultured on permeable collagen films for 10-14 days. NPo (N, number of channels per patch membrane; Po, average value of open probability of individual channels in the patch) under baseline conditions was 0.88 +/- 0.12 (SE)(n = 17). After making cell-attached patches on the apical membrane which contained Na channels, insulin (1 mU/ml) was applied to the serosal bath. While maintaining the cell-attached patch, NPo significantly increased to 1.48 +/- 0.19 (n = 17; P less than 0.001) after 5-10 min of insulin application. The open probability of Na channels was 0.39 +/- 0.01 (n = 38) under baseline condition, and increased to 0.66 +/- 0.03 (n = 38, P less than 0.001) after addition of insulin. The baseline single-channel conductance was 4pS, and neither the single-channel conductance nor the current-voltage relationship was significantly changed by insulin. These results indicate that insulin increases Na absorption in the distal nephron by increasing the open probability of the amiloride-blockable Na channel.

  8. STN area detection using K-NN classifiers for MER recordings in Parkinson patients during neurostimulator implant surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiaffino, L.; Rosado Muñoz, A.; Guerrero Martínez, J.; Francés Villora, J.; Gutiérrez, A.; Martínez Torres, I.; Kohan, y. D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) applies electric pulses into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improving tremor and other symptoms associated to Parkinson’s disease. Accurate STN detection for proper location and implant of the stimulating electrodes is a complex task and surgeons are not always certain about final location. Signals from the STN acquired during DBS surgery are obtained with microelectrodes, having specific characteristics differing from other brain areas. Using supervised learning, a trained model based on previous microelectrode recordings (MER) can be obtained, being able to successfully classify the STN area for new MER signals. The K Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) algorithm has been successfully applied to STN detection. However, the use of the fuzzy form of the K-NN algorithm (KNN-F) has not been reported. This work compares the STN detection algorithm of K-NN and KNN-F. Real MER recordings from eight patients where previously classified by neurophysiologists, defining 15 features. Sensitivity and specificity for the classifiers are obtained, Wilcoxon signed rank non-parametric test is used as statistical hypothesis validation. We conclude that the performance of KNN-F classifier is higher than K-NN with p<0.01 in STN specificity.

  9. Dissecting Stages of Human Kidney Development and Tumorigenesis with Surface Markers Affords Simple Prospective Purification of Nephron Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Pleniceanu, Oren; Gershon, Rotem; Shukrun, Rachel; Kanter, Itamar; Bucris, Efrat; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Tam, Gal; Tam, Hadar; Caspi, Revital; Pri-Chen, Sara; Vax, Einav; Katz, Guy; Omer, Dorit; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    When assembling a nephron during development a multipotent stem cell pool becomes restricted as differentiation ensues. A faulty differentiation arrest in this process leads to transformation and initiation of a Wilms’ tumor. Mapping these transitions with respective surface markers affords accessibility to specific cell subpopulations. NCAM1 and CD133 have been previously suggested to mark human renal progenitor populations. Herein, using cell sorting, RNA sequencing, in vitro studies with serum-free media and in vivo xenotransplantation we demonstrate a sequential map that links human kidney development and tumorigenesis; In nephrogenesis, NCAM1+CD133− marks SIX2+ multipotent renal stem cells transiting to NCAM1+CD133+ differentiating segment-specific SIX2− epithelial progenitors and NCAM1−CD133+ differentiated nephron cells. In tumorigenesis, NCAM1+CD133− marks SIX2+ blastema that includes the ALDH1+ WT cancer stem/initiating cells, while NCAM1+CD133+ and NCAM1−CD133+ specifying early and late epithelial differentiation, are severely restricted in tumor initiation capacity and tumor self-renewal. Thus, negative selection for CD133 is required for defining NCAM1+ nephron stem cells in normal and malignant nephrogenesis. PMID:27020553

  10. Discrete control of TRPV4 channel function in the distal nephron by protein kinases A and C.

    PubMed

    Mamenko, Mykola; Zaika, Oleg L; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Berrout, Jonathan; O'Neil, Roger G; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-07-12

    We have recently documented that the Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV4 channel, which is abundantly expressed in distal nephron cells, mediates cellular Ca(2+) responses to elevated luminal flow. In this study, we combined Fura-2-based [Ca(2+)]i imaging with immunofluorescence microscopy in isolated split-opened distal nephrons of C57BL/6 mice to probe the molecular determinants of TRPV4 activity and subcellular distribution. We found that activation of the PKC pathway with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly increased [Ca(2+)]i responses to flow without affecting the subcellular distribution of TRPV4. Inhibition of PKC with bisindolylmaleimide I diminished cellular responses to elevated flow. In contrast, activation of the PKA pathway with forskolin did not affect TRPV4-mediated [Ca(2+)]i responses to flow but markedly shifted the subcellular distribution of the channel toward the apical membrane. These actions were blocked with the specific PKA inhibitor H-89. Concomitant activation of the PKA and PKC cascades additively enhanced the amplitude of flow-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses and greatly increased basal [Ca(2+)]i levels, indicating constitutive TRPV4 activation. This effect was precluded by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. Therefore, the functional status of the TRPV4 channel in the distal nephron is regulated by two distinct signaling pathways. Although the PKA-dependent cascade promotes TRPV4 trafficking and translocation to the apical membrane, the PKC-dependent pathway increases the activity of the channel on the plasma membrane.

  11. Functional Profile of the Isolated Uremic Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Leon G.; Schlondorff, Detlef; Trizna, Walter; Gilbert, Richard M.; Bricker, Neal S.

    1978-01-01

    Resistance of the chronically diseased kidney to vasopressin has been proposed as a possible explanation for the urinary concentrating defect of uremia. The present studies examined the water permeability and adenylate cyclase responsiveness of isolated cortical collecting tubules (CCT) from remnant kidneys of uremic rabbits to vasopressin. In the absence of vasopressin the CCTs of both normal and uremic rabbits were impermeable to water. At the same osmotic gradient, addition of a supramaximal concentration of vasopressin to the peritubular bathing medium led to a significantly lower net water flux per unit length (and per unit luminal surface area) in uremic CCTs than in normal CCTs. Transepithelial osmotic water permeability coefficient, Pf, was 0.0232 ±0.0043 cm/s in normal CCTs and 0.0059±0.001 cm/s in uremic CCTs (P < 0.001). The impaired vasopressin responsiveness of the uremic CCTs was observed whether normal or uremic serum was present in the bath. Basal adenylate cyclase activity per microgram protein was comparable in normal and uremic CCTs. Stimulation by NaF led to equivalent levels of activity in both, whereas vasopressin-stimulated activity was 50% lower in the uremic than in the normal CCTs (P < 0.025). The cyclic AMP analogue, 8-bromo cyclic AMP, produced an increase in the Pf of normal CCTs closely comparable to that observed with vasopressin. In contrast, the Pf of uremic CCTs was only minimally increased by this analogue and was not further stimulated by theophylline. These studies demonstrate an impaired responsiveness of the uremic CCT to vasopressin. This functional defect appears to be a result, at least in part, of a blunted responsiveness of adenylate cyclase to vasopressin. The data further suggest that an additional defect in the cellular response to vasopressin may exist, involving a step (or steps) subsequent to the formation of cyclic AMP. A unifying concept of the urinary concentrating defect of uremia is proposed which

  12. Reduction of influence of task difficulty on perceptual decision making by STN deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Green, Nikos; Bogacz, Rafal; Huebl, Julius; Beyer, Ann-Kristin; Kühn, Andrea A; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2013-09-09

    Neurocomputational models of optimal decision making ascribe a crucial role-the computation of conflict between choice alternatives-to the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Specifically, these models predict that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN will diminish the influence of decision conflict on decision making. In this work, patients with Parkinson's disease judged the direction of motion in random dot stimuli while ON and OFF DBS. To induce decision conflict, we varied the task difficulty (motion coherence), leading to increased reaction time (RT) in trials with greater task difficulty in healthy subjects. Results indicate that DBS significantly influences performance for perceptual decisions under high decision conflict. RT increased substantially OFF DBS as the task became more difficult, and a diffusion model best accounted for behavioral data. In contrast, ON DBS, the influence of task difficulty on RT was significantly reduced and a race model best accounted for the observed data. Individual data fits of evidence accumulation models demonstrate different information processing under distinct DBS states. Furthermore, ON DBS, speed-accuracy tradeoffs affected the magnitude of decision criterion adjustment significantly less compared to OFF DBS. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role for the STN in adjusting decision making during high-conflict trials in perceptual decision making.

  13. Solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons: effects of Na+ transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Laghmani, Kamel; Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-12-01

    Sodium and its associated anions are the major determinant of extracellular fluid volume, and the reabsorption of Na(+) by the kidney plays a crucial role in long-term blood pressure control. The goal of this study was to investigate the extent to which inhibitors of transepithelial Na(+) transport (TNa) along the nephron alter urinary solute excretion and TNa efficiency and how those effects may vary along different nephron segments. To accomplish that goal, we used the multinephron model developed in the companion study (28). That model represents detailed transcellular and paracellular transport processes along the nephrons of a rat kidney. We simulated the inhibition of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE3), the bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter (NKCC2), the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), and the amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel (ENaC). Under baseline conditions, NHE3, NKCC2, NCC, and ENaC reabsorb 36, 22, 4, and 7%, respectively, of filtered Na(+) The model predicted that inhibition of NHE3 substantially reduced proximal tubule TNa and oxygen consumption (QO2 ). Whole-kidney TNa efficiency, as reflected by the number of moles of Na(+) reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed (denoted by the ratio TNa/QO2 ), decreased by ∼20% with 80% inhibition of NHE3. NKCC2 inhibition simulations predicted a substantial reduction in thick ascending limb TNa and QO2 ; however, the effect on whole-kidney TNa/QO2 was minor. Tubular K(+) transport was also substantially impaired, resulting in elevated urinary K(+) excretion. The most notable effect of NCC inhibition was to increase the excretion of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-); its impact on whole-kidney TNa and its efficiency was minor. Inhibition of ENaC was predicted to have opposite effects on the excretion of Na(+) (increased) and K(+) (decreased) and to have only a minor impact on whole-kidney TNa and TNa/QO2 Overall, model predictions agree well with measured changes in Na(+) and K(+) excretion in response to

  14. Tubuloglomerular and connecting tubuloglomerular feedback during inhibition of various Na transporters in the nephron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Ren, YiLin; Monu, Sumit R; Leung, Pablo; Kutskill, Kristopher; Garvin, Jeffrey L; Janic, Branislava; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2015-05-01

    Afferent (Af-Art) and efferent arterioles resistance regulate glomerular capillary pressure. The nephron regulates Af-Art resistance via: 1) vasoconstrictor tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), initiated in the macula densa via Na-K-2Cl cotransporters (NKCC2) and 2) vasodilator connecting tubuloglomerular feedback (CTGF), initiated in connecting tubules via epithelial Na channels (ENaC). Furosemide inhibits NKCC2 and TGF. Benzamil inhibits ENaC and CTGF. In vitro, CTGF dilates preconstricted Af-Arts. In vivo, benzamil decreases stop-flow pressure (PSF), suggesting that CTGF antagonizes TGF; however, even when TGF is blocked, CTGF does not increase PSF, suggesting there is another mechanism antagonizing CTGF. We hypothesize that in addition to NKCC2, activation of Na/H exchanger (NHE) antagonizes CTGF, and when both are blocked CTGF dilates Af-Arts and this effect is blocked by a CTGF inhibitor benzamil. Using micropuncture, we studied the effects of transport inhibitors on TGF responses by measuring PSF while increasing nephron perfusion from 0 to 40 nl/min. Control TGF response (-7.9 ± 0.2 mmHg) was blocked by furosemide (-0.4 ± 0.2 mmHg; P < 0.001). Benzamil restored TGF in the presence of furosemide (furosemide: -0.2 ± 0.1 vs. furosemide+benzamil: -4.3 ± 0.3 mmHg; P < 0.001). With furosemide and NHE inhibitor, dimethylamiloride (DMA), increase in tubular flow increased PSF (furosemide+DMA: 2.7 ± 0.5 mmHg, n = 6), and benzamil blocked this (furosemide+DMA+benzamil: -1.1 ± 0.2 mmHg; P < 0.01, n = 6). We conclude that NHE in the nephron decreases PSF (Af-Art constriction) when NKCC2 and ENaC are inhibited, suggesting that in the absence of NKCC2, NHE causes a TGF response and that CTGF dilates the Af-Art when TGF is blocked with NKCC2 and NHE inhibitors.

  15. Differential regulation of mouse and human nephron progenitors by the Six family of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lori L.; Guo, Qiuyu; Lee, YoungJin; Tran, Tracy; Benazet, Jean-Denis; Whitney, Peter H.; Valouev, Anton; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Nephron endowment is determined by the self-renewal and induction of a nephron progenitor pool established at the onset of kidney development. In the mouse, the related transcriptional regulators Six1 and Six2 play non-overlapping roles in nephron progenitors. Transient Six1 activity prefigures, and is essential for, active nephrogenesis. By contrast, Six2 maintains later progenitor self-renewal from the onset of nephrogenesis. We compared the regulatory actions of Six2 in mouse and human nephron progenitors by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). Surprisingly, SIX1 was identified as a SIX2 target unique to the human nephron progenitors. Furthermore, RNA-seq and immunostaining revealed overlapping SIX1 and SIX2 activity in 16 week human fetal nephron progenitors. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of human SIX1 and SIX2 ChIP-seq showed each factor targeted a similar set of cis-regulatory modules binding an identical target recognition motif. In contrast to the mouse where Six2 binds its own enhancers but does not interact with DNA around Six1, both human SIX1 and SIX2 bind homologous SIX2 enhancers and putative enhancers positioned around SIX1. Transgenic analysis of a putative human SIX1 enhancer in the mouse revealed a transient, mouse-like, pre-nephrogenic, Six1 regulatory pattern. Together, these data demonstrate a divergence in SIX-factor regulation between mouse and human nephron progenitors. In the human, an auto/cross-regulatory loop drives continued SIX1 and SIX2 expression during active nephrogenesis. By contrast, the mouse establishes only an auto-regulatory Six2 loop. These data suggest differential SIX-factor regulation might have contributed to species differences in nephron progenitor programs such as the duration of nephrogenesis and the final nephron count. PMID:26884396

  16. ATR cooperates with CTC1 and STN1 to maintain telomeres and genome integrity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Kara A; Leehy, Katherine; Song, Xiangyu; Nelson, Andrew D; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2012-04-01

    The CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex is an essential constituent of plant and vertebrate telomeres. Here we show that CST and ATR (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] and Rad3-related) act synergistically to maintain telomere length and genome stability in Arabidopsis. Inactivation of ATR, but not ATM, temporarily rescued severe morphological phenotypes associated with ctc1 or stn1. Unexpectedly, telomere shortening accelerated in plants lacking CST and ATR. In first-generation (G1) ctc1 atr mutants, enhanced telomere attrition was modest, but in G2 ctc1 atr, telomeres shortened precipitously, and this loss coincided with a dramatic decrease in telomerase activity in G2 atr mutants. Zeocin treatment also triggered a reduction in telomerase activity, suggesting that the prolonged absence of ATR leads to a hitherto-unrecognized DNA damage response (DDR). Finally, our data indicate that ATR modulates DDR in CST mutants by limiting chromosome fusions and transcription of DNA repair genes and also by promoting programmed cell death in stem cells. We conclude that the absence of CST in Arabidopsis triggers a multifaceted ATR-dependent response to facilitate maintenance of critically shortened telomeres and eliminate cells with severe telomere dysfunction.

  17. Crystal Structure of StnA for the Biosynthesis of Antitumor Drug Streptonigrin Reveals a Unique Substrate Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tianle; Wo, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Song, Quanwei; Feng, Guoqiang; Luo, Ray; Lin, Shuangjin; Wu, Geng; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Streptonigrin methylesterase A (StnA) is one of the tailoring enzymes that modify the aminoquinone skeleton in the biosynthesis pathway of Streptomyces species. Although StnA has no significant sequence homology with the reported α/β-fold hydrolases, it shows typical hydrolytic activity in vivo and in vitro. In order to reveal its functional characteristics, the crystal structures of the selenomethionine substituted StnA (SeMet-StnA) and the complex (S185A mutant) with its substrate were resolved to the resolution of 2.71 Å and 2.90 Å, respectively. The overall structure of StnA can be described as an α-helix cap domain on top of a common α/β hydrolase domain. The substrate methyl ester of 10′-demethoxystreptonigrin binds in a hydrophobic pocket that mainly consists of cap domain residues and is close to the catalytic triad Ser185-His349-Asp308. The transition state is stabilized by an oxyanion hole formed by the backbone amides of Ala102 and Leu186. The substrate binding appears to be dominated by interactions with several specific hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds in the cap domain. The molecular dynamics simulation and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the important roles of the key interacting residues in the cap domain. Structural alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis indicate that StnA represents a new subfamily of lipolytic enzymes with the specific binding pocket located at the cap domain instead of the interface between the two domains. PMID:28074848

  18. Nephron-specific deletion of the prorenin receptor causes a urine concentration defect.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Stuart, Deborah; Calquin, Matias; Quadri, Syed; Wang, Shuping; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Siragy, Helmy M; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Kohan, Donald E

    2015-07-01

    The prorenin receptor (PRR), a recently discovered component of the renin-angiotensin system, is expressed in the nephron in general and the collecting duct in particular. However, the physiological significance of nephron PRR remains unclear, partly due to developmental abnormalities associated with global or renal-specific PRR gene knockout (KO). Therefore, we developed mice with inducible nephron-wide PRR deletion using Pax8-reverse tetracycline transactivator and LC-1 transgenes and loxP flanked PRR alleles such that ablation of PRR occurs in adulthood, after induction with doxycycline. Nephron-specific PRR KO mice have normal survival to ∼1 yr of age and no renal histological defects. Compared with control mice, PRR KO mice had 65% lower medullary PRR mRNA and protein levels and markedly diminished renal PRR immunofluorescence. During both normal water intake and mild water restriction, PRR KO mice had significantly lower urine osmolality, higher water intake, and higher urine volume compared with control mice. No differences were seen in urine vasopressin excretion, urine Na(+) and K(+) excretion, plasma Na(+), or plasma osmolality between the two groups. However, PRR KO mice had reduced medullary aquaporin-2 levels and arginine vasopressin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the isolated renal medulla compared with control mice. Taken together, these results suggest nephron PRR can potentially modulate renal water excretion.

  19. Microcyst formation and HIV-1 gene expression occur in multiple nephron segments in HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ross, M J; Bruggeman, L A; Wilson, P D; Klotman, P E

    2001-12-01

    Tubular microcyst formation is a prominent histopathologic feature of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), but its pathogenesis is unknown. HIV-1 has recently been shown to infect renal tubular epithelial cells in patients with HIVAN. In addition, HIV-1 gene expression in renal epithelial cells has been shown to cause a renal disease that is identical to HIVAN in HIV-1 transgenic mice. In these studies, immunohistochemistry for tubular segment-specific markers and mRNA in situ hybridization for HIV-1 was used to determine which tubular segments develop microcysts and which segments express HIV-1 in the kidneys of transgenic mice and patients with HIVAN. It was found that microcysts involve multiple nephron segments in both patients with HIVAN and HIV-1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, HIV-1 infection in HIVAN and HIV-1 transgene expression also occurs in multiple segments of the nephron. These data support a direct role for HIV-1 infection of renal epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of microcyst formation in patients with HIVAN.

  20. Electroneutral absorption of NaCl by the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron: implication for normal electrolytes homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Eladari, Dominique; Chambrey, Régine; Picard, Nicolas; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2014-08-01

    Sodium absorption by the distal part of the nephron, i.e., the distal convoluted tubule, the connecting tubule, and the collecting duct, plays a major role in the control of homeostasis by the kidney. In this part of the nephron, sodium transport can either be electroneutral or electrogenic. The study of electrogenic Na(+) absorption, which is mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), has been the focus of considerable interest because of its implication in sodium, potassium, and acid-base homeostasis. However, recent studies have highlighted the crucial role played by electroneutral NaCl absorption in the regulation of the body content of sodium chloride, which in turn controls extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Here, we review the identification and characterization of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC), the molecule accounting for the main part of electroneutral NaCl absorption in the distal nephron, and its regulators. We also discuss recent work describing the identification of a novel "NCC-like" transport system mediated by pendrin and the sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE) in the β-intercalated cells of the collecting system.

  1. Localization of the succinate receptor in the distal nephron and its signaling in polarized MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Robben, Joris H; Fenton, Robert A; Vargas, Sarah L; Schweer, Horst; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Deen, Peter M T; Milligan, Graeme

    2009-12-01

    When the succinate receptor (SUCNR1) is activated in the afferent arterioles of the glomerulus it increases renin release and induces hypertension. To study its location in other nephron segments and its role in kidney function, we performed immunohistochemical analysis and found that SUCNR1 is located in the luminal membrane of macula densa cells of the juxtaglomerular apparatus in close proximity to renin-producing granular cells, the cortical thick ascending limb, and cortical and inner medullary collecting duct cells. In order to study its signaling, SUCNR1 was stably expressed in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, where it localized to the apical membrane. Activation of the cells by succinate caused Gq and Gi-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization, transient phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and the release of arachidonic acid along with prostaglandins E2 and I2. Signaling was desensitized without receptor internalization but rapidly resensitized upon succinate removal. Immunohistochemical evidence of phosphorylated ERK1/2 was found in cortical collecting duct cells of wild type but not SUCNR1 knockout streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, indicating in vivo relevance. Since urinary succinate concentrations in health and disease are in the activation range of the SUCNR1, this receptor can sense succinate in the luminal fluid. Our study suggests that changes in the luminal succinate concentration may regulate several aspects of renal function.

  2. Nephron-sparing surgery in renal cell carcinoma: current perspectives on technical issues.

    PubMed

    González, Javier; Cózar, José Manuel; Gómez, Antonio; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; Esteban, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Surgical resection remains the standard treatment for renal cell carcinoma. Although historically the concept of wide excision of the affected kidney dictated surgical thinking for more than half a century, a better understanding of the biology of this tumor, standardized staging, and changing patterns of presentation permit today a refined management approach with nephron-sparing surgery, thus limiting potential long-term morbidity by maximizing the preservation of functional renal parenchyma. This paper aims to review the current status of nephron-sparing surgery for solid renal masses with an emphasis on indications, preoperative assessment, and operative technical issues, summarizing the most recent existing data on the subject.

  3. An unexpected journey: conceptual evolution of mechanoregulated potassium transport in the distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Carrisoza-Gaytan, Rolando; Carattino, Marcelo D; Kleyman, Thomas R; Satlin, Lisa M

    2016-02-15

    Flow-induced K secretion (FIKS) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) is mediated by large-conductance, Ca(2+)/stretch-activated BK channels composed of pore-forming α-subunits (BKα) and accessory β-subunits. This channel also plays a critical role in the renal adaptation to dietary K loading. Within the ASDN, the cortical collecting duct (CCD) is a major site for the final renal regulation of K homeostasis. Principal cells in the ASDN possess a single apical cilium whereas the surfaces of adjacent intercalated cells, devoid of cilia, are decorated with abundant microvilli and microplicae. Increases in tubular (urinary) flow rate, induced by volume expansion, diuretics, or a high K diet, subject CCD cells to hydrodynamic forces (fluid shear stress, circumferential stretch, and drag/torque on apical cilia and presumably microvilli/microplicae) that are transduced into increases in principal (PC) and intercalated (IC) cell cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration that activate apical voltage-, stretch- and Ca(2+)-activated BK channels, which mediate FIKS. This review summarizes studies by ourselves and others that have led to the evolving picture that the BK channel is localized in a macromolecular complex at the apical membrane, composed of mechanosensitive apical Ca(2+) channels and a variety of kinases/phosphatases as well as other signaling molecules anchored to the cytoskeleton, and that an increase in tubular fluid flow rate leads to IC- and PC-specific responses determined, in large part, by the cell-specific composition of the BK channels.

  4. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M.; Raza, Sarah; O’Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population. PMID:27144443

  5. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  6. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    PubMed

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M; Raza, Sarah; O'Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  7. Caudal migration and proliferation of renal progenitors regulates early nephron segment size in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Richard W.; Dodd, Rachel C.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The nephron is the functional unit of the kidney and is divided into distinct proximal and distal segments. The factors determining nephron segment size are not fully understood. In zebrafish, the embryonic kidney has long been thought to differentiate in situ into two proximal tubule segments and two distal tubule segments (distal early; DE, and distal late; DL) with little involvement of cell movement. Here, we overturn this notion by performing lineage-labelling experiments that reveal extensive caudal movement of the proximal and DE segments and a concomitant compaction of the DL segment as it fuses with the cloaca. Laser-mediated severing of the tubule, such that the DE and DL are disconnected or that the DL and cloaca do not fuse, results in a reduction in tubule cell proliferation and significantly shortens the DE segment while the caudal movement of the DL is unaffected. These results suggest that the DL mechanically pulls the more proximal segments, thereby driving both their caudal extension and their proliferation. Together, these data provide new insights into early nephron morphogenesis and demonstrate the importance of cell movement and proliferation in determining initial nephron segment size. PMID:27759103

  8. Lats1/2 Regulate Yap/Taz to Control Nephron Progenitor Epithelialization and Inhibit Myofibroblast Formation.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Helen; Reginensi, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    In the kidney, formation of the functional filtration units, the nephrons, is essential for postnatal life. During development, mesenchymal progenitors tightly regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation to give rise to all nephron epithelia. Here, we investigated the functions of the Hippo pathway serine/threonine-protein kinases Lats1 and Lats2, which phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, in nephron progenitor cells. Genetic deletion of Lats1 and Lats2 in nephron progenitors of mice led to disruption of nephrogenesis, with an accumulation of spindle-shaped cells in both cortical and medullary regions of the kidney. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that the cells that accumulated in the interstitium derived from nephron progenitor cells and expressed E-cadherin as well as vimentin, a myofibroblastic marker not usually detected after mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The accumulation of these interstitial cells associated with collagen deposition and ectopic expression of the myofibroblastic markers vimentin and α-smooth-muscle actin in developing kidneys. Although these myofibroblastic cells had high Yap and Taz accumulation in the nucleus concomitant with a loss of phosphorylated Yap, reduction of Yap and/or Taz expression levels completely rescued the Lats1/2 phenotype. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Lats1/2 kinases restrict Yap/Taz activities to promote nephron progenitor cell differentiation in the mammalian kidney. Notably, our data also show that myofibroblastic cells can differentiate from nephron progenitors.

  9. Preferential Propagation of Competent SIX2+ Nephronic Progenitors by LIF/ROCKi Treatment of the Metanephric Mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Sharma, Nirmala; Hall, Michael D; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Perantoni, Alan O

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nephrogenic stem cell preservation and commitment is fundamental to harnessing the potential of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) for nephron regeneration. Accordingly, we established a culture model that preferentially expands the MM SIX2+ progenitor pool using leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a Rho kinase inhibitor (ROCKi), and extracellular matrix. Passaged MM cells express the key stem cell regulators Six2 and Pax2 and remain competent to respond to WNT4 induction and form mature tubular epithelia and glomeruli. Mechanistically, LIF activates STAT, which binds to a Stat consensus sequence in the Six2 proximal promoter and sustains SIX2 levels. ROCKi, on the other hand, attenuates the LIF-induced differentiation activity of JNK. Concomitantly, the combination of LIF/ROCKi upregulates Slug expression and activates YAP, which maintains SIX2, PAX2, and SALL1. Using this novel model, our study underscores the pivotal roles of SIX2 and YAP in MM stem cell stability.

  10. Nephron sparing endoscopic treatment for primary carcinoma of the renal calyx: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QI; OU, TONG-WEN; XU, JIA-WEI; LI, JIN; BORAZJANI, ALI; JIA, CHUN-SONG; WANG, XU; YAN, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Primary carcinoma of the renal calyx is extremely rare. The present study reported nephron sparing endoscopic treatment for primary carcinoma of the renal calyx. An 81-year-old female presented with a 1-year history of intermittent painless gross hematuria. Computed tomography and X-ray of the urinary tract were unable to definitively identify any lesion. Flexible ureteroscopic examination revealed a tumor with epicenter in the lower calyx of the right kidney, with additional involvement around the calyx. Biopsies were obtained and pathology revealed low-grade urothelial carcinoma. Considering additional co-morbidities, the patient elected to undergo endoscopic management with thulium laser. The present report described the feasibility of flexible ureteroscopic thulium laser resection for the treatment of renal calyx carcinoma. PMID:27330785

  11. Six2 and Wnt regulate self-renewal and commitment of nephron progenitors through shared gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Seop; Ma, Wenxiu; O’Brien, Lori L.; Chung, Eunah; Guo, Jin-Jin; Cheng, Jr-Gang; Valerius, M. Todd; McMahon, Jill A.; Wong, Wing Hung; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A balance between Six2-dependent self-renewal and canonical Wnt signaling-directed commitment regulates mammalian nephrogenesis. Intersectional studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional profiling identified direct target genes shared by each pathway within nephron progenitors. Wnt4 and Fgf8 are essential for progenitor commitment; cis-regulatory modules flanking each gene are co-bound by Six2 and β-catenin, and dependent on conserved Lef/Tcf binding sites for activity. In vitro and in vivo analyses suggest that Six2 and Lef/Tcf factors form a regulatory complex that promotes progenitor maintenance while entry of β-catenin into this complex promotes nephrogenesis. Alternative transcriptional responses associated with Six2 and β-catenin co-binding events occur through non-Lef/Tcf DNA binding mechanisms highlighting the regulatory complexity downstream of Wnt signaling in the developing mammalian kidney. PMID:22902740

  12. Differential expression of claudin tight junction proteins in the human cortical nephron

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Adam; Campbell, Sara; Bass, Paul; Mason, Juan; Collins, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background. In renal tubules, paracellular permeability is tightly controlled to facilitate solute absorption and urinary concentration and is regulated by tight junctions, which incorporate claudin proteins. There is very limited information confirming the localization of these proteins in the human renal cortex. Most data is inferred from mouse, bovine and rabbit studies and differences exist between mouse and other species. Methods. A survey of claudin staining was performed on human kidney cortex embedded in glycolmethacrylate resin to enhance tissue morphology and facilitate the cutting of 2 µm serial sections. Results. Claudin-2, -10 and -11 antibodies labelled renal tubular epithelial cells, correlating with Lotus tetragonolobus and N-cadherin positive proximal tubules. Claudin-3, -10, -11 and -16 antibodies strongly stained a population of tubules that were positive for Tamm Horsfall protein on adjacent sections, confirming expression in the thick ascending limb of the Loop of Henle. Claudin-3, -4 and -8 antibodies reacted with tubules that correlated with the distal nephron markers, E-cadherin, epithelial membrane antigen and Dolichos biflorus and claudin-3, -4, -7 and -8 with the distal tubule marker, calbindin, and the collecting duct marker, aquaporin-2. Claudin-14 was localized in distal convoluted tubules, correlating positively with calbindin but negatively with aquaporin-2, whereas claudin-1 staining was identified in the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule, distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Cellular and tight junction localization of claudin staining in renal tubules was heterogeneous and is discussed. Conclusions. Complex variation in the expression of human claudins likely determines paracellular permeability in the kidney. Altered claudin expression may influence pathologies involving abnormalities of absorption. PMID:20124215

  13. An unexpected journey: conceptual evolution of mechanoregulated potassium transport in the distal nephron

    PubMed Central

    Carrisoza-Gaytan, Rolando; Carattino, Marcelo D.; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced K secretion (FIKS) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) is mediated by large-conductance, Ca2+/stretch-activated BK channels composed of pore-forming α-subunits (BKα) and accessory β-subunits. This channel also plays a critical role in the renal adaptation to dietary K loading. Within the ASDN, the cortical collecting duct (CCD) is a major site for the final renal regulation of K homeostasis. Principal cells in the ASDN possess a single apical cilium whereas the surfaces of adjacent intercalated cells, devoid of cilia, are decorated with abundant microvilli and microplicae. Increases in tubular (urinary) flow rate, induced by volume expansion, diuretics, or a high K diet, subject CCD cells to hydrodynamic forces (fluid shear stress, circumferential stretch, and drag/torque on apical cilia and presumably microvilli/microplicae) that are transduced into increases in principal (PC) and intercalated (IC) cell cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration that activate apical voltage-, stretch- and Ca2+-activated BK channels, which mediate FIKS. This review summarizes studies by ourselves and others that have led to the evolving picture that the BK channel is localized in a macromolecular complex at the apical membrane, composed of mechanosensitive apical Ca2+ channels and a variety of kinases/phosphatases as well as other signaling molecules anchored to the cytoskeleton, and that an increase in tubular fluid flow rate leads to IC- and PC-specific responses determined, in large part, by the cell-specific composition of the BK channels. PMID:26632600

  14. Effects of aldosterone and potassium-sparing diuretics on electrical potential differences across the distal nephron.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Kokko, J P

    1977-01-01

    We have previously shown that the transtubular potential of the rabbit cortical collecting tubule varies in concert with changes in plasma mineralocorticoid levels, while the potential of the distal convoluted tubule is invariant with such changes. In the present studies we have examined the effects of in vitro addition of d-aldosterone to isolated tubules, as well as the effects of triamterene and spirolactone. d-Aldosterone (0.2 mum added to the perfusate or 1 muM added to the bathing medium) resulted in a marked stimulation of the transtubular potential difference (lumen-negative) after a short latent period. d-Aldosterone had no effect on the potential difference of distal convoluted tubules of intact or adrenalectomized rabbits. Both the magnitude of the response and the length of the latent period in the cortical collecting tubule after aldosterone were markedly temperature-dependent. Triamterene caused a gradual but reversible inhibition of the potential difference in the cortical collecting tubule but had no effect in the distal tubule. Spirolactone, when added before aldosterone, blocked the electrical response to the hormone in the cortical collecting tubule, and produced a gradual inhibition of the potential difference in mineralocorticoid-stimulated tubules. Spirolactone had no effect on the potential difference of the distal tubule. We conclude that (a) the influence of aldosterone on the potential across the distal nephron is restricted to the distal convoluted tubule, (b) the electrical response to aldosterone and the latent period are temperature-dependent, (c) the response to aldosterone is blocked by spirolactone, and (d) triamterene inhibits the potential difference only in the cortical collecting tubule. PMID:830667

  15. Zero ischaemia laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery by re-suturing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinshan; Zu, Qiang; Du, Qingshan; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To report a pre-suture technique in laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery (LNSS), which could help reduce and even avoid ischaemia for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Material and methods Between January and June 2013 we treated 14 patients presenting with renal tumours. The mean age was 46 years and average tumour size was 2.4 cm in diameter determined by computed tomography (CT). All the patients were treated with LNSS by pre-suturing the resection. Results In 13 out of the 14 cases, no clamping was needed during the whole surgery processes, i.e. zero ischaemia was achieved. In the other case, the renal artery was clamped for only 150 seconds due to suture avulsion. The mean operating time was 75 minutes (range 50 to 110 minutes) and mean blood loss was 60 ml (range 30 to 200 ml). After removal of the drain 2–3 days after surgery, the average postoperative hospital stay time was four days. The surgery had only a minor effect on the renal function. No case of urinary leakage or postoperative bleeding occurred. Postoperative pathological reports showed that the tumours were resected completely with negative surgical margins for all cases. There were no signs of recurrence on follow-up CT performed 1–6 months after surgery. Conclusions The pre-suture technique in LNSS reported here required zero or minimal ischaemia time and hence avoided renal ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This surgical technique could be a feasible surgical option for treatment of small, exophytic and peripheral renal tutors. PMID:25477760

  16. Standardized reporting of resection technique during nephron-sparing surgery: the surface-intermediate-base margin score.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Andrea; Carini, Marco; Uzzo, Robert G; Campi, Riccardo; Smaldone, Marc C; Kutikov, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    A standardized reporting system of nephron-sparing surgery resection techniques is lacking. The surface-intermediate-base scoring system represents a formal reporting instrument to assist in interpretation of reported data and to facilitate comparisons in the urologic literature.

  17. Concept and computational design for a bioartificial nephron-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E; Kaazempur-Mofrad, M; Borenstein, J

    2008-06-01

    A MEMS-based, (Micro Electro Mechanical System) bioartificial device is proposed for replicating the function of a single nephron. Consistent with the anatomy and physiology of humans, our device has 3 distinct sections, replicating the function of the glomerulus, the proximal tubule, and the loop of Henle. Construction of a bioartificial loop of Henle in particular requires control of diffusion-scale features. The proposed device can be built using existing microfabrication technologies and populated with various renal cell types. A computational model is also developed to analyze the coupled, multiphase mass transport in this system. Using the model, a design is generated with flow and solute transport properties matching those of the human nephron.

  18. Differential regulation of ROMK (Kir1.1) in distal nephron segments by dietary potassium.

    PubMed

    Wade, James B; Fang, Liang; Coleman, Richard A; Liu, Jie; Grimm, P Richard; Wang, Tong; Welling, Paul A

    2011-06-01

    ROMK channels are well-known to play a central role in renal K secretion, but the absence of highly specific and avid-ROMK antibodies has presented significant roadblocks toward mapping the extent of expression along the entire distal nephron and determining whether surface density of these channels is regulated in response to physiological stimuli. Here, we prepared new ROMK antibodies verified to be highly specific, using ROMK knockout mice as a control. Characterization with segmental markers revealed a more extensive pattern of ROMK expression along the entire distal nephron than previously thought, localizing to distal convoluted tubule regions, DCT1 and DCT2; the connecting tubule (CNT); and cortical collecting duct (CD). ROMK was diffusely distributed in intracellular compartments and at the apical membrane of each tubular region. Apical labeling was significantly increased by high-K diet in DCT2, CNT1, CNT2, and CD (P < 0.05) but not in DCT1. Consistent with the large increase in apical ROMK, dramatically increased mature glycosylation was observed following dietary potassium augmentation. We conclude 1) our new antibody provides a unique tool to characterize ROMK channel localization and expression and 2) high-K diet causes a large increase in apical expression of ROMK in DCT2, CNT, and CD but not in DCT1, indicating that different regulatory mechanisms are involved in K diet-regulated ROMK channel functions in the distal nephron.

  19. Reappraising contemporary theories of subcortical participation in language: proposing an interhemispheric regulatory function for the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mediation of high-level linguistic processes.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Murdoch, Bruce E; Theodoros, Deborah G; Silburn, Peter; Hall, Bruce

    2004-02-01

    Apropos the basal ganglia, the dominant striatum and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have been hypothesised to represent integral components of subcortical language circuitry. Working subcortical language theories, however, have failed thus far to consider a role for the STN in the mediation of linguistic processes, a structure recently defined as the driving force of basal ganglia output. The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of surgically induced functional inhibition of the STN upon linguistic abilities, within the context of established models of basal ganglia participation in language. Two males with surgically induced 'lesions' of the dominant and non-dominant dorsolateral STN, aimed at relieving Parkinsonian motor symptoms, served as experimental subjects. General and high-level language profiles were compiled for each subject up to 1 month prior to and 3 months following neurosurgery, within the drug-on state (i.e., when optimally medicated). Comparable post-operative alterations in linguistic performance were observed subsequent to surgically induced functional inhibition of the left and right STN. More specifically, higher proportions of reliable decline as opposed to improvement in post-operative performance were demonstrated by both subjects on complex language tasks, hypothesised to entail the interplay of cognitive-linguistic processes. The outcomes of the current research challenge unilateralised models of functional basal ganglia organisation with the proposal of a potential interhemispheric regulatory function for the STN in the mediation of high-level linguistic processes.

  20. Effects of L-DOPA and STN-HFS dyskinesiogenic treatments on NR2B regulation in basal ganglia in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Adrien; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Savasta, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side effect of chronic levodopa (L-DOPA) administration, the reference treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) alleviates parkinsonian motor symptoms and indirectly improves dyskinesia by decreasing L-DOPA requirement. However, inadequate stimulation can also trigger dyskinetic movements in PD patients and animal models. Here, we investigated the possible association between L-DOPA- and STN-HFS-induced dyskinesia and regulation of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors in the rodent model of PD. We subjected 6-OHDA-lesioned rats to HFS for 1h, at an intensity triggering forelimb dyskinesia. Other 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were treated with chronic high doses of L-DOPA for ten days, to induce abnormal involuntary movements. The 6-OHDA lesion regulated NR2B only in the SNr, where the activation of NR2B was observed (as assessed by phosphorylation of the Tyr1472 residue). Both STN-HFS and L-DOPA dyskinesiogenic treatments induced NR2B activation in the STN and EP, but only L-DOPA triggered NR2B hyperphosphorylation in the striatum. Finally, the use of CP-101,606 exacerbated L-DOPA-induced motor behavior and associated NR2B hyperphosphorylation in the striatum, STN and EP. Thus, NR2B activation in basal ganglia structures is correlated with dyskinesia.

  1. The STN8 kinase-PBCP phosphatase system is responsible for high-light-induced reversible phosphorylation of the PSII inner antenna subunit CP29 in rice.

    PubMed

    Betterle, Nico; Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Rosa, Anthony; Wu, Guangxi; Bassi, Roberto; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid light-harvesting proteins is a mechanism to compensate for unbalanced excitation of photosystem I (PSI) versus photosystem II (PSII) under limiting light. In monocots, an additional phosphorylation event on the PSII antenna CP29 occurs upon exposure to excess light, enhancing resistance to light stress. Different from the case of the major LHCII antenna complex, the STN7 kinase and its related PPH1 phosphatase were proven not to be involved in CP29 phosphorylation, indicating that a different set of enzymes act in the high-light (HL) response. Here, we analyze a rice stn8 mutant in which both PSII core proteins and CP29 phosphorylation are suppressed in HL, implying that STN8 is the kinase catalyzing this reaction. In order to identify the phosphatase involved, we produced a recombinant enzyme encoded by the rice ortholog of AtPBCP, antagonist of AtSTN8, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. The recombinant protein was active in dephosphorylating P-CP29. Based on these data, we propose that the activities of the OsSTN8 kinase and the antagonistic OsPBCP phosphatase, in addition to being involved in the repair of photo-damaged PSII, are also responsible for the HL-dependent reversible phosphorylation of the inner antenna CP29.

  2. Cognitive and Psychiatric Effects of STN versus GPi Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Yun-Peng; Li, Ji-Ping; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus interna (GPi) can reduce motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and improve their quality of life. However, the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on cognitive functions and their psychiatric effects remain controversial. The present meta-analysis was therefore performed to clarify these issues. Methods We searched the PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Other sources, including internet-based clinical trial registries and grey literature sources, were also searched. After searching the literature, two investigators independently performed literature screens to assess the quality of the included trials and to extract the data. The outcomes included the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on multiple cognitive domains, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Results Seven articles related to four randomized controlled trials that included 521 participants were incorporated into the present meta-analysis. Compared with GPi DBS, STN DBS was associated with declines in selected cognitive domains after surgery, including attention, working memory and processing speed, phonemic fluency, learning and memory, and global cognition. However, there were no significant differences in terms of quality of life or psychiatric effects, such as depression and anxiety, between the two groups. Conclusions A selective decline in frontal-subcortical cognitive functions is observed after STN DBS in comparison with GPi DBS, which should not be ignored in the target selection for DBS treatment in PD patients. In addition, compared to GPi DBS, STN DBS does not affect depression, anxiety, and quality of life. PMID:27248139

  3. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  4. Stromal Fat4 acts non-autonomously with Dchs1/2 to restrict the nephron progenitor pool.

    PubMed

    Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Reginensi, Antoine; Pan, Qun; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Helmbacher, Françoise; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of the balance between progenitor self-renewal and differentiation is crucial to development. In the mammalian kidney, reciprocal signalling between three lineages (stromal, mesenchymal and ureteric) ensures correct nephron progenitor self-renewal and differentiation. Loss of either the atypical cadherin FAT4 or its ligand Dachsous 1 (DCHS1) results in expansion of the mesenchymal nephron progenitor pool, called the condensing mesenchyme (CM). This has been proposed to be due to misregulation of the Hippo kinase pathway transcriptional co-activator YAP. Here, we use tissue-specific deletions to prove that FAT4 acts non-autonomously in the renal stroma to control nephron progenitors. We show that loss of Yap from the CM in Fat4-null mice does not reduce the expanded CM, indicating that FAT4 regulates the CM independently of YAP. Analysis of Six2(-/-);Fat4(-/-) double mutants demonstrates that excess progenitors in Fat4 mutants are dependent on Six2, a crucial regulator of nephron progenitor self-renewal. Electron microscopy reveals that cell organisation is disrupted in Fat4 mutants. Gene expression analysis demonstrates that the expression of Notch and FGF pathway components are altered in Fat4 mutants. Finally, we show that Dchs1, and its paralogue Dchs2, function in a partially redundant fashion to regulate the number of nephron progenitors. Our data support a model in which FAT4 in the stroma binds to DCHS1/2 in the mouse CM to restrict progenitor self-renewal.

  5. Missense Mutation of POU Domain Class 3 Transcription Factor 3 in Pou3f3L423P Mice Causes Reduced Nephron Number and Impaired Development of the Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Alexandra; Kemter, Elisabeth; Kumar, Sudhir; Popper, Bastian; Aigner, Bernhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    During nephrogenesis, POU domain class 3 transcription factor 3 (POU3F3 aka BRN1) is critically involved in development of distinct nephron segments, including the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). Deficiency of POU3F3 in knock-out mice leads to underdevelopment of the TAL, lack of differentiation of TAL cells, and perinatal death due to renal failure. Pou3f3L423P mutant mice, which were established in the Munich ENU Mouse Mutagenesis Project, carry a recessive point mutation in the homeobox domain of POU3F3. Homozygous Pou3f3L423P mutants are viable and fertile. The present study used functional, as well as qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses to characterize the renal phenotype of juvenile (12 days) and aged (60 weeks) homo- and heterozygous Pou3f3L423P mutant mice and age-matched wild-type controls. In both age groups, homozygous mutants vs. control mice displayed significantly smaller kidney volumes, decreased nephron numbers and mean glomerular volumes, smaller TAL volumes, as well as lower volume densities of the TAL in the kidney. No histological or ultrastructural lesions of TAL cells or glomerular cells were observed in homozygous mutant mice. Aged homozygous mutants displayed increased serum urea concentrations and reduced specific urine gravity, but no evidence of glomerular dysfunction. These results confirm the role of POU3F3 in development and function of the TAL and provide new evidence for its involvement in regulation of the nephron number in the kidney. Therefore, Pou3f3L423P mutant mice represent a valuable research model for further analyses of POU3F3 functions, or for nephrological studies examining the role of congenital low nephron numbers.

  6. Measurement of Na-K-ATPase-mediated rubidium influx in single segments of rat nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Cheval, L.; Doucet, A. )

    1990-07-01

    To determine the functioning rate of Na-K-ATPase in the rat nephron, a micromethod was developed to measure the rate of rubidium uptake in single nephron segments microdissected from collagenase-treated kidneys. Because the hydrolytic activity of Na-K-ATPase displayed the same apparent affinity for K and Rb ions, whereas the Vmax elicited by K was higher than that in the presence of Rb, experiments were performed in the presence of cold Rb plus 86Rb. Before the assay, tubules were preincubated for 10 min at 37 degrees C to restore the normal transmembrane cation gradients. 86Rb uptake was measured after washing out extracellular cations by rinsing the tubules in ice-cold choline chloride solution containing Ba2+. Rb uptake increased quasi-linearly as a function of incubation time up to 30 s in the thick ascending limb, 1 min in the proximal convoluted tubule, and 5 min in the collecting tubule, and reached an equilibrium after 5-30 min. The initial rates of Rb uptake increased in a saturable fashion as Rb concentration in the medium rose from 0.25 to 5 mM. In medullary thick ascending limb, the initial rate of Rb uptake was inhibited by greater than 90% by 2.5 mM ouabain and by 10(-5) M of the metabolic inhibitor carbonyl cyanide trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. Correlation of Na-K-ATPase hydrolytic activity at Vmax and initial rates of ouabain-sensitive Rb uptake in the successive segments of nephron indicates that in intact cells the pump works at approximately 20-30% of its Vmax. Increasing intracellular Na concentration by tubule preincubation in a Rb- and K-free medium increased the initial rates of Rb intake up to the Vmax of the hydrolytic activity of the pump.

  7. Repeated ethanol exposure during late gestation decreases nephron endowment in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stephen P; Kenna, Kelly; Bertram, John F; Hoy, Wendy E; Yan, Edwin B; Bocking, Alan D; Brien, James F; Walker, David W; Harding, Richard; Moritz, Karen M

    2008-08-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy can affect fetal development, but little is known about the effects on the developing kidney. Our objectives were to determine the effects of repeated ethanol exposure during the latter half of gestation on glomerular (nephron) number and expression of key genes involved in renal development or function in the ovine fetal kidney. Pregnant ewes received daily intravenous infusion of ethanol (0.75 g/kg, n=5) or saline (control, n=5) over 1 h from 95 to 133 days of gestational age (DGA; term is approximately 147 DGA). Maternal and fetal arterial blood samples were taken before and after the start of the daily ethanol infusions for determination of blood ethanol concentration (BEC). Necropsy was performed at 134 DGA, and fetal kidneys were collected for determination of total glomerular number using the physical disector/fractionator technique; at this gestational age nephrogenesis is completed in sheep. Maximal maternal and fetal BECs of 0.12+/-0.01 g/dl (mean+/-SE) and 0.11+/-0.01 g/dl, respectively, were reached 1 h after starting maternal ethanol infusions. Ethanol exposure had no effect on fetal body weight, kidney weight, or the gene expression of members of the renin-angiotensin system, insulin-like growth factors, and sodium channels. However, fetal glomerular number was lower after ethanol exposure (377,585+/-8,325) than in controls (423,177+/-17,178, P<0.001). The data demonstrate that our regimen of fetal ethanol exposure during the latter half of gestation results in an 11% reduction in nephron endowment without affecting the overall growth of the kidney or fetus or the expression of key genes involved in renal development or function. A reduced nephron endowment of this magnitude could have important implications for the cardiovascular health of offspring during postnatal life.

  8. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  9. Prostaglandin signaling regulates nephron segment patterning of renal progenitors during zebrafish kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Poureetezadi, Shahram Jevin; Cheng, Christina N; Chambers, Joseph M; Drummond, Bridgette E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney formation involves patterning events that induce renal progenitors to form nephrons with an intricate composition of multiple segments. Here, we performed a chemical genetic screen using zebrafish and discovered that prostaglandins, lipid mediators involved in many physiological functions, influenced pronephros segmentation. Modulating levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or PGB2 restricted distal segment formation and expanded a proximal segment lineage. Perturbation of prostaglandin synthesis by manipulating Cox1 or Cox2 activity altered distal segment formation and was rescued by exogenous PGE2. Disruption of the PGE2 receptors Ptger2a and Ptger4a similarly affected the distal segments. Further, changes in Cox activity or PGE2 levels affected expression of the transcription factors irx3b and sim1a that mitigate pronephros segment patterning. These findings show for the first time that PGE2 is a regulator of nephron formation in the zebrafish embryonic kidney, thus revealing that prostaglandin signaling may have implications for renal birth defects and other diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17551.001 PMID:27996936

  10. Polymerase chain reaction localization of constitutive nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase messenger RNAs in microdissected rat nephron segments.

