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Sample records for nerve constriction injury

  1. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model.

  2. Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Rat Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duo-Yi; Meng, Lan; Ji, Nan; Luo, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI). Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL). Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy. Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000). In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group. Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP. PMID:25673460

  3. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  4. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3-0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response.

  5. Ameliorative potential of Vernonia cinerea on chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Venkata R K; Shanmugam, Palanichamy; Krishnan, Uma M; Muthuraman, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the ameliorative potential of ethanolic extract of whole plant of Vernonia cinerea in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats. Behavioral parameters such as a hot plate, acetone drop, paw pressure, Von Frey hair and tail immersion tests were performed to assess the degree of thermal, chemical and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. Biochemical changes in sciatic nerve tissue were ruled out by estimating thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and total calcium levels. Ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea and pregabalin were administered for 14 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. CCI of sciatic nerve has been shown to induce significant changes in behavioral, biochemical and histopathological assessments when compared to the sham control group. Vernonia cinerea attenuated in a dose dependent manner the above pathological changes induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve, which is similar to attenuation of the pregabalin pretreated group. The ameliorating effect of ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea against CCI of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain may be due to the presence of flavonoids and this effect is attributed to anti-oxidative, neuroprotective and calcium channel modulator actions of these compounds.

  6. Operant behavioral responses to orofacial cold stimuli in rats with chronic constrictive trigeminal nerve injury: effects of menthol and capsazepine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both spinal and trigeminal somatosensory systems use the TRPM8 channel as a principal transducer for detecting cold stimuli. It is currently unclear whether this cold transducer may play a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain manifesting cold allodynia and hyperalgesia. In the present study, trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive nerve injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI). Behavioral responses to cold stimuli in orofacial regions were assessed by the newly developed orofacial operant test in the ION-CCI rats. We tested menthol and capsazepine, two compounds that can activate and inhibit TRPM8 respectively, on orofacial operant responses to cold stimuli in ION-CCI rats. Testing animals performed operant tasks by voluntarily contacting their orofacial regions to a cold stimulation module in order to access sweetened milk as a reward, and contact time and number of the operant behaviors were automatically recorded. Total contact time was significantly reduced at the cooling temperatures of 17°C and 12°C in ION-CCI group in comparison with sham group, indicating the presence of cold allodynia and hyperalgesia in ION-CCI rats. When menthol was administered to ION-CCI rats, total contact time was further reduced and total contact number increased at the cooling temperatures. In contrast, after administration of capsazepine to ION-CCI rats, total contact time was significantly increased at the cooling temperatures. The behavioral outcomes support the idea that TRPM8 plays a role in cold allodynia and hyperalgesia following chronic trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:23767981

  7. Systemic administration of vitamins C and E attenuates nociception induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Ana Paula K; de Souza, Jéssica A; Santos, Maria do Carmo Q; Horst, Andréa; Scheid, Taína; Kolberg, Carolina; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Partata, Wania A

    2016-03-01

    Antioxidants have been tested to treat neuropathic pain, and α-Tocopherol (vitamin E--vit. E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C--vit. C) are potent antioxidants. We assessed the effect of intraperitoneal administration of vit. C (30 mg/kg/day) and vit. E (15 mg/kg/day), given alone or in combination, on the mechanical and thermal thresholds and the sciatic functional index (SFI) in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. We also determined the lipid hydroperoxides and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the injured sciatic nerve. Further, we assessed the effects of oral administration of vit. C+vit. E (vit. C+E) and of a combination of vit. C+E and gabapentin (100mg/kg/day, i.p.) on the mechanical and thermal thresholds of CCI rats. The vitamins, whether administered orally or i.p., attenuated the reductions in the mechanical and thermal thresholds induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effect was greater with a combination of vit. C+E than with each vitamin given alone. The SFI was also improved in vitamin-treated CCI rats. Co-administration of vit. C+E and gabapentin induced a greater antinociceptive effect than gabapentin alone. No significant change occurred in TAC and lipid hydroperoxide levels, but TAC increased (45%) while lipid hydroperoxides decreased (38%) in the sciatic nerve from vit. C+E-treated CCI rats. Thus, treatment with a combination of vit. C+E was more effective to treat CCI-induced neuropathic pain than vitamins alone, and the antinociceptive effect was greater with co-administration of vit. C+E and gabapentin than with gabapentin alone.

  8. Analgesic effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashish K; Bhati, Yogendra; Tripathi, Chakra D; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-08-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, management of neuropathic pain remains unsatisfactory. Piracetam is a prototype of nootropic drugs, used to improve cognitive impairment. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Neuropathic pain was induced by the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Following this, piracetam was intraperitoneally administered for 2 weeks in doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, and pain was assessed by employing the behavioural tests for thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate and tail flick tests) and cold allodynia (acetone test). After the induction of neuropathic pain, significant development of thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia was observed. The administration of piracetam (50 mg/kg) did not have any significant effect on all the behavioural tests. Further, piracetam (100 mg/kg) also had no effect on the hot plate and tail flick tests; however it significantly decreased the paw withdrawal duration in the acetone test. Piracetam in a dose of 200 mg/kg significantly modulated neuropathic pain as observed from the increased hot plate and tail flick latencies, and decreased paw withdrawal duration (in acetone test). Therefore, the present study suggests the potential use of piracetam in the treatment of neuropathic pain, which merits further clinical investigation.

  9. Ameliorative potential of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril) on chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parneet; Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of ramipril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) on the chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in mice. The neuropathic pain was induced by four loose ligations of the right sciatic nerve in mice. The battery of behavioral tests, i.e. plantar, pin prick, tail flick, tail pinch, rota rod tests, were performed to assess the degree of thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in ipsilateral paw and tail, and motor in-coordination activity respectively. In addition, the biochemical tests, i.e. total protein, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reduced glutathione, were also performed in sciatic nerve tissue samples. The administration of ramipril (2 and 4 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced rise in peripheral as well as central pain sensitivity (thermal and mechanical) along with impairment of motor in-coordination activity. Further, it also produces ameliorative effects on chronic constriction injury-induced rise in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decrease in glutathione levels when compared with a normal control group. It may be concluded that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor may be a potential new target for the management of neuropathic pain. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. High-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation alters thermal but not mechanical allodynia following chronic constriction injury of the rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Somers, D L; Clemente, F R

    1998-11-01

    To determine if daily transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can alter the thermal and mechanical allodynia that develops after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the right sciatic nerve of rats. A completely randomized experimental design was used. Four groups of rats underwent CCI surgery to the right sciatic nerve and either were not treated with TENS or received TENS starting at different times after the CCI surgery. TENS was delivered daily for 1 hour to CCI rats through self-adhesive electrodes applied to skin innervated by the right dorsal rami of lumbar spinal nerves L1-6. Rats of different groups received daily TENS starting immediately, 20 to 30 hours, or 3 days after the CCI surgery. Thermal and mechanical pain thresholds of hind paws were assessed bilaterally in all rats twice before the CCI surgery (baseline) and then 2, 7, 12, and 14 days after surgery. Thermal and mechanical allodynia were expressed as difference scores between the pain thresholds of right and left hind paws. These values were normalized to differences that existed between the two paws at baseline. Daily TENS beginning immediately after CCI surgery prevented the development of thermal allodynia at all assessment times (p < .05). Daily TENS starting 1 day after surgery reduced thermal allodynia, but only on days 2 and 14 (p < .05). Daily TENS beginning 3 days after surgery had no effect on the development of thermal allodynia. Regardless of when it was started, daily TENS did not consistently alter mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. It appears that daily TENS can prevent thermal but not mechanical allodynia in this model. However, early intervention with the treatment is critical if it is to be effective at all.

  11. Bilateral changes of IL-10 protein in lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following proximal and distal chronic constriction injury of peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Jancalek, R; Svizenska, I; Klusakova, I; Dubovy, P

    2011-08-26

    Interleukin-10 prevents transition of a physiological inflammatory reaction to a pathological state that may result in neuropathic pain. We studied bilateral changes of IL-10 protein levels in L4-L5 and C7-C8 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either L4-L5 spinal nerves (pCCI) or the sciatic nerve (dCCI). Rats undergoing pCCI or dCCI were left to survive for 1, 3, 7 or 14 d, sham-operated rats for 3 or 14 d. After the survival time, C7-C8 and L4-L5 DRG were removed bilaterally from naïve, operated, and sham-operated rats and IL-10 protein was detected by immunohistochemical staining and measured using ELISA analysis. Unilateral pCCI and dCCI induced a transient bilateral elevation in IL-10 protein level not only in the homonymous lumbar DRG but also in the heteronymous cervical DRG nonassociated with the spinal segments of constricted nerve. Sham operations also induced bilateral elevation of IL-10 protein in both homonymous and heteronymous DRG. Our experiments revealed that the more proximal is a nerve injury the more rapid is the initial increase and slower the subsequent decrease of IL-10 protein level in DRG. Changes of IL-10 protein in DRG nonassociated with damaged nerve could be related to a general neuroinflammatory reaction of the nervous system to injury and thereby promote potential of the DRG neurons for regenerating their axons following a conditioning lesion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  13. The change of HCN1/HCN2 mRNA expression in peripheral nerve after chronic constriction injury induced neuropathy followed by pulsed electromagnetic field therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhou, Jun; Gu, Lianbing; Zuo, Yunxia

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is usually defined as a chronic pain state caused by peripheral or central nerve injury as a result of acute damage or systemic diseases. It remains a difficult disease to treat. Recent studies showed that the frequency of action potentials in nociceptive afferents is affected by the activity of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (HCN) family. In the current study, we used a neuropathy rat model induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve to evaluate the change of expression of HCN1/HCN2 mRNA in peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Rats were subjected to CCI with or without pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy. It was found that CCI induced neural cell degeneration while PEMF promoted nerve regeneration as documented by Nissl staining. CCI shortened the hind paw withdrawal latency (PWL) and hind paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and PEMF prolonged the PWL and PWT. In addition, CCI lowers the expression of HCN1 and HCN2 mRNA and PEMF cannot restore the expression of HCN1 and HCN2 mRNA. Our results indicated that PEMF can promote nerve regeneration and could be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:27901476

  14. Novel Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Derivative as a New Therapeutic Strategy for Reducing Neuropathic Pain after Chronic Constriction Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25855977

  15. Novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) derivative as a new therapeutic strategy for reducing neuropathic pain after chronic constriction nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain.

  16. High frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with diphenidol administration results in an additive antiallodynic effect in rats following chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Teng; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2015-03-04

    The impact of coadministration of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and diphenidol is not well established. Here we estimated the effects of diphenidol in combination with TENS on mechanical allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. Using an animal chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, the rat was estimated for evidence of mechanical sensitivity via von Frey hair stimulation and TNF-α expression in the sciatic nerve using the ELISA assay. High frequency (100Hz) TENS or intraperitoneal injection of diphenidol (2.0μmol/kg) was applied daily, starting on postoperative day 1 (POD1) and lasting for the next 13 days. We demonstrated that both high frequency TENS and diphenidol groups had an increase in mechanical withdrawal thresholds of 60%. Coadministration of high frequency TENS and diphenidol gives better results of paw withdrawal thresholds in comparison with high frequency TENS alone or diphenidol alone. Both diphenidol and coadministration of high frequency TENS with diphenidol groups showed a significant reduction of the TNF-α level compared with the CCI or HFS group (P<0.05) in the sciatic nerve on POD7, whereas the CCI or high frequency TENS group exhibited a higher TNF-α level than the sham group (P<0.05). Our resulting data revealed that diphenidol alone, high frequency TENS alone, and the combination produced a reduction of neuropathic allodynia. Both diphenidol and the combination of diphenidol with high frequency TENS inhibited TNF-α expression. A moderately effective dose of diphenidol appeared to have an additive effect with high frequency TENS. Therefore, multidisciplinary treatments could be considered for this kind of mechanical allodynia.

  17. Delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment in rats attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Kato, Kei; Mannoji, Chikato; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    Animal experimental study with intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate therapeutic effects of delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment for mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically for patients with hematological disorders. Previous reports showed that immediate G-CSF attenuates neuropathic pain in CCI of the sciatic nerve. However, the acute treatment for neuropathic pain prior to accurate diagnosis is not realistic in clinical settings. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to the CCI model. This model induces mechanical allodynia on the ipsilateral hind paw within the first week after the injury. One week after CCI, rats received intraperitoneal G-CSF (15.0 μg/kg) for 5 consecutive days. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using the von Frey hair test. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p-p38MAPK) and OX-42 (a marker for activated microglia) on tissue slides from a subset of rats 2 weeks after surgery. Western blot analyses were carried out to determine protein expression level of p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β on spinal cord homogenates 2 weeks after CCI. Results of the von Frey filament test showed that G-CSF significantly attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by the CCI model. Immunohistochemistry revealed that G-CSF reduced the number of p-p38MAPK-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that p-p38MAPK-expressing cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn are mainly microglia. Western blot analysis indicated that G-CSF decreased the expression levels of both p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. The present results indicate a beneficial effect of delayed G-CSF treatment in an animal model of peripheral nerve

  18. Effects of 660- and 980-nm low-level laser therapy on neuropathic pain relief following chronic constriction injury in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Masoumipoor, M; Jameie, S B; Janzadeh, A; Nasirinezhad, F; Soleimani, M; Kerdary, M

    2014-09-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is one of the most suffered conditions in medical disciplines. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in the induction of NP was studied by many researchers. Neuropathies lead to medical, social, and economic isolation of the patient, so various therapies were used to treat or reduce it. During the recent years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in certain areas of medicine and rehabilitation. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) is a well-known model for neuropathic pain studies. In order to find the effects of different wavelengths of LLLT on the injured sciatic nerve, the present research was done. Thirty Wistar adult male rats (230-320 g) were used in this study. The animals were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10). To induce neuropathic pain for the sciatic nerve, the CCI technique was used. Low-level laser of 660 and 980 nm was used for two consecutive weeks. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was done before and after surgery on days 7 and 14, respectively. Paw withdrawal thresholds were also evaluated. CCI decreased the pain threshold, whereas both wavelengths of LLLT for 2 weeks increased mechanical and thermal threshold significantly. A comparison of the mechanical and thermal threshold showed a significant difference between the therapeutic effects of the two groups that received LLLT. Based on our findings, the laser with a 660-nm wavelength had better therapeutic effects than the laser with a 980-nm wavelength, so the former one may be used for clinical application in neuropathic cases; however, it needs more future studies.

  19. Kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors contribute to orofacial heat hyperalgesia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction injury in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Ana Paula; Schroeder, Samilla Driessen; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Calixto, João Batista; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Mechanisms coupled to kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors have been implicated in sensory changes associated to various models of neuropathy. The current study aimed to investigate if kinins also participate in orofacial thermal hyperalgesia induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION), a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain which displays persistent hypersensitivity to orofacial sensory stimulation, in rats and mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35g) or Wistar rats (200-250g; n=6-10 per group in both cases) underwent CION or sham surgery and were submitted repeatedly to application of heat ( approximately 50 degrees C) to the ipsilateral or contralateral snout, delivered by a heat source placed 1cm from the vibrissal pad. Decreases in latency to display head withdrawal or vigorous snout flicking were considered indicative of heat hyperalgesia. CION caused long-lasting heat hyperalgesia which started on Day 2 after surgery in both species and lasted up to Day 17 in mice and Day 10 in rats. Administration of DALBK or HOE-140 (peptidic B(1) and B(2) receptor antagonists, respectively; each at 3nmol in 10microl) onto the exposed infraorbital nerve of mice at the moment of surgery delayed the development of the thermal hyperalgesia. Systemic treatment on Day 5 (mice) or Day 4 (rats) with Des-Arg(9), Leu(8)-Bradykinin (DALBK, B(1) receptor antagonist, 0.1-1micromol/kg, i.p.) or HOE-140 (B(2) receptor antagonist, 0.001-1micromol/kg, i.p.) transiently reduced heat hyperalgesia in both species. Due to the peptidic nature of DALBK and HOE-140, it is likely that their effects reported herein resulted from blockade of peripheral kinin receptors. Thus, mechanisms operated by kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors, contribute to orofacial heat hyperalgesia induced by CION in both mice and rats. Perhaps kinin B(1) and B(2) receptor antagonists might constitute effective preventive and curative treatments for orofacial thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury.

  20. Nontraumatic paralysis of the radial nerve with multiple constrictions.

    PubMed

    Yongwei, Pan; Guanglei, Tian; Jianing, Wei; Shuhuan, Wang; Qingtai, Li; Wen, Tian

    2003-03-01

    To present an uncommon lesion of radial nerve paralysis with multiple constrictions. Eight patients were treated in our department between January 1994 and August 2000. There were 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 26 years (10-43 y). The radial nerves of all patients were explored. There were 1 to 5 segmental constrictive lesions at the main trunks of the radial nerves or the posterior interosseous nerves; no obvious extrinsic compression was noted. Epineurolysis was performed in 3 patients, in the other 5 patients the constricted portions of the nerves were resected, and neurorrhaphy was performed in 2 patients, nerve-grafting in 3. Histologic examination of the resected portions showed concentration of inflammatory cells around the vessels in the perineurium. The patients were followed-up for 6 months to 4 years after surgery. Seven patients had at least grade 4 muscle strength in the involved muscles. One patient who was treated by external neurolysis 15 months after onset had no signs of recovery 10 months after surgery. Nontraumatic paralysis of the radial nerve with multiple constrictions is very uncommon. The etiology may be a focal inflammatory response around the feeding arteries in the perineurium.

  1. Multiple constrictions of the radial nerve without external compression.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Nagano, A; Mikami, Y; Tajiri, Y

    2000-01-01

    We report a patient with multiple constrictions within the main trunk of the radial nerve that was found after epineurectomy and speculate that the etiology is an inflammatory response. (J Hand Surg 2000; 25A:134-137. Copyright 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.).

  2. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  3. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  4. Ultrasonographic identification of nerve pathology in neuralgic amyotrophy: Enlargement, constriction, fascicular entwinement, and torsion.

    PubMed

    Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Csillik, Anita; Dévay, Katalin; Rosero, Maja; Barsi, Péter; Böhm, Josef; Schelle, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the ultrasonographic findings on nerves in neuralgic amyotrophy. Fourteen patients with neuralgic amyotrophy were examined using high-resolution ultrasound. Four types of abnormalities were found: (1) focal or diffuse nerve/fascicle enlargement (57%); (2) incomplete nerve constriction (36%); (3) complete nerve constriction with torsion (50%; hourglass-like appearance); and (4) fascicular entwinement (28%). Torsions were confirmed intraoperatively and were seen on the radial nerve in 85% of patients. A significant correlation was found between no spontaneous recovery of nerve function and constriction/torsion/fascicular entwinement (P = 0.007). Ultrasonographic nerve pathology in neuralgic amyotrophy varies in order of severity from nerve enlargement to constriction to nerve torsion, with treatment ranging from conservative to surgical. We postulate that the constriction caused by inflammation is the precursor of torsion and that development of nerve torsion is facilitated by the rotational movements of limbs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Baclofen reversed thermal place preference in rats with chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Salte, K; Lea, G; Franek, M; Vaculin, S

    2016-06-20

    Chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve was used as an animal model of neuropathic pain. Instead of frequently used reflex-based tests we used an operant thermal place preference test to evaluate signs of neuropathic pain and the effect of baclofen administration in rats with neuropathy. Chronic constriction injury was induced by four loose ligations of the sciatic nerve. Thermal place preference (45 °C vs. 22 °C and 45 °C vs. 11 °C) was measured after the ligation and after the administration of baclofen in sham and experimental rats. Rats with the chronic constriction injury spent significantly less time on the colder plate compared to sham operated animals at the combination 45 °C vs. 11 °C. After administration of baclofen (10 mg/kg s.c.), the aversion to the colder plate in rats with chronic constriction injury disappeared. At the combination 45 °C vs. 22 °C, no difference in time spent on colder and/or warmer plate was found between sham and experimental animals. These findings show the importance of cold allodynia evaluation in rats with chronic constriction injury and the effectiveness of baclofen in this neuropathic pain model.

  6. Constriction of the buccal branch of the facial nerve produces unilateral craniofacial allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Grace, Peter M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-12-18

    Despite pain being a sensory experience, studies of spinal cord ventral root damage have demonstrated that motor neuron injury can induce neuropathic pain. Whether injury of cranial motor nerves can also produce nociceptive hypersensitivity has not been addressed. Herein, we demonstrate that chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the buccal branch of the facial nerve results in long-lasting, unilateral allodynia in the rat. An anterograde and retrograde tracer (3000MW tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated dextran) was not transported to the trigeminal ganglion when applied to the injury site, but was transported to the facial nucleus, indicating that this nerve branch is not composed of trigeminal sensory neurons. Finally, intracisterna magna injection of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist reversed allodynia, implicating the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by facial nerve CCI. These data extend the prior evidence that selective injury to motor axons can enhance pain to supraspinal circuits by demonstrating that injury of a facial nerve with predominantly motor axons is sufficient for neuropathic pain, and that the resultant pain has a neuroimmune component.

  7. Penile constriction injury: An experience of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit Somaji; Patil, Sunil Raghunath; Kumar, Vikash; Kasat, Gaurav Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Penile injury due to constriction by a foreign object is a rare known complication, commonly seen in pediatric age group. We report four cases of penile constriction injury in adults due to various foreign objects and different indications. Between October 2014 and March 2016, four patients (mean age 42.5 years) presented with penile constriction injury with duration at presentation ranging from 18 h to 2 months. One patient had complete transection of the corpus and penile urethra. Three patients were managed successfully with daily dressings followed by split-skin grafting in one patient. One patient required delayed primary suturing after the resolution of local edema. The outcome was satisfactory in all patients with retained erectile function. Early medical attention and management is the key to success in penile constriction injury cases and to avoid complications and morbidity. Prompt removal can be challenging in cases of metal foreign bodies. PMID:28058007

  8. Prolonged constriction of sciatic nerve affecting oxidative stressors & antioxidant enzymes in rat.

    PubMed

    Varija, Devarapali; Kumar, K P; Reddy, K P; Reddy, V K

    2009-05-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of reactive oxygen species in the balance between the pro-oxidant and antioxidant levels in experimental peripheral constriction injury induced by silver wire looping of sciatic nerve of rats. Rats were divided into experimental group 1 (silver wire ligated) and group 2 (control, sham operated). Functional and behavioural activities were assessed by a modified Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) locomotory rating scale. Mechanical pain intensity was measured with Randall and Selitto apparatus. Foot positioning, toe spread, paw withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal latency were carried out on days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 in rats with chronic pain. Oxidative stress markers such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) were measured along with antioxidants such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) on day 30 after constriction in sciatic nerve, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion, dorsal root and ventral root. Significant (P<0.05) increase in MDA, AOPP, SOD and GPx and decrease in the GSH and catalase activities in sciatic nerve, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion, dorsal root and ventral root were observed in experimental group rats compared to control group. There was no recovery in foot positioning and toe spread. Reduced paw withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal latency was observed in ligated rats compared to control rats. Foot positioning, toe spread, paw withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal latency with no recovery until day 30 confirmed locomotory deficits, hyperalgesia and neuronal impairment. Oxidative stress evidenced by increased MDA, AOPP and decreased GSH and catalase support the generation of reactive oxygen species in constriction model. The present experimental model for chronic pain induced by silver wire spirally coiled around sciatic nerve may be useful for future studies.

  9. Typical brachial neuritis (Parsonage-Turner syndrome) with hourglass-like constrictions in the affected nerves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong-Wei; Wang, Shufeng; Tian, Guanglei; Li, Chun; Tian, Wen; Tian, Mengmeng

    2011-07-01

    To report on 5 patients who had acute brachial neuritis (Parsonage-Turner syndrome) with hourglass-like constriction in the affected nerves. We retrospectively reviewed 5 patients who were treated in our department from December 2003 to December 2008. Acute, intense pain around the shoulder girdle and upper arm was the first symptom and was followed by muscle weakness and atrophy. Clinical and EMG examinations showed involvement of 2 or more nerves in the affected extremity. Those severely affected nerves that had no response to conservative treatment were explored, and an hourglass-like constriction was identified. Neurolysis was performed at the sites of constrictions in 2 radial nerves and 1 median nerve. The constricted portion was resected, and direct coaptation was performed in 1 radial nerve and 1 musculocutaneous nerve. The constricted portion was resected, and nerve graft was performed in 2 radial nerves and 1 median nerve. All patients were followed up for 24 to 84 months after surgery. Of 3 nerves treated with external neurolysis, all attained full recovery. Of 2 nerves treated with resection and neurorrhaphy, 1 attained full recovery, and the other had an incomplete recovery. Of 3 nerves treated with resection and nerve graft, 1 (4-cm nerve graft) attained full recovery, and 2 (4-cm and 13-cm nerve graft, respectively) had incomplete recovery. The site of nerve lesion of brachial neuritis was not necessarily within the brachial plexus. Our finding of hourglass-like constrictions in individual peripheral nerves suggest that multifocal involvement of terminal branch lesions may underlie the complex patterns of paralysis often encountered clinically. Prognostic IV. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of hand].

    PubMed

    Ma, Shanjun; Zhou, Tianjian

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat the brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand. The clinical data from 21 cases with brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand were analyzed retrospectively between August 2009 and April 2012. Of them, there were 13 males and 8 females with an average age of 15 years (range, 10-29 years). The causes of the convulsive cerebral palsy included preterm deliveries in 11 cases, hypoxia asphyxia in 7, traumatic brain injury in 2, and encephalitis sequela in 1. The disease duration was 2-26 years (mean, 10.6 years). All the 21 patients had cock waists, crooking fingers, and contracture of adductors pollicis, 12 had the forearm pronation deformity. According to Ashworth criteria, there were 2 cases at level I, 5 cases at level II, 8 cases at level III, 4 cases at level IV, and 2 cases at level V. All patients had no intelligence disturbances. The forearm X-ray film showed no bone architectural changes before operation. The contraction of muscle and innervation was analyzed before operation. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer was performed. The functional activities and deformity improvement were evaluated during follow-up. After operation, all the patients' incision healed by first intension, without muscle atrophy and ischemic spasm. All the 21 cases were followed up 1.5-4.5 years (mean, 2.3 years). No superficial sensory loss occurred. The effectiveness was excellent in 13 cases, good in 6 cases, and poor in 2 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 90.4% at last follow-up. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand can remove and prevent the recurrence of spasm, achieve the orthopedic goals, to assure the restoration of motor function and the improvement of the life quality.

  11. Intraneural dexamethasone applied simultaneously to rat sciatic nerve constriction delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Medeiros, Daniel C; Vieira, Rafael P; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2012-02-21

    Although neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain sensitization in models of neuropathic pain have been widely studied, there are some aspects that require further investigation. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the local intraneural or perineural injections of dexamethasone, an efficacious anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drug, delays the development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in an experimental model of neuropathic pain in rats. Hargreaves and electronic von Frey tests were applied. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of right sciatic nerve was performed. Single intraneural dexamethasone administration at the moment of constriction delayed the development of sensitization for thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. However, perineural administration of dexamethasone, at the highest dose, did not delay experimental pain development. These results show that inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is an essential trigger for the pathological changes that lead to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, this approach opens new opportunities to study cellular and molecular neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain derived from peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Dentoalveolar nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Auyong, Thomas G; Le, Anh

    2011-08-01

    Nerve injury associated with dentoalveolar surgery is a complication contributing to the altered sensation of the lower lip, chin, buccal gingivae, and tongue. This surgery-related sensory defect is a morbid postoperative outcome. Several risk factors have been proposed. This article reviews the incidence of trigeminal nerve injury, presurgical risk assessment, classification, and surgical coronectomy versus conventional extraction as an approach to prevent neurosensory damage associated with dentoalveolar surgery. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Traumatic facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda N; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Boahene, Kofi Derek O

    2013-10-01

    Facial nerve trauma can be a devastating injury resulting in functional deficits and psychological distress. Deciding on the optimal course of treatment for patients with traumatic facial nerve injuries can be challenging, as there are many critical factors to be considered for each patient. Choosing from the great array of therapeutic options available can become overwhelming to both patients and physicians, and in this article, the authors present a systematic approach to help organize the physician's thought process.

  14. Peripheral nerve palsy by torsional nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Waltraud Kleist-Welch; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-04-01

    Peripheral nerve palsy caused by torsional nerve injury is rare. Only a few patients have been reported in the literature. The etiology of this type of nerve lesion is poorly understood. To report on 5 patients presenting with peripheral nerve palsy caused by a torsional nerve injury. Five patients presented with 6 upper peripheral nerve palsy involving the axillary nerve (n = 2), musculocutaneous nerve (n = 2), radial nerve (n = 1), and suprascapular nerve (n = 1). There was no history of trauma in 3 patients, but in the other 2 patients, nerve palsy occurred after a traumatic event. Because of a lack of spontaneous recovery, surgical exploration was performed. Torsion of the whole nerve (n = 5) or only 1 fascicle (n = 1) was found. Epifascicular epineurectomy and detorsion, as well as resection of the torsion site with subsequent primary nerve suture, were performed in 3 lesions. Good to excellent recovery of motor function was achieved in all 5 patients. In the last patient who presented with 2 nerve torsions, the follow-up period after the last surgery is too short to allow evaluation. Although not a frequent event, torsional nerve injury should be taken into consideration when dealing with peripheral nerve injuries. Surgical exploration with detorsion or suture results in good recovery.

  15. Fascicular constrictions in patients with spontaneous palsy of the anterior interosseous nerve and the posterior interosseous nerve.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Tazaki, Kenichi; Takayama, Shinichiro; Matsumura, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    There is no definition for fascicular constrictions of the spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy (sAINP) and spontaneous posterior interosseous nerve palsy (sPINP). One surgeon has evaluated his findings in our 32 patients of sAINP/sPINP using either photographs or video tapes and proposed a definition. All patients had interfascicular neurolysis, and 87 case reports of "fascicular constriction" were also evaluated. Fascicular constriction was defined as every instance of thinning in the fascicle regardless to its extent. Thinning as a result of extrinsic compression was excluded. The fascicular constrictions were divided into four types: recessed, recessed-bulging, rotation, and rotation-bulging constriction. Two independent surgeons went through our findings to verify their repeatability. The relation between the fascicular constrictions and age at the onset of palsy was evaluated using Student's t test. We found 54 fascicular constrictions, with many variations. However, they could all be categorised by our method. The repeatability among the independent authors was 96%. The age at the onset of palsy was significantly younger in rotation-bulging than in rotation constriction (p = 0.0003). Our definition of describing fascicular constrictions was accurate, and should help to provide consensus in describing these palsies.

  16. Antinociceptive activity of astragaloside IV in the animal model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Bing; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Chen; Wang, Qi; Song, Juan; Gao, Yue; Hou, Ming-Xiao; Chen, Yu-Feng; Wang, Tong-Chao; Cai, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the applicability of astragaloside IV (AG) for the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain, we systemically evaluated the antinociceptive activity of AG in the animal model of chronic constriction injury. We studied behaviors, electrophysiology, and biochemistry from day 2 to day 23 after the surgery. We found that when administered intraperitoneally at the dose of 60 mg/kg, AG caused significant inhibition of allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by mechanic and thermal stimuli as well as downregulation of the expressions of a series of proteins involved in mediating neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia, such as P2X purinoceptor 3, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1, and transient receptor potential cation channel subtypes A1 and V1. Further investigation showed that AG restored the nerve conduction velocity and the histological structure of the damaged sciatic nerve on day 23 after the surgery. Moreover, results from immunoelectron microscope showed that glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1 induced by AG could form a circular band in the myelin debris between the injured axons and Schwann cells, contributing toward restoration of the damaged nerve. In conclusion, in our animal model, AG effectively inhibited the neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury.

  17. Implant-related nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Mark J; Kelly, Patrick D

    2015-04-01

    Injuries to branches of the trigeminal nerves are a known complication during dental implant placement. These injuries tend to be more severe than those experienced during other dentoalveolar procedures. This article reviews the types of nerve injuries and areas and situations of which clinicians should be cognizant when placing dental implants. Strategies to avoid injuries, and a management algorithm for suspected nerve injuries, are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation between "hourglass-like fascicular constriction" and idiopathic anterior interosseous nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Toru; Nakashima, Yuko; Shinomiya, Rikuo; Kurumadani, Hiroshi; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    In recent operative cases of anterior interosseous nerve palsy (AINP), hourglass-like fascicular constrictions have been reported. We prospectively investigated the ultrasonographic history of these lesions to better understand the role of this lesion in AINP. Seven patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic AINP based on classic clinical findings and had hourglass-like fascicular constrictions found on ultrasonography were included. All but 1 patient selected surgery, and we followed up all patients clinically and with ultrasonography. In the 5 patients treated surgically in whom paralysis recovered to a level greater than M4, postoperative ultrasonography revealed less constriction. The other patient experienced little recovery after surgery, and the severe constriction remained. In a conservatively treated patient, the paralysis recovered completely, and upon ultrasonography, the constriction had lessened. Although the mechanism is still unknown, hourglass-like fascicular constriction lessened with relief of motor weakness both in operatively and conservatively treated patients. Muscle Nerve 55: 508-512, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. MRI bullseye sign: An indicator of peripheral nerve constriction in parsonage-turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sneag, Darryl B; Saltzman, Eliana B; Meister, David W; Feinberg, Joseph H; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-07-01

    The role of MRI in identifying hourglass constrictions (HGCs) of nerves in Parsonage-Turner syndrome (PTS) is largely unknown. Six patients with PTS and absent or minimal recovery underwent MRI. Surgical exploration was performed at identified pathologic sites. The time between symptom onset and surgery was 12.4 ± 6.9 months; the time between MRI and surgery was 1.3 ± 0.6 months. Involved nerves included suprascapular, axillary, radial, and median nerve anterior interosseous and pronator teres fascicles. Twenty-three constriction sites in 10 nerves were identified on MRI. A "bullseye sign" of the nerve, identified immediately proximal to 21 of 23 sites, manifested as peripheral signal hyperintensity and central hypointensity orthogonal to the long axis of the nerve. All constrictions were confirmed operatively. In PTS, a bullseye sign on MRI can accurately localize HGCs, a previously unreported finding. Causes of HGCs and the bullseye sign are unknown. Muscle Nerve 56: 99-106, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bilateral chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve: a model of long-term cold hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Acosta-Rua, Antonio J; Johnson, Richard D

    2005-08-01

    Effects of chronic constriction injury (CCI) and sham surgery of both sciatic nerves were evaluated for reflex lick/guard (L/G) and operant escape responses to thermal stimulation of rats. Experiment 1 compared L/G and escape responses to 0.3 degrees C, 43 degrees C, and 47 degrees C stimulation during a period of 60 days after CCI. Experiment 2 evaluated escape from 44 degrees C, 47 degrees C, and 10 degrees C for 100 days after CCI. The rats escaped from heat or cold stimulation of the paws in a dark compartment by climbing on a thermally neutral platform in a brightly lit compartment. For reflex testing, a single compartment provided no escape option. There was no significant effect of bilateral CCI on reflex or escape responses to nociceptive heat. However, there were long-term increases in the duration of L/G responding during trials of 0.3 degrees C stimulation and in the duration of escape responding to 10 degrees C. Hyperalgesia for cold was confirmed by a preference test, with a 2-compartment shuttle box with one floor heated (45 degrees C) and the other floor cooled (10 degrees C). Occupancy of the heated compartment was significantly increased by CCI (indicating a relative aversion for cold). For preclinical testing of treatments for allodynia/hyperalgesia after nerve injury, it is crucial to use methods of testing that are sensitive to effects on nociception throughout the neuraxis. Operant escape testing satisfies this criterion and is sensitive to bilateral CCI of rats, which avoids asymmetric postural/motor influences of unilateral CCI.

  1. PARP inhibition attenuates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in chronic constriction injury induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Ruby, P K; Sharma, Shyam S; Gogoi, Ranadeep; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve degeneration after nerve injury is accompanied with oxidative stress that may activate poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, DNA repair enzyme). PARP overactivation amplifies the neuronal damage either due to energy crisis or through inflammatory process by facilitating nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). Hence investigated the role of PARP inhibitors, 3-Aminobenzamide (3-AB) and 1,5-isoquinolinediol (ISO) in the attenuation of chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. 3-AB and ISO (at doses 30 and 3mg/kg i.p., respectively) were tested in rats subjected to standard tests for evaluating hyperalgesia and allodynia. Sciatic functional index (SFI) was assessed by performing walking track analysis. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced biochemical alterations were estimated after 14 days in sciatic nerve and lumbar spinal cord. Molecular changes were explored by immunohistochemistry and DNA fragmentation by TUNEL assay. Treatment significantly improved sensorimotor responses (p<0.001), SFI (p<0.001) and foot posture. PARP inhibition significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) reduced the elevated levels of nitrite, inflammatory markers and also normalized the depleted NAD(total) levels. The protein expression of poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR), NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitrotyrosine were significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) decreased in both sciatic nerve and lumbar spinal cord, evident through immunohistochemistry. Present study outcomes fortify the pathological role of PARP overactivation in CCI induced neuropathy and PARP inhibition ameliorated oxidative stress and neuroinflammation associated with CCI induced nerve injury. Therefore, the current study suggests the PARP inhibitors can further be evaluated for designing futuristic strategies for the management of trauma induced neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  3. Peripheral nerve injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Hainline, Brian W

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss peripheral nerve injuries in sport and to discuss such injuries within the context of their mechanisms of action. This review is based on the author's personal experience combined with analysis of pertinent articles and reviews. Peripheral nerve injuries are uncommon in sport, but represent a potentially serious cause of morbidity to the athlete. Although making a diagnosis of the involved peripheral nerve is not necessarily difficult for the practicing neurologist, it is critical to always place peripheral nerve injury in sport within the context of sports medicine. Nerve injuries do not occur in isolation, but rather are intertwined with the conditioning of the athlete, the biomechanics of the sport, and the use of protective equipment. In assessing peripheral nerve injuries in sport, it is not enough to simply make a diagnosis of the involved nerve; the physician must also assess whether the nerve became injured through a process of direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. Diagnosing sports-related peripheral nerve injuries within the context of their mechanism of action better allows for the possibility of functional rehabilitation.

  4. Comparison of the effects of curcumin, tramadol and surgical treatments on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Dilek; Kocman, Atacan Emre; Yildirim, Engin; Ozatik, Orhan; Aydin, Sule; Aydan, Kose

    2017-04-04

    Nerve entrapment syndromes are the most common causes of neuropathic pain. Surgical decompression is preferred method of treatment. The goal of the study was to compare the efficacy of curcumin, tramadol and chronic constriction release treatment (CCR), individually or together, in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Eighty male-rats were divided into eight study groups. Group 1 was the sham group. Group 2 was the control group with established chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI was also established in Groups 3-8. Group 3 underwent chronic constriction release (CCR). Groups 4 and 5 received curcumin and tramadol. Groups 6 and 7 also received curcumin (100 mg kg-1 daily, oral) and tramadol (10 mg kg-1 daily, intraperitoneal, 14 days) after CCR, respectively. Combined curcumin-tramadol treatment was applied to Group 8. Behavioral tests (thermal hyperalgesia, dynamic plantar, cold plate test) were performed on days 0, 3, 7, 13, 17, and 21. Tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were analyzed in the nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) samples on day 21.days. Histopathologic examination was performed on nervous tissue and DRG. Tramadol-CCR and tramadol-curcumin significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. In CCI-CCR-tramadol treatment, TNF-α levels were found significantly lower in the sciatic nerve tissue and DRG, and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the sciatic nerve tissue. CCI-CCR-tramadol treatment is highly effective in the symptomatic treatment of neuropathic pain. CCR-curcumin is associated with decreased degeneration and increased regeneration of the nerve tissue.

  5. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators.

  6. Peripheral nerve injury during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, S E

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented where a peripheral nerve injury occurred due to the pressure of a restraint buckle causing a postoperative motor and sensory deficit. Because these are iatrogenic injuries it is useful to review the mechanism of injury and means of prevention.

  7. Peripheral nerve injury during anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Lieblich, S. E.

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented where a peripheral nerve injury occurred due to the pressure of a restraint buckle causing a postoperative motor and sensory deficit. Because these are iatrogenic injuries it is useful to review the mechanism of injury and means of prevention. Images Figure 1 PMID:2096751

  8. Electroacupuncture and lumbar transplant of GDNF-secreting fibroblasts synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia after sciatic nerve constriction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yong; Lu, Peihua; Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gencheng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to induce potent analgesic effects on neuropathic pain in both patients and rodents. Cell therapy to release antinociceptive agents near the pain processing centers of the spinal cord is a promising next step in the development of treatment modalities. This study investigated the effects of the combination of EA and cell therapy by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neuropathic pain in rats. The hyperalgesic state was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve and fibroblasts genetically modified to secrete bioactive GDNF (FBs-GDNF) were used for cell therapy. Fifty-eight rats with neuropathic pain were randomly divided into five groups (CCI+PBS, n = 11; CCI+FBs-GDNF, n = 12; CCI+EA+PBS, n = 11; CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2, n = 12; CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF, n = 12). On the 7th day after CCI, the rats received intrathecal transplantation of FBs-GDNF or control fibroblasts (FBs-pLNCX2). In the meantime, EA was administered once every other day from the 7th day after CCI surgery for 21 days. The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to radiant heat was measured every other day. The results showed that the ipsilateral PWL of the rats from all three EA treatment groups significantly increased starting on the 12th day compared with the PBS control group. Strikingly, the group which received EA treatment and FBs-GDNF transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF) showed a significantly decreased thermal hyperalgesia after 2 weeks post CCI surgery compared with the groups which received EA treatment and FBs-pLNCX2 transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2) or PBS (CCI+EA+PBS) as well as the FBs-GDNF transplantation group without EA treatment (CCI+FBs-GDNF). Our data suggest that EA and cell therapy can synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain rats.

  9. Conditioned place preference and spontaneous dorsal horn neuron activity in chronic constriction injury model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Brian D.; Reddy, Chandan G.; Howard, Matthew A.; Kang, Sinyoung; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain commonly present with spontaneous pain, in addition to allodynia and hyperalgesia. While evoked responses in neuropathic pain models are well characterized, determining the presence of spontaneous pain is more challenging. We determined if the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model could be used to measure effects of treatment of spontaneous pain, by evaluating dorsal horn neuron (DHN) spontaneous activity and spontaneous pain-related behaviors. We measured conditioned place preference (CPP) to analgesia produced by sciatic nerve block with bupivacaine in rats with established CCI. We undertook another CPP experiment using hindpaw incision. We also examined DHN spontaneous activity in CCI rats. While CCI produced nocifensive responses to mechanical stimuli, CPP to analgesic nerve block was not evident 14 days following injury: Compared to baseline (314 ± 65 sec), CCI rats did not show a preference for the bupivacaine-paired chamber following conditioning (330 ± 102 sec). On the other hand, sciatic nerve block after hindpaw incision produced CPP on postoperative day 1, serving as a positive control. The proportion of spontaneously active DHNs (33%) was not significantly increased in CCI rats compared to the sham (21%). The median rate of spontaneous activity in the CCI group (12.6 imp/s) was not different from the sham group (9.2 imp/s). Also, there was no change in DHN spontaneous activity following sciatic nerve block with bupivacaine. Our findings suggest that CCI as a neuropathic pain model should not be used to measure effects of treatment of spontaneous pain driven by the peripheral input. PMID:26584420

  10. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146.