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Y; Tomita, K; Nonoguchi, H; Marumo, F

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of the release of nitric oxide (NO) in the kidney has been shown to result in renal hemodynamic changes and natriuresis. NO is a potent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to an increase of cyclic GMP. The precise localization of NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase in the renal structure is not known. In this study, the microlocalization of mRNAs coding for constitutive NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase was carried out in the rat kidney, using an assay of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in individual microdissected renal tubule segments along the nephron, glomeruli, vasa recta bundle, and arcuate arteries. A large signal for constitutive NO synthase was detected in inner medullary collecting duct. Small signals were detected in inner medullary thin limb, cortical collecting duct, outer medullary collecting duct, glomerulus, vasa recta, and arcuate artery. Soluble guanylate cyclase mRNA is expressed largely in glomerulus, proximal convoluted tubule, proximal straight tubule, and cortical collecting duct, and in small amounts in medullary thick ascending limb, inner medullary thin limb, outer medullary collecting duct, inner medullary collecting duct, and the vascular system. Our data demonstrate that NO can be produced locally in the kidney, and that soluble guanylate cyclase is widely distributed in glomerulus, renal tubules, and the vascular system. Images PMID:1379616

  11. Preferential Propagation of Competent SIX2+ Nephronic Progenitors by LIF/ROCKi Treatment of the Metanephric Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Sharma, Nirmala; Hall, Michael D.; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Perantoni, Alan O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nephrogenic stem cell preservation and commitment is fundamental to harnessing the potential of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) for nephron regeneration. Accordingly, we established a culture model that preferentially expands the MM SIX2+ progenitor pool using leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a Rho kinase inhibitor (ROCKi), and extracellular matrix. Passaged MM cells express the key stem cell regulators Six2 and Pax2 and remain competent to respond to WNT4 induction and form mature tubular epithelia and glomeruli. Mechanistically, LIF activates STAT, which binds to a Stat consensus sequence in the Six2 proximal promoter and sustains SIX2 levels. ROCKi, on the other hand, attenuates the LIF-induced differentiation activity of JNK. Concomitantly, the combination of LIF/ROCKi upregulates Slug expression and activates YAP, which maintains SIX2, PAX2, and SALL1. Using this novel model, our study underscores the pivotal roles of SIX2 and YAP in MM stem cell stability. PMID:26321142

  12. Impact of chronic subthalamic high-frequency stimulation on metabolic basal ganglia activity: a 2-deoxyglucose uptake and cytochrome oxidase mRNA study in a macaque model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Wassilios; Guigoni, Celine; Cirilli, Laetitia; Garret, Maurice; Bioulac, Bernard H; Gross, Christian E; Bezard, Erwan; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms of action of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) remain only partially understood. Hitherto, experimental studies have suggested that STN-HFS reduces the activity of STN neurons. However, some recent reports have challenged this view, showing that STN-HFS might also increase the activity of globus pallidus internalis (GPi) neurons that are under strong excitatory drive of the STN. In addition, most results emanate from studies applying acute STN-HFS, while parkinsonian patients receive chronic stimulation. Thus, the present study was designed to assess the effect of chronic (10 days) STN-HFS in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated nonhuman primate. For this purpose, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, a measure of global synaptic activity, was assessed in the basal ganglia and the motor thalamus after chronic unilateral STN-HFS. Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mRNA expression, a marker of efferent metabolic activity, was additionally assessed in the globus pallidus. Chronic STN-HFS (i) reversed abnormally decreased 2-DG uptake in the STN of parkinsonian nonhuman primates, (ii) reversed abnormally increased 2-DG accumulation in the GPi while COI mRNA expression was increased, suggesting global activation of GPi neurons, and (iii) reversed abnormally increased 2-DG uptake in the ventrolateral motor thalamus nucleus. The simultaneous decrease in 2-DG uptake and increase in COI mRNA expression are difficult to reconcile with the current model of basal ganglia function and suggest that the mechanisms by which STN-HFS exerts its clinical benefits are more complex than a simple reversal of abnormal activity in the STN and its targets.

  13. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  14. Enhanced Distal Nephron Sodium Reabsorption in Chronic Angiotensin II Infused Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Seth, Dale M.; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusions enhance urinary excretion of angiotensinogen suggesting augmentation of distal nephron sodium reabsorption. To assess if chronic Ang II infusions (15 ng/min for 2 weeks) enhance distal nephron sodium reabsorption, we compared sodium excretion before and following blockade of the two main distal nephron sodium transporters by iv amiloride (5 mg/kg body weight) plus bendroflumethiazide (12 mg/kg body weight) in male C57/BL6 anesthetized control mice (n=10) and in chronic Ang II-infused mice (n=8). Chronic Ang II infusions increased systolic blood pressure to 141±6 mm Hg compared to 106±4 mm Hg in control mice. After anesthesia, mean arterial pressure averaged 97±4 mm Hg in chronic Ang II-infused mice compared with 94±3 mm Hg in control mice allowing comparison of renal function at similar arterial pressures. Ang II-infused mice had lower urinary sodium excretion (0.16±0.04 versus 0.30±0.05 μEq/min, P<0.05), higher distal sodium reabsorption (1.74±0.18 versus 1.12±0.18 μEq/min, P<0.05) and higher fractional reabsorption of distal sodium delivery (91.1±1.8% versus 77.9±4.3 %, P<0.05) than control mice. Urinary Ang II concentrations, measured during distal blockade, were greater in Ang II infused mice (1235.0±277.2 versus 468.9±146.9 fmol/ml, P<0.05). In chronic Ang II-infused mice treated with spironolactone (n=5), fractional reabsorption of distal sodium delivery was similarly augmented as in chronic Ang II infused mice (94.6±1.7%, P<0.01). These data provide in vivo evidence that there is enhanced distal sodium reabsorption dependent on sodium channel and Na+-Cl− cotransporter activity and increased urinary Ang II concentrations in mice infused chronically with Ang II. PMID:19487583

  15. A nephron-based model of the kidneys for macro-to-micro α-particle dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Robert F; Song, Hong; Huso, David L; Sundel, Margaret H; Sgouros, George

    2012-07-07

    Targeted α-particle therapy is a promising treatment modality for cancer. Due to the short path-length of α-particles, the potential efficacy and toxicity of these agents is best evaluated by microscale dosimetry calculations instead of whole-organ, absorbed fraction-based dosimetry. Yet time-integrated activity (TIA), the necessary input for dosimetry, can still only be quantified reliably at the organ or macroscopic level. We describe a nephron- and cellular-based kidney dosimetry model for α-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy, more suited to the short range and high linear energy transfer of α-particle emitters, which takes as input kidney or cortex TIA and through a macro to micro model-based methodology assigns TIA to micro-level kidney substructures. We apply a geometrical model to provide nephron-level S-values for a range of isotopes allowing for pre-clinical and clinical applications according to the medical internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD) schema. We assume that the relationship between whole-organ TIA and TIA apportioned to microscale substructures as measured in an appropriate pre-clinical mammalian model also applies to the human. In both, the pre-clinical and the human model, microscale substructures are described as a collection of simple geometrical shapes akin to those used in the Cristy-Eckerman phantoms for normal organs. Anatomical parameters are taken from the literature for a human model, while murine parameters are measured ex vivo. The murine histological slides also provide the data for volume of occupancy of the different compartments of the nephron in the kidney: glomerulus versus proximal tubule versus distal tubule. Monte Carlo simulations are run with activity placed in the different nephron compartments for several α-particle emitters currently under investigation in radiopharmaceutical therapy. The S-values were calculated for the α-emitters and their descendants between the different nephron compartments for both the

  16. A nephron-based model of the kidneys for macro-to-micro α-particle dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; Song, Hong; Huso, David L; Sundel, Margaret; Sgouros, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective Targeted α-particle therapy is a promising treatment modality for cancer. Due to the short path-length of α-particles, the potential efficacy and toxicity of these agents is best evaluated by microscale dosimetry calculations instead of whole-organ, absorbed fraction –based dosimetry. Yet time-integrated activity (TIA), the necessary input for dosimetry, can still only be quantified reliably at the organ or macroscopic level. We describe a nephron- and cellular-based kidney dosimetry model for α-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy, more suited to the short range and high linear energy transfer of α-particle emitters, which takes as input kidney or cortex TIA and through a macro to micro model-based methodology assigns TIA to micro-level kidney substructures. We apply the model to provide nephron-level S-values for a range of isotopes allowing for pre-clinical and clinical applications according to the medical internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD) schema. Methods We assume that the relationship between whole-organ TIA and TIA apportioned to microscale substructures as measured in an appropriate pre-clinical mammalian model also applies to the human. In both, the pre-clinical and the human model, microscale substructures are described as a collection of simple geometrical shapes akin go those used in the Cristy-Eckermann phantoms for normal organs. Anatomical parameters are taken from the literature for a human model, while murine parameters are measured, ex vivo. The murine histological slides also provide the data for volume of occupancy of the different compartments of the nephron in the kidney: glomerulus vs. proximal tubule vs. distal tubule. Monte Carlo simulations are run with activity placed in the different nephron compartments for several α-particle emitters currently under investigation in radiopharmaceutical therapy. Results The S-values were calculated for the α-emitters and their descendants between the different nephron compartments

  17. A nephron-based model of the kidneys for macro-to-micro α-particle dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Song, Hong; Huso, David L.; Sundel, Margaret H.; Sgouros, George

    2012-07-01

    Targeted α-particle therapy is a promising treatment modality for cancer. Due to the short path-length of α-particles, the potential efficacy and toxicity of these agents is best evaluated by microscale dosimetry calculations instead of whole-organ, absorbed fraction-based dosimetry. Yet time-integrated activity (TIA), the necessary input for dosimetry, can still only be quantified reliably at the organ or macroscopic level. We describe a nephron- and cellular-based kidney dosimetry model for α-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy, more suited to the short range and high linear energy transfer of α-particle emitters, which takes as input kidney or cortex TIA and through a macro to micro model-based methodology assigns TIA to micro-level kidney substructures. We apply a geometrical model to provide nephron-level S-values for a range of isotopes allowing for pre-clinical and clinical applications according to the medical internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD) schema. We assume that the relationship between whole-organ TIA and TIA apportioned to microscale substructures as measured in an appropriate pre-clinical mammalian model also applies to the human. In both, the pre-clinical and the human model, microscale substructures are described as a collection of simple geometrical shapes akin to those used in the Cristy-Eckerman phantoms for normal organs. Anatomical parameters are taken from the literature for a human model, while murine parameters are measured ex vivo. The murine histological slides also provide the data for volume of occupancy of the different compartments of the nephron in the kidney: glomerulus versus proximal tubule versus distal tubule. Monte Carlo simulations are run with activity placed in the different nephron compartments for several α-particle emitters currently under investigation in radiopharmaceutical therapy. The S-values were calculated for the α-emitters and their descendants between the different nephron compartments for both the

  18. Contribution of individual superficial nephron segments to ammonium handling in chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat. Evidence for ammonia disequilibrium in the renal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, E; Martin, D; Buerkert, J

    1985-01-01

    Ammonia entry along surface nephron segments of rats was studied with micropuncture techniques under control and chronic metabolic acidosis conditions. Tubule fluid was collected successively from sites at the end and beginning of the distal tubule and at the end of the proximal tubule of the same nephron. During chronic metabolic acidosis, ammonium excretion doubled. As anticipated, the ammonium concentration (TFNH+4) was significantly higher in proximal tubule fluid during acidosis, and ammonium delivery to end proximal sites increased from 19.4 +/- 2.3 to 34.0 +/- 3.2 pmol/min (P less than 0.001). Although chronic acidosis did not affect TFNH+4 at the beginning of the distal tubule, ammonium delivery to the end of the distal tubule increased from 5.72 +/- 0.97 to 9.88 +/- 0.97 pmol/min. In both control and acidotic groups ammonium delivery was lower (P less than 0.001) to end distal sites than to end proximal sites, indicating net loss in the intervening segment. This loss was greater during chronic metabolic acidosis (23.9 +/- 3.3 vs. 13.6 +/- 2.0 pmol/min in controls, P less than 0.025). In both groups net entry of ammonia, in similar amounts, occurred along the distal tubule (P less than 0.05). In situ pH averaged 6.80 +/- 0.05 at end proximal tubule sites and fell to 6.54 +/- 0.08 at the beginning of the distal tubule (P less than 0.005). Chronic metabolic acidosis did not affect these measurements. The calculated free ammonia at the end of the proximal tubule rose from 9.3 +/- 2.2 to 21 +/- 9 microM (P less than 0.005) during chronic metabolic acidosis, and was also higher at beginning distal sites during acidosis (8.8 +/- 2.4 vs. 2.7 +/- 0.7 microM in controls, P less than 0.05). In both groups ammonia values for the beginning distal tubule fluid were lower than for end proximal tubule fluid. Thus, loss of ammonium in the loop segment is enhanced by chronic metabolic acidosis. Distal entry of ammonia is markedly less than along the proximal tubule and does

  19. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  20. Vasopressin regulation of sodium transport in the distal nephron and collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Kortenoeven, M L A; Pedersen, N B; Rosenbaek, L L; Fenton, R A

    2015-08-15

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the posterior pituitary gland during states of hyperosmolality or hypovolemia. AVP is a peptide hormone, with antidiuretic and antinatriuretic properties. It allows the kidneys to increase body water retention predominantly by increasing the cell surface expression of aquaporin water channels in the collecting duct alongside increasing the osmotic driving forces for water reabsorption. The antinatriuretic effects of AVP are mediated by the regulation of sodium transport throughout the distal nephron, from the thick ascending limb through to the collecting duct, which in turn partially facilitates osmotic movement of water. In this review, we will discuss the regulatory role of AVP in sodium transport and summarize the effects of AVP on various molecular targets, including the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2, the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter NCC, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC.

  1. Homeostasis, the Milieu Intérieur, and the Wisdom of the Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Zeidel, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of homeostasis has been inextricably linked to the function of the kidneys for more than a century when it was recognized that the kidneys had the ability to maintain the “internal milieu” and allow organisms the “physiologic freedom” to move into varying environments and take in varying diets and fluids. Early ingenious, albeit rudimentary, experiments unlocked a wealth of secrets on the mechanisms involved in the formation of urine and renal handling of the gamut of electrolytes, as well as that of water, acid, and protein. Recent scientific advances have confirmed these prescient postulates such that the modern clinician is the beneficiary of a rich understanding of the nephron and the kidney’s critical role in homeostasis down to the molecular level. This review summarizes those early achievements and provides a framework and introduction for the new CJASN series on renal physiology. PMID:24789550

  2. Nephron-sparing surgery in bilateral Wilms’ tumor: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sohrab; Kudchadkar, Sharmad; Yadav, Priyank; Ansari, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) has been proposed by many as an alternative to bilateral nephrectomies and renal replacement therapy in bilateral Wilms’ tumor (BWT). NSS is not without significant recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. Long-term follow-up, especially with regard to the renal function, remains lacking. Preoperative computed tomography angiogram can help prepare a roadmap for NSS but can underestimate the salvageable parenchyma due to compression of normal adjacent parenchyma. Intraoperative ultrasound can delineate the boundary of surgical margin and help achieve negative margins. We present two cases of BWT, aged 7 and 13 months, managed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by bilateral NSS and adjuvant chemotherapy and report the follow-up of the same. We also explore the role of preoperative imaging and intraoperative ultrasound in the management. Both patients are alive without recurrence at a follow-up of 12 and 8 months. PMID:28057999

  3. Freestanding rGO-SWNT-STN Composite Film as an Anode for Li Ion Batteries with High Energy and Power Densities

    PubMed Central

    Song, Taeseup; Choi, Junghyun; Paik, Ungyu

    2015-01-01

    Freestanding Si-Ti-Ni alloy particles/reduced graphene oxide/single wall carbon nanotube composites have been prepared as an anode for lithium ion batteries via a simple filtration method. This composite electrode showed a 9% increase in reversible capacity, a two-fold higher cycle retention at 50 cycles and a two-fold higher rate capability at 2 C compared to pristine Si-Ti-Ni (STN) alloy electrodes. These improvements were attributed to the suppression of the pulverization of the STN active material by the excellent mechanical properties of the reduced graphene oxide-single wall carbon nanotube networks and the enhanced kinetics associated with both electron and Li ion transport.

  4. Freestanding rGO-SWNT-STN Composite Film as an Anode for Li Ion Batteries with High Energy and Power Densities.

    PubMed

    Song, Taeseup; Choi, Junghyun; Paik, Ungyu

    2015-12-18

    Freestanding Si-Ti-Ni alloy particles/reduced graphene oxide/single wall carbon nanotube composites have been prepared as an anode for lithium ion batteries via a simple filtration method. This composite electrode showed a 9% increase in reversible capacity, a two-fold higher cycle retention at 50 cycles and a two-fold higher rate capability at 2 C compared to pristine Si-Ti-Ni (STN) alloy electrodes. These improvements were attributed to the suppression of the pulverization of the STN active material by the excellent mechanical properties of the reduced graphene oxide-single wall carbon nanotube networks and the enhanced kinetics associated with both electron and Li ion transport.

  5. Subthalamic nucleus involvement in executive functions with increased cognitive load: a subthalamic nucleus and anterior cingulate cortex depth recording study.

    PubMed

    Aulická, Stefania Rusnáková; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Daniel, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Baláž, Marek; Bočková, Martina; Chrastina, Jan; Rektor, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    We studied the appearance of broadband oscillatory changes (ranging 2-45 Hz) induced by a cognitive task with two levels of complexity. The event-related de/synchronizations (ERD/S) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were evaluated in an executive function test. Four epilepsy surgery candidates with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the ACC and three Parkinson's disease patients with externalized deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted in the STN participated in the study. A Flanker test (FT) with visual stimuli (arrows) was performed. Subjects reacted to four types of stimuli presented on the monitor by pushing the right or left button: congruent arrows to the right or left side (simple task) and incongruent arrows to the right or left side (more difficult complex task). We explored the activation of STN and the activation of the ACC while processing the FT. Both conditions, i.e. congruent and incongruent, induced oscillatory changes in the ACC and also STN with significantly higher activation during incongruent trial. At variance with the ACC, in the STN not only the ERD beta but also the ERD alpha activity was significantly more activated by the incongruent condition. In line with our earlier studies, the STN appears to be involved in activities linked with increased cognitive load. The specificity and complexity of task-related activation of the STN might indicate the involvement of the STN in processes controlling human behaviour, e.g. in the selection and inhibition of competing alternatives.

  6. Sex differences in proximal and distal nephron function contribute to the mechanism of idiopathic hypercalcuria in calcium stone formers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Benjamin; Bergsland, Kristin; Gillen, Daniel L; Evan, Andrew P; Clark, Daniel L; Baylock, Jaime; Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M

    2015-07-01

    Idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is a common familial trait among patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Previously, we have demonstrated that hypercalciuria is primarily due to reduced renal proximal and distal tubule calcium reabsorption. Here, using measurements of the clearances of sodium, calcium, and endogenous lithium taken from the General Clinical Research Center, we test the hypothesis that patterns of segmental nephron tubule calcium reabsorption differ between the sexes in IH and normal subjects. When the sexes are compared, we reconfirm the reduced proximal and distal calcium reabsorption. In IH women, distal nephron calcium reabsorption is decreased compared to normal women. In IH men, proximal tubule calcium reabsorption falls significantly, with a more modest reduction in distal calcium reabsorption compared to normal men. Additionally, we demonstrate that male IH patients have lower systolic blood pressures than normal males. We conclude that women and men differ in the way they produce the hypercalciuria of IH, with females reducing distal reabsorption and males primarily reducing proximal tubule function.

  7. Tubuloglomerular Feedback and Single Nephron Function after Converting Enzyme Inhibition in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ploth, David W.; Rudulph, James; Lagrange, Ronald; Navar, L. Gabriel

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were done in normal rats to assess kidney, single nephron, and tubuloglomerular feedback responses during renin-angiotensin blockade with the converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI) SQ 20881 (E. R. Squibb & Sons, Princeton, N. Y.) (3 mg/kg, per h). Converting enzyme inhibition was documented by complete blockade of vascular responses to infusions of angiotensin I (600 ng/kg). Control plasma renin activity was 12.5±2.7 ng angiotensin I/ml per h (mean±SEM) and increased sevenfold with CEI (n = 7). There were parallel increases in glomerular filtration rate from 1.08±0.05 to 1.26±0.05 ml/min and renal blood flow from 6.7±0.4 to 7.5±0.5 ml/min. During CEI infusion absolute and fractional sodium excretion were increased 10-fold. Proximal tubule and peritubular capillary pressures were unchanged. Single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) was measured from both proximal and distal tubule collections; SNGFR based only on distal collections was significantly increased by CEI. A significant difference was observed between SNGFR values measured from proximal and distal tubule sites (6.0±1.6 nl/min) and this difference remained unchanged after CEI administration. Slight decreases in fractional absorption were suggested at micropuncture sites beyond the late proximal tubule, whereas early distal tubule flow rate was augmented by CEI. Tubuloglomerular feedback activity was assessed by measuring changes in proximal tubule stop-flow pressure (SFP) or SNGFR in response to alterations in orthograde microperfusion rate from late proximal tubule sites. During control periods, SFP was decreased 11.2±0.4 mm Hg when the perfusion rate was increased to 40 nl/min; during infusion of CEI, the same increase in perfusion rate resulted in a SFP decrement of 6.7±0.5 mm Hg (P<.001). When late proximal tubule perfusion rate was increased from 0 to 30 nl/min, SNGFR was decreased by 15.0±1.2 nl/min during control conditions, and by 11.3±1.3 nl/min during CEI infusion

  8. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  9. Electrode Position and Current Amplitude Modulate Impulsivity after Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsons Disease—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Rajan, Roopa; Sarma, Sankara; Kishore, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (STN-DBS) is highly effective in alleviating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) which are not optimally controlled by dopamine replacement therapy. Clinical studies and reports suggest that STN-DBS may result in increased impulsivity and de novo impulse control disorders (ICD). Objective/Hypothesis: We aimed to compare performance on a decision making task, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), in healthy conditions (HC), untreated and medically-treated PD conditions with and without STN stimulation. We hypothesized that the position of electrode and stimulation current modulate impulsivity after STN-DBS. Methods: We built a computational spiking network model of basal ganglia (BG) and compared the model's STN output with STN activity in PD. Reinforcement learning methodology was applied to simulate IGT performance under various conditions of dopaminergic and STN stimulation where IGT total and bin scores were compared among various conditions. Results: The computational model reproduced neural activity observed in normal and PD conditions. Untreated and medically-treated PD conditions had lower total IGT scores (higher impulsivity) compared to HC (P < 0.0001). The electrode position that happens to selectively stimulate the part of the STN corresponding to an advantageous panel on IGT resulted in de-selection of that panel and worsening of performance (P < 0.0001). Supratherapeutic stimulation amplitudes also worsened IGT performance (P < 0.001). Conclusion(s): In our computational model, STN stimulation led to impulsive decision making in IGT in PD condition. Electrode position and stimulation current influenced impulsivity which may explain the variable effects of STN-DBS reported in patients. PMID:27965590

  10. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X.; Smith, Roger D.; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  11. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X; Smith, Roger D; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  12. Evaluation of the Hepato and Nephron-Protective Effect of a Polyherbal Mixture using Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adebesin, Olumide Adedapo; Okpuzor, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A polyherbal formulation prepared from a mixture of leaves of Gongronema latifolia, Ocimum gratissimum and Vernonia amygdalina (GOV) was evaluated for hepato-nephro protective properties against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: Normal Wistar albino rats were orally treated with different doses of GOV extract (2, 4 and 8 g/kg b. wt), distilled water and some standard hepatoprotective drugs such as Liv 52 and silymarin for 14 days. However, a day prior to the 14th day, 3 g/kg body weight dose of Acetaminophen (APAP) was administered p.o. 1h before GOV and the standard drugs to induce hepatic and renal damage. The normal control was setup which received only distilled water. The serum levels of liver marker enzymes, biochemical analytes, antioxidant enzymes and hematological parameters were monitored. Results: The results showed that pretreatment of experimental animals with a different doses of the polyherbal formulation dose dependently caused a significant (p≤0.05) increase in the levels of most of the measured hematological parameters but significantly (p≤0.05) reduced the levels of MCV and monocytes when compared to the APAP induced toxin control group. Rats pretreated with GOV exhibited significant (p < 0.05) increase in serum levels of ALP, ALT, AST, GGT, LDH, Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Urea and a subsequent decrease in Albumin, Creatine and Total protein when compared to the normal rats. This trend in enzyme and biochemical analytes levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reversed when compared to toxin control group. GOV significantly (p < 0.05) and dose dependently increased the serum, kidney and hepatic CAT, GPx, GSH, GST, SOD and total protein activity in APAP induced damage in rats compared to the toxin control groups. Conclusion: The data from this study suggest that the polyherbal formulation possess hepato and nephron-protective potential against acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity in rats, thus

  13. Re-appraising contemporary theories of subcortical participation in language: proposing an interhemispheric regulatory function for the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mediation of high-level linguistic processes.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Murdoch, Bruce E; Theodoros, Deborah; Silburn, Peter; Hall, Bruce

    2004-10-01

    Apropos the basal ganglia, the dominant striatum and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have been hypothesized to represent integral components of subcortical language circuitry. Working subcortical language theories, however, have failed thus far to consider a role for the STN in the mediation of linguistic processes, a structure recently defined as the driving force of basal ganglia output. The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of surgically induced functional inhibition of the STN upon linguistic abilities, within the context of established models of basal ganglia participation in language. Two males with surgically induced'lesions'of the dominant and non-dominant dorsolateral STN, aimed at relieving Parkinsonian motor symptoms, served as experimental subjects. General and high-level language profiles were compiled for each subject up to 1 month prior to and 3 months following neurosurgery, within the drug-on state (i.e., when optimally medicated). Comparable post-operative alterations in linguistic performance were observed subsequent to surgically induced functional inhibition of the left and right STN. More specifically, higher proportions of reliable decline as opposed to improvement in post-operative performance were demonstrated by both subjects on complex language tasks, hypothesised to entail the interplay of cognitive-linguistic processes. The outcomes of the current research challenge unilateralised models of functional basal ganglia organisation with the proposal of a potential interhemispheric regulatory function for the STN in the mediation of high-level linguistic processes.

  14. Epithelial cell fate in the nephron tubule is mediated by the ETS transcription factors etv5a and etv4 during zebrafish kidney development.

    PubMed

    Marra, Amanda N; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-03-15

    Kidney development requires the differentiation and organization of discrete nephron epithelial lineages, yet the genetic and molecular pathways involved in these events remain poorly understood. The embryonic zebrafish kidney, or pronephros, provides a simple and useful model to study nephrogenesis. The pronephros is primarily comprised of two types of epithelial cells: transportive and multiciliated cells (MCCs). Transportive cells occupy distinct tubule segments and are characterized by the expression of various solute transporters, while MCCs function in fluid propulsion and are dispersed in a "salt-and-pepper" fashion within the tubule. Epithelial cell identity is reliant on interplay between the Notch signaling pathway and retinoic acid (RA) signaling, where RA promotes MCC fate by inhibiting Notch activity in renal progenitors, while Notch acts downstream to trigger transportive cell formation and block adoption of an MCC identity. Previous research has shown that the transcription factor ets variant 5a (etv5a), and its closely related ETS family members, are required for ciliogenesis in other zebrafish tissues. Here, we mapped etv5a expression to renal progenitors that occupy domains where MCCs later emerge. Thus, we hypothesized that etv5a is required for normal development of MCCs in the nephron. etv5a loss of function caused a decline of MCC number as indicated by the reduced frequency of cells that expressed the MCC-specific markers outer dense fiber of sperm tails 3b (odf3b) and centrin 4 (cetn4), where rescue experiments partially restored MCC incidence. Interestingly, deficiency of ets variant 4 (etv4), a related gene that is broadly expressed in the posterior mesoderm during somitogenesis stages, also led to reduced MCC numbers, which were further reduced by dual etv5a/4 deficiency, suggesting that both of these ETS factors are essential for MCC formation and that they also might have redundant activities. In epistatic studies, exogenous RA

  15. Epithelial cell fate in the nephron tubule is mediated by the ETS transcription factors etv5a and etv4 during zebrafish kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Amanda N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney development requires the differentiation and organization of discrete nephron epithelial lineages, yet the genetic and molecular pathways involved in these events remain poorly understood. The embryonic zebrafish kidney, or pronephros, provides a simple and useful model to study nephrogenesis. The pronephros is primarily comprised of two types of epithelial cells: transportive and multiciliated cells (MCCs). Transportive cells occupy distinct tubule segments and are characterized by the expression of various solute transporters, while MCCs function in fluid propulsion and are dispersed in a “salt-and-pepper” fashion within the tubule. Epithelial cell identity is reliant on interplay between the Notch signaling pathway and retinoic acid (RA) signaling, where RA promotes MCC fate by inhibiting Notch activity in renal progenitors, while Notch acts downstream to trigger transportive cell formation and block adoption of an MCC identity. Previous research has shown that the transcription factor ets variant 5a (etv5a), and its closely related ETS family members, are required for ciliogenesis in other zebrafish tissues. Here, we mapped etv5a expression to renal progenitors that occupy domains where MCCs later emerge. Thus, we hypothesized that etv5a is required for normal development of MCCs in the nephron. etv5a loss of function caused a decline of MCC number as indicated by the reduced frequency of cells that expressed the MCC-specific markers outer dense fiber of sperm tails 3b (odf3b) and centrin 4 (cetn4), where rescue experiments partially restored MCC incidence. Interestingly, deficiency of ets variant 4 (etv4), a related gene that is broadly expressed in the posterior mesoderm during somitogenesis stages, also led to reduced MCC numbers, which were further reduced by dual etv5a/4 deficiency, suggesting that both of these ETS factors are essential for MCC formation and that they also might have redundant activities. In epistatic studies, exogenous RA

  16. The postobstructive kidney. Observations on nephron function after the relief of 24 hr of ureteral ligation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Bercovitch, D. Danny; Kasen, Leonard; Blann, Laurence; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1971-01-01

    After the relief of 24 hr of complete unilateral ureteral obstruction in the dog, the experimental kidney is characterized by a decrease in filtration rate and an increase in fractional and often absolute excretion of sodium before and after the administration of mannitol. In the hydrated state, the failure to conserve sodium is associated with increases in fractional free water clearance and fractional sodium supply to water-freeing sites signifying that the augmented sodium excretion is derived from a proximal source. In the hydropenic state there is decreased fractional free water reabsorption, and sometimes free water excretion, in the postobstructive kidney. An early plateau in free water reabsorption is associated with an increased fractional excretion of sodium. These findings are attributed to the early development of distal nephron impermeability to water as a result of enhanced distal tubular supply and transport of sodium. There is a decrease in maximal tubular reabsorptive capacity (Tm) of glucose in the post-obstructive kidney which is, however, less marked than the decrease in filtration rate. The fall in filtration rate is to some extent likely due to a dropping out of nephrons from the circulation while the remaining nephrons are hypoperfused. The magnitude of the sodium reabsorptive defect is markedly exaggerated as the concentration of nonreabsorbable solute (mannitol) in the glomerular perfusate is increased. It is concluded that the postobstructive increase in sodium excretion during mannitol administration is in part due to a limit in the capacity to reabsorb sodium against a concentration gradient in the proximal tubule. PMID:5552413

  17. SUMOylation regulates telomere length by targeting the shelterin subunit Tpz1Tpp1 to modulate shelterin–Stn1 interaction in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Keisuke; Low, Ross S.; Santosa, Venny; Tsuji, Hiroki; Moser, Bettina A.; Fujisawa, Shiho; Harland, Jennifer L.; Raguimova, Olga N.; Go, Andrew; Ueno, Masaru; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru; Nakamura, Toru M.; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres protect DNA ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes from degradation and fusion, and ensure complete replication of the terminal DNA through recruitment of telomerase. The regulation of telomerase is a critical area of telomere research and includes cis regulation by the shelterin complex in mammals and fission yeast. We have identified a key component of this regulatory pathway as the SUMOylation [the covalent attachment of a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins] of a shelterin subunit in fission yeast. SUMOylation is known to be involved in the negative regulation of telomere extension by telomerase; however, how SUMOylation limits the action of telomerase was unknown until now. We show that SUMOylation of the shelterin subunit TPP1 homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Tpz1) on lysine 242 is important for telomere length homeostasis. Furthermore, we establish that Tpz1 SUMOylation prevents telomerase accumulation at telomeres by promoting recruitment of Stn1-Ten1 to telomeres. Our findings provide major mechanistic insights into how the SUMOylation pathway collaborates with shelterin and Stn1-Ten1 complexes to regulate telomere length. PMID:24711392

  18. Bicarbonate promotes BK-α/β4-mediated K excretion in the renal distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Ryan J; Wen, Donghai; Hatcher, Lori I; Sansom, Steven C

    2012-12-01

    Ca-activated K channels (BK), which are stimulated by high distal nephron flow, are utilized during high-K conditions to remove excess K. Because BK predominantly reside with BK-β4 in acid/base-transporting intercalated cells (IC), we determined whether BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) exhibit deficient K excretion when consuming a high-K alkaline diet (HK-alk) vs. high-K chloride diet (HK-Cl). When wild type (WT) were placed on HK-alk, but not HK-Cl, renal BK-β4 expression increased (Western blot). When WT and β4KO were placed on HK-Cl, plasma K concentration ([K]) was elevated compared with control K diets; however, K excretion was not different between WT and β4KO. When HK-alk was consumed, the plasma [K] was lower and K clearance was greater in WT compared with β4KO. The urine was alkaline in mice on HK-alk; however, urinary pH was not different between WT and β4KO. Immunohistochemical analysis of pendrin and V-ATPase revealed the same increases in β-IC, comparing WT and β4KO on HK-alk. We found an amiloride-sensitive reduction in Na excretion in β4KO, compared with WT, on HK-alk, indicating enhanced Na reabsorption as a compensatory mechanism to secrete K. Treating mice with an alkaline, Na-deficient, high-K diet (LNaHK) to minimize Na reabsorption exaggerated the defective K handling of β4KO. When WT on LNaHK were given NH(4)Cl in the drinking water, K excretion was reduced to the magnitude of β4KO on LNaHK. These results show that WT, but not β4KO, efficiently excretes K on HK-alk but not on HK-Cl and suggest that BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion is promoted by bicarbonaturia.

  19. Degree and Predictors of Functional Loss of the Operated Kidney following Nephron-Sparing Surgery: Assessment by Quantitative SPECT of 99m Tc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Nativ, Ofer; Levi, Amos; Farfara, Roy; Halachmi, Sarel; Moskovitz, Boaz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the degree and predictors of renal function loss of the operated kidney following nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). Material and methods. The study group included 113 patients with renal mass who underwent NSS at our institution. QDMSA before and 3–6 months after surgery was used for evaluation differences in renal function of each kidney. Mean change of percent uptake by the kidney was correlated with various clinical and pathological variables. Results. The overall average decrease of renal function of the operated kidney as measured by QDMSA was 10.5% ± 2.6 SER. Among the studied variables, the most important predictors of postoperative ipsilateral residual kidney function were estimated blood loss (EBL), P = 0.0003, duration of warm ischemia, P = 0.008, patient's age at surgery, P = 0.024, method used for tumor bed closure, P = 0.06, and location of the lesion, P = 0.08. Conclusions. Carful hemostasis, minimal duration of arterial clamping, and use of tissue adhesives to seal tumor bed are associated with maximal preservation of postoperative residual renal function after NSS. These variables should be considered by the operative team when planning the surgical procedure . PMID:21845188

  20. ABCC1 Is Related to the Protection of the Distal Nephron against Hyperosmolality and High Sodium Environment: Possible Implications for Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Leonardo M.; Alvarez, Adriana B.; Rodrigues, Rachel C.; Santos, Diego H. F.; Lopes, Anibal G.; Capella, Marcia A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in protecting cells against oxidative damage. ABCC1 protein transports GSH. Although this protein is largely studied in cancer, due to multidrug resistance phenotype, its role in the tubular cells of the kidney is unknown. The goal of this study was to find out whether ABCC1 has a role in protecting cells from the distal nephron against the stress caused by high medullar osmolality. Main Methods MA104 cells were treated with high concentrations of sodium chloride, urea, or both to raise the osmolality of the culture medium. Cell viability was accessed by MTT and trypan blue assays. ABCC1 expression and extrusion of carboxi-fluorescein (CF), a fluorescent ABCC1 substrate, were measured by flow cytometry. Key Findings Incubation of MA104 cells in a high sodium concentration medium resulted in changes in cell granularity and altered expression and activity of ABCC1. Urea did not alter ABCC1 expression or activity, but reversed the observed NaCl effects. High sodium concentrations also had a negative effect on cell viability and urea also protected cells against this effect. Significance Our findings demonstrate that ABCC1 plays a significant role in the protection of kidney epithelial cells against the stress caused by high sodium environment present in renal medulla. PMID:23840808

  1. Laparoscopic Retroperitoneal Nephron-Sparing Surgery Without Renal Artery Clamping with Preoperative Selective Arterial Embolization for Management of Right Renal Angiomyolipoma of Diameter 10 cm: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hoshii, Tatsuhiko; Morita, Shinichi; Ikeda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Go

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A 38-year-old female without the tuberous sclerosis complex was diagnosed with right renal angiomyolipoma of 10 cm in diameter. She underwent laparoscopic retroperitoneal nephron-sparing surgery without renal artery clamping with preoperative selective arterial embolization to avoid a significant risk of hemorrhage and the damage of the renal function during nephron-sparing surgery. The tumor was resected completely. The time taken to complete the procedure was 4 hours 11 minutes and blood loss was 780 mL. She was transfused 400 mL of autologous blood. PMID:28265590

  2. Phenotyping by magnetic resonance imaging nondestructively measures glomerular number and volume distribution in mice with and without nephron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Baldelomar, Edwin J.; Charlton, Jennifer R.; Beeman, Scott C.; Hann, Bradley D.; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Pearl, Valeria M.; Bertram, John F.; Wu, Teresa; Zhang, Min; Bennett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nephron mass is strongly linked to susceptibility to chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases. There are currently no tools to identify nephropenia in clinical or preclinical diagnostics. Such new methods could uncover novel mechanisms and therapies for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reveal how variation among traits can affect renal function and morphology. Here we used cationized ferritin (CF) enhanced-MRI (CFE-MRI) to investigate the relationship between glomerular number (Nglom) and volume (Vglom) in kidneys of healthy wild type mice and mice with oligosyndactylism (Os/+), a model of congenital nephron reduction. Mice were injected with cationic ferritin and perfused and the resected kidneys imaged with 7T MRI to detect CF-labeled glomeruli. CFE-MRI was used to measure the intrarenal distribution of individual glomerular volumes and revealed two major populations of glomeruli distinguished by size. Spatial mapping revealed that the largest glomeruli were located in the juxtamedullary region in both wild type and Os/+ mice and the smallest population located in the cortex. Os/+ mice had about a 50% reduction and 35% increase of Nglom and Vglom, respectively, in both glomerular populations compared to wild type, consistent with glomerular hypertrophy in the Os/+ mice. Thus, we provide a foundation for whole-kidney, MRI-based phenotyping of mouse renal glomerular morphology and provide new potential for quantitative human renal diagnostics. PMID:26535998

  3. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-06-07

    There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  4. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Paulais, Marc

    2016-01-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl− channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl− conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl− absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl−, and Ca2+ on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca2+ strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl− has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl−/HCO3− exchange in type B intercalated cells. PMID:27574292

  5. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques; Paulais, Marc

    2016-09-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl(-) conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl(-) absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl(-), and Ca(2+) on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca(2+) strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl(-) has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in type B intercalated cells.

  6. Acute saline expansion increases nephron filtration and distal flow rate but maintains tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness: role of adenosine A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhleen; Deng, Aihua; Thomson, Scott C.; Vallon, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Temporal adaptation of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) permits readjustment of the relationship of nephron filtration rate [single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR)] and early distal tubular flow rate (VED) while maintaining TGF responsiveness. We used closed-loop assessment of TGF in hydropenia and after acute saline volume expansion (SE; 10% body wt over 1 h) to determine whether 1) temporal adaptation of TGF occurs, 2) adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) mediate TGF responsiveness, and 3) inhibition of TGF affects SNGFR, VED, or urinary excretion under these conditions. SNGFR was evaluated in Fromter-Wistar rats by micropuncture in 1) early distal tubules (ambient flow at macula densa), 2) recollected from early distal tubules while 12 nl/min isotonic fluid was added to late proximal tubule (increased flow to macula densa), and 3) from proximal tubules of same nephrons (zero flow to macula densa). SE increased both ambient SNGFR and VED compared with hydropenia, whereas TGF responsiveness (proximal-distal difference in SNGFR, distal SNGFR response to adding fluid to proximal tubule) was maintained, demonstrating TGF adaptation. A1R blockade completely inhibited TGF responsiveness during SE and made VED more susceptible to perturbation in proximal tubular flow, but did not alter ambient SNGFR or VED. Greater urinary excretion of fluid and Na+ with A1R blockade may reflect additional effects on the distal nephron in hydropenia and SE. In conclusion, A1R-independent mechanisms adjust SNGFR and VED to higher values after SE, which facilitates fluid and Na+ excretion. Concurrently, TGF adapts and stabilizes early distal delivery at the new setpoint in an A1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:22622464

  7. Production of superoxide from photosystem II-light harvesting complex II supercomplex in STN8 kinase knock-out rice mutants under photoinhibitory illumination.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Nath, Krishna; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    When phosphorylation of Photosystem (PS) II core proteins is blocked in STN8 knock-out mutants of rice (Oryza sativa) under photoinhibitory illumination, the mobilization of PSII supercomplex is prevented. We have previously proposed that more superoxide (O2(-)) is produced from PSII in the mutant (Nath et al., 2013, Plant J. 76, 675-686). Here, we clarify the type and site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using both histochemical and fluorescence probes, we observed that, compared with wild-type (WT) leaves, levels of ROS, including O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were increased when leaves from mutant plants were illuminated with excess light. However, singlet oxygen production was not enhanced under such conditions. When superoxide dismutase was inhibited, O2(-) production was increased, indicating that it is the initial event prior to H2O2 production. In thylakoids isolated from WT leaves, kinase was active in the presence of ATP, and spectrophotometric analysis of nitrobluetetrazolium absorbance for O2(-) confirmed that PSII-driven superoxide production was greater in the mutant thylakoids than in the WT. This contrast in levels of PSII-driven superoxide production between the mutants and the WT plants was confirmed by conducting protein oxidation assays of PSII particles from osstn8 leaves under strong illumination. Those assays also demonstrated that PSII-LHCII supercomplex proteins were oxidized more in the mutant, thereby implying that PSII particles incur greater damage even though D1 degradation during PSII-supercomplex mobilization is partially blocked in the mutant. These results suggest that O2(-) is the major form of ROS produced in the mutant, and that the damaged PSII in the supercomplex is the primary source of O2(-).

  8. Cost Comparison of Online Searching in Four Hosts: Data-Star, Dialog, ESA-IRS and STN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskola, Pirkko; Sormunen, Eero

    1990-01-01

    Describes study that compared the costs of online searching on six databases in four systems. Costs of the search phase and the output phase are analyzed separately; transmission rate and telecommunication costs are examined; and the effects of pricing structures on online searches are discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  9. Functional and oncologic outcomes after nephron-sparing surgery in a solitary kidney: 10 years of experience

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, José Ignacio; Marchiñena, Patricio García; Tirapegui, Federico; Dantur, Augusto; Jurado, Alberto; Gueglio, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate functional and oncologic outcomes of partial nephrectomy (PN) in patients with a solitary kidney. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients with a solitary kidney undergoing nephron-sparing surgery between March 2003 and March 2013 was performed. GFR was recorded before the procedure and 3 months after surgery, thus establishing a change (cGFR). Several variables that may influence cGFR were analyzed. Complications are herein described, namely bleeding, fistula, acute renal failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Local recurrence and margin status are also described. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method (2 patients with metastasis at the time of surgery were excluded from the analysis). Results: Forty-five patients were available for analysis. Median follow-up was 27.56 months (r 3-96). Mean cGFR was-7.12mL/min (SD 2.1). Variables significantly related with lower GFR after surgery were loss of renal mass (p=0.01)) and male gender (p=0.03). Four patients (8.8%) experienced hemorrhage. Nine patients (20%) developed a urinary fistula. Only one patient with bleeding required open surgery. Two patients (4.4%) needed transient dialysis. Three patients (6.6%) developed ESRD. Four patients (8.8%) had positive surgical margins (PSMs) and four patients (88%) had local recurrence (2 of these had PSMs). Five patients (11.1%) died during follow-up. Four patients (8.8%) died because of renal cancer. Estimated 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival and cancer specific survival rates were 88.4% (CI 95% 70.5-96); 87.7% (CI 95% 68.1-96) and 92.4% (CI 95% 75-98), respectively. Conclusion: Loss of renal mass and male gender were associated with lower postoperative GFR. Our outcomes were comparable with those in the World literature. PMID:27256179

  10. The ClC-K2 Chloride Channel Is Critical for Salt Handling in the Distal Nephron.

    PubMed

    Hennings, J Christopher; Andrini, Olga; Picard, Nicolas; Paulais, Marc; Huebner, Antje K; Cayuqueo, Irma Karen Lopez; Bignon, Yohan; Keck, Mathilde; Cornière, Nicolas; Böhm, David; Jentsch, Thomas J; Chambrey, Régine; Teulon, Jacques; Hübner, Christian A; Eladari, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chloride transport by the renal tubule is critical for blood pressure (BP), acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Chloride uptake from the urinary fluid is mediated by various apical transporters, whereas basolateral chloride exit is thought to be mediated by ClC-Ka/K1 and ClC-Kb/K2, two chloride channels from the ClC family, or by KCl cotransporters from the SLC12 gene family. Nevertheless, the localization and role of ClC-K channels is not fully resolved. Because inactivating mutations in ClC-Kb/K2 cause Bartter syndrome, a disease that mimics the effects of the loop diuretic furosemide, ClC-Kb/K2 is assumed to have a critical role in salt handling by the thick ascending limb. To dissect the role of this channel in detail, we generated a mouse model with a targeted disruption of the murine ortholog ClC-K2. Mutant mice developed a Bartter syndrome phenotype, characterized by renal salt loss, marked hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis. Patch-clamp analysis of tubules isolated from knockout (KO) mice suggested that ClC-K2 is the main basolateral chloride channel in the thick ascending limb and in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Accordingly, ClC-K2 KO mice did not exhibit the natriuretic response to furosemide and exhibited a severely blunted response to thiazide. We conclude that ClC-Kb/K2 is critical for salt absorption not only by the thick ascending limb, but also by the distal convoluted tubule.

  11. Using Zebrafish to Study Podocyte Genesis During Kidney Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Paul T.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During development, vertebrates form a progression of up to three different kidneys that are comprised of functional units termed nephrons. Nephron composition is highly conserved across species, and an increasing appreciation of the similarities between zebrafish and mammalian nephron cell types has positioned the zebrafish as a relevant genetic system for nephrogenesis studies. A key component of the nephron blood filter is a specialized epithelial cell known as the podocyte. Podocyte research is of the utmost importance as a vast majority of renal diseases initiate with the dysfunction or loss of podocytes, resulting in a condition known as proteinuria that causes nephron degeneration and eventually leads to kidney failure. Understanding how podocytes develop during organogenesis may elucidate new ways to promote nephron health by stimulating podocyte replacement in kidney disease patients. In this review, we discuss how the zebrafish model can be used to study kidney development, and how zebrafish research has provided new insights into podocyte lineage specification and differentiation. Further, we discuss the recent discovery of podocyte regeneration in adult zebrafish, and explore how continued basic research using zebrafish can provide important knowledge about podocyte genesis in embryonic and adult environments. PMID:24920186

  12. New percutaneous ablative modalities in nephron-sparing surgery of small renal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2004-07-01

    Renal tumors are increasingly detected on abdominal imaging studies. Standard treatment of small renal tumors includes partial or radical nephrectomy, done either open or laparoscopically. Several in situ ablative techniques to treat small renal lesions are currently in various phases of evolution. All involve imparting destructive energy to the tumor while minimizing injury to adjacent normal tissue. Cryotherapy (CryoT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFUS) and high-intensity radiation (HIR) are all being evaluated as tools to ablate renal tumors. The goal with these modalities is to minimize the blood loss, tissue manipulation, and morbidity associated with excisional approaches. Animal studies have shown that large, reproducible lesions can be ablated in normal kidney tissue by these new techniques. Studies of human renal tissue response to RFA are just beginning. Ex vivo studies reveal large, reproducible controlled lesions in normal renal tissue, similar to animal studies. In vivo studies have shown no significant toxicity, while efficacy is currently under evaluation. Preliminary clinical studies in humans have revealed that renal tumors are slow to regress after treatment, but about 75% of these small renal tumors appeared well treated. Mixed responses have been observed in the remaining cases. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of these new minimal invasive techniques and their possible clinical implication in the future.

  13. Myths and facts about the EARLYSTIM study.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, W M Michael; Rau, Jörn; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Krack, Paul; Schnitzler, Alfons; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Timmermann, Lars; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-12-01

    DBS of the STN improves quality of life (QoL) and motor function not only in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), but also in PD with early motor complications, as shown in the recent EARLYSTIM study. In spite of the evidence in favor of STN-DBS, the findings of the EARLYSTIM study have recently been controversially debated. Here, we argue that a placebo or lessebo effect is unlikely to have relevantly contributed to the favorable outcome of STN-DBS in the EARLYSTIM study. The method of quantification of the placebo effect of DBS in a previous publication reveals flaws leading to implausible results, and therefore the placebo effect of DBS remains currently elusive, especially because blinding of PD patients with STN-DBS as a crucial preassumption for assessing a placebo effect is practically impossible. Moreover, we claim that the extent of such a placebo effect is most likely very small. Specific challenges of STN-DBS at an earlier stage of PD and inclusion criteria are the risk of inclusion of patients who later evolve to atypical parkinsonism, the risk of a floor effect for the benefit from DBS, the need for experienced multidisciplinary care including prevention of suicidal behavior, and the need for highly qualified long-term follow-up. The EARLYSTIM study has shown that STN-DBS may be proposed earlier on in the course of PD, as soon as motor complications start to cause relevant disability despite proper medical management. This can lead to a gain of several years of improved QoL.