  11. Changes of sleep patterns in rats with chronic constriction injury under aversive conditions.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shin; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Wataru; Utsu, Yoshiaki; Toide, Katsuo; Kamei, Chiaki

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the changes of sleep parameters in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) under aversive conditions. The electroencephalogram (EEG) in the frontal cortex of CCI rats and electromyogram (EMG) were measured over 6 h by placing rats on sandpaper as an aversive condition, to compare with rats placed on sawdust. Six days after CCI surgery, the rats exhibited significant mechanical allodynia, and also had neuropathic pain. When rats were placed on sawdust, no significant difference was observed between the CCI group and sham-operated control group in sleep latency, total waking time, total non-REM sleep time and total REM sleep time. On the other hand, when CCI rats were placed on sandpaper, a significant increase was observed in sleep latency and total waking time compared with the sham group; however, no significant difference was observed in the total non-REM sleep time and total REM sleep time between these two groups. These results indicate that an important factor of sleep disturbance in CCI rats is not only damage to the nerves but also being under aversive conditions. In addition, it was found that CCI rats placed on sandpaper as an aversive condition can serve as a new sleep disturbance model.

  12. Extracranial spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Donner, T R; Kline, D G

    1993-06-01

    Eighty-three consecutive patients with extracranial accessory nerve injury seen over a 12-year period are reviewed. The most common etiology was iatrogenic injury to the nerve at the time of previous surgery. Such operations were usually minor in nature and often related to lymph node or benign tumor removal. Examination usually distinguished winging due to trapezius weakness from that of serratus anterior palsy. Trapezius weakness was seen in all cases. Sternocleidomastoid weakness was unusual. Patients with accessory palsy were evaluated by both clinical and electromyographic studies. Patients who exhibited no clinical or electrical evidence of regeneration were operated on (44 cases). Based on intraoperative nerve action potential studies, 8 lesions in continuity had neurolysis alone. Resection with repair either by end-to-end suture or by grafts was necessary in 31 cases. One case had suture removed from nerve, two had nerve placed into target muscle, and two had more proximal neurotization. Function was usually improved in both operative and nonoperative patients. Related anatomy is discussed.

  13. Pleiotrophin and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Jianghai, Chen; Juan, Liu; Hao, Kang

    2009-10-01

    The proto-oncogene pleiotrophin, discovered in 1989, was considered as a multifunctional growth factor, which played an important role in tumor occurrence, development, and central nervous system. The latest research showed that pleiotrophin signal pathway probably participated in neural repair after peripheral nerve injury, especially in the following critical points, such as the protection of spinal cord neuron, the promotion of the speed of neuron axon regeneration, the guidance of neuron axon regeneration, skeleton muscle reinnervation, and so on. It potentially plays a key role in the guidance of neural axon regeneration in peripheral nervous system and muscle reinnervation. With the deepening of related researches, pleiotrophin gene would become a controllable target for improving the repairing effect of peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction of the neuromuscular junction.

  14. Craniocerebral injury promotes the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Jun; Na, Lei; Jiang, Hongtao; Xue, Jingfeng; Yang, Zhenjun; Wang, Pei

    2014-01-01

    The increase in neurotrophic factors after craniocerebral injury has been shown to promote fracture healing. Moreover, neurotrophic factors play a key role in the regeneration and repair of peripheral nerve. However, whether craniocerebral injury alters the repair of peripheral nerve injuries remains poorly understood. Rat injury models were established by transecting the left sciatic nerve and using a free-fall device to induce craniocerebral injury. Compared with sciatic nerve injury alone after 6–12 weeks, rats with combined sciatic and craniocerebral injuries showed decreased sciatic functional index, increased recovery of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight, recovery of sciatic nerve ganglia and corresponding spinal cord segment neuron morphologies, and increased numbers of horseradish peroxidase-labeled cells. These results indicate that craniocerebral injury promotes the repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25374593

  15. Ameliorative potential of Alstonia scholaris (Linn.) R. Br. against chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hasandeep; Arora, Rohit; Arora, Saroj; Singh, Balbir

    2017-01-19

    Alstonia scholaris commonly known as 'Saptaparni' is an Indian traditional medicinal plant used in Ayurveda. It is commonly used to treat various disorders like asthma, bronchitis, diarrhea, dysentery and malaria. In folklore medicine the milky juice of the plant is applied on wounds and ulcers to treat pain, ear ache and also in rheumatic pains. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of A. scholaris R. Br. in chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve (CCI) induced neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve. The behavioral parameters like mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia were assessed on the 14(th) day. Tissue parameters like total protein, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase, total calcium and TNF-α were assessed to check biochemical changes. Chloroform and methanol extract of A. scholaris leaves (100 and 200 mg/kg) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, as positive control) were administered orally for 14 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. CCI resulted in significant development of mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia along with alteration in the biochemical changes. Administration of methanol extract at 200 mg/kg significantly attenuated the CCI induced change in nociceptive threshold and biochemical changes which was comparable to that of pregabalin. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the bioactive methanol extract revealed the presence of different types of flavonoids such as gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, ellagic acid and kaempferol, in which kaempferol was observed to be in higher concentration. Methanol extract (200 mg/kg) of A. scholaris showed the ameliorative effect in CCI induced neuropathic pain which may be due to the presence of kaempferol and attributed to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes.

  17. Assessment of oxidative parameters in rat spinal cord after chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Goecks, Cristina S B; Horst, Andréa; Moraes, Maira S; Scheid, Taína; Kolberg, Carolina; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Partata, Wania A

    2012-09-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in neuropathic pain, the direct relationship between these species and chronic constriction of sciatic nerve (CCI) has not been studied in spinal cord. Thus, this study induced CCI in rats and these animals were sacrificed 3 and 10 days after the surgical procedure to determine the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and lipid hydroperoxide levels in lumbosacral spinal cord. Von Frey Hair and hot plate tests were performed to assess the degree of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 0, 3 and 10. The results showed that CCI significantly induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 3 and 10. Parallel there was increase in spinal cord lipid hydroperoxide at days 3 and 10 in rats submitted to CCI. In Sham rats a significant increase in this parameter occurred at day 10. H(2)O(2) decreased at day 10 only in CCI group. SOD activity was decreased in Sham and CCI groups at day 3, while catalase activity was increased in CCI rats at days 3 and 10. Ascorbic acid levels were reduced only in CCI rats at day 3. Although the role of such changes is unclear, many were not specific to neuropathic pain and the differences could be related to different degrees of central sensitization in Sham and CCI rats.

  18. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  19. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  20. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27983642

  1. Synaptic ultrastructure changes in trigeminocervical complex post trigeminal nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, John; Trinh, Van Nancy; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Li, Kang-Wu; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z. David

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal nerves collecting sensory information from the orofacial area synapse on second order neurons in the dorsal horn of subnucleus caudalis and cervical C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2, or trigeminocervical complex), which is critical for sensory information processing. Injury to the trigeminal nerves may cause maladaptive changes in synaptic connectivity that plays an important role in chronic pain development. Here, we examined whether injury to the infraorbital nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerves, led to synaptic ultrastructural changes when the injured animals have developed neuropathic pain states. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic profiles in Vc/C2 at three-weeks post-injury, corresponding to the time of peak behavioral hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Using established criteria, synaptic profiles were classified as associated with excitatory (R-), inhibitory (F-), and primary afferent (C-) terminals. Each type was counted within the superficial dorsal horn of the Vc/C2 and the means from each rat were compared between sham and injured animals; synaptic contact length was also measured. The overall analysis indicates that rats with orofacial pain states had increased numbers and decreased mean synaptic length of R-profiles within the Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn (lamina I) three-weeks post CCI-ION. Increases in the number of excitatory synapses in the superficial dorsal horn of Vc/C2 could lead to enhanced activation of nociceptive pathways, contributing to the development of orofacial pain states. PMID:26132987

  2. Low intensity laser treatment of nerve injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Luo, Qing-Ming

    2007-05-01

    The neural regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injuries has long been an important field in neuroscience. Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation is a novel and useful tool for the treatment of many injuries and disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LIL irradiation in the treatment of peripheral and central nerve injuries. Some animal experiments and clinical investigations have shown beneficial effects of LIL irradiation on neural tissues, but its therapeutic value and efficacy are controversial. Reviewing the data of experimental and clinical studies by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation in specific parameters can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral and central nerves and LIL therapy is a safe and valuable treatment for superficial peripheral nerve injuries and spinal cord injury. The biological effects of LIL treatment depend largely on laser wavelength, power and dose per site and effective irradiation doses are location-specific.

  3. Investigation of nerve injury through microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Rezina; Thakor, Nitish

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), can potentially lead to irreversible damage resulting in permanent loss of function. Investigating the complex dynamics involved in these processes may elucidate the biological mechanisms of both nerve degeneration and regeneration, and may potentially lead to the development of new therapies for recovery. A scientific overview on the biological foundations of nerve injury is presented. Differences between nerve regeneration in the central and PNS are discussed. Advances in microtechnology over the past several years have led to the development of invaluable tools that now facilitate investigation of neurobiology at the cellular scale. Microfluidic devices are explored as a means to study nerve injury at the necessary simplification of the cellular level, including those devices aimed at both chemical and physical injury, as well as those that recreate the post-injury environment. PMID:24227311

  4. Chronic constriction injury-induced nociception is relieved by nanomedicine-mediated decrease of rat hippocampal tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Elizabeth; Spengler, Robert N; Bonoiu, Adela C; Mahajan, Supriya D; Davidson, Bruce A; Ding, Hong; Kumar, Rajiv; Prasad, Paras N; Knight, Paul R; Ignatowski, Tracey A

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain syndrome that arises from nerve injury. Current treatments only offer limited relief, clearly indicating the need for more effective therapeutic strategies. Previously, we demonstrated that proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a key mediator of neuropathic pain pathogenesis; TNF is elevated at sites of neuronal injury, in the spinal cord, and supraspinally during the initial development of pain. The inhibition of TNF action along pain pathways outside higher brain centers results in transient decreases in pain perception. The objective of this study was to determine whether specific blockade of TNF in the hippocampus, a site of pain integration, could prove efficacious in reducing sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced pain behavior. Small inhibitory RNA directed against TNF mRNA was complexed to gold nanorods (GNR-TNF siRNA; TNF nanoplexes) and injected into the contralateral hippocampus of rats 4 days after unilateral CCI. Withdrawal latencies to a noxious thermal stimulus (hyperalgesia) and withdrawal to innocuous forces (allodynia) were recorded up to 10 days and compared with baseline values and sham-operated rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was dramatically decreased in CCI rats receiving hippocampal TNF nanoplexes; and mechanical allodynia was transiently relieved. TNF levels (bioactive protein, TNF immunoreactivity) in hippocampal tissue were decreased. The observation that TNF nanoplex injection into the hippocampus alleviated neuropathic pain-like behavior advances our previous findings that hippocampal TNF levels modulate pain perception. These data provide evidence that targeting TNF in the brain using nanoparticle-protected siRNA may be an effective strategy for treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Synaptic ultrastructure changes in trigeminocervical complex posttrigeminal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Park, John; Trinh, Van Nancy; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Li, Kang-Wu; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2016-02-01

    Trigeminal nerves collecting sensory information from the orofacial area synapse on second-order neurons in the dorsal horn of subnucleus caudalis and cervical C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2, or trigeminocervical complex), which is critical for sensory information processing. Injury to the trigeminal nerves may cause maladaptive changes in synaptic connectivity that plays an important role in chronic pain development. Here we examined whether injury to the infraorbital nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerves, led to synaptic ultrastructural changes when the injured animals have developed neuropathic pain states. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic profiles in Vc/C2 at 3 weeks postinjury, corresponding to the time of peak behavioral hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Using established criteria, synaptic profiles were classified as associated with excitatory (R-), inhibitory (F-), and primary afferent (C-) terminals. Each type was counted within the superficial dorsal horn of the Vc/C2 and the means from each rat were compared between sham and injured animals; synaptic contact length was also measured. The overall analysis indicates that rats with orofacial pain states had increased numbers and decreased mean synaptic length of R-profiles within the Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn (lamina I) 3 weeks post-CCI-ION. Increases in the number of excitatory synapses in the superficial dorsal horn of Vc/C2 could lead to enhanced activation of nociceptive pathways, contributing to the development of orofacial pain states. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Vitamin B complex attenuated heat hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve constriction in rats and reduced capsaicin in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Bressan, Elisangela; Reeh, Peter W; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2015-09-05

    Vitamins of the B complex attenuate some neuropathic pain sensory aspects in various animal models and in patients, but the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. Herein it was investigated if the treatment with a vitamin B complex (VBC) reduces heat hyperalgesia in rats submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction and the possibility that TRPV1 receptors represent a target for B vitamins. In the present study, the VBC refers to a combination of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 at low- (18, 18 and 1.8mg/kg, respectively) or high- (180, 180 and 18mg/kg, respectively) doses. Acute treatment of rats with either the low- or the high-doses combination reduced heat hyperalgesia after nerve injury, but the high-doses combination resulted in a long-lasting effect. Repeated treatment with the low-dose combination reduced heat hyperalgesia on day four after nerve injury and showed a synergist effect with a single injection of carbamazepine (3 or 10mg/kg), which per se failed to modify the heat threshold. In naïve rats, acute treatment with the high-dose of VBC or B1 and B12 vitamins independently reduced heat hyperalgesia evoked by capsaicin (3µg into the upper lip). Moreover, the VBC, as well as, each one of the B vitamins independently reduced the capsaicin-induced calcium responses in HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with the human TRPV1 channels. Altogether, these results indicate that B vitamins can be useful to control heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain and that modulation of TRPV1 receptors may contribute to their anti-hyperalgesic effects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Pregnancy suppresses neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury in rats through the inhibition of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yoshiko; Kanao-Kanda, Megumi; Kanda, Hirotsugu; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pregnancy-induced analgesia develops during late pregnancy, but it is unclear whether this analgesia is effective against neuropathic pain. The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pregnancy-induced analgesia have not been investigated. We examined the antinociceptive effect of pregnancy-induced analgesia in a neuropathic pain model and the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Iba-1, and c-Fos in the spinal dorsal horn just before parturition. Materials and methods Female Sprague Dawley rats (200–250 g) were randomly assigned to one of four groups (pregnant + chronic constriction injury [CCI]; pregnant + sham injury; not pregnant + CCI; and not pregnant + sham injury). Separate groups were used for the behavioral and tissue analyses. CCI of the left sciatic nerve was surgically induced 3 days after confirming pregnancy in the pregnancy group or on day 3 in the not pregnant group. The spinal cord was extracted 18 days after CCI. TNF-α, GFAP, Iba-1, and c-Fos expression levels in the spinal dorsal horn were measured by Western blot analysis. Mechanical threshold was tested using von Frey filaments. Results The lowered mechanical threshold induced by CCI was significantly attenuated within 1 day before parturition and decreased after delivery. TNF-α expression in CCI rats was decreased within 1 day before parturition. Further, GFAP, Iba-1, and c-Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn was reduced in the pregnant rats. Serum TNF-α in all groups was below measurable limits. Conclusion Our findings indicate that pregnancy-induced analgesia suppresses neuropathic pain through reducing spinal levels of TNF-α, GFAP, Iba-1, and c-Fos in a rat model of CCI. PMID:28331359

  8. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  9. Nerve Injury in Athletes Caused by Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.; Engelhardt, David L.; Kirkpatrick, John S.; Bassett, Frank H.

    1992-01-01

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently used in the treatment of athletic injuries. In very rare circumstances, inappropriate use in some individuals can lead to nerve injury resulting in temporary or permanent disability of the athlete. Six cases of cold-induced peripheral nerve injury from 1988 to 1991 at the Sports Medicine Center at Duke University are reported. Although disability can be severe and can render an athlete unable to compete for several months, each of these cases resolved spontaneously. Whereas the application of this modality is typically quite safe and beneficial, clinicians must be aware of the location of major peripheral nerves, the thickness of the overlying subcutaneous fat, the method of application (with inherent or additional compression), the duration of tissue cooling, and the possible cryotherapy sensibility of some individuals. PMID:16558167

  10. Electrical Stimulation Enhances Reinnervation After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation following peripheral nerve injury has been a controversial method of treatment due primarily to the inconsistent literature surrounding it. In this presentation transcript I outline ongoing experiments investigating a clinically translatable daily muscle stimulation paradigm in rats following nerve injury. Results show that reinnervation of muscle and functional behavioural metrics are enhanced with daily stimulation with upregulation of intramuscular neurotrophic factors as a potential mechanism. In addition, the impact of stimulation on terminal sprouting, a mentioned negative aspect of electrical muscle stimulation, was a minor contributor to long term functional reinnervation of stimulated muscles in our studies. PMID:26913163

  11. Prevention and Management of Nerve Injuries in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Hugh G; Donahue, Dean M

    2015-11-01

    Nerve injuries can cause substantial morbidity after thoracic surgical procedures. These injuries are preventable, provided that the surgeon has a thorough understanding of the anatomy and follows important surgical principles. When nerve injuries occur, it is important to recognize the options available in the immediate and postoperative settings, including expectant management, immediate nerve reconstruction, or auxiliary procedures. This article covers the basic anatomy and physiology of nerves and nerve injuries, an overview of techniques in nerve reconstruction, and a guide to the nerves most commonly involved in thoracic operative procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SIP30 Is Regulated by ERK in Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guangdun; Han, Mei; Du, Yimin; Lin, Anning; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yuqiu; Jing, Naihe

    2009-01-01

    ERK plays an important role in chronic neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that in chronic constriction injury-treated rat spinal cords, up-regulation of SIP30 (SNAP25-interacting protein 30), which is involved in the development and maintenance of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain, correlates with ERK activation and that the up-regulation of SIP30 is suppressed by intrathecal delivery of the MEK inhibitor U0126. In PC12 cells, up-regulation of SIP30 by nerve growth factor is also dependent on ERK activation. We found that there is an ERK-responsive region in the rat sip30 promoter. Activation of ERK promotes the recruitment of the transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein to the sip30 gene promoter. Taken together, our results provide a potential downstream target of ERK activation-mediated neuropathic pain. PMID:19723624

  13. Fate of combat nerve injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Exoskeletal Orthosis are promising, even in patients complicated by the presence of a foot drop (0/5 motor strength to the peroneal nerve), allowing them...after limb salvage. J Trauma. 2011;71:S120 S124. 32. Patzkowski JC, Blanck RV, Owens JG, et al. Can an ankle-foot orthosis change hearts and minds? J

  14. GLIAL RESPONSES AFTER CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Dianna L.

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT) nerve innervates lingual taste buds and is susceptible to damage during dental and inner ear procedures. Interruption of the CT results in a disappearance of taste buds, which can be accompanied by taste disturbances. Because the CT usually regenerates to reinnervate taste buds successfully in a few weeks, a persistence of taste disturbances may indicate alterations in central nervous function. Peripheral injury to other sensory nerves leads to glial responses at central terminals, which actively contribute to abnormal sensations arising from nerve damage. Therefore, the current study examined microglial and astrocytic responses in the first central gustatory relay -the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS)- after transection of the CT. Damage to the CT resulted in significant microglial responses in terms of morphological reactivity and an increased density of microglial cells from 2-20 days after injury. This increased microglial population primarily resulted from microglial proliferation from 1.5-3 days, which was supplemented by microglial migration within sub-divisions of the nTS between days 2-3. Unlike other nerve injuries, CT injury did not result in recruitment of bone marrow-derived precursors. Astrocytes also reacted in the nTS with increased levels of GFAP by 3 days, although none showed evidence of cell division. GFAP levels remained increased at 30 days by which time microglial responses had resolved. These results show that nerve damage to the CT results in central glial responses, which may participate in long lasting taste alterations following CT lesion. PMID:22315167

  15. [Neurosurgical position causes peripheral nerve injuries?

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Enríquez, Pedro; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Manrique-Carmona, Luisa

    2016-12-16

    Positioning during neurosurgical procedures is a challenge for surgical teams even if precautions are taken, the mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve injury (elongation, compression or ischaemia) are latent and it is important to know the frequency of occurrence in our environment. To analyze the frequency of peripheral nerve injury secondary to surgical positioning. Prospective study including 163 patients scheduled for neurosurgical procedures. Four groups: supine, lateral, ventral and park bench were analyzed by neurological exploration in order to detect injury and relate with risk factors already described. In this study 112 patients were included, two patients who were under park bench position experienced paresthesias in ulnar region of less than 24 hours' duration; statistically significant correlation with body weight greater than 85kg. The incidence of peripheral nerve injury is low, understanding the mechanisms that may originate it helps towards prevention and early detection of complications. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  18. Chronic Constriction Injury Reduces Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Activity in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Michelle R.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Poklis, Justin L.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Selley, Dana E.; Dewey, William L.

    2013-01-01

    The present studies examined the effect of chronic neuropathic pain on cannabinoid receptor density and receptor-mediated G-protein activity within supraspinal brain areas involved in pain processing and modulation in mice. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) produced a significant decrease in WIN 55, 212-2 -stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in membranes prepared from the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) of CCI mice when compared to sham operated controls. Saturation binding with [3H]SR 141716A in membranes of the rACC showed no significant differences in binding between CCI and sham mice. Analysis of levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) or 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the rACC following CCI showed no significant differences between CCI and sham mice. These data suggest that CCI produced desensitization of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in the rACC in the absence of an overall decrease in cannabinoid 1 receptor density or change in levels of AEA or 2-AG. These data are the first to show alterations in cannabinoid receptor function in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex in response to a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:20380816

  19. Changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in rat trigeminal ganglia following chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-08-17

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), especially the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav1.3 and Nav1.7, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, have been implicated in acute and chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of VGSC Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 after nerve injury and their roles in the development of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We used the infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury model of TN in the rat. The time course of changes in the mechanical pain threshold was examined. In addition, real-time PCR and double immunofluorescence staining of VGSC α subunits were used to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. Behavioral tests showed that the mechanical pain threshold decreased significantly 4-42 days after surgery and reached the lowest observed value by day 12. Compared with sham-operated controls, we found that trigeminal ganglion in rats subjected to an infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury showed upregulation of Nav1.3 and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 messenger RNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that VGSC may participate in the regulation of TN.

  20. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  1. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Sassine, Tannus Jorge; Lima, Guilherme de Freitas; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Padua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Nadai, Anderson de

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

  2. Reactive microglia after taste nerve injury: comparison to nerve injury models of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Dianna L; Finger, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT), which innervates taste buds on the anterior portion of the tongue, is susceptible to damage during inner ear surgeries. Injury to the CT causes a disappearance of taste buds, which is concurrent with significant microglial responses at central nerve terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). The resulting taste disturbances that can occur may persist for months or years, long after the nerve and taste buds have regenerated. These persistent changes in taste sensation suggest alterations in central functioning and may be related to the microglial responses. This is reminiscent of nerve injuries that result in chronic pain, where microglial reactivity is essential in maintaining the altered sensation (i.e., pain). In these models, methods that diminish microglial responses also diminish the corresponding pain behavior. Although the CT nerve does not contain nociceptive pain fibers, the microglial reactivity after CT damage is similar to that described in pain models. Therefore, methods that decrease microglial responses in pain models were used here to test if they could also affect microglial reactivity after CT injury. Treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic that dampens pain responsive microglia, was largely ineffective in diminishing microglial responses after CT injury. In addition, signaling through the toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4) does not seem to be required after CT injury as blocking or deleting TLR4 had no effect on microglial reactivity. These results suggest that microglial responses following CT injury rely on different signaling mechanisms than those described in nerve injuries resulting in chronic pain.

  3. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  4. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain.

  5. Abdominoplasty-related nerve injuries: systematic review and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Zakaria, Hesham M; Felder, John M; Arnspiger, Sarah

    2014-02-01

    Abdominoplasty is a common cosmetic procedure; nerve injury is an underexplored risk of the procedure. The authors review existing literature to examine the incidence and treatment of nerve injuries after abdominoplasty procedures and provide a treatment algorithm based on their results. A search of the literature on MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken. After full-text review, 23 articles met our criteria. Any mentions of nerve injury, including references to a lack of nerve injury, were documented. All data were pooled for analysis. From our combined data, we calculated the risks of postabdominoplasty nerve injury by dividing the total number of nerve injuries by the total number of patients. Pooled data showed that 1.94% of patients sustained specific nerve injury, and 1.02% of patients sustained permanent injury after abdominoplasty. In addition, 7.67% experienced decreased sensation, 1.07% reported chronic pain, and 0.44% reported temporary weakness or paralysis. Nerves directly injured were the lateral femoral cutaneous (1.36% of patients) and iliohypogastric (0.10%) nerves. Nerves injured from surgical positioning were the brachial plexus (0.10%), musculocutaneous (0.10%), radial (0.05%), sciatic (0.19%), and common peroneal (0.05%) nerves. Although our results showed a low incidence of postabdominoplasty nerve injury, the lasting impact on affected patients' quality of life can be significant. Appropriate and timely treatment by a multidisciplinary team is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Better reporting of nerve injuries in future studies of abdominoplasty will provide more accurate information about the incidence and consequences of these injuries. 4.

  6. Injuries to neck structures in deaths due to constriction of neck, with a special reference to hanging.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B R; Harish, D; Sharma, Anup; Sharma, Swati; Singh, Harshabad

    2008-07-01

    This prospective study aimed at examining various injuries to the neck structures in deaths due to constriction of neck. Neck dissection technique, as advocated by Prinsloo and Gordon was undertaken to study the injuries to the thyro-hyoid complex, strap muscles, carotid vessels, etc. Of the 1746 medico-legal autopsies, conducted during the study period, 5% were deaths due asphyxia of which 82% were those of constriction of neck. The 21-30 years age group accounted for the maximum number of cases (57%). Male:female ratio was 2:1. Hanging (69%) outnumbered other asphyxial deaths--ligature and/or manual strangulation, smothering, etc. Injury to the sternocleido-mastoid muscle (54%) was the commonest injury to the neck structures. The hyoid bone was fractured in 21% cases, while the thyroid cartilage was fractured in 17% cases. Complete hanging was noted in 68% of cases while the hanging was atypical in 88%. Fixed knot was found to have been used in 71%. A single loop round the neck was observed in 80% of the cases and it was above the level of thyroid in 58% cases. Most cases of the fracture of the laryngo-hyoid complex were in the 41-60 year age group, 72% and the fracture was on the same side as the knot in 52% cases. Majority used soft daily wear articles of clothing like a sari (32%) or chunni (24%). Asphyxial deaths due to constriction of neck being common in all parts of the world, prospective studies in different setups to examine the profile of neck structure injuries are needed so as to differentiate the suicidal or homicidal nature of such deaths with a greater certainty.

  7. microRNA changes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of rats with chronic constriction injury: A TaqMan® Low Density Array study.

    PubMed

    Genda, Yuuki; Arai, Masae; Ishikawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Okabe, Tadashi; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain is expected to aid in the discovery and selection of effective therapeutic methods. Currently, microRNA (miRNA) is thought to play an important role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. We, therefore, hypothesized that miRNAs are involved in neuropathic pain, and investigated this possibility by analyzing miRNA expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model using the TaqMan® Low Density Array (TLDA). Neuropathic pain model rats were produced by CCI induced by ligation of the sciatic nerve. The miRNA expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was analyzed in Day 0 rats, with no sciatic nerve ligation or sham operation, Day 7 rats, examined 7 days after sciatic nerve ligation or sham operation, and Day 14 rats, examined 14 days after sciatic nerve ligation or sham operation using TLDA. In this study, 111 miRNAs were significantly regulated in CCI rats in both the Day 7 and Day 14 groups compared with sham rats in both groups. Of these 111, there were 75 miRNAs (67.6%) that had been analyzed in previous reports and 36 miRNAs (32.4%) related to the development of tumors of the nervous system and neurodegenerative diseases. Certain miRNAs were reported to be related to neuropathic pain; miR-500, -221 and -21. The expression levels of a large number of miRNAs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in CCI rats changed. These results provide a step toward elucidation of the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain.

  8. Schwann cells express erythropoietin receptor and represent a major target for Epo in peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqing; Gonias, Steven L; Campana, W Marie

    2005-09-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) expresses potent neuroprotective activity in the peripheral nervous system; however, the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Epo is upregulated in sciatic nerve after chronic constriction injury (CCI) and crush injury in rats, largely due to local Schwann cell production. In uninjured and injured nerves, Schwann cells also express Epo receptor (EpoR), and its expression is increased during Wallerian degeneration. CCI increased the number of Schwann cells at the injury site and the number was further increased by exogenously administered recombinant human Epo (rhEpo). To explore the activity of Epo in Schwann cells, primary cultures were established. These cells expressed cell-surface Epo receptors, with masses of 71 and 62 kDa, as determined by surface protein biotinylation and affinity precipitation. The 71-kDa species was rapidly but transiently tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to rhEpo. ERK/MAP kinase was also activated in rhEpo-treated Schwann cells; this response was blocked by pharmacologic antagonism of JAK-2. RhEpo promoted Schwann cell proliferation, as determined by BrdU incorporation. Cell proliferation was ERK/MAP kinase-dependent. These results support a model in which Schwann cells are a major target for Epo in injured peripheral nerves, perhaps within the context of an autocrine signaling pathway. EpoR-induced cell signaling and Schwann cell proliferation may protect injured peripheral nerves and promote regeneration.

  9. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury

    PubMed Central

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26th day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40th days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  10. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26(th) day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40(th) days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition.

  11. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  12. Tramadol reduces anxiety-related and depression-associated behaviors presumably induced by pain in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Caspani, Ombretta; Reitz, Marie-Céline; Ceci, Angelo; Kremer, Andreas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-09-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities of neuropathic pain (NP). Pharmacological preclinical studies on NP have given abundant information on the effects of drugs on reflex measures of stimulus-evoked pain. However, few preclinical studies focus on relief of comorbidities evoked by NP. In this study, we investigated the effects of tramadol on nociceptive reflex, depression-associated and anxiety-related behaviors in a NP model in rats. We used chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve as an animal model of neuropathic pain. We performed electronic von Frey tests (evF) to measure mechanical sensitivity, elevated plus maze tests (EPM) to record anxiety-related behaviors and forced swimming tests (FST) to evaluate depression-associated behaviors. In the evF, CCI rats showed a decrease of 82% of the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) compared to sham (P<0.001). Tramadol increased the PWT by 336% in CCI rats (P<0.001) and by 16% in sham (P<0.05). On the EPM, CCI rats spent 45% less time than sham on the open arms of the maze (P<0.05). Tramadol increased the time spent on the open arms of CCI rats by 67% (P<0.05) and had no significant effect on sham. During the FST, CCI rats showed 28% longer immobility than sham (P<0.01). Tramadol reduced the immobility time in CCI rats by 22% (P<0.001), while having no effect on sham. Tramadol reversed the changes in mechanical sensitivity as well as anxiety-related and depression-associated behaviors that are caused by injury of the sciatic nerve with only minor effects in the absence of injury. These data suggest that tramadol relieves chronic pain and its indirect consequences and comorbidities, and that this study also is a model for pharmacological studies seeking to investigate the effect of drugs on the major disabling symptoms of NP.

  13. [Study of peripheral nerve injury in trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Galván, Marina Lizeth; Martínez-Ruiz, Fernando Maximiliano; de la Garza-Castro, Oscar; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, location, mechanism, and characteristics of peripheral nerve injury (PNI) in trauma patients. A retrospective study of medical records with PNI diagnosis secondary to trauma in the period of 2008-2012. The following information was collected: gender, age, occupation, anatomic location, affected nerve, mechanism of injury, degree of injury, costs, and hospitalization time. The prevalence of PNI is 1.12%. The location of the nerve injury was 61% upper limb, the highest incidence was presented to the brachial plexus (35%) and ulnar nerve (18%). The mechanism of the lesion was sharp injury (19%). The PNI are commonly present in people of a productive age. Neurotmesis was the most frequent degree of lesion. The patients stayed at hospital 2.51 ± 1.29 days and the average cost was 12,474.00 Mexican pesos ± 5,595.69 (US$ 1,007.54 ± 452.21) for one nerve injury.

  14. Nerve injuries in supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children: is nerve exploration indicated?

    PubMed

    Khademolhosseini, Majid; Abd Rashid, Abdul Halim; Ibrahim, Sharaf

    2013-03-01

    A retrospective study of nerve injuries with displaced supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children younger than 12 years of age, treated in Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Our objectives were to determine the incidence of primary and iatrogenic nerve injuries in supracondylar humerus fractures Gartland types II and III and to determine the outcome of nerve recovery. A total of 272 patients with displaced supracondylar humerus fractures who required admission to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia from January 2000 to December 2007 were reviewed. There were 182 boys (67%) and 90 girls (33%). The mean age was 6.0 years, ranging from 1 to 12 years. Of 272 supracondylar fractures, 79 were type II and 193 were type III. Fifty-one (19%) patients had closed reduction, 160 (59%) had closed reduction and percutaneous crossed Kirschner (K) wires, and 61 (22%) had open reduction and crossed K-wires. Associated nerve injuries involving the median, radial, and ulnar nerves were observed in 48 (18%) patients. Nerve injuries were observed in nine (3%) patients upon admission. Thirty-nine (14%) patients developed nerve injuries following treatment. Of these 39 patients, 34 had ulnar, three had radial, and two had median nerve injuries. Nerve exploration was performed in five patients (in four patients following debridement of open fracture and in one because of unacceptable postoperative radiographs, and they subsequently underwent open reduction and exploration). Except for these five patients, the K-wires were not removed earlier nor were the nerves surgically explored in others. The nerve injuries resolved clinically on an average time of 3.5 months (range from 3 weeks to 8 months). Our study found complete resolution of all patients with nerve injuries confirmed by clinical assessment. On the basis of our study, we believe that there is no indication to remove the K-wires immediately or to explore the nerve surgically following a mini-open technique, which

  15. Role of miR-145 in chronic constriction injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaolin; Tang, Yuanzhang; Zhang, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of miRNA-145 (miR-145) in rat models of chronic constriction injury (CCI). Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, CCI, agomiRNA (agomiR)-normal control (NC) and agomiR-145 groups (n=25 in each group); in addition, 30 rats with CCI were divided into small hairpin (sh)RNA-NC and shRNA-ras responsive element binding protein 1 (RREB1) groups. Paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were detected. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect miR-145 expression levels, and western blotting was performed to measure RREB1 and phosphorylated-protein kinase B (p-AKT) expression levels. In addition, a dual luciferase reporter assay was conducted to identify the target gene of miR-145. PWMT and PWTL were decreased in CCI rats and this decrease was alleviated by miR-145 injection. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after CCI, miR-145 expression level in the spinal cord tissue of rats in the CCI group was significantly decreased compared with 1 day before CCI (P<0.05). Compared with the CCI group, miR-145 expression level in the agomiR-145 group was significantly higher (P<0.05). In addition, expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT were significantly increased in the CCI group and significantly decreased in the agomiR-145 group (P<0.05). Furthermore, knockdown of RREB1 expression by shRNA-RREB1 significantly increased values of PWMT and PWTL, decreased expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT, and increased miR-145 expression levels (P<0.05). Further investigation demonstrated that miR-145 can bind with RREB1 mRNA. In conclusion, miR-145 may be involved in the development of CCI through regulating the expression of RREB1. PMID:28105140

  16. Comparative Study of Nerve Grafting versus Distal Nerve Transfer for Treatment of Proximal Injuries of the Ulnar Nerve.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2015-11-01

    The prognosis for motor recovery associated with ulnar nerve injuries at a level proximal to the elbow is usually considered poor. Nerve transfers techniques were introduced as an alternative for the management of nerve lesions of the upper limb, aiming to improve the surgical results of those nerves for which direct reconstruction has not historically yielded good outcomes. A retrospective chart review was conducted to compare the outcomes obtained using nerve grafting (20 cases) with those of distal nerve transfer (15 patients) for the treatment of proximal injuries of the ulnar nerve. Nerve transfer combined the suture of the anterior interosseous nerve to the motor branch of the ulnar nerve and the cooptation of its sensory branch to the third common digital nerve via an end-to-side suture. The Medical Research Council M3/M4 outcomes were observed significantly more often in the nerve transfer group (80 vs. 22%), and the mean values for handgrip strength were higher (31.3 ± 5.8 vs. 14.5 ± 7.2 kg). The groups were similar in attaining good sensory recovery (40 vs. 30%) and mean two-point-discrimination (grafting: 11 ± 2 mm; nerve transfer: 9 ± 1 mm). The mean value of the disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand for the nerve transfer group (23.6 ± 6.7) was significantly lower than for grafting (34.2 ± 8.3). Distal nerve transfer resulted in better motor and functional outcomes than nerve grafting. Both techniques resulted in similar sensory outcomes, and nerve grafting was demonstrated to be a better technique for managing the painful symptoms associated with the nerve injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  19. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  20. Nerve injuries of the upper extremity and hand

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Lars B.; Wiberg, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    A nerve injury has a profound impact on the patient’s daily life due to the impaired sensory and motor function, impaired dexterity, sensitivity to cold as well as eventual pain problems. To perform an appropriate treatment of nerve injuries, a correct diagnosis must be made, where the injury is properly classified, leading to an optimal surgical approach and technique, where timing of surgery is also important for the outcome. Knowledge about the nerve regeneration process, where delicate processes occur in neurons, non-neuronal cells (i.e. Schwann cells) and other cells in the peripheral as well as the central nervous systems, is crucial for the treating surgeon. The surgical decision to perform nerve repair and/or reconstruction depends on the type of injury, the condition of the wound as well as the vascularity of the wound. To reconnect injured nerve ends, various techniques can be used, which include both epineurial and fascicular nerve repair, and if a nerve defect is caused by the injury, a nerve reconstruction procedure has to be performed, including bridging the defect using nerve-grafts or nerve transfer techniques. The patients must be evaluated properly and regularly after the surgical procedure and appropriate rehabilitation programmes are useful to improve the final outcome. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160071. Originally published online at www.efortopenreviews.org PMID:28630754

  1. Morin Mitigates Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI)-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Induced PARP Over-Activation and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is initiated or caused due to the primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system and is proposed to be linked to a cascade of events including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Oxidative/nitrosative stress aggravates the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration through poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) overactivation. Hence, the present study investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the phytoconstituent; morin in chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathy. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction of the left sciatic nerve in rats, and the effect of morin (15 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated by measuring behavioural and biochemical changes. Mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli confirmed the CCI-induced neuropathic pain and treatment with morin significantly improved these behavioural deficits and improved the sciatic functional index by the 14th day after CCI induction. After 14 days of CCI induction, oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammatory markers were elevated in rat lumbar spinal cord. Oxidative stress induced PARP overactivation resulted in depleted levels of ATP and elevated levels of poly (ADP) ribose (PAR). Treatment with morin reduced the levels of nitrites, restored glutathione levels and abrogated the oxidant induced DNA damage. It also mitigated the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Protein expression studies confirmed the PARP inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity of morin. Findings of this study suggest that morin, by virtue of its antioxidant properties, limited PARP overactivation and neuroinflammation and protected against CCI induced functional, behavioural and biochemical deficits.

  2. Temporal changes in MrgC expression after spinal nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Shao-Qiu; Han, Liang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Qian; Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Fei; Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor subtype C (MrgC) may play an important role in pain sensation. However, the distribution of MrgC receptors in different subpopulations of rodent dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons has not been clearly demonstrated owing to a lack of MrgC-selectively antibody. It is also unclear whether peripheral nerve injury induces different time-dependent changes in MrgC expression in injured and uninjured DRG neurons. Here we showed that MrgC immunoreactivity is distributed in both IB4-positive (non-peptidergic) and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive (peptidergic) DRG neurons in mice and rats. Importantly, the MrgC mRNA level and MrgC immunoreactivity were both decreased in the injured L5 DRG compared to corresponding levels in the contralateral (uninjured) DRG in rats on days 14 and 30 after an L5 spinal nerve ligation. In contrast, mRNA and protein levels of MrgC were increased in the adjacent uninjured L4 DRG. Thus, nerve injury may induce temporal changes in MrgC expression that differ between injured and uninjured DRG neurons. In animal behavior tests, chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve induced mechanical pain hypersensitivity in wild-type mice and Mrg-clusterΔ−/− mice (Mrg KO). However, the duration of mechanical hypersensitivity was longer in the Mrg KO mice than in their wild-type littermates, indicating that activation of Mrgs may constitute an endogenous mechanism that inhibits the maintenance of neuropathic pain. These findings extend our knowledge about the distribution of MrgC in rodent DRG neurons and the regulation of its expression by nerve injury. PMID:24374082

  3. Nerve injury complicating multiligament knee injury: current concepts and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mook, William Randolph; Ligh, Cassandra A; Moorman, Claude T; Leversedge, Fraser J

    2013-06-01

    Multiligament knee injuries account for <0.02% of all orthopaedic injuries, and 16% to 40% of these patients suffer associated injury to the common peroneal nerve (CPN). The proximity of the CPN to the proximal fibula predisposes the nerve to injury during local trauma and dislocation; the nerve is highly vulnerable to stretch injury during varus stress, particularly in posterolateral corner injuries. CPN injuries have a poor prognosis compared with that of other peripheral nerve injuries. Management is determined based on the severity and location of nerve injury, timing of presentation, associated injuries requiring surgical management, and the results of serial clinical evaluations and electrodiagnostic studies. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthosis wear and physical therapy. Surgical management includes one or more of the following: neurolysis, primary nerve repair, intercalary nerve grafting, tendon transfer, and nerve transfer. Limited evidence supports the use of early one-stage nerve reconstruction combined with tendon transfer; however, optimal management of these rare injuries continues to change, and treatment should be individualized.

  4. Neuronal plasticity of trigeminal ganglia in mice following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lynds, Randi; Lyu, Chuang; Lyu, Gong-Wei; Shi, Xie-Qi; Rosén, Annika; Mustafa, Kamal; Shi, Tie-Jun Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background Nerve injury may induce neuropathic pain. In studying the mechanisms of orofacial neuropathic pain, attention has been paid to the plastic changes that occur in the trigeminal ganglia (TGs) and nucleus in response to an injury of the trigeminal nerve branches. Previous studies have explored the impact of sciatic nerve injury on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and it has shown dramatic changes in the expression of multiple biomarkers. In large, the changes in biomarker expression in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury are similar to that in DRGs after sciatic nerve injury. However, important differences exist. Therefore, there is a need to study the plasticity of biomarkers in TGs after nerve injury in the context of the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of biomarkers associated with chronic persistent pain in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury. Materials and methods To mimic the chronic nature of the disorder, we used an intraoral procedure to access the infraorbital nerve (ION) and induced a nerve injury in mice. Immunohistochemistry and quantification were used for revealing the expression level of each biomarker in TGs after nerve injury. Results Two weeks after partial ION injury, immunohistochemistry results showed strongly upregulated expressions of activating transcription factor 3 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the ipsilateral TGs. Microglial cells were also activated after nerve injury. In regard to positive neuronal profile counting, however, no significant difference in expression was observed in galanin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylated AKT, or P2X3 in ipsilateral TGs when compared to contralateral TGs. Conclusion In this study, the expression and regulation of biomarkers in TGs have been observed in response to trigeminal nerve injury. Our results suggest that NPY and Iba1 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of

  5. Peripheral nerve injuries attributable to sport and recreation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory

    2008-02-01

    Many different sports and recreational activities are associated with injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although some of those injuries are specific to an individual sport, other peripheral nerve injuries occur ubiquitously within many sporting activities. This review of sport-specific PNS injuries should assist in the understanding of morbidity associated with particular sporting activities, professional or amateur. Proper recognition of these syndromes can prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and delays in proper diagnosis. The sports most commonly associated with peripheral nerve injuries are likely football, hockey, and baseball, but many other sports have unique associations with peripheral nerve injury. This article should be of assistance for the neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopedic surgeon, physiatrist, sports medicine doctor, and general physician in contact with athletes at risk for neurologic injuries.

  6. Peripheral nerve injuries attributable to sport and recreation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory

    2009-02-01

    Many different sports and recreational activities are associated with injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although some of those injuries are specific to an individual sport, other peripheral nerve injuries occur ubiquitously within many sporting activities. This review of sport-specific PNS injuries should assist in the understanding of morbidity associated with particular sporting activities, professional or amateur. Proper recognition of these syndromes can prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and delays in proper diagnosis. The sports most commonly associated with peripheral nerve injuries are likely football, hockey, and baseball, but many other sports have unique associations with peripheral nerve injury. This article should be of assistance for the neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopedic surgeon, physiatrist, sports medicine doctor, and general physician in contact with athletes at risk for neurologic injuries.

  7. Prostanoid receptor EP1 and Cox-2 in injured human nerves and a rat model of nerve injury: a time-course study.

    PubMed

    Durrenberger, Pascal F; Facer, Paul; Casula, Maria A; Yiangou, Yiangos; Gray, Roy A; Chessell, Iain P; Day, Nicola C; Collins, Sue D; Bingham, Sharon; Wilson, Alex W; Elliot, David; Birch, Rolfe; Anand, Praveen

    2006-01-04

    Recent studies show that inflammatory processes may contribute to neuropathic pain. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is an inducible enzyme responsible for production of prostanoids, which may sensitise sensory neurones via the EP1 receptor. We have recently reported that while macrophages infiltrate injured nerves within days of injury, they express increased Cox-2-immunoreactivity (Cox-2-IR) from 2 to 3 weeks after injury. We have now investigated the time course of EP1 and Cox-2 changes in injured human nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and the chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI) model in the rat. Tissue sections were immunostained with specific antibodies to EP1, Cox-2, CD68 (human macrophage marker) or OX42 (rat microglial marker), and neurofilaments (NF), prior to image analysis, from the following: human brachial plexus nerves (21 to 196 days post-injury), painful neuromas (9 days to 12 years post-injury), avulsion injured DRG, control nerves and DRG, and rat CCI model tissues. EP1 and NF-immunoreactive nerve fibres were quantified by image analysis. EP1:NF ratio was significantly increased in human brachial plexus nerve fibres, both proximal and distal to injury, in comparison with uninjured nerves. Sensory neurones in injured human DRG showed a significant acute increase of EP1-IR intensity. While there was a rapid increase in EP1-fibres and CD-68 positive macrophages, Cox-2 increase was apparent later, but was persistent in human painful neuromas for years. A similar time-course of changes was found in the rat CCI model with the above markers, both in the injured nerves and ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord. Different stages of infiltration and activation of macrophages may be observed in the peripheral and central nervous system following peripheral nerve injury. EP1 receptor level increase in sensory neurones, and macrophage infiltration, appears to precede increased Cox-2 expression by macrophages. However, other methods for detecting Cox-2 levels and

  8. How Far Have We Come in the Field of Nerve Regeneration After Trigeminal Nerve Injury?

    PubMed

    Rosén, Annika; Tardast, Arezo; Shi, Tie-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from nerve injury with sensory disturbances or orofacial pain have greatly reduced quality of life, and it is a big cost for the society. Abnormal sensations caused by trigeminal nerve injury often become chronic, severely debilitating, and extremely difficult to treat. In general, non-invasive treatment such as drug treatment has been insufficient, and there are currently few available effective treatments. Surgical interventions such as end-to-end connection or nerve grafting have disadvantages such as donor site morbidity or formation of neuroma. There is need for optimizing the technique for nerve repair, especially for the trigeminal nerve system, which has so far not yet been well explored. Recently, tissue engineering using biodegradable synthetic material and cell-based therapies represents a promising approach to nerve repair and it has been reported that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) has an anti-inflammatory effect and seems to play an important role in nerve healing and regeneration.

  9. A novel bioactive nerve conduit for the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin-bin; Yin, Yi-xia; Yan, Qiong-jiao; Wang, Xin-yu; Li, Shi-pu

    2016-01-01

    The use of a nerve conduit provides an opportunity to regulate cytokines, growth factors and neurotrophins in peripheral nerve regeneration and avoid autograft defects. We constructed a poly-D-L-lactide (PDLLA)-based nerve conduit that was modified using poly{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(L-lysine)]} and β-tricalcium phosphate. The effectiveness of this bioactive PDLLA-based nerve conduit was compared to that of PDLLA-only conduit in the nerve regeneration following a 10-mm sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed the nerve morphology in the early period of regeneration, 35 days post injury, using hematoxylin-eosin and methylene blue staining. Compared with the PDLLA conduit, the nerve fibers in the PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit were thicker and more regular in size. Muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had greater diameters in the PDLLA bioactive group than in the PDLLA only group. The PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit is a promising strategy for repair after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:26981105

  10. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Samuel; da Silva Filho, Paulo Roberto Ferreira; Tietzmann, Alexandre; Hirata, Helton Hiroshi; de Mattos, Carlos Augusto; da Gama, Sérgio Augusto Machado

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve) was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  11. Iatrogenic nerve injuries in the treatment of supracondylar humerus fractures: are we really just missing nerve injuries on preoperative examination?

    PubMed

    Joiner, Elizabeth R A; Skaggs, David L; Arkader, Alexandre; Andras, Lindsay M; Lightdale-Miric, Nina R; Pace, J Lee; Ryan, Deirdre D

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies report the rate of iatrogenic nerve injury in operatively treated supracondylar humerus (SCH) fractures is 3% to 4%. A reliable neurological examination can be difficult to obtain in a young child in pain. We hypothesized that nerve injuries may be missed preoperatively, later noted postoperatively in a more compliant patient, and then falsely considered an iatrogenic injury. A prospective study was conducted on patients who presented between April 2011 and April 2013 with an extension-type SCH fracture that was managed surgically. A neurological examination was performed preoperatively, postoperatively, and at follow-up visits by a fellowship-trained attending pediatric orthopaedic surgeon. Only patients in whom the attending surgeon felt a reliable neurovascular examination was obtained were included in this study. Of the 100 patients, 16% had a nerve injury recognized on preoperative examination and 3% had a new nerve injury on postoperative examination (1 anterior interosseous, 1 median sensory, and 1 radial motor). The Gartland type (P=0.421), type of reduction (open vs. closed; P=0.720), and number of lateral-entry (P=0.898) or medial-entry (P=0.938) pins used were not associated with patients who had a new nerve injury found postoperatively. A trend was seen between fracture severity and rate of a preoperative nerve injury: type II 7% (2/28), type III 19% (9/58), and type IV 36% (5/14) (P=0.058). Preoperatively, nerve injuries were noted at the following rates: median 12% (12/100) (including 8 anterior interosseous nerve injuries), radial 8% (8/100), ulnar 3% (3/100). In this prospective study, in patients who were able to comply with a preoperative neurological examination done by an attending pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, the rate of iatrogenic nerve injury after operative treatment of SCH fractures is 3%. We conclude that this finding is true, and not a result of inadequate preoperative neurological examinations. Level I prognostic study.

  12. Trigeminal nerve injury induced thrombospondin-4 upregulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang-Wu; Kim, Doo-Sik; Zaucke, Frank; Luo, Z. David

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause upregulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Methods Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 upregulation and orofacial behavioral hypersensitivity. Results Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 upregulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 upregulation in Vc/C2 and behavioral hypersensitivity. Conclusions Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 upregulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. PMID:24019258

  13. Trigeminal nerve injury-induced thrombospondin-4 up-regulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, K-W; Kim, D-S; Zaucke, F; Luo, Z D

    2014-04-01

    Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause up-regulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve. Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation and orofacial behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 and behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 up-regulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  14. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury.

  15. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  16. Inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia by intrathecal administration of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 inhibitor NO-711 in rats with chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan-Shan; Zeng, Yin-Ming; Wang, Jun-Ke; Yan, Rong; Nie, Xin; Cao, Jun-Li

    2005-04-25

    The present study was undertaken to explore the role of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporters in the neuropathic pain. On the chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats 4 doses (5, 10, 20, 40 microg in group N5, N10, N20, N40, respectively) of specific gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 inhibitor NO-711 or normal saline (in group NS) were intrathecally administered before sciatic nerve ligation (pre-treatment) or at the third day after ligation (post-treatment). The paw withdrawl latency (PWL) from a noxious thermal stimulus and paw withdrawl mechanical threshold (PWMT) of von Frey filament was used as measure of thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia respectively. The results demonstrated that post-treatment of NO-711 significantly suppressed thermal hyperalgesia and allodynia in CCI rats (P<0.05, P<0.01), the inhibitory effect lasted for 2 h (N40 group) and 4 h (N20 group) respectively. NO-711 inhibited thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI in a dose-dependent manner. Intrathecal pretreatment with different doses of NO-711 delayed the occurrence of thermal hyperalgesia, but could not delay the emergence of allodynia induced by CCI. This study indicates that gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter inhibitor has anti-thermal hyperalgesia and anti-tactile allodynia effects in neuropathic rats.

  17. Atorvastatin prevents neuroinflammation in chronic constriction injury rats through nuclear NFκB downregulation in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chu, Li-Wen; Chen, Jun-Yih; Wu, Pao-Chu; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2015-06-17

    Atorvastatin, traditionally used to treat hyperlipidemia, belongs to a class of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors. This study investigated the antineuroinflammatory and antihyperalgesic effects of atorvastatin in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord for chronic constriction injury (CCI) neuropathic pain in rats. Fifty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups including sham, CCI, and CCI+atorvastatin. Rats were orally administered atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) once daily for 2 weeks after surgery and sacrificed at days 3, 7, and 14. All animals were assessed for mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both hindpaws. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect inflammatory proteins and proinflammatory cytokines at day 7 after surgery. Pain behaviors were significantly reduced in the CCI+atorvastatin group compared to the CCI group. Atorvastatin attenuated CCI-induced inflammatory mediators (pAkt/Akt, COX-2, iNOS, EP1, and EP4) and reduced proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β levels in DRG and spinal cord. Atorvastatin also inhibited nuclear pNFκB activation. Double immunofluorescent staining further demonstrated that pNFκB proteins were decreased by atorvastatin in DRG satellite cells and spinal microglia. Atorvastatin may primarily inhibit the nuclear translocation of pNFκB to prevent CCI-induced peripheral neuropathic pain. Atorvastatin exhibits antineuroinflammatory and antinociceptive properties in the central and peripheral nerve systems.

  18. Yiqi Huayu recipe relieves nerve root constriction induced radicular neuralgia by down-regulating TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhanying; Cui, Xuejun; Hu, Zhijun; Xiao, Jing; Li, Weiwei; Yang, Qiangling; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Shi, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of Yiqi Huayu recipe on TRPV4 expression in radicular neuralgia model induced by chronic constriction to the rat lumber nerve root. Healthy male SD rats were divided into 3 groups for radicular neuralgia (RN) model construction: the sham operation group, model groups (day 3, 7, 14 and 28), and medication groups (day 3, 7, 14 and 28). Von-Frey hairs test was performed to detect the 50% with drawal threshold (50% TPW) for rats of each group. The expression of TRPV4 in dorsal root ganglion was detected at both mRNA and protein level. Rats from all model groups displayed hyperalgesia with significantly reduced 50% TPW values compared with sham-operation group (P<0.01); Yiqi Huayu recipe medication groups showed higher 50% TPW than model group since 7 days post medication (P<0.01); the medication groups showed decreased TRPV4 expression than that of model groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, Yiqi Huayu recipe alleviates nerve root constriction induced radicular neuralgia by repressing TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglion. PMID:26770465

  19. Nerve injuries sustained during warfare: part I--Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Birch, R; Misra, P; Stewart, M P M; Eardley, W G P; Ramasamy, A; Brown, K; Shenoy, R; Anand, P; Clasper, J; Dunn, R; Etherington, J

    2012-04-01

    We describe 261 peripheral nerve injuries sustained in war by 100 consecutive service men and women injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their mean age was 26.5 years (18.1 to 42.6), the median interval between injury and first review was 4.2 months (mean 8.4 months (0.36 to 48.49)) and median follow-up was 28.4 months (mean 20.5 months (1.3 to 64.2)). The nerve lesions were predominantly focal prolonged conduction block/neurapraxia in 116 (45%), axonotmesis in 92 (35%) and neurotmesis in 53 (20%) and were evenly distributed between the upper and the lower limbs. Explosions accounted for 164 (63%): 213 (82%) nerve injuries were associated with open wounds. Two or more main nerves were injured in 70 patients. The ulnar, common peroneal and tibial nerves were most commonly injured. In 69 patients there was a vascular injury, fracture, or both at the level of the nerve lesion. Major tissue loss was present in 50 patients: amputation of at least one limb was needed in 18. A total of 36 patients continued in severe neuropathic pain. This paper outlines the methods used in the assessment of these injuries and provides information about the depth and distribution of the nerve lesions, their associated injuries and neuropathic pain syndromes.

  20. Clinical aspects of ballistic peripheral nerve injury: shrapnel versus gunshot.

    PubMed

    Rochkind, Shimon; Strauss, Ido; Shlitner, Zvi; Alon, Malvina; Reider, Evgeny; Graif, Moshe

    2014-08-01

    Ballistic injuries to peripheral nerves pose special challenges in terms of indications, timing and type of surgical intervention. The aim of the present work was to analyze our experience in the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve ballistic injuries with respect to the mechanism of injury (gunshot versus shrapnel), and identify common and dissimilar prognostic factors in both types of injury. This study was conducted on 42 patients totaling 58 nerves. Twenty-two patients (32 nerves) were injured by gunshot and 20 patients (26 nerves) by shrapnel. Median postoperative follow-up was 33 months (range 12 months to 14 years). Overall postoperative outcome appears to be more favorable for gunshot-wound (GSW) patients than shrapnel-injured patients, especially in terms of neuropathic pain relief (75 % vs. 58 % respectively, p < 0.05). Presence of foreign particles in shrapnel injured patients has a negative impact on the surgical outcome in terms of rate of pain improvement (28 % compared to 67 % in patients with and without foreign particles, respectively). Nerve graft reconstruction, rather than neurolysis, seems to be the more beneficial treatment for shrapnel-induced neuropathic pain (100 % vs. 47 % in improvement rate, respectively). Early surgical intervention (median 2 months after injury) significantly relieved neuropathic pain in 83 % of shrapnel-injured patients compared to 58 % in patients operated later. This study suggests that shrapnel injury is more destructive for nerve tissue than gunshot injury. Our impression is that early surgical intervention in shrapnel injuries and split nerve grafting (especially when small fragments are recognized in the nerve) significantly improve the patient's functional activity and quality of life.

  1. Glial NF-kappa B inhibition alters neuropeptide expression after sciatic nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan Ping; Fu, Eugene S.; Sagen, Jacqueline; Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A.; Bethea, John R.; Brambilla, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    We utilized a transgenic mouse model where nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is selectively inhibited in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expressing cells. The transgene, GFAP-IκBα-dn, overexpresses a dominant negative form of the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα) under the control of the GFAP promoter. In the present work, we sought to understand the impact of glial NF-κB inhibition on the expression of pain mediating sensory neuropeptides galanin and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) in a model of neuropathic pain in mice. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the left sciatic nerve was performed on wild type (WT) and GFAP-IκBα-dn transgenic mice. RT-PCR and immunohistological staining were performed in sciatic nerve and/or L4-L5 DRG tissue for galanin, CGRP and macrophage marker CD11b. GFAP-IκBα-dn mice had less mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia compared to WT mice post-CCI. After CCI, we observed galanin upregulation in DRG and sciatic nerve, which was less in GFAP-IκBα-dn mice. CGRP gene expression in the DRG increased transiently on day 1 post-CCI in WT but not in GFAP-IκBα-dn mice, and no evidence of CGRP upregulation in sciatic nerve post-CCI was found. After CCI, upregulation of CD11b in sciatic nerve was less in GFAP-IκBα-dn mice compared to WT mice, indicative of less macrophage infiltration. Our results showed that glial NF-κB inhibition reduces galanin and CGRP expression, which are neuropeptides that correlate with pain behavior and inflammation after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:21352816

  2. Nerve injuries associated with supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children: our experience in a specialist peripheral nerve injury unit.

    PubMed

    Kwok, I H Y; Silk, Z M; Quick, T J; Sinisi, M; MacQuillan, A; Fox, M

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to identify the pattern of nerve injury associated with paediatric supracondylar fractures of the humerus. Over a 17 year period, between 1996 and 2012, 166 children were referred to our specialist peripheral nerve injury unit. From examination of the medical records and radiographs were recorded the nature of the fracture, associated vascular and neurological injury, treatment provided and clinical course. Of the 166 patients (111 male, 55 female; mean age at time of injury was seven years (standard deviation 2.2)), 26 (15.7%) had neurological dysfunction in two or more nerves. The injury pattern in the 196 affected nerves showed that the most commonly affected nerve was the ulnar nerve (43.4%), followed by the median (36.7%) and radial (19.9%) nerves. A non-degenerative injury was seen in 27.5%, whilst 67.9% were degenerative in nature. Surgical exploration of the nerves was undertaken in 94 (56.6%) children. The mean follow-up time was 12.8 months and 156 (94%) patients had an excellent or good clinical outcome according to the grading of Birch, Bonney and Parry. Following paediatric supracondylar fractures we recommend prompt referral to a specialist unit in the presence of complete nerve palsy, a positive Tinel's sign, neuropathic pain or vascular compromise, for consideration of nerve exploration. When managed appropriately, nerve recovery and clinical outcomes for this paediatric population are extremely favourable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:851-6. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Antinociceptive effect of linear polarized 0.6 to 1.6 microm irradiation of lumbar sympathetic ganglia in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Muneshige, Hiroshi; Toda, Katsuhiro; Ma, Dianli; Kimura, Hiroaki; Asou, Tomohiro; Ikuta, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Linear polarized near-infrared light created with linear polarized near-infrared light therapy equipment (Super Lizer HA-550, Tokyo Iken Co, Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) has been used for the treatment of various painful disorders in Japan. Irradiation near the stellate ganglion with a Super Lizer (ISGL) is an especially notable therapeutic method used with stellate ganglion block (SGB) or substitutes for SGB. ISGL is a safe, simple, well-tolerated, and effective treatment. We examined the effects of irradiation with a Super Lizer applied to an area near the lumbar sympathetic ganglia on the ligated side in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, which is believed to be an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Rats showing thermal hyperalgesia in a radiant heat test 1 wk postoperatively were used in Experiments 1 and 2: (1) Thermal hyperalgesia of irradiation group (n = 11) was less than that of the control or nonirradiation (n = 11) group at 1, 3, and 8 h after irradiation; however, the effect disappeared 12 h after irradiation. (2) Daily irradiation (n = 16) and 1 wk (n = 14) from 7 days after nerve ligation significantly shortened the interval from thermal hyperalgesia until recovery. Rats showing mechanical hyperalgesia in the von Frey hair test 1 wk postoperatively were used in Experiment 3: 1 wk irradiation beginning 7 days after nerve ligation (n = 9) did not promote the recovery from mechanical hyperalgesia. We speculate that repeated ISGL may be more effective than a single ISGL in alleviating pain in CRPS patients. We cannot explain the discrepancy between the results obtained in Experiments 2 and 3. We believe the results of this study are relevant to the effect of ISGL for patients with upper-limb CRPS: irradiation near the lumbar sympathetic ganglia of the rat is effective for thermal but not mechanical pain in CCI.

  4. Investigation of infraorbital nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Sakavicius, D; Juodzbalys, G; Kubilius, R; Sabalys, G P

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the severity of infraorbital nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures and to estimate the treatment methods facilitating its functional recovery. A total of 478 patients with unilateral zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures were treated. Infraorbital nerve sensory disturbances were diagnosed in 64.4% of the patients. Injury of the infraorbital nerve was expressed as asymmetry index, which was calculated as a ratio between the affected side and the intact side electric pain detection thresholds at the innervation zone skin before treatment and 14 days, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. A mean asymmetry index of 0.6 +/- 0.03 and 1.9 +/- 0.5 was registered for 57 (11.9%) patients with hyperalgesia and for 251 (52.5%) patients with hypoalgesia, respectively. As a result of retrospective analysis of infraorbital nerve sensory disturbances and its functional recovery, infraorbital nerve injury severity was classified as mild, moderate and severe. It was found that the dynamics and outcome of the functional infraorbital nerve recovery depend on the severity of the injury and the presence of infraorbital canal damage. Function was completely recovered within 3 months after treatment in cases with mild nerve injury. In moderate cases, complete recovery was seen within 6 months and in 34.6% of the severe cases, within a 12-month period after treatment when infraorbital nerve decompression was performed according to the stated indication. Treatment based on infraorbital nerve injury classification offers a better prognosis for complete recovery of the infraorbital nerve function.

  5. Chronic postoperative breast pain: danger zones for nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Seiboth, Laura A; Iorio, Matthew L

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative breast pain is a frequent complaint, reported by 50 percent of women following a breast procedure. Breast pain interferes with sexual activity, as reported by 48 percent of patients, exercise (36 percent), social activity (13 percent), and employment (6 percent). To define neurogenic causes of chronic postoperative breast pain, the authors performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients from a single surgeon and performed 10 anatomical bilateral dissections. The authors evaluated the most commonly injured nerves, based on zone of injury, injury type, and precedent breast procedure. Dissections referenced the zone of injury with the specific procedure and designated the individual nerves at risk. The authors identified 57 patients with chronic breast pain from breast reconstruction (n = 38), reduction (n = 2), mastopexy (n = 2), augmentation (n = 4) and irradiation (n = 11). On the basis of anatomic innervation, the authors designated five zones of nerve injury: superior, medial, inferior, lateral, and central/nipple-areola complex. The lateral zone was most commonly injured (79 percent), followed by inferior (10.5 percent), medial (5 percent), central (3.5 percent), and superior (2 percent) zones. Forty-two patients suffered intercostal nerve neuromas from mechanical nerve trauma/entrapment, with pain at the surgical scar or nearby tissue dissection. Four patients with traction-stretch neuropathy had pain from blunt augmentation pocket dissection. Eleven patients with irradiation-induced neuropathy had diffuse, nonlocalized nerve pain. By shifting the approach to chronic breast pain from "global chronic breast pain" to defined danger zones of nerve injury, the practitioner can identify the type of nerve injury and associate the most common nerve injury to a given breast procedure. This approach should assist in diagnosis and treatment, and ultimately improve patient morbidity.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  8. Conservative rehabilitation of sciatic nerve injury following hamstring tear.

    PubMed

    Aggen, Peter D; Reuteman, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Resident's case report There have been only a few case reports in the literature mentioning sciatic nerve injury following a hamstring tear. In previous cases surgical intervention was performed to debride scar tissue around the sciatic nerve with the goal of full return to function for the patient. The purpose of this case report is to describe the conservative interventions that allowed for recovery from a hamstring tear with sciatic nerve involvement. The subject was a 53 year old female who developed foot drop and weakness in the common fibular nerve distribution following a grade 3 hamstring injury sustained during Nordic skiing. Nerve function and strength gradually returned over the course of several months of conservative rehabilitation which included on neural gliding and strengthening exercises. At 18 months post injury, the subject had returned to 95% of full sport function and 98% of full function with activities of daily living, as rated by the Hip Outcome Scale, and had full strength with manual muscle testing. Isokinetic testing revealed strength deficits of 11-23% in knee flexion peak torque at 60 degrees/second and 180 degrees/second respectively. Sciatic nerve injury is a rare, but important potential consequence of severe hamstring strains. Clinicians should be cognizant of the potential injury to the nerve tissue following hamstring strains, so they may be dealt with in a prompt and appropriate manner. The use of neural gliding may be worth considering for a prophylactic effect following hamstring strains.

  9. “Early Evaluation of Nerve Regeneration After Nerve Injury and Repair Using Functional Connectivity MRI”

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rupeng; Hettinger, Patrick C.; Liu, Xiping; Machol, Jacques; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) studies in rat brain show brain reorganization caused by nerve injury and repair. In this study, distinguishable differences were found in healthy, nerve transection without repair (R+) and nerve transection with repair (R−) groups in the subacute stage (two weeks after initial injury). Only forepaw on the healthy side was used to determine seed voxel regions in this study. Disturbance of neuronal network in the primary sensory region of cortex occurs within two hours after initial injury, and the network pattern was restored in R+ group in subacute stage, while the disturbed pattern remained in R− group. These are the central findings of the study. This technique provides a novel way of detecting and monitoring the effectiveness of peripheral nerve injury treatment in the early stage and potentially offers a tool for clinicians to avoid poor clinical outcomes. PMID:24515926

  10. Misdirection of regenerating motor axons after nerve injury and repair in the rat sciatic nerve model

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Alaid, Awad O.; Spinner, Robert J.; Engelstad, JaNean K.; Sorenson, E. J.; Kaufman, K. R.; Dyck, Peter J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Misdirection of regenerating axons is one of the factors that can explain the poor results often found after nerve injury and repair. In this study, we quantified the degree of misdirection and the effect on recovery of function after different types of nerve injury and repair in the rat sciatic nerve model; crush injury, direct coaptation, and autograft repair. Sequential tracing with retrograde labeling of the peroneal nerve before and 8 weeks after nerve injury and repair was performed to quantify the accuracy of motor axon regeneration. Digital video analysis of ankle motion was used to investigate the recovery of function. In addition, serial compound action potential recordings and nerve and muscle morphometry were performed. In our study, accuracy of motor axon regeneration was found to be limited; only 71% (±4.9%) of the peroneal motoneurons were correctly directed 2 months after sciatic crush injury, 42% (±4.2%) after direct coaptation, and 25% (±6.6%) after autograft repair. Recovery of ankle motion was incomplete after all types of nerve injury and repair and demonstrated a disturbed balance of ankle plantar and dorsiflexion. The number of motoneurons from which axons had regenerated was not significantly different from normal. The number of myelinated axons was significantly increased distal to the site of injury. Misdirection of regenerating motor axons is a major factor in the poor recovery of nerves that innervate different muscles. The results of this study can be used as basis for developing new nerve repair techniques that may improve the accuracy of regeneration. PMID:18448099

  11. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guixin; Wu, Zuopei; Wang, Xinhong; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are transferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachial plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury. PMID:25657729

  12. [Isolated traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve. Radial nerve transfer in four cases and literatura review].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; Socolovsky, Mariano; Di Masi, Gilda; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the results of an initial series of four cases of traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve, treated by a nerve transfer from the triceps long branch of the radial nerve. An extensive analysis of the literature has also been made. Four patients aged between 21 and 42 years old presenting an isolated traumatic palsy of the axillary nerve were operated between January 2007 and June 2010. All cases were treated by nerve transfer six to eight months after the trauma. The results of these cases are analyzed, the same as the axillary nerve injuries series presented in the literature from 1982. One year after the surgery, all patients improved their abduction a mean of 70° (range 30 to 120°), showing a M4 in the British Medical Council Scale. No patient complained of triceps weakness after the procedure. These results are similar to those published employing primary grafting for the axillary nerve. Isolated injuries of the axillary nerve should be treated with surgery when spontaneous recovery is not verified 6 months after the trauma. Primary repair with grafts is the most popular surgical technique, with a rate of success of approximately 90%. The preliminary results of a nerve transfer employing the long triceps branch are similar, and a definite comparison of both techniques with a bigger number of cases should be done in the future. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Femoral nerve regeneration and its accuracy under different injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aikeremujiang Muheremu; Ao, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Cao, Peng; Peng, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Surgical accuracy has greatly improved with the advent of microsurgical techniques. However, complete functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury has not been achieved to date. The mechanisms hindering accurate regeneration of damaged axons after peripheral nerve injury are in urgent need of exploration. The present study was designed to explore the mechanisms of peripheral nerve regeneration after different types of injury. Femoral nerves of rats were injured by crushing or freezing. At 2, 3, 6, and 12 weeks after injury, axons were retrogradely labeled using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) and True Blue, and motor and sensory axons that had regenerated at the site of injury were counted. The number and percentage of Dil-labeled neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord increased over time. No significant differences were found in the number of labeled neurons between the freeze and crush injury groups at any time point. Our results confirmed that the accuracy of peripheral nerve regeneration increased with time, after both crush and freeze injury, and indicated that axonal regeneration accuracy was still satisfactory after freezing, despite the prolonged damage.

  14. Different patterns of morphological changes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus accompany the differential expression of disability following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, Eszter; Keay, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Physical and psychological trauma which results in mood disorders and the disruption of complex behaviours is associated with reductions in hippocampal volume. Clinical evaluation of neuropathic pain reveals mood and behavioural change in a significant number of patients. A rat model of neuropathic injury results in complex behavioural changes in a subpopulation (∼30%) of injured rats; these changes are co-morbid with a range of other ‘disabilities’. The specific objective of this study was to determine in rats the morphology of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in individuals with and without complex behavioural disruptions following a constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and to determine whether rats that develop disabilities following nerve injury have a reduced hippocampal volume compared with injured rats with no disabilities. The social behaviours of nerve-injured rats were evaluated before and after nerve injury. The morphology of the hippocampus of rats with and without behavioural disruptions was compared in serial histological sections. Single-housing and repeated social-interaction testing had no effect on the morphology of either the hippocampus or the dentate gyrus. Rats with transient or ongoing disability identified by behavioural disruption following sciatic nerve injury, show bilateral reductions in hippocampal volume, and lateralised reduction in the dentate gyrus (left side). Disabled rats display a combination of behavioural and physiological changes, which resemble many of the criteria used clinically to diagnose mood disorders. They also show reductions in the volume of the hippocampus similar to people with clinically diagnosed mood disorders. The sciatic nerve injury model reveals a similarity to the human neuropathic pain presentation presenting an anatomically specific focus for the investigation of the neural mechanisms underpinning the co-morbidity of chronic pain and mood disorder. PMID:25269883

  15. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Xijun; Fu, Guo; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Honggang; Hu, Jun; Yi, Jianhua; Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Qingtang

    2014-01-01

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25206757

  16. A model of injury potential for myelinated nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Guang-Hao, Zhang; Xiao-Lin, Huo; Ai-Hua, Wang; Cheng, Zhang; Chang-Zhe, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Excellent models have been described in literatures which related membrane potential to extracellular electric or magnetic stimulation and which described the formation and propagation of action potentials along the axon, for both myelinated and nonmyelinated fibers. There is not, however, an adequate model for nerve injury which allows to compute the distribution of injury potential, a direct current potential difference between intact and injured nerve, because its importance has been ignored in the shadow of the well-known action potential. This paper focus on the injury potential and presents a model of the electrical properties of myelinated nerve which describes the time course of events following injury. The time-varying current and potential at all nodes can be computed from the model, and the factors relate to the amplitude of injury potential can be determined. It is shown that the amplitude of injury potential decreased gradually with injury time, and the recession curve was exponential. Results also showed that the initial amplitude of injury potential is positively related to the grade of injury and fiber diameter. This model explained the mechanism of formation of injury potential and can provide instruction for applied electric field to prevent the formation injury potential.

  17. Nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain causes disinhibition of the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Blom, Sigrid Marie; Pfister, Jean-Pascal; Santello, Mirko; Senn, Walter; Nevian, Thomas

    2014-04-23

    Neuropathic pain caused by peripheral nerve injury is a debilitating neurological condition of high clinical relevance. On the cellular level, the elevated pain sensitivity is induced by plasticity of neuronal function along the pain pathway. Changes in cortical areas involved in pain processing contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Yet, it remains elusive which plasticity mechanisms occur in cortical circuits. We investigated the properties of neural networks in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a brain region mediating affective responses to noxious stimuli. We performed multiple whole-cell recordings from neurons in layer 5 (L5) of the ACC of adult mice after chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve of the left hindpaw and observed a striking loss of connections between excitatory and inhibitory neurons in both directions. In contrast, no significant changes in synaptic efficacy in the remaining connected pairs were found. These changes were reflected on the network level by a decrease in the mEPSC and mIPSC frequency. Additionally, nerve injury resulted in a potentiation of the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons, whereas the cellular properties of interneurons were unchanged. Our set of experimental parameters allowed constructing a neuronal network model of L5 in the ACC, revealing that the modification of inhibitory connectivity had the most profound effect on increased network activity. Thus, our combined experimental and modeling approach suggests that cortical disinhibition is a fundamental pathological modification associated with peripheral nerve damage. These changes at the cortical network level might therefore contribute to the neuropathic pain condition.

  18. Ursolic acid induces neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biao; Liu, Yan; Yang, Guang; Xu, Zemin; Chen, Jiajun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the role of ursolic acid in the neural regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. BALB/c mice were used to establish models of sciatic nerve injury through unilateral sciatic nerve complete transection and microscopic anastomosis at 0.5 cm below the ischial tube-rosity. The successfully generated model mice were treated with 10, 5, or 2.5 mg/kg ursolic acid via intraperitoneal injection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that serum S100 protein expression level gradually increased at 1–4 weeks after sciatic nerve injury, and significantly decreased at 8 weeks. As such, ursolic acid has the capacity to significantly increase S100 protein expression levels. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that S100 mRNA expression in the L4–6 segments on the injury side was increased after ursolic acid treatment. In addition, the muscular mass index in the soleus muscle was also increased in mice treated with ursolic acid. Toluidine blue staining revealed that the quantity and average diameter of myelinated nerve fibers in the injured sciatic nerve were significantly increased after treatment with ursolic acid. 10 and 5 mg/kg of ursolic acid produced stronger effects than 2.5 mg/kg of ursolic acid. Our findings indicate that ursolic acid can dose-dependently increase S100 expression and promote neural regeneration in BALB/c mice following sciatic nerve injury. PMID:25206561

  19. An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Omar, N.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time. PMID:17587067

  20. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain — A question of age

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the ‘default’ neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a ‘latent’ pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically ‘unexplained’ or ‘functional’ pain in adolescence. PMID:26220898

  1. Endothelin-1 impairs retrograde axonal transport and leads to axonal injury in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takazumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sasaoka, Masaaki; Shimazaki, Atsushi; Hara, Hideaki

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve. Vehicle or ET-1 (0.2, 1, or 5 pmol/eye) were injected into the vitreous body in Sprague-Dawley rats. Retinal vessels were observed, using a fundus camera, before, and at 10 min, 3 days and 7 days after a single intravitreous injection. Two days after the injection, a neuronal tracer, fluoro gold, was administered via the superior colliculi to retrogradely label active retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Five days after the tracer administration, retrogradely labeled RGCs were evaluated in the flat-mounted retina, and cross sections from each optic nerve were graded for injury by four independent, masked observers. ET-1 at 5 pmol/eye caused a significant constriction of retinal vessels (versus the vehicle-treated group) at 10 min after the injection. Intravitreous injection of ET-1 caused a dose-related decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. Injection of 5 pmol/eye ET-1 led to a statistically significant decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs (versus the vehicle-treated group). ET-1 at 1 and 5 pmol/eye caused histological optic nerve damage (evaluated using a graded scale). The histological optic nerve damage correlated with the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. In conclusion, a single intravitreous injection of ET-1 impaired retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve and this impairment correlated with the histological optic nerve damage.

  2. Past, Present, and Future of Nerve Conduits in the Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang

    2015-01-01

    With significant advances in the research and application of nerve conduits, they have been used to repair peripheral nerve injury for several decades. Nerve conduits range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes, and from nondegradable tubes to biodegradable tubes. Researchers have explored hollow tubes, tubes filled with scaffolds containing neurotrophic factors, and those seeded with Schwann cells or stem cells. The therapeutic effect of nerve conduits is improving with increasing choice of conduit material, new construction of conduits, and the inclusion of neurotrophic factors and support cells in the conduits. Improvements in functional outcomes are expected when these are optimized for use in clinical practice. PMID:26491662

  3. Chronic nerve injury-induced Mas receptor expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons alleviates neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanting; Qin, Yue; Liu, Tuanjiang; Hao, Dingjun

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain, which is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia and spontaneous pain, is one of the most painful symptoms that can be experienced in the clinic. It often occurs as a result of injury to the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord or brain. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in nociception. As an essential component of the RAS, the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas axis may be involved in antinociception. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression pattern of Mas in DRG neurons following chronic nerve injury and examine the effects of Mas inhibition and activation on neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model. The results showed, that compared with the sham group, CCI caused a time-dependent induction of Mas expression at both the mRNA and the protein levels in DRG neurons. Consistent with the results, isolated DRG neurons showed a time-dependent increase in Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane following the CCI surgery, but not the sham surgery. Compared with the sham control groups, CCI significantly decreased the paw withdrawal latency and threshold, and this was markedly improved and aggravated by intrathecal injection of the selective Mas agonist Ang-(1-7) and the selective Mas inhibitor D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7), respectively. In conclusion, this study has provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that the Mas expression in DRG neurons is time-dependently induced by chronic nerve injury and that the intrathecal activation and inhibition of Mas can improve and aggravate CCI-induced neuropathic pain, respectively. This study has provided novel insights into the pathophysiological process of neuropathic pain and suggests that the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis could be an effective therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, warranting further study.

  4. Meaningful power grip recovery after salvage reconstruction of a median nerve avulsion injury with a pedicled vascularized ulnar nerve

    PubMed Central

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Jansen, Leigh A; Hynes, Sally; Hicks, Jane; Bristol, Sean; Carr, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In cases of median nerve injury alongside an unsalvageable ulnar nerve, a vascularized ulnar nerve graft to reconstruct the median nerve is a viable option. While restoration of median nerve sensation is consistently reported, recovery of significant motor function is less frequently observed. The authors report a case involving a previously healthy man who sustained upper arm segmental median and ulnar nerve injuries and, after failure of sural nerve grafts, was treated with a pedicled vascularized ulnar nerve graft to restore median nerve function. Long-term follow-up showed near full fist, with 12 kg of grip strength, key pinch with 1.5 kg of strength and protective sensation in the median nerve distribution. The present case demonstrates that pedicled ulnar vascularized nerve grafts can provide significant improvements to median nerve sensory and motor function in a heavily scarred environment. PMID:26665144

  5. Long thoracic nerve injury due to an electric burn.

    PubMed

    Still, J M; Law, E J; Duncan, J W; Hughes, H F

    1996-01-01

    A 19-year-old white man was burned over 7.5% of his body when he sustained an electric injury from a transformer. There was no associated fall or loss of consciousness. Debridement and grafting were required. The patient had some transient weakness of the muscles of his right arm associated with lower cervical nerve-root injury. This subsequently improved. He also was found to have paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle, with winging of the scapula due to long thoracic nerve injury. This has not improved. A surgical procedure suggested to improve function of the shoulder was rejected by the patient. This is only the second case reported of long thoracic nerve injury due to an electric burn of which we are aware.

  6. Artemin induced functional recovery and reinnervation after partial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruizhong; Rossomando, Anthony; Sah, Dinah W Y; Ossipov, Michael H; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Systemic artemin promotes regeneration of dorsal roots to the spinal cord after crush injury. However, it is unclear whether systemic artemin can also promote peripheral nerve regeneration, and functional recovery after partial lesions distal to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) remains unknown. In the present investigation, male Sprague Dawley rats received axotomy, ligation, or crush of the L5 spinal nerve or sham surgery. Starting the day of injury, animals received intermittent subcutaneous artemin or vehicle across 2weeks. Sensory thresholds to tactile or thermal stimuli were monitored for 6weeks after injury. Immunohistochemical analyses of the DRG and nerve regeneration were performed at the 6-week time point. Artemin transiently reversed tactile and thermal hypersensitivity after axotomy, ligation, or crush injury. Thermal and tactile hypersensitivity reemerged within 1week of treatment termination. However, artemin-treated rats with nerve crush, but not axotomy or ligation, subsequently showed gradual return of sensory thresholds to preinjury baseline levels by 6weeks after injury. Artemin normalized labeling for NF200, IB4, and CGRP in nerve fibers distal to the crush injury, suggesting persistent normalization of nerve crush-induced neurochemical changes. Sciatic and intradermal administration of dextran or cholera toxin B distal to the crush injury site resulted in labeling of neuronal profiles in the L5 DRG, suggesting regeneration functional restoration of nonmyelinated and myelinated fibers across the injury site into cutaneous tissue. Artemin also diminished ATF3 and caspase 3 expression in the L5 DRG, suggesting persistent neuroprotective actions. A limited period of artemin treatment elicits disease modification by promoting sensory reinnervation of distal territories and restoring preinjury sensory thresholds. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensitization of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons parallels heat hyperalgesia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, David

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that spinal lamina I neurons with ascending axons that project to the midbrain play a crucial role in hyperalgesia. To test this hypothesis the quantitative properties of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain were compared to those of unoperated and sham-operated controls. Behavioural testing showed that animals with a CCI exhibited heat hyperalgesia within 4 days of the injury, and this hyperalgesia persisted throughout the 14-day post-operative testing period. In the CCI, nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons had heat thresholds that were significantly lower than controls (43.0 ± 2.8°C vs. 46.7 ± 2.6°C; P < 10−4, ANOVA). Nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons were also significantly more responsive to graded heat stimuli in the CCI, compared to controls (P < 0.02, 2-factor repeated-measures ANOVA), and increased after-discharges were also observed. Furthermore, the heat-evoked stimulus–response functions of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in CCI animals co-varied significantly (P < 0.03, ANCOVA) with the amplitude of heat hyperalgesia determined behaviourally. Taken together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons have an important mechanistic role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. PMID:19289544

  8. Trigeminal nerve injury ErbB3/ErbB2 promotes mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Liping; Westlund, Karin N

    2012-08-01

    Chronic constriction injury of the trigeminal infraorbital nerve results in transient analgesia followed by whisker pad mechanical allodynia in rats. Neuregulin 1 expressed on axonal membranes binds receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB, promoting Schwann cell development and remyelination. This study investigated whether orofacial mechanical allodynia is signaled by ErbB3-ErbB2 heterodimers in injured nerves. Whisker pad mechanical allodynia (von Frey stimuli) was quantified in wild type rats and in transgenic rats with Sleeping Beauty transposon mutation for neuregulin 1 transgene. Pain-related behavior was retested after intraperitoneal injection of the ErbB2 inhibitor Lapatinib, an agent shown by others to reduce breast cancer pain. Infraorbital nerve injury was evaluated histologically with myelin and neuronal biomarkers. ErbB3 changes over time were measured with western blots. Whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity began in week 2 in wild type rats (3.11 ± 5.93 g vs. 18.72 ± 0.00 g after sham surgery, n = 9, P < 0.001), indicating trigeminal neuropathic pain, but was not evident in transgenic rats (odds ratio: 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.38-3.35). Initiation of statistically significant mechanohypersensitivity was delayed until week 6 after surgery in transgenic rats (3.44 ± 4.60 g vs. 18.72 ± 0.00 g, n = 4, P < 0.001). Mechanical allodynia, which persisted 8 weeks in wild type rats was alleviated by Lapatinib (15 ± 3.89 g vs. 2.45 ± 1.13 g, n = 6, P < 0.001). Infraorbital nerve damage was verified histologically. Statistically significant ErbB3 increases (weeks 5 and 10) in wild type and transgenic rats (week 10) coincided with time points when mechanical hypersensitivity was present. The Neuregulin 1-ErbB3-ErbB2 complex is a causal mechanism in nerve injury-induced trigeminal neuropathic pain. Understanding peripheral glial mechanisms after nerve injury will improve neuropathic pain treatment.