  14. Relevance of renal-specific oxidoreductase in tubulogenesis during mammalian nephron development.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Yashpal S; Yang, Qiwei; Tian, Yufeng; Lin, Sun; Wada, Jun; Chugh, Sumant; Srivastava, Satish K

    2002-04-01

    Renal-specific oxidoreductase (RSOR), an enzyme relevant to diabetic nephropathy, is exclusively expressed in renal tubules. Studies were initiated to determine whether, like other tubule-specific proteins, it selectively modulates tubulogenesis. Northern blot analyses revealed a approximately 1.5-kb transcript, and RSOR expression was detectable in mice embryonic kidneys at day 13, gradually increased by day 17, and extended into neo- and postnatal periods. RSOR mRNA and protein expression was confined to proximal tubules, commencing at gestational day 17 and increasing subsequently, but remained absent in glomeruli and medulla. Treatment with RSOR antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a dose-dependent dysmorphogenesis of metanephric explants harvested at gestational day 13. The explants were smaller and had expanded mesenchyme, and the population of tubules was markedly decreased. The glomeruli were unaffected, as assessed by mRNA expression of glomerular epithelial protein 1 and reactivity with wheat germ agglutinin. Antisense treatment led to a selective reduction of RSOR mRNA. Immunoprecipitation also indicated a selective translational blockade of RSOR. These findings suggest that RSOR is developmentally regulated, exhibits a distinct spatiotemporal distribution, and probably plays a role in tubulogenesis.

  15. A cross validation study of deep brain stimulation targeting: from experts to atlas-based, segmentation-based and automatic registration algorithms.

    PubMed

    Castro, F Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Meuli, Reto; Maeder, Philippe; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Validation of image registration algorithms is a difficult task and open-ended problem, usually application-dependent. In this paper, we focus on deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. DBS involves implantation of an electrode deep inside the brain to electrically stimulate specific areas shutting down the disease's symptoms. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has turned out to be the optimal target for this kind of surgery. Unfortunately, the STN is in general not clearly distinguishable in common medical imaging modalities. Usual techniques to infer its location are the use of anatomical atlases and visible surrounding landmarks. Surgeons have to adjust the electrode intraoperatively using electrophysiological recordings and macrostimulation tests. We constructed a ground truth derived from specific patients whose STNs are clearly visible on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted images. A patient is chosen as atlas both for the right and left sides. Then, by registering each patient with the atlas using different methods, several estimations of the STN location are obtained. Two studies are driven using our proposed validation scheme. First, a comparison between different atlas-based and nonrigid registration algorithms with a evaluation of their performance and usability to locate the STN automatically. Second, a study of which visible surrounding structures influence the STN location. The two studies are cross validated between them and against expert's variability. Using this scheme, we evaluated the expert's ability against the estimation error provided by the tested algorithms and we demonstrated that automatic STN targeting is possible and as accurate as the expert-driven techniques currently used. We also show which structures have to be taken into account to accurately estimate the STN location.

  16. Robotic-assisted transperitoneal nephron-sparing surgery for small renal masses with associated surgical procedures: surgical technique and preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Graziano; Codacci-Pisanelli, Massimo; Patriti, Alberto; Ceribelli, Cecilia; Biancafarina, Alessia; Casciola, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    Small renal masses (T1a) are commonly diagnosed incidentally and can be treated with nephron-sparing surgery, preserving renal function and obtaining the same oncological results as radical surgery. Bigger lesions (T1b) may be treated in particular situations with a conservative approach too. We present our surgical technique based on robotic assistance for nephron-sparing surgery. We retrospectively analysed our series of 32 consecutive patients (two with 2 tumours and one with 4 bilateral tumours), for a total of 37 robotic nephron-sparing surgery (RNSS) performed between June 2008 and July 2012 by a single surgeon (G.C.). The technique differs depending on tumour site and size. The mean tumour size was 3.6 cm; according to the R.E.N.A.L. Nephrometry Score 9 procedures were considered of low, 14 of moderate and 9 of hight complexity with no conversion in open surgery. Vascular clamping was performed in 22 cases with a mean warm ischemia time of 21.5 min and the mean total procedure time was 149.2 min. Mean estimated blood loss was 187.1 ml. Mean hospital stay was 4.4 days. Histopathological evaluation confirmed 19 cases of clear cell carcinoma (all the multiple tumours were of this nature), 3 chromophobe tumours, 1 collecting duct carcinoma, 5 oncocytomas, 1 leiomyoma, 1 cavernous haemangioma and 2 benign cysts. Associated surgical procedures were performed in 10 cases (4 cholecystectomies, 3 important lyses of peritoneal adhesions, 1 adnexectomy, 1 right hemicolectomy, 1 hepatic resection). The mean follow-up time was 28.1 months ± 12.3 (range 6-54). Intraoperative complications were 3 cases of important bleeding not requiring conversion to open or transfusions. Regarding post-operative complications, there were a bowel occlusion, 1 pleural effusion, 2 pararenal hematoma, 3 asymptomatic DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and 1 transient increase in creatinine level. There was no evidence of tumour recurrence in the follow-up. RNSS is a safe and feasible technique

  17. Connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus pars interna to regions within the speech network: a meta-analytic connectivity study.

    PubMed

    Manes, Jordan L; Parkinson, Amy L; Larson, Charles R; Greenlee, Jeremy D; Eickhoff, Simon B; Corcos, Daniel M; Robin, Donald A

    2014-07-01

    Cortico-basal ganglia connections are involved in a range of behaviors within motor, cognitive, and emotional domains; however, the whole-brain functional connections of individual nuclei are poorly understood in humans. The first aim of this study was to characterize and compare the connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) using meta-analytic connectivity modeling. Structure-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses were performed for STN and GPi seeds using archived functional imaging coordinates from the BrainMap database. Both regions coactivated with caudate, putamen, thalamus, STN, GPi, and GPe, SMA, IFG, and insula. Contrast analyses also revealed coactivation differences within SMA, IFG, insula, and premotor cortex. The second aim of this study was to examine the degree of overlap between the connectivity maps derived for STN and GPi and a functional activation map representing the speech network. To do this, we examined the intersection of coactivation maps and their respective contrasts (STN > GPi and GPi > STN) with a coordinate-based meta-analysis of speech function. In conjunction with the speech map, both STN and GPi coactivation maps revealed overlap in the anterior insula with GPi map additionally showing overlap in the supplementary motor area (SMA). Among cortical regions activated by speech tasks, STN was found to have stronger connectivity than GPi with regions involved in cognitive linguistic processes (pre-SMA, dorsal anterior insula, and inferior frontal gyrus), while GPi demonstrated stronger connectivity to regions involved in motor speech processes (middle insula, SMA, and premotor cortex).

  18. Vocal emotion decoding in the subthalamic nucleus: An intracranial ERP study in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Renaud, Olivier; Haegelen, Claire; Tamarit, Lucas; Milesi, Valérie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul; Grandjean, Didier

    2017-01-12

    Using intracranial local field potential (LFP) recordings in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS), we explored the electrophysiological activity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in response to emotional stimuli in the auditory modality. Previous studies focused on the influence of visual stimuli. To this end, we recorded LFPs within the STN in response to angry, happy, and neutral prosodies in 13 patients with PD who had just undergone implantation of DBS electrodes. We observed specific modulation of the right STN in response to anger and happiness, as opposed to neutral prosody, occurring at around 200-300ms post-onset, and later at around 850-950ms post-onset for anger and at around 3250-3350ms post-onset for happiness. Taken together with previous reports of modulated STN activity in response to emotional visual stimuli, the present results appear to confirm that the STN is involved in emotion processing irrespective of stimulus valence and sensory modality.

  19. Severe Salt-Losing Syndrome and Hyperkalemia Induced by Adult Nephron-Specific Knockout of the Epithelial Sodium Channel α-Subunit.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Romain; Boscardin, Emilie; Malsure, Sumedha; Sergi, Chloé; Maillard, Marc P; Loffing, Johannes; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sørensen, Mads Vaarby; Koesters, Robert; Rossier, Bernard C; Frateschi, Simona; Hummler, Edith

    2016-08-01

    Systemic pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) is a severe salt-losing syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and characterized by neonatal life-threatening hypovolemia and hyperkalemia. The very high plasma aldosterone levels detected under hypovolemic or hyperkalemic challenge can lead to increased or decreased sodium reabsorption, respectively, through the Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). However, the role of ENaC deficiency remains incompletely defined, because constitutive inactivation of individual ENaC subunits is neonatally lethal in mice. We generated adult inducible nephron-specific αENaC-knockout mice (Scnn1a(Pax8/LC1)) that exhibit hyperkalemia and body weight loss when kept on a regular-salt diet, thus mimicking PHA-1. Compared with control mice fed a regular-salt diet, knockout mice fed a regular-salt diet exhibited downregulated expression and phosphorylation of NCC protein, despite high plasma aldosterone levels. In knockout mice fed a high-sodium and reduced-potassium diet (rescue diet), although plasma aldosterone levels remained significantly increased, NCC expression returned to control levels, and body weight, plasma and urinary electrolyte concentrations, and excretion normalized. Finally, shift to a regular diet after the rescue diet reinstated the symptoms of severe PHA-1 syndrome and significantly reduced NCC phosphorylation. In conclusion, lack of ENaC-mediated sodium transport along the nephron cannot be compensated for by other sodium channels and/or transporters, only by a high-sodium and reduced-potassium diet. We further conclude that hyperkalemia becomes the determining factor in regulating NCC activity, regardless of sodium loss, in the ENaC-mediated salt-losing PHA-1 phenotype.

  20. Port-site metastasis as a primary complication following retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma or nephron-sparing surgery: A report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; WANG, KAI; ZHONG, DACHUAN; LIU, XIA; SUN, JI; LIN, LIANXIANG; GE, LINNA; YANG, BO

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the clinical data of two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma and one patient with renal carcinoma who developed port-site metastasis following retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery. The current study aimed to identify the cause and prognosis of the occurrence of port-site metastasis subsequent to laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma and nephron-sparing surgery. Post-operative pathology confirmed the presence of high-grade urothelial cell carcinoma in two patients and Fuhrman grade 3 renal clear cell carcinoma in one patient. Port-site metastasis was initially detected 1–7 months post-surgery. The two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma succumbed to the disease 2 and 4 months following the identification of the port-site metastasis, respectively, whereas the patient with renal carcinoma survived with no disease progression during the targeted therapy period. The occurrence of port-site metastasis may be attributed to systemic and local factors. Measures to reduce the development of this complication include strict compliance with the operating guidelines for tumor surgery, avoidance of air leakage at the port-site, complete removal of the specimen with an impermeable bag, irrigation of the laparoscopic instruments and incisional wound with povidone-iodine when necessary, and enhancement of the body's immunity. Close post-operative follow-up observation for signs of recurrence or metastasis is essential, and systemic chemotherapy may be required in patients with high-grade renal pelvis carcinoma and renal carcinoma in order to prolong life expectancy. PMID:27313720

  1. A 2D model of axial symmetry for proximal tubule of an average human nephron: indicative results of diffusion, convection and absorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insfrán, J. F.; Ubal, S.; Di Paolo, y. J.

    2016-04-01

    A simplified model of a proximal convoluted tubule of an average human nephron is presented. The model considers the 2D axisymmetric flow of the luminal solution exchanging matter with the tubule walls and the peritubular fluid by means of 0D models for the epithelial cells. The tubule radius is considered to vary along the conduit due to the trans-epithelial pressure difference. The fate of more than ten typical solutes is tracked down by the model. The Navier-Stokes and Reaction-Diffusion-Advection equations (considering the electro-neutrality principle) are solved in the lumen, giving a detailed picture of the velocity, pressure and concentration fields, along with trans-membrane fluxes and tubule deformation, via coupling with the 0D model for the tubule wall. The calculations are carried out numerically by means of the finite element method. The results obtained show good agreement with those published by other authors using models that ignore the diffusive transport and disregard a detailed calculation of velocity, pressure and concentrations. This work should be seen as a first approach towards the development of a more comprehensive model of the filtration process taking place in the kidneys, which ultimately helps in devising a device that can mimic/complement the renal function.

  2. Comparison of frequencies of non motor symptoms in Indian Parkinson’s disease patients on medical management versus deep brain stimulation: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rukmini Mridula, Kandadai; Borgohain, Rupam; Jabeen, Shaik Afshan; Padmaja, Gaddamanugu; Bandaru, VCS Srinivasarao; Ankathi, Praveen; Kanikannan, Meena A; Ali Khan, Mohammed Shujath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non motor symptoms (NMS) of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a major cause of disability and recognition of these symptoms and treatment is important for comprehensive health care. Deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) has been shown to improve motor symptoms in PD and effects on NMS are unknown. To investigate the NMS among PD patients who underwent STN DBS. Methods: We recruited prospectively 56 patients with PD, who had undergone bilateral STN DBS and 53 age and duration of illness matched PD patients on dopaminergic therapy (controls). NMS were assessed using 30 item questionnaire NMS Quest. These questions evaluated 9 domains, gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, sexual, cognition (apathy/attention/memory), anxiety/depression, hallucinations/delusions, sleep and miscellaneous. Comparison was done on individual symptoms as well as in various domains. This study was carried at Nizam’s Institution of Medical Sciences and study period was from January 2011 to December 2012. Results: Patients who underwent STN DBS had a significantly lower mean total score on NMS quest (6.7 ± 3.8) compared to controls (8.4 ± 3.7) (P < 0.00100). Symptoms in the domains of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, sleep were significantly less frequent while sexual disturbances were significantly more frequent among patients compared to controls. On individual symptom analysis, nocturia  (P < 0.00010), unexplained pains (P < 0.00010), nausea and vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, depression, and insomnia were less prevalent, while sexual disturbances were significantly more common in STN DBS group compared to controls. Conclusion: Bilateral STN DBS not only improves the motor symptoms but also improves many NMS in PD patients. PMID:26056553

  3. Immunolocalization of hyperpolarization-activated cationic HCN1 and HCN3 channels in the rat nephron: regulation of HCN3 by potassium diets.

    PubMed

    López-González, Zinaeli; Ayala-Aguilera, Cosete; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Galicia-Cruz, Othir; Salvador-Hernández, Carolina; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Medeiros, Mara; Hernández, Ana Maria; Escobar, Laura I

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cationic and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) comprise four homologous subunits (HCN1-HCN4). HCN channels are found in excitable and non-excitable tissues in mammals. We have previously shown that HCN2 may transport ammonium (NH4 (+)), besides sodium (Na(+)), in the rat distal nephron. In the present work, we identified HCN1 and HCN3 in the proximal tubule (PT) and HCN3 in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) of the rat kidney. Immunoblot assays detected HCN1 (130 kDa) and HCN3 (90 KDa) and their truncated proteins C-terminal HCN1 (93 KDa) and N-terminal HCN3 (65 KDa) in enriched plasma membranes from cortex (CX) and outer medulla (OM), as well as in brush-border membrane vesicles. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed apical localization of HCN1 and HCN3 in the PT. HCN3 was also found at the basolateral membrane of TALH. We evaluated chronic changes in mineral dietary on HCN3 protein abundance. Animals were fed with three different diets: sodium-deficient (SD) diet, potassium-deficient (KD) diet, and high-potassium (HK) diet. Up-regulation of HCN3 was observed in OM by KD and in CX and OM by HK; the opposite effect occurred with the N-terminal truncated HCN3 in CX (KD) and OM (HK). SD diet did not produce any change. Since HCN channels activate with membrane hyperpolarization, our results suggest that HCN channels may play a role in the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, contributing to Na(+), K(+), and acid-base homeostasis in the rat kidney.

  4. Special Morphological Features at the Interface of the Renal Stem/Progenitor Cell Niche Force to Reinvestigate Transport of Morphogens During Nephron Induction

    PubMed Central

    Minuth, Will W.; Denk, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Formation of a nephron depends on reciprocal signaling of different morphogens between epithelial and mesenchymal cells within the renal stem/progenitor cell niche. Previously, it has been surmised that a close proximity exists between both involved cell types and that morphogens are transported between them by diffusion. However, actual morphological data illustrate that mesenchymal and epithelial stem/progenitor cell bodies are separated by a striking interface. Special fixation of specimens by glutaraldehyde (GA) solution including cupromeronic blue, ruthenium red, or tannic acid for electron microscopy depicts that the interface is not void but filled in extended areas by textured extracellular matrix. Surprisingly, projections of mesenchymal cells cross the interface to contact epithelial cells. At those sites the plasma membranes of a mesenchymal and an epithelial cell are connected via tunneling nanotubes. Regarding detected morphological features in combination with involved morphogens, their transport cannot longer be explained solely by diffusion. Instead, it has to be sorted according to biophysical properties of morphogens and to detected environment. Thus, the new working hypothesis is that morphogens with good solubility such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are transported by diffusion. Morphogens with minor solubility such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted and stored for delivery on demand in illustrated extracellular matrix. In contrast, morphogens with poor solubility such as Wnts are transported in mesenchymal cell projections along the plasma membrane or via illustrated tunneling nanotubes. However, the presence of an intercellular route between mesenchymal and epithelial stem/progenitor cells by tunneling nanotubes also makes it possible that all morphogens are transported this way. PMID:26862472

  5. Renal clearance studies of effect of left atrial distension in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the water diuresis of left atrial distension in 16 dogs on the basis of clearance studies employing hydration, chronic and acute salt loading, deoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess, and distal tubular nephron blockade with diuretics. The diuresis was found in hydrated and salt-loaded dogs and was independent of DOCA and presumed renin depletion. It was not found in five dogs after distal tubular blockade. No significant reproducible saluresis was ever documented. The water diuresis was always stopped by exogenous vasopressin (seven dogs). Antidiuretic hormone inhibition with distal tubular nephron water permeability changes appears to be the sole mechanism of the diuresis of left atrial distension in the dog.

  6. A Micropuncture Study of Potassium Excretion by the Remnant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Norman; Aynedjian, Hagop S.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of enhanced potassium excretion by the remaining nephrons of the remnant kidney, micropuncture and clearance experiments were carried out in rats after surgical ablation of 3/4 of the total renal mass. The potassium intake in all animals was approximately 5 meq/day. Animals were studied 24 h and 10-14 days after 3/4 nephrectomy. Balance measurements in the chronic animals before micropuncture study indicated that 24 h K+ excretion by the remnant kidney was equal to that of the two kidneys before ablation of renal mass. Measurements of distal tubular inulin and potassium concentrations revealed progressive reabsorption of potassium in this segment of the nephron in both the 24-h and chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats, as well as in normal control rats. A large increase in tubular fluid potassium content occurred between the end of the distal tubule and the final urine in the 3/4-nephrectomized rats, but not in the normal controls. These observations suggest that the segment of the nephron responsible for enhanced potassium excretion by remaining nephrons was the collecting duct. In additional experiments, potassium was completely eliminated from the diet of chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats before micropuncture study. In these animals, no addition of K+ occurred beyond the distal tubules. Normal rats infused with 0.15 M KCl to acutely elevate serum K+ concentration, demonstrated reabsorption of K+ in the distal tubule and a large addition of K+ to the urine beyond the distal tubule. We conclude that the collecting duct is the major site of regulation of urinary potassium excretion in normal rats and is responsible for the adaptation to nephron loss by the remnant kidney. PMID:4703232

  7. Effects of maternal vitamin A status on kidney development: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, Paul; Kurpad, Anura; Rekha, Swarna; Muthayya, Sumitra; Dwarkanath, Pratibha; Iyengar, Arpana; Philip, Babu; Mhaskar, Arun; Benjamin, Alice; Maharaj, Suran; Laforte, Diane; Raju, Chandhana; Phadke, Kishore

    2007-02-01

    Nephron endowment ranges widely in normal human populations. Recent autopsy studies have drawn attention to the possibility that subtle congenital nephron deficits may be associated with increased risk of developing hypertension later in life. Since modest maternal vitamin A deficiency reduces nephron number in rats, we designed a pilot study to determine the prevalence of maternal vitamin A deficiency in Montreal (Canada) and Bangalore (India) and the usefulness of newborn renal volume as a surrogate for nephron endowment. Among 48 pregnant Montreal women, two (4%) had one isolated mid-gestation retinol level slightly below the accepted limit of normal (0.9 mumol/L), whereas 25 (55%) of 46 pregnant women in Bangalore had at least one sample below this limit. Average estimated retinoid intake was correlated with mean serum retinol in pregnant women from Bangalore. In Montreal where maternal vitamin A deficiency was negligible, we found that newborn renal volume (estimated by renal ultrasonography at 2-6 weeks of age) was correlated with surface area at birth and was inversely correlated with serum creatinine at 1 month. Interestingly, renal volume adjusted for body surface area in Montreal (184+/-44 ml/m(2)) was significantly greater than in Bangalore (114+/-33 ml/m(2)) (p<0.01). Definitive studies are needed to establish whether maternal vitamin A deficiency accounts for subtle renal hypoplasia in Indian newborns. If so, there may be important public health implications for regions of the world where maternal vitamin A deficiency is prevalent.

  8. Potential role of fluctuations in the composition of renal tubular fluid through the nephron in the initiation of Randall's plugs and calcium oxalate crystalluria in a computer model of renal function.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W G

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an updated computer model which attempts to simulate known renal reabsorption and secretion activity through the nephron (NEPHROSIM) and its possible relevance to the initiation of calcium-containing renal stones. The model shows that, under certain conditions of plasma composition, de novo nucleation of both calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaP) can take place at the end of the descending limb of the Loop of Henle (DLH), particularly in untreated, recurrent idiopathic CaOx stone-formers (RSF). The model incorporates a number of hydrodynamic factors that may influence the subsequent growth of crystals nucleated at the end of the DLH as they progress down the renal tubules. These include the fact that (a) crystals of either CaOx or CaP nucleated at the end of the DLH and travelling close to the walls of the tubule travel at slower velocities than the fluid flowing at the central axis of the tubule, (b) the transit of CaOx crystals travelling close to the tubule walls may be delayed for up to at least 25 min, during which time the crystals may continue to grow if the relative supersaturation with respect to CaOx (RSS CaOx) is high enough and (c) such CaOx crystals may stop moving or even fall back in upward-draining collecting ducts (CD) owing to the Stokes gravitational effect. The model predicts, firstly, that for small, transient increases in plasma oxalate concentration, crystallisation only takes place in the CD and leads to the formation of small crystals which are comfortably passed in the urine and, secondly, that for slightly greater increases in the filtered load of oxalate, spontaneous and/or heterogeneous nucleation of CaOx may occur both at the end of the DLH and in the CD. This latter situation leads to the passage in the final urine of a mixture of large crystals of CaOx (arising from nucleation at the end of the DLH) and small crystals of CaOx (as a result of nucleation originating in the CD). As a result of the

  9. Prospective comparative study on cost-effectiveness of subthalamic stimulation and best medical treatment in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Valldeoriola, Francesc; Morsi, Ossama; Tolosa, Eduardo; Rumià, Jordi; Martí, Maria José; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2007-11-15

    This is an open, prospective, longitudinal study designed to compare two cohorts of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease during 1 year, one undergoing bilateral subthalamic stimulation (STN-DBS) and the other receiving the best medical treatment (BMT), with respect to the clinical effects observed and the medical expenses produced. Assessments were done by using clinical measures and a generic health related quality of life scale. A questionnaire was used to collect direct healthcare resources. As a measure of cost-effectiveness, we calculated life years gained adjusted by health-related quality of life (QALY) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Clinical and demographic variables of both groups were comparable at baseline. Total UPDRS scores improved from 50.5 +/- 3.6 to 28.5 +/- 3.8 in STN-DBS patients and worsened from 44.3 +/- 3.3 to 54.2 +/- 4 in the control group. Pharmacological costs in the operated patients were 3,799 +/- 940 euro, while in the BMT group the costs were 13,208 +/- 4,966 euro. Other medical costs were 1,280 +/- 720 euro in the STN-DBS group and 4,017 +/- 2,962 euro in BMT patients. Nondirect medical costs were 4,079 +/- 1,289 in operated patients and 2,787 +/- 1,209 euro in the BMT group. Mean QALYs were 0.7611 +/- 0.03 in STN-DBS and 0.5401 +/- 0.06 in BMT patients. In STN-DBS patients, the ICER needed to obtain an improvement of one point in the total UPDRS score was of 239.8 euro and the ICER/QALY was of 34,389 euro. Cost-effectiveness parameters were mostly related to the degree of clinical improvement and the reduction of pharmacological costs after STN-DBS. An ICER of 34,389 euro/QALY is within appropriate limits to consider subthalamic stimulation as an efficient therapy.

  10. Study of Immunohistochemical Markers (CK-19, CD-56, Ki-67, p53) in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Solitary Thyroid Nodules with special Reference to Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Smriti Sudhanshu; Joshi, Avinash R; Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Bhayekar, Pallavi; Jadhav, Amruta; Nayar, Musphera; Kambale, Neelam S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Solitary Thyroid Nodule (STN) has provoked increased concern owing to higher incidence of malignancy. The inter and intra observer variation in the histomorphological diagnosis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas (PTC) may sometimes pose a diagnostic difficulty. Aim This study was undertaken to analyse immunohistochemical (IHC) markers (CK-19, CD-56, p53, Ki-67) to differentiate between benign and malignant surgically resected STN along with their utility in the identification of PTC. Materials and Methods The present cross sectional study was conducted over a period of 4 years. A technique of manual tissue array was employed for cases subjected to IHC. The primary antibodies used were CK-19, CD-56, p53 and Ki-67. Analysis of the expression of IHC markers (p53, Ki-67) to distinguish between benign and malignant STN was done. Evaluation and correlation of expression of IHC markers (CK-19, CD-56) to determine its utility in reaching definitive diagnosis and assessing prognosis of PTC was tried. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. The results were considered to be significant when the p-value <0.05. Results Out of the 160 cases of surgically resected STN specimens, 68 cases were non-neoplastic, 24 cases were benign and 68 cases were of malignant tumours (7 cases of follicular carcinoma (FCa), 61 cases of PTC). CK-19 was found to be a sensitive (83.61%) and a highly specific positive marker (100%) for the diagnosis of PTC. The difference in CD-56 expression between PTC and non-PTC group was found to be highly statistically significant. CD-56 was found to be a sensitive (85.86%) and specific (82.25%) negative marker in differentiating PTC from follicular lesions/neoplasms. The difference in p53 expression between the malignant and non-malignant STN cases was found to be highly statistically significant with a sensitivity and specificity 85.29% and 70.65% respectively. The statistical difference in mean Ki-67 Labeling Index (LI) was found to be

  11. Evidence of Subthalamic PGO-like Waves During REM Sleep in Humans: A Deep Brain Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mendoza, Julio; Lozano, Beatriz; Seijo, Fernando; Santamarta-Liébana, Elena; Ramos-Platón, Maria José; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernández-González, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine whether the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a role in the transmission of PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans. Design: Simultaneous recordings from deep brain electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs), and standard polysomnography to ascertain sleep/wake states. Setting: Main Hospital, department of clinical neurophysiology sleep laboratory. Participants: 12 individuals with Parkinson's disease, with electrodes implanted in the STN; and, as a control for localization purposes, 4 cluster headache patients with electrodes implanted in the posterior hypothalamus. Interventions: All subjects underwent functional neurosurgery for implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. Results: Sharp, polarity-reversed LFPs were recorded within the STN during REM sleep in humans. These subthalamic PGO-like waves (2–3 Hz, 80–200 μV, and 300–500 msec) appeared during REM epochs as singlets or in clusters of 3–13 waves. During the pre-REM period, subthalamic PGO-like waves were temporally related to drops in the submental electromyogram and/or onset of muscular atonia. Clusters of PGO-like waves occurred typically before and during the bursts of rapid eye movements and were associated with an enhancement in fast (15–35 Hz) subthalamic oscillatory activity. Conclusion: Subthalamic PGO-like waves can be recorded during pre-REM and REM sleep in humans. Our data suggest that the STN may play an active role in an ascending activating network implicated in the transmission of PGO waves during REM sleep in humans. Citation: Fernández-Mendoza J; Lozano B; Seijo F; Santamarta-Liébana E; Ramos-Platón MJ; Vela-Bueno A; Fernández-González F. Evidence of subthalamic PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans: a deep brain polysomnographic study. SLEEP 2009;32(9):1117-1126. PMID:19750916

  12. Epidemiological characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream isolates from a Chinese Burn Institute: A three-year study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangtao; Yin, Supeng; Xiang, Lijuan; Gong, Yali; Sun, Kedai; Luo, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Zichen; Deng, Liuyang; Jiang, Bei; Jin, Shouguang; Chen, Jing; Peng, Yizhi

    2016-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infection is a serious threat to burn patients. Bacteremia due to A. baumannii is becoming the most common cause of mortality following burn. However, the epidemiology of A. baumannii causing burn-related bloodstream infections has rarely been reported. We retrospectively collected 81 A. baumannii isolates from the bloodstream of burn patients over a three-year period. Antibiotic susceptibility tests, the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant genes and sequence typing (ST) were conducted to characterize these strains. Most of the isolates showed an extensive drug-resistant phenotype. The resistance frequencies to imipenem and meropenem were 94% and 91%, respectively. The blaOXA-23-like gene, AmpC, IS-AmpC, PER and SIM are the five most prevalent resistant genes, and their prevalence rates are 93% (75/81), 86% (70/81), 73% (59/81), 73% (59/81) and 52% (42/81), respectively. The 81 isolates were grouped into 10 known and 18 unknown ST types, with ST368 (38%) being the most prevalent. Except for ST457 and four new types (STn2, STn6, STn11 and STn14), the remaining 23 ST types belonged to one clonal complex 92, which is most common among clinical isolate in China. The above results indicated that ST368 isolates possessing both the blaOXA-23-like gene and ampC gene were the main culprits of the increasing nosocomial A. baumannii infection in this study. More attention should be paid to monitoring the molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates from burn patients to prevent further distribution. Such information may help clinicians with therapeutic decisions and infection control in the Burns Institute.

  13. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in the post-CORAL era part 2: new directions in Transcatheter Nephron Salvage following flawed revascularization trials.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Sos, Thomas A; Benli, Caghan; Sal, Oguzhan; Rossignol, Patrick; Ortiz, Alberto; Solak, Yalcin; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Unlike endovascular therapeutic studies for atherosclerosis in many other vascular beds, major trials regarding endovascular renovascular revascularization have resulted in a stagnating equipoise. However, every major trial completed for this topic thus far has suffered from major methodological flaws that limit the validity and external generalizability of their results. Furthermore, certain patient populations who are known to benefit from renovascular revascularization may never be studied because they cannot be ethically withheld from life-saving treatment. Forthcoming percutaneous techniques may one day complement angioplasty and stenting in a burgeoning era of cellular modulation and endovascular-directed renal regeneration.

  14. Optimising renal cancer patients for nephron-sparing surgery: a review of pre-operative considerations and peri-operative techniques for partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ertemi, Hani; Khetrapal, Pramit; Pavithran, Nevil M; Mumtaz, Faiz

    2017-02-03

    Nonmodifiable factors including pre-operative renal function and amount of healthy renal tissue preserved are the most important predictive factors that determine renal function after partial nephrectomy. Ischaemia time is an important modifiable risk factor and cold ischaemia time should be used if longer ischaemia time is anticipated. New techniques may have a role in maximising postoperative kidney function, but more robust studies are required to understand their potential benefits and risks.

  15. Aerosol-cloud interactions studied with the chemistry-climate model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Tost, H.; Steil, B.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-08-01

    This study uses the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model to simulate cloud properties and estimate cloud radiative effects induced by aerosols. We have tested two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation parameterizations, i.e., the standard STN (osmotic coefficient model) and hybrid (HYB, replacing the osmotic coefficient by the κ hygroscopicity parameter) schemes to calculate aerosol hygroscopicity and critical supersaturation, and consider aerosol-cloud feedbacks with a focus on warm clouds. Both prognostic schemes (STN and HYB) account for aerosol number, size and composition effects on droplet nucleation, and are tested in combination with two different cloud cover parameterizations, i.e., a relative humidity threshold and a statistical cloud cover scheme (RH-CLC and ST-CLC). The use of either STN and HYB leads to very different cloud radiative effects, particularly over the continents. The STN scheme predicts highly effective CCN activation in warm clouds and hazes/fogs near the surface. The enhanced CCN activity increases the cloud albedo effect of aerosols and cools the Earth's surface. The cooler surface enhances the hydrostatic stability of the lower continental troposphere and thereby reduces convection and convective precipitation. In contrast, the HYB simulations calculate lower, more realistic CCN activation and consequent cloud albedo effect, leading to relatively stronger convection and high cloud formation. The enhanced high clouds increase greenhouse warming and moderate the cooling effect of the low clouds. With respect to the cloud radiative effects, the statistical ST-CLC scheme shows much higher sensitivity to aerosol-cloud coupling for all continental regions than the RH-CLC threshold scheme, most pronounced for low clouds but also for high clouds. Simulations of the short wave cloud radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere in ST-CLC are a factor of 2-8 more sensitive to aerosol coupling than the RH-CLC configurations. The long wave

  16. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline*

    PubMed Central

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter−1 of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter−1 for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  17. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G

    2015-07-31

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter(-1) of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter(-1) for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways.

  18. COMPARISON OF DATA FROM THE STN AND IMPROVE NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two national chemical speciation-monitoring networks operate currently within the United States. The Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) monitoring network operates primarily in rural areas collecting aerosol and optical data to better understand th...

  19. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  20. Glomerular Dynamic Studies of the Pathogenesis of Acute Renal Failure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-30

    IAD-A174 113 GLOMERULAR DYNAMIC STUDIES OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANOTE 1/1 RENAL FAILURE(U) VIRGINIA COMNWEALTH UNIV RICHMOND I D E OKEN 3e JUN 84...8217i1 . d /or 1 Special June 30, 1984 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 Contract...values might be underestimated by tubular inulin leakage if measured in the customary fashion.) Nephron filtration fraction was estimated from the

  1. Postnatal development of renal function: micropuncture and clearance studies in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Horster, Michael; Valtin, Heinz

    1971-01-01

    Postnatal renal development was studied in dogs between 2 and 77 days. Single, superficial nephrons were evaluated by micropuncture, concurrently with measurements of total renal function and morphometric analyses in the same animals. Glomerular filtration rate for the entire kidney increased linearly from 0.13 ml/min per g kidney weight at 2 days to 0.91 at 77 days. Extraction of p-aminohippurate increased from about 20 to 80%, and renal plasma flow per g kidney weight, measured as Cpah/Epah, increased threefold during the same period. Filtration fraction increased to the mature value during the first half of the postnatal period studied. The clearance of urea per unit of renal mass increased with age, whereas the fraction of filtered urea reabsorbed declined during the early part of the postnatal period. The pattern of fractional urea reabsorption may be due mainly to increased medullary recycling of urea and to a rise in the reabsorption of water from the medullary collecting duct. Urine osmolality was higher than plasma from birth onward and rose with age. Osmolal equality of collecting duct fluid and medullary interstitium reflected mature vasopressin (ADH)-induced water permeability. The rise in urinary concentration was predominantly due to increasing medullary sequestration of urea. Glomerular filtration rate of the superficial nephron increased from 3.2 nl/min at 21 days, when subcapsular nephrons were uniformly patent, to 23.1 at 77 days. Despite this rise in filtered load, fractional reabsorption of sodium and water in superficial proximal tubules was constant and at the mature level from the onset of intratubular perfusion. Changes in arterial plasma protein concentration, in filtration fraction, and in the hydrostatic pressure gradient between proximal tubule and peritubular capillary may interact to maintain glomerulotubular balance. The data, together with results of an accompanying morphological study, demonstrate a sequence of coordinated changes

  2. Vehicular traffic effects on survival within the Washington University-EPRI veterans cohort: new estimates and sensitivity studies.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, F W; Wyzga, R E; Baty, Jack D; Miller, J Phillip

    2008-08-01

    We analyzed survival patterns among approximately 70,000 U.S. male military veterans relative to vehicular traffic density in their counties of residence, by mortality period and type of exposure model. Previous analyses show traffic density to be a better predictor than concentrations of criteria air pollutants. We considered all subjects and also the subset defined by availability of air quality monitoring data from the U.S. EPA PM(2.5) Speciation Trends Network (STN). Traffic density is a robust predictor of mortality in this cohort; statistically significant estimates of deaths associated with traffic range from 1.3% to 4.4%, depending on the method of analysis. This range of uncertainty is larger than the traditional 95% confidence intervals for each estimate (1-2%). Our best estimate of the relative risk for the entire follow-up period is 1.03. These deaths occurred mainly before 1997 in counties with STN air quality data, which tend to be more urban. We identified a threshold in mortality responses to traffic density, corresponding to county-average traffic flow rates of about 4000 vehicles/day. Relative risks were significantly higher in the more urban (STN) counties in the early subperiods, but this gradient appears to have diminished over time. We found larger risks by pooling results from separate portions of the overall follow-up period, relative to considering the entire period at once, which suggests temporal changes in confounding risk factors such as smoking cessation, for example. These results imply that the true uncertainties in cohort studies may exceed those indicated by the confidence intervals from a single modeling approach.

  3. The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goelz, Lisa C; David, Fabian J; Sweeney, John A; Vaillancourt, David E; Poizner, Howard; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease improves skeletomotor function assessed clinically, and bilateral STN DBS improves motor function to a significantly greater extent. It is unknown whether unilateral STN DBS improves oculomotor function and whether bilateral STN DBS improves it to a greater extent. Further, it has also been shown that bilateral, but not unilateral, STN DBS is associated with some impaired cognitive-motor functions. The current study compared the effect of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on sensorimotor and cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Patients performed prosaccade and antisaccade tasks during no stimulation, unilateral stimulation, and bilateral stimulation. There were three sets of findings. First, for the prosaccade task, unilateral STN DBS had no effect on prosaccade latency and it reduced prosaccade gain; bilateral STN DBS reduced prosaccade latency and increased prosaccade gain. Second, for the antisaccade task, neither unilateral nor bilateral stimulation had an effect on antisaccade latency, unilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain, and bilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain to a greater extent. Third, bilateral STN DBS induced an increase in prosaccade errors in the antisaccade task. These findings suggest that while bilateral STN DBS benefits spatiotemporal aspects of oculomotor control, it may not be as beneficial for more complex cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Our findings are discussed considering the strategic role the STN plays in modulating information in the basal ganglia oculomotor circuit.

  4. Resting-state functional connectivity of subthalamic nucleus in different Parkinson's disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Huizi; Ma, Lingyan; Wu, Tao; Feng, Tao

    2016-12-15

    Previous studies showed that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathophysiology. During rest, PD phenotypes exhibit different STN functional connectivity. STN functional connectivity was examined in 31 PD patients [12 tremor-dominant (TD) and 19 posture instability gait difficulty (PIGD)] and 22 healthy controls (HC). Compared with controls and PIGD patients, the TD patients exhibited higher functional connectivity between the bilateral STN and the left cerebellar anterior lobe. Compared with the TD and HC groups, in the PIGD subgroup functional connectivity was lower between the left putamen and the STN, as well as between the pons and the STN. In the PIGD subgroup, functional connectivity was greater between the STN and bilateral occipital lobe, which positively correlated with PIGD scores in PD patients. Additionally, STN-cerebellum connectivity positively correlated with the tremor score, and STN-putamen connectivity negatively correlated with the PIGD score in PD patients. PD subtypes with distinguished STN functional connectivity might explain the various pathophysiological mechanisms in tremor and gait disorders. Increased coupling between the STN and cerebellum might underlie the neural substrate of PD tremors. Lower functional connectivity between the STN and putamen might underpin PD gait and posture disturbances, while higher functional connectivity between the STN and visual cortex might play a compensatory role.

  5. Studies of the sensing mechanism in the tubuloglomerular feedback pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, F S; Mandin, H; Persson, A E

    1982-08-01

    Two aspects of the single nephron feedback response previously observed by us have been reexamined. The first, the effect of modifying the composition of fluid used to perfuse the loop of Henle of a single nephron, was studied in rats by comparing flow-induced changes in stop-flow pressure (PSF) with three different perfusion solutions: artificial tubule fluid (ATF); 0.3 M mannitol (M); and mannitol plus 25 to 30 mM sodium chloride (M + E). The second, triggering of the feedback response by injection of ionic current into the distal tubule, was studied in similarly prepared rats by monitoring PSF while passing current. Increasing the rate of loop of Henle perfusion with either ATF or M + E resulted in similar decreases in PSF. In contrast, with M, changes in PSF were usually transient and if persistent were smaller than the changes observed with the other two solutions. When loops of Henle were perfused with ATF at a constant rate, injection of current into the early distal tubule making the lumen more negative resulted in decreases in PSF. Currents of opposite polarity caused no change in PSF if loop flow rate was low; these currents increased PSF if the loop flow rates had previously been high. Current-induced feedback responses were obtained with micropipette electrodes filled with either potassium chloride or lithium acetate. Addition of 10(-4) M furosemide blocked the current-induced feedback responses.

  6. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Meijer, Hil G E; van Gils, Stephan A; Krupa, Martin; Heida, Tjitske; Rudolph, Michelle; Wadman, Wytse J; Martens, Hubert C F

    2009-10-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay neuron, which received GABAergic projections from this nucleus; (ii) the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the response of the TC relay neuron to synchronized GPi oscillations; and (iii) the functional basis of the inverse relationship that has been reported between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude, required to alleviate PD motor symptoms [A. L. Benabid et al. (1991)Lancet, 337, 403-406]. The TC relay neuron selectively responded to and relayed synchronized GPi inputs bursting at a frequency located in the range 2-25 Hz. Input selectivity of the TC relay neuron is dictated by low-threshold calcium current dynamics and passive membrane properties of the neuron. STN-DBS prevented the TC relay neuron from relaying synchronized GPi oscillations to cortex. Our model indicates that DBS alters BG output and input selectivity of the TC relay neuron, providing an explanation for the clinically observed inverse relationship between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude.

  7. Facilitating effects of deep brain stimulation on feedback learning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Sarah Nadine; Südmeyer, Martin; Keitel, Ariane; Pollok, Bettina; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-10-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) provides an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms. However, findings of effects on cognitive function such as feedback learning remain controversial and rare. The aim of the present study was to gain a better understanding of cognitive alterations associated with STN-DBS. Therefore, we investigated effects of STN-DBS on active and observational feedback learning in PD. 18 PD patients with STN-DBS and 18 matched healthy controls completed active and observational feedback learning tasks. Patients were investigated ON and OFF STN-DBS. Tasks consisted of learning (with feedback) and test phases (without feedback). STN-DBS improved active learning during feedback trials and PD patients ON (but not OFF) STN-DBS showed comparable performance patterns as healthy controls. No STN-DBS effect was found when assessing performance during active test trials without feedback. In this case, however, STN-DBS effects were found to depend on symptom severity. While more impaired patients benefited from STN-DBS, stimulation had no facilitating effect on patients with less severe symptoms. Along similar lines, the severity of motor symptoms tended to be significantly correlated with differences in active test performance due to STN-DBS. For observational feedback learning, there was a tendency for a positive STN-DBS effect with patients reaching the performance level of healthy controls only ON STN-DBS. The present data suggest that STN-DBS facilitates active feedback learning in PD patients. Furthermore, they provide first evidence that STN-DBS might not only affect learning from own but also from observed actions and outcomes.

  8. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has beneficial antiparkinsonian effects on motor functions in rats, but less efficiency in a choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Darbaky, Yassine; Forni, Claude; Amalric, Marianne; Baunez, Christelle

    2003-08-01

    Chronic subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN HFS) improves motor function in Parkinson's disease. However, its efficacy on cognitive function and the mechanisms involved are less known. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of STN HFS in hemiparkinsonian awake rats performing different specific motor tests and a cognitive operant task. Unilateral STN HFS applied in unilaterally DA-depleted rats decreased the apomorphine-induced circling behaviour and reduced catalepsy induced by the neuroleptic haloperidol. DA-depleted rats exhibited severe deficits in the operant task, among which the inability to perform the task was not alleviated by STN HFS. However, in a few animals showing less impairment, STN HFS significantly reduced the contralateral neglect induced by the lesion. These results are the first to demonstrate a beneficial effect of STN HFS applied in awake rats on basic motor functions. However, STN HFS appears to be less effective on impaired cognitive functions.

  9. Site of Action of Antidiuretic Hormone on Mammalian Nephrons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    beginning of the stop-flow periods, ureteral pressure was raised to that of mean blood pressure by means of a mercury manometer , through a small...imposed through one of the needles by a mercury manometer and chnages in pressure transmitted to the needles at varied distances (0-5 mm) from the

  10. Hepcidin regulates intrarenal iron handling at the distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Moulouel, Boualem; Houamel, Dounia; Delaby, Constance; Tchernitchko, Dimitri; Vaulont, Sophie; Letteron, Philippe; Thibaudeau, Olivier; Puy, Hervé; Gouya, Laurent; Beaumont, Carole; Karim, Zoubida

    2013-10-01

    Hepcidin, the key regulatory hormone of iron homeostasis, and iron carriers such as transferrin receptor1 (TFR1), divalent metal transporter1 (DMT1), and ferroportin (FPN) are expressed in kidney. Whether hepcidin plays an intrinsic role in the regulation of renal iron transport is unknown. Here, we analyzed the renal handling of iron in hemochromatosis Hepc(-/-) and Hjv(-/-) mouse models, as well as in phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-treated mice. We found a marked medullary iron deposition in the kidneys of Hepc(-/-) mice, and iron leak in the urine. The kidneys of Hepc(-/-) mice exhibited a concomitant decrease in TFR1 and increase in ferritin and FPN expression. Increased FPN abundance was restricted to the thick ascending limb (TAL). DMT1 protein remained unaffected despite a significant decrease of its mRNA level, suggesting that DMT1 protein is stabilized in the absence of hepcidin. Treatment of kidney sections from Hepc(-/-) mice with hepcidin decreased DMT1 protein, an effect confirmed in renal cell lines where hepcidin markedly decreased (55)Fe transport. In the kidneys of Hjv(-/-) mice exhibiting low hepcidin expression, the iron overload was similar to that in the kidneys of Hepc(-/-) mice. However, in PHZ mice, iron accumulation resulting from hemoglobin leak was detected in the proximal tubule. Thus, kidneys exhibit a tissue-specific handling of iron that depends on the extra iron source. Hepcidin may control the expression of iron transporters to prevent renal iron overload.

  11. 3-D Imaging and Simulation for Nephron Sparing Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Liu, Jen-Jane

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) is now considered the procedure of choice for small renal masses largely based on functional advantages over traditional open surgery. Lack of haptic feedback, the need for spatial understanding of tumor borders, and advanced operative techniques to minimize ischemia time or achieve zero-ischemia PN are among factors that make MIPN a technically demanding operation with a steep learning curve for inexperienced surgeons. Surgical simulation has emerged as a useful training adjunct in residency programs to facilitate the acquisition of these complex operative skills in the setting of restricted work hours and limited operating room time and autonomy. However, the majority of available surgical simulators focus on basic surgical skills, and procedure-specific simulation is needed for optimal surgical training. Advances in 3-dimensional (3-D) imaging have also enhanced the surgeon's ability to localize tumors intraoperatively. This article focuses on recent procedure-specific simulation models for laparoscopic and robotic-assisted PN and advanced 3-D imaging techniques as part of pre- and some cases, intraoperative surgical planning.

  12. Asymmetric right/left encoding of emotions in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Renana; Shamir, Reuben R.; Linetsky, Eduard; Rosenbluh, Ovadya; Moshel, Shay; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Emotional processing is lateralized to the non-dominant brain hemisphere. However, there is no clear spatial model for lateralization of emotional domains in the basal ganglia. The subthalamic nucleus (STN), an input structure in the basal ganglia network, plays a major role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). This role is probably not limited only to the motor deficits of PD, but may also span the emotional and cognitive deficits commonly observed in PD patients. Beta oscillations (12–30 Hz), the electrophysiological signature of PD, are restricted to the dorsolateral part of the STN that corresponds to the anatomically defined sensorimotor STN. The more medial, more anterior and more ventral parts of the STN are thought to correspond to the anatomically defined limbic and associative territories of the STN. Surprisingly, little is known about the electrophysiological properties of the non-motor domains of the STN, nor about electrophysiological differences between right and left STNs. In this study, microelectrodes were utilized to record the STN spontaneous spiking activity and responses to vocal non-verbal emotional stimuli during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries in human PD patients. The oscillation properties of the STN neurons were used to map the dorsal oscillatory and the ventral non-oscillatory regions of the STN. Emotive auditory stimulation evoked activity in the ventral non-oscillatory region of the right STN. These responses were not observed in the left ventral STN or in the dorsal regions of either the right or left STN. Therefore, our results suggest that the ventral non-oscillatory regions are asymmetrically associated with non-motor functions, with the right ventral STN associated with emotional processing. These results suggest that DBS of the right ventral STN may be associated with beneficial or adverse emotional effects observed in PD patients and may relieve mental symptoms in other neurological and psychiatric

  13. Functional and morphologic damage in the neonatally irradiated canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Peneyra, R.S.; Jaenke, R.S.

    1985-11-01

    Perinatal irradiation of the developing kidney results in progressive glomerulosclerosis (PGS) and renal failure. This syndrome may result from direct radiation damage to mature deep cortical nephrons and/or nephron functional adaptations resulting from outer cortical nephron ablation. Beagle dogs received single, whole-body exposures (330 R) to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation at 4 days of age (IR4) to study the combined effects of direct radiation damage and nephron loss, or at 30 days of age (IR30) to study the effects of renal irradiation alone. To study the effects of nephron loss alone, dogs underwent unilateral nephrectomy (UN4) or superficial hyperthermic renal ablation (HY4) at 4 days of age. Nephron loss due to irradiation (IR4) and partial renal ablation (UN4 and HY4) was associated with compensatory nephron hypertrophy and increased single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR), while irradiation at 30 days resulted in transitory decreased SNGFR. Similar degrees of PGS occurred in IR4 dogs which experienced both irradiation and loss of nephrons and UN4 and HY4 dogs which experienced only loss of nephrons. PGS of lesser severity also occurred in IR30 dogs. These findings indicate that PGS associated with perinatal renal irradiation results from direct radiation damage to deep cortical nephrons and compensatory functional changes occurring in response to loss of renal mass.