  9. Neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid in central nervous system lesions consequent to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Amenta, Francesco; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E; Pacini, Alessandra; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (-)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/-)-, (+)-, or (-)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/-)- or (-)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies.

  10. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E.; Pacini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (−)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−)-, (+)-, or (−)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−)- or (−)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies. PMID:24527432

  11. Facial reanimation after facial nerve injury using hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis: the gruppo otologico experience.

    PubMed

    Tanbouzi Husseini, Sami; Kumar, David Victor; De Donato, Giuseppe; Almutair, Tamama; Sanna, Mario

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the results of facial nerve reanimation after facial nerve injury by means of hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis. Retrospective case review. Private neuro-otologic and cranial base quaternary referral center. Sixty patients underwent hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis for facial nerve reanimation between April 1987 and December 2010. Only forty patients completed a minimal follow up of 24 months at the time of evaluation and were included in the study population. Facial nerve paralysis was present for a mean duration of 11.3 months (range 2-42 months) and all the patients had a HB grade VI prior their surgery. Final facial nerve motor function. The most common cause of facial paralysis was vestibular Schwannoma surgery. All the patients achieved a postoperative HB grade III or IV after a mean follow-up time of 20 months. The facial movements were detected after a period that ranged from ranged from 5 to 9 months. Only 4 patients suffered from difficulties during eating and drinking and three of them had associated lower cranial nerve deficit. Despite the various techniques in facial reanimation following total facial nerve paralysis, the end to end of hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis remains one of the best treatments in cases of viable distal facial stump and nonatrophic musculature.

  12. Blocking caspase activity prevents transsynaptic neuronal apoptosis and the loss of inhibition in lamina II of the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Joachim; Broom, Daniel C; Youn, Dong-Ho; Mills, Charles D; Kohno, Tatsuro; Suter, Marc R; Moore, Kimberly A; Decosterd, Isabelle; Coggeshall, Richard E; Woolf, Clifford J

    2005-08-10

    We show that transsynaptic apoptosis is induced in the superficial dorsal horn (laminas I-III) of the spinal cord by three distinct partial peripheral nerve lesions: spared nerve injury, chronic constriction, and spinal nerve ligation. Ongoing activity in primary afferents of the injured nerve and glutamatergic transmission cause a caspase-dependent degeneration of dorsal horn neurons that is slow in onset and persists for several weeks. Four weeks after spared nerve injury, the cumulative loss of dorsal horn neurons, determined by stereological analysis, is >20%. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons are among the neurons lost, and a marked decrease in inhibitory postsynaptic currents of lamina II neurons coincides with the induction of apoptosis. Blocking apoptosis with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) prevents the loss of GABAergic interneurons and the reduction of inhibitory currents. Partial peripheral nerve injury results in pain-like behavioral changes characterized by hypersensitivity to tactile or cold stimuli. Treatment with zVAD, which has no intrinsic analgesic properties, attenuates this neuropathic pain-like syndrome. Preventing nerve injury-induced apoptosis of dorsal horn neurons by blocking caspase activity maintains inhibitory transmission in lamina II and reduces pain hypersensitivity.

  13. Epigenomic Regulation of Schwann Cell Reprogramming in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ki H.; Hung, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and dynamic transcriptional changes of Schwann cells in response to injury are critical to peripheral nerve repair, yet the epigenomic reprograming that leads to the induction of injury-activated genes has not been characterized. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), which produces a transcriptionally repressive chromatin environment. We find that many promoters and/or gene bodies of injury-activated genes of mature rat nerves are occupied with H3K27me3. In contrast, the majority of distal enhancers that gain H3K27 acetylation after injury are not repressed by H3K27 methylation before injury, which is normally observed in developmentally poised enhancers. Injury induces demethylation of H3K27 in many genes, such as Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is silenced throughout Schwann cell development before injury. In addition, experiments using a Schwann cell-specific mouse knock-out of the Eed subunit of PRC2 indicate that demethylation is a rate-limiting step in the activation of such genes. We also show that some transcription start sites of H3K27me3-repressed injury genes of uninjured nerves are bound with a mark of active promoters H3K4me3, for example, Shh and Gdnf, and the reduction of H3K27me3 results in increased trimethylation of H3K4. Our findings identify reversal of polycomb repression as a key step in gene activation after injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Peripheral nerve regeneration after injury is dependent upon implementation of a novel genetic program in Schwann cells that supports axonal survival and regeneration. Identifying means to enhance Schwann cell reprogramming after nerve injury could be used to foster effective remyelination in the treatment of demyelinating disorders and in identifying pathways involved in regenerative process of myelination. Although recent progress has identified transcriptional determinants of successful reprogramming of the Schwann cell transcriptome

  14. Role of Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring During Parathyroidectomy to Prevent Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Assad, Salman; Assad, Shuja

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is a well known, though less frequent, complication of parathyroid surgery. In recent years, the use of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) has gained popularity amongst surgeons when operating on thyroid gland; however, its utilization in parathyroid surgery is not established. This trend continues to rise, despite multiple studies documenting no statistically significant difference that IONM decreases the incidence of RLN injury. Most surgeons use this technology as an adjunct to visualization alone for identification of RLN. The purpose of this review is to discuss the possible role of IONM in parathyroid surgery with regards to the accuracy, efficacy, and recent trends in the utilization of this technology. There is insufficient evidence that IONM reduces the risk of RLN injury in parathyroidectomy. Although IONM may decrease the likelihood of nerve injury by helping to identify and map the RLN during thyroidectomy, we did not find studies exclusive to parathyroid surgery to see if its use can be supported for parathyroidectomy. Despite this lack of evidence, we believe that IONM is a promising adjunct to visualization alone in detecting nerve structures during neck dissection, but more clinical trials are warranted to establish its role in preventing nerve injury in parathyroid surgery. PMID:28003944

  15. Enophthalmos and Hemifacial Skeletal Atrophy After Trigeminal Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Satchi, Khami; McNab, Alan A

    2016-01-18

    A 60-year-old woman presented with several years increasing right upper eyelid ptosis. She had undergone surgical decompression of the right trigeminal nerve in the posterior cranial fossa 15 years earlier for trigeminal neuralgia. This left her with permanent numbness in the second and third divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the ptosis, she was found to have right enophthalmos and a smaller right face. CT scans showed a smaller midfacial skeleton on the right and a depressed orbital floor. The changes were different to those seen in silent sinus syndrome. Photographs taken over many years showed the facial changes were acquired and came on gradually many years after the trigeminal nerve injury. It is possible that trigeminal nerve injury may lead to trophic changes in the facial skeleton, but these have not been previously reported.

  16. Effect of PACAP in Central and Peripheral Nerve Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Farkas, Orsolya; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Pal, Jozsef; Povlishock, John T.; Schwarcz, Attila; Czeiter, Endre; Szanto, Zalan; Doczi, Tamas; Buki, Andras; Bukovics, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a bioactive peptide with diverse effects in the nervous system. In addition to its more classic role as a neuromodulator, PACAP functions as a neurotrophic factor. Several neurotrophic factors have been shown to play an important role in the endogenous response following both cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury and to be effective when given exogenously. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different models of ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases and retinal degeneration. The aim of this review is to summarize the findings on the neuroprotective potential of PACAP in models of different traumatic nerve injuries. Expression of endogenous PACAP and its specific PAC1 receptor is elevated in different parts of the central and peripheral nervous system after traumatic injuries. Some experiments demonstrate the protective effect of exogenous PACAP treatment in different traumatic brain injury models, in facial nerve and optic nerve trauma. The upregulation of endogenous PACAP and its receptors and the protective effect of exogenous PACAP after different central and peripheral nerve injuries show the important function of PACAP in neuronal regeneration indicating that PACAP may also be a promising therapeutic agent in injuries of the nervous system. PMID:22942712

  17. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Magni, Giulia; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (<30 µm) exhibited increased excitability that was associated with decreased membrane threshold and rheobase, whereas responses in large diameter neurons (>30 µm) were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainic acid (KA), or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR) agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  18. Use of Processed Nerve Allografts to Repair Nerve Injuries Greater Than 25 mm in the Hand.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Brian; Zoldos, Jozef; Weber, Renata V; Ko, Jason; Thayer, Wesley; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Leversedge, Fraser J; Safa, Bauback; Buncke, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    Processed nerve allografts (PNAs) have been demonstrated to have improved clinical results compared with hollow conduits for reconstruction of digital nerve gaps less than 25 mm; however, the use of PNAs for longer gaps warrants further clinical investigation. Long nerve gaps have been traditionally hard to study because of low incidence. The advent of the RANGER registry, a large, institutional review board-approved, active database for PNA (Avance Nerve Graft; AxoGen, Inc, Alachua, FL) has allowed evaluation of lower incidence subsets. The RANGER database was queried for digital nerve repairs of 25 mm or greater. Demographics, injury, treatment, and functional outcomes were recorded on standardized forms. Patients younger than 18 and those lacking quantitative follow-up data were excluded. Recovery was graded according to the Medical Research Council Classification for sensory function, with meaningful recovery defined as S3 or greater level. Fifty digital nerve injuries in 28 subjects were included. There were 22 male and 6 female subjects, and the mean age was 45. Three patients gave a previous history of diabetes, and there were 6 active smokers. The most commonly reported mechanisms of injury were saw injuries (n = 13), crushing injuries (n = 9), resection of neuroma (n = 9), amputation/avulsions (n = 8), sharp lacerations (n = 7), and blast/gunshots (n = 4). The average gap length was 35 ± 8 mm (range, 25-50 mm). Recovery to the S3 or greater level was reported in 86% of repairs. Static 2-point discrimination (s2PD) and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWF) were the most common completed assessments. Mean s2PD in 24 repairs reporting 2PD data was 9 ± 4 mm. For the 38 repairs with SWF data, protective sensation was reported in 33 repairs, deep pressure in 2, and no recovery in 3. These data compared favorably with historical data for nerve autograft repairs, with reported levels of meaningful recovery of 60% to 88%. There were no reported adverse effects

  19. Expression changes of nerve cell adhesion molecules L1 and semaphorin 3A after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Qian-ru; Cong, Meng; Chen, Qing-zhong; Sheng, Ya-feng; Li, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Fei; Gong, Yan-pei

    2016-01-01

    The expression of nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 in the neuronal growth cone of the central nervous system is strongly associated with the direction of growth of the axon, but its role in the regeneration of the peripheral nerve is still unknown. This study explored the problem in a femoral nerve section model in rats. L1 and semaphorin 3A mRNA and protein expressions were measured over the 4-week recovery period. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression was higher in the sensory nerves than in motor nerves at 2 weeks after injury, but vice versa for the expression of semaphorin 3A. Western blot assay results demonstrated that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression was higher in motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at the proximal end after injury, but its expression was greater in the sensory nerves at 2 weeks. Semaphorin 3A expression was higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 3 days and 1 week after injury. Nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 and semaphorin 3A expressions at the distal end were higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 3 days, 1 and 2 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression at the proximal end was greater in the sensory nerves than in the motor nerves; semaphorin 3A expression was higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 2 weeks after injury. Taken together, these results indicated that nerve cell adhesion molecules L1 and semaphorin 3A exhibited different expression patterns at the proximal and distal ends of sensory and motor nerves, and play a coordinating role in neural chemotaxis regeneration. PMID:28197202

  20. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. CONSERVATIVE REHABILITATION OF SCIATIC NERVE INJURY FOLLOWING HAMSTRING TEAR

    PubMed Central

    Reuteman, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Study Design: Resident's case report Background: There have been only a few case reports in the literature mentioning sciatic nerve injury following a hamstring tear. In previous cases surgical intervention was performed to debride scar tissue around the sciatic nerve with the goal of full return to function for the patient. Objectives: The purpose of this case report is to describe the conservative interventions that allowed for recovery from a hamstring tear with sciatic nerve involvement. Case Description: The subject was a 53 year old female who developed foot drop and weakness in the common fibular nerve distribution following a grade 3 hamstring injury sustained during Nordic skiing. Nerve function and strength gradually returned over the course of several months of conservative rehabilitation which included on neural gliding and strengthening exercises. Outcomes: At 18 months post injury, the subject had returned to 95% of full sport function and 98% of full function with activities of daily living, as rated by the Hip Outcome Scale, and had full strength with manual muscle testing. Isokinetic testing revealed strength deficits of 11–23% in knee flexion peak torque at 60 degrees/second and 180 degrees/second respectively. Discussion: Sciatic nerve injury is a rare, but important potential consequence of severe hamstring strains. Clinicians should be cognizant of the potential injury to the nerve tissue following hamstring strains, so they may be dealt with in a prompt and appropriate manner. The use of neural gliding may be worth considering for a prophylactic effect following hamstring strains. PMID:21589670

  2. The role of renal sympathetic nerves in ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Elisabeth; Schlaich, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Decreased blood flow supply to the kidneys known as renal ischemia/reperfusion is a common occurrence during various clinical and surgical settings. This remains highly concerning as it is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). The kidneys have a rich supply of efferent and afferent sympathetic nerves playing a crucial physiological role in regulation of renal function. Studies in animal models of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury have indicated that very early during an ischemic event, the sympathetic nerves are activated and in concert with decreased nitric oxide availability, increased angiotensin II and several other molecules results in renal damage. Renal sympathetic inhibition or denervation seems to prevent or decrease some of the renal damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury but the evidence at present is based on animal studies and remains to be confirmed in the clinical setting. Remote ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has gained a lot of interest as a strategy to limit ischemia/reperfusion damage with some recent evidence suggesting that intact sympathetic nerves may be relevant in mediating protective effects. In this article, we review the experimental studies and emerging clinical studies that have investigated the role of sympathetic nerves following ischemia/reperfusion injury and studies exploring the role of sympathetic nerves in IPC and preventing tissue dysfunction induced by renal ischemia/reperfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  4. Orbitoethmoidal impacted injury by kitchen knife causing abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, José Thiers; da Silva Tabosa, Ana Karla; de Souza, Fernando Jordão; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    Impacted knife injuries in the maxillofacial region are rare and infrequently reported. In cases of injury involving orbit or eye, these reports are even rarer. Damage to the orbital contents may result in a rupture of the globe, extraocular muscle injury, lacrimal gland damage, and others. Orbital foreign bodies are not only difficult to detect, and clinical features vary according to its size, characteristics, shape, penetrating method, and site. In this report, a case of abducens nerve palsy after orbitoethmoidal knife injury is presented.

  5. [Incarcerated epitrochlear fracture with a cubital nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Moril-Peñalver, L; Pellicer-Garcia, V; Gutierrez-Carbonell, P

    2013-01-01

    Injuries of the medial epicondyle are relatively common, mostly affecting children between 7 and 15 years. The anatomical characteristics of this apophysis can make diagnosis difficult in minimally displaced fractures. In a small percentage of cases, the fractured fragment may occupy the retroepitrochlear groove. The presence of dysesthesias in the territory of the ulnar nerve requires urgent open reduction of the incarcerated fragment. A case of a seven-year-old male patient is presented, who required surgical revision due to a displaced medial epicondyle fracture associated with ulnar nerve injury. A review of the literature is also made.

  6. Curcumin promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is capable of promoting peripheral nerve regeneration in normal condition. However, it is unclear whether its beneficial effect on nerve regeneration still exists under diabetic mellitus. The present study was designed to investigate such a possibility. Diabetes in rats was developed by a single dose of streptozotocin at 50 mg/kg. Immediately after nerve crush injury, the diabetic rats were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with curcumin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg), or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by morphometric analysis and retrograde labeling. The functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies and behavioral analysis. Axonal regeneration and functional recovery was significantly enhanced by curcumin, which were significantly better than those in vehicle saline group. In addition, high doses of curcumin (100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than low dose (50 mg/kg). In conclusion, curcumin is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetes mellitus, highlighting its therapeutic values as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injury repair in diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. JAB1 is Involved in Neuropathic Pain by Regulating JNK and NF-κB Activation After Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiangdong; Yu, Jiang; Xu, Xingguo; Wei, Xiaojia; Gu, Xiaoling; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Dongmei; Xu, Zhongling

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion or dysfunction of the somatosensory nervous system, is a severe debilitating condition with which clinical treatment remains challenging. Jun activation domain-binding protein (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in several signaling pathways, controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the expression and possible function of JAB1 in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain has not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of JAB1. Here, employing a neuropathic pain model induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) on rats, we reported the role of JAB1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. By western blot, we found that CCI markedly up-regulated JAB1 expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. Immunofluorescent assay demonstrated that JAB1 was extensively localized in IB4-, CGRP- and NF200-positive neurons in the injured L5 DRG, and mainly co-localized with NeuN in spinal cord. In addition, we showed that CCI induced phosphorylation of p65 and JNK in vivo. Intrathecal injection of JAB1 siRNA significantly attenuated the CCI-induced JNK and p65 phosphorylation and alleviated both mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in rats. Taken together, these results suggested that JAB1 promotes neuropathic pain via positively regulating JNK and NF-κB activation.

  8. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Simon; Liu, Xue Jun; Kwan, Chun; Salter, Michael W

    2010-11-02

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS) to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) remains an open question. Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C-fibers each cause an increase in the permeability of

  9. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, Gareth S.; Keay, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four ‘disability-specific’ genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular structure

  10. Ego constriction.

    PubMed

    Brakel, Linda A W

    2004-09-01

    The terms ego constriction, ego inhibition, and ego restriction have not been clearly differentiated in their usage in the literature. In this paper a rationale for "ego constriction" as an entity distinct from both ego inhibition and ego restriction is given, despite its clear similarities to each. In a person with an ego inhibition, the ego inhibits a part of its own functioning because a particular function is linked to an unacceptable impulse. It is an internalized conflict. The person with an ego restriction, in contrast, avoids psychological pain triggered from an area in the outside world by restricting activity in that area. Like each of these problems but different, a person with an ego constriction first externalizes an internalized conflict associated with important functions or activities. Then, only through a series of particular obligatory steps can the person "overcome" the ego constriction--albeit temporarily. It is noted in this paper that the function of the specified obligatory steps is structurally parallel to the rigid obligatory behavior necessary for genital gratification in the perversions. As the recognition of this distinction arose in the course of an analysis of a mental health professional, something of the necessarily shared nature of analytic work is noticeable, shining through as the background for the work of this paper.

  11. Increased BACE1 activity inhibits peripheral nerve regeneration after injury.

    PubMed

    Tallon, Carolyn; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer; Farah, Mohamed H

    2017-10-01

    Axons of the peripheral nervous system possess the capacity to regenerate following injury. Previously, we showed that genetically knocking out Beta-Site APP-Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE1) leads to increased nerve regeneration. Two cellular components, macrophages and neurons, contribute to enhanced nerve regeneration in BACE1 knockout mice. Here, we utilized a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses BACE1 in its neurons to investigate whether neuronal BACE1 has an inverse effect on regeneration following nerve injury. We performed a sciatic nerve crush in BACE1 transgenic mice and control wild-type littermates, and evaluated the extent of both morphological and physiological improvements over time. At the earliest time point of 3days, we observed a significant decrease in the length of axonal sprouts growing out from the crush site in BACE1 transgenic mice. At later times (10 and 15days post-crush), there were significant reductions in the number of myelinated axons in the sciatic nerve and the percentage of re-innervated neuromuscular junctions in the gastrocnemius muscle. Transgenic mice had a functional electrophysiological delay in the recovery up to 8weeks post-crush compared to controls. These results indicate that BACE1 activity levels have an inverse effect on peripheral nerve repair after injury. The results obtained in this study provide evidence that neuronal BACE1 activity levels impact peripheral nerve regeneration. This data has clinical relevance by highlighting a novel drug target to enhance peripheral nerve repair, an area which currently does not have any approved therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nerve transfers for the restoration of hand function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Susan E; Yee, Andrew; Ray, Wilson Z

    2012-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a significant public health problem. Despite advances in understanding of the pathophysiological processes of acute and chronic SCI, corresponding advances in translational applications have lagged behind. Nerve transfers using an expendable nearby motor nerve to reinnervate a denervated nerve have resulted in more rapid and improved functional recovery than traditional nerve graft reconstructions following a peripheral nerve injury. The authors present a single case of restoration of some hand function following a complete cervical SCI utilizing nerve transfers.

  13. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing.

  14. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury.

  15. Behavioral indices of ongoing pain are largely unchanged in male mice with tissue or nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Rochelle; Scherrer, Gregory; Goulding, Evan H.; Tecott, Laurence H.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the impact of chronic pain on the quality of life in patients, including changes to affective state and daily life activities, rodent preclinical models rarely address this aspect of chronic pain. To better understand the behavioral consequences of the tissue and nerve injuries typically used to model neuropathic and inflammatory pain in mice, we measured home cage and affective state behaviors in animals with spared nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury (CCI) or intraplantar CFA. Mechanical hypersensitivity is prominent in each of these conditions and persists for many weeks. Home cage behavior was continuously monitored for 16 days in a system that measures locomotion, feeding and drinking and allows for precise analysis of circadian patterns. When monitored after injury, animals with SNI and CFA behaved no differently from controls in any aspect of daily life. Animals with CCI were initially less active, but the difference between CCI and controls disappeared by 2 weeks after injury. Further, in all pain models, there was no change in any measure of affective state. We conclude that in these standard models of persistent pain, despite the development of prolonged hypersensitivity, the mice do not have significantly altered “quality of life”. As alteration in daily life activities is the feature that is so disrupted in patients with chronic pain, our results suggest that the models used here do not fully reflect the human conditions and point to a need for development of a murine chronic pain model in which lifestyle changes are manifest. PMID:21256675

  16. Axoplasmic importins enable retrograde injury signaling in lesioned nerve.

    PubMed

    Hanz, Shlomit; Perlson, Eran; Willis, Dianna; Zheng, Jun-Qi; Massarwa, R'ada; Huerta, Juan J; Koltzenburg, Martin; Kohler, Matthias; van-Minnen, Jan; Twiss, Jeffery L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2003-12-18

    Axoplasmic proteins containing nuclear localization signals (NLS) signal retrogradely by an unknown mechanism in injured nerve. Here we demonstrate that the importin/karyopherin alpha and beta families underlie this process. We show that importins are found in axons at significant distances from the cell body and that importin beta protein is increased after nerve lesion by local translation of axonal mRNA. This leads to formation of a high-affinity NLS binding complex that traffics retrogradely with the motor protein dynein. Trituration of synthetic NLS peptide at the injury site of axotomized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons delays their regenerative outgrowth, and NLS introduction to sciatic nerve concomitantly with a crush injury suppresses the conditioning lesion induced transition from arborizing to elongating growth in L4/L5 DRG neurons. These data suggest a model whereby lesion-induced upregulation of axonal importin beta may enable retrograde transport of signals that modulate the regeneration of injured neurons.

  17. Functional and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Traumatic Peripheral Nerve-Muscle Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Renate; Gey, Manuel; Abaei, Alireza; Warnecke, Daniela; de Roy, Luisa; Dürselen, Lutz; Rasche, Volker; Knöll, Bernd

    2017-07-08

    Traumatic injuries to human peripheral nerves are frequently associated with damage to nerve surrounding tissues including muscles and blood vessels. Currently, most rodent models of peripheral nerve injuries (e.g., facial or sciatic nerve) employ surgical nerve transection with scissors or scalpels. However, such an isolated surgical nerve injury only mildly damages neighboring tissues and weakly activates an immune response. In order to provide a rodent nerve injury model accounting for such nerve-associated tissue damage and immune cell activation, we developed a drop tower-based facial nerve trauma model in mice. We compare nerve regeneration in this novel peripheral nerve trauma model with the established surgical nerve injury along several parameters. These include gene expression, histological and functional facial motoneuron (FMN) regeneration, facial nerve degeneration, immune cell activation and muscle damage. Regeneration-associated genes (RAGs; e.g., Atf3) were strongly induced in FMNs subjected to traumatic and surgical injury. Regeneration of FMNs and functional recovery of whisker movement were faster in traumatic versus complete surgical injury, thus cutting down experimentation time. Wallerian degeneration of distal nerve stumps was readily observed in this novel trauma injury model. Importantly, drop tower-inflicted facial nerve injury resulted in muscle damage, activation of muscle satellite cell markers (PAX7) and pronounced infiltration of immune cells to the injury site only in this model but not upon surgical nerve transection. Thus, we provide a novel rodent PNS trauma model that can be easily adopted to other PNS nerves such as the sciatic nerve. Since this nerve trauma model replicates multiple tissue damage frequently encountered in clinical routine, it will be well suited to identify molecular and cellular mechanisms of PNS nerve repair in wild-type and genetically modified rodents.

  18. Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria

    2016-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with

  19. The Histological Effects of Ozone Therapy on Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Somay, Hakan; Emon, Selin Tural; Uslu, Serap; Orakdogen, Metin; Meric, Zeynep Cingu; Ince, Umit; Hakan, Tayfun

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common, important problem that lacks a definitive, effective treatment. It can cause neurologic deficits ranging from paresthesia to paralysis. This study evaluated the effect of ozone therapy on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into control sham surgery, sciatic nerve injury, and sciatic nerve injury with ozone groups (each n = 8). The sciatic nerve injury was inflicted via De Koning's crush-force method. The sciatic nerve injury group received medical air and the sciatic nerve injury ozone group received 0.7 mg/kg ozone. Sciatic nerve samples were obtained 4 weeks after injury. Vascular congestion, vacuolization, edema formation, S100 expression, and the thicknesses of the perineurium and endoneurium and diameter of the injured sciatic nerves were evaluated. The diameter of the sciatic nerve and thicknesses of the perineurium and epineurium were significantly greater in the sciatic nerve injury group (P < 0.05) and significantly less in the sciatic nerve injury with ozone group (P < 0.001). High S100 immunoreactivity was seen in the sciatic nerve injury group compared with the other 2 groups (P < 0.05). The distributions of vascular congestion and vacuolization were significantly less in the sciatic nerve injury with ozone group (P < 0.05). Ozone therapy improved sciatic nerve injury recovery without causing an increase in fibrotic tissue. Ozone reduced fibrosis, vascular congestion, vacuolization, and edema in rodents. Ozone treatment might be used to assist in sciatic nerve injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolated optic nerve oedema as unusual presentation of electric injury.

    PubMed

    Izzy, Saef; Deeb, Wissam; Peters, George B; Mitchell, Ann

    2014-10-15

    A 45-year-old man with no significant medical history presented following an electric current injury (380 V). He developed multiple systemic injuries including third degree burns and after 1 week of hospitalisation he reported unilateral visual changes. Examination suggested the presence of optic nerve oedema without evidence of haemorrhage, exudate or vessel abnormality. This was considered to be related to the electric shock. A trial of corticosteroids was considered. He was followed up to 5 months in clinic and was noted to have developed unilateral optic atrophy and no other systemic manifestations. Initial and 5 months follow-up optic nerve colour photograph and optical coherence topography were documented. The present case highlights the fact that electric current injury can present with only a unilateral ischaemic optic neuropathy, the need for early diagnosis for timely treatment and the controversial role of corticosteroids.

  1. Curcumin exerts antinociceptive effects by inhibiting the activation of astrocytes in spinal dorsal horn and the intracellular extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in rat model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Feng-Tao; Liang, Jiang-Jun; Liu, Ling; Cao, Ming-Hui; Li, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activation of glial cells and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway play an important role in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Curcumin can alleviate the symptom of inflammatory pain by inhibiting the production and release of interleukin and tumor necrosis factor. However, whether curcumin affects neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and the possible mechanism involved are still unknown. This study investigated the effects of tolerable doses of curcumin on the activation of astrocytes and ERK signaling in the spinal dorsal horn in rat model of neuropathic pain. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: a control (sham operated) group, and chronic constriction injury groups (to induce neuropathic pain) that were either untreated or treated with curcumin. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia thresholds were measured. The distribution and morphological changes of astrocytes were observed by immunofluorescence. Western blotting was used to detect changes in the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and phosphorylated ERK. Injured rats showed obvious mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, and the fluorescence intensity of GFAP were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of injured compared with control rats. The soma of astrocytes also appeared hypertrophied in injured animals. Expression of GFAP and phosphorylated ERK was also significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of injured compared with control rats. Curcumin reduced the injury-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, the increase in the fluorescence intensity of GFAP and the hypertrophy of astrocytic soma, activation of GFAP and phosphorylation of ERK in the spinal dorsal horn. Curcumin can markedly alleviate nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The analgesic effect of curcumin may be attributed to its inhibition of astrocyte hypertrophy

  2. Effect of vagus nerve stimulation on thermal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Xue-Min; Li, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yan-Lin; Liang, Hui; Huang, Yue; Yuan, Xiang; Zhou, Qing; Zhang, Zong-Ze

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the effects of vagus nerve stimulation on haemodynamics, pulmonary histopathology, arterial blood gas and pro-inflammatory responses to thermal injury. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into six equal groups: normal control (NC) group; thermal injury (TEM) group subjected to 40% total body surface area (%TBSA) third-degree thermal injury; vagotomy (VGX) group subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy after thermal injury; electrical stimulation (STM) group subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy plus the left vagus nerve trunk electrical stimulation (5 V, 2 ms and 1 Hz) after thermal injury; the antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (MRA) group administrated with atropine (0.1 mg kg(-1)) before electrical stimulation and the antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (NRA) group administrated with hexamethonium (10 mg kg(-1)) before electrical stimulation. The haemodynamics, histopathology of lung tissue, arterial blood gas, lactic acid, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured. Vagus nerve electrical stimulation not only significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), but also decreased the infiltration of inflammatory cells into interstitial and alveolar spaces after thermal challenge and attenuated TNF-alpha and IL-6 production. Hexamethonium pre-treatment significantly reversed the effects of vagal electrical stimulation, but atropine administration before electrical stimulation had no such effects. Direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve might produce therapeutic effect on thermal injury. The effect may be realised by limiting the inflammatory response via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rats. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Distal Nerve Stump following Nerve Injury: Insights into Wallerian Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Gu, Xiaosong; Yi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Nerve injury is a common and difficult clinical problem worldwide with a high disability rate. Different from the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system is able to regenerate after injury. Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump contributes to the construction of a permissible microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration. To gain new molecular insights into Wallerian degeneration, this study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes and elucidate significantly involved pathways and cellular functions in the distal nerve stump following nerve injury. Microarray analysis showed that a few genes were differentially expressed at 0.5 and 1 h post nerve injury and later on a relatively larger number of genes were up-regulated or down-regulated. Ingenuity pathway analysis indicated that inflammation and immune response, cytokine signaling, cellular growth and movement, as well as tissue development and function were significantly activated following sciatic nerve injury. Notably, a cellular function highly related to nerve regeneration, which is called Nervous System Development and Function, was continuously activated from 4 days until 4 weeks post injury. Our results may provide further understanding of Wallerian degeneration from a genetic perspective, thus aiding the development of potential therapies for peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27999531

  4. Iatrogenic Injury to the Long Thoracic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Federico; Davoli, Giuseppe; Bouklas, Dimitri; Oricchio, Luca; Frati, Giacomo; Neri, Eugenio

    2001-01-01

    After heart surgery, complications affecting the brachial plexus have been reported in 2% to 38% of cases. The long thoracic nerve is vulnerable to damage at various levels, due to its long and superficial course. This nerve supplies the serratus anterior muscle, which has an important role in the abduction and elevation of the superior limb; paralysis of the serratus anterior causes “winged scapula,” a condition in which the arm cannot be lifted higher than 90° from the side. Unfortunately, the long thoracic nerve can be damaged by a wide variety of traumatic and nontraumatic occurrences, ranging from viral or nonviral disease to improper surgical technique, to the position of the patient during transfer to a hospital bed. Our patient, a 62-year-old man with triple-vessel disease, underwent myocardial revascularization in which right and left internal thoracic arteries and the left radial artery were grafted to the right coronary, descending anterior, and obtuse marginal arteries, respectively. Despite strong recovery and an apparently good postoperative course, the patient sued for damages due to subsequent winging of the left scapula. In this instance, the legal case has less to do with the cause of the lesion (which remains unclear) than with failure to adequately inform the patient of possible complications at the expense of the nervous system. The lesson is that each patient must receive detailed written and oral explanation of the potential benefits and all conceivable risks of a procedure. (Tex Heart Inst J 2001;28:315–7) PMID:11777160

  5. ISCHEMIC MODEL OF OPTIC NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, George A

    2005-01-01

    Purpose It is proposed that the anterior optic nerve is specifically susceptible to microcirculatory compromise contributing to the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Methods Ischemic optic neuropathy was induced by delivering endothelin-1 (ET-1) to the retrobulbar space in one eye of 12 primates for 6 to 12 months. Regional ganglion cell axonal sizes and densities were compared with the normal, contralateral eyes. Results Without changes of intraocular pressure, mean axonal density was significantly decreased in ET-1 eyes compared to controls (P = .03, paired t test). Two-way matched-pair analysis of variance showed a significant effect of ET-1 on overall axonal density (P < .0001). Among the animals with significant axonal loss, the mean axonal loss was 11.6%, and loss varied from 4% to 21%. Axonal loss was commonly localized within specific quadrants. Five animals were examined for preferential axonal size loss. As a group, there appears to be a tendency toward preferential large axonal loss, but the mean axonal loss of large and small axons did not meet significant differences (P = .1) However, examination of individual animals with significant loss shows significantly greater loss of large axons as compared to the small axons in three of the animals. Conclusions Chronic optic nerve ischemia causes demonstrable and localized damage of the optic nerve, without intraocular pressure elevation. There is preferential loss of large retinal ganglion cell axons in animals with significant axonal loss. Ischemia-induced focal axonal loss is similar to human glaucoma and may represent a differential regional vulnerability. PMID:17057819

  6. Late radiation injury to muscle and peripheral nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    1995-03-30

    Late radiation injury to muscles and peripheral nerves is infrequently observed. However, the success of radiation oncology has led to longer patient survival, providing a greater opportunity for late effects to develop, increase in severity and, possibly, impact the quality of life of the patient. In addition, when radiation therapy is combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy, the risk of late complications is likely to increase. It is clear that the incidence of complications involving muscles and nerves increases with time following radiation. The influence of volume has yet to be determined; however, an increased volume is likely to increase the risk of injury to muscles and nerves. Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the {alpha}/{beta} ratio for muscle is approximately 4 Gy and, possibly, 2 Gy for peripheral nerve, indicating the great influence of fractionation on response of these tissues. This is of concern for intraoperative radiation therapy, and for high dose rate brachytherapy. This review of clinical and experimental data discusses the response of muscle and nerves late after radiation therapy. A grading system has been proposed and endpoints suggested. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Availability of CBCT and iatrogenic alveolar nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Suomalainen, Anni; Apajalahti, Satu; Vehmas, Tapio; Ventä, Irja

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether the rapid increase in the availability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has changed the number of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries related to the removal of mandibular third molars in Finland. The hypothesis was that the number of nerve injuries should diminish due to better imaging methods. The number of CBCT devices, the annual number of CBCT examinations and the number of permanent IAN injuries occurring between 1997 and 2007 were analyzed. The data was collected from three national registers: the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, the Social Insurance Institution and the Patient Insurance Centre. A detailed analysis was made from the cases of permanent IAN injuries. The first CBCT device was registered in 2002 and the cumulative number of these devices in 2009 was 22. There was an increase from 555 to 3160 in the number of annual CBCT examinations during the period 2004-2009. The total number of permanent IAN injuries during the years 1997-2007 was 129 and remained stable throughout the period (regression analysis, p = 0.974, r (2) = 0.01). Contrary to this hypothesis, the availability of CBCT devices has had no significant influence on the number of IAN injuries related to mandibular third molar removals in Finland. More education should be given to optimize the use of CBCT to cover difficult cases that may give rise to complications.

  8. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Chailee F; Damitz, Lynn A; Gracely, Richard H; Mintz, Alice C; Zolnoun, Denniz A; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transobturator slings can be successfully used to treat stress urinary incontinence and improve quality of life through a minimally invasive vaginal approach. Persistent postoperative pain can occur and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Following a sling procedure, a patient complained of pinching clitoral and perineal pain. Her symptoms of localized clitoral pinching and pain became generalized over the ensuing years, eventually encompassing the entire left vulvovaginal region. Aim The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical utility of conventional pain management techniques used for the evaluation and management of patients with postoperative pain following pelvic surgery. Methods We described a prototypical patient with persistent pain in and around the clitoral region complicating the clinical course of an otherwise successful sling procedure. We specifically discussed the utility of bedside sensory assessment techniques and selective nerve blocks in the evaluation and management of this prototypical patient. Results Neurosensory assessments and a selective nerve block enabled us to trace the source of the patient’s pain to nerve entrapment along the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. We then utilized a nerve stimulator-guided hydrodissection technique to release the scar contracture Conclusion This case demonstrates that the dorsal nerve of the clitoris is vulnerable to injury directly and/or indirectly. Assimilation of a time-honored pain management construct for the evaluation and management of patients’ pain may improve outcomes while obviating the need for invasive surgery. PMID:27729812

  9. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  10. Maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure prevents worsening of ventilator-induced lung injury caused by chest wall constriction in surfactant-depleted rats

    PubMed Central

    Loring, Stephen H.; Pecchiari, Matteo; Valle, Patrizia Della; Monaco, Ario; Gentile, Guendalina; D'Angelo, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To see whether in acute lung injury (ALI) 1) compression of the lungs caused by thoracoabdominal constriction degrades lung function and worsens ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and 2) maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (Pl) by increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) reduces the deleterious effects of chest wall constriction. Design Experimental study in rats. Setting Physiology laboratory. Interventions ALI was induced in 3 groups of 9 rats by saline lavage. Nine animals immediately sacrificed served as control group. Group L had lavage only, group LC had the chest wall constricted with an elastic binder, and group LCP had the same chest constriction but with PEEP raised to maintain end-expiratory Pl. After lavage, all groups were ventilated with the same pattern for 1½ hr. Measurements and Main Results Pl, measured with an esophageal balloon-catheter, lung volume changes, arterial blood gasses and pH were assessed during mechanical ventilation (MV). Lung wet-to-dry ratio (W/D), albumin, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and serum E-selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) were measured at the end of MV. Lavage caused hypoxemia and acidemia, increased lung resistance and elastance, and decreased end-expiratory lung volume. With prolonged MV, lung mechanics, hypoxemia, and W/D were significantly worse in group LC. Pro-inflammatory cytokines except E-selectin were elevated in serum and BALF in all groups, with significantly greater levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in group LC, which also exhibited significantly worse bronchiolar injury and greater heterogeneity of airspace expansion at a fixed Pl than other groups. Conclusions Chest wall constriction in ALI reduces lung volume, worsens hypoxemia, and increases pulmonary edema, mechanical abnormalities, pro-inflammatory mediator release, and histological signs of VILI. Maintaining end-expiratory Pl at preconstriction

  11. Restoration of shoulder abduction by nerve transfer in avulsed brachial plexus injury: evaluation of 99 patients with various nerve transfers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, D C; Lee, G W; Hashem, F; Wei, F C

    1995-07-01

    During the 5-year period between 1987 and 1991, 99 patients with total root or upper root (C5, C6, or C7) injuries were treated by nerve transfer to obtain shoulder abduction. More than eight different combinations of coaptation between donor nerves (intercostal nerves, phrenic nerve, spinal accessory nerve, ipsilateral C7, or cervical motor nerves) and recipient nerves (suprascapular nerve, axillary nerve, and upper trunk or C5) were applied. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Different results were obtained in each category. Simultaneous neurotization of the suprascapular and axillary nerves with the phrenic and spinal accessory nerves obtained much better and more reliable shoulder abduction. Neurotization of the C5 spinal nerve by multiple nerve transfers was another good option that yielded good shoulder abduction in a single patient. If the phrenic nerve was traumatized, neurotization of the suprascapular nerve solely with the spinal accessory nerve was still capable of achieving an acceptable range of shoulder abduction.

  12. Clinical Decision Support and Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Androwich, Ida M; Dykes, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Decision support at the point of care has been demonstrated to be an effective tool in providing a safe environment and improving patient outcomes. The operating room is typically an area where advanced technology is introduced to nurses on a regular basis. This quality improvement project focused on preventing a peripheral nerve injury, which is an example of a postoperative adverse event that is considered preventable. Injury of a peripheral nerve is the result of compression, hyperextension, flexion, or ischemia surrounding the nerve. The goals for this project were to improve the knowledge of peripheral nerve injury of the operating room nurses, design and implement a peripheral nerve injury assessment screen that could provide decision support within the operating room record, improve the nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions, and (long term) decrease the incidence of peripheral nerve injury. A decision support screen within the operating room record was designed to supplement the operating room nurse's risk assessment for peripheral nerve injury. The components of this project involved a preliminary and postproject surveys on peripheral nerve injury knowledge, an educational presentation, and a retrospective random review of nursing documentation in the operating room electronic health records. Project results demonstrated a significant increase in nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions (63%-92%) and a positive attitude toward their exposure to basic decision support (P = .046). Recommendations for future studies and establishing a standardized coding system for peripheral nerve injury identification were identified.

  13. Ethical considerations in elective amputation after traumatic peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Keith P.; Holloway, Robert G.; Landau, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries often complicate extremity trauma, and may cause substantial functional deficits. We have encountered patients who request amputation of such injured extremities, with the goal of prosthetic replacement as a means to restore function. Data on long-term outcomes of limb salvage vs amputation are limited and somewhat contradictory, leaving how to respond to such requests in the hands of the treating physician. We present example cases, drawn from our experience with wounded soldiers in a peripheral nerve injury clinic, in order to facilitate discussion of the ways in which these patients stress the system of medical decision-making while identifying ethical questions central to responding to these requests. PMID:25279253

  14. Phonatory characteristics of patients undergoing thyroidectomy without laryngeal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hong, K H; Kim, Y K

    1997-10-01

    Complications that arise after thyroid surgery may be associated with infection, hemorrhage, hormonal problems, and laryngeal nerve injury. Voice alteration after thyroidectomy is usually caused by recurrent or superior laryngeal nerve injury. This voice dysfunction may also be associated with laryngotracheal fixation with impairment of vertical movement or by temporary malfunction of the strap muscles after surgery. In this study, we evaluated the voice function phonetically before and after thyroidectomy in 54 patients, although function of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves was normal. During surgery, the superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves were identified and protected, and after surgery electromyographic testing of the cricothyroid muscle was performed. Typical voice symptoms after surgery were easy fatigue during phonation and difficulty with high pitch and singing voice. Acoustic analysis revealed that the phonation time and fundamental frequency were not changed after surgery, but the speaking fundamental frequency, range of speaking fundamental frequency, and vocal range were significantly diminished after surgery. These data allowed us to suggest that the cause of voice dysfunction is not seen in neural lesions, but in a disturbance of the extralaryngeal skeleton. These voice changes emphasize the importance of the extralaryngeal mechanism for pitch control.