  14. Types of neurons of the subthalamic nucleus and zona incerta in the guinea pig--Nissl and Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Robak, A; Bogus-Nowakowska, K; Szteyn, S

    2000-01-01

    The studies were carried out on the subthalamus of adult guinea pigs. Golgi impregnation, Nissl and Klüver-Barrera methods were used for the study. In Nissl stained sections the subthalamic neuronal population consists of multipolar, fusiform, oval and pear-shaped perikarya. In two studied areas: nucleus subthalamicus (STN) and zona incerta (ZI) three types of neurons were distinguished. Type I, multipolar neurons with quadrangular, triangular or oval perikarya. They have 3-6 primary dendrites which run slightly wavy and spread out in all directions. Type II, bipolar neurons with fusiform or semilunar perikarya, they have two primary dendrites. Type III, pear-shaped neurons with 1-2 dendritic trunks arising from one pole of the neuron. In all types of neurons axon emerges from the perikaryon or initial segment of a dendritic trunk and can be followed at a maximum distance of about 50 microns.

  15. Reduced Vglut2/Slc17a6 Gene Expression Levels throughout the Mouse Subthalamic Nucleus Cause Cell Loss and Structural Disorganization Followed by Increased Motor Activity and Decreased Sugar Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Anttila, Casey J.A.; Nordenankar, Karin; Arvidsson, Emma; Mahmoudi, Souha; Zampera, André; Wärner Jonsson, Hanna; Bergquist, Jonas; Lévesque, Daniel; Andersson, Malin; Dumas, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a central role in motor, cognitive, and affective behavior. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN is the most common surgical intervention for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), and STN has lately gained attention as target for DBS in neuropsychiatric disorders, including obsessive compulsive disorder, eating disorders, and addiction. Animal studies using STN-DBS, lesioning, or inactivation of STN neurons have been used extensively alongside clinical studies to unravel the structural organization, circuitry, and function of the STN. Recent studies in rodent STN models have exposed different roles for STN neurons in reward-related functions. We have previously shown that the majority of STN neurons express the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 gene (Vglut2/Slc17a6) and that reduction of Vglut2 mRNA levels within the STN of mice [conditional knockout (cKO)] causes reduced postsynaptic activity and behavioral hyperlocomotion. The cKO mice showed less interest in fatty rewards, which motivated analysis of reward-response. The current results demonstrate decreased sugar consumption and strong rearing behavior, whereas biochemical analyses show altered dopaminergic and peptidergic activity in the striatum. The behavioral alterations were in fact correlated with opposite effects in the dorsal versus the ventral striatum. Significant cell loss and disorganization of the STN structure was identified, which likely accounts for the observed alterations. Rare genetic variants of the human VGLUT2 gene exist, and this study shows that reduced Vglut2/Slc17a6 gene expression levels exclusively within the STN of mice is sufficient to cause strong modifications in both the STN and the mesostriatal dopamine system. PMID:27699212

  16. Studies of the electrical potential difference in rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Seely, J F; Chirito, E

    1975-07-01

    The electrical potential difference (PD) in the rat proximal convoluted tubule was investigated in vivo as a function of distance from the glomerulus. The PD was found to be invariably negative (up to -4.5 mV) in the earliest segments (less than 0.5 mm from the glomerulus) and rose to positive values (+2 to +4) in the later segments (1 mm beyond the glomerulus). This change in PD correlated with the bubule fluid-to-plasma (TF/P) chloride ratios, which rose from unity in the early segments to approximately 1.3 in the late. Corresponding changes in PD and chloride ratios could be elicited by single-nephron stop-flow techniques in the early segments. Luminal perfusion techniques demonstrated a direct relationship between PD and tubule fluid chloride concentration. Acetazolamide was found to significantly reduce both late proximal PD (less than +2 mV) and TF/P chloride ratios (less than 1.06). Split-drop studies demonstrated that the negative PD in the early proximal tubule was dependent on the presence of glucose and alanine and the absence of a chloride gradient, whereas in the late proximal tubule under the same conditions the PD was not significantly different from zero. In this segment of the nephron the positive PD in free flow appeared to result from the chloride diffusion potential generated by preferential HCO3 reabsorption. These results provide further demonstration of intrinsic differences in the transport properties along the length of the proximal convoluted tubule.

  17. Zebrafish nephrogenesis involves dynamic spatiotemporal expression changes in renal progenitors and essential signals from retinoic acid and irx3b

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Rebecca A.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney nephrons are comprised of proximal and distal tubule segments that perform unique roles in excretion. The developmental pathways that establish nephron segment identities from renal progenitors are poorly understood. Here, we used the zebrafish pronephros to study nephron segmentation. We found that zebrafish nephron progenitors undergo elaborate spatiotemporal expression changes of many genes before adopting a segment fate. Initially, two domains of nephron progenitors are established, then are subdivided and demarcate individual nephron segments. Using genetic and chemical genetic models of retinoic acid (RA) deficiency, we discovered that RA modulates rostral progenitor formation. To delineate downstream pathways, we knocked down the irx3b transcription factor and found it regulates proximal tubule segment size and distal segment differentiation. Our results suggest a model whereby RA patterns the early field of nephron progenitors, with subsequent factors like irx3b acting to refine later progenitor subdomains and ensure activation of segment-specific gene programs. PMID:21761484

  18. Tremor-correlated neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Amtage, Florian; Henschel, Kathrin; Schelter, Björn; Vesper, Jan; Timmer, Jens; Lücking, Carl Hermann; Hellwig, Bernhard

    2008-09-19

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD) is generated by an oscillatory neuronal network consisting of cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) which is part of the basal ganglia is of particular interest, since deep brain stimulation of the STN is an effective treatment for PD including Parkinsonian tremor. It is controversial if and how the STN contributes to tremor generation. In this study, we analyze neuronal STN activity in seven patients with Parkinsonian rest tremor who underwent stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation. Surface EMG was recorded from the wrist flexors and extensors. Simultaneously, neuronal spike activity was registered in different depths of the STN using an array of five microelectrodes. After spike-sorting, spectral coherence was analyzed between spike activity of STN neurons and tremor activity. Significant coherence at the tremor frequency was detected between EMG and neuronal STN activity in 76 out of 145 neurons (52.4%). In contrast, coherence in the beta band occurred only in 10 out of 145 neurons (6.9%). Tremor-coherent STN activity was widely distributed over the STN being more frequent in its dorsal parts (70.8-88.9%) than in its ventral parts (25.0-48.0%). Our results suggest that synchronous neuronal STN activity at the tremor frequency contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinsonian tremor. The wide-spread spatial distribution of tremor-coherent spike activity argues for the recruitment of an extended network of subthalamic neurons for tremor generation.

  19. Bilateral high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on attentional performance: transient deleterious effects and enhanced motivation in both intact and parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Baunez, Christelle; Christakou, Anastasia; Chudasama, Yogita; Forni, Claude; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2007-01-01

    It is now well established that subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation (STN HFS) alleviates motor problems in Parkinson's disease. However, its efficacy for cognitive function remains a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of STN HFS in rats performing a visual attentional task. Bilateral STN HFS was applied in intact and in bilaterally dopamine (DA)-depleted rats. In all animals, STN HFS had a transient debilitating effect on all the variables measured in the task. In DA-depleted rats, STN HFS did not alleviate the deficits induced by the DA lesion such as omissions and latency to make correct responses, but induced perseverative approaches to the food magazine, an indicator of enhanced motivation. In sham-operated controls, STN HFS significantly reduced accuracy and induced perseverative behaviour, mimicking partially the effects of bilateral STN lesions in the same task. These results are in line with the hypothesis that STN HFS only partially mimics inactivation of STN produced by lesioning and confirm the motivational exacerbation induced by STN inactivation. PMID:17331214

  20. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on strength, bradykinesia, and electromyographic patterns of the ankle joint in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Sturman, Molly M; Bakay, Roy A E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the control of movement in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after they received surgically implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The experiment studied ankle strength, movement velocity, and the associated electromyographic patterns in PD patients, six of whom had tremor at the ankle. The patients were studied off treatment, ON STN deep brain stimulation (DBS), on medication, and on medication plus STN DBS. Twelve matched control subjects were also examined. Medication alone and STN DBS alone increased patients' ankle strength, ankle velocity, agonist muscle burst amplitude, and agonist burst duration, while reducing the number of agonist bursts during movement. These findings were similar for PD patients with and without tremor. The combination of medication plus STN DBS normalized maximal strength at the ankle joint, but ankle movement velocity and electromyographic patterns were not normalized. The findings are the first to demonstrate that STN DBS and medication increase strength and movement velocity at the ankle joint.

  1. The subthalamic nucleus during decision-making with multiple alternatives.

    PubMed

    Keuken, Max C; Van Maanen, Leendert; Bogacz, Rafal; Schäfer, Andreas; Neumann, Jane; Turner, Robert; Forstmann, Birte U

    2015-10-01

    Several prominent neurocomputational models predict that an increase of choice alternatives is modulated by increased activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In turn, increased STN activity allows prolonged accumulation of information. At the same time, areas in the medial frontal cortex such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the pre-SMA are hypothesized to influence the information processing in the STN. This study set out to test concrete predictions of STN activity in multiple-alternative decision-making using a multimodal combination of 7 Tesla structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and ancestral graph (AG) modeling. The results are in line with the predictions in that increased STN activity was found with an increasing amount of choice alternatives. In addition, our study shows that activity in the ACC is correlated with activity in the STN without directly modulating it. This result sheds new light on the information processing streams between medial frontal cortex and the basal ganglia.

  2. The sensitivity of health effect estimates from time-series studies to fine particulate matter component sampling schedule.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Sheppard, Lianne; Hannigan, Michael P; Dutton, Steven J; Peel, Jennifer L; Clark, Maggie L; Vedal, Sverre

    2013-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency air pollution monitoring data have been a valuable resource commonly used for investigating the associations between short-term exposures to PM2.5 chemical components and human health. However, the temporally sparse sampling on every third or sixth day may affect health effect estimation. We examined the impact of non-daily monitoring data on health effect estimates using daily data from the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study. Daily concentrations of four PM2.5 chemical components (elemental and organic carbon, sulfate, and nitrate) and hospital admission counts from 2003 through 2007 were used. Three every-third-day time series were created from the daily DASH monitoring data, imitating the US Speciation Trend Network (STN) monitoring schedule. A fourth, partly irregular, every-third-day time series was created by matching existing sampling days at a nearby STN monitor. Relative risks (RRs) of hospital admissions for PM2.5 components at lags 0-3 were estimated for each data set, adjusting for temperature, relative humidity, longer term temporal trends, and day of week using generalized additive models, and compared across different sampling schedules. The estimated RRs varied somewhat between the non-daily and daily sampling schedules and between the four non-daily schedules, and in some instances could lead to different conclusions. It was not evident which features of the data or analysis were responsible for the variation in effect estimates, although seeing similar variability in resampled data sets with relaxation of the every-third-day constraint suggests that limited power may have had a role. The use of non-daily monitoring data can influence interpretation of estimated effects of PM2.5 components on hospital admissions in time-series studies.

  3. Subthalamic 6-OHDA-induced lesion attenuates levodopa-induced dyskinesias in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J A

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives direct dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra pars compacta that degenerates in Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of dopaminergic denervation of STN in the origin of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats were distributed in four groups which were concomitantly lesioned with 6-OHDA or vehicle (sham) in the STN and in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as follows: a) MFB-sham plus STN-sham, b) MFB-sham plus STN-lesion, c) MFB-lesion plus STN-sham, and d) MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion. Four weeks after lesions, animals were treated with levodopa (6mg/kg with 15mg/kg benserazide i.p.) twice daily for 22 consecutive days. Abnormal involuntary movements were measured. In situ hybridization was performed measuring the expression of striatal preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, STN cytochrome oxidase (CO) and nigral GAD67 mRNAs. STN 6-OHDA denervation did not induce dyskinesias in levodopa-treated MFB-sham animals but attenuated axial (p<0.05), limb (p<0.05) and orolingual (p<0.01) dyskinesias in rats with a concomitant lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The attenuation of dyskinesias was associated with a decrease in the ipsilateral STN CO mRNA levels (p<0.05). No significant differences between MFB-lesion plus STN-sham and MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion groups in the extent of STN dopaminergic denervation were observed. Moreover, intrasubthalamic microinfusion of dopamine in the MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion group triggered orolingual (p<0.01), but not axial or limb, dyskinesias. These results suggest that dopaminergic STN innervation influences the expression of levodopa-induced dyskinesias but also the existence of non dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms. STN noradrenergic depletion induced by 6-OHDA in the STN needs to be taken in account as a possible mechanism explaining the attenuation of dyskinesias in the combined lesion group.

  4. Tremor reduction by subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Grips, Eva; Weigel, Ralf; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has proved to be effective for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the recent studies used only clinical data to analyse tremor reduction. The objective of our study was to quantify tremor reduction by STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication in elderly PD patients using an objective measuring system. Amplitude and frequency of resting tremor and re-emergent resting tremor during postural tasks were analysed using an ultrasound-based measuring system and surface electromyography. In a prospective study design nine patients with advanced PD were examined preoperatively off and on medication, and twice postoperatively during four treatment conditions: off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. While both STN DBS and medication reduced tremor amplitude, STN DBS alone and the combination of medication and STN DBS were significantly superior to pre- and postoperative medication. STN DBS but not medication increased tremor frequency, and off treatment tremor frequency was significantly reduced postoperatively compared to baseline. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS is highly effective in elderly patients with advanced PD and moderate preoperative tremor reduction by medication. Thus, with regard to the advanced impact on the other parkinsonian symptoms, STN DBS can replace thalamic stimulation in this cohort of patients. Nevertheless, medication was still effective postoperatively and may act synergistically. The significantly superior efficacy of STN DBS on tremor amplitude and its impact on tremor frequency in contrast to medication might be explained by the influence of STN DBS on additional neural circuits independent from dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  5. In Parkinson's disease on a probabilistic Go/NoGo task deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus only interferes with withholding of the most prepotent responses.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Dejan; Dirnberger, Georg; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    The evidence on the impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on action restraint on Go/NoGO reaction time (RT) tasks in Parkinson's disease (PD) is inconsistent; with some studies reporting no effect and others finding that STN stimulation interferes with withholding of responses and results in more commission errors relative to STN-DBS off. We used a task in which the probability of Go stimuli varied from 100% (simple RT task) to 80, 50 and 20% (probabilistic Go/NoGo RT task), thus altering the prepotency of the response and the difficulty in withholding it on NoGo trials. Twenty PD patients with STN-DBS, ten unoperated PD patients and ten healthy controls participated in the study. All participants were tested twice; the order of on versus off stimulation for STN-DBS PD patients was counterbalanced. Both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were tested on medication. The results indicated that STN-DBS selectively decreased discriminability when the response was most prepotent (high--80%, as compared to low Go probability trials--50 and 20%). Movement times were faster with STN stimulation than with DBS off across different Go probability levels. There was neither an overall nor a selective effect of STN-DBS on RTs depending on the level of Go probability. Furthermore, compared to healthy controls, both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were more prone to making anticipatory errors; which was not influenced by STN stimulation. The results provide evidence for 'load-dependent' effects of STN stimulation on action restraint as a function of the prepotency of the Go response.

  6. Pallidotomy suppresses beta power in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Bour, Lo J; Bot, Maarten; Van Den Munckhof, Pepijn; Speelman, Johannes D; Schuurman, P Richard; De Bie, Rob M A

    2011-04-01

    Parkinsonian patients, who have had a unilateral pallidotomy, may require bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), due to disease progression. The current model of the basal ganglia circuitry does not predict a direct effect of pallidotomy on the neuronal activity of the ipsilateral STN. To date, only three studies have investigated the effect of pallidotomy on overall activity of the STN or neuronal firing rate, but not on the spectral content of the neuronal oscillatory activity. Moreover, none of these studies attempted to differentiate the effects on the dorsal (sensory-motor) and ventral (associative-limbic) parts of the STN. We studied the effect of pallidotomy on spectral power in six frequency bands in the STN ipsilateral and contralateral to pallidotomy from seven patients and in 60 control nuclei of patients without prior functional neurosurgery, and investigated whether this effect is different on the dorsal and ventral STN. The data show that pallidotomy suppresses beta power (13-30 Hz) in the ipsilateral STN. This effect tends predominantly to be present in the dorsal part of the STN. In addition, spectral power in the frequency range 3-30 Hz is significantly higher in the dorsal part than in the ventral part. The effect of pallidotomy on STN neural activity is difficult to explain with the current model of basal ganglia circuitry and should be envisaged in the context of complex modulatory interactions in the basal ganglia.

  7. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively reverses dopamine denervation-induced cellular defects in the output structures of the basal ganglia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Salin, Pascal; Manrique, Christine; Forni, Claude; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2002-06-15

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now recognized as an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease, but the molecular basis of its effects remains unknown. This study examined the effects of unilateral STN HFS (2 hr of continuous stimulation) in intact and hemiparkinsonian awake rats on STN neuron metabolic activity and on neurotransmitter-related gene expression in the basal ganglia, by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry. In both intact and hemiparkinsonian rats, this stimulation was found to induce c-fos protein expression but to decrease cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA levels in STN neurons. STN HFS did not affect the dopamine lesion-mediated overexpression of enkephalin mRNA or the decrease in substance P in the ipsilateral striatum. The lesion-induced increases in intraneuronal glutamate decarboxylase 67 kDa isoform (GAD67) mRNA levels on the lesion side were reversed by STN HFS in the substantia nigra, partially antagonized in the entopeduncular nucleus but unaffected in the globus pallidus. The stimulation did not affect neuropeptide or GAD67 mRNA levels in the side contralateral to the dopamine lesion or in intact animals. These data furnish the first evidence that STN HFS decreases the metabolic activity of STN neurons and antagonizes dopamine lesion-mediated cellular defects in the basal ganglia output structures. They provide molecular substrate to the therapeutic effects of this stimulation consistent with the current hypothesis that HFS blocks STN neuron activity. However, the differential impact of STN HFS on the effects of dopamine lesion among structures receiving direct STN inputs suggests that this stimulation may not cause simply interruption of STN outflow.

  8. Verbal fluency in patients receiving bilateral versus left-sided deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Rickard L; Lidman, Elin; Häggström, Björn; Hariz, Marwan I; Linder, Jan; Fredricks, Anna; Blomstedt, Patric

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of unilateral (left-sided) versus bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on verbal fluency. To do this, 10 Parkinson's disease patients with predominantly bilateral motor symptoms who received bilateral STN DBS were compared with 6 patients suffering from predominantly unilateral symptoms who received STN DBS on the left side only. The results suggest that unilateral STN DBS of the speech dominant hemisphere is associated with significantly less declines in measures of verbal fluency as compared to bilateral stimulation.

  9. Effects of neurostimulation for advanced Parkinson’s disease patients on motor symptoms: A multiple-treatments meta-analysas of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Shao, Bei; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Yi; Lin, Shi-Yi; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure of choice for patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). We aim to evaluate the efficacy of GPi (globus pallidus internus), STN (subthalamic nucleus)-DBS and medical therapy for PD. We conducted a systematic review and multiple-treatments meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy of neurostimulation and medical therapy for PD patients. Sixteen eligible studies were included in this analysis. We pooled the whole data and found obvious difference between GPi-DBS versus medical therapy and STN-DBS versus medical therapy in terms of UPDRS scores (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale). Meanwhile, we found GPi-DBS had the similar efficacy on the UPDRS scores when compared with STN-DBS. What is more, quality of life, measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire) showed greater improvement after GPi-DBS than STN-DBS. Five studies showed STN-DBS was more effective for reduction in medication than GPi-DBS. Overall, either GPi-DBS or STN-DBS was an effective technique to control PD patients’ symptoms and improved their functionality and quality of life. Meanwhile, the UPDRS scores measuring parkinsonian symptoms revealed no significant difference between GPi-DBS and STN-DBS. STN-DBS was more effective for reduction in medication than GPi-DBS. Alternatively, GPi-DBS was more effective for improving the PDQ-39 score than STN-DBS. PMID:27142183

  10. Morphology of the kidney in the West African caecilian, Geotrypetes seraphini (Amphibia, Gymnophiona, Caeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Møbjerg, N; Jespersen, A; Wilkinson, M

    2004-11-01

    This study deals with the morphology and ultrastructure of the mesonephros in adult caecilians of the species Geotrypetes seraphini. Based on serial sections in paraffin and araldite, nephrons are reconstructed and the cellular characteristics of different nephron segments described. The long and slender mesonephric kidneys of G. seraphini are broadest caudally and taper toward the front, where the organs are divided into smaller segmental divisions. Two nephron types can be distinguished on the basis of their connections to the coelom and their position within the nephric tissue: ventral nephrons connect to the coelom via a ciliated peritoneal funnel, whereas medial nephrons lack this connection. Both nephron types are composed of a filtration unit, the Malpighian corpuscle, and a renal tubule, which can be divided into six morphologically distinct segments: neck segment, proximal tubule, intermediate segment, early distal tubule, late distal tubule, and collecting tubule. Collecting tubules merge and form a branch system that opens into collecting ducts. Collecting ducts empty into the Wolffian duct. Proximal tubules of nephrons in the frontal divisions are morphologically different from the proximal tubules of more caudal kidney regions. Distal tubule subdivision is only clearly recognizable at the electron microscopic level. The length of each nephron segment is calculated from a ventral nephron with a total length of approximately 3.8 mm, and the course of the segments within the nephric tissue is reported. The number of nephrons was estimated at 1,700 units in each kidney. The segmentation and ultrastructure of the mesonephric nephrons in G. seraphini are discussed in relation to nephron descriptions from other caecilians and we further discuss the evolutionary origin of the amphibian nephron.

  11. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication on resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Molly M; Vaillancourt, David E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and antiparkinsonian medication have proved to be effective treatments for tremor in Parkinson's disease. To date it is not known how and to what extent STN DBS alone and in combination with antiparkinsonian medication alters the pathophysiology of resting and postural tremor in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication on the neurophysiological characteristics of resting and postural hand tremor in Parkinson's disease. Resting and postural hand tremor were recorded using accelerometry and surface electromyography (EMG) from 10 Parkinson's disease patients and 10 matched control subjects. The Parkinson's disease subjects were examined under four treatment conditions: (i) off treatment; (ii) STN DBS; (iii) medication; and (iv) medication plus STN DBS. The amplitude, EMG frequency, regularity, and 1-8 Hz tremor-EMG coherence were analysed. Both STN DBS and medication reduced the amplitude, regularity and tremor-EMG coherence, and increased the EMG frequency of resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease. STN DBS was more effective than medication in reducing the amplitude and increasing the frequency of resting and postural tremor to healthy physiological levels. These findings provide strong evidence that effective STN DBS normalizes the amplitude and frequency of tremor. The findings suggest that neural activity in the STN is an important modulator of the neural network(s) responsible for both resting and postural tremor genesis in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Delimiting subterritories of the human subthalamic nucleus by means of microelectrode recordings and a Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Adam; Spivak, Alexander; Shpigelman, Lavi; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2009-09-15

    Positive therapeutic response without adverse side effects to subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) depends to a large extent on electrode location within the STN. The sensorimotor region of the STN (seemingly the preferred location for STN DBS) lies dorsolaterally, in a region also marked by distinct beta (13-30 Hz) oscillations in the parkinsonian state. In this study, we present a real-time method to accurately demarcate subterritories of the STN during surgery, based on microelectrode recordings (MERs) and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM). Fifty-six MER trajectories were used, obtained from 21 PD patients who underwent bilateral STN DBS implantation surgery. Root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density (PSD) of the MERs were used to train and test an HMM in identifying the dorsolateral oscillatory region (DLOR) and nonoscillatory subterritories within the STN. The HMM demarcations were compared to the decisions of a human expert. The HMM identified STN-entry, the ventral boundary of the DLOR, and STN-exit with an error of -0.09 +/- 0.35, -0.27 +/- 0.58, and -0.20 +/- 0.33 mm, respectively (mean +/- standard deviation), and with detection reliability (error < 1 mm) of 95, 86, and 91%, respectively. The HMM was successful despite a very coarse clustering method and was robust to parameter variation. Thus, using an HMM in conjunction with RMS and PSD measures of intraoperative MER can provide improved refinement of STN entry and exit in comparison with previously reported automatic methods, and introduces a novel (intra-STN) detection of a distinct DLOR-ventral boundary.

  13. Facial expression recognition and subthalamic nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, U; Kuehler, A; Hennenlotter, A; Haslinger, B; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; Pfister, R; Sprengelmeyer, R; Lange, K; Ceballos-Baumann, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the impact of STN stimulation in Parkinson's disease on perception of facial expressions. Results: There was a selective reduction in recognition of angry faces, but not other expressions, during STN stimulation. Conclusions: The findings may have important implications for social adjustment in these patients. PMID:15026519

  14. Renal Function and Hemodynamic Study in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kwang; Kang, Sung Kyew

    1995-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the renal function and hemodynamic changes in obesity and hyperinsulinemia which are characteristics of type II diabetes. Methods Studies were carried out in two groups of female Zucker rats. Group 1 rats were obese Zucker rats with hereditary insulin resistance. Group 2 rats were lean Zucker rats and served as controls. In comparison with lean Zucker rats, obese Zucker rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia but normoglycemia. Micropuncture studies and morphologic studies were performed in these rats. Results Functional studies showed that obese Zucker rats exhibited increases in kidney weight and GFR(obese Zucker, 1.23±.07)ml/min; lean Zucker, 0.93±.03ml/min). Micropuncture studies revealed that the increase in GFR in obese Zucker rats was attributable to the increases in the single nephron plasma flow rate and glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure. The glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient was the same in both groups. Morphologic studies revealed that the increase in GFR in obese Zucker rats was associated with an increase in glomerular volume. Conclusions These results suggest that obesity and hyperinsulinemia, which are the characteristics of type II diabetes, can be associated with glomerular hyperfiltration and glomerular capillary hypertension. PMID:7626557

  15. End-stage kidney disease probably due to reflux nephropathy with segmental hypoplasia (Ask-Upmark kidney) in young Boxer dogs in Norway. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kolbjørnsen, O; Heggelund, M; Jansen, J H

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a retrospective morphologic study of 7 young Boxer dogs, showing end-stage kidney lesions compatible with chronic pyelonephritis with severe segmental cortical atrophy and fibrosis, associated with chronic tubulointerstitial inflammation of varying degree. Azotemia was observed in 6 of the 7 cases. The gross kidney lesions were as follows: bilateral small kidneys with numerous segmental cortical scars causing depression of the renal cortical surface. Histologic examination revealed salient atrophy of nephrons, including paucity of glomeruli, glomerulocystic lesions, colloid-filled tubular microcysts, and a conspicuously increased occurrence of arteries with narrowed lumina caused by intimal thickening. These segmental abnormalities were accompanied by pronounced interstitial fibrosis. All but 1 dog showed salient tubulointerstitial lympho-plasmacytic infiltration, which in 3 cases also included diffuse infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocyte (PMN)-cells and occurrence of tubular PMN-casts. Morphologic signs of abnormal metanephric differentiation (renal dysplasia) were observed in all cases in the form of atypical tubules or asynchronous nephronic development (immature glomeruli) or both. However, other morphologic primary dysplastic features were absent. Based on the morphologic features, it is concluded that the end-stage kidney disease in these young Boxer dogs was the result of chronic atrophic nonobstructive pyelonephritis, most probably caused by vesico-ureteral reflux, compatible with reflux nephropathy causing segmental hypoplasia (Ask-Upmark kidney) in man. It is proposed that atypical tubular epithelium in the form of adenomatoid proliferation of collecting duct epithelial cells should be considered an acquired compensatory lesion, rather than the result of disorganized metanephric development.

  16. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Christina; Macoir, Joël; Langlois, Mélanie; Cantin, Léo; Prud'homme, Michel; Monetta, Laura

    2015-02-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) on different language abilities are still controversial and its impact on high-level language abilities such as metaphor comprehension has been overlooked. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of STN electrical stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities such as lexical and semantic capacities. Eight PD individuals with bilateral STN-DBS were first evaluated OFF-DBS and, at least seven weeks later, ON-DBS. Performance on metaphor comprehension, lexical decision, word association and verbal fluency tasks were compared ON and OFF-DBS in addition to motor symptoms evaluation. STN stimulation had a significant beneficial effect on motor symptoms in PD. However, this stimulation did not have any effect on metaphor comprehension or any other cognitive ability evaluated in this study. These outcomes suggest that STN stimulation may have dissociable effects on motor and language functions.

  17. Early dysfunction and progressive degeneration of the subthalamic nucleus in mouse models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Jeremy F; McIver, Eileen L; Mullen, Matthew RM; Wokosin, David L; Surmeier, D James; Bevan, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an element of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry critical for action suppression. In Huntington's disease (HD) action suppression is impaired, resembling the effects of STN lesioning or inactivation. To explore this potential linkage, the STN was studied in BAC transgenic and Q175 knock-in mouse models of HD. At <2 and 6 months of age autonomous STN activity was impaired due to activation of KATP channels. STN neurons exhibited prolonged NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, caused by a deficit in glutamate uptake, and elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress, which was ameliorated by NMDA receptor antagonism. STN activity was rescued by NMDA receptor antagonism or the break down of hydrogen peroxide. At 12 months of age approximately 30% of STN neurons had been lost, as in HD. Together, these data argue that dysfunction within the STN is an early feature of HD that may contribute to its expression and course. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21616.001 PMID:27995895

  18. The human subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus differentially encode reward during action control.

    PubMed

    Justin Rossi, Peter; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have recently been shown to encode reward, but few studies have been performed in humans. We investigated STN and GPi encoding of reward and loss (i.e., valence) in humans with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that STN and GPi neurons would change their firing rate in response to reward- and loss-related stimuli, we recorded the activity of individual neurons while participants performed a behavioral task. In the task, action choices were associated with potential rewarding, punitive, or neutral outcomes. We found that STN and GPi neurons encode valence-related information during action control, but the proportion of valence-responsive neurons was greater in the STN compared to the GPi. In the STN, reward-related stimuli mobilized a greater proportion of neurons than loss-related stimuli. We also found surprising limbic overlap with the sensorimotor regions in both the STN and GPi, and this overlap was greater than has been previously reported. These findings may help to explain alterations in limbic function that have been observed following deep brain stimulation therapy of the STN and GPi. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1952-1964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Deep brain stimulation and medication for parkinsonian tremor during secondary tasks.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Molly M; Vaillancourt, David E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Sierens, Diane K; Bakay, Roy A E; Corcos, Daniel M

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the efficacy of subthalamic nucleus (STN), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and medication for resting tremor during performance of secondary tasks. Hand tremor was recorded using accelerometry and electromyography (EMG) from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and ten matched control subjects. The PD subjects were examined off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. In the first experiment, tremor was recorded in a quiet condition and during a cognitive task designed to enhance tremor. In the second experiment, tremor was recorded in a quiet condition and during isometric finger flexion (motor task) with the contralateral limb at 5% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) that was designed to suppress tremor. Results showed that: (1) STN DBS and medication reduced tremor during a cognitive task that exacerbated tremor, (2) STN DBS normalized tremor frequency in both the quiet and cognitive task conditions, whereas tremor amplitude was only normalized in the quiet condition, (3) a secondary motor task reduced tremor in a similar manner to STN DBS. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS still suppresses tremor in the presence of a cognitive task. Furthermore, a secondary motor task of the opposite limb suppresses tremor to levels comparable to STN DBS.

  20. Axonal and synaptic failure suppress the transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and information during high frequency deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Zimnik, Andrew; Zheng, Fang; Turner, Robert S; Alzheimer, Christian; Doiron, Brent; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2014-02-01

    High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its effects on neural activity in basal ganglia circuits are not fully understood. DBS increases the excitation of STN efferents yet decouples STN spiking patterns from the spiking patterns of STN synaptic targets. We propose that this apparent paradox is resolved by recent studies showing an increased rate of axonal and synaptic failures in STN projections during DBS. To investigate this hypothesis, we combine in vitro and in vivo recordings to derive a computational model of axonal and synaptic failure during DBS. Our model shows that these failures induce a short term depression that suppresses the synaptic transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and rate-coded information from STN to its synaptic targets. In particular, our computational model reproduces the widely reported suppression of parkinsonian β oscillations and synchrony during DBS. Our results support the idea that short term depression is a therapeutic mechanism of STN DBS that works as a functional lesion by decoupling the somatic spiking patterns of STN neurons from spiking activity in basal ganglia output nuclei.

  1. Parkinson's disease patients with bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation gain weight.

    PubMed

    Macia, Frédéric; Perlemoine, Caroline; Coman, Irène; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent; Tison, François

    2004-02-01

    Weight, body mass index (BMI) and energy expenditure/energy intake (EE/EI) was studied in 19 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients after subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) versus 14 nonoperated ones. Operated patients had a significant weight gain (WG, + 9.7 +/- 7 kg) and BMI increase (+ 4.7 kg/m2). The fat mass was higher after STN-DBS. Resting EE (REE; offdrug/ON stimulation) was significantly decreased in STN-DBS patients, while their daily energy expenditure (DEI) was not significantly different. A significant correlation was found among WG, BMI increase, and pre-operative levodopa-equivalent daily dose, their reduction after STN-DBS, and the differential REE related to stimulation and the REE in the offdrug/OFF stimulation condition. In conclusion, STN-DBS in PD induces a significant WG associated with a reduction in REE without DEI adjustment.

  2. Deep brain stimulation effect on freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Ferraye, Murielle U; Debû, Bettina; Pollak, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The majority of patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from freezing of gait (FOG), which responds more or less to levodopa. Thalamic stimulation, mainly used in the treatment of tremor dominant Parkinson's disease is ineffective in FOG. GPi stimulation moderately improves FOG, but this effect may abate in the long term. STN stimulation was reported to improve levodopa-responsive FOG. In some patients, the benefit from levodopa is greater than that from STN stimulation, and levodopa and STN stimulation can have additive effects. On the contrary, STN stimulation is ineffective on levodopa-resistant FOG. In the few cases of levodopa-induced FOG, STN stimulation can indirectly be effective, thanks to a great decrease or arrest of levodopa. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus has recently been performed in small groups of patients suffering from both off- and on-levodopa gait impairments. The first results appear encouraging, but they need to be confirmed by controlled studies in larger series of patients.

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases premature responding in a rat gambling task.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Creed, Meaghan C; Fletcher, Paul J; Lobo, Daniela S S; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2013-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, several recent studies have found an association between STN-DBS and increased impulsivity. Currently, it is not clear whether the observed increase in impulsivity results from STN-DBS per se, or whether it involves an interaction with the underlying PD neuropathology and/or intake of dopaminergic drugs. We investigated the effects of STN-DBS on performance of intact rats on two tasks measuring impulsive responding: a novel rat gambling task (rGT) and a differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL20s) schedule. Following initial behavioural training, animals received electrode implantation into the STN (n=24) or sham surgery (n=24), and were re-tested on their assigned behavioural task, with or without STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS administered for two hours immediately prior to testing, had no effects on rGT choice behaviour or on DRL response inhibition (p>0.05). However, STN-DBS significantly increased premature responding in the rGT task (p=0.0004), an effect that took several sessions to develop and persisted in subsequent trials when no stimulation was given. Consistent with the notion of distinct facets of impulsivity with unique neurochemical underpinnings, we observed differential effects of STN-DBS in the two tasks employed. These results suggest that STN-DBS in the absence of parkinsonism may not lead to a general loss of inhibitory control, but may instead affect impulsivity under specific conditions.

  4. Effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation during exercise on the mesolimbocortical dopaminergic region in Parkinson's disease: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Takao; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yagi, Shunsuke; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Kanno, Toshihiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Ito, Tae; Terada, Tatsuhiro; Namba, Hiroki; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2013-03-01

    To elucidate the dynamic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during activity on the dopaminergic system, 12 PD patients who had STN-DBS operations at least 1 month prior, underwent two positron emission tomography scans during right-foot movement in DBS-off and DBS-on conditions. To quantify motor performance changes, the motion speed and mobility angle of the foot at the ankle were measured twice. Estimations of the binding potential of [(11)C]raclopride (BP(ND)) were based on the Logan plot method. Significant motor recovery was found in the DBS-on condition. The STN-DBS during exercise significantly reduced the [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in the caudate and the nucleus accumbens (NA), but not in the dorsal or ventral putamen. The magnitude of dopamine release in the NA correlated negatively with the magnitude of motor load, indicating that STN-DBS facilitated motor behavior more smoothly and at less expense to dopamine neurons in the region. The lack of dopamine release in the putamen and the significant dopamine release in the ventromedial striatum by STN-DBS during exercise indicated dopaminergic activation occurring in the motivational circuit during action, suggesting a compensatory functional activation of the motor loop from the nonmotor to the motor loop system.

  5. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Vance, Katie M.; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    synaptic transmission in the STN has been understudied. Here, we show that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors mediate the NMDA receptor component of EPSCs in subthalamic neurons. Moreover, our results demonstrate that pharmacologic modulation of GluN2D-containing receptors alters the time course of EPSCs and controls the in vivo spike-firing rate in the STN. This study identifies GluN2D as a potential target for modulating subthalamic neuron activity. PMID:26631477

  6. Structural and functional connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus during vocal emotion decoding

    PubMed Central

    Frühholz, Sascha; Ceravolo, Leonardo; Grandjean, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the role played by the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in human emotion has recently advanced with STN deep brain stimulation, a neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, the potential presence of several confounds related to pathological models raises the question of how much they affect the relevance of observations regarding the physiological function of the STN itself. This underscores the crucial importance of obtaining evidence from healthy participants. In this study, we tested the structural and functional connectivity between the STN and other brain regions related to vocal emotion in a healthy population by combining diffusion tensor imaging and psychophysiological interaction analysis from a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging study. As expected, we showed that the STN is functionally connected to the structures involved in emotional prosody decoding, notably the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, auditory cortex, pallidum and amygdala. These functional results were corroborated by probabilistic fiber tracking, which revealed that the left STN is structurally connected to the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. These results confirm, in healthy participants, the role played by the STN in human emotion and its structural and functional connectivity with the brain network involved in vocal emotions. PMID:26400857

  7. A functionally relevant and long-term model of deep brain stimulation of the rat subthalamic nucleus: advantages and considerations.

    PubMed

    Spieles-Engemann, A L; Collier, T J; Sortwell, C E

    2010-10-01

    In this review we outline some relevant considerations with regards to the rat model of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). In order to optimize the rat STN DBS model in terms of predictive validity for the clinical situation we propose that the STN stimulation experimental design parameters in rodents should incorporate the following features: (i) stimulation parameters that demonstrate functional alleviation of symptoms induced by nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) denervation; (ii) stimulation duration that is relatively long-term and continuous; (iii) stimulation that is initiated at a time when the denervation status of the nigrostriatal system is known to be partial and progressing; (iv) stimulation current spread that is minimized and optimized to closely approximate the clinical situation; (v) the appropriate control conditions are included; and (vi) implantation to the STN target is verified post-mortem. Further research that examines the effect of long-term STN DBS on the neurophysiology and neurochemistry of STN circuitry is warranted. The rat model of functionally relevant long-term STN DBS provides a most favorable preclinical experimental platform in which to conduct these studies.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients. PMID:28050309

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Valéria de Carvalho; Rieder, Carlos R M; da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients.

  10. [Clinical intervention of nicotine dependence from a systemic-relational focus. Results of a descriptive study of series of cases].

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pila, José María; López García, Esther; Calatayud, Pedro; Pereira, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We present in this work a descriptive study of series of cases in treatment for nicotine addiction with a multicomponent program focusing on a systemic-relational therapy. While a good number of smokers are able to stop smoking, with the help of different programs with different levels of complexity depending on their level of addiction, there is a group of smokers who associate their difficulty to stop smoking with aspects related to their life cycle situation, problems with their family of origin or with their social network. We revised the most relevant clinical aspects of the model and presented the results of a descriptive study of a series of 128 patients, of wich 60.50% expressed family and/or personal problems that made the possibilities of success in the program more difficult. After an intervention that lasted a year during wich there were 25 therapy sessions together with combined substitute therapy with nicotine (STN) during the first 3 months of treatment, 77.30% maintained abstinence. Nowadays we know much more about nicotine addictions, giving different answers to different needs, just like the different levels of complexity of each addict. We consider that the contributions of the systemic-relational model in its different ways of understanding the intervention, can better the results of the treatment. We are justified in increasing the level of complexity of the interventions when there exist complications in the clinical handling of nicotine addiction because of other models of treatment of lesser intensity.

  11. High incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loizon, Marine; Laurencin, Chloé; Vial, Christophe; Danaila, Teodor; Thobois, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We observed several cases of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) revealed after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). 115 consecutive PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2014 at the Neurological Hospital in Lyon were retrospectively included. CTS was accepted as the diagnosis only if clinical examination and ENMG both confirmed it. Nine patients (7.8 %) developed CTS in the 2 years following surgery, which is far beyond the 2.7/1000 incidence in the general population. The present study shows an overrepresentation of CTS occurrence after STN-DBS in PD.

  12. Histological aspects of the "fixed-particle" model of stone formation: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R

    2017-02-01

    Crystallization by itself is not harmful as long as the crystals are not retained in the kidneys and are allowed to pass freely down the renal tubules to be excreted in the urine. A number of theories have been proposed, and studies performed, to determine the mechanisms involved in crystal retention within the kidneys. It has been suggested that urinary transit through the nephron is too fast for crystals to grow large enough to be retained. Thus, free particle mechanism alone cannot lead to stone formation, and there must be a mechanism for crystal fixation within the kidneys. Animal model studies suggest that crystal retention is possible through both the free- and fixed-particle mechanisms. Crystal-cell interaction leads to pathological changes which promote crystal attachment to either epithelial cells or their basement membrane. Alternatively, crystals aggregate and produce large enough particles to block the tubules particularly at sites, where urinary flow is affected because of changes in the luminal diameter of the tubule. Crystal deposits plugging the openings of the ducts of Bellini may be the result of such a phenomenon. Intratubular crystals translocating to renal interstitium may produce osteogenic changes in the epithelial or endothelial cells resulting in the formation of the Randall's plaques. Thus, fixation appears to be either through the formation of Randall's plugs, crystal plugs clogging the openings of the ducts of Bellini or sub-epithelial crystal deposits, and the Randall's plaques.

  13. Bilateral subthalamic stimulation effects on oral force control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Serge; Gentil, Michèle; Fraix, Valérie; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Pollak, Pierre

    2003-02-01

    Dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD) consists of articulatory, phonatory and respiratory impairment. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation greatly improves motor disability, but its long-term effect on speech within a large group of patients has not been precisely evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of bilateral STN stimulation on oral force control in PD. We measured forces of the upper lip, lower lip and tongue in twenty-six PD patients treated with bilateral STN stimulation. Measurements of the articulatory organ force, as well as a motor evaluation using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), were made with and without STN stimulation. Maximal voluntary force (MVF), reaction time (RT), movement time (MT), imprecision of the peak force (PF) and the hold phase (HP) were all improved with STN stimulation during the articulatory force task, as well as the motor examination scores of the UPDRS. It seems that the beneficial STN stimulation-induced effect on articulatory forces persisted whatever the duration of post-surgical follow-up. However, dysarthria evaluated by the UPDRS was worse in two subgroups of patients with a one to two year and three to five year post-surgical follow-up, in comparison with a subgroup of patients with a three month follow-up. STN stimulation has a beneficial long-term effect on the articulatory organs involved in speech production, and this indicates that parkinsonian dysarthria is associated, at least in part, with an alteration in STN neuronal activity. Nevertheless, to confirm the persistence of the beneficial effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria, a longitudinal evaluation is still needed.

  14. Identification of target areas for deep brain stimulation in human basal ganglia substructures based on median nerve sensory evoked potential criteria

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, F; Vesper, J; Curio, G

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In the interventional treatment of movement disorders, the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the most relevant electrode targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS). This study tested the value of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for the functional identification of VIM and STN. Methods: Median nerve SEP were recorded from the final stimulation electrodes targeted at STN and VIM. Throughout the stereotactic procedure SEP were recorded during short electrode stops above STN/VIM and within the presumed target areas. After digital filtering, high and low frequency SEP components were analysed separately to parameterise both the 1000 Hz SEP burst and low frequency (<100 Hz) components. Results: SEP recorded in the VIM target region could unequivocally be distinguished from SEP recorded in STN. The 1000 Hz burst signal was significantly larger in VIM than in STN without any overlap of amplitude values. In the low frequency band, a primary high amplitude negativity was obtained in VIM, contrasting with a low amplitude positivity in STN. SEP waveshapes in recordings above target positions resembled SEP obtained in STN. When entering VIM, a sharp amplitude increase was observed over a few millimetres only. Conclusions: Based on SEP criteria, the VIM target but not the STN region can be identified by typical SEP configuration changes, when penetrating the target zone. The approach is independent of the patient's cooperation and vigilance and therefore feasible in general anaesthesia. It provides an easy, reliable, and robust tool for the final assessment of electrode positions at the last instance during electrode implantation when eventual electrode revisions can easily be performed. PMID:12876229

  15. Multiple nephron-sparing procedures in solitary kidney with recurrent, metachronous, nonfamilial renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nosnik, Israel P; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Nelson, Rendon; Polascik, Thomas J

    2006-12-01

    Patients with metachronous bilateral renal cell carcinoma pose a significant challenge given the high mortality of renal cell carcinoma and the poor quality of life should dialysis become necessary. In addition, patients may be subject to morbidity due to potential multiple treatments of the multifocal renal tumors. We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with multifocal, bilateral clear cell carcinoma who maintained a minimal change in serum creatinine after undergoing unilateral radical nephrectomy, subsequent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous cryoablation, laparoscopic cryoablation, and open partial nephrectomy for recurrent renal cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney.

  16. Non-nephronal hematuria misdiagnosed as C1q nephropathy: Look before you leap.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S N; Jha, R; Fatima, R; Swarnalata, G

    2012-05-01

    A 19-year-old male presented with persistent macroscopic hematuria for last 3 months. On initial evaluation, he was found to have minimal proteinuria, normal renal function, and normal complement with negative lupus serology. Light microscopy, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy of renal tissue confirmed the presence of C1q nephropathy. Because of poor response to immunosuppressive agent (prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil), passage of urinary clot once and vexing persistent macroscopic hematuria, alternative diagnosis was considered. Cystourethroscopy showed urethritis of prostatic urethra. Immunosuppressives were stopped and doxycycline started to which hematuria responded dramatically. This case report illustrates that hematuria in this patient was because of undiagnosed urethritis rather than incidental C1q nephropathy.

  17. NHA2 is expressed in distal nephron and regulated by dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Kondapalli, Kalyan C; Todd Alexander, R; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Rao, Rajini

    2016-12-01

    Increased renal reabsorption of sodium is a significant risk factor in hypertension. An established clinical marker for essential hypertension is elevated sodium lithium countertransport (SLC) activity. NHA2 is a newly identified Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter with potential genetic links to hypertension, which has been shown to mediate SLC activity and H(+)-coupled Na(+)(Li(+)) efflux in kidney-derived MDCK cells. To evaluate a putative role in sodium homeostasis, we determined the effect of dietary salt on NHA2. In murine kidney sections, NHA2 localized apically to distal convoluted (both DCT1 and 2) and connecting tubules, partially overlapping in distribution with V-ATPase, AQP2, and NCC1 transporters. Mice fed a diet high in sodium chloride showed elevated transcripts and expression of NHA2 protein. We propose a model in which NHA2 plays a dual role in salt reabsorption or secretion, depending on the coupling ion (sodium or protons). The identified novel regulation of Na(+)/H(+) antiporter in the kidney suggests new roles in salt homeostasis and disease.

  18. Distinct distribution of specific members of protein 4.1 genefamily in the mouse nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Ramez, Mohamed; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Cluzeaud, Francoise; Chanan, Sumita; Patterson, Michael; Walensky, Loren D.; Marfatia, Shirin; Baines, Anthony J.; Chasis, Joel A.; Conboy, John G.; Mohandas, Narla; Gascard, Philippe

    2002-12-11

    Background: Protein 4.1 is an adapter protein which linksthe actin cytoskeleton to various transmembrane proteins. 4.1 proteinsare encoded by four homologous genes, 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B, whichundergo complex alternative splicing. Here we performed a detailedcharacterization of the expression of specific 4.1 proteins in the mousenephron. Methods: Distribution of renal 4.1 proteins was investigated bystaining of paraformaldehyde fixed mouse kidney sections with antibodieshighly specific for each 4.1 protein. Major 4.1 splice forms, amplifiedfrom mouse kidney marathon cDNA, were expressed in transfected COS-7cells in order to assign species of known exon composition to proteinsdetected in kidney. Results: A 105kDa4.1R splice form, initiating atATG-2 translation initiation site and lacking exon 16, but including exon17B, was restricted to thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. A 95kDa 4.1Nspliceform,lacking exons 15 and 17D, was expressed in either descendingor ascending thin limb of Henle'sloop, distal convoluted tubule and allregions of the collecting duct system. A major 108kDa 4.1B spliceform,initiating at a newly characterized ATG translation initiation site, andlacking exons 15, 17B, and 21, was present only in Bowman's capsule andproximal convoluted tubule (PCT). There was no expression of 4.1G inkidney. Conclusion: Distinct distribution of 4.1 proteins along thenephron suggests their involvement in targeting of selected transmembraneproteins in kidney epithelium andtherefore in regulation of specifickidney functions.

  19. Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species on Tubular Transport along the Nephron.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-23

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are oxygen-containing molecules naturally occurring in both inorganic and biological chemical systems. Due to their high reactivity and potentially damaging effects to biomolecules, cells express a battery of enzymes to rapidly metabolize them to innocuous intermediaries. Initially, ROS were considered by biologists as dangerous byproducts of respiration capable of causing oxidative stress, a condition in which overproduction of ROS leads to a reduction in protective molecules and enzymes and consequent damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. In fact, ROS are used by immune systems to kill virus and bacteria, causing inflammation and local tissue damage. Today, we know that the functions of ROS are not so limited, and that they also act as signaling molecules mediating processes as diverse as gene expression, mechanosensation, and epithelial transport. In the kidney, ROS such as nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O₂(-)), and their derivative molecules hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and peroxynitrite (ONO₂(-)) regulate solute and water reabsorption, which is vital to maintain electrolyte homeostasis and extracellular fluid volume. This article reviews the effects of NO, O₂(-), ONO₂(-), and H₂O₂ on water and electrolyte reabsorption in proximal tubules, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts, and the effects of NO and O₂(-) in the macula densa on tubuloglomerular feedback.

  20. Adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition for studying movement-related activity in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Bianchi, Anna M.; Priori, Alberto; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method that combines adaptive autoregressive (AAR) identification and spectral power decomposition for the study of movement-related spectral changes in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials (LFPs). This approach introduces the concept of movement-related poles, allowing one to study not only the classical event-related desynchronizations (ERD) and synchronizations (ERS), which correspond to modulations of power, but also event-related modulations of frequency. We applied the method to analyze movement-related EEG signals and LFPs contemporarily recorded from the sensorimotor cortex, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in a patient with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic neurosurgery for the implant of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. In the AAR identification we compared the whale and the exponential forgetting factors, showing that the whale forgetting provides a better disturbance rejection and it is therefore more suitable to investigate movement-related brain activity. Movement-related power modulations were consistent with previous studies. In addition, movement-related frequency modulations were observed from both scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia LFPs. The method therefore represents an effective approach to the study of movement-related brain activity.