  15. Tips to avoid nerve injury in elbow arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hilgersom, Nick F J; Oh, Luke S; Flipsen, Mark; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2017-01-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a technical challenging surgical procedure because of close proximity of neurovascular structures and the limited articular working space. With the rising number of elbow arthroscopies being performed nowadays due to an increasing number of surgeons performing this procedure and a broader range of indications, a rise in complications is foreseen. With this editorial we hope to create awareness of possible complications of elbow arthroscopy, particularly nerve injuries, and provide a guideline to avoid complications during elbow arthroscopy. PMID:28251060

  16. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use.

  17. Immunoreactive Changes in the Hypoglossal Nucleus after Nerve Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    Skene & Willard, 1981a,b). Levels of synthetic enzymes for neurotransmitter biosynthesis have been shown to be reduced after nerve injury (Ross et...significantly with maturity ( Skene & Willard, 1981b); GAPs have also been shown to increase after axotomy ( Skene & Willard, 1981a). In rat hypoglossal...proteins (Willard & Skene , 1981a,b; Redshaw and Bisby, 1984). Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a novel

  18. Effects of intermedin on dorsal root ganglia in the transmission of neuropathic pain in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Qiu, Shu-yi; Xu, Ling-yun; Zhang, Chun-ping; Yi, Yun; Wu, Qin; Huang, Li-ping; Liu, Shuang-mei; Wu, Bing; Peng, Li-chao; Song, Miao-miao; Gao, Yun; Liang, Shang-dong

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a common and severely disabling state that affects millions of people worldwide. The P2X3 receptor plays a crucial role in facilitating pain transmission. Intermedin (IMD), which is also known as adrenomedullin 2 (AMD2) is a newly discovered hormone that is a member of the calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide family. The present research investigates the effects of IMD on pain transmission in neuropathic pain states as mediated by P2X3 receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats were used as the neuropathic pain model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups as follows: blank control group (Control), sham operation group (Sham), CCI rats treated with saline group (CCI+NS), CCI rats treated with IMD1-53 group (CCI+IMD1-53 ), and CCI rats treated with IMD inhibitor IMD14-47 group (CCI+IMD14-47 ). The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was tested by the von Frey method, and the thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) was tested via automatic thermal stimulus instruments. Changes in the expression of P2X3 receptors and IMD in CCI rat L4/L5 DRG were detected using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. After treatment with intrathecal injection (i.t.), mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the CCI+IMD1-53 group was maintained, but MWT and TWL in the CCI+IMD14-47 groups increased. The expression levels of P2X3 receptors and IMD in L4/L5 DRG in the CCI+NS and CCI+IMD1-53 groups were significantly increased compared with those in the Control group or the Sham group. After application of IMD14-47 in CCI rats, there was a decrease in the expression levels of P2X3 receptors and IMD in L4/L5 DRG. The phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 in L4/L5 DRG in the CCI+NS group and the CCI+IMD1-53 group was stronger than that in the Control group or the Sham group; however, the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 in the CCI+IMD14-47 group was much

  19. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies. Results In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement. Conclusions The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management. PMID:24421983

  20. Concepts in Neural Coaptation: Using the Facial Nerve as a Paradigm in Understanding Principles Surrounding Nerve Injury and Repair.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, Sameep; Helman, Samuel; Saman, Masoud; Cooch, Nisha; Wood-Smith, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with nerve transection face unpredictable outcomes, and microsurgical interventions have variable success. The facial nerve in particular is prone to traumatic transection and leads to debilitating sequelae. Surgeons have used multiple modalities of enhancing nerve regeneration and restoring premorbid functionality. The success of nerve regeneration is predicated on multiple physiologic factors. This article sought to collate the literature on factors influencing nerve damage and repair, using the facial nerve as a paradigm. As such, facial reanimation will also be briefly discussed as it relates to the central theme. A PubMed search was conducted to find articles published on nerve physiology and anatomy, as well as repair. Articles from 1947 to 2013 were studied; however, the preponderance of articles in the study was from the past 15 years to include recent advances. The type and severity of nerve injury, as well as timing of intervention, influence the anatomical and functional outcomes of nerve repair. As there is no uniform solution for all reconstructive challenges, multiple factors must be considered when planning an intervention. Future advances suggest a potential role for engineered nerve conduits in providing a tool for nerve regrowth. Our review has detailed mechanisms of nerve injury, physiology, interventions in nerve repair, and future direction of this expanding field. This review provides a guide for the microsurgeon in factors involved in restorative success.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygenation alleviates chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and inhibits GABAergic neuron apoptosis in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiqun; Li, Fenghua; Thomas, Sebastian; Yang, Zhongjin

    2017-09-15

    Dysfunction of GABAergic inhibitory controls contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. We examined our hypotheses that (1) chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain is associated with increased spinal GABAergic neuron apoptosis, and (2) hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) alleviates CCI-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting GABAergic neuron apoptosis. Male rats were randomized into 3 groups: CCI, CCI+HBO and the control group (SHAM). Mechanical allodynia was tested daily following CCI procedure. HBO rats were treated at 2.4 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for 60min once per day. The rats were euthanized and the spinal cord harvested on day 8 and 14 post-CCI. Detection of GABAergic cells and apoptosis was performed. The percentages of double positive stained cells (NeuN/GABA), cleaved caspase-3 or Cytochrome C in total GABAergic cells or in total NeuN positive cells were calculated. HBO significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with significantly increased spinal apoptotic GABA-positive neurons. HBO considerably decreased these spinal apoptotic cells. Cytochrome-C-positive neurons and cleaved caspase-3-positive neurons were also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO significantly decreased these positive cells. Caspase-3 mRNA was also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO reduced mRNA expression of caspase-3. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. HBO alleviated CCI-induced neuropathic pain and reduced GABAergic neuron apoptosis. The beneficial effect of HBO may be via its inhibitory role in CCI-induced GABAergic neuron apoptosis by suppressing mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the spinal cord. Increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal

  2. Side-to-side nerve bridges reduce muscle atrophy after peripheral nerve injury in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Shea, Jill E; Garlick, Jared W; Salama, Mohamed E; Mendenhall, Shaun D; Moran, Linh A; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can result in muscle atrophy and long-term disability. We hypothesize that creating a side-to-side bridge to link an injured nerve with a healthy nerve will reduce muscle atrophy and improve muscle function. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n = 7 per group). Group 1: transection only--a 10-mm gap was created in the proximal tibial nerve; group 2: transected plus repaired--the transected tibial nerve was repaired; group 3: transected plus repaired plus nerve bridge--transected nerve repaired with a distal nerve bridge between the tibial and peroneal nerves via epineurial windows; and group 4: transected plus nerve bridge--transected tibial nerve left unrepaired and distal bridge added. Gait was assessed every 2 wk. At 90 d the following measures were determined: gastrocnemius mass, muscle and nerve nuclear density, and axonal infiltration into the nerve bridge. Groups 3 and 4 had greater improvements in walking track recovery than groups 1 and 2. Group 3's gastrocnemius muscles exhibited the least amount of atrophy. Groups 1, 2, and 4 exhibited greater histologic appearance of muscle breakdown compared with group 3 and control muscle. Finally, most bridges in groups 3 and 4 had neuronal sprouting via the epineurial windows. Our study demonstrated reduced muscle atrophy with a side-to-side nerve bridge in the setting of peripheral nerve injury. These results support the application of novel side-to-side bridges in combination with traditional end-to-end neurorrhaphy to preserve muscle viability after peripheral nerve injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The response of spinal microglia to chemotherapy-evoked painful peripheral neuropathies is distinct from that evoked by traumatic nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, F. Y.; Xiao, W.-H.; Bennett, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathies produced by nerve trauma are accompanied by substantial axonal degeneration and by a response in spinal cord microglia that is characterized by hypertrophy and increased expression of several intracellular and cell-surface markers, including ionizing calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and Cd11b (a complement receptor 3 antigen recognized by the OX42 antibody). The microglia response has been hypothesized to be essential for the pathogenesis of the neuropathic pain state. In contrast, the painful peripheral neuropathies produced by low doses of cancer chemotherapeutics do not produce degeneration of axons in the peripheral nerve, although they do cause partial degeneration of the sensory axons’ distal-most tips, i.e. the intraepidermal nerve fibers that form the axons’ terminal receptor arbors. The question thus arises as to whether the relatively minor and distal axonal injury characterizing the chemotherapy-evoked neuropathies is sufficient to evoke the microglial response that is seen after traumatic nerve injury. We examined the lumbar spinal cord of rats with painful peripheral neuropathies due to the anti-neoplastic agents, paclitaxel, vincristine, and oxaliplatin, and the anti-retroviral agent, 2′,3′-dideoxycytidine (ddC), and compared them to rats with a complete sciatic nerve transection and the partial sciatic nerve injury produced in the chronic constriction injury model (CCI). As expected, microglia hypertrophy and increased expression of Iba1 were pronounced in the nerve transection and CCI animals. However, there was no microglia hypertrophy or increased Iba1 staining in the animals treated with paclitaxel, vincristine, oxaliplatin, or ddC. These results suggest that the mechanisms that produce neuropathic pain after exposure to chemotherapeutics may be fundamentally different than those operating after nerve trauma. PMID:21195745

  4. Sciatic Nerve Injury After Proximal Hamstring Avulsion and Repair.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas J; Spinner, Robert J; Mohan, Rohith; Gibbs, Christopher M; Krych, Aaron J

    2017-07-01

    Muscle bellies of the hamstring muscles are intimately associated with the sciatic nerve, putting the sciatic nerve at risk of injury associated with proximal hamstring avulsion. There are few data informing the magnitude of this risk, identifying risk factors for neurologic injury, or determining neurologic outcomes in patients with distal sciatic symptoms after surgery. To characterize the frequency and nature of sciatic nerve injury and distal sciatic nerve-related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion and to characterize the influence of surgery on these symptoms. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a retrospective review of patients with proximal partial or complete hamstring avulsion. The outcome of interest was neurologic symptoms referable to the sciatic nerve distribution below the knee. Neurologic symptoms in operative patients were compared pre- and postoperatively. The cohort consisted of 162 patients: 67 (41.4%) operative and 95 (58.6%) nonoperative. Sciatic nerve-related symptoms were present in 22 operative and 23 nonoperative patients, for a total of 45 (27.8%) patients (8 [4.9%] motor deficits, 11 [6.8%] sensory deficits, and 36 [22.2%] with neuropathic pain). Among the operative cohort, 3 of 3 (100.0%) patients showed improvement in their motor deficit postoperatively, 3 of 4 (75.0%) patients' sensory symptoms improved, and 17 of 19 (89.5%) patients had improvement in pain. A new or worsening deficit occurred in 5 (7.5%) patients postoperatively (2 [3.1%] motor deficits, 1 [1.5%] sensory deficit, and 3 [4.5%] with new pain). Predictors of operative intervention included lower age (odds ratio [OR], 0.952; 95% CI, 0.921-0.982; P = .001) and complete avulsion (OR, 10.292; 95% CI, 2.526-72.232; P < .001). Presence of neurologic deficit was not predictive. Sciatic nerve-related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion are underrecognized. Currently, neurologic symptoms are not considered when determining whether to pursue operative

  5. Peripheral nerve grafts support regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Amin, Arthi A; Tom, Veronica J; Houle, John D

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic insults to the spinal cord induce both immediate mechanical damage and subsequent tissue degeneration leading to a substantial physiological, biochemical, and functional reorganization of the spinal cord. Various spinal cord injury (SCI) models have shown the adaptive potential of the spinal cord and its limitations in the case of total or partial absence of supraspinal influence. Meaningful recovery of function after SCI will most likely result from a combination of therapeutic strategies, including neural tissue transplants, exogenous neurotrophic factors, elimination of inhibitory molecules, functional sensorimotor training, and/or electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles or spinal circuits. Peripheral nerve grafts provide a growth-permissive substratum and local neurotrophic factors to enhance the regenerative effort of axotomized neurons when grafted into the site of injury. Regenerating axons can be directed via the peripheral nerve graft toward an appropriate target, but they fail to extend beyond the distal graft-host interface because of the deposition of growth inhibitors at the site of SCI. One method to facilitate the emergence of axons from a graft into the spinal cord is to digest the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are associated with a glial scar. Importantly, regenerating axons that do exit the graft are capable of forming functional synaptic contacts. These results have been demonstrated in acute injury models in rats and cats and after a chronic injury in rats and have important implications for our continuing efforts to promote structural and functional repair after SCI.

  6. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  7. Follow-up evaluation with ultrasonography of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Yue; Yue, Linxian; Chiu, Jack; He, Fanding; Wu, Xiaojing; Zang, Bin; Lu, Bin; Yao, Xiaoke; Jiang, Zirui

    2014-01-01

    Published data on earthquake-associated peripheral nerve injury is very limited. Ultrasonography has been proven to be efficient in the clinic to diagnose peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound in the evaluation of persistent peripheral nerve injuries 1 year after the Wenchuan earthquake. Thirty-four patients with persistent clinical symptoms and neurologic signs of impaired nerve function were evaluated with sonography prior to surgical repair. Among 34 patients, ultrasonography showed that 48 peripheral nerves were entrapped, and 11 peripheral nerves were disrupted. There was one case of misdiagnosis on ultrasonography. The concordance rate of ultrasonographic findings with those of surgical findings was 98%. A total of 48 involved nerves underwent neurolysis and the symptoms resolved. Only five nerves had scar tissue entrapment. Preoperative and postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic results were concordant, which verified that ultrasonography is useful for preoperative diagnosis and postoperative evaluation of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:25206859

  8. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Yang, Bao-lin; Liu, Zeng-xu; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Wen-jun; Yuan, Keng; Zeng, Hui-hong; Zhu, Gao-chun; Liu, De-ming; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26487865

  9. Physiological properties of spinal lamina II GABAergic neurons in mice following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Schoffnegger, Doris; Heinke, Bernhard; Sommer, Claudia; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2006-12-15

    Aberrant GABAergic inhibition in spinal dorsal horn may underlie some forms of neuropathic pain. Potential, but yet unexplored, mechanisms include reduced excitability, abnormal discharge patterns or altered synaptic input of spinal GABAergic neurons. To test these hypotheses, we quantitatively compared active and passive membrane properties, firing patterns in response to depolarizing current steps and synaptic input of GABAergic neurons in spinal dorsal horn lamina II of neuropathic and of control animals. Transgenic mice were used which expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) controlled by the GAD67 promoter, thereby labelling one-third of all spinal GABAergic neurons. In all neuropathic mice included in this study, chronic constriction injury of one sciatic nerve led to tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Control mice were sham-operated. Membrane excitability of GABAergic neurons from neuropathic or sham-treated animals was indistinguishable. The most frequent firing patterns observed in neuropathic and sham-operated animals were the initial burst (neuropathic: 46%, sham-treated: 42%), the gap (neuropathic: 31%, sham-treated: 29%) and the tonic firing pattern (neuropathic: 16%, sham-treated: 24%). The synaptic input from dorsal root afferents was similar in neuropathic and in control animals. Thus, a reduced membrane excitability, altered firing patterns or changes in synaptic input of this group of GABAergic neurons in lamina II of the spinal cord dorsal horn are unlikely causes for neuropathic pain.

  10. Prevention of iatrogenic inferior alveolar nerve injuries in relation to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Renton, T

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to review current hypotheses on the aetiology and prevention of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injuries in relation to dental procedures. The inferior alveolar nerve can be damaged during many dental procedures, including administration of local anaesthetic, implant bed preparation and placement, endodontics, third molar surgery and other surgical interventions. Damage to sensory nerves can result in anaesthesia, paraesthesia, pain, or a combination of the three. Pain is common in inferior alveolar nerve injuries, resulting in significant functional problems. The significant disability associated with these nerve injuries may also result in increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. Many of these iatrogenic nerve injuries can be avoided with careful patient assessment and planning. Furthermore, if the injury occurs there are emerging strategies that may facilitate recovery. The emphasis of this review is on how we may prevent these injuries and facilitate resolution in the early post surgical phase.

  11. Gait analysis in rats with peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, P; Matloub, H S; Sanger, J R; Narini, P

    2001-02-01

    Rats are commonly used to study peripheral nerve repair and grafting. The traditional footprint method to assess functional recovery is messy, indirect, and not useful when contractures develop in the animal model. The aim of the present study was to establish an accurate, reproducible, but simple, method to assess dynamic limb function. The basic quantitative aspects of a normal gait were characterized from 59 recorded walks in 23 rats. The video was digitized and analyzed frame by frame on a personal computer. Seven parameters of the gait were assessed: (1) walking speed; (2) stance phase, swing phase and right to left stance/swing ratio; (3) step length and step length ratio; (4) ankle angles at terminal stance and midswing; (5) tail height; (6) midline deviation; and (7) tail deviation. These gait parameters were then applied to groups of animals with sciatic (group S), tibial (group T), and peroneal (group P) nerve injuries. A discriminant analysis was performed to analyze each parameter and to compute a functional score. We found that the video gait analysis was superior to the footprint method and believe it will be very useful in future studies on peripheral nerve injury.

  12. Modified Quad surgery significantly improves the median nerve conduction and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nerve conduction studies or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have become an important tool in the investigation of peripheral nerve lesions, and is sensitive in detecting brachial plexus nerve injury, and other nerve injuries. To investigate whether the modified Quad surgical procedure improves nerve conductivity and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury (OBPI) patients. Methods All nerves were tested with direct functional electrical stimulation. A Prass probe was used to stimulate the nerves, and recording the response, the compound motor action potential (CMAP) in the muscle. SSEP monitoring was performed pre- and post modified Quad surgery, stimulating the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist, the radial nerve over the dorsum of the hand, recording the peripheral, cervical and cortical responses. All patients have had the modified Quad surgery (n = 19). The modified Quad surgery is a muscle release and transfer surgery with nerve decompressions. All patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of standardized movements, the modified Mallet scale to index active shoulder movements. Results The cervical responses were significantly lower in amplitude in the affected arm than the un-affected arm. The median nerve conduction was significantly improved from 8.04 to 9.26 (P < 0.022) post-operatively. The shoulder abduction was also significantly improved (pre-op 30° ± 23.3 to 143° ± 33.7, p < 0.0001), with a mean follow-up of 43 months after the modified Quad surgery in these patients. Conclusion Median nerve conduction, and shoulder abduction were significantly improved in OBPI children, who have undergone the modified Quad procedure with neuroplasty, internal microneurolysis and tetanic stimulation of the median nerve. PMID:23714699

  13. Modified Quad surgery significantly improves the median nerve conduction and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Kumar, Nirupuma; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have become an important tool in the investigation of peripheral nerve lesions, and is sensitive in detecting brachial plexus nerve injury, and other nerve injuries. To investigate whether the modified Quad surgical procedure improves nerve conductivity and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury (OBPI) patients. All nerves were tested with direct functional electrical stimulation. A Prass probe was used to stimulate the nerves, and recording the response, the compound motor action potential (CMAP) in the muscle. SSEP monitoring was performed pre- and post modified Quad surgery, stimulating the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist, the radial nerve over the dorsum of the hand, recording the peripheral, cervical and cortical responses. All patients have had the modified Quad surgery (n = 19). The modified Quad surgery is a muscle release and transfer surgery with nerve decompressions. All patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of standardized movements, the modified Mallet scale to index active shoulder movements. The cervical responses were significantly lower in amplitude in the affected arm than the un-affected arm. The median nerve conduction was significantly improved from 8.04 to 9.26 (P < 0.022) post-operatively. The shoulder abduction was also significantly improved (pre-op 30° ± 23.3 to 143° ± 33.7, p < 0.0001), with a mean follow-up of 43 months after the modified Quad surgery in these patients. Median nerve conduction, and shoulder abduction were significantly improved in OBPI children, who have undergone the modified Quad procedure with neuroplasty, internal microneurolysis and tetanic stimulation of the median nerve.

  14. Increased expression of Gem after rat sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Cheng, Xinghai; Zhou, Zhengming; Wu, Hao; Long, Long; Gu, Xingxing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-02-01

    Gem belongs to the Rad/Gem/Kir subfamily of Ras-related GTPases, whose expression is induced in several cell types upon activation by extracellular stimuli. Two functions of Gem have been demonstrated, including regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and inhibition of Rho kinase-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization, such as stress fiber formation and neurite retraction. Because of the essential relationship between actin reorganization and peripheral nerve regeneration, we investigated the spatiotemporal expression of Gem in a rat sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model. After never injury, we observed that Gem had a significant up-regulation from 1 day, peaked at day 5 and then gradually decreased to the normal level. At its peak expression, Gem expressed mainly in Schwann cells (SCs) and macrophages of the distal sciatic nerve segment, but had few colocalization in axons. In addition, the peak expression of Gem was in parallel with PCNA, and numerous SCs expressing Gem were PCNA positive. Thus, all of our findings suggested that Gem may be involved in the pathophysiology of sciatic nerve after SNC.

  15. Vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 levels after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Idiris; Kurutaş, Ergül Belge

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 were altered after crush-induced peripheral nerve injury in an experimental rat model. A total of 80 male Wistar rats were randomized into one control (n = 8) and six study groups (1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3, and 7 days after experimental nerve injury; n = 12 for each group). Crush-induced peripheral nerve injury was performed on the sciatic nerves of rats in six study groups. Tissue samples from the sites of peripheral nerve injury were obtained at 1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3 and 7 days after experimental nerve injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve were significantly greater at 1 and 12 hours after experimental nerve injury, while they were significantly lower at 7 days than in control group. Tissue level of vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve was significantly lower at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours than in the control group. These results suggest that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 vary with progression of crush-induced peripheral nerve injury, and supplementation of these vitamins in the acute period may be beneficial for acceleration of nerve regeneration. PMID:27335572

  16. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  17. The re-formation of connections in the nervous sytem of Lymnaea stagnalis after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Janse, C; Kits, K S; Lever, A J

    1979-01-01

    Changes in the tentacle reflex pathway of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis induced by peripheral nerve injury were studied with behavioural and electrophysiological techniques. After nerve injury regeneration of sensory axons is obtained in 6-12 days, suggesting an axonal outgrowth at a rate of 1 mm per day. Recovery of the tentacle reflex takes much more time indicating that synaptic efficacy is affected considerably by the period of sensory deprivation following nerve injury.

  18. Combined common peroneal and tibial nerve injury after knee dislocation: one injury or two? An MRI-clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chandan G; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT Knee dislocations are often accompanied by stretch injuries to the common peroneal nerve (CPN). A small subset of these injuries also affect the tibial nerve. The mechanism of this combined pattern could be a single longitudinal stretch injury of the CPN extending to the sciatic bifurcation (and tibial division) or separate injuries of both the CPN and tibial nerve, either at the level of the tibiofemoral joint or distally at the soleal sling and fibular neck. The authors reviewed cases involving patients with knee dislocations with CPN and tibial nerve injuries to determine the localization of the combined injury and correlation between degree of MRI appearance and clinical severity of nerve injury. METHODS Three groups of cases were reviewed. Group 1 consisted of knee dislocations with clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 28, including 19 cases of complete CPN injury); Group 2 consisted of knee dislocations without clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 19); and Group 3 consisted of cases of minor knee trauma but without knee dislocation (n = 14). All patients had an MRI study of the knee performed within 3 months of injury. MRI appearance of tibial and common peroneal nerve injury was scored by 2 independent radiologists in 3 zones (Zone I, sciatic bifurcation; Zone II, knee joint; and Zone III, soleal sling and fibular neck) on a severity scale of 1-4. Injury signal was scored as diffuse or focal for each nerve in each of the 3 zones. A clinical score was also calculated based on Medical Research Council scores for strength in the tibial and peroneal nerve distributions, combined with electrophysiological data, when available, and correlated with the MRI injury score. RESULTS Nearly all of the nerve segments visualized in Groups 1 and 2 demonstrated some degree of injury on MRI (95%), compared with 12% of nerve segments in Group 3. MRI nerve injury scores were significantly more severe in Group 1 relative to Group 2 (2.06 vs 1.24, p < 0.001) and Group

  19. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  20. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A; Obukhov, Dmitry K

    2016-04-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration.

  1. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

  2. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Riley, D. Colton; Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Shack, R. Bruce; Dortch, Richard D.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Does, Mark D.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26323827

  3. Musculocutaneous nerve injury after simulated freefall in a vertical wind-tunnel: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Kenneth; Keel, John C

    2007-03-01

    We report a case of a skydiver with isolated musculocutaneous nerve injury, which occurred after prolonged positioning of the arm during simulated freefall in a vertical wind-tunnel. Musculocutaneous nerve injury is rare, and the mechanism of isolated injury to this nerve is not entirely understood. Isolated peripheral nerve injuries such as this easily mimic other injuries and can be difficult to diagnose. The skydiver complained of right arm weakness and numbness that began after training in a vertical wind-tunnel. Exam revealed weakness in right elbow flexion and forearm supination, and diminished sensation in the right lateral forearm. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed a decreased amplitude in the right lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve sensory nerve action potential, and fibrillations and positive sharp waves in the biceps and brachialis muscles. By 5 months, the subject reported complete sensory and motor recovery. Physical and electrodiagnostic findings corresponded to the distribution of the musculocutaneous nerve. The mechanism of injury was likely the prolonged abducted, extended, and externally rotated position of the shoulder during simulated freefall. Although isolated nerve injuries are uncommon, unusual activities and physiologic demands of athletes can result in such injuries. It is important to be aware of peripheral nerve injuries to facilitate proper diagnosis and management.

  4. Redoxins in peripheral neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Valek, Lucie; Kanngießer, Maike; Häussler, Annett; Agarwal, Nitin; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral nerve injury causes redox stress in injured neurons by upregulations of pro-oxidative enzymes, but most neurons survive suggesting an activation of endogenous defense against the imbalance. As potential candidates we assessed thioredoxin-fold proteins, called redoxins, which maintain redox homeostasis by reduction of hydrogen peroxide or protein dithiol-disulfide exchange. Using a histologic approach, we show that the peroxiredoxins (Prdx1-6), the glutaredoxins (Glrx1, 2, 3 and 5), thioredoxin (Txn1 and 2) and their reductases (Txnrd1 and 2) are expressed in neurons, glial and/or vascular cells of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and in the spinal cord. They show distinct cellular and subcellular locations in agreement with the GO terms for "cellular component". The expression and localization of Glrx, Txn and Txnrd proteins was not affected by sciatic nerve injury but peroxiredoxins were upregulated in the DRGs, Prdx1 and Prdx6 mainly in non-neuronal cells and Prdx4 and Prdx5 in DRG neurons, the latter associated with an increase of respective mRNAs and protein accumulation in peripheral and/or central fibers. The upregulation of Prdx4 and Prdx5 in DRG neurons was reduced in mice with a cre-loxP mediated deficiency of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) in these neurons. The results identify Prdx4 and Prdx5 as endogenous HIF1α-dependent, transcriptionally regulated defenders of nerve injury evoked redox stress that may be important for neuronal survival and regeneration.

  5. Suprascapular nerve injury: A cause to consider in shoulder pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kaihan; Yew, Wei Ping

    2016-05-13

    Suprascapular nerve injury is increasingly being recognized as an important cause of shoulder dysfunction. The non-specific clinical features of suprascapular nerve injury can make diagnosis difficult. However, it is essential for clinicians to consider it as part of the differential diagnoses in patients with vague pain or sensory disturbances over the posterosuperior part of their shoulder or have unexplained atrophy and weakness of their supraspinatus or infraspinatus muscle. Electrodiagnostic studies are useful in confirming and localising the nerve injury, while MRIs can be employed to determine the cause of nerve injury and assess the integrity of the rotator cuff muscles. Isolated suprascapular nerve injury can be managed with a trial of conservative management for at least 6 months. Subsequently, decompression of the nerve through open or arthroscopic techniques can be considered - both are associated with high rates of pain relief and functional improvement.

  6. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Aurora; Van Zyl, Natasha; Weymouth, Michael; Flood, Stephen; Nunn, Andrew; Cooper, Catherine; Hahn, Jodie; Galea, Mary P.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN) and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN). They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible. PMID:27690115

  7. Use of nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair: A Web of Science-based literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Nan, Jinniang; Hu, Xuguang; Li, Hongxiu; Zhang, Xiaonong; Piao, Renjing

    2012-12-15

    To identify global research trends in the use of nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair. Numerous basic and clinical studies on nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair were performed between 2002-2011. We performed a bibliometric analysis of the institutions, authors, and hot topics in the field, from the Web of Science, using the key words peripheral nerve and conduit or tube. peer-reviewed published articles on nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair, indexed in the Web of Science; original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items. articles requiring manual searching or telephone access; documents not published in the public domain; and several corrected papers. (a) Annual publication output; (b) publication type; (c) publication by research field; (d) publication by journal; (e) publication by funding agency; (f) publication by author; (g) publication by country and institution; (h) publications by institution in China; (i) most-cited papers. A total of 793 publications on the use of nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair were retrieved from the Web of Science between 2002-2011. The number of publications gradually increased over the 10-year study period. Articles constituted the main type of publication. The most prolific journals were Biomaterials, Microsurgery, and Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. The National Natural Science Foundation of China supported 27 papers, more than any other funding agency. Of the 793 publications, almost half came from American and Chinese authors and institutions. Nerve conduits have been studied extensively for peripheral nerve regeneration; however, many problems remain in this field, which are difficult for researchers to reach a consensus.

  8. Pain relief from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus by late intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Berman, J; Anand, P; Chen, L; Taggart, M; Birch, R

    1996-09-01

    We performed intercostal nerve transfer in 19 patients to relieve pain from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus. The procedure was successful in 16 patients at a mean of 28.6 months (12 to 68) after the injury.

  9. AlphaB-crystallin regulates remyelination after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Erin-Mai F.; Nakanishi, Stan T.; Hoghooghi, Vahid; Eaton, Shane E. A.; Palmer, Alexandra L.; Frederick, Ariana; Stratton, Jo A.; Stykel, Morgan G.; Zochodne, Douglas W.; Biernaskie, Jeffrey; Ousman, Shalina S.

    2017-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin (αBC) is a small heat shock protein that is constitutively expressed by peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons and Schwann cells. To determine what role this crystallin plays after peripheral nerve damage, we found that loss of αBC impaired remyelination, which correlated with a reduced presence of myelinating Schwann cells and increased numbers of nonmyelinating Schwann cells. The heat shock protein also seems to regulate the cross-talk between Schwann cells and axons, because expected changes in neuregulin levels and ErbB2 receptor expression after PNS injury were disrupted in the absence of αBC. Such dysregulations led to defects in conduction velocity and motor and sensory functions that could be rescued with therapeutic application of the heat shock protein in vivo. Altogether, these findings show that αBC plays an important role in regulating Wallerian degeneration and remyelination after PNS injury. PMID:28137843

  10. Sleep deprivation aggravates median nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and enhances microglial activation by suppressing melatonin secretion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Nerve injury-induced changes in Homer/glutamate receptor signaling contribute to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Goulding, Scott P; Hu, Jia-Hua; Klugmann, Matthias; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2013-10-01

    While group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors regulate nociception, the precise molecular mechanism(s) contributing to glutamate signaling in chronic pain remain unclear. Here we not only confirmed the key involvement of Homer proteins in neuropathic pain, but also distinguished between the functional roles for different Homer family members and isoforms. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced long-lasting, time-dependent increases in the postsynaptic density expression of the constitutively expressed (CC) isoforms Homer1b/c and/or Homer2a/b in the spinal dorsal horn and supraspinal structures involved in nociception (prefrontal cortex, thalamus), that co-occurred with increases in their associated mGluRs, NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor, and the activation of downstream kinases. Virus-mediated overexpression of Homer1c and Homer2b after spinal (intrathecal) virus injection exacerbated CCI-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, however, Homer1 and Homer2 gene knockout (KO) mice displayed no changes in their neuropathic phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the immediate early gene (IEG) Homer1a isoform reduced, while KO of Homer1a gene potentiated neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Thus, nerve injury-induced increases in CC-Homers expression promote pain in pathological states, but IEG-Homer induction protects against both the development and maintenance of neuropathy. Additionally, exacerbated pain hypersensitivity in transgenic mice with reduced Homer binding to mGluR5 supports also an inhibitory role for Homer interactions with mGluR5 in mediating neuropathy. Such data indicate that nerve injury-induced changes in glutamate receptor/Homer signaling contribute in dynamic but distinct ways to neuropathic pain processing, which has relevance for the etiology of chronic pain symptoms and its treatment.

  12. Medicolegal Aspects of Iatrogenic Dysphonia and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ta, Jennifer H; Liu, Yuan F; Krishna, Priya

    2016-01-01

    To examine aspects of litigation involving iatrogenic dysphonia and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the adult population. Legal database review. Medicolegal judicial system. Jury verdicts and settlement reports listing voice impairment or recurrent laryngeal nerve dysfunction as a primary injury in adult patients were identified in the Westlaw Database. Reports were examined for plaintiff demographics, defendant specialty, procedure performed, rates of settlements and verdicts, monetary awards, primary plaintiff symptoms, and common allegations. A total of 123 jury verdict and settlement reports were identified. General surgeons (24%), otolaryngologists (20%), and anesthesiologists (18%) were involved in the majority of cases. The procedure causing the alleged injury was primarily thyroidectomy (34%), followed by intubation (18%) and spinal instrumentation (10%). The majority of cases (70%) were decided in favor of the defendant. Where monetary awards were recorded, settlements and jury verdicts in favor of the plaintiff ranged between $4250 and $3,000,000, with a mean of $788,713. In addition to voice disturbances, complaints of dyspnea and dysphagia were commonly listed alleged injuries. The only factors associated with plaintiff verdicts were general surgery specialty (odds ratio, 6.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-23.2) and claims of loss of consortium (odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-60.7). Dysphonia is a common complication in a number of procedures across multiple specialties. Although the majority of cases are decided in favor or the defendant, payments awarded can be considerable. Awareness of factors involved in these medical malpractice cases can help limit physician liability. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  13. Sciatic nerve injury in adult rats causes distinct changes in the central projections of sensory neurons expressing different glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Keast, Janet R.; Forrest, Shelley L.; Osborne, Peregrine B.

    2010-01-01

    Most small unmyelinated neurons in adult rat dorsal ganglia (DRG) express one or more of the co-receptors targeted by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin and artemin (GFRα1, GFRα2 and GFRα3 respectively). The function of these GDNF family ligands (GFLs) is not fully elucidated but recent evidence suggests GFLs could function in sensory neuron regeneration after nerve injury and peripheral nociceptor sensitisation. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine if the DRG neurons targeted by each GFL change after sciatic nerve injury. We compared complete sciatic nerve transection and the chronic constriction model and found the pattern of changes incurred by each injury was broadly similar. In lumbar spinal cord, there was a widespread increase in neuronal GFRα1 immunoreactivity (IR) in the L1-6 dorsal horn. GFRα3-IR also increased but in a more restricted area. In contrast, GFRα2-IR decreased in patches of superficial dorsal horn and this loss was more extensive after transection injury. No change in calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR was detected after either injury. Analysis of double-immunolabelled L5 DRG sections suggested the main effect of injury on GFRα1- and GFRα3-IR was to increase expression in both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. In contrast, no change in basal expression of GFRα2-IR was detected in DRG by analysis of fluorescence intensity and there was a small but significant reduction in GFRα2-IR neurons. Our results suggest the DRG neuronal populations targeted by GDNF, neurturin or artemin, and the effect of exogenous GFLs could change significantly after a peripheral nerve injury. PMID:20533358

  14. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  15. Peripheral nerve injuries in sports-related surgery: presentation, evaluation, and management: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Maak, Travis G; Osei, Daniel; Delos, Demetris; Taylor, Samuel; Warren, Russell F; Weiland, Andrew J

    2012-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries during sports-related operative interventions are rare complications, but the associated morbidity can be substantial. Early diagnosis, efficient and effective evaluation, and appropriate management are crucial to maximizing the prognosis, and a clear and structured algorithm is therefore required. We describe the surgical conditions and interventions that are commonly associated with intraoperative peripheral nerve injuries. In addition, we review the common postoperative presentations of patients with these injuries as well as the anatomic structures that are directly injured or associated with these injuries during the operation. Some examples of peripheral nerve injuries incurred during sports-related surgery include ulnar nerve injury during ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow and elbow arthroscopy, median nerve injury during ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow, axillary nerve injury during Bankart repair and the Bristow transfer, and peroneal nerve injury during posterolateral corner reconstruction of the knee and arthroscopic lateral meniscal repair. We also detail the clinical and radiographic evaluation of these patients, including the utility and timing of radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography, electromyography (EMG), and nonoperative or operative management. The diagnosis, evaluation, and management of peripheral nerve injuries incurred during sports-related surgical interventions are critical to minimizing patient morbidity and maximizing postoperative function. Although these injuries occur during a variety of procedures, common themes exist regarding evaluation techniques and treatment algorithms. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy and medical management. Operative treatments include neurolysis, transposition, neurorrhaphy, nerve transfer, and tendon transfer. This article provides orthopaedic surgeons with a simplified, literature-based algorithm for

  16. Sciatic Nerve Injury After Proximal Hamstring Avulsion and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Thomas J.; Spinner, Robert J.; Mohan, Rohith; Gibbs, Christopher M.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Muscle bellies of the hamstring muscles are intimately associated with the sciatic nerve, putting the sciatic nerve at risk of injury associated with proximal hamstring avulsion. There are few data informing the magnitude of this risk, identifying risk factors for neurologic injury, or determining neurologic outcomes in patients with distal sciatic symptoms after surgery. Purpose: To characterize the frequency and nature of sciatic nerve injury and distal sciatic nerve–related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion and to characterize the influence of surgery on these symptoms. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This was a retrospective review of patients with proximal partial or complete hamstring avulsion. The outcome of interest was neurologic symptoms referable to the sciatic nerve distribution below the knee. Neurologic symptoms in operative patients were compared pre- and postoperatively. Results: The cohort consisted of 162 patients: 67 (41.4%) operative and 95 (58.6%) nonoperative. Sciatic nerve–related symptoms were present in 22 operative and 23 nonoperative patients, for a total of 45 (27.8%) patients (8 [4.9%] motor deficits, 11 [6.8%] sensory deficits, and 36 [22.2%] with neuropathic pain). Among the operative cohort, 3 of 3 (100.0%) patients showed improvement in their motor deficit postoperatively, 3 of 4 (75.0%) patients’ sensory symptoms improved, and 17 of 19 (89.5%) patients had improvement in pain. A new or worsening deficit occurred in 5 (7.5%) patients postoperatively (2 [3.1%] motor deficits, 1 [1.5%] sensory deficit, and 3 [4.5%] with new pain). Predictors of operative intervention included lower age (odds ratio [OR], 0.952; 95% CI, 0.921-0.982; P = .001) and complete avulsion (OR, 10.292; 95% CI, 2.526-72.232; P < .001). Presence of neurologic deficit was not predictive. Conclusion: Sciatic nerve–related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion are underrecognized. Currently, neurologic

  17. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Improves Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Sciatic Nerve Crush Rat Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm2 and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm2. Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm2 had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm2. Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm2. Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm2 and 8 J/cm2) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  18. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury.

  19. Effects of pudendal nerve injury in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kerns, J M; Damaser, M S; Kane, J M; Sakamoto, K; Benson, J T; Shott, S; Brubaker, L

    2000-01-01

    To test a neurogenic hypothesis for external urethral sphincter (EUS) dysfunction associated with urinary incontinence, the proximal pudendal nerve was crushed in anesthetized retired breeder female rats (n = 5) and compared with a sham lesion group (n = 4). Outcome measures included concentric needle electromyograms (EMGs) from the target EUS, voiding patterns during a 2-hour dark period, and micturition data over a 24-hour period. Fast Blue (FB) was introduced to the crush site at the time of injury and Diamidino Yellow (DY) to the EUS at the time the rats were killed (3 months post-operative), when histological analysis of the nerve and urethra was also performed. EMG records indicated the EUS motor units undergo typical denervation changes followed by regeneration and recovery. Voiding patterns from the crush group show a significant increase of small urine marks in the front third of the cage. At 1-2 weeks post-op, the frequency of voids was significantly increased in the crush group compared to pre-op and late post-op time periods. The mean volume voided in the light phase at the early post-op time was significantly increased in the sham group. Light and electron microscopic patterns seen in nerve and muscle suggest the regenerating motor units maintain a structural integrity. Motoneurons in the lower lumbar cord were labeled with either DY (14. 5 +/- 6.8), FB (31.7 +/- 23.7), or both (35.0 +/- 17.5) tracers, indicating approximately 54% of the crushed pudendal neurons regenerated to the EUS. In conclusion, several measures suggest this reversible crush lesion induces mild urinary incontinence. This animal model is promising for further development of hypotheses regarding neural injury, the pathogenesis of incontinence, and strategies aimed at prevention and treatment. Neurourol. Urodynam. 19:53-69, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Perspectives on tissue-engineered nerve regeneration for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Suk; Lee, Hai Bang

    2014-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made to safely improve nerve function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients through the regeneration of injured nerve tissue. This perspective focuses on an extensive overview of SCI research as well as tissue-engineered nerve regeneration for the treatment of SCI.

  1. Electrical stimulation does not enhance nerve regeneration if delayed after sciatic nerve injury: the role of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Xu, Chun-gui; Wang, Tian-bing; Kou, Yu-hui; Yin, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Pei-xun; Xue, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate and enhance nerve regeneration in sensory and motor neurons after injury, but there is little evidence that focuses on the varying degrees of fibrosis in the delayed repair of peripheral nerve tissue. In this study, a rat model of sciatic nerve transection injury was repaired with a biodegradable conduit at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 2 months after injury, when the rats were divided into two subgroups. In the experimental group, rats were treated with electrical stimuli of frequency of 20 Hz, pulse width 100 ms and direct current voltage of 3 V; while rats in the control group received no electrical stimulation after the conduit operation. Histological results showed that stained collagen fibers comprised less than 20% of the total operated area in the two groups after delayed repair at both 1 day and 1 week but after longer delays, the collagen fiber area increased with the time after injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression level of transforming growth factor β (an indicator of tissue fibrosis) decreased at both 1 day and 1 week after delayed repair but increased at both 1 and 2 months after delayed repair. These findings indicate that if the biodegradable conduit repair combined with electrical stimulation is delayed, it results in a poor outcome following sciatic nerve injury. One month after injury, tissue degeneration and distal fibrosis are apparent and are probably the main reason why electrical stimulation fails to promote nerve regeneration after delayed repair. PMID:25788926

  2. Attenuating effect of Acorus calamus extract in chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats: an evidence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acorus calamus (family: Araceae), is an indigenous plant, traditionally it is used as an ingredient of various cocktail preparations and for the management of severe inflammatory disorders in Indian system of medicine. Present study investigated the attenuating role of Acorus calamus plant extract in chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. Methods Hot plate, plantar, Randall Selitto, Von Frey Hair, pin prick, acetone drop, photoactometer and rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of thermal, radiant, mechanical, chemical sensation, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively, at different time intervals i.e., day 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Tissue myeloperoxidase, superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after 21st day to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations were also performed. Hydroalcoholic extract of Acorus calamus (HAE-AC, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered from the day of surgery for 14 days. Results CCI of sciatic nerve significantly induced thermal, radiant, mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal, chemical, tactile allodynia, along with increase in the levels of superoxide anion, total calcium and myeloperoxidase activity. Moreover significant histological changes were also observed. HAE-AC attenuated CCI induced development of painful behavioural, biochemical and histological changes in a dose dependent manner similar to that of pregabalin serving as positive control. Conclusions Acorus calamus prevented CCI induced neuropathy which may be attributed to its multiple actions including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory actions. PMID:21426568

  3. Treatment of Peroneal Nerve Injuries in the Multiligament Injured/Dislocated Knee.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Michael P; Pareek, Ayoosh; Reardon, Patrick; Krych, Aaron; Stuart, Michael J; Levy, Bruce A

    2016-05-01

    Tibiofemoral knee dislocations are typically a consequence of high-energy mechanisms, causing significant damage to the soft tissue and osseous structures of the knee. Concomitant neurovascular injuries such as popliteal artery and peroneal nerve injuries are also common and can have significant long-term consequences. The mechanism typically involves a traction injury to the peroneal nerve subsequent to an extreme varus moment applied to the knee. Complete nerve injuries typically hold a worse prognosis than incomplete palsies. Rates of functional recovery in the setting of a complete palsy following a knee dislocation event have been dismal. A period of observation and nonoperative treatment is initially performed, utilizing orthotic devices to assist with lower extremity deficits. Surgical treatment options include neurolysis, nerve grafting, tendon transfer, arthrodesis, and direct motor nerve transfers. Motor nerve transfers continue to be explored with initial reports showing promising results.