  1. Neural Circuit Modulation During Deep Brain Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus for Parkinson's Disease: What Have We Learned from Neuroimaging Studies?

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents a powerful clinical tool for the alleviation of many motor symptoms that are associated with Parkinson's disease. Despite its extensive use, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of STN-DBS remain poorly understood. In the present review, we integrate and discuss recent literature examining the network effects of STN-DBS for Parkinson's disease, placing emphasis on neuroimaging findings, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These techniques enable the noninvasive detection of brain regions that are modulated by DBS on a whole-brain scale, representing a key experimental strength given the diffuse and far-reaching effects of electrical field stimulation. By examining these data in the context of multiple hypotheses of DBS action, generally developed through clinical and physiological observations, we define a multitude of consistencies and inconsistencies in the developing literature of this rapidly moving field. PMID:24147633

  2. Clinicopathological study on thyroid follicular carcinoma-like renal tumor related to serious hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Yu, Jianpeng; Xu, Zhonghua; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thyroid carcinoma-like tumor of the kidney (TLFCK) is an extremely rare variant of renal cell carcinoma. Most cases were incidentally found, while we report the first case of TLFCK presented with hypertension. Patient concerns: A 25-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital presenting with hypertension for ∼20 months, without gross hematuria, weight loss, and flank pain. Diagnoses: Imaging studies revealed a right renal mass with multiple calcifications. Histologically, the tumor had striking follicles with dense, colloid-like material resembling thyroid follicular carcinoma while the tumor cells were negative for thyroid markers (thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor-1). Interventions: The patient successfully underwent nephron sparing surgery with an uneventful recovery. Outcomes: Hypertension returned to normal without any medication interference. Two years after surgery, the patient is still in good health without recurring disease or related hypertension. Lessons: Recognition of the cytomorphological features of TLFCK can avoid misdiagnosis of this renal tumor as a metastatic carcinoma and the objective of surgical management is to remove the tumor and preserve renal function. PMID:28328844

  3. Treatment of dysarthria following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripoliti, Elina; Strong, Laura; Hickey, Freya; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Candelario, Joseph; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Speech impairment is a frequent side effect of the surgery. This study examined the efficacy of an intensive speech treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, LSVT) on dysarthria after STN-DBS. The LSVT was administered in ten patients with STN-DBS (surgical group) and ten patients without (medical group). Patients were assessed before, immediately after and six months following the speech treatment using sustained phonation, a speech intelligibility scale and monologue. Vocal loudness, speech intelligibility and perceptual ratings were the primary outcome measures. Vocal loudness and perceptual scores improved significantly across tasks for the medical group only. Speech intelligibility did not significantly change for either group. Results in the surgical group were variable with some patients deteriorating. Treatment of dysarthria following STN-DBS needs further investigation due to the variable response to LSVT. PMID:21953693

  4. Oscillatory entrainment of subthalamic nucleus neurons and behavioural consequences in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Syed, E C J; Benazzouz, A; Taillade, M; Baufreton, J; Champeaux, K; Falgairolle, M; Bioulac, B; Gross, C E; Boraud, T

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the functional role of oscillatory activity in the local field potential (LFP) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). It has been postulated that beta (15-30 Hz) oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia induces PD motor symptoms. To assess this hypothesis, an LFP showing significant power in the beta frequency range (23 Hz) was used as a stimulus both in vitro and in vivo. We first demonstrated in rat brain slices that STN neuronal activity was driven by the LFP stimulation. We then applied beta stimulation to the STN of 16 rats and two monkeys while quantifying motor behaviour. Although stimulation-induced behavioural effects were observed, stimulation of the STN at 23 Hz induced no significant decrease in motor performance in either rodents or primates. This study is the first to show LFP-induced behaviour in both rats and primates, and highlights the complex relationship between beta power and parkinsonian symptoms.

  5. Benign nodal lesions mimicking metastases from pediatric renal neoplasms: a report of the National Wilms' Tumor Study Pathology Center.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D A; Beckwith, J B; Mierau, G W

    1990-12-01

    Regional lymph node status is a key factor in the staging of pediatric renal tumors on the National Wilms' Tumor Study (NWTS). A review of cases entered on the NWTS has uncovered a number of cases where benign lymph node findings were mistaken for metastases. Most frequently, this was due to the presence of complexes of epithelial cells and Tamm-Horsfall protein within nodal sinuses. The epithelial cells were derived from damaged nephrons, usually resulting from obstruction by tumor. Another epithelial pseudometastic lesion, intranodal squamous epithelial cells, was found to originate from metaplastic calyceal urothelium. Benign mesothelial or coelomic inclusions similar to those previously described in pelvic and periaortic lymph nodes of adult females were found in nodes of four patients, including two boys, who are, to our knowledge, the first to be described with this finding. Other sources of confusion included protrusion of lymphoid follicles or germinal centers into nodal sinuses, thick endothelial cells of postcapillary venules mimicking epithelial tubules, nodal megakaryocytes resembling anaplastic nuclear changes, and histiocytic granulomas. Immunocytochemical methods were useful in evaluating some of these phenomena. Recognition of these pseudometastatic lesions is essential in order to avoid unnecessary and potentially hazardous therapeutic intensification.

  6. Submyelin potassium accumulation may functionally block subsets of local axons during deep brain stimulation: a modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, S. C.; Miyazawa, G.; Steinmetz, P. N.

    2008-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been used for over a decade to relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, although its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. To better understand the direct effects of DBS on central neurons, a computational model of a myelinated axon has been constructed which includes the effects of K+ accumulation within the peri-axonal space. Using best estimates of anatomic and electrogenic model parameters for in vivo STN axons, the model predicts a functional block along the axon due to K+ accumulation in the submyelin space. The functional block occurs for a range of model parameters: high stimulation frequencies (>130 Hz); high extracellular K+ concentrations (>3 × 10-3 M); low maximum Na+/K+ ATPase current densities (<0.026 A m-2); low diffusion coefficients for K+ diffusion out of the submyelin space (<2.4 × 10-9 m2 s-1); small periaxonal space widths of the myelin attachment sections (<2.7 × 10-9 m) and perinodal/internodal sections (<8.4 × 10-9 m). These results suggest that therapeutic DBS of the STN likely results in a functional block for many STN axons, although a subset of STN axons may also be activated at the stimulating frequency.

  7. Depression and intelligence in patients with Parkinson's disease and deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R; Cox, Katie L; Tramontana, Michael G; Byrne, Daniel W; Davis, Thomas L; Fang, John Y; Konrad, Peter E; Padaliya, Bhavna; Mutter, Robert W; Gill, Chandler E; Richardson, Caralee R; Charles, P David

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the association of depression with intelligence and education in patients with Parkinson's disease treated with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS). The literature has been contradictory concerning depression in Parkinson's disease patients. Some studies have shown less depression in Parkinson's disease patients with more education not treated with STN-DBS. Other recently published studies indicate that STN-DBS improves the depression associated with Parkinson's disease. No studies have examined the correlation of these factors with depression in Parkinson's disease patients treated with STN-DBS. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) pre- and postoperatively to 21 Parkinson's disease patients (seven women, 14 men, ages 49-75) who underwent STN-DBS. The postoperative scores of the lower 50th percentile (n=8) of the Verbal Comprehensive Index of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) decreased significantly (P=0.036), while the upper 50th percentile (n=13) remained nearly constant (P=0.802). Furthermore, as the education increased from highschool to graduate level, patients demonstrated less improvement in depressive symptoms postoperatively. These findings suggest that Parkinson's disease patients with lower intelligence test scores and less education benefit more with regards to depressive symptomatology after STN-DBS than patients with higher scores and education.

  8. Hypoxia enhances the malignant nature of bladder cancer cells and concomitantly antagonizes protein O-glycosylation extension.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Lima, Luís; Azevedo, Rita; Soares, Janine; Cotton, Sofia; Parreira, Beatriz; Neves, Manuel; Amaro, Teresina; Tavares, Ana; Teixeira, Filipe; Palmeira, Carlos; Rangel, Maria; Silva, André M N; Reis, Celso A; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Oliveira, Maria José; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2016-09-27

    Invasive bladder tumours express the cell-surface Sialyl-Tn (STn) antigen, which stems from a premature stop in protein O-glycosylation. The STn antigen favours invasion, immune escape, and possibly chemotherapy resistance, making it attractive for target therapeutics. However, the events leading to such deregulation in protein glycosylation are mostly unknown. Since hypoxia is a salient feature of advanced stage tumours, we searched into how it influences bladder cancer cells glycophenotype, with emphasis on STn expression. Therefore, three bladder cancer cell lines with distinct genetic and molecular backgrounds (T24, 5637 and HT1376) were submitted to hypoxia. To disclose HIF-1α-mediated events, experiments were also conducted in the presence of Deferoxamine Mesilate (Dfx), an inhibitor of HIF-1α proteasomal degradation. In both conditions all cell lines overexpressed HIF-1α and its transcriptionally-regulated protein CA-IX. This was accompanied by increased lactate biosynthesis, denoting a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Concomitantly, T24 and 5637 cells acquired a more motile phenotype, consistent with their more mesenchymal characteristics. Moreover, hypoxia promoted STn antigen overexpression in all cell lines and enhanced the migration and invasion of those presenting more mesenchymal characteristics, in an HIF-1α-dependent manner. These effects were reversed by reoxygenation, demonstrating that oxygen affects O-glycan extension. Glycoproteomics studies highlighted that STn was mainly present in integrins and cadherins, suggesting a possible role for this glycan in adhesion, cell motility and invasion. The association between HIF-1α and STn overexpressions and tumour invasion was further confirmed in bladder cancer patient samples. In conclusion, STn overexpression may, in part, result from a HIF-1α mediated cell-survival strategy to adapt to the hypoxic challenge, favouring cell invasion. In addition, targeting STn-expressing glycoproteins may

  9. Subthalamic nucleus neurons are synchronized to primary motor cortex local field potentials in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Shoichi; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S.; Ostrem, Jill L.; Galifianakis, Nicholas B.; Miller, Kai J.; Starr, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal dopamine denervation results in a cascade of abnormalities in the single unit activity of downstream basal ganglia nuclei that include increased firing rate, altered firing patterns, and increased oscillatory activity. However, the effects of these abnormalities on cortical function are poorly understood. Here, in humans undergoing deep brain stimulator implantation surgery, we utilize the novel technique of subdural electrocorticography in combination with subthalamic nucleus (STN) single unit recording to study basal ganglia-cortex interactions at the millisecond time scale. We show that in patients with PD, STN spiking is synchronized with primary motor cortex (M1) local field potentials in two distinct patterns: First, STN spikes are phase-synchronized with M1 rhythms in the theta, alpha, or beta (4-30 Hz) bands. Second, STN spikes are synchronized with M1 gamma activity over a broad spectral range (50-200 Hz). The amplitude of STN spike-synchronized gamma activity in M1 is itself rhythmically modulated by the phase of a lower frequency rhythm (phase-amplitude coupling), such that “waves” of phase-synchronized gamma activity precede the occurrence of STN spikes. We show the disease specificity of these phenomena in PD, by comparison with STN-M1 paired recordings performed in a group of patients with a different disorder, primary cranio-cervical dystonia. Our findings support a model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop in PD in which gamma activity in primary motor cortex, modulated by the phase of low frequency rhythms, drives STN unit discharge. PMID:23616531

  10. Continuous bilateral infusion of vigabatrin into the subthalamic nucleus: Effects on seizure threshold and GABA metabolism in two rat models.

    PubMed

    Gey, Laura; Gernert, Manuela; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role as a regulator of basal ganglia outflow but also influences the activity of cortical and limbic structures, so that it is widely used as a therapeutic target in different brain diseases, including epilepsy. In addition to electrical stimulation of the STN, targeted delivery of anti-seizure drugs to the STN may constitute an alternative treatment approach in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. In the present experimental study, we investigated the anti-seizure and adverse effects of chronic infusion of vigabatrin into the STN of rats. Vigabatrin is a clinically approved anti-seizure drug, which acts by increasing brain GABA levels by irreversibly inhibiting GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T). Based on functional and neurochemical effects of acute STN microinjection, doses for continuous infusion were calculated and administered, using an innovative drug infusion technology. Bilateral infusion of only 10μg/day vigabatrin over 3weeks into the STN resulted in an almost complete inhibition of GABA-T and 4-fold increase in GABA in the target region, which was associated with a significant increase in seizure threshold, determined once weekly by i.v. infusion of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Lower doses or unilateral infusion were less effective, both on PTZ seizures and on kindled seizures. Bilateral infusion into substantia nigra pars reticulata was less effective and more toxic than STN infusion. In part of the rats, tolerance to the anti-seizure effect developed. The data demonstrate that chronic administration of very low, nontoxic doses of vigabatrin into STN is an effective means of increasing local GABA concentrations and seizure threshold.

  11. NMDA receptor antagonism potentiates the L-DOPA-induced extracellular dopamine release in the subthalamic nucleus of hemi-parkinson rats.

    PubMed

    El Arfani, Anissa; Bentea, Eduard; Aourz, Najat; Ampe, Ben; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Massie, Ann; Sarre, Sophie; Smolders, Ilse; Michotte, Yvette

    2014-10-01

    Long term treatment with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is associated with several motor complications. Clinical improvement of this treatment is therefore needed. Lesions or high frequency stimulation of the hyperactive subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD), alleviate the motor symptoms and reduce dyskinesia, either directly and/or by allowing the reduction of the L-DOPA dose. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists might have similar actions. However it remains elusive how the neurochemistry changes in the STN after a separate or combined administration of L-DOPA and a NMDA receptor antagonist. By means of in vivo microdialysis, the effect of L-DOPA and/or MK 801, on the extracellular dopamine (DA) and glutamate (GLU) levels was investigated for the first time in the STN of sham and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. The L-DOPA-induced DA increase in the STN was significantly higher in DA-depleted rats compared to shams. MK 801 did not influence the L-DOPA-induced DA release in shams. However, MK 801 enhanced the L-DOPA-induced DA release in hemi-parkinson rats. Interestingly, the extracellular STN GLU levels remained unchanged after nigral degeneration. Furthermore, administration of MK 801 alone or combined with L-DOPA did not alter the STN GLU levels in both sham and DA-depleted rats. The present study does not support the hypothesis that DA-ergic degeneration influences the STN GLU levels neither that MK 801 alters the GLU levels in lesioned and non-lesioned rats. However, NMDA receptor antagonists could be used as a beneficial adjuvant treatment for PD by enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of l-DOPA at least in part in the STN.

  12. Mismatch negativity-like potential (MMN-like) in the subthalamic nuclei in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Minks, Eduard; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Chrastina, Jan; Halámek, Josef; Shaw, Daniel J; Bareš, Martin

    2014-12-01

    An infrequent change to an otherwise repetitive sequence of stimuli leads to the generation of mismatch negativity (MMN), even in the absence of attention. This evoked negative response occurs in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) over the temporal and frontal cortices, 100-250 ms after onset of the deviant stimulus. The MMN is used to detect sensory information processing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether MMN can be recorded in the subthalamic nuclei (STN) as evidence of auditory information processing on an unconscious level within this structure. To our knowledge, MMN has never been recorded in the human STN. We recorded intracerebral EEG using a MMN paradigm in five patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who were implanted with depth electrodes in the subthalamic nuclei (STN). We found far-field MMN when intracerebral contacts were connected to an extracranial reference electrode. In all five PD patients (and nine of ten intracerebral electrodes), we also found near-field MMN-like potentials when intracerebral contacts were referenced to one another, and in some electrodes, we observed phase reversals in these potentials. The mean time-to-peak latency of the intracerebral MMN-like potentials was 214 ± 38 ms (median 219 ms). We reveal MMN-like potentials in bilateral STN. This finding provides evidence that STN receives sensory (auditory) information from other structures. The question for further research is whether STN receives such signals through a previously described hyperdirect pathway between STN and frontal cortex (a known generator of the MMN potential) and if the STN contributes to sensorimotor integration.

  13. Identification of (2S,3S)-β-Methyltryptophan as the Real Biosynthetic Intermediate of Antitumor Agent Streptonigrin

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dekun; Zou, Yi; Zhang, Zhang; Xu, Fei; Brock, Nelson L.; Zhang, Liping; Deng, Zixin; Lin, Shuangjun

    2016-01-01

    Streptonigrin is a potent antitumor antibiotic, active against a wide range of mammalian tumor cells. It was reported that its biosynthesis relies on (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan as an intermediate. In this study, the biosynthesis of (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan and its isomer (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan by enzymes from the streptonigrin biosynthetic pathway is demonstrated. StnR is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferase that catalyzes a transamination between L-tryptophan and β-methyl indolepyruvate. StnQ1 is an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent C-methyltransferase and catalyzes β-methylation of indolepyruvate to generate (R)-β-methyl indolepyruvate. Although StnR exhibited a significant preference for (S)-β-methyl indolepyruvate over the (R)-epimer, StnQ1 and StnR together catalyze (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan formation from L-tryptophan. StnK3 is a cupin superfamily protein responsible for conversion of (R)-β-methyl indolepyruvate to its (S)-epimer and enables (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan biosynthesis from L-tryptophan when combined with StnQ1 and StnR. Most importantly, (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan was established as the biosynthetic intermediate of the streptonigrin pathway by feeding experiments with a knockout mutant, contradicting the previous proposal that stated (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan as the intermediate. These data set the stage for the complete elucidation of the streptonigrin biosynthetic pathway, which would unlock the potential of creating new streptonigrin analogues by genetic manipulation of the biosynthetic machinery. PMID:26847951

  14. Hypoxia enhances the malignant nature of bladder cancer cells and concomitantly antagonizes protein O-glycosylation extension

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luís; Azevedo, Rita; Soares, Janine; Cotton, Sofia; Parreira, Beatriz; Neves, Manuel; Amaro, Teresina; Tavares, Ana; Teixeira, Filipe; Palmeira, Carlos; Rangel, Maria; Silva, André M.N.; Reis, Celso A.; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Oliveira, Maria José; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Invasive bladder tumours express the cell-surface Sialyl-Tn (STn) antigen, which stems from a premature stop in protein O-glycosylation. The STn antigen favours invasion, immune escape, and possibly chemotherapy resistance, making it attractive for target therapeutics. However, the events leading to such deregulation in protein glycosylation are mostly unknown. Since hypoxia is a salient feature of advanced stage tumours, we searched into how it influences bladder cancer cells glycophenotype, with emphasis on STn expression. Therefore, three bladder cancer cell lines with distinct genetic and molecular backgrounds (T24, 5637 and HT1376) were submitted to hypoxia. To disclose HIF-1α-mediated events, experiments were also conducted in the presence of Deferoxamine Mesilate (Dfx), an inhibitor of HIF-1α proteasomal degradation. In both conditions all cell lines overexpressed HIF-1α and its transcriptionally-regulated protein CA-IX. This was accompanied by increased lactate biosynthesis, denoting a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Concomitantly, T24 and 5637 cells acquired a more motile phenotype, consistent with their more mesenchymal characteristics. Moreover, hypoxia promoted STn antigen overexpression in all cell lines and enhanced the migration and invasion of those presenting more mesenchymal characteristics, in an HIF-1α-dependent manner. These effects were reversed by reoxygenation, demonstrating that oxygen affects O-glycan extension. Glycoproteomics studies highlighted that STn was mainly present in integrins and cadherins, suggesting a possible role for this glycan in adhesion, cell motility and invasion. The association between HIF-1α and STn overexpressions and tumour invasion was further confirmed in bladder cancer patient samples. In conclusion, STn overexpression may, in part, result from a HIF-1α mediated cell-survival strategy to adapt to the hypoxic challenge, favouring cell invasion. In addition, targeting STn-expressing glycoproteins may

  15. Impact of Bilateral Subthalamic Stimulation on Motor/Cognitive Functions in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    ASAHI, Takashi; NAKAMICHI, Naomi; TAKAIWA, Akiko; KASHIWAZAKI, Daina; KOH, Masaki; DOUGU, Nobuhiro; TAKASHIMA, Shutaro; TANAKA, Kortaro; KURODA, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is still unclear whether deep brain stimulation targeted to the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) affects cognitive function in Parkinson's disease (PD). This prospective study was aimed to systemically evaluate the impact of bilateral STN-DBS on motor and cognitive functions in patients with PD. This study included totally 11 Japanese patients with medically intolerant PD. Neurological and cognitive status was precisely evaluated before and 1 year after bilateral STN-DBS, using unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), levodopa equivalent doses, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Japanese adult reading test (JART), repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS), and Wechsler adult intelligence scale-revised (WAIS-R). Preoperative RBANS and WAIS-R identified cognitive dysfunction that could not be detected by MMSE and JART. Before surgery, PD patients had significantly impaired immediate memory and attention. Motor function significantly improved 1 year after bilateral STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS did not affect any score on cognitive examinations. However, postoperative improvements of total score on RBANS and performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) scores on WAIS-R were closely related to those of UPDRS part III off (R2 = 0.61, P < 0.01; R2 = 0.39, P < 0.05, respectively). These findings strongly suggest that bilateral STN-DBS may significantly improve cognitive function in a certain subgroup of patients whose therapeutic effects on motor function are prominent. PMID:24872253

  16. Neuropsychology Review Submission

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, P. Justin; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been well documented that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) to address some of the disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) can evoke unintended effects, especially on non-motor behavior. This observation has catalyzed more than a decade of research concentrated on establishing trends and identifying potential mechanisms for these non-motor effects. While many issues remain unresolved, the collective result of many research studies and clinical observations has been a general recognition of the role of the STN in mediating limbic function. In particular, the STN has been implicated in impulse control and the related construct of valence processing. A better understanding of STN involvement in these phenomena could have important implications for treating impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs affect up to 40% of PD patients on dopamine agonist therapy and approximately 15% of PD patients overall. ICDs have been reported to be associated with STN DBS. In this paper we will focus on impulse control and review pre-clinical, clinical, behavioral, imaging, and electrophysiological studies pertaining to the limbic function of the STN. PMID:26577509

  17. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p < 0.05). Improvement in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III score (off medication, on stimulation) 12 months after the operation was higher for patients who underwent 3D-SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). The total electrical energy

  18. Cholesterol stimulates and ceramide inhibits Sticholysin II-induced pore formation in complex bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Ida; García-Linares, Sara; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-04-01

    The pore forming capacity of Sticholysin II (StnII; isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus) in bilayer membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and either cholesterol or palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) has been examined. The aim of the study was to elucidate how the presence of differently ordered PSM domains affected StnII oligomerization and pore formation. Cholesterol is known to enhance pore formation by StnII, and our results confirmed this and provide kinetic information for the process. The effect of cholesterol on bilayer permeabilization kinetics was concentration-dependent. In the concentration regime used (2.5-10nmol cholesterol in POPC:PSM 80:20 by nmol), cholesterol also increased the acyl chain order in the fluid PSM domain and thus decreased bilayer fluidity, suggesting that fluidity per se was not responsible for cholesterol's effect. Addition of PCer (2.5-10nmol) to the POPC:PSM (80:20 by nmol) bilayers attenuated StnII-induced pore formation, again in a concentration-dependent fashion. This addition also led to the formation of a PCer-rich gel phase. Addition of cholesterol to PCer-containing membranes could partially reduce the inhibitory effect of PCer on StnII pore formation. We conclude that the physical state of PSM (as influenced by either cholesterol or PCer) affected StnII binding and pore formation under the conditions examined.

  19. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain.

  20. Different cerebral cortical areas influence the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on parkinsonian motor deficits and freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Aalto, Sargo; Rinne, Juha O; Lee, Ki Ook; Oh, Seung Hun; Chang, Jin Woo; Lee, Myung Sik

    2007-11-15

    Inconsistent response in freezing of gait (FOG) with levodopa treatment or STN DBS makes the pathogenesis difficult to understand. We studied brain areas associated with the expression of STN DBS effect on parkinsonian motor deficits and FOG. Ten Parkinson's disease patients with typical FOG were included. One month before STN DBS, we performed [(18)F]-deoxyglucose PET scans and measured the UPDRS motor and modified FOG (mFOG) scores during levodopa off and on periods. At two months after STN DBS, same rating scores were measured. The percentage improvement of mFOG and UPDRS motor scores by STN DBS during levodopa off period was calculated. We searched for brain areas in which glucose metabolism correlated with the improvement of mFOG and UPDRS motor scores by DBS. During levodopa off period, STN DBS improved the UPDRS motor scores by 32.3% and the mFOG scores by 56.6%. There was no correlation between the improvements of both scores. The improvement of UPDRS motor score by DBS correlated with the metabolic activities of rostral supplementary motor area (Brodmann's area 8; BA8), anterior cingulate cortex (BA32), and prefrontal cortex (BA9). On the other hand, there was a positive correlation between the improvement of mFOG score by DBS and the metabolic activity of the parietal, occipital, and temporal sensory association cortices. In conclusion, dysfunction of different cerebral cortical areas limits the beneficial effects of DBS on parkinsonian motor deficits and FOG.

  1. The effect of low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus on basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkyoung; Song, Inho; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, In Young

    2014-08-08

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has recently been introduced as an alternative target to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease with severe and medically intractable axial symptoms such as gait and postural impairment. However, it is little known about how electrical stimulation of the PPN affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia. We examined how low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In order to identify the effect of low frequency stimulation on the PPTg, neuronal activity in both the STN and substantia nigra par reticulata (SNr) were recorded and subjected to quantitative analysis, including analysis of firing rates and firing patterns. In this study, we found that the firing rates of the STN and SNr were suppressed during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. However, the firing pattern, in contrast to the firing rate, did not exhibit significant changes in either the STN or SNr of 6-OHDA lesioned rats during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. In addition, we also found that the firing rate of STN and SNr neurons displaying burst and random pattern were decreased by low frequency stimulation of PPTg, while the neurons displaying regular pattern were not affected. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of the PPTg affects neuronal activity in both the STN and SNr, and may represent electrophysiological efficacy of low frequency PPN stimulation.

  2. Single molecule study of heterotypic interactions between mucins possessing the Tn cancer antigen

    PubMed Central

    Haugstad, Kristin E; Stokke, Bjørn T; Brewer, C Fred; Gerken, Thomas A; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are linear, heavily O-glycosylated proteins with physiological roles that include cell signaling, cell adhesion, inflammation, immune response and tumorgenesis. Cancer-associated mucins often differ from normal mucins by presenting truncated carbohydrate chains. Characterization of the binding properties of mucins with truncated carbohydrate side chains could thus prove relevant for understanding their role in cancer mechanisms such as metastasis and recognition by the immune system. In this work, heterotypic interactions of model mucins that possess the Tn (GalNAcαThr/Ser) and T (Galβ1–3GalNAcαThr/Ser) cancer antigens derived from porcine submaxillary mucin (PSM) were studied using atomic force microscopy. PSM possessing only the Tn antigen (Tn-PSM) was found to bind to PSM analogs possessing a combination of T, Tn and STn antigens as well as biosynthetic analogs of the core 1 blood group A tetrasaccharide (GalNAcα1–3[Fucα1–2] Galβ1–3GalNAcαSer/Thr). The rupture forces for the heterotypic interactions ranged from 18– to 31 pN at a force-loading rate of ∼0.5 nN/s. The thermally averaged distance from the bound complex to the transition state (xβ) was estimated to be in the range 0.37–0.87 nm for the first barrier of the Bell Evans analysis and within 0.34–0.64 nm based on a lifetime analysis. These findings reveal that the binding strength and energy landscape for heterotypic interactions of Tn-PSM with the above mucins, resemble homotypic interactions of Tn-PSM. This suggests common carbohydrate epitope interactions for the Tn cancer antigen with the above mucin analogs, a finding that may be important to the role of the Tn antigen in cancer cells. PMID:25527429

  3. The effects of DBS patterns on basal ganglia activity and thalamic relay : a computational study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rahul; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-08-01

    Thalamic neurons receive inputs from cortex and their responses are modulated by the basal ganglia (BG). This modulation is necessary to properly relay cortical inputs back to cortex and downstream to the brain stem when movements are planned. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the BG input to thalamus becomes pathological and relay of motor-related cortical inputs is compromised, thereby impairing movements. However, high frequency (HF) deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be used to restore relay reliability, thereby restoring movements in PD patients. Although therapeutic, HF stimulation consumes significant power forcing surgical battery replacements, and may cause adverse side effects. Here, we used a biophysical-based model of the BG-Thalamus motor loop in both healthy and PD conditions to assess whether low frequency stimulation can suppress pathological activity in PD and enable the thalamus to reliably relay movement-related cortical inputs. We administered periodic pulse train DBS waveforms to the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) with frequencies ranging from 0-140 Hz, and computed statistics that quantified pathological bursting, oscillations, and synchronization in the BG as well as thalamic relay of cortical inputs. We found that none of the frequencies suppressed all pathological activity in BG, though the HF waveforms recovered thalamic reliability. Our rigorous study, however, led us to a novel DBS strategy involving low frequency multi-input phase-shifted DBS, which successfully suppressed pathological symptoms in all BG nuclei and enabled reliable thalamic relay. The neural restoration remained robust to changes in the model parameters characterizing early to late PD stages.

  4. An in vivo microperfusion study of distal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption in normal and ammonium chloride rats.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, D Z

    1985-01-01

    For many years it has been thought that distal nephron hydrogen ion secretion can be importantly modulated by factors such as sodium delivery, sodium avidity, and potassium stores. Free flow micropuncture studies have also indicated that the rate of bicarbonate delivery may also alter the rate of bicarbonate reabsorption. The present studies were undertaken to examine possible luminal influences on total CO2 reabsorption in microperfused distal tubules in the rat in vivo. Tubules from normal and acidotic rats were perfused with five solutions in a manner that induced changes in bicarbonate load, sodium and potassium fluxes (JNa, JK), and luminal sulfate concentration. in each collected perfusate, simultaneous analyses were undertaken to determine water reabsorption, Na, and K concentrations using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and total CO2 by microcalorimetry. Using factorial analysis of covariance to account for confounding effects on total CO2 flux (JtCO2) such as water reabsorption, distal tubules of acidotic rats reabsorbed CO2 in the range of 50-112 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 X These JtCO2 values were not significantly correlated with HCO3 load, JNa, or JK despite changes in the latter from net reabsorption to net secretion. Distal tubules of rats with normal acid-base status had JtCO2 values which were neither significantly different from zero nor correlated with changes in JK and JNa. Further, doubling the load from 250-500 pmol/min (by doubling the perfusion rate of 25-mM HCO3 solutions) did not stimulate JtCO2 in these normal animals. Accordingly, these acute in vivo microperfusion studies indicate for the first time that neither load nor potassium or sodium fluxes are important modulators of distal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption. PMID:2982915

  5. Genomics of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: implications from a rare tumor for pan-cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Rathmell, Kimryn W.; Chen, Fengju; Creighton, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of the renal cell carcinomas, a heterogenous group of cancers arising from the nephron. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) profiled this understudied disease using multiple data platforms, including whole exome sequencing, whole genome sequencing (WGS), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing. The insights gained from this study would have implications for other types of kidney cancer as well as for cancer biology in general. Global molecular patterns in ChRCC provided clues as to this cancer's cell of origin, which is distinct from that of the other renal cell carcinomas, illustrating an approach that might be applied towards elucidating the cell of origin of other cancer types. MtDNA sequencing revealed loss-of-function mutations in NADH dehydrogenase subunits, highlighting the role of deregulated metabolism in this and other cancers. Analysis of WGS data led to the discovery of recurrent genomic rearrangements involving TERT promoter region, which were associated with very high expression levels of TERT, pointing to a potential mechanism for TERT deregulation that might be found in other cancers. WGS data, generated by large scale efforts such as TCGA and the International Cancer Genomics Consortium (ICGC), could be more extensively mined across various cancer types, to uncover structural variants, mtDNA mutations, themes of tumor metabolic properties, as well as noncoding point mutations. TCGA's data on ChRCC should continue to serve as a resource for future pan-cancer as well as kidney cancer studies, and highlight the value of investigations into rare tumor types to globally inform principals of cancer biology. PMID:25859550

  6. Effects of subthalamic stimulation on speech of consecutive patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zrinzo, L.; Martinez-Torres, I.; Frost, E.; Pinto, S.; Foltynie, T.; Holl, E.; Petersen, E.; Roughton, M.; Hariz, M.I.; Limousin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Following STN-DBS, speech intelligibility can deteriorate, limiting its beneficial effect. Here we prospectively examined the short- and long-term speech response to STN-DBS in a consecutive series of patients to identify clinical and surgical factors associated with speech change. Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients were assessed before surgery, then 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after STN-DBS in 4 conditions on- and off-medication with on- and off-stimulation using established and validated speech and movement scales. Fifteen of these patients were followed up for 3 years. A control group of 12 patients with PD were followed up for 1 year. Results: Within the surgical group, speech intelligibility significantly deteriorated by an average of 14.2% ± 20.15% off-medication and 16.9% ± 21.8% on-medication 1 year after STN-DBS. The medical group deteriorated by 3.6% ± 5.5% and 4.5% ± 8.8%, respectively. Seven patients showed speech amelioration after surgery. Loudness increased significantly in all tasks with stimulation. A less severe preoperative on-medication motor score was associated with a more favorable speech response to STN-DBS after 1 year. Medially located electrodes on the left STN were associated with a significantly higher risk of speech deterioration than electrodes within the nucleus. There was a strong relationship between high voltage in the left electrode and poor speech outcome at 1 year. Conclusion: The effect of STN-DBS on speech is variable and multifactorial, with most patients exhibiting decline of speech intelligibility. Both medical and surgical issues contribute to deterioration of speech in STN-DBS patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that STN-DBS for PD results in deterioration in speech intelligibility in all combinations of medication and stimulation states at 1

  7. Studies on the exaggerated natriuretic response to a saline infusion in the hypothyroid rat

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Edward W.; DiScala, Vincent A.

    1970-01-01

    The exaggerated natriuresis of hypothyroid rats receiving a 5% saline infusion was studied to determine the mechanism and the site within the nephron responsible for this increase in sodium excretion. Sodium clearance (CNa) and fractional sodium excretion were both demonstrated to be greater in hypothyroid rats for any amount of sodium infused. The rate of increase in fractional sodium excretion in response to saline loading was 3.4 times greater in hypothyroid animals. At the conclusion of the diuresis some of the hypothyroid animals excreted greater than 45% of the filtered sodium load, while no control animal excreted more than 12% of the filtered sodium load. The mean clearance of insulin during the saline diuresis was 36.6% lower (P < 0.001) in the hypothyroid rats. D-Aldosterone given to hypothyroid animals 3 hr before the experiment did not alter the magnitude or rate of increase in fractional sodium excretion. Inulin space determinations in nephrectomized rats revealed that extracellular fluid volume was contracted by 17.1% in the hypothyroid rats (P < 0.01). Plasma sodium was not significantly different in hypothyroid and control animals. A limit on solute free water reabsorption (TeH2O) per osmolar clearance (COsm) was demonstrated in the hypothyroid rats when these animals excreted greater than 12% of the filtered osmotic load. The limit on TeH2O formation was associated with an acceleration in the rate of sodium excretion and a decline in the rate of potassium excretion. Early in the diuresis when COsm, CNa, and TeH2O were comparable in hypothyroid and control rats, the filtered sodium load was 31% lower (P < 0.01) in the hypothyroid animals. These findings indicate that diminished thyroid hormone activity decreases renal sodium reabsorptive capacity. Indirect evidence suggests that the distal and possibly the proximal tubules are the sites of this diminished sodium reabsorption in hypothyroid animals. PMID:5422024

  8. AB255. A study on the clonal origination of multifocal clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Li, Quanlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Nephron sparing surgery has become a prior treatment for the early stage renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Multifocal RCC is an important reason that causes the recurrence. In this study, we discovered the origination of multifocal RCCs, aimed at providing a theoretical foundation for clinical treatment. Methods Sixty-five tumors from 27 multifocal RCC patients were collected and microscopic incised. The genome DNA was extracted. The loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of polymorphous micro satellites on 3p25 (D3S1317, D3S1038, D3S1597), 3p14 (D3S1300, D3S1234, D3S1540), 7q31 (D7S522), 8q21 (D8S261), 9q21 (D9S171), and 17p13 (TP53) genes was detected. The X chromosome inactivation was detected on the female cases. The results were compared with normal renal tissue. Results Twenty-five of 27 cases (93%) have LOH on at least one micro satellite. The LOH rates were: D3S1317 29%, D3S1038 25%, D3S1597 26%, D3S1300 17%, D3S1234 20%, D3S1540 31%, D7S522 29%, D8S261 22%, D9S171 23%, TP53 46%. Eighteen cases (66.7%) showed a common LOH type. In the 10 female cases whom were found non-random X chromosome inactivation, two (2/10, 20%) patients’ multifocal foci appeared different X chromosome inactivation types from original ones, the other 8 patients’ multifocal foci and original ones showed the same X chromosome inactivation type. Conclusions In most cases, multifocal RCC foci shares a common clonal origin. But in minority cases, multifocal RCC foci are independently originated.

  9. Different patterns of medication change after subthalamic or pallidal stimulation for Parkinson's disease: target related effect or selection bias?

    PubMed Central

    Minguez-Castellan..., A; Escamilla-Sevilla, F; Katati, M; Martin-Linares, J; Meersmans, M; Ortega-Moreno, A; Arjona, V

    2005-01-01

    Background: Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is favoured over bilateral globus pallidus internus (Gpi) DBS for symptomatic treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) due to the possibility of reducing medication, despite lack of definitive comparative evidence. Objective: To analyse outcomes after one year of bilateral Gpi or STN DBS, with consideration of influence of selection bias on the pattern of postsurgical medication change. Methods: The first patients to undergo bilateral Gpi (n = 10) or STN (n = 10) DBS at our centre were studied. They were assessed presurgically and one year after surgery (CAPIT protocol). Results: Before surgery the Gpi DBS group had more dyskinesias and received lower doses of medication. At one year, mean reduction in UPDRS off medication score was 35% and 39% in the Gpi and STN groups, respectively (non-significant difference). Dyskinesias reduced in proportion to presurgical severity. The levodopa equivalent dose was significantly reduced only in the STN group (24%). This study high-lights the absence of significant differences between the groups in clinical scales and medication dose at one year. In the multivariate analysis of predictive factors for off-state motor improvement, the presurgical levodopa equivalent dose showed a direct relation in the STN and an inverse relation in the Gpi group. Conclusion: Differences in the patterns of medication change after Gpi and STN DBS may be partly due to a patient selection bias. Both procedures may be equally useful for different subgroups of patients with advanced PD, Gpi DBS especially for patients with lower threshold for dyskinesia. PMID:15607992

  10. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated.

  11. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine tegmental neurons projecting to the subthalamic nucleus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Takako; Kita, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the mesopontine tegmentum. This study investigated the numbers and distributions of neurons involved in these projections in rats using Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tracing combined with immunostaining of choline acetyltransferase and a neuron-specific nuclear protein. The results suggest that a small population of cholinergic neurons mainly in the caudoventral part of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN), approximately 360 neurons (≈10% of total) in the homolateral and 80 neurons (≈2%) in the contralateral PPN, projects to the STN. In contrast, the number of non-cholinergic neurons projecting to the STN was estimated to be 9 times as much, with approximately 3300 in the homolateral side and 1300 neurons in the contralateral side. A large gathering of the FG-labeled non-cholinergic neurons was found rostrodorsomedial to the caudolateral PPN. The biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) anterograde tracing method was used to substantiate the mesopontine-STN projections. Injection of BDA into the caudoventral PPN labeled numerous thin fibers with small en-passant varicosities in the STN. Injection of BDA into the non-cholinergic neuron-rich area labeled a moderate number of thicker fibers with patches of aggregates of larger boutons. The densities of labeled fibers and the number of retrogradely labeled cells in the mesopontine tegmentum suggested that the terminal field formed in the STN by each cholinergic neuron is more extensive than that by each non-cholinergic neuron. The findings suggest that cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine afferents may carry different information to the STN. PMID:21198985

  12. No Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Intertemporal Decision-Making in Parkinson Patients123

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Storzer, Lena; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). DBS or pharmacological treatment is believed to modulate the tendency to, or reverse, impulse control disorders. Several brain areas involved in impulsivity and reward valuation, such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum, are linked to the STN, and activity in these areas might be affected by STN-DBS. To investigate the effect of STN-DBS on one type of impulsive decision-making—delay discounting (i.e., the devaluation of reward with increasing delay until its receipt)—we tested 40 human PD patients receiving STN-DBS treatment and medication for at least 3 months. Patients were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four groups to test the effects of DBS on/off states as well as medication on/off states on delay discounting. The delay-discounting task consisted of a series of choices among a smaller. sooner or a larger, later monetary reward. Despite considerable effects of DBS on motor performance, patients receiving STN-DBS did not choose more or less impulsively compared with those in the off-DBS group, as well as when controlling for risk attitude. Although null results have to be interpreted with caution, our findings are of significance to other researchers studying the effects of PD treatment on impulsive decision-making, and they are of clinical relevance for determining the therapeutic benefits of using STN-DBS. PMID:27257622

  13. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  14. Subthalamic nucleus activity in the awake hemiparkinsonian rat: relationships with motor and cognitive networks.

    PubMed

    Delaville, Claire; McCoy, Alex J; Gerber, Colin M; Cruz, Ana V; Walters, Judith R

    2015-04-29

    Oscillatory activity in both beta and gamma ranges has been recorded in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and linked to motor function, with beta activity considered antikinetic, and gamma activity, prokinetic. However, the extent to which nonmotor networks contribute to this activity is unclear. This study uses hemiparkinsonian rats performing a treadmill walking task to compare synchronized STN local field potential (LFP) activity with activity in motor cortex (MCx) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), areas involved in motor and cognitive processes, respectively. Data show increases in STN and MCx 29-36 Hz LFP spectral power and coherence after dopamine depletion, which are reduced by apomorphine and levodopa treatments. In contrast, recordings from mPFC 3 weeks after dopamine depletion failed to show peaks in 29-36 Hz LFP power. However, mPFC and STN both showed peaks in the 45-55 Hz frequency range in LFP power and coherence during walking before and 21 days after dopamine depletion. Interestingly, power in this low gamma range was transiently reduced in both mPFC and STN after dopamine depletion but recovered by day 21. In contrast to the 45-55 Hz activity, the amplitude of the exaggerated 29-36 Hz rhythm in the STN was modulated by paw movement. Furthermore, as in PD patients, after dopamine treatment a third band (high gamma) emerged in the lesioned hemisphere. The results suggest that STN integrates activity from both motor and cognitive networks in a manner that varies with frequency, behavioral state, and the integrity of the dopamine system.

  15. L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in adult rats with a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of dopamine neurons is paralleled by increased c-fos gene expression in the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques

    2006-05-01

    Levodopa (L-DOPA), the metabolic precursor of dopamine, is widely used as a pharmacological agent for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term L-DOPA use results in abnormal involuntary movements such as dyskinesias. There is evidence that abnormal cell signaling in the basal ganglia is involved in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a key role in the circuitry of the basal ganglia and in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. However, the contribution of the STN to L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias remains unclear. The objective of this work was to study the effects of acute or chronic systemic administration of L-DOPA to adult rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of dopamine neurons on c-fos expression in the STN and test the hypothesis that these effects correlate with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. c-fos mRNA expression was measured in the STN by in situ hybridization histochemistry at the single cell level. Our results confirm earlier evidence that the chronic administration of L-DOPA to rats with a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion increases c-fos expression in the STN. We also report that c-fos expression can be increased following an acute injection of L-DOPA to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats but not following a chronic injection of L-DOPA to sham-operated, unlesioned rats. Finally, we provide evidence that the occurrence and severity of dyskinesia is correlated with c-fos mRNA levels in the ipsilateral STN. These results suggest that altered cell signaling in the STN is involved in some of the behavioral effects induced by systemic L-DOPA administration.

  16. SPAK isoforms and OSR1 regulate sodium-chloride co-transporters in a nephron-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Grimm, P Richard; Taneja, Tarvinder K; Liu, Jie; Coleman, Richard; Chen, Yang-Yi; Delpire, Eric; Wade, James B; Welling, Paul A

    2012-11-02

    STE20/SPS-1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (SPAK) and oxidative stress-related kinase (OSR1) activate the potassium-dependent sodium-chloride co-transporter, NKCC2, and thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, in vitro, and both co-localize with a kinase regulatory molecule, Cab39/MO25α, at the apical membrane of the thick ascending limb (TAL) and distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Yet genetic ablation of SPAK in mice causes a selective loss of NCC function, whereas NKCC2 becomes hyperphosphorylated. Here, we explore the underlying mechanisms in wild-type and SPAK-null mice. Unlike in the DCT, OSR1 remains at the TAL apical membrane of KO mice where it is accompanied by an increase in the active, phosphorylated form of AMP-activated kinase. We found an alterative SPAK isoform (putative SPAK2 form), which modestly inhibits co-transporter activity in vitro, is more abundant in the medulla than the cortex. Thus, enhanced NKCC2 phosphorylation in the SPAK knock-out may be explained by removal of inhibitory SPAK2, sustained activity of OSR1, and activation of other kinases. By contrast, the OSR1/SPAK/M025α signaling apparatus is disrupted in the DCT. OSR1 becomes largely inactive and displaced from M025α and NCC at the apical membrane, and redistributes to dense punctate structures, containing WNK1, within the cytoplasm. These changes are paralleled by a decrease in NCC phosphorylation and a decrease in the mass of the distal convoluted tubule, exclusive to DCT1. As a result of the dependent nature of OSR1 on SPAK in the DCT, NCC is unable to be activated. Consequently, SPAK(-/-) mice are highly sensitive to dietary salt restriction, displaying prolonged negative sodium balance and hypotension.

  17. Radical nephroureterectomy versus endoscopic procedures for the treatment of localised upper tract urothelial carcinoma: a meta-analysis and a systematic review of current evidence from comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Yakoubi, R; Colin, P; Seisen, T; Léon, P; Nison, L; Bozzini, G; Shariat, S F; Rouprêt, M

    2014-12-01

    The conservative management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) has seen important developments over the last 10 years with advances in endoscopy. Our aim was to compare the available evidence regarding the impact of endoscopic nephron sparing procedures (NSP) and radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) on survival of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). A critical review of Pubmed/Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed in July 2013 according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. Overall, eight publications were selected for inclusion in this meta-analysis but all of them were retrospective or non-randomised comparative studies. The primary end points were the overall and cancer-specific survivals (OS and CSS) in the two treatment groups. We achieved to pool data on 1002 patients diagnosed with localised UTUC and treated either by endoscopic NSP (n = 322) or by RNU (n = 680). No significant difference was found in terms of OS and CSS between RNU and endoscopic NSP (HR = 1.47 and p = 0.31; HR = 0.96 and p = 0.91, respectively). However, the low level of evidence (3b) and the heterogeneity of the studies limited the quality of the results. In the absence of prospective and randomised studies, the equivalent oncologic control for endoscopic NSP and RNU is not provided by this meta-analysis. Multicentre prospective studies are urgently needed to assess the oncologic outcomes of UTUC with endoscopic management. In the next multicentre studies, the patients should be matched on the basis of the tumour stage (imaging) and grade (biopsy) at diagnosis.

  18. Characterization of Ca(2+) channels in rat subthalamic nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, W J; Baba, Y; Otsuka, T; Murakami, F

    2000-11-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a key role in motor control. Although previous studies have suggested that Ca(2+) conductances may be involved in regulating the activity of STN neurons, Ca(2+) channels in this region have not yet been characterized. We have therefore investigated the subtypes and functional characteristics of Ca(2+) conductances in STN neurons, in both acutely isolated and slice preparations. Acutely isolated STN cells were identified by retrograde filling with the fluorescent dye, Fluoro-Gold. In acutely isolated STN neurons, Cd(2+)-sensitive, depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents were observed in all cells studied. The current-voltage relationship and current kinetics were characteristic of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The steady-state voltage-dependent activation curves and inactivation curves could both be fitted with a single Boltzmann function. Currents evoked with a prolonged pulse, however, inactivated with multiple time constants, suggesting either the presence of more than one Ca(2+) channel subtype or multiple inactivation processes with a single channel type in STN neurons. Experiments using organic Ca(2+) channel blockers revealed that on average, 21% of the current was nifedipine sensitive, 52% was sensitive to omega-conotoxin GVIA, 16% was blocked by a high concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA (200 nM), and the remainder of the current (9%) was resistant to the co-application of all blockers. These currents had similar voltage dependencies, but the nifedipine-sensitive current and the resistant current activated at slightly lower voltages. omega-Agatoxin IVA at 20 nM was ineffective in blocking the current. Together, the above results suggest that acutely isolated STN neurons have all subtypes of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels except for P-type, but have no low-voltage-activated channels. Although acutely isolated neurons provide a good preparation for whole cell voltage-clamp study, dendritic processes are

  19. Conditions for the generation of beta oscillations in the subthalamic nucleus-globus pallidus network.

    PubMed

    Holgado, Alejo J Nevado; Terry, John R; Bogacz, Rafal

    2010-09-15

    The advance of Parkinson's disease is associated with the existence of abnormal oscillations within the basal ganglia with frequencies in the beta band (13-30 Hz). While the origin of these oscillations remains unknown, there is some evidence suggesting that oscillations observed in the basal ganglia arise due to interactions of two nuclei: the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus pars externa (GPe). To investigate this hypothesis, we develop a computational model of the STN-GPe network based upon anatomical and electrophysiological studies. Significantly, our study shows that for certain parameter regimes, the model intrinsically oscillates in the beta range. Through an analytical study of the model, we identify a simple set of necessary conditions on model parameters that guarantees the existence of beta oscillations. These conditions for generation of oscillations are described by a set of simple inequalities and can be summarized as follows: (1) The excitatory connections from STN to GPe and the inhibitory connections from GPe to STN need to be sufficiently strong. (2) The time required by neurons to react to their inputs needs to be short relative to synaptic transmission delays. (3) The excitatory input from the cortex to STN needs to be high relative to the inhibition from striatum to GPe. We confirmed the validity of these conditions via numerical simulation. These conditions describe changes in parameters that are consistent with those expected as a result of the development of Parkinson's disease, and predict manipulations that could inhibit the pathological oscillations.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus local field potential activity helps encode motor effort rather than force in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Cheeran, Binith; FitzGerald, James J; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter

    2015-04-15

    Local field potential (LFP) recordings from patients with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the basal ganglia have suggested that frequency-specific activities correlate with force or effort, but previous studies have not been able to disambiguate the two. Here, we dissociated effort from actual force generated by contrasting the force generation of different fingers while recording LFP activity from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease who had undergone functional surgery. Patients were studied while on their normal dopaminergic medication. We investigated the relationship between frequency-specific oscillatory activity in the STN and voluntary flexion of either the index or little finger at different effort levels. At each tested effort level (10%, 25%, and 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction force of each individual finger), the index finger generated larger force than the little finger. Movement-related suppression of beta-band power in the STN LFP was significantly modulated by effort, but not by which finger was used, suggesting that the beta suppression in the STN LFP during sustained contraction serves as a proxy for effort. The absolute force scaled with beta power suppression, but with the scaling determined by the maximal voluntary contraction force of the motor effector. Our results argue against the hypothesis that the basal ganglia are directly involved in the parameterization of force during movement and support a role of the STN in the control of motor effort to be attributed to a response.

  1. F/A-18 AN/APG-65 Radar Case Study Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    FLIGHT HOUR nPI^ONSTKATION IN A/C F-q AT PAX RIVFI - m RAHAR FAIIJIRFS • JANUARY 1983 ; FORMAL RFLIARILITY PFMONSTRATION (,MIL-STn-781 H) - 106...P’l « I’lQ nPFRATINn HOURS, ZERO FAILURES « RAIIAR EXCEEIlEn CURRENT (OPTIllM III) 8S HK MTKF RFniHREMENT • RAHAR PASSEH NEXT YEAR’S

  2. Regulation of Sticholysin II-Induced Pore Formation by Lipid Bilayer Composition, Phase State, and Interfacial Properties.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ortega, Juan; García-Linares, Sara; Åstrand, Mia; Al Sazzad, Md Abdullah; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-04-12

    Sticholysin II (StnII) is a pore-forming toxin that uses sphingomyelin (SM) as the recognition molecule in targeting membranes. After StnII monomers bind to SM, several toxin monomers act in concert to oligomerize into a functional pore. The regulation of StnII binding to SM, and the subsequent pore-formation process, is not fully understood. In this study, we examined how the biophysical properties of bilayers, originating from variations in the SM structure, from the presence of sterol species, or from the presence of increasingly polyunsaturated glycerophospholipids, affected StnII-induced pore formation. StnII-induced pore formation, as determined from calcein permeabilization, was fastest in the pure unsaturated SM bilayers. In 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/saturated SM bilayers (4:1 molar ratio), pore formation became slower as the chain length of the saturated SMs increased from 14 up to 24 carbons. In the POPC/palmitoyl-SM (16:0-SM) 4:1 bilayers, SM could not support pore formation by StnII if dimyristoyl-PC was included at 1:1 stoichiometry with 16:0-SM, suggesting that free clusters of SM were required for toxin binding and/or pore formation. Cholesterol and other sterols facilitated StnII-induced pore formation markedly, but the efficiency did not appear to correlate with the sterol structure. Benzyl alcohol was more efficient than sterols in enhancing the pore-formation process, suggesting that the effect on pore formation originated from alcohol-induced alteration of the hydrogen-bonding network in the SM-containing bilayers. Finally, we observed that pore formation by StnII was enhanced in the PC/16:0-SM 4:1 bilayers, in which the PC was increasingly unsaturated. We conclude that the physical state of bilayer lipids greatly affected pore formation by StnII. Phase boundaries were not required for pore formation, although SM in a gel state attenuated pore formation.

  3. Striatal Glutamate and GABA after High Frequency Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shim, Insop; Sung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Il sup; Cho, Chul Bum

    2017-01-01

    Objective High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is recognized as an effective treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. However, the neurochemical basis of its effects remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of STN HFS in intact and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model on changes of principal neurotransmitters, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the striatum. Methods The authors examined extracellular glutamate and GABA change in the striatum on sham group, 6-OHDA group, and 6-OHDA plus deep brain stimulation (DBS) group using microdialysis methods. Results High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify glutamate and GABA. The results show that HFS-STN induces a significant increase of extracellular glutamate and GABA in the striatum of 6-OHDA plus DBS group compared with sham and 6-OHDA group. Conclusion Therefore, the clinical results of STN-HFS are not restricted to the direct STN targets but involve widespread adaptive changes within the basal ganglia. PMID:28264233

  4. A Non-Invasive Imaging Approach to Understanding Speech Changes following Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Shalini; Jacks, Adam; Robin, Donald A.; Poizner, Howard; Zhang, Wei; Franklin, Crystal; Liotti, Mario; Vogel, Deanie; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To explore the use of non-invasive functional imaging and “virtual” lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we report the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. Method Perceptual and acoustic speech measures as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF) during speech as measured by PET were obtained with STN-DBS on and off. TMS was applied to a region in the speech motor network found to be abnormally active during DBS. Speech disruption by TMS was compared both perceptually and acoustically with that resulting from DBS on. Results Speech production was perceptually inferior and acoustically less contrastive during left STN stimulation compared to no stimulation. Increased neural activity in left dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) was observed during DBS on. “Virtual” lesioning of this region resulted in speech characterized by decreased speech segment duration, increased pause duration, and decreased intelligibility. Conclusions This case report provides evidence that impaired speech production accompanying STN-DBS may be resulting from unintended activation of PMd. Clinical application of functional imaging and TMS may lead to optimizing the delivery of STN-DBS to improve outcomes for speech production as well as general motor abilities. PMID:19029533

  5. Customizing Deep Brain Stimulation to the Patient Using Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Frankenmolle, Anneke; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD); however declines in cognitive function have been associated with this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive-motor performance of 10 PD patients implanted with STN DBS systems during either clinically determined stimulation settings or settings derived from a computational model. Cicerone DBS software was used to define the model parameters such that current spread to non-motor areas of the STN was minimized. Clinically determined and model defined parameters were equally effective in improving motor scores on the traditional clinical rating scale (UPDRS-III). Under modest dual-task conditions, cognitive-motor performance was worse with clinically determined compared to model derived parameters. In addition, the model parameters provided a 33% reduction in power consumption. These results indicate that the cognitivemotor declines associated with bilateral STN can be mitigated, without compromising motor benefits, utilizing stimulation parameters that minimize current spread into non-motor regions of the STN. PMID:19965023

  6. Two opposite effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on subthalamic nucleus neuron activity: involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Ruiz-Ortega, Jose Angel; Ugedo, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the basal ganglia interferes with movement regulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) on neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this effect using single-unit extracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. Administration of Delta(9)-THC (0.25-2 mg/kg, i.v.) stimulated (by 107% +/- 32%) neurons mainly recorded in the ventromedial portion of the caudal STN, whereas it inhibited (by 65% +/- 4%) neurons recorded in the dorsolateral portion of the rostral STN. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg, i.v.) completely reverted these effects. The excitatory effect of Delta(9)-THC on STN neurons was not observed after antagonism of GABA(A) receptors by bicuculline administration (10 ng, icv.) or after chemical lesion of the globus pallidus with ibotenic acid. The inhibitory effect was abolished when excitatory amino acid receptors were blocked by kynurenic acid (0.5 mumol, icv.). These results indicate that CB1 receptor activation modulates STN neuron activity by indirect mechanisms involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

  7. The subthalamic nucleus modulates the early phase of probabilistic classification learning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Lam, Judith M; Breit, Sorin; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Krüger, Rejko; Luft, Andreas R; Wächter, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Previous models proposed that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is critical in the early phase of skill acquisition. We hypothesized that subthalamic deep brain stimulation modulates the learning curve in early classification learning. Thirteen idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (iPD) with subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), 9 medically treated iPD, and 21 age-matched healthy controls were tested with a probabilistic classification task. STN-DBS patients were tested with stimulation OFF and ON, and medically treated patients with medication OFF and ON, respectively. Performance and reaction time were analyzed on the first 100 consecutive trials as early learning phase. Moreover, data were separated for low and high-probability patterns, and more differentiated strategy analyses were used. The major finding was a significant modulation of the learning curve in DBS patients with stimulation ON: although overall learning was similar to healthy controls, only the stimulation ON group showed a transient significant performance dip from trials '41-60' that rapidly recovered. Further analysis indicated that this might be paralleled by a modulation of the learning strategy, particularly on the high-probability patterns. The reaction time was unchanged during the dip. Our study supports that the STN serves as a relay in early classification learning and directs attention toward unacquainted content. The STN might play a role in balancing the short-term success against strategy optimization for improved long-term outcome.

  8. Fiber type composition of the sternomastoid and diaphragm muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Guido, Anderson Neri; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia; Minatel, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    The muscle fiber phenotype is mainly determined by motoneuron innervation and changes in neuromuscular interaction alter the muscle fiber type. In dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, changes in the molecular assembly of the neuromuscular junction and in nerve terminal sprouting occur in the sternomastoid (STN) muscle during early stages of the disease. In this study, we were interested to see whether early changes in neuromuscular assembly are correlated with alterations in fiber type in dystrophic STN at 2 months of age. A predominance of hybrid fast myofibers (about 52% type IIDB) was observed in control (C57Bl/10) STN. In mdx muscle, the lack of dystrophin did not change this profile (about 54% hybrid type IIDB). Pure fast type IID fibers predominated in normal and dystrophic diaphragm (DIA; about 39% in control and 30% in mdx muscle) and a population of slow Type I fibers was also present (about 10% in control and 13% in mdx muscle). In conclusion, early changes in neuromuscular assembly do not affect the fiber type composition of dystrophic STN. In contrast to the pure fast fibers of the more affected DIA, the hybrid phenotype of the STN may permit dynamic adaptations during progression of the disease.

  9. Uric acid as a risk factor for progression of non-diabetic chronic kidney disease? The Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Gisela; Kollerits, Barbara; Neyer, Ulrich; Ritz, Eberhard; Kronenberg, Florian

    2008-04-01

    The kidney is one of the organs most prominently affected by aging. This can be seen by a loss of renal mass which is caused by a decrease in the number of nephrons resulting in hyperfiltration, hypertrophy and elevations in glomerular pressure. The factors influencing aging of the kidney are not fully elucidated. Epidemiological, experimental and interventional studies resulted in inconsistent results and have not firmly established whether uric acid levels affect progression of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Therefore, we analyzed whether uric acid levels predict the progression of CKD in the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study comprising at baseline 227 Caucasian patients aged 18-65 years with primary non-diabetic CKD of various degrees of renal impairment. Of them, 177 completed a prospective follow-up of 7 years. Primary endpoint was progression of CKD defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or terminal renal failure. Patients who reached a progression endpoint (n =6 5) were significantly older, had higher baseline serum creatinine and protein excretion rates as well as lower Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR). Uric acid levels were only higher in patients with progression of disease when patients with uric acid-lowering drugs were excluded from the analysis. Cox regression analysis revealed that increasing uric acid levels predict disease progression only when the analysis was not adjusted for baseline kidney function parameters. As soon as we adjusted the analysis for GFR and proteinuria this association completely vanished. In summary, our prospective 7 year follow-up study in patients with non-diabetic primary CKD did not support uric acid as an independent predictor for CKD progression.

  10. Extruded Films From Modified Polypropylene Resin: Dielectric and Breakdown Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    81A OF HPORT Of THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UL Standard Form 2" ( R •v 2.") lY~u.Wi bV ANUd 44 119)46 cONENTS PAGE...Technical Information Center* ATTN: DTIC-FDAC Cameron Station (8ldg 5) (16f: jue €eptos for OTIC will Alexandria, VA 22304-6145 seau fr STnM offil...Howard) I - SLCET-DR-B 22 - Originating Office Comander, CECOM R &D Technical Library Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703-5703 1 - ASQNC-ELC-IS-L- R (Tech Library

  11. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    O’Cearbhaill, Roisin E.; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K.; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.; Sabbatini, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011–Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient’s pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36–68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2–39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  12. Increased extracellular dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels contribute to enhanced subthalamic nucleus neural activity during exhausting exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Y; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the mechanism underlying the enhanced subthalamic nucleus (STN) neural activity during exhausting exercise from the perspective of monoamine neurotransmitters and changes of their corresponding receptors. Rats were randomly divided into microdialysis and immunohistochemistry study groups. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of the STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe before, during and 90 min after one bout of exhausting exercise. Dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were subsequently detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For immunohistochemistry study, the expression of DRD2 and HT2C receptors in the STN, before, immediately after and 90 min after exhaustion was detected through immunohistochemistry technique. Microdialysis study results showed that the extracellular DA and 5-HT neurotransmitters increased significantly throughout the procedure of exhausting exercise and the recovery period (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry study results showed that the expression levels of DRD2 and HT2C in the rat STN immediately after exhausting exercise and at the time point of 90 min after exhaustion were both higher than those of the rest condition, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Our results suggest that the increased extracellular DA and 5-HT in the STN might be one important factor leading to the enhanced STN neural activity and the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise. This study may essentially offer useful evidence for better understanding of the mechanism of the central type of exercise-induced fatigue. PMID:26424920

  13. Older Candidates for Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease Have a Higher Incidence of Psychiatric Serious Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Cozac, Vitalii V.; Ehrensperger, Michael M.; Gschwandtner, Ute; Hatz, Florian; Meyer, Antonia; Monsch, Andreas U.; Schuepbach, Michael; Taub, Ethan; Fuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of serious adverse events (SAE) of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We investigated a group of 26 patients with PD who underwent STN-DBS at mean age 63.2 ± 3.3 years. The operated patients from the EARLYSTIM study (mean age 52.9 ± 6.6) were used as a comparison group. Incidences of SAE were compared between these groups. Results: A higher incidence of psychosis and hallucinations was found in these elderly patients compared to the younger patients in the EARLYSTIM study (p < 0.01). Conclusions: The higher incidence of STN-DBS-related psychiatric complications underscores the need for comprehensive psychiatric pre- and postoperative assessment in older DBS candidates. However, these psychiatric SAE were transient, and the benefits of DBS clearly outweighed its adverse effects. PMID:27375478

  14. Subthalamic Stimulation Reduces Vowel Space at the Initiation of Sustained Production: Implications for Articulatory Motor Control in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, John J.; Alken, Amy G.; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stimulation of the subthalamic nuclei (STN) is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but complaints of speech difficulties after surgery have been difficult to quantify. Speech measures do not convincingly account for such reports. Objective: This study examined STN stimulation effects on vowel production, in order to probe whether DBS affects articulatory posturing. The objective was to compare positioning during the initiation phase with the steady prolongation phase by measuring vowel spaces for three “corner” vowels at these two time frames. Methods: Vowel space was measured over the initial 0.25 sec of sustained productions of high front (/i/), high back (/u/) and low vowels (/a/), and again during a 2 sec segment at the midpoint. Eight right-handed male subjects with bilateral STN stimulation and seven age-matched male controls were studied based on their participation in a larger study that included functional imaging. Mean values: age = 57±4.6 yrs; PD duration = 12.3±2.7 yrs; duration of DBS = 25.6±21.2 mos, and UPDRS III speech score = 1.6±0.7. STN subjects were studied off medication at their therapeutic DBS settings and again with their stimulators off, counter-balanced order. Results: Vowel space was larger in the initiation phase compared to the midpoint for both the control and the STN subjects off stimulation. With stimulation on, however, the initial vowel space was significantly reduced to the area measured at the mid-point. For the three vowels, the acoustics were differentially affected, in accordance with expected effects of front versus back position in the vocal tract. Conclusions: STN stimulation appears to constrain initial articulatory gestures for vowel production, raising the possibility that articulatory positions normally used in speech are similarly constrained. PMID:27003219

  15. Subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation for early motor complications in Parkinson's disease-the EARLYSTIM trial: early is not always better.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tiago A; Espay, Alberto J; Marras, Connie; Eckman, Mark H; Pollak, Pierre; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) has revolutionized the management of disabling motor complications in Parkinson's disease. The EARLYSTIM trial applied this treatment to patients who had been experiencing motor complications for less than three years. STN-DBS significantly improved all primary and secondary outcome measures while best medical therapy failed to provide any improvement at the two-year follow-up time point. On face value these results strongly favor the application of STN-DBS far earlier than is currently applied, when patients are just beginning to experience problems with motor complications. Here we review the application of early DBS and the EARLYSTIM trial from the perspectives of clinical issues, health economics and study design and patient expectation of benefit. We conclude that the most relevant issue is not when to operate but on whom and that early is not always better. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. The Evolution of the Society of Trauma Nurses' Leadership Institute.

    PubMed

    Krichten, Amy; Kyle, Amber

    2015-01-01

    The Society of Trauma Nurses (STN) understands the increasing complexity of trauma care and the vital leadership role nurses play. In 2009, the STN took the initiative to form a Leadership Committee tasked with researching the possibility of developing a mechanism to offer trauma leaders opportunities in leadership development. Investigation and collaboration among the committee members, with input from the Board of Directors and the organization's executive director, resulted in the STN Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute design is to equip trauma nurses with the tools needed to effectively lead from the bedside to the boardroom and beyond through web-based modules. Operationalization of the plan took intense focus and dedicated leadership. Following a pilot study, the initial cohort ran the first quarter of 2015. Because of the positive feedback and identified opportunities for improvement, the program will continue to be offered with further expansion planning underway.

  17. Imaging Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease and the Contribution of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicola; Antonelli, Francesca; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2011-01-01

    Taking risks is a natural human response, but, in some, risk taking is compulsive and may be detrimental. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is thought to play a large role in our ability to inhibit responses. Differences between individuals' ability to inhibit inappropriate responses may underlie both the normal variation in trait impulsivity in the healthy population, as well as the pathological compulsions experienced by those with impulse control disorders (ICDs). Thus, we review the role of the STN in response inhibition, with a particular focus on studies employing imaging methodology. We also review the latest evidence that disruption of the function of the STN by deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease can increase impulsivity. PMID:21765999

  18. Morphological and physiological studies of rat kidney cortex slices undergoing isosmotic swelling and its reversal: a possible mechanism for ouabain-resistant control of cell volume.

    PubMed

    Russo, M A; Ernst, S A; Kapoor, S C; van Rossum, G D

    1985-01-01

    Slices of rat kidney cortex were induced to swell by preincubation at 1 degree C in an isotonic Ringer's solution, and their capacity to reverse swelling, by net extrusion of cellular water, was studied during subsequent incubation at 25 degrees C. The recovery from swelling was prevented by the respiratory inhibitor, antimycin A. On the other hand, extrusion of water was little affected by ouabain. The extrusion of water continuing in the presence of ouabain (but not that in its absence) was significantly reduced when furosemide was added or when medium Cl- was replaced by NO-3 or I-. There was substantial variability in the morphological appearance of cells within the cortical slices. Different segments of the nephron showed different structural changes during swelling and its reversal, the proximal tubules being most markedly affected. Proximal tubular cells of swollen slices showed disorganization of brush borders and expansion of their apical surfaces, and contained vesicles in their apical cytoplasm. Upon recovery at 25 degrees C, the apical portions of these cells showed reversal of the expansion, but some apical vesicles remained. These vesicles were much more numerous after recovery in the presence of ouabain, but they were much reduced in numbers, or totally absent, when recovery took place in the presence of furosemide or absence of Cl-, with or without ouabain. The vesicles seen in the presence of ouabain alone appeared to fuse with each other and with infoldings of the basolateral plasma membrane. Rather similar results were obtained with distal tubular cells in the slices. We suggest that volume regulation in the proximal and distal tubular cells proceeds by way of two mechanisms. The first consists of extrusion of water coupled to the ouabain-sensitive transport of Na+ and K+. The other proceeds by way of an ouabain-resistant entry of water into apical cytoplasmic vesicles, following furosemide-sensitive movements of Cl- and Na+; the vesicles then

  19. Pathophysiological changes in rat kidneys with partial ureteral obstruction since infancy.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, B A; Aperia, A; Elinder, G

    1984-08-01

    A partial ureteral obstruction (PUO) was created in 5-day-old rats by implanting the left ureter in the psoas muscle. The surgical technique was modified to produce mild or severe hydronephrosis [Hn (m) and Hn (s)]. The rats were studied at ages between 45 and 65 days with regard to kidney weight, number of functioning glomeruli, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), total glomerular filtration rate (GFR), nephron filtration rate (SNGFR), tubular free-flow pressure (PT, and stop-flow pressure (SFP). Total GFR was determined after the release of obstruction. The other studies were performed in the obstructed state. Reference values were obtained from sham-operated and untouched control rats. The number of functioning nephrons was depressed 38% in Hn (m) and 73% in Hn (s). Total GFR was preserved in Hn (m) and depressed 54% in Hn (s). SNGFR in the remaining nephrons was significantly elevated in Hn (m) and normal in Hn (s). SFP was significantly elevated in Hn (s). The Hn (s) rats were hypertensive. The glomerular density was lower in the hydronephrotic than in the contralateral kidneys. This suggests a compensatory growth of the remaining nephrons in the Hn kidneys. We conclude that PUO present since infancy will either destroy the nephrons or elicit an adaptive response that will tend to preserve GFR.

  20. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Restores Neural and Behavioral Functions During Reaction Time Task in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Jin-Yan; Gao, Ge; Chang, Jing-Yu; Woodward, Donald J.; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used in the clinic to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Our previous work has shown that DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can improve major motor deficits, and induce a variety of neural responses in rats with unilateral dopamine (DA) lesions. In the present study, we examined the effect of STN DBS on reaction time (RT) performance and parallel changes in neural activity in the cortico-basal ganglia regions of partially bilateral DA- lesioned rats. We recorded neural activity with a multiple-channel single-unit electrode system in the primary motor cortex (MI), the STN, and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) during RT test. RT performance was severely impaired following bilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the dorsolateral part of the striatum. In parallel with such behavioral impairments, the number of responsive neurons to different behavioral events was remarkably decreased after DA lesion. Bilateral STN DBS improved RT performance in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, and restored operational behavior-related neural responses in cortico-basal ganglia regions. These behavioral and electrophysiological effects of DBS lasted nearly an hour after DBS termination. These results demonstrate that a partial DA lesion-induced impairment of RT performance is associated with changes in neural activity in the cortico-basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, STN DBS can reverse changes in behavior and neural activity caused by partial DA depletion. The observed long-lasting beneficial effect of STN DBS suggests the involvement of the mechanism of neural plasticity in modulating corticobasal ganglia circuits. PMID:20025062

  1. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia.

  2. Reduced noradrenergic innervation of ventral midbrain dopaminergic cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Masilamoni, Gunasingh Jeyaraj; Groover, Olivia; Smith, Yoland

    2017-04-01

    There is anatomical and functional evidence that ventral midbrain dopaminergic (DA) cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) receive noradrenergic innervation in rodents, but much less is known about these interactions in primates. Degeneration of NE neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) and related brainstem NE cell groups is a well-established pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the development of such pathology in animal models of PD has been inconsistent across species and laboratories. We recently demonstrated 30-40% neuronal loss in the LC, A5 and A6 NE cell groups of rhesus monkeys rendered parkinsonian by chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In this study, we used dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH) immunocytochemistry to assess the impact of this neuronal loss on the number of NE terminal-like varicosities in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), ventral tegmental area (VTA), retrorubral field (RRF) and STN of MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. Our findings reveal that the NE innervation of the ventral midbrain and STN of normal monkeys is heterogeneously distributed being far more extensive in the VTA, RRF and dorsal tier of the SNC than in the ventral SNC and STN. In parkinsonian monkeys, all regions underwent a significant (~50-70%) decrease in NE innervation. At the electron microscopic level, some DβH-positive terminals formed asymmetric axo-dendritic synapses in VTA and STN. These findings demonstrate that the VTA, RRF and SNCd are the main ventral midbrain targets of ascending NE inputs, and that these connections undergo a major break-down in chronically MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. This severe degeneration of the ascending NE system may contribute to the pathophysiology of ventral midbrain and STN neurons in PD.

  3. Effects of varying subthalamic nucleus stimulation on apraxia of lid opening in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giorgio; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valérie; Pollak, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Apraxia of lid opening (ALO) is a non-paralytic inability to open the eyes or sustain lid elevation at will. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the syndrome are still unknown. ALO has been reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS), suggesting a possible involvement of the basal ganglia. We aimed to assess the effects of varying STN stimulation voltage on ALO in PD patients. Seven out of 14 PD patients with bilateral STN stimulation consecutively seen in our centre presented with ALO. We progressively increased voltage on each STN, using either 130 Hz (high-frequency stimulation, HFS) or 2 or 3 Hz (low-frequency stimulation, LFS). In five patients, HFS induced ALO time-locked to stimulation in 7 out of 10 STNs at a voltage higher than that used for chronic stimulation. LFS induced myoclonus in the pretarsal orbicularis oculi muscle (pOOm) with a rhythm synchronous to the frequency. In the other two patients with ALO already present at the time of the study, HFS improved ALO in 3 out of 4 STNs. ALO recurred within minutes of stimulation arrest. Our findings show that STN-DBS can have opposite effects on ALO. On the one hand, ALO is thought to be a corticobulbar side effect due to lateral current spreading from the STN, in which case it is necessary to use voltages below the ALO-inducing threshold. On the other hand, ALO may be considered a form of off-phase focal dystonia possibly improved by increasing the stimulation voltages.

  4. Effects of nigral stimulation on locomotion and postural stability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chastan, N; Westby, G W M; Yelnik, J; Bardinet, E; Do, M C; Agid, Y; Welter, M L

    2009-01-01

    The physiopathology of gait and balance disorders in Parkinson's disease patients is still poorly understood. Levodopa treatment and subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation improve step length and walking speed, with less effect on postural instability. These disorders have been linked to dysfunction of the descending basal ganglia outputs to brainstem structures. In this study, we evaluated the effects of stimulation of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), on locomotion and balance in Parkinson's disease patients. Biomechanical parameters and leg muscle activity were recorded during gait initiation in seven selected patients operated for bilateral STN stimulation, out of 204 stimulated patients, with one contact of each electrode located within the SNr. Step length, anteroposterior and vertical velocities of the centre of gravity were studied, with special reference to the subjects' ability to brake the centre of gravity fall before foot-contact, and compared to seven controls. In Parkinson's disease patients, five treatment conditions were tested: (i) no treatment, (ii) levodopa treatment, (iii) STN stimulation, (iv) SNr stimulation and (v) combined levodopa treatment and STN stimulation. The effects of these treatments on motor parkinsonian disability were assessed with the UPDRS III scale, separated into 'axial' (rising from chair, posture, postural stability and gait) and 'distal' scores. Whereas levodopa and/or STN stimulation improved 'axial' and 'distal' motor symptoms, SNr stimulation improved only the 'axial' symptoms. Compared to controls, untreated Parkinson's disease patients showed reduced step length and velocity, and poor braking just prior to foot-contact, with a decrease in both soleus (S) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscle activity. Step length and velocity significantly increased with levodopa treatment alone or in combination with STN stimulation in both natural and fast gait conditions, and with STN stimulation alone in the fast gait

  5. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials trigger a plateau potential in rat subthalamic neurons at hyperpolarized states.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, T; Murakami, F; Song, W J

    2001-10-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) directly innervates the output structures of the basal ganglia, playing a key role in basal ganglia function. It is therefore important to understand the regulatory mechanisms for the activity of STN neurons. In the present study, we aimed to investigate how the intrinsic membrane properties of STN neurons interact with their synaptic inputs, focusing on their generation and the properties of the long-lasting, plateau potential. Whole cell recordings were obtained from STN neurons in slices prepared from postnatal day 14 (P14) to P20 rats. We found that activation of glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked a plateau potential in a subpopulation of STN neurons (n = 13/22), in a voltage-dependent manner. Plateau potentials could be induced only when the cell was hyperpolarized to more negative than about -75 mV. Plateau potentials, evoked with a depolarizing current pulse, again only from a hyperpolarized state, were observed in about half of STN neurons tested (n = 162/327). Only in neurons in which a plateau potential could be evoked by current injection did EPSPs evoke plateau potentials. L-type Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels, and TEA-sensitive K(+) channels were found to be involved in the generation of the potential. The stability of the plateau potential, tested by the injection of a negative pulse current during the plateau phase, was found to be robust at the early phase of the potential, but decreased toward the end. As a result the early part of the plateau potential was resistant to membrane potential perturbations and would be able to support a train of action potentials. We conclude that excitatory postsynaptic potentials, evoked in a subpopulation of STN neurons at a hyperpolarized state, activate L-type Ca(2+) and other channels, leading to the generation of a plateau potential. Thus about half of STN neurons can transform short-lasting synaptic excitation into a long

  6. Effect of bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation on gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Faist, M; Xie, J; Kurz, D; Berger, W; Maurer, C; Pollak, P; Lücking, C H

    2001-08-01

    The fundamental disturbance of the parkinsonian gait is the reduction in walking velocity. This is mainly due to reduction in stride length, while cadence (steps/min) is slightly enhanced. Treatment with L-dopa increases stride length while cadence is unchanged. Chronic stimulation of the thalamus has no effect on Parkinsonian gait. The efficacy of electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on gait in advanced Parkinson's disease has been clearly demonstrated clinically. The aim of the present study was to quantify the changes in gait measures induced by STN stimulation and L-dopa and to assess possible differential or additive effects. Eight Parkinson's disease patients (mean +/- SD age 48.1 +/- 7.3 years) with chronic bilateral STN stimulation (mean duration of disease 13.3 +/- 2.4 years, mean stimulation time 15.4 +/- 10.6 months) and 12 age-matched controls were investigated. Subjects walked on a special treadmill with a closed-loop ultrasound control system that used the subject's position to adjust treadmill speed continuously for the actual walking velocity. In an appropriate crossover design, spatiotemporal gait measures and leg joint angle movements were assessed for at least 120 stride cycles in four treatment conditions: with and without stimulation and with and without a suprathreshold dose of L-dopa. With STN stimulation, there were increases of almost threefold in mean walking velocity (from 0.35 to 0.96 m/s) and stride length (from 0.34 to 0.99 m). Cadence remained constant. The range of motion of the major leg joints also increased. L-Dopa alone had a slightly weaker effect, with an increase in walking velocity to 0.94 m/s and in stride length to 0.92 m at a similar cadence. These increased values were in the range of those for healthy age-matched subjects performing the same task. The combination of both treatments further increased the mean walking velocity to 1.19 m/s and stride length to 1.20 m at an unchanged cadence. However, not

  7. Cognitive Changes following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Meng, Xiangyu; Xiao, Jinsong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, it has been largely acknowledged that deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) can alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but its effects on cognitive function remain unclear, which are not given enough attention by many clinical doctors and researchers. To date, 3 existing meta-analyses focusing on this issue included self-control studies and have not drawn consistent conclusions. The present study is the first to compare effect sizes of primary studies that include control groups, hoping to reveal the net cognitive outcomes after STN DBS and the clinical significance. Methods. A structured literature search was conducted using strict criteria. Only studies with control group could be included. Data on age, duration of disease, levodopa equivalent dosage (LED), and multiple cognitive scales were collected and pooled. Results. Of 172 articles identified, 10 studies (including 3 randomized controlled trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled studies) were eligible for inclusion. The results suggest that STN DBS results in decreased global cognition, memory, verbal fluency, and executive function compared with control group. No significant difference is found in other cognitive domains. Conclusions. STN DBS seems relatively safe with respect to cognitive function, and further studies should focus on the exact mechanisms of possible verbal deterioration after surgery in the future.

  8. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Asahina, Masato; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase three months after STN-DBS. The preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase one year after STN-DBS and the preoperative CSF homovanilic acid (HVA) levels had significant negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in on phase three months after STN-DBS. In PDQ-39 SI (summary index), preoperative plasma dopamine (DA) level had significantly negative correlations with postoperative PDQ-39 SI one year after STN-DBS suggesting that higher preoperative plasma DA level resulted in better quality of life (QOL) one year after STN-DBS. The stepwise multiple linear regression study revealed that higher preoperative plasma HVA levels had negative influence on the postoperative motor symptoms (i.e., increase in the score of UPDRS), whereas higher preoperative CSF L-DOPA levels had positive influence on the postoperative motor symptoms and QOL (decrease in the score of UPDRS and PDQ-39 SI) The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively in 11 patients despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. Unexpectedly, CSF HVA levels significantly increased from 0.00089±0.0003 ng/μl to 0.002±0.0008 ng/μl after STN-DBS. Conclusion The preoperative catecholamine levels might affect the postoperative motor symptoms and quality of life. The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. PMID:26394059

  9. Renal morphology of the euryhaline flounder (Platichthys flesus): distribution of arginine vasotocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Weybourne, E; Warne, J M; Hentschel, H; Elger, M; Balment, R J

    2005-04-01

    The current study characterized tubular segmentation of the European flounder nephron and localized the vasotocin receptor expression by immunohistochemistry. Flounder nephron was shown to comprise a prominent renal corpuscle, short neck segment, proximal tubule I, proximal tubule II, collecting tubule, and collecting duct. Using specific antibodies raised against flounder vasotocin receptor, specific V(1) receptor staining was detected within the glomeruli, the endothelial surface of the afferent and efferent arterioles, and the capillaries surrounding the collecting duct system. Immunostaining for the receptor was exclusively vascular and there did not appear to be a tubular component.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase expression in kidney and renal cancer: implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    Four different carbonic anhydrases are expressed in the human nephron, the functional unit of the kidney. These are specifically expressed in different nephron segments, emphasizing the critical role carbonic anhydrases play in maintaining the homeostasis of this crucial organ.Whereas the localization of carbonic anhydrases in the kidney has been long established, interest in carbonic anhydrases has increased dramatically for renal cancer, in particular for the clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) because carbonic anhydrase IX is specifically expressed in ccRCC. Therefore carbonic anhydrase IX is being studied as potential diagnostic and therapeutic target, despite carbonic anhydrase IX expression in non-renal tissues.

  11. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  12. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  13. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  14. Two cycles of recurrent maternal half-sib selection reduce foliar late blight in a diploid hybrid Solanum phureja-S. stenotomum population by two-thirds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is an important disease problem worldwide. Foliar resistance to late blight was found in a hybrid population of the cultivated diploid species Solanum phureja-S. stenotomum (phu-stn). The objective of this study was to determine if resistance t...

  15. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  16. Ultrastructural study of the kidney in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae (Rhipidistia: Coelacanthini).

    PubMed

    Jarial, Mohinder S; Gattone, Vincent H; Wilkins, John H

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of the nephrons of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae was investigated by electron microscopy. Each nephron is composed of a large renal corpuscle with well vascularized glomerulus, ciliated neck segment, proximal tubule divided into first and second proximal segments, ciliated intermediate segment, distal tubule, collecting tubule, and duct. The podocytes of visceral epithelium contain large bi-lobed nuclei and their surface membranes pinch off vesicles into the cytoplasm. The processes of the podocytes give rise to pedicels that enclose narrow filtration slits. The endothelium of glomerular capillaries is attenuated and fenestrated. The short cytoplasmic processes of mesangial cells do not penetrate deeply into the sub-endothelial lamina. The glomerular basement membrane is about 286 nm in thickness. The pedicels also arise from podocyte cell bodies, and are connected by diaphragms and enclose slits, which open into narrow urinary spaces between podocytes. The cuboidal cells of the short neck segment display cilia with a characteristic pattern of 9+2 microtubules. The first proximal tubule segment differs from the second proximal segment in having densely packed microvilli, prominent endocytotic-lysosomal apparatus, and numerous basal membrane infoldings associated with mitochondria. The lateral cell membranes like those of other segments are straight and joined by desmosomes and apical adhering and tight junctions. The distal tubules display few short luminal microvilli and numerous basal mitochondria. The distal tubule, collecting tubule and duct are devoid of intercalated cells. The ultrastructure of the L chalumnae nephrons correlates well with their osmoregulatory function and resembles that of freshwater rainbow trout.

  17. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: Influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R.; Lempka, Scott F.; Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson’s disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation. PMID:20607090

  18. Spatial Localization of Sources in the Rat Subthalamic Motor Region Using an Inverse Current Source Density Method

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Janssen, Marcus L. F.; Zwartjes, Daphne G. M.; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Veltink, Peter H.; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Heida, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study we introduce the use of the current source density (CSD) method as a way to visualize the spatial organization of evoked responses in the rat subthalamic nucleus (STN) at fixed time stamps resulting from motor cortex stimulation. This method offers opportunities to visualize neuronal input and study the relation between the synaptic input and the neural output of neural populations. Approach: Motor cortex evoked local field potentials and unit activity were measured in the subthalamic region, with a 3D measurement grid consisting of 320 measurement points and high spatial resolution. This allowed us to visualize the evoked synaptic input by estimating the current source density (CSD) from the measured local field potentials, using the inverse CSD method. At the same time, the neuronal output of the cells within the grid is assessed by calculating post stimulus time histograms. Main results: The CSD method resulted in clear and distinguishable sources and sinks of the neuronal input activity in the STN after motor cortex stimulation. We showed that the center of the synaptic input of the STN from the motor cortex is located dorsal to the input from globus pallidus. Significance: For the first time we have performed CSD analysis on motor cortex stimulation evoked LFP responses in the rat STN as a proof of principle. Our results suggest that the CSD method can be used to gain new insights into the spatial extent of synaptic pathways in brain structures. PMID:27857684

  19. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R; Lempka, Scott F; Cooper, Scott E; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson's disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation-induced regional blood flow responses correlate with improvement of motor signs in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Golchin, N; Tabbal, S D; Hershey, T; Videen, T O; Wu, J; Usche, J W M; Revilla, F J; Hartlein, J M; Wernle, A R; Mink, J W; Perlmutter, J S

    2008-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) improves motor symptoms in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, yet the mechanism of action remains unclear. Previous studies indicate that STN DBS increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in immediate downstream targets but does not reveal which brain regions may have functional changes associated with improved motor manifestations. We studied 48 patients with STN DBS who withheld medication overnight and underwent PET scans to measure rCBF responses to bilateral STN DBS. PET scans were performed with bilateral DBS OFF and ON in a counterbalanced order followed by clinical ratings of motor manifestations using Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (UPDRS 3). We investigated whether improvement in UPDRS 3 scores in rigidity, bradykinesia, postural stability and gait correlate with rCBF responses in a priori determined regions. These regions were selected based on a previous study showing significant STN DBS-induced rCBF change in the thalamus, midbrain and supplementary motor area (SMA). We also chose the pedunculopontine nucleus region (PPN) due to mounting evidence of its involvement in locomotion. In the current study, bilateral STN DBS improved rigidity (62%), bradykinesia (44%), gait (49%) and postural stability (56%) (paired t-tests: P < 0.001). As expected, bilateral STN DBS also increased rCBF in the bilateral thalami, right midbrain, and decreased rCBF in the right premotor cortex (P < 0.05, corrected). There were significant correlations between improvement of rigidity and decreased rCBF in the SMA (r(s) = -0.4, P < 0.02) and between improvement in bradykinesia and increased rCBF in the thalamus (r(s) = 0.31, P < 0.05). In addition, improved postural reflexes correlated with decreased rCBF in the PPN (r(s) = -0.38, P < 0.03). These modest correlations between selective motor manifestations and rCBF in specific regions suggest possible regional selectivity for improvement of different motor

  1. Dissecting human skeletal muscle troponin proteoforms by top-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Sumandea, Marius P; Larsson, Lars; Moss, Richard L; Ge, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscles are the most abundant tissues in the human body. They are composed of a heterogeneous collection of muscle fibers that perform various functions. Skeletal muscle troponin (sTn) regulates skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation. sTn consists of 3 subunits, troponin I (TnI), troponin T (TnT), and troponin C (TnC). TnI inhibits the actomyosin Mg(2+)-ATPase, TnC binds Ca(2+), and TnT is the tropomyosin (Tm)-binding subunit. The cardiac and skeletal isoforms of Tn share many similarities but the roles of modifications of Tn in the two muscles may differ. The modifications of cardiac Tn are known to alter muscle contractility and have been well-characterized. However, the modification status of sTn remains unclear. Here, we have employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to decipher the modifications of human sTnT and sTnI. We have extensively characterized sTnT and sTnI proteoforms, including alternatively spliced isoforms and post-translationally modified forms, found in human skeletal muscle with high mass accuracy and comprehensive sequence coverage. Moreover, we have localized the phosphorylation site of slow sTnT isoform III to Ser1 by tandem MS with electron capture dissociation. This is the first study to comprehensively characterize human sTn and also the first to identify the basal phosphorylation site for human sTnT by top-down MS.

  2. Lexical-semantic inhibitory mechanisms in Parkinson's disease as a function of subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castner, Joanna E; Copland, David A; Silburn, Peter A; Coyne, Terry J; Sinclair, Felicity; Chenery, Helen J

    2007-11-05

    Inhibitory control may be affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) due to impairment within the non-motor basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. The present study aimed to identify the effects of chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on lexical-semantic inhibitory control. Eighteen participants with PD who had undergone surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN, completed a picture-word interference (PWI) task and the Hayling test in on and off stimulation conditions. The results of PD participants were compared with 21 non-neurologically impaired control participants. PD participants performed no differently from controls on the PWI task, and no significant differences between on and off stimulation conditions were revealed, therefore suggesting that PD participants are not impaired in lexical-semantic interference control. In contrast, in the off stimulation condition, PD participants had significantly delayed reaction times and increased errors on the inhibition section of the Hayling test compared with the STN stimulation condition and control participants. These results suggest that PD patients are impaired in aspects of inhibitory control that are dependent on behavioural inhibition (such as the suppression of prepotent responses) and selection from competing alternatives without the presence of external cues. Furthermore, STN stimulation acts to restore these behavioural inhibitory processes.

  3. Effects of lesions of the subthalamic nucleus/zona incerta area and dorsomedial striatum on attentional set-shifting in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tait, David S; Phillips, Janice M; Blackwell, Andrew D; Brown, Verity J

    2017-03-14

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) show cognitive impairments, including difficulty in shifting attention between perceptual dimensions of complex stimuli. Inactivation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be effective in ameliorating the motor abnormalities associated with striatal dopamine (DA) depletion, but it is possible that STN inactivation might result in additional, perhaps attentional, deficits. This study examined the effects of: DA depletion from the dorsomedial striatum (DMS); lesions of the STN area; and the effects of the two lesions together, on the ability to shift attentional set in the rat. In a single session, rats performed the intradimensional/extradimensional (ID/ED) test of attentional set-shifting. This comprises a series of seven, two-choice discriminations, including acquisitions of novel discriminations in which the relevant stimulus is either in the currently attended dimension (ID) or the currently unattended dimension (ED shift) and reversals (REVs) following each acquisition stage. Bilateral lesions were made by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the DMS, resulting in a selective impairment in reversal learning. Large bilateral ibotenic acid lesions centered on the STN resulted in an increase in trials to criterion in the initial stages, but learning rate improved within the session. There was no evidence of a 'cost' of set-shifting - the ED stage was completed in fewer trials than the ID stage - and neither was there a cost of reversal learning. Strikingly, combined lesions of both regions did not resemble the effects of either lesion alone and resulted in no apparent deficits.

  4. Functional MRI reveals frequency-dependent responses during deep brain stimulation at the subthalamic nucleus or internal globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Younce, John R; Albaugh, Daniel L; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a widely used therapeutic tool for the symptomatic treatment of movement disorders, most commonly Parkinson's disease (PD). High frequency stimulation at both the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) has been used with great success for the symptomatic treatment of PD, although the therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. To better understand how DBS at these target sites modulates neural circuitry, the present study used functional blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map global brain responses to DBS at the STN and GPi of the rat. Robust activation centered in the ipsilateral motor cortex was observed during high frequency stimulation at either target site, with peak responses observed at a stimulation frequency of 100Hz. Of note, frequency tuning curves were generated, demonstrating that cortical activation was maximal at clinically-relevant stimulation frequencies. Divergent responses to stimulation were noted in the contralateral hemisphere, with strong cortical and striatal negative BOLD signal during stimulation of the GPi, but not STN. The frequency-dependence of the observed motor cortex activation at both targets suggests a relationship with the therapeutic effects of STN and GPi DBS, with both DBS targets being functionally connected with motor cortex at therapeutic stimulation frequencies.

  5. Locations of movement-related cells in the human subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Marks, William J; Christine, Chadwick; Starr, Philip A

    2003-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an emerging target for deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Understanding the somatotopic organization of the STN is important for surgical navigation within the nucleus. We analyzed intraoperative data obtained during 54 procedures for the implantation of STN stimulators to assess the locations of movement-related cells. Cells were considered movement-related if they exhibited modulation of the cell discharge during passive movement of the contralateral upper or lower extremity. Microelectrode track reconstructions were plotted on a human brain atlas, using the location of the DBS electrode from postoperative magnetic resonance images as a registration mark in reconstructing microelectrode track locations. Movement-related cells were predominantly located in the dorsal part of the nucleus. The majority of the cells were related to proximal joint manipulation. Arm-related cells were located laterally and at the rostral and caudal poles, whereas leg-related cells were located medially and centrally. The finding of three or more leg-related cells on a given microelectrode track was predictive of a medial localization within the motor area. Our findings are consistent with the small number of published studies on STN somatopy in the human and the nonhuman primate.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects on Diadochokinetic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Unger, Elin; Wahlgren, Sofia; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; Zafar, Hamayun; van Doorn, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The hypokinetic dysarthria observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects the range, speed, and accuracy of articulatory gestures in patients, reducing the perceived quality of speech acoustic output in continuous speech. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) and of the caudal zona incerta (cZi-DBS) are current surgical treatment options for PD. This study aimed at investigating the outcome of STN-DBS (7 patients) and cZi-DBS (7 patients) in two articulatory diadochokinesis tasks (AMR and SMR) using measurements of articulation rate and quality of the plosive consonants (using the percent measurable VOT metric). The results indicate that patients receiving STN-DBS increased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition in the AMR task only, with no effect on production quality. Patients receiving cZi-DBS decreased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition and further showed a reduction in production quality. The data therefore suggest that cZi-DBS is more detrimental for extended articulatory movements than STN-DBS. PMID:22007342

  7. Hemisphere-Specific Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Speaking Rate and Articulatory Accuracy of Syllable Repetitions in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Emily Q; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that left versus right deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) would have differential effects on speech. Twenty right-handed individuals with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) underwent unilateral STN DBS. Ten were operated on the right and 10 on the left hemisphere as indicated by severity of nonspeech motor function. Speech was evaluated before surgery and 3 to 6 months after surgery with stimulator-off and with stimulator-on, with all participants off anti-parkinsonian medication for 12 hours before evaluation. Evaluators and patient speakers were blinded to the stimulator status at the postsurgery evaluations. Motor performance was assessed with UPDRS-III. Each participant produced three samples of diadochokinetic syllables. Syllable rate, syllable and vowel duration, VOT, and F0 were obtained. The diadochokinetic syllables were rated for articulatory accuracy and speaking rate. Twenty graduate clinicians served as judges. The samples were randomly presented via headphones. A mixed ANOVA with repeated measures was used to assess the significance of the changes in UPRS-III scores and speech measures. The results indicated that unilateral STN DBS produced improvement in nonspeech motor function regardless of the side of stimulation. In contrast, the changes in articulatory accuracy and syllable rate associated with the STN DBS were hemisphere specific.

  8. MDMA modulates spontaneous firing of subthalamic nucleus neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Luise; von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas; Hentschke, Harald

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') has a broad spectrum of molecular targets in the brain, among them receptors and transporters of the serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenergic systems. Its action on the serotonergic system modulates motor systems in rodents and humans. Although parts of the basal ganglia could be identified as mediators of the motor effects of MDMA, very little is known about the role of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Therefore, this study investigated the modulation of spontaneous action potential activity of the STN by MDMA (2.5-20 µM) in vitro. MDMA had very heterogeneous effects, ranging from a complete but reversible inhibition to a more than twofold increase in firing at 5 µM. On average, MDMA excited STN neurons moderately, but lost its excitatory effect in the presence of the 5-HT(2A) antagonist MDL 11,939. 5-HT(1A) receptors did not appear to play a major role. Effects of MDMA on transporters for serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) were investigated by coapplication of the reuptake inhibitors citalopram and desipramine, respectively. Similar to the effects of 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade, antagonism of SERT and NET bestowed an inhibitory effect on MDMA. From these results, we conclude that both the 5-HT and the noradrenergic system mediate MDMA-induced effects on STN neurons.

  9. Resonant antidromic cortical circuit activation as a consequence of high-frequency subthalamic deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Arbuthnott, G W; Jutras, M J; Goldberg, J A; Jaeger, D

    2007-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) for many patients. The most effective stimulation consists of high-frequency biphasic stimulation pulses around 130 Hz delivered between two active sites of an implanted depth electrode to the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Multiple studies have shown that a key effect of STN-DBS that correlates well with clinical outcome is the reduction of synchronous and oscillatory activity in cortical and basal ganglia networks. We hypothesized that antidromic cortical activation may provide an underlying mechanism responsible for this effect, because stimulation is usually performed in proximity to cortical efferent pathways. We show with intracellular cortical recordings in rats that STN-DBS did in fact lead to antidromic spiking of deep layer cortical neurons. Furthermore, antidromic spikes triggered a dampened oscillation of local field potentials in cortex with a resonant frequency around 120 Hz. The amplitude of antidromic activation was significantly correlated with an observed suppression of slow wave and beta band activity during STN-DBS. These findings were seen in ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane anesthesia in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Thus antidromic resonant activation of cortical microcircuits may make an important contribution toward counteracting the overly synchronous and oscillatory activity characteristic of cortical activity in PD.

  10. Near-infrared stimulation on globus pallidus and subthalamus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Minsu; Koo, Ho; Kim, Minsun; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Kim, Sohee

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared stimulation (NIS) is an emerging technique used to evoke action potentials in nervous systems. Its efficacy of evoking action potentials has been demonstrated in different nerve tissues. However, few studies have been performed using NIS to stimulate the deep brain structures, such as globus pallidus (GP) and subthalamic nucleus (STN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into GP stimulation group (n=11) and STN stimulation group (n=6). After introducing optrodes stereotaxically into the GP or STN, we stimulated neural tissue for 2 min with continuous near-infrared light of 808 nm while varying the radiant exposure from 40 to 10 mW. The effects were investigated with extracellular recordings and the temperature rises at the stimulation site were also measured. NIS was found to elicit excitatory responses in eight out of 11 cases (73%) and inhibitory responses in three cases in the GP stimulation group, whereas it predominantly evoked inhibitory responses in seven out of eight cases (87.5%) and an excitatory response in one case in STN stimulation group. Only radiation above 20 mW, accompanying temperature increases of more than 2°C, elicited a statistically significant neural response (p<0.05). The responsiveness to NIS was linearly dependent on the power of radiation exposure.