  4. Debates to personal conclusion in peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction: A 30-year experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chuang, David Chwei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the science and management of peripheral nerve injuries over the past 40 years. Yet there are many questions and few answers. The author, with 30 years of experience in treating them at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, addresses debates on various issues with personal conclusions. These include: (1) Degree of peripheral nerve injury, (2) Timing of nerve repair, (3)Technique of nerve repair, (4) Level of brachial plexus injury,(5) Level of radial nerve injury,(6) Traction avulsion amputation of major limb, (7) Proximal Vs distal nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries and (8) Post paralysis facial synkinesis.

  5. Nerve Injuries in Aesthetic Breast Surgery: Systematic Review and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Zakaria, Hesham M; Felder, John M; Fantus, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    The risk of nerve injuries in aesthetic breast surgery has not been well explored. The authors conducted a systematic review to provide evidence-based information on the incidence and treatment of nerve injuries resulting from aesthetic breast surgery. A broad literature search of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken to identify studies in which nerve injury occurred after breast augmentation or mastopexy. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were established before the search was performed. The initial 4806 citations were narrowed by topic, title, and abstract to 53 articles. After full-text review, 36 studies were included. The risk of any nerve injury after breast augmentation ranged from 13.57% to 15.44%. Specific nerve injury rates were calculated for the intercostal cutaneous nerves, branches to the nipple-areola complex, intercostobrachial nerve, long thoracic nerve, and brachial plexus. Also calculated were the total estimated risks of chronic pain, hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, and numbness. The meta-analysis showed no associations between the rates of breast nerve injury or sensation change and implant size, incision type, or implant position in patients who underwent breast augmentation. The data were insufficient to determine rates of nerve injury in mastopexy. The possibility of nerve injury, sensation change, or chronic pain with breast augmentation is real, and estimating the incidences of these conditions is useful to both patients and surgeons. Optimizing patient outcomes requires timely treatment by a multidisciplinary team and may include peripheral nerve surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  6. Recombinant hNeuritin Promotes Structural and Functional Recovery of Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Xinli; Shan, Liya; Zhu, Jingling; Chen, Rong; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Wumei; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Neuritin is a new neurotropic factor implicated in nervous system development and plasticity. Studies have shown that Neuritin is upregulated in injured nerves, suggesting that it is involved in nerve repair. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether recombinant human Neuritin could restore nerve structure and function in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Neuritin treatment had a dose-dependent effect on functional recovery 4 weeks after injury, as determined by the walking-track test. Similar trends were observed for gastrocnemius muscular strength and nerve conduction velocity. Additionally, sciatic nerve fiber density and organization as well as degree of remyelination were increased, while growth-associated protein 43 and neurofilament 200 expression was upregulated upon treatment with Neuritin. These findings demonstrate that Neuritin stimulates nerve regeneration and functional recovery and thus promotes the repair of injured sciatic nerves. PMID:28066172

  7. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury after brachial plexus block: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun; Shin, Heesuk

    2013-12-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  8. Digital nerve injuries: epidemiology, results, costs, and impact on daily life.

    PubMed

    Thorsén, Frida; Rosberg, Hans-Eric; Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Dahlin, Lars B

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiology, results of treatment, impact on activity of daily living (ADL), and costs for treatment of digital nerve injuries have not been considered consistently. Case notes of patients of 0-99 years of age living in Malmö municipality, Sweden, who presented with a digital nerve injury and were referred to the Department of Hand Surgery in 1995-2005 were analysed retrospectively. The incidence was 6.2/100 000 inhabitants and year. Most commonly men (75%; median age 29 years) were injured. Isolated nerve injuries and concomitant tendon injuries were equally common. The direct costs (hospital stay, operation, outpatient visits, visits to a nurse and/or a hand therapist) for a concomitant tendon injury was almost double compared with an isolated digital nerve injury (6136 EUR [range, 744-29 689 EUR] vs 2653 EUR [range, 468-6949 EUR]). More than 50% of the patients who worked were injured at work and 79% lost time from work (median 59 days [range 3-337]). Permanent nerve dysfunction for the individual patient with ADL problems and subjective complaints of fumbleness, cold sensitivity, and pain occur in the patients despite surgery. It is concluded that digital nerve injuries, often considered as a minor injury and that affect young people at productive age, cause costs, and disability. Focus should be directed against prevention of the injury and to improve nerve regeneration from different aspects.

  9. Meta-analysis of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in thyroid surgery with or without intraoperative nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rulli, F; Ambrogi, V; Dionigi, G; Amirhassankhani, S; Mineo, T C; Ottaviani, F; Buemi, A; DI Stefano, P; Mourad, M

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) aimed at reducing the injuries of recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy is controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of nerve injuries with or without IONM. Studies published from January 1994 to February 2012 in English language on humans were identified. Heterogeneity of studies was checked by the Higgins test. Summary estimates of predictive values of injury were made using the Mantel-Haenszel test based on the fixed-effects model. Publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot and Egger's method. Eight articles were selected accounting a total of 5257 nerves at risk. IONM revealed a significant impact in preventing transient injuries (positive predictive value = 5% [95% CI: 2-8], negative = 96% [95% CI: 91-100], relative risk = 0.73 [95% CI: 0.54-0.98], p = 0.035), whereas they failed to demonstrate effect on permanent injuries (positive predictive value = 2% [95% CI: 0.6-3.8], negative 99% [95% CI: 97-100], relative risk = 0.73 [95% CI: 0.44-1.23], p = 0.235). This meta-analysis demonstrated the merit of IONM in preventing transient injury during thyroidectomy. No advantage was found in permanent injuries.

  10. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury in Trauma-Induced Mandible Fractures.

    PubMed

    Tay, Andrew Ban Guan; Lai, Juen Bin; Lye, Kok Weng; Wong, Wai Yee; Nadkarni, Nivedita V; Li, Wenyun; Bautista, Dianne

    2015-07-01

    This prospective observational cohort study sought to determine the prevalence of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury after mandibular fractures before and after treatment and to elucidate factors associated with the incidence of post-treatment IAN injury and time to normalization of sensation. Consenting patients with mandibular fractures (excluding dentoalveolar, pathologic, previous fractures, or mandibular surgery) were prospectively evaluated for subjective neurosensory disturbance (NSD) and underwent neurosensory testing before treatment and then 1 week, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Eighty patients (men, 83.8%; mean age, 30.0 yr; standard deviation, 12.6 yr) with 123 mandibular sides (43 bilateral) were studied. Injury etiology included assault (33.8%), falls (31.3%), motor vehicle accidents (25.0%), and sports injuries (6.3%). Half the fractures (49.6%) involved the IAN-bearing posterior mandible; all condylar fractures (13.0%) had no NSD. Treatment included open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF; 74.8%), closed reduction and fixation (22.0%), or no treatment (3.3%). Overall prevalence of IAN injury was 33.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.8-42.6) before treatment and 53.8% (95% CI, 46.0-61.6) after treatment. In the IAN-bearing mandible, the prevalence was 56.2% (95% CI, 43.2-69.2) before treatment and 72.9% (95% CI, 63.0-82.7) after treatment. In contrast, this prevalence in the non-IAN-bearing mandible was 12.6% (95% CI, 4.1-21.1) before treatment and 31.6% (95% CI, 20.0-43.3) after treatment. Factors associated with the development of post-treatment IAN injury included fracture site and gap distance (a 1-mm increase was associated with a 27% increase in odds of post-treatment sensory alteration). Time to normalization after treatment was associated with type of treatment (ORIF inhibited normalization) and fracture site (IAN-bearing sites took longer to normalize). IAN injury was 4 times more likely in IAN-bearing posterior mandibular

  11. Beneficial Effect of Metformin on Nerve Regeneration and Functional Recovery After Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Liu, Jun; Yu, Hailong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2016-05-01

    Neuroprotective effects of metformin have been increasingly recognized in both diabetic and non-diabetic conditions. Thus far, no information has been available on the potential beneficial effects of metformin on peripheral nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus. The present study was designed to investigate such a possibility. Diabetes was established by a single injection of streptozotocin at 50 mg/kg in rats. After sciatic nerve crush injury, the diabetic rats were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with metformin (30, 200 and 500 mg/kg), or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by morphometric analysis and retrograde labeling. The functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies and behavioral analysis. It was found that metformin significantly enhanced axonal regeneration and functional recovery compared to saline after sciatic nerve injury in diabetic rats. In addition, metformin at 200 and 500 mg/kg showed better performance than that at 30 mg/kg. Taken together, metformin is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injuries in diabetes mellitus, highlighting its therapeutic values for peripheral nerve injury repair in diabetes mellitus.

  12. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in microtubule-associated protein tau during peripheral nerve injury and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guang-bin; Shen, Mi; Gu, Xiao-song; Yi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Tau, a primary component of microtubule-associated protein, promotes microtubule assembly and/or disassembly and maintains the stability of the microtubule structure. Although the importance of tau in neurodegenerative diseases has been well demonstrated, whether tau is involved in peripheral nerve regeneration remains unknown. In the current study, we obtained sciatic nerve tissue from adult rats 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after sciatic nerve crush and examined tau mRNA and protein expression levels and the location of tau in the sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury. The results from our quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that compared with the uninjured control sciatic nerve, mRNA expression levels for both tau and tau tubulin kinase 1, a serine/threonine kinase that regulates tau phosphorylation, were decreased following peripheral nerve injury. Our western blot assay results suggested that the protein expression levels of tau and phosphorylated tau initially decreased 1 day post nerve injury but then gradually increased. The results of our immunohistochemical labeling showed that the location of tau protein was not altered by nerve injury. Thus, these results showed that the expression of tau was changed following sciatic nerve crush, suggesting that tau may be involved in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration. PMID:27857758

  14. Ulnar Nerve Injury as a Result of Galeazzi Fracture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Roettges, Paul; Turker, Tolga

    2017-09-01

    Sparse documentation of Galeazzi fracture with associated nerve injury exists in the medical literature. The purpose of this report is to review the available literature in regard to incidence, nerve injury type, treatment strategies, and expected outcomes. We present a classic Galeazzi fracture dislocation with associated complete ulnar nerve transection injury at the level of the wrist. After rigid internal bony stabilization, allograft nerve repair was performed. The patient's presentation, operative management, recovery, and a thorough literature review are discussed. Fracture union was attained with near full wrist and elbow range of motion. Despite lack of ulnar nerve function return, the patient was able to resume manual labor occupation. Despite its close proximity to the dislocating distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), thorough review reveals rare associated ulnar nerve palsy. If there is suspicion for nerve injury in the setting of open DRUJ dislocation, the nerve should be explored to identify possible entrapment or transection. Literature supports likely return of nerve function in cases of intact nerve; however, management of nerve transection remains debatable.

  15. The pattern of peripheral nerve injuries among Pakistani soldiers in the war against terror.

    PubMed

    Razaq, Sarah; Yasmeen, Rehana; Butt, Aamir Waheed; Akhtar, Noreen; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-05-01

    To determine the pattern of peripheral nerve injuries in Pakistani soldiers in the War against terror. Case series. Department of Electrodiagnosis at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from June 2008 to June 2011. All new cases of war wounded soldiers with peripheral nerve injuries were consecutively enrolled. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic study was carried out by experienced physiatrists. Data was entered in pretested especially designed questionnaire which was analysed using SPSS version 17.0. Seddon's classification system was used to assess the severity of injury. There were 418 cases of peripheral nerve injuries with 504 different nerve segments. Mean age was 29.41 ±8 years. Blast was the main cause of nerve injury in 244 (48.5%) cases followed by gunshot in 215 (42.7%) and 45 (8.9%) cases had nerve injuries secondary to fall, burial under debris and motor vehicle accidents. Eighty six (17%) cases had multiple nerve injuries. Most commonly injured nerve was ulnar (20.6%) followed by sciatic (16.7%), median (16.5%), radial (16.3%), peroneal (8.7%), brachial plexus (8.5%), axillary (4.8%), tibial (2%), femoral (1.8%), long thoracic (0.4%) and others (3.8%). Axonotmesis was seen in 459 (91.1%) cases, 44 (8.7%) cases revealed neurotmesis and 1 (0.2%) case had neuropraxia. Peripheral nerve injuries are a major component of war related injuries mainly involving the upper limbs. Electrodiagnostic studies help in assessing severity and determining prognosis. Precise documentation of severity of nerve injuries is important to estimate the burden on our resources and to extend rehabilitation services.

  16. The importance of a good evaluation in order to prevent oral nerve injuries: a review.

    PubMed

    Céspedes-Sánchez, Juan M; Ayuso-Montero, Raúl; Marí-Roig, Antoni; Arranz-Obispo, Carlos; López-López, José

    2014-04-01

    Oral nerve injuries are a less frequent complication but they involve a decrease in the patient life quality. The purpose of the current review is to know the described risk factors to prevent injuries and to know the therapies against an established injury. A Pubmed search of the English and Spanish language literature from 2000-2012 using the keywords 'oral surgery' or 'trigeminal nerve injuries' or 'lingual nerve injuries' or 'mandibular nerve injuries' was performed. Review articles were included and important articles from the references were added. A total of 662 were obtained from the search, from which 25 were selected accomplishing the inclusion criteria. Moreover, seven important articles were selected from the references of the ones mentioned, obtaining a total of 32 articles for the review. There is a relationship between the position of the extracted tooth and the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve injuries; as well as the age of the patient, the intra-operatory exposition of the nerve, the technique access for the lower third molar extraction and the surgeon's inexperience. The radiological examination is useful to evaluate the nerve damage and to decide on the surgical technique.

  17. Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M.; de Borst, G.J.; Nolan, B.W.; Indes, J.; Buck, D.B.; Lo, R.C.; Moll, F.L.; Schermerhorn, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may be diminished by cranial nerve injury (CNI). Using a quality improvement registry, we aimed to identify the nerves affected, duration of symptoms (transient vs. persistent), and clinical predictors of CNI. Methods We identified all patients undergoing CEA in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) between 2003 and 2011. Surgeon-observed CNI rate was determined at discharge (postoperative CNI) and at follow-up to determine persistent CNI (CNIs that persisted at routine follow-up visit). Hierarchical multivariable model controlling for surgeon and hospital was used to assess independent predictors for postoperative CNI. Results A total of 6,878 patients (33.8% symptomatic) were included for analyses. CNI rate at discharge was 5.6% (n = 382). Sixty patients (0.7%) had more than one nerve affected. The hypoglossal nerve was most frequently involved (n = 185, 2.7%), followed by the facial (n = 128, 1.9%), the vagus (n = 49, 0.7%), and the glossopharyngeal (n = 33, 0.5%) nerve. The vast majority of these CNIs were transient; only 47 patients (0.7%) had a persistent CNI at their follow-up visit (median 10.0 months, range 0.3–15.6 months). Patients with perioperative stroke (0.9%, n = 64) had significantly higher risk of CNI (n = 15, CNI risk 23.4%, p < .01). Predictors for CNI were urgent procedures (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1, p < .01), immediate re-exploration after closure under the same anesthetic (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.0, p < .01), and return to the operating room for a neurologic event or bleeding (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8, p < .01), but not redo CEA (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.5–1.9, p = .90) or prior cervical radiation (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3–2.5, p = .80). Conclusions As patients are currently selected in the VSGNE, persistent CNI after CEA is rare. While conditions of urgency and (sub)acute reintervention carried increased risk for postoperative CNI, a history of prior ipsilateral CEA or cervical

  18. Sciatic nerve injury induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion satellite glial cells and selectively modifies neurosteroidogenesis in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Véronique; Meyer, Laurence; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Eckert, Anne; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-01-15

    Neurosteroids are synthesized either by glial cells, by neurons, or within the context of neuron-glia cross-talk. Various studies suggested neurosteroid involvement in the control of neurodegeneration but there is no evidence showing that the natural protection of nerve cells against apoptosis directly depends on their own capacity to produce neuroprotective neurosteroids. Here, we investigated the interactions between neurosteroidogenesis and apoptosis occurring in sensory structures of rats subjected to neuropathic pain generated by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), we observed no apoptotic cells in the spinal cord up to 30 days after CCI although pain symptoms such as mechano-allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were evidenced with the Hargreaves's behavioral and von Frey filament tests. In contrast, double-labeling experiments combining TUNEL and immunostaining with antibodies against glutamine synthetase or neuronal nuclei protein revealed apoptosis occurrence in satellite glial cells (SGC) (not in neurons) of CCI rat ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at day 30 after injury. Pulse-chase experiments coupled with high performance liquid chromatography and flow scintillation detection showed that, among numerous biosynthetic pathways converting [(3)H]pregnenolone into various [(3)H]neurosteroids, only [(3)H]estradiol formation was selectively modified and upregulated in DRG of CCI rats. Consistently, immunohistochemical investigations localized aromatase (estradiol-synthesizing enzyme) in DRG neurons but not in SGC. Pharmacological inhibition of aromatase caused apoptosis of CCI rat DRG neurons. Altogether, our results suggest that endogenously produced neurosteroids such as estradiol may be pivotal for the protection of DRG sensory neurons against sciatic nerve CCI-induced apoptosis.

  19. Involvement of ERK phosphorylation of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons in thermal hypersensitivity in rats with infraorbital nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuko; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Shibuta, Kazuo; Honda, Kuniya; Katagiri, Ayano; Kiyomoto, Masaaki; Sessle, Barry J; Matsuura, Shingo; Ohara, Kinuyo; Urata, Kentaro; Iwata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms, this study assessed nocifensive behavior evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the whisker pad skin, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) neurons, and Vc neuronal responses to mechanical or thermal stimulation of the whisker pad skin in rats with the chronic constriction nerve injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI). The mechanical and thermal nocifensive behavior was significantly enhanced on the side ipsilateral to the ION-CCI compared to the contralateral whisker pad or sham rats. ION-CCI rats had an increased number of phosphorylated ERK immunoreactive (pERK-IR) cells which also manifested NeuN-IR but not GFAP-IR and Iba1-IR, and were significantly more in ION-CCI rats compared with sham rats following noxious but not non-noxious mechanical stimulation. After intrathecal administration of the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 in ION-CCI rats, the number of pERK-IR cells after noxious stimulation and the enhanced thermal nocifensive behavior but not the mechanical nocifensive behavior were significantly reduced in ION-CCI rats. The enhanced background activities, afterdischarges and responses of wide dynamic range neurons to noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation in ION-CCI rats were significantly depressed following i.t. administration of PD98059, whereas responses to non-noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation were not altered. The present findings suggest that pERK-IR neurons in the Vc play a pivotal role in the development of thermal hypersensitivity in the face following trigeminal nerve injury.

  20. Supracondylar humeral fractures with isolated anterior interosseous nerve injuries: is urgent treatment necessary?

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kody K; Skaggs, David L; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Andras, Lindsay; Moisan, Alice; Goodbody, Christine; Flynn, John M

    2014-11-05

    It is unclear if pediatric patients with a supracondylar humeral fracture and isolated anterior interossous nerve injury require urgent treatment. A retrospective, multicenter study of 4409 patients with operatively treated supracondylar humeral fractures was conducted. Exclusion criteria were additional nerve injuries other than the anterior interosseous nerve, any sensory changes, pulselessness, ipsilateral forearm fractures, open fractures, less than two months of follow-up, or pathological fractures. Thirty-five of 4409 patients met inclusion criteria. The average time to surgery was 14.6 hours (range, two to thirty-six hours). No patient developed compartment syndrome. There was no significant difference in time to return of anterior interosseous nerve function relative to the time to surgical reduction and fixation (p = 0.668). A complete return of anterior interosseous nerve function occurred in all patients with an average time of forty-nine days (range, two to 224 days). Ninety percent of patients recovered anterior interosseous nerve function by 149 days. To our knowledge, this is the largest series to date of supracondylar humeral fractures with anterior interosseous nerve injuries. There is no evidence that a supracondylar humeral fracture with an isolated anterior interosseous nerve injury requires urgent treatment. A delay in treatment up to twenty-four hours was not associated with an increased time of nerve recovery or other complications. This series excluded patients with sensory nerve injuries, pulselessness, and ipsilateral forearm fractures, which all may require urgent surgery. Barring other clinical indications for urgent treatment of a supracondylar humeral fracture, an isolated anterior interosseous nerve injury (no sensory changes) may not by itself be an indication for urgent surgery. The anterior interosseous nerve injuries in this series showed complete recovery at a mean time of forty-nine days. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone

  1. Role of the Excitability Brake Potassium Current IKD in Cold Allodynia Induced by Chronic Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    González, Alejandro; Ugarte, Gonzalo; Restrepo, Carlos; Herrera, Gaspar; Piña, Ricardo; Gómez-Sánchez, José Antonio; Pertusa, María; Orio, Patricio; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2017-03-22

    Cold allodynia is a common symptom of neuropathic and inflammatory pain following peripheral nerve injury. The mechanisms underlying this disabling sensory alteration are not entirely understood. In primary somatosensory neurons, cold sensitivity is mainly determined by a functional counterbalance between cold-activated TRPM8 channels and Shaker-like Kv1.1-1.2 channels underlying the excitability brake current IKD Here we studied the role of IKD in damage-triggered painful hypersensitivity to innocuous cold. We found that cold allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, was related to both an increase in the proportion of cold-sensitive neurons (CSNs) in DRGs contributing to the sciatic nerve, and a decrease in their cold temperature threshold. IKD density was reduced in high-threshold CSNs from CCI mice compared with sham animals, with no differences in cold-induced TRPM8-dependent current density. The electrophysiological properties and neurochemical profile of CSNs revealed an increase of nociceptive-like phenotype among neurons from CCI animals compared with sham mice. These results were validated using a mathematical model of CSNs, including IKD and TRPM8, showing that a reduction in IKD current density shifts the thermal threshold to higher temperatures and that the reduction of this current induces cold sensitivity in former cold-insensitive neurons expressing low levels of TRPM8-like current. Together, our results suggest that cold allodynia is largely due to a functional downregulation of IKD in both high-threshold CSNs and in a subpopulation of polymodal nociceptors expressing TRPM8, providing a general molecular and neural mechanism for this sensory alteration.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This paper unveils the critical role of the brake potassium current IKD in damage-triggered cold allodynia. Using a well-known form of nerve injury and combining behavioral analysis, calcium imaging, patch clamping, and pharmacological

  2. Facial Nerve Axotomy in Mice: A Model to Study Motoneuron Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Deborah N.; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Batka, Richard J.; Haulcomb, Melissa M.; Miller, Whitney M.; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this surgical protocol is to expose the facial nerve, which innervates the facial musculature, at its exit from the stylomastoid foramen and either cut or crush it to induce peripheral nerve injury. Advantages of this surgery are its simplicity, high reproducibility, and the lack of effect on vital functions or mobility from the subsequent facial paralysis, thus resulting in a relatively mild surgical outcome compared to other nerve injury models. A major advantage of using a cranial nerve injury model is that the motoneurons reside in a relatively homogenous population in the facial motor nucleus in the pons, simplifying the study of the motoneuron cell bodies. Because of the symmetrical nature of facial nerve innervation and the lack of crosstalk between the facial motor nuclei, the operation can be performed unilaterally with the unaxotomized side serving as a paired internal control. A variety of analyses can be performed postoperatively to assess the physiologic response, details of which are beyond the scope of this article. For example, recovery of muscle function can serve as a behavioral marker for reinnervation, or the motoneurons can be quantified to measure cell survival. Additionally, the motoneurons can be accurately captured using laser microdissection for molecular analysis. Because the facial nerve axotomy is minimally invasive and well tolerated, it can be utilized on a wide variety of genetically modified mice. Also, this surgery model can be used to analyze the effectiveness of peripheral nerve injury treatments. Facial nerve injury provides a means for investigating not only motoneurons, but also the responses of the central and peripheral glial microenvironment, immune system, and target musculature. The facial nerve injury model is a widely accepted peripheral nerve injury model that serves as a powerful tool for studying nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:25742324

  3. Botulinum neurotoxin type A counteracts neuropathic pain and facilitates functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury in animal models.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, S; Luvisetto, S; Cobianchi, S; Makuch, W; Obara, I; Mezzaroma, E; Caruso, M; Straface, E; Przewlocka, B; Pavone, F

    2010-11-24

    A growing interest was recently focused on the use of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) for fighting pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BoNT/A on neuropathic pain. It was observed that BoNT/A is able to counteract neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve both in mice and in rats. This effect is already present after a single intraplantar (i.pl.) or intrathecal (i.t.) neurotoxin administration that significantly reduces the sciatic nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia in mice and rats and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. This effect was evident starting 24 h after the administration of BoNT/A and it was long-lasting, being present 81 or 25 days after i.pl. injection of the higher dose in mice (15 pg/paw) and rats (75 pg/paw), respectively, and 35 days after i.t. injection in rats (75 pg/rat). Moreover, BoNT/A-injected mice showed a quicker recovery of the walking pattern and weight bearing compared to control groups. The behavioral improvement was accompanied by structural modifications, as revealed by the expression of cell division cycle 2 (Cdc2) and growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) regeneration associated proteins, investigated by immunofluorescence and Western blotting in the sciatic nerve, and by the immunofluorescence expression of S100β and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) Schwann cells proteins. In conclusion, the present research demonstrate long-lasting anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of BoNT/A in animal models of neuropathic pain together with an acceleration of regenerative processes in the injured nerve, as evidenced by both behavioral and immunohistochemistry/blotting analysis. These results may have important implications in the therapy of neuropathic pain.

  4. Peroneal nerve injuries as a complication of injection.

    PubMed

    Kirdi, N; Yakut, E; Meriç, A

    1998-01-01

    Ten children (8 males, 2 females) diagnosed with peroneal nerve injury as a complication of injection were included in this study. The age of the children ranged between four to seven years (mean 6.5 +/- 1.25 years). Physiotherapy and rehabilitation protocol included superficial heat, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (either galvanic or faradic current according to the response elicited), electromyographic biofeedback, exercises (passive, active-assistive and active), and orthotic support. Before treatment, foot-drop and steppage gait were observed in all the patients; both were remedied. The post-treatment muscle strength and electrodiagnostic test results showed statistically significant improvement when compared with pretreatment values (p < 0.05). We believe that our relatively favorable results in this study, manifested as shorter recovery time with no residual deficits, may be related to early intervention with an extensive physiotherapy program.

  5. Thirty minutes of low intensity electrical stimulation promotes nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Alrashdan, Mohammad S; Park, Jong-Chul; Sung, Mi-Ae; Yoo, Sang Bae; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Tae Hyung; Kim, Sung-June; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2010-06-01

    We investigated whether electrical stimulation (ES) applied directly for 30 minutes after crushing injury to the sciatic nerves of rats could improve nerve regeneration. Two groups of animals were used in this study (n = 20 each): the ES group received 30 minutes of low intensity ES (20 Hz pulse rate, 2 uA amplitude) immediately after a standard crush injury, while the control group received no stimulation after injury. Both groups were followed up for three weeks. The sciatic function index (SFI) was calculated weekly. Mean conduction velocity (MCV) and peak voltage (PV) were calculated, and the sensory neurons in L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were traced with Fluorogold in retrograde fashion and quantified at the end of the follow up period. Histomorphometric studies were also carried out in both groups. The ES group showed improved functional and sensory recovery compared to the control group three weeks after injury. SFI, MCV and the number of retrogradely labeled sensory neurons were significantly higher in the ES group. Additionally, axon counts, myelin thicknesses and G-ratio values were also higher in the ES group. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed an elevated expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in DRG sensory neurons of the ES group five days post-injury. Here, we present the first evidence that the application of ES for 30 minutes immediately following crush injury is effective to promote nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  6. Anatomical basis of the risk of injury to the right laryngeal recurrent nerve during thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Benouaich, Vincent; Porterie, Jean; Bouali, Ourdia; Moscovici, Jacques; Lopez, Raphaël

    2012-08-01

    Despite the intrathoracic part being short, the right laryngeal recurrent nerve is often injured during thoracic surgery. The aim of this cadaver study was to understand the mechanisms of right laryngeal recurrent nerve injuries during thoracic surgery and to describe anatomical landmarks for its preservation. Dissections were performed on 10 fresh human cadavers. A right anterolateral thoracic wall segment was removed, preserving the first rib. Dissections were carried out to identify the following structures: first rib, esophagus, trachea, right main bronchus, right brachiocephalic and subclavian vessels, azygos vein, phrenic nerve, vagus nerve, and right laryngeal recurrent nerve. The distance between the origin of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve and its adjacent structures was assessed. Moderate traction of the thoracic part of the vagus nerve resulted in a downward translation of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve's origin. In such conditions, the right laryngeal recurrent nerve's origin was distant of 14.8 mm (±2.89 mm) from the subclavian artery. Intraoperative incidence of right laryngeal recurrent nerve direct injury could be decreased by understanding the detailed course of its intrathoracic part. Moreover, traction on the intrathoracic part of the right vagus nerve may result in indirect lesions of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve: stretch induced lesions and nerve vasculature's lesions.

  7. Acceleration of Regeneration of Large Gap Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using Acellular Nerve Allografts plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS). PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zhongyu Li, MD, PhD RECIPIENT: Wake Forest University Health Sciences...Gap Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acellular Nerve Allografts plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS). 5b. GRANT...include successful seeding of AFS into ANA. This accomplishment also documented that these cells remained viable up to 72 hours after seeding. The

  8. Review of Literature of Radial Nerve Injuries Associated with Humeral Fractures—An Integrated Management Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiang; Wu, QiuLi; Li, Yan; Feng, ShiQing

    2013-01-01

    Background Radial nerve palsy associated with fractures of the shaft of the humerus is the most common nerve lesion complicating fractures of long bones. However, the management of radial nerve injuries associated with humeral fractures is debatable. There was no consensus between observation and early exploration. Methods and Findings The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, CINAHL, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, and Social Sciences Citation Index were searched. Two authors independently searched for relevant studies in any language from 1966 to Jan 2013. Thirty studies with 2952 humeral fractures participants were identified. Thirteen studies favored conservative strategy. No significant difference between early exploration and no exploration groups (OR, 1.03, 95% CI 0.61, 1.72; I2 = 0.0%, p = 0.918 n.s.). Three studies recommend early radial nerve exploration in patients with open fractures of humerus with radial nerve injury. Five studies proposed early exploration was performed in high-energy humeral shaft fractures with radial nerve injury. Conclusions The conservative strategy was a good choice for patients with low-energy closed fractures of humerus with radial nerve injury. We recommend early radial nerve exploration (within the first 2 weeks) in patients with open fractures or high-energy closed fractures of humerus with radial nerve injury. PMID:24250799

  9. Regenerative effect of adipose tissue-derived stem cells transplantation using nerve conduit therapy on sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bai-Shuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Shen, Chiung-Chyi

    2014-05-01

    This study proposed a biodegradable GGT nerve conduit containing genipin crosslinked gelatin annexed with tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles for the regeneration of peripheral nerves. Cytotoxicity tests revealed that GGT-extracts were non-toxic and promoted proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the induction of stem cells (i-ASCs) derived from adipose tissue. Furthermore, the study confirmed the effectiveness of a GGT/i-ASCs nerve conduit as a guidance channel in the repair of a 10-mm gap in the sciatic nerve of rats. At eight weeks post-implantation, walking track analysis showed a significantly higher sciatic function index (SFI) (P < 0.05) in the GGT/i-ASC group than in the autograft group. Furthermore, the mean recovery index of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) differed significantly between GGT/i-ASCs and autograft groups (P < 0.05), both of which were significantly superior to the GGT group (P < 0.05). No severe inflammatory reaction in the peripheral nerve tissue at the site of implantation was observed in either group. Histological observation and immunohistochemistry revealed that the morphology and distribution patterns of nerve fibers in the GGT/i-ASCs nerve conduits were similar to those of the autografts. These promising results achieved through a combination of regenerative cells and GGT nerve conduits suggest the potential value in the future development of clinical applications for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  10. The radio-radial nerve transfer for elbow extension restoration in C5 to C7 nerve root injury.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-01-01

    Extension of the elbow is required to oppose gravity; however, activation of the triceps brachii is frequently underestimated during the surgical planning for brachial plexus injuries. This report aims to describe a novel technique of distal nerve transfer designed for elbow extension reconstruction in patients sustaining a C5-C7 nerve root injury. We report a patient sustaining a brachial plexus injury with triceps palsy and preserved finger extension motion; after careful intraneural dissection of the radial nerve, a fascicle innervating the extensor digitorum communis muscle was sectioned, derouted and connected to a motor branch to the lateral head of the triceps. Eleven months after surgery, elbow extension strength scored MRC M4. No deficits on finger extension were observed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Peripheral nerve injury grading simplified on MR neurography: As referenced to Seddon and Sunderland classifications

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Ahlawat, Shivani; Belzberg, Allan; Andreseik, Gustav

    2014-01-01

    The Seddon and Sunderland classifications have been used by physicians for peripheral nerve injury grading and treatment. While Seddon classification is simpler to follow and more relevant to electrophysiologists, the Sunderland grading is more often used by surgeons to decide when and how to intervene. With increasing availability of high-resolution and high soft-tissue contrast imaging provided by MR neurography, the surgical treatment can be guided following the above-described grading systems. The article discusses peripheral nerve anatomy, pathophysiology of nerve injury, traditional grading systems for classifying the severity of nerve injury, and the role of MR neurography in this domain, with respective clinical and surgical correlations, as one follows the anatomic paths of various nerve injury grading systems. PMID:25114384

  12. Peripheral nerve injury grading simplified on MR neurography: As referenced to Seddon and Sunderland classifications.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Ahlawat, Shivani; Belzberg, Allan; Andreseik, Gustav

    2014-07-01

    The Seddon and Sunderland classifications have been used by physicians for peripheral nerve injury grading and treatment. While Seddon classification is simpler to follow and more relevant to electrophysiologists, the Sunderland grading is more often used by surgeons to decide when and how to intervene. With increasing availability of high-resolution and high soft-tissue contrast imaging provided by MR neurography, the surgical treatment can be guided following the above-described grading systems. The article discusses peripheral nerve anatomy, pathophysiology of nerve injury, traditional grading systems for classifying the severity of nerve injury, and the role of MR neurography in this domain, with respective clinical and surgical correlations, as one follows the anatomic paths of various nerve injury grading systems.

  13. A shed form of LDL receptor–related protein–1 regulates peripheral nerve injury and neuropathic pain in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Arandjelovic, Sanja; Li, Xiaoqing; Janes, Julie; Dragojlovic, Nikola; Zhou, George P.; Dolkas, Jenny; Myers, Robert R.; Gonias, Steven L.; Campana, W. Marie

    2007-01-01

    Injury to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) initiates a response controlled by multiple extracellular mediators, many of which contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Schwann cells in an injured nerve demonstrate increased expression of LDL receptor–related protein–1 (LRP1), an endocytic receptor for diverse ligands and a cell survival factor. Here we report that a fragment of LRP1, in which a soluble or shed form of LRP1 with an intact α-chain (sLRP-α), was shed by Schwann cells in vitro and in the PNS after injury. Injection of purified sLRP-α into mouse sciatic nerves prior to chronic constriction injury (CCI) inhibited p38 MAPK activation (P-p38) and decreased expression of TNF-α and IL-1β locally. sLRP-α also inhibited CCI-induced spontaneous neuropathic pain and decreased inflammatory cytokine expression in the spinal dorsal horn, where neuropathic pain processing occurs. In cultures of Schwann cells, astrocytes, and microglia, sLRP-α inhibited TNF-α–induced activation of p38 MAPK and ERK/MAPK. The activity of sLRP-α did not involve TNF-α binding, but rather glial cell preconditioning, so that the subsequent response to TNF-α was inhibited. Our results show that sLRP-α is biologically active and may attenuate neuropathic pain. In the PNS, the function of LRP1 may reflect the integrated activities of the membrane-anchored and shed forms of LRP1. PMID:18060043

  14. Neuroprotective and Nerve Regenerative Approaches for Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction after Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jeffrey D.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a significant cause of reduced quality of life in men and their partners. Cavernous nerve injury (CNI) during pelvic surgery results in ED in greater than 50% of patients, regardless of additional patient factors. ED related to CNI is difficult to treat and typically poorly responsive to first- and second-line therapeutic options. Recently, a significant amount of research has been devoted to exploring neuroprotective and neuroregenerative approaches to salvage erectile function in patients with CNI. In addition, therapeutic options such as neuregulins, immunophilin ligands, gene therapy, stem cell therapy and novel surgical strategies, have shown benefit in pre-clinical, and limited clinical studies. In the era of personalized medicine, these new therapeutic technologies will be the future of ED treatment and are described in this review. PMID:28820434

  15. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, D.; Keating, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery. PMID:25276813

  16. Nerve injuries in total hip arthroplasty with a mini invasive anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Macheras, George A; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Leonidou, Andreas O; Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis P; Galanakos, Spyridon P

    2016-07-25

    Minimal invasive techniques in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become increasingly popular during recent years. Despite much debate over the outcome of several minimal invasive techniques, complications arising from the use of anterior minimally invasive surgery (AMIS) for THA on a traction table are not well documented. Our study aims to focus on nerve damage during the AMIS procedure and the possible explanations of these injuries. We reviewed all primary THAs performed with the AMIS technique using a traction table, over 5 years and recorded all intraoperative and postoperative complications up to the latest follow-up. We focused on nerve injuries and nerve function impairment following the aforementioned technique. Our study included 1,512 THAs performed with the AMIS technique in 2 major hip reconstruction centres (KAT General Hospital, Athens, Greece and University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland), on 1,238 patients (985 women, 253 men; mean age 65.24 years). Mean follow-up was 29.4 months. We observed 51 cases of transient lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropraxia (3.37%), 4 cases of femoral nerve paralysis (3 permanent, 1 transient [0.26%]) and 1 case of permanent sciatic nerve paralysis (0.06%). No case of obturator or pudendal nerve injury was noticed. Mean age of these cases was 68.97 years. Sciatic and femoral nerve injuries were confirmed by electromyography, showing axonotmesis of the damaged nerve. Neurological injuries are a rare but distinct complication of THAs using the AMIS technique. Possible explanations for such referred nerve injuries are direct nerve injury, extreme traction, hyperextension, extreme external rotation of the leg, use of retractors and coexisting spinal deformities. Controlled use of traction in hip extension, cautious use of retractors and potential use of dynamometers may be useful, so that neurological damage can be avoided. Further studies are needed to fully elucidate the role of the above factors in AMIS

  17. Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Graham, Stuart L; Klistorner, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To investigate anterograde degenerative changes along the visual pathway in a rat model of optic nerve axotomy. Optic nerve transection was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed at regular time intervals and tissues harvested. Immunoblotting followed by densitometric analysis was used to determine the phosphorylation profile of Akt in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and the primary visual cortex (V1). The neuronal cell size and cell density were measured in the dLGN and the V1 using Nissl staining. The prevalence of apoptosis was characterized by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) histochemistry. Caspase-3 antibodies were also used to identify apoptotic cells. Neurons and astrocytes were detected using NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. An early and sustained loss of Akt phosphorylation was observed after optic nerve transection in both dLGN and V1. At week one, a decrease in the neuronal cell size (50.5±4.9 vs 60.3±5.0 µm(2), P = 0.042) and an increase of TUNEL positive cells (7.9±0.6 vs 1.4±0.5 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P<0.001) were evident in the dLGN but not in V1. A significant decline in neuronal cell number (14.5±0.1 vs 17.4±1.3 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P = 0.048), cell size (42.5±4.3 vs 62.1±4.7 µm(2), P = 0.001) and an increase in apoptotic cells (5.6±0.5 vs 2.0±0.4 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P<0.001) appeared in V1 initially at one month post-transection. The changes in the visual pathway continued through two months. Both neuronal cells and GFAP-positive glial cells were affected in this anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway. Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway takes place in target relay (LGN) and visual cortex following the optic nerve injury. Apoptosis was observed in both neural and adjacent glial cells. Reduction of Akt phosphorylation preceded cellular and apoptotic changes.

  18. Anterograde Degeneration along the Visual Pathway after Optic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stuart L.; Klistorner, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate anterograde degenerative changes along the visual pathway in a rat model of optic nerve axotomy. Methods Optic nerve transection was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed at regular time intervals and tissues harvested. Immunoblotting followed by densitometric analysis was used to determine the phosphorylation profile of Akt in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and the primary visual cortex (V1). The neuronal cell size and cell density were measured in the dLGN and the V1 using Nissl staining. The prevalence of apoptosis was characterized by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) histochemistry. Caspase-3 antibodies were also used to identify apoptotic cells. Neurons and astrocytes were detected using NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. Results An early and sustained loss of Akt phosphorylation was observed after optic nerve transection in both dLGN and V1. At week one, a decrease in the neuronal cell size (50.5±4.9 vs 60.3±5.0 µm2, P = 0.042) and an increase of TUNEL positive cells (7.9±0.6 vs 1.4±0.5 ×102 cells/mm2, P<0.001) were evident in the dLGN but not in V1. A significant decline in neuronal cell number (14.5±0.1 vs 17.4±1.3 ×102 cells/mm2, P = 0.048), cell size (42.5±4.3 vs 62.1±4.7 µm2, P = 0.001) and an increase in apoptotic cells (5.6±0.5 vs 2.0±0.4 ×102 cells/mm2, P<0.001) appeared in V1 initially at one month post-transection. The changes in the visual pathway continued through two months. Both neuronal cells and GFAP-positive glial cells were affected in this anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway. Conclusions Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway takes place in target relay (LGN) and visual cortex following the optic nerve injury. Apoptosis was observed in both neural and adjacent glial cells. Reduction of Akt phosphorylation preceded cellular and apoptotic changes

  19. Restoration of elbow flexion in brachial plexus avulsion injury: comparing spinal accessory nerve transfer with intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Waikakul, S; Wongtragul, S; Vanadurongwan, V

    1999-05-01

    This study was performed to compare the clinical outcome of 2 types of commonly used nerve transfers, the spinal accessory nerve transfer and the intercostal nerve transfer. This study was a prospective randomized parallel trial involving 205 patients presenting between 1989 and 1994. All patients were males ranging in age from 16 to 43 years. All patients underwent surgery within 6 months of injury. Spinal accessory nerve transfer was performed in 130 patients; better results were obtained in terms of less operative time, fewer blood transfusions, fewer immediate complications, and better motor function (very good and good power in 83% of patients). Intercostal nerve transfer was performed in 75 patients; better results were observed in terms of earlier electromyographic evidence of motor reinnervation, improvement in protective sensation, and reduction of pain. However, very good and good motor recovery was observed in only 64% of patients. There was no significant difference with regard to tidal volume, vital capacity, and the FEV1 to FEV ratio before and after surgery in either group. Smoking adversely affected the rate of recovery. Spinal accessory nerve transfer should be used when motor function of the elbow flexors is the major concern. Intercostal nerve transfer should be performed in patients who need both motor and sensory reconstruction and in those who have chronic pain syndrome after brachial plexus injury.