  11. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  12. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  13. A Side by Side Comparison of Filter-Based PM(sub 2.5) Measurements at a Suburban Site: A Closure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Jennifer C.; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Taubman, Brett F.; Doddridge, Bruce G.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2007-01-01

    Reliable determination of the effects of air quality on public health and the environment requires accurate measurement of PM(sub 2.5) mass and the individual chemical components of fine aerosols. This study seeks to evaluate PM(sub 2.5) measurements that are part of a newly established national network by comparing them with a more conventional sampling system. Experiments were carried out during 2002 at a suburban site in Maryland, United States, where two samplers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Speciation Trends Network: Met One Speciation Air Sampling System STNS and Thermo Scientific Reference Ambient Air Sampler STNR, two Desert Research Institute Sequential Filter Samplers DRIF, and a continuous TEOM monitor (Thermo Scientific Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance) were sampling air in parallel. These monitors differ not only in sampling configuration but also in protocol-specific sample analysis procedures. Measurements of PM(sub 2.5) mass and major contributing species were well correlated among the different methods with r-values > 0.8. Despite the good correlations, daily concentrations of PM(sub 2.5) mass and major contributing species were significantly different at the 95% confidence level from 5 to 100% of the time. Larger values of PM(sub 2.5) mass and individual species were generally reported from STNR and STNS. The January STNR average PM(sub 2.5) mass (8.8 (micro)g/per cubic meter) was 1.5 (micro)g/per cubic meter larger than the DRIF average mass. The July STNS average PM(sub 2.5) mass (27.8 (micro)g/per cubic meter) was 3.8 (micro)g/per cubic meter larger than the DRIF average mass. These differences can only be partially accounted for by known random errors. Variations in flow control, face velocity, and sampling artifacts likely influence the measurement of PM(sub 2.5) speciation and mass closure. Simple statistical tests indicate that the current uncertainty estimates used in the STN network may underestimate the

  14. A Network Analysis of 15O-H2O PET Reveals Deep Brain Stimulation Effects on Brain Network of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Park, Bumhee; Kim, Hae Yu; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Kim, Joong Il; Yoon, Misun; Lee, Jong Doo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a network abnormality, the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) need to be investigated in the aspect of networks. This study aimed to examine how DBS of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) affects the motor networks of patients with idiopathic PD during motor performance and to show the feasibility of the network analysis using cross-sectional positron emission tomography (PET) images in DBS studies. Materials and Methods We obtained [15O]H2O PET images from ten patients with PD during a sequential finger-to-thumb opposition task and during the resting state, with DBS-On and DBS-Off at STN. To identify the alteration of motor networks in PD and their changes due to STN-DBS, we applied independent component analysis (ICA) to all the cross-sectional PET images. We analysed the strength of each component according to DBS effects, task effects and interaction effects. Results ICA blindly decomposed components of functionally associated distributed clusters, which were comparable to the results of univariate statistical parametric mapping. ICA further revealed that STN-DBS modifies usage-strengths of components corresponding to the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits in PD patients by increasing the hypoactive basal ganglia and by suppressing the hyperactive cortical motor areas, ventrolateral thalamus and cerebellum. Conclusion Our results suggest that STN-DBS may affect not only the abnormal local activity, but also alter brain networks in patients with PD. This study also demonstrated the usefulness of ICA for cross-sectional PET data to reveal network modifications due to DBS, which was not observable using the subtraction method. PMID:25837179

  15. Impact of Combined Subthalamic Nucleus and Substantia Nigra Stimulation on Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Hidding, U; Gulberti, A; Horn, A; Buhmann, C; Hamel, W; Koeppen, J A; Westphal, M; Engel, A K; Gerloff, C; Weiss, D; Moll, C K E; Pötter-Nerger, M

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the tolerability and the effects of conventional subthalamic nucleus (STN) and combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra (STN+SNr) high-frequency stimulation in regard to neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients. In this single center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial, twelve patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (1 female; age: 61.3 ± 7.3 years; disease duration: 12.3 ± 5.4 years; Hoehn and Yahr stage: 2.2 ± 0.39) were included. Apathy, fatigue, depression, and impulse control disorder were assessed using a comprehensive set of standardized rating scales and questionnaires such as the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-I), Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (QUIP-RS), and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Three patients that were initially assigned to the STN+SNr stimulation mode withdrew from the study within the first week due to discomfort. Statistical comparison of data retrieved from patients who completed the study revealed no significant differences between both stimulation conditions in terms of mean scores of scales measuring apathy, fatigue, depression, impulse control disorder, and quality of life. Individual cases showed an improvement of apathy under combined STN+SNr stimulation. In general, combined STN+SNr stimulation seems to be safe in terms of neuropsychiatric side effects, although careful patient selection and monitoring in the short-term period after changing stimulation settings are recommended.

  16. Impact of Combined Subthalamic Nucleus and Substantia Nigra Stimulation on Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Horn, A.; Hamel, W.; Koeppen, J. A.; Westphal, M.; Engel, A. K.; Gerloff, C.; Moll, C. K. E.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the tolerability and the effects of conventional subthalamic nucleus (STN) and combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra (STN+SNr) high-frequency stimulation in regard to neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients. In this single center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial, twelve patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (1 female; age: 61.3 ± 7.3 years; disease duration: 12.3 ± 5.4 years; Hoehn and Yahr stage: 2.2 ± 0.39) were included. Apathy, fatigue, depression, and impulse control disorder were assessed using a comprehensive set of standardized rating scales and questionnaires such as the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-I), Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (QUIP-RS), and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Three patients that were initially assigned to the STN+SNr stimulation mode withdrew from the study within the first week due to discomfort. Statistical comparison of data retrieved from patients who completed the study revealed no significant differences between both stimulation conditions in terms of mean scores of scales measuring apathy, fatigue, depression, impulse control disorder, and quality of life. Individual cases showed an improvement of apathy under combined STN+SNr stimulation. In general, combined STN+SNr stimulation seems to be safe in terms of neuropsychiatric side effects, although careful patient selection and monitoring in the short-term period after changing stimulation settings are recommended. PMID:28246572

  17. Separation of Two Distinct O-Glycoforms of Human IgA1 by Serial Lectin Chromatography Followed by Mass Spectrometry O-Glycan Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, S; Ju, T

    2017-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which carries four to six mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) on its hinge region (HR), is the most abundant O-glycoprotein in plasma or serum. While normal O-glycans from hematopoietic-originated cells are core 1-based complex structures, many reports showed that the IgA1 from patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) carries undergalactosylated or truncated O-glycans such as the Tn antigen and its sialylated version the SialylTn (STn) antigen on the HR. Yet, there is still a debate whether Tn/STn on the HR of IgA1 is specific to the IgA1 from patients with IgAN since these antigens have also been seen in serum IgA1 of healthy individuals. An additional question is whether the O-glycans at all sites on the two HRs of one IgA1 molecule are homogeneous (either all normal or all Tn/STn) or heterogeneous (both normal and Tn/STn O-glycans). To address these questions, we conducted a systematic study on the O-glycans of plasma IgA1 from both IgAN patients and healthy controls using serial HPA and PNA lectin chromatography followed by western blotting and further analysis of O-glycans from HPA-bound and PNA-bound IgA1 fractions by mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, we found that a variable minor fraction of IgA1 from both IgAN patients and healthy controls had Tn/STn antigens, and that the O-glycoprotein IgA1 molecules from most samples had only two distinct O-glycoforms: one major glycoform with homogeneous normal core 1-based O-glycans and one minor glycoform with homogeneous Tn/STn antigens. These results raised a serious question about the role of Tn/STn antigens on IgA1 in pathogenesis of IgAN, and there is a demand for a practical methodology that any laboratory can utilize to analyze the O-glycans of IgA1. Herein, we describe the methodology we developed in more detail. The method could also be applied to the analysis of any other O-glycosylated proteins.

  18. Association of Deep Brain Stimulation Washout Effects With Parkinson Disease Duration

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Fernandez, Hubert H.; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), including bradykinesia. When stimulation ceases abruptly, bradykinesia returns gradually. The duration of the gradual, slow washout varies across patients, and although the origin of this variability is unclear, it is hypothesized to be related to 1 or more clinical characteristics of patients. Objective To determine if a correlation exists between clinical characteristics of patients with Parkinson disease (age, age at disease onset, disease severity, disease duration, medication dose, or time since surgery) and the washout rate for bradykinesia when STN DBS is discontinued. Design Serial quantitative assessments of bradykinesia were performed during a defined period following cessation of STN DBS. Setting Academic research. Patients Twenty-four patients with Parkinson disease who underwent STN DBS were enrolled in the study. Patients were assessed while off medication (medication had been discontinued 10½ to 16½ hours before testing), and stimulator settings were unchanged for a mean (median) of 20 (14) months. Main Outcome Measures We measured bradykinesia in the dominant hand by assessing finger tapping (item 23 on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale), which was quantified using an angular velocity transducer strapped on the index finger. Finger tapping was assessed every 2 minutes for 20 seconds at a time. This was performed during a 20-minute period with DBS on (baseline period), during a 50-minute period following discontinuation of STN DBS for the dominant hand, and again during a 20-minute period after turning on the device. Results When STN DBS was turned off, an initial fast but partial loss of benefit was observed, which was followed by a further slow washout of the residual therapeutic effect. The half-life of the slow washout phase varied significantly across patients, and this variation was strongly related to disease

  19. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target.

  20. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target. PMID:27070317

  1. Spatio-spectral characterization of local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus via multitrack microelectrode recordings.

    PubMed

    Telkes, I; Ince, N F; Onaran, I; Abosch, A

    2015-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective treatment for motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, precise intraoperative localization of STN remains a procedural challenge. In the present study, local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from three tracks during microelectrode recording-based (MER) targeting of STN, in five patients. The raw LFP data were preprocessed in original recording setup and then data quality was compared to data with common average derivation. The depth-frequency maps were generated according to preprocessing results for each patient and spectral characteristics of LFPs were explored at each depth across different tracks and different subjects. Spatio-spectral analysis of LFP was investigated to see whether LFP activity can be used for optimal track selection and STN border identification. Analysis show that monopolar derivation suffer from various artifacts and/or power line noise which makes the interpretation of target localization very difficult in most of the subjects. Unlikely, bipolar derivation helps to recover the neurological signals and investigation of signal characteristics. The frequency-vs-depth maps using a modified Welch periodogram with robust statistics, demonstrated that a median-based spectrum estimation approach eliminates outliers pretty well by preserving band-specific LFP activity. The results indicate that there is a clear oscillatory beta activity around 20 Hz in all subjects. 1/f normalization reveals the high frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 200-to-350 Hz in two subjects. It's noted that the optimal track selection is not consistent with the track having highest beta band oscillations in two out of five subjects. In conclusion, microelectrode-derived LFP recordings may provide an alternative approach to single unit activity (SUA)-based MER, for localizing the target STN borders during DBS surgery. Despite the small number of subjects, the present study adds to

  2. Identification of a novel cancer-specific immunodominant glycopeptide epitope in the MUC1 tandem repeat.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Mads A; Sørensen, Anne Louise; Mandel, Ulla; Paulsen, Hans; Burchell, Joy; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-02-01

    The cell membrane mucin MUC1 is over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers, and cancer-associated MUC1 glycoforms represent potential targets for immunodiagnostic and therapeutic measures. We have recently shown that MUC1 with GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr (Tn) and NeuAcalpha2-6GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr (STn) O-glycosylation is a cancer-specific glycoform, and that Tn/STn-MUC1 glycopeptide-based vaccines can override tolerance in human MUC1 transgenic mice and induce humoral immunity with high specificity for MUC1 cancer-specific glycoforms (Sorensen AL, Reis CA, Tarp MA, Mandel U, Ramachandran K, Sankaranarayanan V, Schwientek T, Graham R, Taylor-Papadimitriou J, Hollingsworth MA, et al. 2006. Chemoenzymatically synthesized multimeric Tn/STn MUC1 glycopeptides elicit cancer-specific anti-MUC1 antibody responses and override tolerance. Glycobiology. 16:96-107). In order to further characterize the immune response to Tn/STn-MUC1 glycoforms, we generated monoclonal antibodies with specificity similar to the polyclonal antibody response found in transgenic mice. In the present study, we define the immunodominant epitope on Tn/STn-MUC1 glycopeptides to the region including the amino acids GSTA of the MUC1 20-amino acid tandem repeat (HGVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPA). Most other MUC1 antibodies are directed to the PDTR region, although patients with antibodies to the GSTA region have been identified. A panel of other MUC1 glycoform-specific monoclonal antibodies was included for comparison. The study demonstrates that the GSTA region of the MUC1 tandem repeat contains a highly immunodominant epitope when presented with immature short O-glycans. The cancer-specific expression of this glycopeptide epitope makes it a prime candidate for immunodiagnostic and therapeutic measures.

  3. Automatic subthalamic nucleus detection from microelectrode recordings based on noise level and neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Dolan, Kevin; He, Xuan; Fiorella Contarino, Maria; Schuurman, Richard; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Wadman, Wytse J.; Bour, Lo; Martens, Hubert C. F.

    2011-08-01

    Microelectrode recording (MER) along surgical trajectories is commonly applied for refinement of the target location during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. In this study, we utilize automatically detected MER features in order to locate the subthalamic nucleus (STN) employing an unsupervised algorithm. The automated algorithm makes use of background noise level, compound firing rate and power spectral density along the trajectory and applies a threshold-based method to detect the dorsal and the ventral borders of the STN. Depending on the combination of measures used for detection of the borders, the algorithm allocates confidence levels for the annotation made (i.e. high, medium and low). The algorithm has been applied to 258 trajectories obtained from 84 STN DBS implantations. MERs used in this study have not been pre-selected or pre-processed and include all the viable measurements made. Out of 258 trajectories, 239 trajectories were annotated by the surgical team as containing the STN versus 238 trajectories by the automated algorithm. The agreement level between the automatic annotations and the surgical annotations is 88%. Taking the surgical annotations as the golden standard, across all trajectories, the algorithm made true positive annotations in 231 trajectories, true negative annotations in 12 trajectories, false positive annotations in 7 trajectories and false negative annotations in 8 trajectories. We conclude that our algorithm is accurate and reliable in automatically identifying the STN and locating the dorsal and ventral borders of the nucleus, and in a near future could be implemented for on-line intra-operative use.

  4. Influences of membrane properties on phase response curve and synchronization stability in a model globus pallidus neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Kitano, Katsunori

    2012-06-01

    The activity patterns of the globus pallidus (GPe) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are closely associated with motor function and dysfunction in the basal ganglia. In the pathological state caused by dopamine depletion, the STN-GPe network exhibits rhythmic synchronous activity accompanied by rebound bursts in the STN. Therefore, the mechanism of activity transition is a key to understand basal ganglia functions. As synchronization in GPe neurons could induce pathological STN rebound bursts, it is important to study how synchrony is generated in the GPe. To clarify this issue, we applied the phase-reduction technique to a conductance-based GPe neuronal model in order to derive the phase response curve (PRC) and interaction function between coupled GPe neurons. Using the PRC and interaction function, we studied how the steady-state activity of the GPe network depends on intrinsic membrane properties, varying ionic conductances on the membrane. We noted that a change in persistent sodium current, fast delayed rectifier Kv3 potassium current, M-type potassium current and small conductance calcium-dependent potassium current influenced the PRC shape and the steady state. The effect of those currents on the PRC shape could be attributed to extension of the firing period and reduction of the phase response immediately after an action potential. In particular, the slow potassium current arising from the M-type potassium and the SK current was responsible for the reduction of the phase response. These results suggest that the membrane property modulation controls synchronization/asynchronization in the GPe and the pathological pattern of STN-GPe activity.

  5. Final report of work carried out under contract with Los Alamos National Laboratory, June 1, 1989--May 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report contains information about a research program where the effects of streptozyatocin has on diabetes. The researchers look at biochemical, physiological, and metabolic processes. Other things of interest to the researchers include; filtration by kidneys, number of nephrons per kidney, and microperfusion studies performed to learn more about the effects of unmodified and glucosylated albumin.

  6. Clinical and economic results of bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraix, V; Houeto, J‐L; Lagrange, C; Pen, C Le; Krystkowiak, P; Guehl, D; Ardouin, C; Welter, M‐L; Maurel, F; Defebvre, L; Rougier, A; Benabid, A‐L; Mesnage, V; Ligier, M; Blond, S; Burbaud, P; Bioulac, B; Destée, A; Cornu, P; Pollak, P

    2006-01-01

    Background High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an alternative but expensive neurosurgical treatment for parkinsonian patients with levodopa induced motor complications. Objective To assess the safety, clinical effects, quality of life, and economic cost of STN stimulation. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study in 95 consecutive Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving bilateral STN stimulation and assessed its effects over 12 months. A double blind randomised motor evaluation was carried out at 3 month follow up, and quality of life, self care ability, and predictive factors of outcome following surgery were assessed. The cost of PD was estimated over 6 months before and after surgery. Results The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score improved by 57% (p<0.0001) and activities of daily living improved by 48% (p<0.0001) at 12 month follow up. Double blind motor scoring improved by 51% at 3 month follow up (p<0.0001). The total PD Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL‐37) score improved by 28% (p<0.001). The better the preoperative motor score after a levodopa challenge, the better the outcome after STN stimulation. Five patients developed an intracerebral haematoma during electrode implantation with permanent after effects in two. The 6 month costs of PD decreased from €10 087 before surgery to €1673 after surgery (p<0.0001) mainly because of the decrease in medication. These savings allowed a return on the procedure investment, estimated at €36 904 over 2.2 years. Conclusions STN stimulation has good outcomes with relatively low risk and little cost burden in PD patients with levodopa induced motor complications. PMID:16543519

  7. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation impacts language in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew; Ullman, Michael T; Charles, P David

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated.

  8. MRI directed bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, N; Plaha, P; O'Sullivan, K; McCarter, R; Heywood, P; Gill, S

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Bilateral chronic high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has emerged as an appropriate therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease refractory to medical therapy. Advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiology have led to the development of varied targeting methods for the delivery of this treatment. Intraoperative neurophysiological and clinical monitoring is regarded by many to be mandatory for accurate STN localisation. We have examined efficacy of bilateral STN stimulation using a predominantly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-directed technique. Methods: DBS leads were stereotactically implanted into the STN using an MRI directed method, with intraoperative macrostimulation used purely for adjustment. The effects of DBS were evaluated in 16 patients followed up to 12 months, and compared with baseline assessments. Assessments were performed in both off and on medication states, and were based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and timed motor tests. Functional status outcomes were examined using the PDQ-39 quality of life questionnaire. A battery of psychometric tests was used to assess cognition. Results: After 12 months, stimulation in the off medication state resulted in significant improvements in Activities of Daily Living and Motor scores (UPDRS parts II and III) by 62% and 61% respectively. Timed motor tests were significantly improved in the off medication state. Motor scores (UPDRS part III) were significantly improved by 40% in the on medication state. Dyskinesias and off duration were significantly reduced and the mean dose of L-dopa equivalents was reduced by half. Psychometric test scores were mostly unchanged or improved. Adverse events were few. Conclusions: An MRI directed targeting method for implantation of DBS leads into the STN can be used safely and effectively, and results are comparable with studies using intraoperative microelectrode neurophysiological

  9. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, A.; Moll, C.K.E.; Hamel, W.; Buhmann, C.; Koeppen, J.A.; Boelmans, K.; Zittel, S.; Gerloff, C.; Westphal, M.; Schneider, T.R.; Engel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing. PMID:26594626

  10. Deep brain stimulation and cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease: The predictive value of electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Markser, A; Maier, Franziska; Lewis, C J; Dembek, T A; Pedrosa, D; Eggers, C; Timmermann, L; Kalbe, E; Fink, G R; Burghaus, Lothar

    2015-10-01

    Some Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) develop new-onset cognitive decline. We examined whether clinical EEG recordings can be used to predict cognitive deterioration in PD patients undergoing STN-DBS. In this retrospective study, we used the Grand Total EEG (GTE)-score (short and total) to evaluate pre- and postoperative EEGs. In PD patients undergoing STN-DBS (N = 30), cognitive functioning was measured using Mini-Mental State Test and DemTect before and after surgery. Severity of motor impairment was assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III. Patients were classified into patients with or without cognitive decline after STN-DBS surgery. Epidemiological data, pre- and postoperative EEG recordings as well as neuropsychological and neurological data, electrode positions and the third ventricle width were compared. A logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of cognitive decline. Motor deficits significantly improved from pre- to post-surgery, while the mean GTE-scores increased significantly. Six patients developed cognitive deterioration 4-12 months postoperatively. These patients had significantly higher preoperative GTE-scores than patients without cognitive deterioration, although preoperative cognitive functioning was comparable. Electrode positions, brain atrophy and neurological data did not differ between groups. Logistic regression analysis identified the GTE-score as a significant predictor of postoperative cognitive deterioration. Data suggest that the preoperative GTE-score can be used to identify PD patients that are at high risk for developing cognitive deterioration after STN-DBS surgery even though their preoperative cognitive state was normal.

  11. Striatal Molecular Signature of Subchronic Subthalamic Nucleus High Frequency Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lortet, Sylviane; Lacombe, Emilie; Boulanger, Nicolas; Rihet, Pascal; Nguyen, Catherine; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Salin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN-HFS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and its interaction with levodopa (L-DOPA), focusing on the striatum. Striatal gene expression profile was assessed in rats with nigral dopamine neuron lesion, either treated or not, using agilent microarrays and qPCR verification. The treatments consisted in anti-akinetic STN-HFS (5 days), chronic L-DOPA treatment inducing dyskinesia (LIDs) or the combination of the two treatments that exacerbated LIDs. STN-HFS modulated 71 striatal genes. The main biological processes associated with the differentially expressed gene products include regulation of growth, of apoptosis and of synaptic transmission, and extracellular region is a major cellular component implicated. In particular, several of these genes have been shown to support survival or differentiation of striatal or of dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that STN HFS may induce widespread anatomo-functional rearrangements in the striatum and create a molecular environment favorable for neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. STN-HFS and L-DOPA treatment share very few common gene regulation features indicating that the molecular substrates underlying their striatal action are mostly different; among the common effects is the down-regulation of Adrb1, which encodes the adrenergic beta-1- receptor, supporting a major role of this receptor in Parkinson's disease. In addition to genes already reported to be associated with LIDs (preprodynorphin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metabotropic glutamate receptor 4, cannabinoid receptor 1), the comparison between DOPA and DOPA/HFS identifies immunity-related genes as potential players in L-DOPA side effects. PMID:23593219

  12. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Impacts Language in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A.; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated. PMID:22880117

  13. Membrane permeability as a cause of transport defects in experimental Fanconi syndrome. A new hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M; Dubord, L; Hausser, C; Schwab, C

    1976-01-01

    The injection of sodium maleate (200-400 mg/kg) into rats produces aminoaciduria along with glycosuria and phosphaturia, resembling the Fanconi syndrome. This experimental model was studied by means of microinjections into proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney, stop-flow diuresis, and microperfusion of single nephrons. Our results show that, in maleate-treated rats, competition between amino acids or related structures (L-proline, L-OH-proline, and glycine) possesses the same characteristics, and net influx of amino acids appear normal at the proximal nephron. Data obtained by classical stop-flow techniques and single nephron microperfusions also indicate a normal entry of labeled amino acids (L-lysine, glycine, L-valine, L-proline, L-cystine), and 3-0-methyl-D-[3H]glucose and [32P]phosphate from the luminal side of the proximal tubule cell. However, the efflux of molecules from the cell appears enhanced throughout the proximal and distal tubule; molecules that exit at this site are excreted directly into the urine. Our results suggest that the phosphaturia, aminoaciduria, and glycosuria of the experimental Fanconi syndrome can be explained by a modification of the cell membrane permeability (increased efflux) at distal sites of the nephron rather than by a modification of the membrane transport (decreased influx) at the proximal sites, as is currently accepted. Our data also stress the importance of efflux phenomena in membrane transport. PMID:1262464

  14. Who Studies Women's Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Marion; Owen, Mairead

    1998-01-01

    Studied a cohort (originally 44) of students who entered a British university to study women's studies in 1994. The strong emphases on the salience of the students' choice and the experiential importance of identity as a concept were striking. Theoretical difficulties in theorizing identity are explored. (SLD)

  15. Modifications of the genital kidney proximal and distal tubules for sperm transport in Notophthalmus viridescens (Amphibia, Urodela, Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Abbigail E; Siegel, Dustin S

    2014-08-01

    Male salamanders use nephrons from the genital kidney to transport sperm from the testicular lobules to the Wolffian duct. The microstructure of the epithelia of the genital kidney proximal tubule and distal tubule was studied over 1 year in a population of Notophthalmus viridescens from Crawford and Pike counties in central Missouri. Through ultrastructural analysis, we were able to support the hypothesis that the genital kidney nephrons are modified to aid in the transportation of sperm. A lack of folding of the basal plasma membrane, in both the genital kidney proximal and distal tubules when compared to the pelvic kidney proximal and distal tubules, reduces the surface area and thus likely decreases the efficiency of reabsorption in these nephron regions of the genital kidney. Ciliated epithelial cells are also present along the entire length of the genital kidney proximal tubule, but are lacking in the epithelium of the pelvic kidney proximal tubule. The exact function of these cilia remains unknown, but they may aid in mixing of seminal fluids or the transportation of immature sperm through the genital kidney nephrons. Ultrastructural analysis of proximal and distal tubules of the genital kidney revealed no seasonal variation in cellular activity and no mass production of seminal fluids throughout the reproductive cycle. Thus, we failed to support the hypothesis that the cellular activity of the epithelia lining the genital kidney nephrons is correlated to specific events in the reproductive cycle. The cytoplasmic contents and overall structure of the genital and pelvic kidney epithelial cells were similar to recent observations in Ambystoma maculatum, with the absence of abundant dense bodies apically in the epithelial cells lining the genital kidney distal tubule.

  16. Photoprotective function of chloroplast avoidance movement: in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Sztatelman, Olga; Waloszek, Andrzej; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2010-06-15

    Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement has long been considered to be a photoprotective mechanism. Here, we present an experimental model in which this function can be shown for wild type Arabidopsis thaliana. We used blue light of different fluence rates for chloroplast positioning, and strong red light inactive in chloroplast positioning as a stressing light. The performance of photosystem II was measured by means of chlorophyll fluorescence. After stressing light treatment, a smaller decrease in photosystem II quantum yield was observed for leaves with chloroplasts in profile position as compared with leaves with chloroplasts in face position. Three Arabidopsis mutants, phot2 (no avoidance response), npq1 (impaired zeaxanhtin accumulation) and stn7 (no state transition), were examined for their chloroplast positioning and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters under identical experimental conditions. The results obtained for these mutants revealed additional stressing effects of blue light as compared with red light.

  17. Probabilistic versus deterministic tractography for delineation of the cortico-subthalamic hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mikkel V; Lund, Torben E; Sunde, Niels; Frandsen, Jesper; Rosendal, Frederikke; Juul, Niels; Østergaard, Karen

    2016-07-08

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and tractography allows noninvasive mapping of the structural connections of the brain, and may provide important information for neurosurgical planning. The hyperdirect pathway, connecting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) with the motor cortex, is assumed to play a key role in mediating the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), which is an effective but poorly understood treatment for Parkinson disease. This study aimed to apply recent methodological advances in DWI acquisition and analysis to the delineation of the hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for surgery. METHODS High spatial and angular resolution DWI data were acquired preoperatively from 5 patients with Parkinson disease undergoing DBS. The authors compared the delineated hyperdirect pathways and associated STN target maps generated by 2 different tractography methods: a tensor-based deterministic method, typically available in clinical settings, and an advanced probabilistic method based on constrained spherical deconvolution. In addition, 10 high-resolution data sets with the same scanning parameters were acquired from a healthy control participant to assess the robustness of the tractography results. RESULTS Both tractography approaches identified connections between the ipsilateral motor cortex and the STN. However, the 2 methods provided substantially different target regions in the STN, with the target center of gravity differing by > 1.4 mm on average. The probabilistic method (based on constrained spherical deconvolution) plausibly reconstructed a continuous set of connections from the motor cortex, terminating in the dorsolateral region of the STN. In contrast, the tensor-based method reconstructed a comparatively sparser and more variable subset of connections. Furthermore, across the control scans, the probabilistic method identified considerably more consistent targeting regions within the STN compared with the deterministic

  18. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on bradykinesia and muscle activation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy A; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and antiparkinsonian medication (Meds) have proved to be effective therapies for treating bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. However, it is not currently known how or to what extent STN stimulation alters the control signals to agonist and antagonist muscles to change movement speed. Our objective was to investigate movement speed along with the amplitude and temporal features of EMG activity to determine how and to what extent these parameters are changed by DBS and medication. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease were studied following neurosurgery that implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the STN. The experiments for the patients were performed in each of four treatment conditions: (i) OFF treatment; (ii) STN DBS; (iii) Meds; and (iv) Meds plus STN DBS. Also, a group of age- and gender-matched control subjects were examined. Medication and DBS had similar effects in that both treatments increased movement speed, increased the amplitude of the first agonist burst, increased burst duration, reduced the number of agonist bursts, reduced cocontraction, increased the size of the antagonist EMG, and reduced the centroid time of the antagonist EMG. When DBS and medication were combined, only temporal measures of burst duration and the number of agonist bursts were different from the medication alone condition. There was a positive association between the level of bradykinesia OFF treatment and the level of bradykinesia following DBS and medication. The movement speed of neurologically normal control subjects' was over 40% higher during both flexion and extension movements when compared with the patients during Meds plus STN DBS. The changes in the muscle activation patterns provide a mechanism of action for the pharmacological and surgical interventions used to treat bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. However, despite the success of medication and DBS at improving bradykinesia in patients

  19. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Alex; Hogan, S. John; Bogacz, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe). Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson’s disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters. PMID:26683341

  20. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Nicolette M; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Twickler, Th B Marcel; de Bie, Rob M; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P Richard; La Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry, alters basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 8 patients with PD treated with DBS STN, in the basal state and during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using a stable glucose isotope, in the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. We measured EGP, hepatic insulin sensitivity, peripheral insulin sensitivity (Rd), resting energy expenditure (REE), glucoregulatory hormones, and Parkinson symptoms, using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Basal plasma glucose and EGP did not differ between the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was similar in both conditions and there were no significant differences in Rd and plasma glucoregulatory hormones between DBS on and DBS off. UPDRS was significantly higher in the non-stimulated condition. DBS of the STN in patients with PD does not influence basal EGP or insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that acute modulation of the motor basal ganglia circuitry does not affect glucose metabolism in humans.

  1. Subthalamus stimulation in Parkinson disease: Accounting for the bilaterality of contacts

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Pereira, Bruno; Derost, Philippe; Vassal, François; Ulla, Miguel; Morand, Dominique; Coll, Guillaume; Gabrillargues, Jean; Marques, Ana; Debilly, Bérangère; Coste, Jérôme; Durif, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease uses bi-hemispheric high-frequency stimulation within the subthalamus, however, the specific impacts of bilaterality of DBS are still not clear. Thus, we aimed to study the individual-level clinical impact of locations of right-left contact pair-up accounting for each subthalamic nucleus (STN) anatomy. Methods: Contact locations and effects at 1 year were studied retrospectively in an unselected series of 53 patients operated between 2004 and 2010. Location of contacts was defined relatively to the main axis of STN used to map longitudinal and transversal positions, and STN membership (out meaning out-of-STN). Contact pairings were described via three methods: (i) Unified contact location (UCL) collapsing DBS into an all-in-one contact; (ii) balance of contact pair-up (BCPU), defined as symmetric or asymmetric regardless of laterality; (iii) hemisphere-wise most frequent contact pair-up (MFCP) regardless of BCPU. Clinical data were: mean levodopa equivalent dose, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score III without medication, UPDRS II and III speech sub-scores, UPDRS II freezing sub-score, 1 year versus preoperative values, with and without levodopa. Ad-hoc two-sided tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Worsening speech, was more frequent for UCL_out patients and when the left MFCP contact was rear and/or superolateral, however, it less frequent for BCPU-asymmetric patients. Worsening freezing was more frequent when the right MFCP contact was rear and superolateral. Conclusions: These results point to strategies for minimizing dysarthria and freezing as adverse effects of DBS. PMID:27990316

  2. Estimation of organic carbon blank values and error structures of the speciation trends network data for source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Kim; Philip K. Hopke; Youjun Qin

    2005-08-01

    Because the particulate organic carbon (OC) concentrations reported in U.S. Environment Protection Agency Speciation Trends Network (STN) data were not blank corrected, the OC blank concentrations were estimated using the intercept in particulate matter {lt} 2.5 {mu}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) regression against OC concentrations. The estimated OC blank concentrations ranged from 1 to 2.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3} showing higher values in urban areas for the 13 monitoring sites in the northeastern United States. In the STN data, several different samplers and analyzers are used, and various instruments show different method detection limit (MDL) values, as well as errors. A comprehensive set of error structures that would be used for numerous source apportionment studies of STN data was estimated by comparing a limited set of measured concentrations and their associated uncertainties. To examine the estimated error structures and investigate the appropriate MDL values, PM2.5 samples collected at a STN site in Burlington, VT, were analyzed through the application of the positive matrix factorization. A total of 323 samples that were collected between December 2000 and December 2003 and 49 species based on several variable selection criteria were used, and eight sources were successfully identified in this study with the estimated error structures and min values among different MDL values from the five instruments: secondary sulfate aerosol (41%) identified as the result of emissions from coal-fired power plants, secondary nitrate aerosol (20%), airborne soil (15%), gasoline vehicle emissions (7%), diesel emissions (7%), aged sea salt (4%), copper smelting (3%), and ferrous smelting (2%). Time series plots of contributions from airborne soil indicate that the highly elevated impacts from this source were likely caused primarily by dust storms.

  3. Deep brain stimulation activation volumes and their association with neurophysiological mapping and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maks, Christopher B.; Butson, Christopher R.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Despite the clinical success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD), little is known about the electrical spread of the stimulation. The primary goal of this study was to integrate neuroimaging, neurophysiology, and neurostimulation data sets from 10 PD patients, unilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS electrodes, to identify the theoretical volume of tissue activated (VTA) by clinically defined therapeutic stimulation parameters. Methods Each patient-specific model was created with a series of five steps: 1) definition of the neurosurgical stereotactic coordinate system within the context of pre-operative imaging data; 2) entry of intra-operative microelectrode recording locations from neurophysiologically defined thalamic, subthalamic, and substantia nigra neurons into the context of the imaging data; 3) fitting a 3D brain atlas to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the patient; 4) positioning the DBS electrode in the documented stereotactic location, verified by post-operative imaging data; and 5) calculation of the VTA using a diffusion tensor based finite element neurostimulation model. Results The patient-specific models show that therapeutic benefit was achieved with direct stimulation of a wide range of anatomical structures in the subthalamic region. Interestingly, of the 5 patients exhibiting a greater than 40% improvement in their unified PD rating scale (UPDRS), all but one had the majority of their VTA outside the atlas defined borders of the STN. Further, of the 5 patients with less than 40% UPDRS improvement all but one had the majority of their VTA inside the STN. Conclusions Our results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that therapeutic benefit is associated with electrode contacts near the dorsal border of the STN, and provide quantitative estimates of the electrical spread of the stimulation in a clinically relevant context. PMID:18403440

  4. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  5. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation on Emotional Prosody Comprehension in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background Although impaired decoding of emotional prosody has frequently been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), to date only few reports have sought to explore the effect of Parkinson's treatment on disturbances of prosody decoding. In particular, little is known about how surgical treatment approaches such as high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affect emotional speech perception in patients with PD. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on prosody processing. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end the performance of 13 PD patients on three tasks requiring the decoding of emotional speech was assessed and subsequently compared to the performance of healthy control individuals. To delineate the effect of STN-DBS, all patients were tested with stimulators turned on as well as with stimulators turned off. Results revealed that irrespective of whether assessments were made “on” or “off” stimulation, patients' performance was less accurate as compared to healthy control participants on all tasks employed in this study. However, while accuracy appeared to be unaffected by stimulator status, a facilitation of reactions specific to highly conflicting emotional stimulus material (i.e. stimulus material presenting contradicting emotional messages on a verbal and non-verbal prosodic level) was observed during “on” stimulation assessments. Conclusion In sum, presented results suggest that the processing of emotional speech is indeed modulated by STN-DBS. Observed alterations might, on the one hand, reflect a more efficient processing of highly conflicting stimulus material following DBS. However, on the other hand, given the lack of an improvement in accuracy, increased impulsivity associated with STN stimulation needs to be taken into consideration. PMID:21552518

  6. Distinct populations of neurons respond to emotional valence and arousal in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Tomáš; Serranová, Tereza; Růžička, Filip; Vostatek, Pavel; Wild, Jiří; Šťastná, Daniela; Bonnet, Cecilia; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Evžen; Urgošík, Dušan; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Both animal studies and studies using deep brain stimulation in humans have demonstrated the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in motivational and emotional processes; however, participation of this nucleus in processing human emotion has not been investigated directly at the single-neuron level. We analyzed the relationship between the neuronal firing from intraoperative microrecordings from the STN during affective picture presentation in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the affective ratings of emotional valence and arousal performed subsequently. We observed that 17% of neurons responded to emotional valence and arousal of visual stimuli according to individual ratings. The activity of some neurons was related to emotional valence, whereas different neurons responded to arousal. In addition, 14% of neurons responded to visual stimuli. Our results suggest the existence of neurons involved in processing or transmission of visual and emotional information in the human STN, and provide evidence of separate processing of the affective dimensions of valence and arousal at the level of single neurons as well. PMID:25713375

  7. Effects of bilateral subthalamic stimulation on gait kinematics and kinetics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrarin, M; Rizzone, M; Bergamasco, B; Lanotte, M; Recalcati, M; Pedotti, A; Lopiano, L

    2005-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation, a recent surgical approach to Parkinson's disease (PD), has been shown to be effective in relieving motor symptoms. The present study carried out a full body gait analysis, during overground walking, on ten PD patients with bilaterally implanted STN stimulation devices. Walking performance was analyzed on the same day, in four conditions (Stim Off-Med Off, Stim On-Med Off, Stim Off-Med On, Stim On-Med On). The results showed that, on average, STN stimulation alone (S+M-) and L-dopa alone (S-M+), significantly increased gait speed, stride length and the lower limb joint Range of Motion (ROM) with respect to the basal condition (S-M-); also cadence was found to play a role in velocity increase, particularly when L-dopa was administered. Both treatments improved pelvis and trunk kinematics, and power production at the ankle and hip joints. The combination of the two treatments (S+M+) produced an additional effect on gait speed, stride length, ROM of knee and ankle joints, pelvis obliquity and trunk inclination. Given the additive and synergistic effects, it can be hypothesized that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Our results confirm the findings of earlier studies that employed treadmill walking.

  8. Seasonal variation in the biochemical composition of red seaweed ( Catenella repens) from Gangetic delta, northeast coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kakoli; Ghosh, Rajrupa; Homechaudhuri, Sumit; Mitra, Abhijit

    2009-10-01

    The biochemical composition of red seaweeds, Catenella repens was investigated in this present study along with subsequent analysis of relevant physico-chemical variables. In this study, the relationship between the nutritive components of this species and the ambient environmental parameters was established. Protein content varied from 2.78 ± 0.30% of dry weight (stn.3) to 16.03 ± 0.96% of dry weight (stn.1) with highest values during monsoon. The protein levels were positively correlated with dissolved nitrate content and negatively correlated with water temperature (except stn.3) and salinity. Carbohydrate content of this species varied significantly ( p < 0.05) during pre-monsoon between stations and the values showed positive relationship with salinity and surface water temperature. In contrast to carbohydrate, lipid concentration was lowest in values and varied very slightly between seasons and stations. Astaxanthin content of the seaweed species was greater in pre-monsoon than monsoon and post-monsoon in all the selected stations. Compared with the three seasons, samples of red seaweed collected in pre-monsoon has high carbohydrate-astaxanthin in contrast to protein-lipid which showed high values during monsoon. Statistical analysis computed among the environmental and biochemical parameters suggests the potential role played by the abiotic parameters on biosynthetic pathways of seaweed. This paper also highlights the influence of the nutritional quality of water that can be used for mass cultivation of Catenella repens.

  9. Weight change following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Cartwright, Michael S; Passmore, Leah V; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Siddiqui, Mustafa S

    2010-08-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) tend to lose weight progressively over years. Weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for treatment of PD has been documented in several studies that were limited by small sample size and exclusive focus on PD patients with STN stimulation. The current study was undertaken to examine weight change in a large sample of movement disorder patients following DBS. A retrospective review was undertaken of 182 patient charts following DBS of the STN, ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus (VIM), and globus pallidus internus (GPi). Weight was collected preoperatively and postoperatively up to 24 months following surgery. Data were adjusted for baseline weight and multivariate linear regression was performed with repeated measures to assess weight change. Statistically significant mean weight gain of 1.8 kg (2.8% increase from baseline, p = 0.0113) was observed at a rate of approximately 1 kg per year up to 24 months following surgery. This gain was not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target in a multivariate model. Significant mean weight gain of 2.3 kg (p = 0.0124) or 4.2% was observed in our PD patients. Most patients with PD and ET gain weight following DBS, and this gain is not predicted by age, gender, diagnosis, or stimulation target.

  10. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson’s disease following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intensive voice therapy (LSVT®LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes for surgical subjects were comparable to non-surgical cohorts. Methods Eight subjects with PD (four with STN-DBS and four without) received LSVT LOUD four times a week for four weeks. Four additional subjects with PD remained untreated. Voice intensity (SPL), Vowel Articulation Index (VAI), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and a structured interview were evaluated before and after treatment and again six months later. Results Both treated groups showed significant increases in SPL from pre to post and six-month follow up. VAI was significantly higher for the treated groups compared to the untreated subjects at follow up. Several treated individuals had significant clinical improvement in VHI scores, particularly within the LSVT-DBS group. Treated individuals reported improvements in voice and speech in structured interviews; however, answers suggest more variable long-term maintenance within the LSVT-DBS group. The untreated group exhibited no significant changes in any measure throughout the study. Conclusions Results support LSVT LOUD for treating voice and speech in individuals with PD following STN-DBS surgery. However, modifications may be required to maintain functional improvements. PMID:21724193

  11. Sticholysin II: a pore-forming toxin as a probe to recognize sphingomyelin in artificial and cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paloma Sanchez; Chieppa, Gabriele; Desideri, Alessandro; Cannata, Stefano; Romano, Elena; Luly, Paolo; Rufini, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major component of membrane rafts, and also is a precursor of many bioactive molecules. The sphingomyelin plays important biological roles and alterations of its metabolism are the basis of some genetic disorders such as the Niemann Pick disease. A complete understanding of its biological role is frustrated by the lack of efficient tools for its recognition in the cell. Sticholysin II (StnII) is a 20 kDa protein from the sea-anemone Stichodactyla helianthus which shows a cytotoxic activity by forming oligomeric aqueous pores in the cell plasma membrane. A recent NMR analysis indicates that the sticholysin II binds specifically to sphingomyelin by two domains that recognize respectively the hydrophilic (i.e. phosphorylcholine) and the hydrophobic (i.e. ceramide) moieties of the molecule. Aim of our research has been to verify the possible employ of an antibody against the StnII to investigate the localization and the dynamics of sphingomyelin in cell membranes. For this purpose, we developed a monoclonal antibody (named A10) against the toxin and we tested its ability to bind StnII after binding to sphingomyelin. A10 antibody is able to recognize the sticholysin II both in its native form and after SDS treatment, being the protein still suitable for many analytic techniques such as ELISA, western blotting and immunofluorescence. The high affinity of the toxin for the sphingomyelin in cell membranes has been demonstrated by microscopic immuno-localization and western blot analysis; both methods confirmed that sphingomyelin is the molecular acceptor for StnII also in cell membranes. Finally, we studied the specificity of the toxin for sphingomyelin by a cell membrane-double labelling method, using cholera toxin, specific for the ganglioside GM1, and sticholysin II. The results obtained show that there is no cross-reactivity between the two toxins, confirming that sticholysin II is able to discriminate among membrane domains with sphingomyelin with

  12. A spiking Basal Ganglia model of synchrony, exploration and decision making

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Rengaswamy, Maithreye; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    To make an optimal decision we need to weigh all the available options, compare them with the current goal, and choose the most rewarding one. Depending on the situation an optimal decision could be to either “explore” or “exploit” or “not to take any action” for which the Basal Ganglia (BG) is considered to be a key neural substrate. In an attempt to expand this classical picture of BG function, we had earlier hypothesized that the Indirect Pathway (IP) of the BG could be the subcortical substrate for exploration. In this study we build a spiking network model to relate exploration to synchrony levels in the BG (which are a neural marker for tremor in Parkinson's disease). Key BG nuclei such as the Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externus (GPe) and Globus Pallidus internus (GPi) were modeled as Izhikevich spiking neurons whereas the Striatal output was modeled as Poisson spikes. The model is cast in reinforcement learning framework with the dopamine signal representing reward prediction error. We apply the model to two decision making tasks: a binary action selection task (similar to one used by Humphries et al., 2006) and an n-armed bandit task (Bourdaud et al., 2008). The model shows that exploration levels could be controlled by STN's lateral connection strength which also influenced the synchrony levels in the STN-GPe circuit. An increase in STN's lateral strength led to a decrease in exploration which can be thought as the possible explanation for reduced exploratory levels in Parkinson's patients. Our simulations also show that on complete removal of IP, the model exhibits only Go and No-Go behaviors, thereby demonstrating the crucial role of IP in exploration. Our model provides a unified account for synchronization, action section, and explorative behavior. PMID:26074761

  13. Fine particulate matter source apportionment for the Chemical speciation Trends Network site at Birmingham, Alabama, using Positive Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Karsten; Jayanty, R K M; Flanagan, James B

    2008-01-01

    The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model version 1.1 was used with data from the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) Chemical Speciation Trends Network (STN) to estimate source contributions to ambient PM2.5 in a highly industrialized urban setting in the southeastern United States. Model results consistently resolved 10 factors that are interpreted as two secondary, five industrial, one motor vehicle, one road dust, and one biomass burning sources. The STN dataset is generally not corrected for field blank levels, which are significant in the case of organic carbon (OC). Estimation of primary OC using the elemental carbon (EC) tracer method applied on a seasonal basis significantly improved the model's performance. Uniform increase of input data uncertainty and exclusion of a few outlier samples (associated with high potassium) further improved the model results. However, it was found that most PMF factors did not cleanly represent single source types and instead are "contaminated" by other sources, a situation that might be improved by controlling rotational ambiguity within the model. Secondary particulate matter formed by atmospheric processes, such as sulfate and secondary OC, contribute the majority of ambient PM2.5 and exhibit strong seasonality (37 +/- 10% winter vs. 55 +/- 16% summer average). Motor vehicle emissions constitute the biggest primary PM2.5 mass contribution with almost 25 +/- 2% long-term average and winter maximum of 29 +/- 11%. PM2.5 contributions from the five identified industrial sources vary little with season and average 14 +/- 1.3%. In summary, this study demonstrates the utility of the EC tracer method to effectively blank-correct the OC concentrations in the STN dataset. In addition, examination of the effect of input uncertainty estimates on model results indicates that the estimated uncertainties currently being provided with the STN data may be somewhat lower than the levels needed for optimum modeling results.

  14. Change of the melanocortin system caused by bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Sevilla, F; Pérez-Navarro, M J; Muñoz-Pasadas, M; Sáez-Zea, C; Jouma-Katati, M; Piédrola-Maroto, G; Ramírez-Navarro, A; Mínguez-Castellanos, A

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVES - Determine whether bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with an increase in neuropeptide Y (NPY) and/or resistance to inhibition by leptin in relation to post-surgery weight gain. MATERIALS AND METHODS - This prospective study included 20 patients who underwent bilateral STN-DBS and 17 who refused surgery. Data were obtained at baseline, 3 and 6 months on neurological and nutritional status, including determination of body mass index (BMI) and serum NPY and leptin levels. RESULTS -  NPY and leptin levels changed over time, with a distinct pattern. The BMI increase at 6 months was greater in the surgical group (5.5 ± 6.3% vs 0.5 ± 3.5%; P = 0.035). Medical group exhibited a reduction in leptin level (-2.0 ± 4.3 ng/ml) and a consequent increase in NPY level (72.4 ± 58.7 pmol/ml). However, STN-DBS patients showed an increase in leptin (3.1 ± 5.0 ng/ml; P = 0.001 vs medical group) and also in NPY (12.1 ± 53.6 pmol/ml; P = 0.022 vs medical group) levels, which suggests resistance to inhibition by leptin. Rise in NPY level correlated with higher stimulation voltages. CONCLUSIONS -  Bilateral STN-DBS causes disruption of the melanocortin system, probably related to diffusion of the electric current to the hypothalamus. This mechanism may in part explain the weight gain of patients with PD after surgery.

  15. Understanding the impact of deep brain stimulation on ambulatory activity in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Lynn; Chastin, Sebastien Francois Martin; Lord, Sue; Baker, Katherine; Burn, David John

    2012-06-01

    Whilst deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), its effect on daily activity is unknown. We aimed to quantify changes in ambulatory activity following DBS-STN in advanced PD using novel accelerometry based measures that describe changes to the volume and pattern of walking. Seventeen participants with advanced PD were measured over a 7-day period using an activPAL (™) activity monitor. Data were collected 6 weeks before and 6 months after surgery and included measures that describe the volume and pattern of ambulatory activity (number of steps per day, accumulation, diversity and variability of walking time), alongside standard measures for disease severity, freezing of gait, gait speed, and extended activities of daily living. Activity outcomes were compared pre- and 6 months post-surgery using linear mixed models and correlated with standard outcomes. The results of this study are despite significant improvements in motor symptoms after surgery, the volume of ambulatory activity (total number of steps per day) did not change (P = 0.468). However, significant increases in length and variability of walking bouts emerged, suggesting improvements in diversity and flexibility of walking patterns. Motor severity and extended activities of daily living scores were significantly correlated with walking bout variability but not with volume of walking. Thus, the conclusions are reduction in motor symptom severity after DBS-STN translated into selective improvements in daily activity. Novel measures derived from accelerometry provide a discrete measure of performance and allow closer interpretation of the impact of DBS-STN on real-world activity.

  16. My 25 Stimulating Years with DBS in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hariz, Marwan

    2017-01-01

    The year 2017 marks the 30th anniversary of the birth of modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), which was introduced by Benabid, Pollak et al. in 1987, initially targeting the motor thalamus to treat tremor, and subsequently targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for treatment of symptoms of advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). STN DBS is undoubtedly “the most important discovery since levodopa”, as stated by David Marsden in 1994. In 2014, The Lasker– DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award to “honor two scientists who developed deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus”, was bestowed upon Benabid and DeLong. STN DBS remains today the main surgical procedure for PD, due to its effectiveness in ameliorating PD symptoms and because it is the only surgical procedure for PD that allows a radical decrease in medication. Future improvements of DBS include the possibility to deliver a “closed-loop”, “on demand” stimulation, as highly preliminary studies suggest that it may improve both axial and appendicular symptoms and reduce side effects such as dysarthria. Even though DBS of the subthalamic nucleus is the main surgical procedure used today for patients with PD, all patients are not suitable for STN DBS; as a functional neurosurgeon performing since more than 25 years various surgical procedures the aim of which is not to save life but to improve the patient’s quality of life, I consider that the surgery should be tailored to the patient’s individual symptoms and needs, and that its safety is paramount. PMID:28282816

  17. Relationship between oscillatory activity in the cortico-basal ganglia network and parkinsonism in MPTP-treated monkeys.

    PubMed

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Pittard, Damien; Bliwise, Donald; Wichmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Parkinsonism is associated with changes in oscillatory activity patterns and increased synchronization of neurons in the basal ganglia and cortex in patients and animal models of Parkinson's disease, but the relationship between these changes and the severity of parkinsonian signs remains unclear. We examined this relationship by studying changes in local field potentials (LFPs) in the internal pallidal segment (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN), and in encephalographic signals (EEG) from the primary motor cortex (M1) in Rhesus monkeys which were rendered progressively parkinsonian by repeated systemic injections of small doses of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Observations during wakefulness and sleep (defined by EEG and video records) were analyzed separately. The severity of parkinsonism correlated with increases in spectral power at frequencies below 15.5Hz in M1 and GPi and reductions in spectral power at frequencies above 15.6Hz with little change in STN. The severity of parkinsonism also correlated with increases in the coherence between M1 EEG and basal ganglia LFPs in the low frequency band. Levodopa treatment reduced low-frequency activity and increased high-frequency activity in all three areas, but did not affect coherence. The state of arousal also affected LFP and EEG signals in all three structures, particularly in the STN. These results suggest that parkinsonism-associated changes in alpha and low-beta band oscillatory activity can be detected early in the parkinsonian state in M1 and GPi. Interestingly, oscillations detectable in STN LFP signals (including oscillations in the beta-band) do not appear to correlate strongly with the severity of mild-to-moderate parkinsonism in these animals. Levodopa-induced changes in oscillatory M1 EEG and basal ganglia LFP patterns do not necessarily represent a normalization of abnormalities caused by dopamine depletion.

  18. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) Protocol for Podocyte Isolation in Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bates, Thomas J D; Naumann, Uta; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a very important model for studying human diseases. The conserved structure of the nephrons in the kidney allows the user to answer questions relating to study human kidney disorders. Wt1a-expressing podocytes are the most important cells within the glomeruli of adult zebrafish. In order to understand the molecular characteristics of these cells, within damage models, we have established a method for isolating them.

  19. A new biomarker for subthalamic deep brain stimulation for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease—a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmel, Gerrit E.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Obradovic, Milan; Gorman, Robert B.; Single, Peter S.; Chenery, Helen J.; Coyne, Terry; Silburn, Peter A.; Parker, John L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard treatment for advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other motor disorders. Although the surgical procedure has improved in accuracy over the years thanks to imaging and microelectrode recordings, the underlying principles that render DBS effective are still debated today. The aim of this paper is to present initial findings around a new biomarker that is capable of assessing the efficacy of DBS treatment for PD which could be used both as a research tool, as well as in the context of a closed-loop stimulator. Approach. We have used a novel multi-channel stimulator and recording device capable of measuring the response of nervous tissue to stimulation very close to the stimulus site with minimal latency, rejecting most of the stimulus artefact usually found with commercial devices. We have recorded and analyzed the responses obtained intraoperatively in two patients undergoing DBS surgery in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced PD. Main results. We have identified a biomarker in the responses of the STN to DBS. The responses can be analyzed in two parts, an initial evoked compound action potential arising directly after the stimulus onset, and late responses (LRs), taking the form of positive peaks, that follow the initial response. We have observed a morphological change in the LRs coinciding with a decrease in the rigidity of the patients. Significance. These initial results could lead to a better characterization of the DBS therapy, and the design of adaptive DBS algorithms that could significantly improve existing therapies and help us gain insights into the functioning of the basal ganglia and DBS.

  20. The serendipity case of the pedunculopontine nucleus low-frequency brain stimulation: chasing a gait response, finding sleep, and cognition improvement.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Galati, Salvatore; Bassi, Mario Stampanoni; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini - PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness. Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN) or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibers, influencing non-motor behaviors.

  1. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson's Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2016-12-13

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in "on" and "off" medication and "on" and "off" stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the "off" medication state. The "off" medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The "off" medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications.

  2. Detection of glyco-mucin profiles improves specificity of MUC16 and MUC1 biomarkers in ovarian serous tumours.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Sara; Marcos-Silva, Lara; Pereira, Daniela; Pinto, Rita; Almeida, Raquel; Söderberg, Ola; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Felix, Ana; Lunet, Nuno; David, Leonor

    2015-02-01

    The CA125 assay detects circulating MUC16 and is one of the most widely used cancer biomarkers for the follow-up of ovarian cancer. We previously demonstrated that detection of aberrant cancer-associated glycoforms of MUC16 as well as MUC1 in circulation could improve the yield of these serum assays. Our aim was to refine ovarian cancer biomarkers by detection of aberrant glycoforms (Tn, STn, and T) of MUC16 and MUC1 in ovarian cancer tissue using Proximity Ligation Assays (PLA). We studied two series of serous ovarian tumours, a pilot series of 66 ovarian tumours (27 cystadenomas, 16 borderline tumours and 23 adenocarcinomas) from Centro Hospitalar S. João, Porto and a validation series of 89 ovarian tumours (17 cystadenomas, 25 borderline tumours and 47 adenocarcinomas) from the Portuguese Institute of Oncology Francisco Gentil, Lisbon. PLA reactions for MUC16/Tn, MUC16/STn, MUC1/Tn and MUC1/STn were negative in benign lesions but often positive in borderline and malignant lesions, in both series. An even better yield was obtained based on positivity for any of the four glyco-mucin profiles, further increasing sensitivity to 72% and 83% in the two series, respectively, with 100% specificity. The strategy is designated glyco-mucin profiling and provides strong support for development of PLA-based serum assays for early diagnosis.

  3. Brain tissue properties differentiate between motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Ettore A; Dukart, Juergen; Helms, Gunther; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Kherif, Ferath; Lutti, Antoine; Chowdhury, Rumana; Hetzer, Stefan; Haynes, John-Dylan; Kühn, Andrea A; Draganski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding basic organizational principles of the human basal ganglia, accurate in vivo assessment of their anatomical properties is essential to improve early diagnosis in disorders with corticosubcortical pathology and optimize target planning in deep brain stimulation. Main goal of this study was the detailed topological characterization of limbic, associative, and motor subdivisions of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in relation to corresponding corticosubcortical circuits. To this aim, we used magnetic resonance imaging and investigated independently anatomical connectivity via white matter tracts next to brain tissue properties. On the basis of probabilistic diffusion tractography we identified STN subregions with predominantly motor, associative, and limbic connectivity. We then computed for each of the nonoverlapping STN subregions the covariance between local brain tissue properties and the rest of the brain using high-resolution maps of magnetization transfer (MT) saturation and longitudinal (R1) and transverse relaxation rate (R2*). The demonstrated spatial distribution pattern of covariance between brain tissue properties linked to myelin (R1 and MT) and iron (R2*) content clearly segregates between motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits. We interpret the demonstrated covariance pattern as evidence for shared tissue properties within a functional circuit, which is closely linked to its function. Our findings open new possibilities for investigation of changes in the established covariance pattern aiming at accurate diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders and prediction of treatment outcome. PMID:24777915

  4. The Serendipity Case of the Pedunculopontine Nucleus Low-Frequency Brain Stimulation: Chasing a Gait Response, Finding Sleep, and Cognition Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Galati, Salvatore; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini – PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness. Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN) or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibers, influencing non-motor behaviors. PMID:23761781

  5. Morphological changes of glutamatergic synapses in animal models of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Mathai, Abraham; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the main entry doors for extrinsic inputs to reach the basal ganglia (BG) circuitry. The cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem are the key sources of glutamatergic inputs to these nuclei. There is anatomical, functional and neurochemical evidence that glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in the striatum and STN of animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and that these changes may contribute to aberrant network neuronal activity in the BG-thalamocortical circuitry. Postmortem studies of animal models and PD patients have revealed significant pathology of glutamatergic synapses, dendritic spines and microcircuits in the striatum of parkinsonians. More recent findings have also demonstrated a significant breakdown of the glutamatergic corticosubthalamic system in parkinsonian monkeys. In this review, we will discuss evidence for synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction and pathology of cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum and STN in models of PD. The potential functional implication of these alterations on synaptic integration, processing and transmission of extrinsic information through the BG circuits will be considered. Finally, the significance of these pathological changes in the pathophysiology of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD will be examined. PMID:26441550

  6. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson’s Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V.

    2016-01-01

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in “on” and “off” medication and “on” and “off” stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the “off” medication state. The “off” medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The “off” medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications. PMID:27983589

  7. Practical application of stereological methods in experimental kidney animal models.

    PubMed

    Fernández García, María Teresa; Núñez Martínez, Paula; García de la Fuente, Vanessa; Sánchez Pitiot, Marta; Muñiz Salgueiro, María Del Carmen; Perillán Méndez, Carmen; Argüelles Luis, Juan; Astudillo González, Aurora

    The kidneys are vital organs responsible for excretion, fluid and electrolyte balance and hormone production. The nephrons are the kidney's functional and structural units. The number, size and distribution of the nephron components contain relevant information on renal function. Stereology is a branch of morphometry that applies mathematical principles to obtain three-dimensional information from serial, parallel and equidistant two-dimensional microscopic sections. Because of the complexity of stereological studies and the lack of scientific literature on the subject, the aim of this paper is to clearly explain, through animal models, the basic concepts of stereology and how to calculate the main kidney stereological parameters that can be applied in future experimental studies.

  8. Pedunculopontine nucleus evoked potentials from subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Tsang, Eric; Mazzella, Filomena; Hamani, Clement; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Chen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the pedunculopontine nucleus area (PPNR) evoked activities were examined in two patients with Parkinson's disease. The patients had previously undergone bilateral STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) and subsequently received unilateral DBS electrodes in the PPNR. Evoked potentials were recorded from the local field potentials (LFP) from the PPNR with STN stimulation at different frequencies and bipolar contacts. Ipsilateral and contralateral short latency (<2ms) PPNR responses were evoked from left but not from right STN stimulation. In both patients, STN stimulation evoked contralateral PPNR responses at medium latencies between 41 and 45ms. Cortical evoked potentials to single pulse STN stimulation were observed at latencies between 18 and 27ms. These results demonstrate a functional connection between the STN and the PPNR. It likely involves direct projections between the STN and PPNR or polysynaptic pathways with thalamic or cortical relays.

  9. [Morphofunctional disturbances in kidneys of sturgeons and bony fishes of the Volga-Caspian reservoir under natural conditions].

    PubMed

    Romanov, Al A; Lepilina, I N; Romanov, An A

    2006-01-01

    By light microscopy, the morphofunctional state of mesonephros was studied for various sturgeons and bony fishes taken from natural waters. Different changes were recorded in structural-functional elements of nephrons of the mesonephros. The most frequent disturbances are hemorrhages in the intertubule tissue of kidneys, hyalinosis of vessel walls, swollen epithelium, inflammations. The revealed disturbances may be regarded as a response to negative environmental impacts.

  10. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  11. Role of renal sympathetic nerve activity in prenatal programming of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel

    2016-03-21

    Prenatal insults, such as maternal dietary protein deprivation and uteroplacental insufficiency, lead to small for gestational age (SGA) neonates. Epidemiological studies from many different parts of the world have shown that SGA neonates are at increased risk for hypertension and early death from cardiovascular disease as adults. Animal models, including prenatal administration of dexamethasone, uterine artery ligation and maternal dietary protein restriction, result in SGA neonates with fewer nephrons than controls. These models are discussed in this educational review, which provides evidence that prenatal insults lead to altered sodium transport in multiple nephron segments. The factors that could result in increased sodium transport are discussed, focusing on new information that there is increased renal sympathetic nerve activity that may be responsible for augmented renal tubular sodium transport. Renal denervation abrogates the hypertension in programmed rats but has no effect on control rats. Other potential factors that could cause hypertension in programmed rats, such as the renin-angiotensin system, are also discussed.

  12. Intrarenal plasma flow measurement noninvasively in man with 123-I orthoiodohippurate

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, K.E.; Nimmon, C.C.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The kidney has two populations of nephrons, cortical CN and juxtamedullary JMN. CN are the majority 85%, show autoregulation and have short loops of Henle; JMN have long loops of Henle. Disorders such as essential hypertension EHT and drugs are thought to have different effects on CN and JMN. A stochastic approach with a linear system model has been developed using I-123 orthoiodohippurate IOIH (2mCi) which tracer is taken up and proximally tubularly secreted by both CN and JNN in proportion to flow. In 12 normal volunteers Indoramin increased flow to CN by 17% whereas in 6 others Ibopamine reduced CN flow by 19% (p<0.05) but tended to increase JMN flow causing a water diuresis. The study shows that the two populations of nephrons should be considered separately in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of renal disorders.

  13. Expression of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene and its protein in normal human kidney.

    PubMed

    Ernest, S; Rajaraman, S; Megyesi, J; Bello-Reuss, E N

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the product of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene overexpressed in cancer cells, is present also in normal tissues. In the kidney, MDR1 Pgp has been found in the proximal tubule and in cultured mesangial cells. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the complete nephronal localization of MDR mRNA and its product, Pgp, in the human kidney. MDR mRNA expression was studied with the use of nonradioactive in situ MDR RNA probes. MDR1 Pgp was immunolocalized using the specific monoclonal antibody MRK16. The presence of MDR mRNA was confirmed in proximal tubules and mesangium, and demonstrated as well in thick limb of Henle's loops and in collecting ducts. MDR1 Pgp colocalized in the same nephronal segments. This suggests that, in addition to secreting xenobiotics, Pgp may play a role in the transport of endogenous substrates or in the regulation of Cl- channels.

  14. Effects of lead on the kidney: Roles of high-affinity lead-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A. ); DuVal, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Lead-induced nephropathy produces both tubular and interstitial manifestations of cell injury, but the pathophysiology of these lesions is not completely understood. Delineation of the molecular factors underlying renal handling of lead is one of central importance in understanding the mechanisms of renal cell injury from this agent. Recent studies from this laboratory have identified several distinct high-affinity lead-binding proteins (PbBP) from rat kidney and brain that appear to play critical roles in the intracellular bioavailability of lead to several essential cellular processes in these target tissues at low dose levels. These studies have also shown that the real PbBP is selectively localized in only certain nephrons and only specific segments of the renal proximal tubule. The striking nephron and cell-type specificity of the localization reaction could result from physoiological differences in nephron functional activity or selective molecular uptake mechanisms/metabolism differences that act to define target cell populations in the kidney. In addition, other preliminary studies have shown that short-term, high-dose lead exposure produces increased excretion of this protein into the urine with concomitant decreases in renal concentrations.

  15. Functional genetic targeting of embryonic kidney progenitor cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M Rita; Brändli, André W; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya; Vainio, Seppo J

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor-treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting.

  16. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow.

  17. Atlas of Cellular Dynamics during Zebrafish Adult Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a useful animal model to study the signaling pathways that orchestrate kidney regeneration, as its renal nephrons are simple, yet they maintain the biological complexity inherent to that of higher vertebrate organisms including mammals. Recent studies have suggested that administration of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in zebrafish mimics human acute kidney injury (AKI) through the induction of nephron damage, but the timing and details of critical phenotypic events associated with the regeneration process, particularly in existing nephrons, have not been characterized. Here, we mapped the temporal progression of cellular and molecular changes that occur during renal epithelial regeneration of the proximal tubule in the adult zebrafish using a platform of histological and expression analysis techniques. This work establishes the timing of renal cell death after gentamicin injury, identifies proliferative compartments within the kidney, and documents gene expression changes associated with the regenerative response of proliferating cells. These data provide an important descriptive atlas that documents the series of events that ensue after damage in the zebrafish kidney, thus availing a valuable resource for the scientific community that can facilitate the implementation of zebrafish research to delineate the mechanisms that control renal regeneration. PMID:26089919

  18. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  19. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  20. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  1. Biofeasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of bioremediation as a method for disposing of contaminants by exploiting natural biodegradation processes. The process of conducting a biofeasibility study and a case study are reviewed. (LZ)

  2. Cystometric study

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003904.htm Cystometric study To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystometric study measures the amount of fluid in the bladder ...

  3. Lack of anion effect on volume expansion natriuresis in the developing canine kidney.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, J M; Kleinman, L I; Disney, T A

    1986-10-01

    The renal response to volume expansion with sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate was studied in 15 newborn and 13 adult dogs. Proximal and distal nephron function were estimated using the technique of distal nephron blockade. Fractional sodium reabsorption was 99.0 +/- 0.3% in newborn and 96.6 +/- 0.06% in adult during the NaCl expansion (P less than 0.01) and 98.1 +/- 0.7% in the newborn and 93.2 +/- 0.7% in the adult during NaHCO3 expansion (P less than 0.001). With either anion the higher fractional sodium reabsorption in the newborn was due to reabsorption of a greater fraction of the load presented to the distal nephron segment. The percent of the distal sodium load that was reabsorbed was 98.0 +/- 0.6% in the newborn and 92.2 +/- 1.0% in the adult during NaCl expansion, and 96.1 +/- 1.3% in the newborn and 81.5 +/- 2.4% in the adult during NaHCO3 expansion. Differences in distal nephron chloride, potassium and bicarbonate reabsorption among the groups support the hypothesis that the enhanced distal sodium reabsorption in the newborn occurred largely in the ascending loop of Henle with NaCl expansion, while it occurred in the late distal and cortical collecting tubules with NaHCO3 expansion. There was no difference between the natriuretic responses to NaCl or NaHCO3 in the newborn (P greater than 0.20); however, the natriuretic response to NaCl was less than that to NaHCO3 in the adult (P less than 0.001). This suggests that the bulk of the sodium that escaped reabsorption in Henle's loop during NaHCO3 expansion was reabsorbed in the late distal tubule in the newborn, but not in the adult.

  4. Zeb1 Is a Potential Regulator of Six2 in the Proliferation, Apoptosis and Migration of Metanephric Mesenchyme Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuping; Zhao, Ya; Zhou, Yuru; Xie, Yajun; Ju, Pan; Long, Yaoshui; Liu, Jianing; Ni, Dongsheng; Cao, Fen; Lyu, Zhongshi; Mao, Zhaomin; Hao, Jin; Li, Yiman; Wan, Qianya; Kanyomse, Quist; Liu, Yamin; Ren, Die; Ning, Yating; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Qin; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Nephron progenitor cells surround around the ureteric bud tips (UB) and inductively interact with the UB to originate nephrons, the basic units of renal function. This process is determined by the internal balance between self-renewal and consumption of the nephron progenitor cells, which is depending on the complicated regulation networks. It has been reported that Zeb1 regulates the proliferation of mesenchymal cells in mouse embryos. However, the role of Zeb1 in nephrons generation is not clear, especially in metanephric mesenchyme (MM). Here, we detected cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in MM cells by EdU assay, flow cytometry assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Meanwhile, Western and RT-PCR were used to measure the expression level of Zeb1 and Six2 in MM cells and developing kidney. Besides, the dual-luciferase assay was conducted to study the molecular relationship between Zeb1 and Six2. We found that knock-down of Zeb1 decreased cell proliferation, migration and promoted cell apoptosis in MM cells and Zeb1 overexpression leaded to the opposite data. Western-blot and RT-PCR results showed that knock-down of Zeb1 decreased the expression of Six2 in MM cells and Zeb1 overexpression contributed to the opposite results. Similarly, Zeb1 promoted Six2 promoter reporter activity in luciferase assays. However, double knock-down of Zeb1 and Six2 did not enhance the apoptosis of MM cells compared with control cells. Nevertheless, double silence of Zeb1 and Six2 repressed cell proliferation. In addition, we also found that Zeb1 and Six2 had an identical pattern in distinct developing phases of embryonic kidney. These results indicated that there may exist a complicated regulation network between Six2 and Zeb1. Together, we demonstrate Zeb1 promotes proliferation and apoptosis and inhibits the migration of MM cells, in association with Six2. PMID:27509493

  5. Intelligence Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To make an academic study of matters inherently secret and potentially explosive seems a tall task. But a growing number of scholars are drawn to understanding spycraft. The interdisciplinary field of intelligence studies is mushrooming, as scholars trained in history, international studies, and political science examine such subjects as the…

  6. Religious Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Kathryn, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    An essay on the study of religion at the college level and descriptions of nine programs of religious studies are presented. The essay by David C. Smith suggests that while traditional goals continue to be important, especially in church-related colleges, religious studies has expanded to include insights and materials from such disciplines as…

  7. College Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Sherrie L.; Simpson, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Notes that many students enter postsecondary institutions unprepared to meet the studying demands placed on them. Examines models and taxonomies that have guided researchers as they have investigated studying. Reviews research factors related to studying at the college level: course characteristics, learner characteristics, and learning…

  8. Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Edward

    The product of a Special Studies Institute, this teacher developed resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents social study concepts and activities relative to education in the urban out-of-doors. Focus is on the study of man (past, present, and future) interacting with his environment. Listed below are activity examples: (1)…

  9. Deep brain stimulation of pallidal versus subthalamic for patients with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Wenbin; Huang, Yongmin; Qiu, Zhihai; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects many people every year. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective nonpharmacological method to treat PD motor symptoms. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS versus globus pallidus internus (GPi)-DBS in treating advanced PD. Methods Controlled clinical trials that compared STN-DBS to GPi-DBS for short-term treatment of PD in adults were researched up to November 2015. The primary outcomes were the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Section (UPDRS) III score and the levodopa-equivalent dosage (LED) after DBS. The secondary outcomes were the UPDRS II score and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Results Totally, 13 studies containing 1,148 PD patients were included in this meta-analysis to compare STN-DBS versus GPi-DBS. During the off-medication state, the pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) of UPDRS III and II scores were −2.18 (95% CI =−5.11 to 0.74) and −1.96 (95% CI =−3.84 to −0.08), respectively. During the on-medication state, the pooled WMD of UPDRS III and II scores were 0.15 (95% CI =−1.14 to 1.44) and 1.01 (95% CI =0.12 to 1.89), respectively. After DBS, the pooled WMD of LED and BDI were −254.48 (95% CI =−341.66) and 2.29 (95% CI =0.83 to 3.75), respectively. Conclusion These results indicate that during the off-medication state, the STN-DBS might be superior to GPi-DBS in improving the motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients; but during the on-medication state, the opposite result is observed. Meanwhile, the STN-DBS is superior at reducing the LED, whereas the GPi-DBS shows a significantly greater reduction in BDI score after DBS. PMID:27382286

  10. Disynaptic Subthalamic Input to the Posterior Cerebellum in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jwair, Saad; Coulon, Patrice; Ruigrok, Tom J. H.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, the interplay between basal ganglia and cerebellar functions has been increasingly advocated to explain their joint operation in both normal and pathological conditions. Yet, insight into the neuroanatomical basis of this interplay between both subcortical structures remains sparse and is mainly derived from work in primates. Here, in rodents, we have studied the existence of a potential disynaptic connection between the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the cerebellar cortex as has been demonstrated earlier for the primate. A mixture of unmodified rabies virus (RABV: CVS 11) and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTb) was injected at places in the posterior cerebellar cortex of nine rats. The survival time was chosen to allow for disynaptic retrograde transneuronal infection of RABV. We examined the STN for neurons infected with RABV in all nine cases and related the results with the location of the RABV/CTb injection site, which ranged from the vermis of lobule VII, to the paravermis and hemispheres of the paramedian lobule and crus 2a. We found that cases with injection sites in the vermis of lobule VII showed prominent RABV labeling in the STN. In contrast, almost no subthalamic labeling was noted in cases with paravermal or hemispheral injection sites. We show circumstantial evidence that not only the pontine nuclei but also the pedunculotegmental nucleus may act as the intermediary in the connection from STN to cerebellar cortex. This finding implies that in the rat the STN links disynaptically to the vermal part of lobule VII of the cerebellar cortex, without any major involvement of the cerebellar areas that are linked to sensorimotor functions. As vermal lobule VII recently has been shown to process disynaptic input from the retrosplenial and orbitofrontal cortices, we hypothesize that in the rat the subthalamic input to cerebellar function might be used to influence more prominently non-motor functions of the cerebellum than motor functions. This

  11. Disynaptic Subthalamic Input to the Posterior Cerebellum in Rat.

    PubMed

    Jwair, Saad; Coulon, Patrice; Ruigrok, Tom J H

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, the interplay between basal ganglia and cerebellar functions has been increasingly advocated to explain their joint operation in both normal and pathological conditions. Yet, insight into the neuroanatomical basis of this interplay between both subcortical structures remains sparse and is mainly derived from work in primates. Here, in rodents, we have studied the existence of a potential disynaptic connection between the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the cerebellar cortex as has been demonstrated earlier for the primate. A mixture of unmodified rabies virus (RABV: CVS 11) and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTb) was injected at places in the posterior cerebellar cortex of nine rats. The survival time was chosen to allow for disynaptic retrograde transneuronal infection of RABV. We examined the STN for neurons infected with RABV in all nine cases and related the results with the location of the RABV/CTb injection site, which ranged from the vermis of lobule VII, to the paravermis and hemispheres of the paramedian lobule and crus 2a. We found that cases with injection sites in the vermis of lobule VII showed prominent RABV labeling in the STN. In contrast, almost no subthalamic labeling was noted in cases with paravermal or hemispheral injection sites. We show circumstantial evidence that not only the pontine nuclei but also the pedunculotegmental nucleus may act as the intermediary in the connection from STN to cerebellar cortex. This finding implies that in the rat the STN links disynaptically to the vermal part of lobule VII of the cerebellar cortex, without any major involvement of the cerebellar areas that are linked to sensorimotor functions. As vermal lobule VII recently has been shown to process disynaptic input from the retrosplenial and orbitofrontal cortices, we hypothesize that in the rat the subthalamic input to cerebellar function might be used to influence more prominently non-motor functions of the cerebellum than motor functions. This

  12. Twist relates to tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition and interstitial fibrogenesis in the obstructed kidney.

    PubMed

    Kida, Yujiro; Asahina, Kinji; Teraoka, Hirobumi; Gitelman, Inna; Sato, Tetsuji

    2007-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical step in renal fibrosis. It has been recently reported that a transcription factor, Twist, plays a pivotal role in metastasis of breast tumors by inducing EMT. In this study, we examined whether Twist relates to renal fibrogenesis including EMT of tubular epithelia, evaluating Twist expression level in the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. Kidneys of mice subjected to UUO were harvested 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after obstruction. Compared with control kidneys, Twist mRNA-level significantly increased 3 days after UUO (UUO day 3 kidney) and further augmented until 10 days after UUO. Twist expression increased in tubular epithelia of the dilated tubules and the expanded interstitial areas of UUO kidneys, where cell-proliferating appearances were frequently found in a time-dependent manner. Although a part of tubular cells in whole nephron segment were immunopositive for Twist in UUO day 7 kidneys, tubular epithelia downstream of nephron more frequently expressed Twist than upstream of nephron. In UUO day 7 kidneys, some tubular epithelia were confirmed to coexpress Twist and fibroblast-specific protein-1, a marker for EMT, indicating that Twist is involved in tubular EMT under pathological state. Twist was expressed also in a number of alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts located in the expanded interstitial area of UUO kidneys. From these findings, the present investigation suggests that Twist is associated with tubular EMT, proliferation of myofibroblasts, and subsequent renal fibrosis in obstructed kidneys.

  13. A qualitative analysis of the kidney structure of Meliphagid honeyeaters from wet and arid environments.

    PubMed

    Casotti, G; Richardson, K C

    1993-04-01

    The qualitative ultrastructural renal anatomy was examined in 4 species of honeyeater (parvorder Corvi) inhabiting 2 distinctly different environments. The kidneys of the wet zone New Holland honeyeater Phylidonyris novaehollandiae and little wattlebird Anthochaera lunulata were compared with those of the arid zone white-fronted honeyeater Phylidonyris albifrons and spiny-cheeked honeyeater Acanthogenys rufogularis. The size and structure of glomeruli were similar between species. In all species, except in P. novaehollandiae, the proximal tubule cells contained wide intercellular spaces filled with basolateral cell membrane interdigitations. Medullary nephron tubules were arranged in a sequential manner in all species. Thick and thin limbs of Henle were separated by the collecting ducts and extended the entire length of the medulla, a situation not found in muscicapid passerines. This tubular arrangement is not entirely consistent with the proposed single-effect countercurrent multiplier theory. The thin limb of Henle consisted of only one epithelium type, which had wide intercellular spaces. The thick limb of Henle consisted of 2 types of epithelial cells, each having narrow intercellular spaces, but with varying degrees of cell membrane infoldings. The ultrastructural morphology of the limbs of Henle in honeyeaters differed from those of muscicapid passerines. The ultrastructure of the distal nephron was similar in each species studied. All of the above nephron characteristics are considered to enable honeyeaters to absorb a large proportion of solutes and water from the glomerular filtrate.

  14. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgiades, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults. Nephron sparing resection (partial nephrectomy) has been the “gold standard” for the treatment of resectable disease. With the widespread use of cross sectional imaging techniques, more cases of renal cell cancers are detected at an early stage, i.e. stage 1A or 1B. This has provided an impetus for expanding the nephron sparing options and especially, percutaneous ablative techniques. Percutaneous ablation for RCC is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection or when there is a need to preserve renal function due to comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. During the last few years, percutaneous cryoablation has been gaining acceptance as a curative treatment option for small renal cancers. Clinical studies to date indicate that cryoablation is a safe and effective therapeutic method with acceptable short and long term outcomes and with a low risk, in the appropriate setting. In addition it seems to offer some advantages over radio frequency ablation (RFA) and other thermal ablation techniques for renal masses.

  15. Aerosal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Various methods of measuring aerosols were studied in terms of the best methods to use, the instruments or techniques actually employed, and those techniques applied in field measurements on air quality as influenced by rocket launch effluents, and in an urban environment. Further studies were initiated on the remote sensing of aerosols by satellites and the influence of aerosols on visibility. The characterization of aerosols by measurement of scattered light was studied on Mie theory calculations.

  16. Studying Zooarchaeology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Molly; Wolf, Deborah; Butler, Virginia L.

    2012-01-01

    Children often associate the study of bones with dinosaurs or crime scenes. This unit introduces students to "zooarchaeology," the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Students in grades 3-5 engage in hands-on activities examining bones, shells, and other "hard parts" of animals. They use their observations as a starting point for…

  17. Study Carrels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Information on various study carrels to provide individualized learning space for training use is presented. It is noted that carrels may be standard models or customized, and most are wired for audiovisual equipment. A list of study carrel suppliers and manufacturers is included. (MF)

  18. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    This manual provides teachers with some knowledge of ecological study methods and techniques used in collecting data when plants and animals are studied in the field. Most activities deal with the interrelatedness of plant and animal life to the structure and characteristics of a stream and pond. Also included in this unit plan designed for the…

  19. Bird Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Margaret

    1978-01-01

    Excerpts from a first grade teacher's diary describe bird study activities done by the class over a two week period. Each student studied a bird of their choice in detail and made a papier-mache model of the bird. These models were exhibited at a student initiated program for visitors. (MA)

  20. Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.; Davis, Hazel K., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The 16 articles in this journal issue deal with women's studies within the English curriculum. Topics discussed in the articles include (1) the feminist challenge to the male-centered curriculum in higher education; (2) the women's movement and women's studies; (3) connotations of the word "girl"; (4) women in English education; (5) the new…

  1. Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Cam, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on social studies instruction and technology: (1) "Waking the Sleeping Giant: Social Studies Teacher Educators Collaborate To Integrate Technology into Methods' Courses" (Cheryl Mason, Marsha Alibrandi, Michael Berson, Kara Dawson, Rich Diem, Tony Dralle, David Hicks, Tim Keiper, and John Lee);…

  2. Mucin-associated sialosyl-Tn antigen expression in gastric cancer correlates with an adverse outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Werther, J. L.; Rivera-MacMurray, S.; Bruckner, H.; Tatematsu, M.; Itzkowitz, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of sialosyl-Tn (STn) antigen was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in primary gastric cancers. Twenty-one of 31 (68%) gastric cancers expressed STn, regardless of tumour location, stage or histological type. Eighty-one per cent of patients with STn-positive tumours died of their disease or had recurrent cancer, compared with 20% of patients with STn-negative tumours (P < 0.002). STn may be a useful prognostic marker in patients with gastric cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8123499

  3. Culture Studies: Hawaiian Studies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazama, Dorothy, Ed.

    Reports and materials from the Hawaiian Studies Project are presented. The document, designed for elementary school teachers contains two major sections. The first section describes the planning phase of the project, the Summer Institute for Hawaiian Culture Studies (1976) and the follow-up workshops and consultant help (1976-77). The appendix to…

  4. Eukaliuric diuresis and natriuresis in response to the KATP channel blocker U37883A: micropuncture studies on the tubular site of action.

    PubMed

    Huang, D Y; Osswald, H; Vallon, V

    1999-08-01

    1. Systemic application of U37883A, a blocker of ATP sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, elicits diuresis and natriuresis without significantly altering urinary potassium excretion. 2. To elucidate tubular sites of action upstream to the distal nephron, micropuncture experiments were performed in nephrons with superficial glomeruli of anaesthetized Munich-Wistar-Frömter rats during systemic application of U37883A (1, 5 or 15 mg kg-1 i.v.). 3. The observed eukaliuric diuresis and natriuresis in response to U37883A at 15 mg kg-1 was accompanied by an increase in early distal tubular flow rate (VED) from 10 - 18 nl min(-1) reflecting a reduction in fractional reabsorption of fluid up to this site (FR-fluid) of 13%. The latter proposed an effect on water-permeable segments such as the proximal tubule which could fully account for the observed reduction in fractional reabsorption of Na+ up to the early distal tubule (FR-Na+) of 8% and the increase in early distal tubular Na+ concentration ([Na+]ED) from 35 - 51 mM whereas [K+]ED was left unaltered. 4. In comparison, furosemide (3 mg kg-1 i.v.), which acts in the water-impermeable thick ascending limb, elicited diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis which were associated with a fall in FR-Na+ of 10% with no change in FR-fluid, and a rise in [Na+]ED from 42 - 117 mM and [K+]ED from 1.2 - 5.7 mM with no change in VED. 5. Direct late proximal tubular fluid collections confirmed a significant inhibition of fluid reabsorption in proximal convoluted tubule in response to systemic application of U37883A. 6. These findings suggest that the diuretic and natriuretic effect upstream to the distal tubule in response to systemic application of U37883A involves actions on water-permeable segments such as the proximal convoluted tubule.

  5. Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Background: Action Research about my 2nd grade classroom in the Buffalo School District. I examined three areas of interest and tried to find some conclusions related to behavior management. Purpose: The purpose of this study is how will implementing procedures, rules, and consequences help improve student behavior. Research Design: Descriptive;…

  6. MEDIEVAL STUDIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARTONFFY, ANDREA PONTECORVO; AND OTHERS

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES IS PRESENTED, INCLUDING TEACHER MATERIALS AND STUDENT PROBLEM SETS. THE TEACHER MATERIALS DESCRIBE AND EXPLAIN THE ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND POLITICAL ASPECTS OF MANORIAL LIFE--THE PREDOMINANT FORM OF AGRICULTURAL LIFE IN NORTHERN FRANCE, ENGLAND, AND GERMANY DURING THE PERIOD FROM APPROXIMATELY 800 TO 1300 A.D.…

  7. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  8. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1956-01-01

    The first portion of this study describes in detail the different aspects of stool examinations, including the collection, preservation, and pooling of specimens, macroscopic and bacterioscopic examination, enrichment methods, and cultivation on a variety of solid media. The author also deals with the examination of vomits and of water. The performance and value of different identification tests (agglutination, haemolysis, and bacteriophage) and confirmatory tests are then considered. An annex is included on bacteriological procedures in the laboratory diagnosis of cholera. PMID:13356145

  9. Thalidomide study.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary findings from a study on the effects of thalidomide on HIV-related wasting syndrome are encouraging. The study shows that at least half of the weight gained by participants was in the form of lean body mass. Side effects included declines in neutrophil counts and pain or tingling in the hands and/or feet. A 0.3 log increase in viral load and no decrease in TNF-alpha levels were also noted. Celgene, the manufacturer of thalidomide, has streamlined an expanded access program and fully covers the cost of the drug for people who qualify for the program. (A phone number is provided for more information.) Additionally, the company is studying the benefits of thalidomide treatment for oral and esophageal aphthous ulcers. Results from the use of three different doses following four weeks will be compared, after which patients will be randomly assigned to either a placebo or thalidomide to determine its ability to prevent a relapse. Because of thalidomide's connection to serious birth defects, it is important that men and women engaging in reproductive sex use precautions to prevent pregnancy.

  10. Anticorrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1986-01-01

    The aging behavior of chemically bonded interfaces between metals and pottants, such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) was studied using the Dow Corning primer systems. It was observed that the primers seem to function as anticorrosive agents on metal surfaces. It was demonstrated that EVA, and the A-11861 EVA/glass primer stops corrosion of the aluminum used on the back surfaces of crystalline silicon solar cells. However, this same treatment does not work for the aluminum on the back surfaces of amorphous silicon solar cells.

  11. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Pollitzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    In this study, figures relating to cholera deaths occurring in individual countries, from 1900 to 1952, are recorded as well as the incidence of the disease from 1923 up to the present time. The mode of spread of cholera from its endemic home in India to outside countries is described in relation to favourable seasons, main routes followed by the infection, and the role played by large religious gatherings. The incidence of the disease in the various seaports infected within recent years is discussed. PMID:14364186

  12. Plague studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1953-01-01

    In examining the control and prevention of plague, the author pays particular attention to the control of commensal rodents and their fleas. The various rat poisons in current use, their efficacy and practical application, and the dangers involved in their manipulation are described in great detail. The author also discusses other anti-rodent measures such as fumigation, rat-proofing, sanitation, protection of food, etc. The second part of the study deals with: vector control—the outstanding value of DDT application in rodent-flea control is emphasized—, the direct control of bubonic and pneumonic plague, and the control of the spread of plague at a distance. PMID:20603968

  13. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    Discussing the symptomatology of cholera, the author deals first with the incubation period, the clinical types, choleraic diarrhoea, and cholerine; he then considers in detail the various stages of cholera gravis and the relapses and complications that may be met. This is followed by sections on diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and on prognosis and the various factors influencing it. The author's highly detailed review of the treatment of cholera which concludes this study is divided into three parts, dealing with attempts at specific therapy, with infusion treatment, and with adjuvant treatment. PMID:13426761

  14. Plague studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1953-01-01

    Epidemiological aspects of (a) bubonic plague and (b) primary pneumonic plague are discussed separately in this study. The cause, spread, and persistence of bubonic outbreaks are dealt with. In the case of primary pneumonic plague, the author systematically reviews the factors influencing the spread of the disease: climatic and social conditions, infectivity of the patients, immunity, and control measures. In discussing the cause of pneumonic plague outbreaks, the author deals with the possible influence of a special virulence of pneumonic strains, the role of the rodent and flea species involved, and the possibility of a pneumotropismus acquired by Pasteurella pestis. The periodicity (cyclical and secular) of bubonic plague epidemics is discussed with a view to the possible forecasting of future epidemics. The author indicates the influence of race, age, sex, and occupation on the incidence of both forms of the disease. PMID:13082391

  15. Nutritional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed metabolic studies were conducted of the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 flight crews, and the results are presented in tabular form. Intake and absorption data are also included. Apollo nutrient intakes were found to be characteristically hypocaloric. Estimates of body composition changes from metabolic balance data, from preflight and postflight weights and volumes, and from total body water and potassium provide no evidence for diminished caloric requirements during a flight. As observed during the Gemini Program and during periods of bed rest, measurements of bone density and metabolic balance confirm a tendency toward loss of skeletal tissue in weightlessness. No evidence exists that any inflight metabolic anomaly, including hypokalemia, was induced by marginal or deficient nutrient intakes. In general, the Apollo crewmen were well nourished and exhibited normal gastroenterological functions, although appetite was somewhat diminished and the organoleptic response to food was somewhat modified during flight.

  16. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    The first section of this study deals with areas where cholera is endemic and with the conditions normally favouring endemicity. Turning next to epidemics, the author discusses their origin and types, climatic influences on them, their periodicity and the possibility of forecasting them, the role played in them by different serological races of V. cholerae, and the causes of their decline. In a section on the factors governing the local spread of cholera, he considers contact and water-borne infection; the role of contaminated food and drink, of fomites, of flies, and of carriers; and the incidence according to sex, age, race, and occupation. The last part deals with factors governing the spread of cholera over longer distances, and includes discussion of the effect of movements of individuals and groups and of assemblies of the population on pilgrimages or at religious festivals. PMID:13472431

  17. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    In discussing prevention, the author deals first with the provision of permanently safe water, supplied from waterworks or wells, and with other improvements in environmental sanitation. Control of food and drinks, public health propaganda and education, and vaccination are also considered under this heading. The greater part of this study is devoted to suppressive measures, affecting the individual, the environment, and persons in the mass. Discussion of the isolation, detection and management of cholera patients, the management of contacts, and the management and treatment of carriers is followed by sections on, inter alia, disinfection, temporary improvements in water supplies, fly control, and personal prophylaxis. In dealing with mass prophylaxis, the author pays particular attention to vaccination. In the concluding sections he goes into the control of pilgrimages and local and international quarantine measures. PMID:13479774

  18. Plague studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1953-01-01

    The author examines in detail the symptomatology, diagnosis, and treatment of plague, and outlines the problem of the length of the incubation period. The clinical features commonly met with in all severely-affected plague patients, regardless of the primary localization of the infection, are described. The author then deals with the symptomatology and manifestations of bubonic plague as compared to those of primary pneumonic plague. The importance of a clinical diagnosis, from the point of view of prevention, is stressed, and the differential diagnosis of various forms of the disease is described. The study contains a detailed discussion of the respective merits of antibiotic treatment, serotherapy, and sulfonamide treatment. The author points out that the outstanding success of streptomycin and some other antibiotics will probably relegate the sulfonamides to the second rank in the treatment of bubonic plague. PMID:13082390

  19. [EPINETAC study].

    PubMed

    Hernández Navarrete, Ma Jesús; Arribas Llorente, José Luis; Misiego Peral, Antonio; Guillamón, Inmaculada

    2006-02-01

    Daily, health professionals face biological risks, which have important repercussions for their own health, while performing their professional duties. A system which records data that quantifies and specifies the causes of work place accidents, the instruments most frequently involved in accidents, the professional categories having the greatest exposure, the tasks most at risk and the types of lesions is fundamental in order to grasp the true dimensions of these problems related to accidents and serum-borne disease transmission. Such a data base-could lead to the necessity, and highlight the importance, to increase preventive and protective measures for health personnel. To meet this objective, the EPINETAC project has been developed thanks to the information provided by 106 centers having various degrees of participation during the different years this study has taken.

  20. Systems Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  1. Studying toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  2. Modulation of nutritional state in Parkinsonian patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joana; Matos, Eduarda; Rosas, Maria José; Vieira-Coelho, Augusta; Borges, Nuno; Correia, Flora; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2009-12-01

    Chronic bilateral subthalamic stimulation (DBS-STN) provides considerable clinical benefits in Parkinson disease patients, with improvement in primary symptoms and resolution of side effects of chronic pharmacological treatment. Apart from its therapeutic effects on PD symptoms, DBS-STN also appears to induce weight gain, which may itself induce critical metabolic disorders and limit the benefits of surgery. No data are available in literature showing the efficacy of a nutritional intervention to prevent rapid and/or excessive weight gain after DBSSTN. Fifty-seven PD patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised 16 patients with a nutritional intervention immediately after surgery (1 week after); Group 2 comprised 41 patients with a nutritional intervention in a later period after surgery (mean time of 2.5 ± 1.6 years). Weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage of fat mass, levodopa daily dose (LDD) and part III of the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) were studied before and after an individualized and structured nutritional intervention. Three months after nutritional intervention, Group 1 had a mean BMI (24.1 ± 2.99), that was not significantly different (p = 0.114) from BMI before intervention, with stability of the weight and in percentage of fat mass. In Group 2 all the patients gained weight, reaching to 13.17 ± 10%; a total of 63% of patients became overweight (BMI 25 kg/m(2)). Three months after nutritional intervention, Group 2 had a mean BMI (24.80 ± 2.45) that was significantly (p = 0.03) different from BMI before intervention (26.75 ± 2.99), although percentage of fat mass was higher in women. With this study, we have conclude that nutritional intervention adequate to patient-age, disease characteristics, medical therapy with L-dopa and physical activity, is effective incontrolling weight after DBS-STN surgery.

  3. Prior pallidotomy reduces and modifies neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, A; Moran, A; Marjan, G; Bergman, H; Israel, Z

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with prior radio-frequency lesions in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi, pallidotomy), whose symptoms have deteriorated, may be candidates for further invasive treatment such as subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). Six patients with prior pallidotomy (five unilaterally; one bilaterally) underwent bilateral STN DBS. The microelectrode recordings (MERs, used intraoperatively for STN verification), ipsilateral and contralateral to pallidotomy, and MERs from 11 matched PD patients who underwent bilateral STN DBS without prior pallidotomy were compared. For each trajectory, average, variance and mean successive difference (MSD, a measure of irregularity) of the root mean square (RMS) of the STN MER were calculated. The RMS in trajectories ipsilateral to pallidotomy showed significant reduction of the mean average and MSD of STN activity when compared with trajectories from patients without prior pallidotomy. The RMS parameters contralateral to pallidotomy tend to lie between those ipsilateral to pallidotomy and those without prior pallidotomy. The average STN power spectral density of oscillatory activity was notably lower ipsilateral to pallidotomy than contralateral, or without prior pallidotomy. The finding that pallidotomy reduces STN activity and changes firing characteristics, in conjunction with the effectiveness of STN DBS despite prior pallidotomy, calls for reappraisal and modification of the current model of the basal ganglia (BG) cortical network. It highlights the critical role of direct projections from the BG to brain-stem structures and suggests a possible GPi-STN reciprocal positive-feedback mechanism.

  4. Target Selection Recommendations Based on Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries on Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Lin; Sperry, Laura; Olichney, John; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Chang, Norika Malhado; Liu, Ying; Wang, Su-Ping; Wang, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) has extensive impact on nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to September, 2015, using various search terms and their combinations including PD, NMSs, DBS, globus pallidus internus (GPi), subthalamic nucleus (STN), and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus. Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals on impacts of DBS on neuropsychological profiles, sensory function, autonomic symptoms, weight changes, and sleep disturbances. For psychological symptoms and cognitive impairment, we tried to use more reliable proofs: Random, control, multicenter, large sample sizes, and long period follow-up clinical studies. We categorized the NMSs into four groups: those that would improve definitively following DBS; those that are not significantly affected by DBS; those that remain controversial on their surgical benefit; and those that can be worsened by DBS. Results: In general, it seems to be an overall beneficial effect of DBS on NMSs, such as sensory, sleep, gastrointestinal, sweating, cardiovascular, odor, urological symptoms, and sexual dysfunction, GPi-DBS may produce similar results; Both STN and Gpi-DBS are safe with regard to cognition and psychology over long-term follow-up, though verbal fluency decline is related to DBS; The impact of DBS on behavioral addictions and dysphagia is still uncertain. Conclusions: As the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS are similar, NMSs may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients. PMID:26668154

  5. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    PubMed

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Recent Trends and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    FUKAYA, Chikashi; YAMAMOTO, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has already been performed on more than 120,000 patients worldwide and in more than 7,000 patients in Japan. However, fundamental understanding of DBS effects on the pathological neural circuitry remains insufficient. Recent studies have specifically shown the importance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loops, which were identified as functionally and anatomically discrete units. Three main circuits exist in the CSTC loops, namely, the motor, associative, and limbic circuits. From these theoretical backgrounds, it is determined that DBS sometimes influences not only motor functions but also the cognitive and affective functions of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The main targets of DBS for PD are subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi). Ventralis intermedius (Vim)-DBS was found to be effective in improving tremor. However, Vim-DBS cannot sufficiently improve akinesia and rigidity. Therefore, Vim-DBS is seldom carried out for the treatment of PD. In this article, we review the present state of DBS, mainly STN-DBS and GPi-DBS, for PD. In the first part of the article, appropriate indications and practical effects established in previous studies are discussed. The findings of previous investigations on the complications caused by the surgical procedure and on the adverse events induced by DBS itself are reviewed. In the second part, we discuss target selection (GPi vs. STN) and the effect of DBS on nonmotor symptoms. In the final part, as issues that should be resolved, the suitable timing of surgery, symptoms unresponsive to DBS such as on-period axial symptoms, and the related postoperative programing of stimulation parameters, are discussed. PMID:25925761

  7. Local field potential recordings in a non-human primate model of Parkinsons disease using the Activa PC + S neurostimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Allison T.; Muralidharan, Abirami; Hendrix, Claudia; Johnson, Luke; Gupta, Rahul; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; Baker, Kenneth B.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Using the Medtronic Activa® PC + S system, this study investigated how passive joint manipulation, reaching behavior, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) modulate local field potential (LFP) activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus (GP). Approach. Five non-human primates were implanted unilaterally with one or more DBS leads. LFPs were collected in montage recordings during resting state conditions and during motor tasks that facilitate the expression of parkinsonian motor signs. These recordings were made in the naïve state in one subject, in the parkinsonian state in two subjects, and in both naïve and parkinsonian states in two subjects. Main results. LFPs measured at rest were consistent over time for a given recording location and parkinsonian state in a given subject; however, LFPs were highly variable between subjects, between and within recording locations, and across parkinsonian states. LFPs in both naïve and parkinsonian states across all recorded nuclei contained a spectral peak in the beta band (10-30 Hz). Moreover, the spectral content of recorded LFPs was modulated by passive and active movement of the subjects’ limbs. LFPs recorded during a cued-reaching task displayed task-related beta desynchronization in STN and GP. The bidirectional capabilities of the Activa® PC + S also allowed for recording LFPs while delivering DBS. The therapeutic effect of STN DBS on parkinsonian rigidity outlasted stimulation for 30-60 s, but there was no correlation with beta band power. Significance. This study emphasizes (1) the variability in spontaneous LFPs amongst subjects and (2) the value of using the Activa® PC + S system to record neural data in the context of behavioral tasks that allow one to evaluate a subject’s symptomatology.