  20. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions. PMID:27904499

  1. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  2. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  3. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  4. Reconstruction of posterior interosseous nerve injury following biceps tendon repair: case report and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Mokhtee, David B; Brown, Justin M; Mackinnon, Susan E; Tung, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the terminal branches of the posterior interosseous nerve that makes this reconstruction possible. Finally, we advocate consideration for identification of the posterior interosseous nerve prior to reattachment of the biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity.

  5. Nerve growth factor and associated nerve sprouting contribute to local mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of bone injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Shiraishi, Y; Ozaki, N; Hayashi, K; Hori, K; Ichiyanagi, M; Sugiura, Y

    2012-08-01

    To clarify the mechanism of tenderness after bone injury, we investigated changes in the withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, nerve distribution and nerve growth factor (NGF)-expression in a rat model of bone injury without immobilization for bone injury healing. Rats were divided into three groups as follows: (1) rats incised in the skin and periosteum, followed by drilling a hole in the tibia [bone lesion group (BLG)]; (2) those incised in the skin and periosteum without bone drilling [periosteum lesion group (PLG)]; and (3) those incised in the skin [skin lesion group (SLG)]. Mechanical hyperalgesia continued for 28 days at a lesion in the BLG, 21 days in PLG and 5 days in SLG after treatments, respectively. Endochondral ossification was observed on days 5-28 in BLG and on days 5-21 in PLG. Nerve growth appeared in deep connective tissue (DCT) at day 28 in BLG. Nerve fibres increased in both cutaneous tissue and DCT at day 7 in PLG, but they were not found at day 28. Mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied with endochondral ossification and nerve fibres increasing at the lesion in both BLG and PLG. NGF was expressed in bone-regenerating cells during the bone injury healing. Anti-NGF and trk inhibitor K252a inhibited hyperalgesia in the different time course. This study shows that localized tenderness coincides with the bone healing and involves NGF expression and nerve sprouting after bone injury. The findings present underlying mechanisms and provide pathophysiological relevance of local tenderness to determination of bone fracture and its healing.

  6. NERVE GROWTH FACTOR MAINTAINS POTASSIUM CONDUCTANCE AFTER NERVE INJURY IN ADULT CUTANEOUS AFFERENT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    EVERILL, B.; KOCSIS, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the effects of nerve growth factor on voltage-dependent potassium conductance in normal and axotomized identified large cutaneous afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons (48–50 μm diameter) many of which probably give rise to myelinated Aβ fibers. K-currents were isolated by blocking Na- and Ca-currents with appropriate ion replacement and channel blockers. Separation of current components was achieved on the basis of response to variation in conditioning voltage. Cutaneous afferents were labeled by the retrograde marker hydroxy-stilbamide (FluoroGold) which was injected into the skin of the foot. The sciatic nerve was either ligated or crushed with fine forceps five to seven days later. Neurons were dissociated 14–17 days after injury. The cut ends of the sciatic nerves were positioned into polyethylene tubes, which were connected to mini-osmotic pumps filled with either nerve growth factor or sterile saline. Control neurons displayed a prominent sustained K-current and the transient potassium currents “A” and “D”. Nerve ligation, which blocks target reconnection resulted in near 50% reduction of total outward current; isolated sustained K-current and transient A-current were reduced by a comparable amount. Nerve crush, which allows regeneration to peripheral targets and exposure of the regenerating nerve to the distal nerve segment, resulted in a small reduction in sustained K-current but no reduction in transient A-current compared to controls. Levels of transient A-current and sustained K-current were maintained at control levels after nerve growth factor treatment. These results indicate that the large reduction in transient A-current, and in sustained K-current, observed in cutaneous afferent cell bodies after nerve ligation is prevented by application of nerve growth factor. PMID:11008179

  7. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects.

  8. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regenerative capacity of neurons and the regenerative support of Schwann cells over time. Brief low-frequency electrical stimulation accelerates motor and sensory axon outgrowth across injury sites that, even after delayed surgical repair of injured nerves in animal models and patients, enhances nerve regeneration and target reinnervation. The stimulation elevates neuronal cyclic adenosine monophosphate and, in turn, the expression of neurotrophic factors and other growth-associated genes, including cytoskeletal proteins. Electrical stimulation of denervated muscles immediately after nerve transection and surgical repair also accelerates muscle reinnervation but, at this time, how the daily requirement of long-duration electrical pulses can be delivered to muscles remains a practical issue prior to translation to patients. Finally, the technique of inserting autologous nerve grafts that bridge between a donor nerve and an adjacent recipient denervated nerve stump significantly improves nerve regeneration after delayed nerve repair, the donor nerves sustaining the capacity of the denervated Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. These reviewed methods to promote nerve regeneration and, in turn, to enhance functional recovery after nerve injury and surgical repair are sufficiently promising for early translation to the clinic.

  9. Role of neurotrophin in the taste system following gustatory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Jiang, Xin; Ji, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Taste system is a perfect system to study degeneration and regeneration after nerve injury because the taste system is highly plastic and the regeneration is robust. Besides, degeneration and regeneration can be easily measured since taste buds arise in discrete locations, and nerves that innervate them can be accurately quantified. Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that regulate neural survival, function, and plasticity after nerve injury. Recent studies have shown that neurotrophins play an important role in the developmental and mature taste system, indicating neurtrophin might also regulate taste system following gustatory nerve injury. This review will summarize how taste system degenerates and regenerates after gustatory nerve cut and conclude potential roles of neurotrophin in regulating the process.

  10. Antioxidative mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes repair and regeneration following cavernous nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhan-kui; Yu, Hong-lian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Hui; Luo, Qiong; Ding, Xie-gang

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum exhibit antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that these polysaccharides resist oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage following cavernous nerve injury. In this study, rat models were intragastrically administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides for 2 weeks at 1, 7, and 14 days after cavernous nerve injury. Serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks post-injury. Serum malondialdehyde levels decreased at 2 and 4 weeks. At 12 weeks, peak intracavernous pressure, the number of myelinated axons and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers, levels of phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and 3-nitrotyrosine were higher in rats administered at 1 day post-injury compared with rats administered at 7 and 14 days post-injury. These findings suggest that application of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides following cavernous nerve crush injury effectively promotes nerve regeneration and erectile functional recovery. This neuroregenerative effect was most effective in rats orally administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides at 1 day after cavernous nerve crush injury. PMID:27651780

  11. Protective effect of intraoperative nerve monitoring against recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during re-exploration of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery induces scarring or distorts anatomy, and increases the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury for a reoperation. The benefit of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) for re-exploration (a second nerve exploration) and reoperation has not been established. Methods Two hundred and ten patients were given a thyroid or parathyroid reoperation at our hospital between 2001 and 2010. Using IONM, we re-explored 56 patients who had been operated on before June 2007. The injury rate in these patients was compared with that of the 15 patients re-explored without IONM between 2001 and 2006. Results Of the 70 nerves that were re-explored using IONM, only one was incidentally injured, significantly fewer than the three injured in the 15 nerves re-explored without using IONM (1.43% vs. 20%, P = 0.0164). Conclusions IONM helped prevent RLN damage when re-exploring nerves during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. We recommend the routine use of IONM in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations. PMID:23618223

  12. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries in children: epidemiology and socioeconomics.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Despite the negative effects of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) on long-term population health, their true prevalence among pediatric trauma patients is under debate. The authors investigated the prevalence of PNIs among children involved in trauma and investigated associations between PNIs and several patient characteristics. The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric trauma patients who were registered in the National Trauma Data Bank from 2009 through 2011 and who fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. They used regression techniques to investigate the association of demographic and socioeconomic factors with the rate of PNIs among these patients. Of the 245,470 study patients, 50,211 were involved in motor vehicle crashes, 3380 in motorcycle crashes, 20,491 in bicycle crashes, 18,262 in pedestrian accidents, 26,294 in other crashes (mainly involving all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles), and 126,832 in falls. The respective prevalence of PNIs was 0.66% for motor vehicle crashes, 1% for motorcycle crashes, 0.38% for bicycle crashes, 0.42% for pedestrian accidents, 0.79% for other crashes, and 0.52% for falls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the following were associated with an increased incidence of PNIs: increased patient age (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20), higher Injury Severity Score (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20), elevated systolic blood pressure at arrival at the emergency room (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20), and increased number of trauma surgeons at the institution (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20). The following were associated with lower incidence of PNIs: female sex (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.02), rural hospitals (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.02), and urban nonteaching hospitals (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.02). PNIs are more common than previously identified for the pediatric trauma population. These injuries are associated with older age and increased severity of the overall injury.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma limits the nerve injury caused by 10% dextrose in the rabbit median nerve.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection in a rabbit model of dextrose-induced median nerve injury. New Zealand white rabbits (n = 15) were divided randomly into 3 groups. Three different regimens (group 1: 0.1 ml saline; group 2: 10% dextrose with PRP; group 3: 10% dextrose with saline) were injected within the carpal tunnel. Electrophysiological and histological findings were evaluated 12 weeks after the injection. The mean median motor latency in group 3 was significantly longer than that in groups 1 and 2. The cross-sectional area of the median nerve and subsynovial connective tissue thickness in group 3 were significantly larger than those in groups 1 and 2. PRP injection may be effective in controlling median nerve injury, as demonstrated by improvement in electrophysiological and histological findings 12 weeks after dextrose injection. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Biodegradable fibrin conduit promotes long-term regeneration after peripheral nerve injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Jonas; Kalbermatten, Daniel; McGrath, Aleksandra; Novikova, Liudmila N

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are often associated with loss of nerve tissue and require autologous nerve grafts to provide a physical substrate for axonal growth. Biosynthetic neural conduits could be an alternative treatment strategy in such injuries. The present study investigates the long-term effects of a tubular fibrin conduit on neuronal regeneration, axonal sprouting and recovery of muscle weight following peripheral nerve injury and repair in adult rats. Sciatic axotomy was performed proximally in the thigh to create a 10-mm gap between the nerve stumps. The injury gap was bridged by using a 14-mm-long fibrin glue conduit, entubulating 2 mm of the nerve stump at each end. A reversed autologous nerve graft was used as a control. The regenerative response from sensory and motor neurones was evaluated following retrograde labelling with Fast Blue fluorescent tracer. In control experiments, at 16 weeks following peripheral nerve grafting, 5184 (±574 standard error of mean (SEM)) sensory dorsal root ganglion neurones and 1001 (±37 SEM) spinal motor neurones regenerated across the distal nerve-graft interface. The fibrin conduit promoted regeneration of 60% of sensory neurones and 52% of motor neurones when compared to the control group. The total number of myelinated axons in the distal nerve stump in the fibrin-conduit group reached 86% of the control and the weight of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles recovered to 82% and 89% of the controls, respectively. The present results suggest that a tubular fibrin conduit can be used to promote neuronal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques.

  16. Factors predicting sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Qingtang; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Canbin; Li, Pengliang; Zhu, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries. DATA SOURCES: The online PubMed database was searched for English articles describing outcomes after the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries in humans with a publication date between 1 January 1990 and 16 February 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following types of article were selected: (1) clinical trials describing the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries published in English; and (2) studies that reported sufficient patient information, including age, mechanism of injury, nerve injured, injury location, defect length, repair time, repair method, and repair materials. SPSS 13.0 software was used to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses and to investigate the patient and intervention factors associated with outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensory function was assessed using the Mackinnon-Dellon scale and motor function was assessed using the manual muscle test. Satisfactory motor recovery was defined as grade M4 or M5, and satisfactory sensory recovery was defined as grade S3+ or S4. RESULTS: Seventy-one articles were included in this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that repair time, repair materials, and nerve injured were independent predictors of outcome after the repair of nerve injuries (P < 0.05), and that the nerve injured was the main factor affecting the rate of good to excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include age, gender, repair time, repair materials, nerve injured, defect length, and duration of follow-up. PMID:25206870

  17. Convergent nociceptive input to spinal dorsal horn neurons after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Kishimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Yuya; Maruhama, Kotaro; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-03-01

    The number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the spinal dorsal horn evoked by noxious stimulation was previously shown to be increased following peripheral nerve injury, and this increase was proposed to reflect the neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anomalous convergent primary afferent input to spinal dorsal horn neurons contributed to nerve injury-induced c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input from different branches of the sciatic nerve after injury to the tibial nerve. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by noxious heat stimulation of the hindpaw and also by electrical stimulation (ES) of the injured tibial nerve, respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons was significantly decreased 3 days after the injury. However, the number of c-Fos-IR neurons returned to the control level 14 days after the injury. P-ERK immunoreactive (p-ERK-IR) neurons were induced in the central terminal field of the tibial nerve by ES of the tibial nerve. The topographic distribution pattern and number of such p-ERK-IR neurons remained unchanged after the nerve injury. The time course of changes in the number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input, showed a pattern similar to that of c-Fos-IR neurons after the injury. These results indicate that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to c-Fos hyperinducibility in the spinal dorsal horn.

  18. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-09-04

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands.

  19. A single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Suh, Hye Rim; Han, Hee Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a devastating chronic condition and is often induced in the upper limb following nerve injury or damage. Various drugs or surgical methods have been used to manage neuropathic pain; however, these are frequently accompanied by undesirable side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a safe and non-invasive intervention that has been used to alleviate different types of pain in the clinic, but it is unclear whether TENS can improve chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limb. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single trial of TENS on chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury. Male rats weighing 200-250 g received median nerve-ligation of the right forearm, while the control group received only skin-incision without nerve-ligation. Neuropathic pain-behaviors, including mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia, were measured for 4 weeks. After the development of chronic neuropathic pain, TENS (100 Hz, 200 µs, sub-motor threshold) or placebo-TENS (sham stimulation) was applied for 20 min to the ipsilateral or contralateral side. Neuropathic pain behavior was assessed before and after intervention. Median nerve-ligation significantly induced and maintained neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side. TENS application to the ipsilateral side effectively attenuated the three forms of chronic neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side compared to sham-treated rats (peripheral and central effects), while TENS application to contralateral side only reduced mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral side (central effect). Our findings demonstrate that TENS can alleviate chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury.

  20. Study of the effects of semiconductor laser irradiation on peripheral nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, G. X.; Li, P.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study to what extent diode laser irradiation effects peripheral nerve injury, the experimental research was made on rabbits. Experimental results show that low-energy semiconductor laser can promote axonal regeneration and improve nervous function. It is also found that simultaneous exposure of the injured peripheral nerve and corresponding spinal segments to laser irradiation may achieve the most significant results.

  1. Cerebral changes after injury to the median nerve: a long-term follow up.

    PubMed

    Rosén, Birgitta; Chemnitz, Anette; Weibull, Andreas; Andersson, Gert; Dahlin, Lars B; Björkman, Anders

    2012-04-01

    Injury to the peripheral nerves in the upper extremity results in changes in the nerve, and at multiple sites throughout the central nervous system (CNS). We studied the long-term effects of an injury to the median nerve in the forearm with a focus on changes in the CNS. Four patients with isolated injuries of the median nerve in their 20s were examined a mean of 14 years after the injury. Cortical activation was monitored during tactile stimulation of the fingers of the injured and healthy hand using functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. The neurophysiological state and clinical outcome were also examined. Activation in the primary somatosensory cortex was substantially larger during tactile stimulation of the injured hand than with stimulation of the uninjured hand. We also saw a redistribution of hemispheric dominance. Stimulation of the injured median nerve resulted in a substantially increased dominance of the contralateral hemisphere. However, stimulation of the healthy ulnar nerve resulted in a decreased dominance of the contralateral hemisphere. Neurophysiology showed low sensory amplitudes, velocity, and increased motor latency in the injured nerve. Clinically there were abnormalities predominately in the sensory domain. However, there was an overall improved mean result compared with a five year follow-up in the same subjects. The cortical changes could be the result of cortical reorganisation after a changed afferent signal pattern from the injured nerve. Even though the clinical function improved over time it did not return to normal, and neither did the cortical response.

  2. Iatrogenic facial nerve injuries during chronic otitis media surgery: a multicentre retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Linder, T; Mulazimoglu, S; El Hadi, T; Darrouzet, V; Ayache, D; Somers, T; Schmerber, S; Vincent, C; Mondain, M; Lescanne, E; Bonnard, D

    2017-06-01

    To give an insight into why, when and where iatrogenic facial nerve (FN) injuries may occur and to explain how to deal with them in an emergency setting. Multicentre retrospective study in eight tertiary referral hospitals over 17 years. Twenty patients with partial or total FN injury during surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) were revised. Indication and type of surgery, experience of the surgeon, intra- and postoperative findings, value of CT scanning, patient management and final FN outcome were recorded. In 12 cases, the nerve was completely transected, but the surgeon was unaware in 11 cases. A minority of cases occurred in academic teaching hospitals. Tympanic segment, second genu and proximal mastoid segments were the sites involved during injury. The FN was not deliberately identified in 18 patients at the time of injury, and nerve monitoring was only applied in one patient. Before revision surgery, CT scanning correctly identified the lesion site in 11 of 12 cases and depicted additional lesions such as damage to the lateral semicircular canal. A greater auricular nerve graft was interposed in 10 cases of total transection and in one partially lesioned nerve: seven of them resulted in an HB III functional outcome. In two of the transected nerves, rerouting and direct end-to-end anastomosis was applied. A simple FN decompression was used in four cases of superficially traumatised nerves. We suggest checklists for preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management to prevent and treat iatrogenic FN injury during COM surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Disability following combat-sustained nerve injury of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J C; Glebus, G P; Cho, M S

    2014-02-01

    Injuries to the limb are the most frequent cause of permanent disability following combat wounds. We reviewed the medical records of 450 soldiers to determine the type of upper limb nerve injuries sustained, the rate of remaining motor and sensory deficits at final follow-up, and the type of Army disability ratings granted. Of 189 soldiers with an injury of the upper limb, 70 had nerve-related trauma. There were 62 men and eight women with a mean age of 25 years (18 to 49). Disabilities due to nerve injuries were associated with loss of function, neuropathic pain or both. The mean nerve-related disability was 26% (0% to 70%), accounting for over one-half of this cohort's cumulative disability. Patients injured in an explosion had higher disability ratings than those injured by gunshot. The ulnar nerve was most commonly injured, but most disability was associated with radial nerve trauma. In terms of the final outcome, at military discharge 59 subjects (84%) experienced persistent weakness, 48 (69%) had a persistent sensory deficit and 17 (24%) experienced chronic pain from scar-related or neuropathic pain. Nerve injury was the cause of frequent and substantial disability in our cohort of wounded soldiers.

  4. Intra-articular peroneal nerve incarceration following multi-ligament knee injury.

    PubMed

    Alhoukail, Amro; Panu, Anukul; Olson, Jaret; Jomha, Nadr M

    2015-10-01

    Knee dislocation with a common peroneal nerve injury is a serious problem. A case of multi-ligamentous knee injury with the unusual and interesting finding of a common peroneal nerve rupture incarcerated within the knee joint is presented. MRI and arthroscopic images are used to document this occurrence. To date, there are no published reports of a similar finding in the English orthopaedic literature. Level of evidence IV.

  5. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-06-02

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD.

  6. Treatment of Combined Injuries of the Axillary and Suprascapular Nerves with Scapulothoracic Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    A 20-year-old man suffered the combined axillary and suprascapular nerve palsies associated with scapulothoracic dissociation by motorcycle accident. The dislocated shoulder girdle was reduced and stabilized with osteosynthesis of the fractured clavicle and reattachment of the trapezius avulsed from the scapular spine for removal of continuous traction force to these damaged nerves. Because of no evidence of recovery on manual muscle test and electromyogram, exploration for these nerves was administered 6 weeks after injury. Although neurolysis of both nerves revealed neural continuity, excessive tension still existed on the suprascapular nerve. It was thought that previous operation in which the shoulder girdle had been reduced and stabilized as much as possible could not achieve complete anatomical reduction of the scapula. As an additional treatment, medial walls of the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches were shaven to relax the suprascapular nerve. After a year, complete recovery of both the axillary and suprascapular nerve was identified. Although scapulothoracic dissociation is commonly recognized as massive injury of the shoulder girdle with poor prognosis because of existence of accompanied severe neurovascular injuries, there are more than a few cases in which partial damage on the infraclavicular brachial plexus is only accompanied. In case of them, there is the possibility of lesions in continuity of the nerves in which good prognosis might be expected with surgical intervention including early reduction of the shoulder girdle for removal of excessive tension to the damaged nerve.

  7. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer in brachial plexus injuries. Experimental and anatomical basis.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, J A; Guizoni, M F; Dos Santos, A R; Calixto, J B; Duarte, H E

    1999-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injuries are devastating injuries to the upper limb, and nerve transfer remains the only option in reconstruction. Despite the encouraging results concerning recovery of shoulder and elbow function, no option is available for treatment of the paralytic hand. In rats, we sectioned the radial nerve in the elbow region and transferred it across the chest to reinnervate the lesioned contralateral medial cord of the brachial plexus. Rats were then evaluated for motor and sensory recovery, electrophysiologically, behaviorally and morphologically. Forepaw functional recovery was estimated to be 90%. In cadavers, the radial nerve and profunda brachii artery were dissected. It was observed that the radial nerve vascularized by the profunda brachii artery was able to reach the contralateral brachial plexus distal to the shoulder region without nerve grafts. After sectioning the radial nerve, sensory loss is minimal and motor palsy can be easily restored by tendon transfers. The results of tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy are better than for any other nerve. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer might be of clinical interest in the reconstruction of hand function in entire injury to the brachial plexus.

  8. Results of nerve grafting in radial nerve injuries occurring proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Results of radial nerve grafting are largely unknown for lesions of the radial nerve that occur proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord. METHODS The authors describe 13 patients with proximal radial nerve injuries who were surgically treated and then followed for at least 24 months. The patients' average age was 26 years and the average time between accident and surgery was 6 months. Sural nerve graft length averaged 12 cm. Recovery was scored according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale, which ranges from M0 to M5 (normal muscle strength). RESULTS After grafting, all 7 patients with an elbow extension palsy recovered elbow extension, scoring M4. Six of the 13 recovered M4 wrist extension, 6 had M3, and 1 had M2. Thumb and finger extension was scored M4 in 3 patients, M3 in 2, M2 in 2, and M0 in 6. CONCLUSIONS The authors consider levels of strength of M4 for elbow and wrist extension and M3 for thumb and finger extension to be good results. Based on these criteria, overall good results were obtained in only 5 of the 13 patients. In proximal radial nerve lesions, the authors now advocate combining nerve grafts with nerve or tendon transfers to reconstruct wrist, thumb, and finger extension.

  9. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Jin, Wei-Peng; Seo, Na Ri; Pang, Kang-Mi; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-04-01

    Several studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) can directly affect axon regeneration after peripheral nerve damage. In this study, we performed sensory tests and histological analyses to study the effect of recombinant human FGF-2 (rhFGF2) treatment on damaged mental nerves. The mental nerves of 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were crush-injured for 1 minute and then treated with 10 or 50 μg/mL rhFGF2 or PBS in crush injury area with a mini Osmotic pump. Sensory test using von Frey filaments at 1 week revealed the presence of sensory degeneration based on decreased gap score and increased difference score. However, at 2 weeks, the gap score and difference score were significantly rebounded in the mental nerve crush group treated with 10 μg/mL rhFGF2. Interestingly, treatment with 10 μg/mL rhFGF had a more obviously positive effect on the gap score than treatment with 50 μg/mL rhFGF2. In addition, retrograde neuronal tracing with Dil revealed a significant increase in nerve regeneration in the trigeminal ganglion at 2 and 4 weeks in the rhFGF2 groups (10 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL) than in the PBS group. The 10 μg/mL rhFGF2 group also showed an obviously robust regeneration in axon density in the mental nerve at 4 weeks. Our results demonstrate that 10 μg/mL rhFGF induces mental nerve regeneration and sensory recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

  10. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  11. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  12. Enhancing recovery from peripheral nerve injury using treadmill training

    PubMed Central

    English, Arthur W.; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; Sabatier, Manning J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Full functional recovery after traumatic peripheral nerve injury is rare. We postulate three reasons for the poor functional outcome measures observed. Axon regeneration is slow and not all axons participate. Significant misdirection of regenerating axons to reinnervate inappropriate targets occurs. Seemingly permanent changes in neural circuitry in the central nervous system are found to accompany axotomy of peripheral axons. Exercise in the form of modest daily treadmill training impacts all three of these areas. Compared to untrained controls, regenerating axons elongate considerably farther in treadmill trained animals and do so via an autocrine/paracrine neurotrophin signaling pathway. This enhancement of axon regeneration takes place without an increase in the amount of misdirection of regenerating axons found without training. The enhancement also occurs in a sex-dependent manner. Slow continuous training is effective only in males, while more intense interval training is effective only in females. In treadmill trained, but not untrained mice the extent of coverage of axotomized motoneurons is maintained, thus preserving important elements of the spinal circuitry. PMID:21498059

  13. Interfacing peripheral nerve with macro-sieve electrodes following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Birenbaum, Nathan K; MacEwan, Matthew R; Ray, Wilson Z

    2017-06-01

    Macro-sieve electrodes were implanted in the sciatic nerve of five adult male Lewis rats following spinal cord injury to assess the ability of the macro-sieve electrode to interface regenerated peripheral nerve fibers post-spinal cord injury. Each spinal cord injury was performed via right lateral hemisection of the cord at the T9-10 site. Five months post-implantation, the ability of the macro-sieve electrode to interface the regenerated nerve was assessed by stimulating through the macro-sieve electrode and recording both electromyography signals and evoked muscle force from distal musculature. Electromyography measurements were recorded from the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles, while evoked muscle force measurements were recorded from the tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and gastrocnemius muscles. The macro-sieve electrode and regenerated sciatic nerve were then explanted for histological evaluation. Successful sciatic nerve regeneration across the macro-sieve electrode interface following spinal cord injury was seen in all five animals. Recorded electromyography signals and muscle force recordings obtained through macro-sieve electrode stimulation confirm the ability of the macro-sieve electrode to successfully recruit distal musculature in this injury model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the macro-sieve electrode as a viable interface for peripheral nerve stimulation in the context of spinal cord injury.

  14. Pharmacologic management of trigeminal nerve injury pain after dental implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Hyun; Lee, Seok Hyoung; Kim, Seong Taek

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the trigeminal nerve are a common postoperative complication of dental implant surgery. Usually, the altered sensation and neuropathic pain caused by the nerve injury is temporary, but a permanent neurosensory disorder can sometimes occur. Surgery is commonly used to treat this condition, but the treatment is associated with some complications and a relatively low success rate. This study analyzed the characteristics of pharmacologic management of trigeminal nerve injury pain after dental implant surgery. Eighty-five patients who visited a temporomandibular joint and orofacial pain clinic with a history of trigeminal nerve injury pain after dental implant surgery were enrolled in this study. The pharmacologic management for trigeminal nerve injury pain was evaluated by prescribing a variety of medications for 12 weeks according to the prescription protocol of the study. The patients' pain characteristics, average percentage of pain reduction, and pain relieving factors were investigated prospectively. Patients who took anticonvulsants and antidepressants for at least 12 weeks reported a mean reduction in pain of 24.8%. Interestingly, patients who experienced an altered sensation and neuropathic pain for more than 1 year also reported a reduction in pain and discomfort, with an average decrease of 17.1%. In addition, it was found that early treatment using medications had a significant effect on reducing the level of pain and discomfort. These results suggest that pharmacologic management can be used for treating trigeminal nerve injury pain after dental implant surgery.

  15. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Todd W.; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Loomis, William H.; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  16. A Novel Cytokine Pathway Suppresses Glial Cell Melanogenesis after Injury to Adult Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Tilat A.; Huang, Yuan; Sidani, Amer; Atit, Radhika; Largaespada, David A.; Boissy, Raymond E.; Ratner, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    The neural crest gives rise to numerous cell types, including Schwann cells, neurons, and melanocytes. The extent to which adult neural crest-derived cells retain plasticity has not been tested previously. We report that cutting adult mouse sciatic nerve induces pigmentation around nerve fascicles, among muscle bundles, and in the hypodermis. Pigmented cells are derived from adult nerve, because pigmentation occurs even when nerve fragments are grafted into tyrosinase null albino mice. Pigmentation defects are pervasive in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Mice hemizygous for Nf1 mutations show enhanced pigmentation after nerve lesion and occasionally form pigmented and unpigmented tumors. The Nf1 nerve and the Nf1 host environment both contribute to enhanced pigmentation. Grafted purified Nf1 mutant glial cells [S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR+ or S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR−] mimic nerve-derived pigmentation. The NF1 protein, neurofibromin, is a Ras-GAP that acts downstream of a few defined receptor tyrosine kinases, including [β-common (βc)] the shared common receptor for granulocyte and monocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3 (IL3), and IL5. Cytokines in the environment have the potential to suppress pigmentation as shown by nerve injury experiments in null mice; when is βc absent or Nf1 is mutant, melanogenesis is increased. Thus, the adult nerve glial cell phenotype is maintained after nerve injury by response to cytokines, through neurofibromin. PMID:12427839

  17. Attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus L. stigma after chronic constriction injury of rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Abnous, Khalil; Motamedshariaty, Vahideh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-12-01

    In our previous study, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus elicited antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of such extracts in CCI animals. A total of 72 animals were divided as vehicle-treated CCI rats, sham group, CCI animals treated with the effective dose of aqueous and ethanolic extracts (200 mg/kg, i.p.). The lumbar spinal cord levels of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), were evaluated at days 3 and 7 after CCI (n=3, for each group). The apoptotic protein changes were evaluated at days 3 and 7 by western blotting. Oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione reduced (GSH), were measured on day 7 after CCI. Inflammatory cytokines levels increased in CCI animals on days 3 and 7, which were suppressed by both extracts. The ratio of Bax/ Bcl2 was elevated on day 3 but not on day 7, in CCI animals as compared to sham operated animals and decreased following treatment with both extracts at this time. Both extracts attenuated MDA and increased GSH levels in CCI animals. It may be concluded that saffron alleviates neuropathic pain, at least in part, through attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines, antioxidant activity and apoptotic pathways.

  18. Activation of Antioxidative Functions by Radon Inhalation Enhances the Mitigation Effects of Pregabalin on Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Horie, Shunsuke; Etani, Reo; Kanzaki, Norie; Sasaoka, Kaori; Kobashi, Yusuke; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-01-01

    Radon inhalation brings pain relief for chronic constriction injury- (CCI-) induced neuropathic pain in mice due to the activation of antioxidative functions, which is different from the mechanism of the pregabalin effect. In this study, we assessed whether a combination of radon inhalation and pregabalin administration is more effective against neuropathic pain than radon or pregabalin only. Mice were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 1,000 Bq/m(3) for 24 hours and pregabalin administration after CCI surgery. In mice treated with pregabalin at a dose of 3 mg/kg weight, the 50% paw withdrawal threshold of mice treated with pregabalin or radon and pregabalin was significantly increased, suggesting pain relief. The therapeutic effects of radon inhalation or the combined effects of radon and pregabalin (3 mg/kg weight) were almost equivalent to treatment with pregabalin at a dose of 1.4 mg/kg weight or 4.1 mg/kg weight, respectively. Radon inhalation and the combination of radon and pregabalin increased antioxidant associated substances in the paw. The antioxidant substances increased much more in radon inhalation than in pregabalin administration. These findings suggested that the activation of antioxidative functions by radon inhalation enhances the pain relief of pregabalin and that this combined effect is probably an additive effect.

  19. Activation of Antioxidative Functions by Radon Inhalation Enhances the Mitigation Effects of Pregabalin on Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shunsuke; Etani, Reo; Kanzaki, Norie; Sasaoka, Kaori; Kobashi, Yusuke; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-01-01

    Radon inhalation brings pain relief for chronic constriction injury- (CCI-) induced neuropathic pain in mice due to the activation of antioxidative functions, which is different from the mechanism of the pregabalin effect. In this study, we assessed whether a combination of radon inhalation and pregabalin administration is more effective against neuropathic pain than radon or pregabalin only. Mice were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 1,000 Bq/m3 for 24 hours and pregabalin administration after CCI surgery. In mice treated with pregabalin at a dose of 3 mg/kg weight, the 50% paw withdrawal threshold of mice treated with pregabalin or radon and pregabalin was significantly increased, suggesting pain relief. The therapeutic effects of radon inhalation or the combined effects of radon and pregabalin (3 mg/kg weight) were almost equivalent to treatment with pregabalin at a dose of 1.4 mg/kg weight or 4.1 mg/kg weight, respectively. Radon inhalation and the combination of radon and pregabalin increased antioxidant associated substances in the paw. The antioxidant substances increased much more in radon inhalation than in pregabalin administration. These findings suggested that the activation of antioxidative functions by radon inhalation enhances the pain relief of pregabalin and that this combined effect is probably an additive effect. PMID:26798431

  20. Lingual nerve injury after third molar removal: Unilateral atrophy of fungiform papillae

    PubMed Central

    de-Pablo-Garcia-Cuenca, Alba; Bescós-Atín, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and sensory changes due to lingual nerve injury are one of the most common alterations that follow surgical removal of third molar. They are usually transient but other less common complications, such as the atrophy of fungiform papillae, have an uncertain prognosis. Case Description: We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented a unilateral lingual atrophy of fungiform papillae after third molar extraction accompanied by severe dysesthesia that altered her daily life significantly during the following months and how this complication evolved over time. We conducted a literature review on the different factors that can lead to a lingual nerve injury. Clinical Implications: The clinical evolution of temporary and permanent somatosensitve injuries is an important fact to take into consideration during the postoperative management because it will indicate the lesion prognosis. Key words:Lingual nerve, third molar removal, somatosensitive alteration, papillae atrophy, permanent injury, temporary injury. PMID:24790723

  1. A Romanian therapeutic approach to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zegrea, I; Chivu, Laura Ioana; Albu, Mădălina Georgiana; Zamfirescu, D; Chivu, R D; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Lascăr, I

    2012-01-01

    The study of nerve regeneration and functional recovery of the injured peripheral nerves represents a worldwide subject of clinical and scientific research. Our team aimed to obtain the first guide for nerve regeneration, bioartificial and biodegradable, using exclusively Romanian resources and having the advantages of price and quality, over the imported nerve conduits already used in clinical practice. First steps of this project consisted in obtaining the prototype of nerve guide conduit and its' testing in vitro and in vivo. Tests of physicochemical characterization, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectrometry, thermal analysis (differential calorimetry, thermo-gravimetry), electron microscopy, water absorption and enzymatic degradation of the obtained prototype were followed by in vivo testing. The first results, obtained on a group of Brown Norway rats who suffered experimental lesions of 1 cm at the level of left sciatic nerve, which have then been repaired using the Romanian conduit prototype, are favorable in terms of biocompatibility, biodegradable capacity and support of nerve regeneration.

  2. Upper and lower extremity nerve injuries in pediatric missile wounds: a selective approach to management.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, Andrew A; Sachanandani, Neil S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2011-06-01

    Nerve injuries from missile and gunshot wounds often produce significant disability, and their management is controversial. The role of the surgeon in cases of missile wounds with neurologic deficits is not well defined. Enhancing the trauma team's ability to recognize treatable nerve injuries will lead to improved outcomes. Further, raising awareness of the time-sensitive nature of these injuries will also improve results in these cases. We reviewed a consecutive series of 17 pediatric patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by missile and gunshot wounds in a tertiary care children's hospital. We examined the indications for surgery, presence of associated injuries, mechanisms of injury, demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes. Urban victims were significantly more likely to have been intentionally assaulted than rural or suburban victims and they were also less likely to have completed follow-up care. High-energy weapons were more likely to require surgery compared with low-energy weapons. Patients presenting with tendon injuries were more likely to have a high-grade nerve injury requiring surgery. Patients presenting with tendon lacerations or high-energy mechanisms were significantly more likely to require surgery. Early exploration should be undertaken in cases where transection is likely to have occurred. Early decompression of common entrapment sites distal to repairs or injuries should be performed. Because follow-up is poor in this population, treatment should be prompt and thorough.

  3. Distal anterior interosseous nerve transfer to the deep ulnar nerve and end-to-side suture of the superficial ulnar nerve to the third common palmar digital nerve for treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries: experience in five cases.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2011-06-01

    To demonstrate the results of a double nerve transfer at the level of the hand for recovery of the motor and sensory function of the hand in cases of high ulnar nerve injuries. Five patients underwent a transfer of the distal branch of the anterior interosseous nerve to the deep ulnar nerve, and an end-to-side suture of the superficial ulnar nerve to the third common palmar digital nerve. Two patients recovered strength M3 and three cases were graded as M4; recovery of protective sensation (S3+ in three patients and S4 in two) was observed in the fourth and fifth fingers, and at the hypothenar region. The monofilament test showed values of 3.61 or less in all cases and the two-point discrimination test demonstrated values of 7 mm in three cases and 5 mm in two. This technique of double nerve transfer is effective for motor and sensory recovery of the distal ulnar-innervated side of the hand.

  4. Connexin 43 contributes to ectopic orofacial pain following inferior alveolar nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Unno, Syumpei; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically, it is well known that injury of mandibular nerve fiber induces persistent ectopic pain which can spread to a wide area of the orofacial region innervated by the uninjured trigeminal nerve branches. However, the exact mechanism of such persistent ectopic orofacial pain is not still known. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of connexin 43 in the trigeminal ganglion on mechanical hypersensitivity in rat whisker pad skin induced by inferior alveolar nerve injury. Here, we examined changes in orofacial mechanical sensitivity following inferior alveolar nerve injury. Furthermore, changes in connexin 43 expression in the trigeminal ganglion and its localization in the trigeminal ganglion were also examined. In addition, we investigated the functional significance of connexin 43 in relation to mechanical allodynia by using a selective gap junction blocker (Gap27). Results Long-lasting mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin and the upper eyelid skin, and activation of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, were induced after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Connexin 43 was expressed in the activated satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin, and the connexin 43 protein expression was significantly increased after inferior alveolar nerve injury. Administration of Gap27 in the trigeminal ganglion significantly reduced satellite glial cell activation and mechanical hypersensitivity in the whisker pad skin. Moreover, the marked activation of satellite glial cells encircling trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the whisker pad skin following inferior alveolar nerve injury implies that the satellite glial cell activation exerts a major influence on the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons. Conclusions These findings indicate that the propagation of satellite glial cell activation throughout the trigeminal ganglion via gap junctions, which are

  5. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury after Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to systematically review the comprehensive overview of literature data about injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction to discover the prevalence of injury, the risk factors, recovery rates, and alternative methods of treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases. Articles from January 2009 to June 2014 were searched. English language articles with a minimum of 6 months patient follow-up and injury analysis by patient’s reporting, radiographic, and neurosensory testing were selected. Results In total, 84 literature sources were reviewed, and 14 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analyzed on men and women. The influence of lower third molar extraction (especially impacted) on the inferior alveolar nerve was clearly seen. Conclusions The incidence of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction was about 0.35 - 8.4%. The injury of the inferior alveolar nerve can be predicted by various radiological signs. There are few risk factors that may increase the risk of injury to the nerve such as patients over the age of 24 years old, with horizontal impactions, and extraction by trainee surgeons. Recovery is preferable and permanent injury is very rare. PMID:25635208

  6. Electrical nerve stimulation to promote micturition in spinal cord injury patients: A review of current attempts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian; Chew, Daniel J; Biers, Suzanne; Thiruchelvam, Nikesh

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we focus on the current attempts of electrical nerve stimulation for micturition in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. A literature search was performed through PubMed using "spinal cord injury," "electrical nerve stimulation AND bladder," "sacral anterior root stimulation/stimulator" and "Brindley stimulator" from January 1975 to January 2014. Twenty studies were selected for this review. Electrical nerve stimulation is a clinical option for promoting micturition in SCI patients. Well-designed, randomized and controlled studies are essential for further investigation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Possible role of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings on the antioxidant effects of pretreatment with α-lipoic acid (α-LA) on the crush injury of rat sciatic nerve confirm the possible usefulness of α-LA administration in humans with peripheral nerve injuries. We discussed this issue in relation with our recent results in which the combined employment of α-LA and γ-linolenic acid with a rehabilitation program for six weeks reduced sensory symptoms and neuropathic pain in patients with compressive radiculopathy syndrome from disc-nerve root conflict in comparison with patients submitted to rehabilitation program alone for six weeks. PMID:20807428

  8. Biomechanical analysis of optic nerve injury treated by compound light granules and ciliary neurotrophic factor☆

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuying; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Jingxiang; Li, Peng; Wu, Yazhen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, rabbit models of optic nerve injury were reproduced by the clamp method. After modeling, rabbit models were given one injection of 50 ng recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor into the vitreous body and/or intragastric injection of 4 g/kg compound light granules containing Radix Angelicae Sinensis and Raidix Paeoniae Alba at 4 days after modeling, once per day for 30 consecutive days. After administration, the animals were sacrificed and the intraorbital optic nerve was harvested. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed that the injured optic nerve was thinner and optic nerve fibers were irregular. After treatment with recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor, the arrangement of optic nerve fibers was disordered but they were not markedly thinner. After treatment with compound light granules, the arrangement of optic nerve fibers was slightly disordered and their structure was intact. After combined treatment with recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor and compound light granules, the arrangement of optic nerve fibers was slightly disordered and the degree of injury was less than after either treatment alone. Results of tensile mechanical testing of the optic nerve showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress and maximum strain of the injured optic nerve were significantly lower than the normal optic nerve. After treatment with recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor and/or compound light granules, the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress and maximum strain of the injured optic nerve were significantly increased, especially after the combined treatment. These experimental findings indicate that compound light granules and ciliary neurotrophic factor can alleviate optic nerve injury at the histological and biochemical levels, and the combined treatment is more effective than either treatment alone. PMID:25317141

  9. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  10. Depletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells increases severity of mechanical allodynia and significantly alters systemic cytokine levels following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition caused by damage to the somatosensory nervous system, such as peripheral nerve injury. The immune system, and in particular the adaptive T cell response, plays a key role in mediating such pain. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are a small subpopulation of inhibitory T cells that prevent autoimmunity, limit immunopathology and maintain immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of conditional depletion of Treg cells on mechanical allodynia and serum cytokines in mice with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, an animal model of neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that CCI induced the infiltration of small numbers of Treg cells within effected neuronal tissue. Utilising the transgenic DEREG (DEpletion of REGulatory T cells) mice, we confirmed effective depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells by diphtheria toxin injections. Following CCI we observed a transient, though significant, increase in pain hypersensitivity for Treg-depleted DEREG mice compared to non-Treg-depleted mice. Analysis of systemic cytokine levels demonstrated significant changes in serum cytokine expression profiles. In particular, we observed significant increases in systemic concentration of RANTES, IL-2 and IL-5, and significant decreases in IL-12 and IFN-γ in nerve-injured Treg-depleted DEREG mice. Further analysis indicated a substantial increase in the serum concentration of IL-12p40 as a direct result of Treg cell depletion. These results suggest that depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells promote nerve injury-induced pain hypersensitivity, partially by inducing altered systemic concentrations of cytokines, which may act to regulate neuropathic pain.

  11. Effect of melatonin supplemented at the light or dark period on recovery of sciatic nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rateb, Enas Ezzat; Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Tablawy, Nashwa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; El-Attar, Samah

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can cause disabilities, social or economic problems. Melatonin, the secretory product of the pineal gland has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of melatonin on the recovery of sciatic nerve after injury, comparing its effect when given in the light or the dark periods. Forty adult male Albino rats were allocated into four groups: control, nerve injury, nerve injury + melatonin given at light and nerve injury + melatonin given at dark. Nerve injury was initiated by clamping the sciatic nerve. Sciatic functional index (SFI) was measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Melatonin was given daily for six weeks. Recovery of the function was analyzed by functional analysis, electrophysiological analysis and biochemical measurement of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 β), Nerve growth factor (NGF), and bcl-2. Melatonin improved SFI, nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and the force of gastrocnemius muscle contraction as compared to the untreated rats. SOD activity, NGF, and bcl-2 were significantly increased, while IL-1β was significantly decreased after melatonin treatment as compared to the untreated injury group. SFI reached the control level; muscle contraction and IL-1B were significantly improved in the group treated with melatonin in the dark. Melatonin fastened the neural recovery and may be used in the treatment of nerve injury and it induced better nerve regeneration when the rats were treated during the dark period. PMID:28435433

  12. Mrpl10 and Tbp Are Suitable Reference Genes for Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaxian; Shan, Qianqian; Meng, Yali; Pan, Jiacheng; Yi, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury triggers the dysregulation of a large number of genes at multiple sites, including neurons, peripheral nerve stump, and the target organ. Housekeeping genes were frequently used as reference genes to normalize the expression values of target genes. Suitable selection of housekeeping genes that are stably expressed after nerve injury minimizes bias elicited by reference genes and thus helps to better and more sensitively reflect gene expression changes. However, many housekeeping genes have been used as reference genes without testing the expression patterns of themselves. In the current study, we calculated the expression stability of nine commonly used housekeeping genes, such as 18S (18S ribosomal RNA), Actb (β-actin), CypA (cyclophilin A), Gapdh (glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), Hprt (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase), Pgk1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1), Tbp (TATA box binding protein), Ubc (ubiquitin C), YwhaZ (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation), and four newly identified housekeeping genes, including Ankrd27 (Ankyrin repeat domain 27), Mrpl10 (mitochondrial ribosomal protein L10), Rictor (rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, Complex 2), and Ubxn 11 (UBX domain protein 11), in both distal sciatic nerve samples and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) samples after sciatic nerve injury. Our results suggested that following peripheral nerve injury, Mrpl10 and Tbp might be used as suitable reference genes for sciatic nerve stump and DRGs, respectively. PMID:28134789

  13. Soluble complement receptor 1 protects the peripheral nerve from early axon loss after injury.

    PubMed

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Wolterman, Ruud; de Kok, Maryla; Vigar, Miriam Ann; Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Brian Paul; Baas, Frank

    2008-04-01

    Complement activation is a crucial early event in Wallerian degeneration. In this study we show that treatment of rats with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), an inhibitor of all complement pathways, blocked both systemic and local complement activation after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. Deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) in the nerve was inhibited, the nerve was protected from axonal and myelin breakdown at 3 days after injury, and macrophage infiltration and activation was strongly reduced. We show that both classical and alternative complement pathways are activated after acute nerve trauma. Inhibition of the classical pathway by C1 inhibitor (Cetor) diminished, but did not completely block, MAC deposition in the injured nerve, blocked myelin breakdown, inhibited macrophage infiltration, and prevented macrophage activation at 3 days after injury. However, in contrast to sCR1 treatment, early signs of axonal degradation were visible in the nerve, linking MAC deposition to axonal damage. We conclude that sCR1 protects the nerve from early axon loss after injury and propose complement inhibition as a potential therapy for the treatment of diseases in which axon loss is the main cause of disabilities.

  14. Early surgical exploration of radial nerve injury associated with fracture shaft humerus.

    PubMed

    Noaman, Hassan; Khalifa, Abdel Rahman; El-Deen, Mohamed Alam; Shiha, Anis

    2008-01-01

    The series included 36 patients, predominantly male, mean age 30.3 years. The most common cause of injury was motor car accident in 20 patients. Postreduction radial nerve injury occurred in nine cases. Open fracture humerus with radial nerve injury in seven cases. The fractures were situated in the middle or distal third of the humeral shaft. Most were transverse fractures. Twelve patients had surgery on the day of injury and the other 24 at a mean of 8 days later (3-14). Narrow dynamic compression plate was generally used for fixation. Exploration of the radial nerve demonstrated compression at the lateral intermuscular septum in 19 cases, entrapment in the fracture site in nine cases, and loss of its continuity in eight cases. Neurolysis was required in 20 cases, epineurorrhaphy in nine cases, interfascicular nerve grafts in five, and first-intention tendon transfer in two. Results of nerve surgery were assessed with the MRC (Medical Research Council) at a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Outcome was rated good to excellent in 28 patients, fair in 1, and poor (failure) in 3. First-intention tendon transfers were performed in 2 patients and 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Mean delay to recovery was 7 months after neurolysis and nerve repair and 15 months after nerve grafts. The fracture was united in all cases. The mean time of union was 5 months. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008.

  15. Pattern of Mas expression in acute and post-acute stage of nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Assis, Alex Dias; de Assis Araújo, Fernanda; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Zanon, Renata Graciele

    2017-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang [1-7]) and its receptor Mas are involved in a number of physiological processes, including control of arterial pressure and modulation of nervous system actions. However, the involvement of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in peripheral nerve injury has not been investigated. Using a model of sciatic nerve injury in mice, we demonstrated opposing changes in Mas receptor expression at days 2 and 14 post-injury. Mas receptor expression was more intense 2days after the nerve lesion, compared with the intensity of the intact nerve. At this time point, the sciatic nerve functional index was -20. At day 14 after the lesion, the intensity of the immunostaining labeling in longitudinal sections of the nerve was reduced (∼30%) and the functional index increased +36 (gait improvement). In the axotomized group treated with A779 (a Mas receptor antagonist), the functional recovery index decreased in relation to the untreated axotomized group. The Mas receptor inhibitor also altered the intensity of labeling of S-100, GAP43, and IBA-1 (morphological features compatible with delayed axon growth). This study demonstrated that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis activity was differentially modulated in the acute and post-acute stages of nerve injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental study on the effect of electrostimulation on neural regeneration after oculomotor nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningxi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Zhen; Meng, Youqiang; Feng, Baohui; Wang, Xuhui; Yang, Min; Wan, Liang; Ning, Bo; Li, Shiting

    2014-12-01

    The oculomotor nerve can regenerate anatomically and histologically after injury; however, the degree of functional recovery of extraocular muscles and the pupil sphincter muscle was not satisfactory. Electrostimulation was one potential intervention that was increasingly being studied for use in nerve injury settings. However, the effect of electrostimulation on regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve was still obscure. In this study, we studied the effects of electrostimulation on neural regeneration in terms of neurofunction, myoelectrophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurohistology after oculomotor nerve injury and found that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve enhanced the speed and final level of its functional and electrophysiological recovery, promoted neural regeneration, and enhanced the selectivity and specificity of reinnervation of the regenerated neuron, the conformity among the electrophysiological and functional recovery of extraocular muscles, and neural regeneration, and that the function of extraocular muscles recovered slower than electrophysiology. Thus, we speculated that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve produced a marked effect on all phases of neural regeneration including neuronal survival, sprout formation, axonal elongation, target reconnection, and synaptogenesis. We think that neural electrostimulation can be used in oculomotor nerve injury.

  17. Facial nerve injury following surgery for the treatment of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Ricardo Viana Bessa; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to carry out a longitudinal study of a series of cases in which injury of the facial nerve was observed following surgery for the treatment of temporomandibular ankylosis. The sample was composed of 13 patients, both male and female, in whom 18 surgical approaches were made. A postoperative assessment of the motor function of the facial nerve was made in accordance with the House-Brackmann grading system. All the patients were photographed and assessed at the following postoperative times: 24 hours, one week, one month and three months. The results showed that injury of the facial nerve occurred in 31% of the cases. An increase in the frequency of nerve injury was observed in the cases in which the interpositional arthroplasty technique was employed, as well as the fact that 75% of the patients had undergone at least one surgical intervention prior to the study. After three months all the patients displayed normal function of the facial nerve. The frequency of facial nerve injury is related to the degree of difficulty involved in the surgery determined by the type of ankylosis. The nerve lesions were shown to be of a temporary nature.

  18. Nerve injuries associated with pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Babal, Jessica C; Mehlman, Charles T; Klein, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Supracondylar fractures of the humerus are the most common type of elbow fracture in children. Of all complications associated with supracondylar fractures, nerve injury ranks highest, although reports of the incidence of specific neurapraxia vary. This meta-analysis aims primarily to determine the risk of traumatic neurapraxia in extension-type supracondylar fractures as compared with that of flexion-type fractures; secondarily it aims to use subgroup analysis to assess the risk of iatrogenic neurapraxia induced by pin fixation. A literature search identified studies that reported the incidence of nerve injury presenting with displaced supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children. Meta-analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the risk of traumatic neurapraxia associated with supracondylar fractures. Subgroup analysis of included articles was additionally performed to assess the risk of iatrogenic neurapraxia associated with lateral-only or medial/lateral pin fixation. Data from 5148 patients with 5154 fractures were pooled for meta-analysis. Among these patients, traumatic neurapraxia occurred at a weighted event rate of 11.3%. Anterior interosseous nerve injury predominated in extension-type fractures, representing 34.1% of associated neurapraxias; meanwhile, ulnar neuropathy occurred most frequently in flexion-type injuries, representing 91.3% of associated neurapraxias. Nerve injury induced by lateral-only pinning occurred at a weighted event rate of 3.4%, while the introduction of a medial pin elicited neurapraxia at a weighted event rate of 4.1%. Lateral pinning carried increased risk of median neuropathy, whereas the use of a medial pin significantly increased the risk of ulnar nerve injury. Of nerve injury associated with extension-type fractures, anterior interosseous neurapraxia ranks highest, whereas of flexion-type neuropathy, ulnar nerve injury predominates. We confirm that medial pinning carries the greater overall risk of nerve injury as

  19. Profiling of the dynamically alteredgene expression in peripheral nerve injury using NGS RNA sequencing technique

    PubMed Central

    Han, Duanyang; Chen, Yixun; Kou, Yuhui; Weng, Jian; Chen, Bo; Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery of peripheral nerve injuries is of major demand in clinical practice worldwide. Although, to some extent, peripheral nervous system can spontaneously regenerate, post-injury recovery is often associated with poor functional outcome. The molecular mechanism controlling the peripheral nerve repair process is still majorly unclear. In this study, by utilizing the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) RNA sequencing technique, we aim to profile the gene expression spectrum of the peripheral nerve repair. In total, we detected 2847 were differentially expressed at day 7 post crush nerve injury. The GO, Panther, IPA and GSEA analysis was performed to decipher the biological processes involving the differentially expressed genes. Collectively, our results highlighted the inflammatory response and related signaling pathway (NFkB and TNFa signaling) play key role in peripheral nerve repair regulation. Furthermore, Network analysis illustrated that the IL10, IL18, IFN-γ and PDCD1 were four key regulators with multiple participations in peripheral nerve repair and potentially exert influence to the repair process. The expression changes of IL10, IL18, IFN-γ, PDCD1 and TNFSF14 (LIGHT) were further validated by western blot analysis. Hopefully, the present study may provide useful platform to further reveal the molecular mechanism of peripheral nerve repair and discover promising treatment target to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27158375

  20. The superior laryngeal nerve injury of a famous soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci.

    PubMed

    Marchese-Ragona, R; Restivo, D A; Mylonakis, I; Ottaviano, G; Martini, A; Sataloff, R T; Staffieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) has been attributed much less clinical significance than the recurrent laryngeal nerve. It has sometimes been described as the 'neglected' nerve in thyroid surgery, although injury to this nerve can cause significant disability. The external branch of the SLN is the only motor supply to the cricothyroid muscle, which increases the tension of the ipsilateral vocal fold during highfrequency phonation, particularly in women and voice professionals. Damage to this nerve can manifest as ipsilateral cricothyroid muscle paralysis, and clinical symptoms may include a hoarse, breathy voice, frequent throat clearing, vocal fatigue or diminished vocal frequency range, especially when rising pitch. SLN paralysis can be a significant issue for those whose careers depend largely on a full range of voice. The famous opera soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci, suffered SLN injury during thyroid surgery with distressing consequences.

  1. Anti-hyperalgesic effect of a benzilidine-cyclohexanone analogue on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain: Participation of the κ-opioid receptor and KATP.

    PubMed

    Ming-Tatt, Lee; Khalivulla, Shaik Ibrahim; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Lajis, Nordin; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Akira, Ahmad; Ali, Daud Israf; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the analgesic effect of a novel synthetic cyclohexanone derivative, 2,6-bis-4-(hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzilidine)-cyclohexanone or BHMC in a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. It was demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of BHMC (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice, when evaluated using Randall-Selitto mechanical analgesiometer. It was also demonstrated that pretreatment of naloxone (non-selective opioid receptor blocker), nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI, selective κ-opioid receptor blocker), but not β-funaltrexamine (β-FN, selective μ-opioid receptor blocker) and naltrindole hydrochloride (NTI, selective δ-opioid receptor blocker), reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of BHMC. In addition, the analgesic effect of BHMC was also reverted by pretreatment of 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, soluble guanosyl cyclase blocker) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) but not Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase blocker). Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the systemic administration of BHMC attenuated chronic constriction, injury-induced neuropathic pain. We also suggested that the possible mechanisms include κ-opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide-independent cyclic guanosine monophosphate activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opening.

  2. Saphenous nerve injury during harvesting of one or two hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction☆

    PubMed Central

    de Padua, Vitor Barion Castro; Nascimento, Paulo Emílio Dourado; Silva, Sergio Candido; de Gusmão Canuto, Sergio Marinho; Zuppi, Guilherme Nunes; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether harvesting of two hamstring tendons (semitendinosus and gracilis) has the same rate of nerve injury as harvesting of the semitendinosus tendon alone, used as a triple graft. Methods Changes in sensitivity relating to injury of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve were evaluated in 110 patients six months after they underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendons. They were divided into two groups: one in which only the semitendinosus was used and the other, the semitendinosus and gracilis. Results The group in which only the semitendinosus was used as a graft presented a nerve injury rate of 36.1%. In the group in which the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were used, 58.1% of the patients presented altered sensitivity. In the general assessment on all the patients, the nerve injury rate was 50.9%. Conclusion Harvesting the semitendinosus alone and using it in triple form is a viable option for ACL reconstruction and may give rise to fewer nerve injuries relating to branches of the saphenous nerve. PMID:26535201

  3. Saphenous nerve injury during harvesting of one or two hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    de Padua, Vitor Barion Castro; Nascimento, Paulo Emílio Dourado; Silva, Sergio Candido; de Gusmão Canuto, Sergio Marinho; Zuppi, Guilherme Nunes; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether harvesting of two hamstring tendons (semitendinosus and gracilis) has the same rate of nerve injury as harvesting of the semitendinosus tendon alone, used as a triple graft. Changes in sensitivity relating to injury of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve were evaluated in 110 patients six months after they underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendons. They were divided into two groups: one in which only the semitendinosus was used and the other, the semitendinosus and gracilis. The group in which only the semitendinosus was used as a graft presented a nerve injury rate of 36.1%. In the group in which the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were used, 58.1% of the patients presented altered sensitivity. In the general assessment on all the patients, the nerve injury rate was 50.9%. Harvesting the semitendinosus alone and using it in triple form is a viable option for ACL reconstruction and may give rise to fewer nerve injuries relating to branches of the saphenous nerve.

  4. Sensoric protection after median nerve injury: babysitter-procedure prevents muscular atrophy and improves neuronal recovery.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Becker, Stephan T; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Geuna, Stefano; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P < 0.0001) was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P = 0.0194), nerve fiber (P = 0.0409), and nerve surface (P = 0.0184) in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle's weight and vitality.

  5. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Becker, Stephan T.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P < 0.0001) was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P = 0.0194), nerve fiber (P = 0.0409), and nerve surface (P = 0.0184) in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle's weight and vitality. PMID:25133176

  6. Forced exercise protects the aged optic nerve against intraocular pressure injury.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Vicki; Kezic, Jelena M; Trounce, Ian A; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that the optic nerve of mice becomes increasingly vulnerable to injury with advancing age. Here, we investigated whether regular exercise can modify this age-related vulnerability and improve optic nerve recovery after injury. Aged (12-month-old) C57BL/6J mice were exercised by swimming for 60 min/d, 5 d/wk for 6 weeks. After 5 weeks, injury to the optic nerve was induced by short-term elevation of intraocular pressure. Retinal function was recorded using the electroretinogram and the cellular and biochemical changes induced by injury were assessed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that exercise almost completely reversed age-related vulnerability of the optic nerve to injury such that exercised aged mice had a similar functional response to injury as non-exercised young (3-month-old) mice. Exercise also abrogated injury-induced astrocytic gliosis and macrophage activation in the aged retina. These data suggest that the known benefits of exercise also extend to the visual system and support further investigation of physical activity as a means of protecting against injury, dysfunction, and degeneration in the aging eye.

  7. Postoperative headache following acoustic neuroma resection: occipital nerve injuries are associated with a treatable occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Felder, John M; Endara, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate that occipital nerve injury is associated with chronic postoperative headache in patients who have undergone acoustic neuroma excision and to determine whether occipital nerve excision is an effective treatment for these headaches. Few previous reports have discussed the role of occipital nerve injury in the pathogenesis of the postoperative headache noted to commonly occur following the retrosigmoid approach to acoustic neuroma resection. No studies have supported a direct etiologic link between the two. The authors report on a series of acoustic neuroma patients with postoperative headache presenting as occipital neuralgia who were found to have occipital nerve injuries and were treated for chronic headache by excision of the injured nerves. Records were reviewed to identify patients who had undergone surgical excision of the greater and lesser occipital nerves for refractory chronic postoperative headache following acoustic neuroma resection. Primary outcomes examined were change in migraine headache index, change in number of pain medications used, continued use of narcotics, patient satisfaction, and change in quality of life. Follow-up was in clinic and via telephone interview. Seven patients underwent excision of the greater and lesser occipital nerves. All met diagnostic criteria for occipital neuralgia and failed conservative management. Six of 7 patients experienced pain reduction of greater than 80% on the migraine index. Average pain medication use decreased from 6 to 2 per patient; 3 of 5 patients achieved independence from narcotics. Six patients experienced 80% or greater improvement in quality of life at an average follow-up of 32 months. There was one treatment failure. Occipital nerve neuroma or nerve entrapment was identified during surgery in all cases where treatment was successful but not in the treatment failure. In contradistinction to previous reports, we have identified a subset of patients in whom the syndrome of

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in a polycaprolactone conduit promote sciatic nerve regeneration and sensory neuron survival after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Frattini, Flávia; Lopes, Fatima Rosalina Pereira; Almeida, Fernanda Martins; Rodrigues, Rafaela Fintelman; Boldrini, Leonardo Cunha; Tomaz, Marcelo A; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes; Melo, Paulo A; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2012-10-01

    Despite the fact that the peripheral nervous system is able to regenerate after traumatic injury, the functional outcomes following damage are limited and poor. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that have been used in studies of peripheral nerve regeneration and have yielded promising results. The aim of this study was to evaluate sciatic nerve regeneration and neuronal survival in mice after nerve transection followed by MSC treatment into a polycaprolactone (PCL) nerve guide. The left sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 mice was transected and the nerve stumps were placed into a biodegradable PCL tube leaving a 3-mm gap between them; the tube was filled with MSCs obtained from GFP+ animals (MSC-treated group) or with a culture medium (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium group). Motor function was analyzed according to the sciatic functional index (SFI). After 6 weeks, animals were euthanized, and the regenerated sciatic nerve, the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), the spinal cord, and the gastrocnemius muscle were collected and processed for light and electron microscopy. A quantitative analysis of regenerated nerves showed a significant increase in the number of myelinated fibers in the group that received, within the nerve guide, stem cells. The number of neurons in the DRG was significantly higher in the MSC-treated group, while there was no difference in the number of motor neurons in the spinal cord. We also found higher values of trophic factors expression in MSC-treated groups, especially a nerve growth factor. The SFI revealed a significant improvement in the MSC-treated group. The gastrocnemius muscle showed an increase in weight and in the levels of creatine phosphokinase enzyme, suggesting an improvement of reinnervation and activity in animals that received MSCs. Immunohistochemistry documented that some GFP+ -transplanted cells assumed a Schwann-cell-like phenotype, as evidenced by their expression of the S-100 protein, a Schwann cell

  9. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  10. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  11. Effects of glycine on electrical and histological properties of a rat peripheral nerve injury model.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Martin, Krystell; Baltazar-Rendon, Bernardo; Gonzalez-Maciel, Angelica; Nuno-Licona, Alberto; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Hernandez-Romero, Adriana; Ramos, Andrea; Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso

    2009-03-01

    Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries focuses on lesion type, from expectant to interfascicular repair. Many experiments have been undertaken using different factors to facilitate better or faster nerve stump growth: nerve growth factor (NGF), plaque growth factor (PGF), hyaluronic acid, leukemic inhibiting factor, and GABA, etc. Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain stem and spinal cord, and it also plays a critical role as a modulator of NMDA receptors. We studied the potential regenerative effect of glycine administered for different periods of time and compared results with a control group. The sciatic nerve of Wistar rats was exposed and the electrophysiology procedure was performed: the nerve was cut transversally and stitched back in place with four isolated cardinal 9/0 nylon stitches on each end. Study group rats were administered glycine 40 mM/kg daily for 15, 30, and 60 days, while control group rats were medicated with isotonic saline solution 0.9% for the same time periods. At the end of each study time period, the electrophysiological study was repeated. Animals were sacrificed on the 15th, 30th and 60th postoperative day and the sciatic nerve was exposed and prepared for histological studies. According to our results, glycine was effective in the morphologic regeneration and functional recovery of the sciatic nerve post-injury in Wistar rats with one month administration. We observed that nerve histology with glycine administration was more similar to that of normal nerves.

  12. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  13. Overexpression of miR-206 ameliorates chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats via the MEK/ERK pathway by targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenbo; Zhang, Limin; Li, Rui

    2017-04-12

    Neuropathic pain is chronic pain caused by lesions or diseases of the somatosensory system and existing tolerance to currently available analgesics. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in the development of neuropathic pain and neuro-inflammation resulting from nerve injury. However, the precise mechanism of miRNAs involved in neuropathic pain remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the vital roles of miR-206 and its putative target gene, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in neuropathic pain in the rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI). The levels of miR-206 were down-regulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rats following CCI, while the expressions of BDNF mRNA and protein were up-regulated in vivo. MiR-206 mimics attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a time-dependent manner in CCI rats. The changes were most significant at 7days. And, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were decreased by miR-206 mimics. A direct interaction between miR-206 and the 3'-UTR of BDNF was verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. MiR-206 mimics inhibited the expression levels of BDNF mRNA and protein. Moreover, miR-206 mimics suppressed the activation of the MEK/ERK pathway in the DRG of CCI rats. Overexpression of BDNF abrogated the effects of miR-206 inhibition on neuropathic pain, neuro-inflammation and the MEK/ERK pathway. Treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, exerted the same effect as treatment with miR-206 mimics. These results demonstrate that miR-206 alleviates neuropathic pain development via targeting of BDNF, and negatively mediates the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting that miR-206 may act as a potential target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flexion-Type Supracondylar Humeral Fractures: Ulnar Nerve Injury Increases Risk of Open Reduction.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kelly; Shah, Apurva S; Brusalis, Christopher M; Leddy, Kelly; Flynn, John M

    2017-09-06

    The vast majority of displaced pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures can be treated successfully with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. The need for open reduction is difficult to determine a priori and is typically due to the failure of closed reduction attempts or persistent limb ischemia. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures, the rate of open reduction for flexion-type fractures, and the predictive impact of ulnar nerve injury on the need for open reduction for flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures. We developed a database of consecutive pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures treated operatively at a tertiary care pediatric trauma center from 2000 to 2015. Data recorded included age, mechanism of injury, fracture type (open or closed), fracture pattern (flexion-type or extension-type), concomitant skeletal injury, neurovascular injury, treatment, and surgeon. Radiographs of all flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures were reviewed in order to confirm the classification of the injury pattern. The rate of open reduction for fractures with a flexion-type injury pattern and for such fractures with and without ulnar nerve injury at presentation was assessed. Of 2,783 consecutive pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures treated by surgeons at our center, 95 (3.4%) were flexion-type fractures. Ulnar nerve injury was noted for 10 (10.5%) of the 95 flexion-type fractures. Open injuries were identified at presentation in 3 (3.2%) of the 95 cases. Among closed fractures, 21 (22.8%) of 92 flexion-type fractures required open reduction compared with 50 (1.9%) of 2,647 extension-type fractures (odds ratio [OR] = 15.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.8 to 27.0; p < 0.001). Among closed flexion-type fractures, open reduction was performed in 6 (60%) of 10 fractures with associated ulnar nerve injury and in 15 (18.3%) of 82 fractures without ulnar nerve injury (OR = 6.7; 95% CI = 1

  15. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  16. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  17. Sciatic nerve injury caused by a stretching exercise in a trained dancer.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ho Yong; Lim, Oh Kyung; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-12-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury.

  18. Retrograde axonal transport of LIF is increased by peripheral nerve injury: correlation with increased LIF expression in distal nerve.

    PubMed

    Curtis, R; Scherer, S S; Somogyi, R; Adryan, K M; Ip, N Y; Zhu, Y; Lindsay, R M; DiStefano, P S

    1994-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine that affects the survival and differentiation of certain neuronal populations in vitro. To identify LIF-responsive neurons in the adult rat, we have demonstrated retrograde axonal transport of 125I-LIF to sensory and motor neurons. The accumulation of 125I-LIF by both cell types was significantly increased by prior sciatic nerve crush. Retrograde transport of 125I-LIF was inhibited by excess unlabeled LIF but not by related cytokines, indicating a specific receptor-mediated mechanism. Northern blot analysis revealed LIF expression in peripheral nerve that was increased in distal segments after axotomy. The correlation between LIF expression and increased retrograde transport following injury suggests that LIF plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  19. Endogenous glucocorticoids improve myelination via Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury: An in vivo study using a crush injury model.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Shinsuke; Nishi, Mayumi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Oda, Ryo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-06-01

    Glucocorticoids improve the symptoms of peripheral nerve disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and peripheral neuropathy. The effects of glucocorticoids are mainly anti-inflammatory, but the mechanisms of their effects in peripheral nerve disorders remain unclear. Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves express glucocorticoid receptors (GR), and glucocorticoids enhance the rate of myelin formation in vitro. Therefore, it is possible that the clinical improvement of peripheral nerve disorders by glucocorticoids is due, at least in part, to the modulation of myelination. In this study, an adrenalectomy (ADX) was performed, and followed by a daily injection of either low dose (1 mg/kg) or high dose (10 mg/kg) corticosterone (CORT). We then simulated a crush injury of the sciatic nerves. A sham ADX operation, followed by a simulated crush injury, was conducted as a control. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nuclei of in vivo Schwann cells expressed GR and that glucocorticoids impacted the GR immunoreactivity of the Schwann cells. The mRNA and protein expression of myelin basic protein was significantly lower in the animals given ADX with vehicle than in the sham operation group. However, the expression was restored in the low-dose CORT replacement group. Morphological analyses showed that the ADX with vehicle group had a significantly lower myelin thickness than did the low-dose CORT replacement group and the sham operation group. These results suggest that endogenous glucocorticoids have an important role in myelination through the GR in Schwann cells after an in vivo peripheral nerve injury.

  20. Comparative study of phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Global brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) are devastating events frequently resulting in severe functional impairment. The widely used nerve transfer sources for elbow flexion in patients with global BPIs include intercostal and phrenic nerves. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global BPI. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion BPI was carried out. In the phrenic nerve transfer group, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the anterolateral bundle of the anterior division of the upper trunk (23 patients); in the intercostal nerve transfer group, three intercostal nerves were coapted to the anterolateral bundles of the musculocutaneous nerve. The British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system, angle of elbow flexion, and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the recovery of elbow flexion at least 3 years postoperatively. The efficiency of motor function in the phrenic nerve transfer group was 83%, while it was 70% in the intercostal nerve transfer group. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of the MRC grade (p=0.646) and EMG results (p=0.646). The outstanding rates of angle of elbow flexion were 48% and 40% in the phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer groups, respectively. There was no significant difference of outstanding rates in the angle of elbow flexion between the two groups. Phrenic nerve transfer had a higher proportion of good prognosis for elbow flexion than intercostal nerve transfer, but the effective and outstanding rate had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation between the two groups according to MRC grading, angle of elbow flexion, and EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined treatment with FK506 and nerve growth factor for spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Shouyu; Lv, Decheng

    2013-10-01

    Following spinal cord injury in rats, FK506 is able to protect local nerve tissue, promote neural regeneration, reduce neuronal apoptosis and accelerate the recovery of spinal cord functions. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important in the regulation of central and peripheral nerve cell regeneration, growth differentiation and functions. Previous studies have shown that FK506 and NGF exhibit a synergistic effect in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury; however, it remains unclear whether the synergistic effect is present in the treatment of spinal cord injury. In this study, we combined FK506 and NGF for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The NF200 protein expression in rats with spinal cord injury was determined using immunohistochemical staining and NF200 mRNA expression levels were observed using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The restoration of spinal cord functions was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score. The results demonstrated that the combined treatment significantly enhanced the expression of NF200 and improved spinal cord functions compared with the results of the single treatment. Our experimental observations indicated that FK506 and NGF exhibit a synergistic effect in the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats and that the combined treatment may effectively promote neural regeneration and functional recovery in rats following spinal cord injury.

  2. Mobile zinc increases rapidly in the retina after optic nerve injury and regulates ganglion cell survival and optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Andereggen, Lukas; Yuki, Kenya; Omura, Kumiko; Yin, Yuqin; Gilbert, Hui-Ya; Erdogan, Burcu; Asdourian, Maria S; Shrock, Christine; de Lima, Silmara; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Zhuo, Yehong; Hershfinkel, Michal; Lippard, Stephen J; Rosenberg, Paul A; Benowitz, Larry

    2017-01-10

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the projection neurons of the eye, cannot regenerate their axons once the optic nerve has been injured and soon begin to die. Whereas RGC death and regenerative failure are widely viewed as being cell-autonomous or influenced by various types of glia, we report here that the dysregulation of mobile zinc (Zn(2+)) in retinal interneurons is a primary factor. Within an hour after the optic nerve is injured, Zn(2+) increases several-fold in retinal amacrine cell processes and continues to rise over the first day, then transfers slowly to RGCs via vesicular release. Zn(2+) accumulation in amacrine cell processes involves the Zn(2+) transporter protein ZnT-3, and deletion of slc30a3, the gene encoding ZnT-3, promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration. Intravitreal injection of Zn(2+) chelators enables many RGCs to survive for months after nerve injury and regenerate axons, and enhances the prosurvival and regenerative effects of deleting the gene for phosphatase and tensin homolog (pten). Importantly, the therapeutic window for Zn(2+) chelation extends for several days after nerve injury. These results show that retinal Zn(2+) dysregulation is a major factor limiting the survival and regenerative capacity of injured RGCs, and point to Zn(2+) chelation as a strategy to promote long-term RGC protection and enhance axon regeneration.

  3. Mobile zinc increases rapidly in the retina after optic nerve injury and regulates ganglion cell survival and optic nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiqing; Andereggen, Lukas; Yuki, Kenya; Omura, Kumiko; Yin, Yuqin; Gilbert, Hui-Ya; Erdogan, Burcu; Asdourian, Maria S.; Shrock, Christine; de Lima, Silmara; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Zhuo, Yehong; Hershfinkel, Michal; Lippard, Stephen J.; Benowitz, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the projection neurons of the eye, cannot regenerate their axons once the optic nerve has been injured and soon begin to die. Whereas RGC death and regenerative failure are widely viewed as being cell-autonomous or influenced by various types of glia, we report here that the dysregulation of mobile zinc (Zn2+) in retinal interneurons is a primary factor. Within an hour after the optic nerve is injured, Zn2+ increases several-fold in retinal amacrine cell processes and continues to rise over the first day, then transfers slowly to RGCs via vesicular release. Zn2+ accumulation in amacrine cell processes involves the Zn2+ transporter protein ZnT-3, and deletion of slc30a3, the gene encoding ZnT-3, promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration. Intravitreal injection of Zn2+ chelators enables many RGCs to survive for months after nerve injury and regenerate axons, and enhances the prosurvival and regenerative effects of deleting the gene for phosphatase and tensin homolog (pten). Importantly, the therapeutic window for Zn2+ chelation extends for several days after nerve injury. These results show that retinal Zn2+ dysregulation is a major factor limiting the survival and regenerative capacity of injured RGCs, and point to Zn2+ chelation as a strategy to promote long-term RGC protection and enhance axon regeneration. PMID:28049831

  4. Dorsal scapular nerve injury after trigger point injection into the rhomboid major muscle: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Chang, Min Cheol

    2017-08-14

    We report the case of a patient who presented with right dorsal scapular neuropathy after a trigger point injection into the right rhomboid major muscle. Through a nerve conduction study and electromyography, we demonstrated dorsal scapular nerve injury in this patient. A 38-year-old man complained that his right shoulder functioned less optimally during push-up exercises after a trigger point injection 4 weeks prior. Physical examination revealed mildly reduced right shoulder retractor muscle strength compared with the left side. We performed a nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography 5 weeks after the injection. The compound muscle action potential of the right dorsal scapular nerve showed low amplitude (left vs. right side: 5.2 vs. 1.6 mV) and delayed latency (left vs. right side: 4.9 vs. 6.8 ms). Positive sharp wave (1+) and mildly reduced recruitment were seen on electromyography of the rhomboid major muscle. The findings of the nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography indicated partial right dorsal scapular neuropathy. The nerve injury seemed to have been caused by the needle inserted during trigger point injection. Clinicians should pay attention to the occurrence of dorsal scapular nerve injury when performing trigger point injection into the rhomboid muscle.

  5. Use of antioxidants for the prophylaxis of cold-induced peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fernanda; Pollock, Martin; Karim, Alveera; Jiang, Yuying

    2002-09-01

    "Trench foot" is a particular risk for those involved in adventure tourism, for soldiers in winter mountain training exercises, and for the homeless. Nonfreezing cold nerve injury is characterized by axonal degeneration, which is attributed to free radicals released during cycles of ischemia and reperfusion. This pilot study sought to determine whether the administration of antioxidants might prevent or ameliorate the development of cold nerve injury. Twenty-six rats were divided into two groups. Group 1 animals received, by gavage, a mixture of vitamin C (150 mg/kg/d), vitamin E (100 mg/kg/d), and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (250 mg/kg/d) daily for 4 weeks. Allopurinol (20 mg/kg/d) was added in the last 4 days of treatment. Group 2 animals served as controls and did not receive any antioxidant supplements. After 1 month, two cycles of sciatic nerve cooling (0 degrees C) were induced in 10 controls and 10 experimental animals using circulating water through a nerve cuff. Six additional control animals were subjected to surgery but did not undergo nerve cooling. All animals were killed on the third postoperative day, and their nerves were processed for ultrastructural and quantitative studies. The proportion of degenerated myelinated and unmyelinated axons showed no significant difference between treated and untreated animals. We conclude that the administration of commonly used antioxidants does not prevent cold nerve injury.

  6. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Lars B.; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5–C7 and a non-rupture of C8–T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation—free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve—was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function. PMID:28316590

  7. A novel function of neuroglobin for neuroregeneration in mice after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Sera, Mayuko; Arai, Kunizo; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2017-09-23

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently discovered heme protein in the vertebrate brain that can bind to oxygen molecules. Mammalian Ngb plays a crucial role in neuroprotection under conditions of oxidative stress. To investigate other potential functions of Ngb, we investigated the mouse retinal Ngb system following optic nerve injury. In the retina of control mice, Ngb immunoreactivity was limited to the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer, and this immunoreactivity rapidly decreased to less than 50% of the control level 5 days after optic nerve injury. On the basis of this decrease, we designed in vivo experiments with enhanced expression of Ngb using adult mouse retina. The enhanced expression of Ngb was achieved by injecting chimeric human Ngb protein, which included the cell membrane-penetrating module of fish Ngb. One-day pretreatment with chimeric Ngb increased immunoreactivity levels of Ngb two-fold in mouse RGCs and increased the number of surviving RGCs three-fold by 14 days after optic nerve injury compared with vehicle controls. Furthermore, in the mouse retinas showing enhanced Ngb expression, several regenerating central optic axons exhibited outgrowth and were found to pass through the nerve crush site 14 days after nerve injury. No such regenerating optic axons were observed in the control mouse optic nerve during the same time frame. The data obtained from in vivo experiments strongly indicate that mammalian Ngb has neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of pericardial insulation on hypothermic phrenic nerve injury during open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R A; Spencer, F C

    1987-03-01

    Phrenic nerve injury was evaluated prospectively in 133 patients undergoing open-heart surgery using iced saline slush for topical hypothermia. In the control group of 70 patients no attempt was made to shield the phrenic nerves from direct exposure to ice. Phrenic nerve damage occurred in 73% of these patients, as assessed by persistent diaphragm paralysis evident on inspiratory chest roentgenogram. In 2 patients the paralysis was bilateral. In the second group of 63 patients a pericardial insulation pad was used to prevent contact of the iced slush to the phrenic nerve. Diaphragm paralysis was observed in 17% of these patients. This difference was highly significant (p less than .001). Diaphragm paralysis in the control group was clinically significant; life-threatening respiratory complications developed in 7 patients (14%), frequently resulting in multiple reintubations, tracheostomy, and prolonged mechanical ventilation. In addition, 4 patients with phrenic nerve injury exhibited a clinical syndrome consistent with gastric ileus, which may possibly represent hypothermic injury to the thoracic vagi. The likelihood of phrenic nerve injury when iced saline slush is used for topical myocardial cooling and the possibility of developing serious respiratory disability would support the routine use of pericardial insulation when this method of hypothermia is used.

  9. Herpes simplex virus vector-mediated delivery of neurturin rescues erectile dysfunction of cavernous nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ryuichi; Wolfe, Darren; Coyle, Christian H.; Wechuck, James B.; Tyagi, Pradeep; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Nelson, Joel B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Summary Neurturin (NTN), a member of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family, is known as an important neurotrphic factor for penis-projecting neurons. We recently demonstrated significant protection from erectile dysfunction (ED) following a replication defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-mediated GDNF delivery to the injured cavernous nerve. Herein we applied HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN to this ED model. Rat cavernous nerve was injured bilaterally using a clamp and dry ice. For HSV-treated groups, 20μl of vector stock was administered directly to the damaged nerve. Delivery of an HSV vector expressing both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and lacZ (HSV-LacZ) was used as a control. Intracavernous pressure along with systemic arterial pressure (ICP/AP) was measured 2 and 4 weeks after the nerve injury. Fluorogold (FG) was injected into the penile crus 7 days before sacrifice to assess neuronal survival. Four weeks after nerve injury, rats treated with HSV-NTN exhibited significantly higher ICP/AP compared to untreated or control vector treated groups. The HSV-NTN group had more FG-positive MPG neurons than control group following injury. HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN could be a viable approach for improvement of erectile dysfunction following cavernous nerve injury. PMID:18668142

  10. Effect of subcutaneous administration of calcium channel blockers on nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    White, D M; Cousins, M J

    1998-08-10

    Recent studies suggest that calcium contributes to peripheral neural mechanisms of hyperalgesia associated with nerve damage. In this animal behavioural study, we examined further the contribution of calcium in neuropathic pain by testing whether subcutaneous administration of either a calcium chelating agent or voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers attenuate nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. Studies were carried out in animals with partially ligated sciatic nerves, an established animal model of neuropathic pain. The nociceptive flexion reflex was quantified using an Ugo Basile Analgesymeter. Partial nerve injury induced a significant decrease in mechanical threshold compared to the sham operated controls. Daily subcutaneous injections of the calcium chelating agent, Quin 2 (20 microgram/2.5 microliter), significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. Similarly, SNX-111, a N-type channel blocker, also significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. SNX-230, a P and/or Q-type channel blocker, and nifedipine, a L-type channel blocker, had no effect on the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. In control experiments, SNX-111 had no effect on mechanical thresholds when administered subcutaneously in either the hindpaw of normal animals or the back of the neck in nerve injury animals. This study shows that neuropathic pain involves a local calcium-dependent mechanism in the receptive field of intact neurons of an injured nerve, since it can be alleviated by subcutaneous injections of either a calcium chelating agent or SNX-111, a N-type calcium channel blocker. These agents may be effective, peripherally acting therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain.

  11. Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Update and Preliminary Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ida K; Davidge, Kristen M; Novak, Christine B; Hoben, Gwendolyn; Kahn, Lorna C; Juknis, Neringa; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can result in profound loss of upper extremity function. Recent interest in the use of nerve transfers to restore volitional control is an exciting development in the care of these complex patients. In this article, the authors review preliminary results of nerve transfers in spinal cord injury. Review of the literature and the authors' cases series of 13 operations in nine spinal cord injury nerve transfer recipients was performed. Representative cases were reviewed to explore critical concepts and preliminary outcomes. The nerve transfers used expendable donors (e.g., teres minor, deltoid, supinator, and brachialis) innervated above the level of the spinal cord injury to restore volitional control of missing function such as elbow extension, wrist extension, and/or hand function (posterior interosseous nerve or anterior interosseous nerve/finger flexors reinnervated). Results from the literature and the authors' patients (after a mean postsurgical follow-up of 12 months) indicate gains in function as assessed by both manual muscle testing and patients' self-reported outcomes measures. Nerve transfers can provide an alternative and consistent means of reestablishing volitional control of upper extremity function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury. Early outcomes provide evidence of substantial improvements in self-reported function despite relatively subtle objective gains in isolated muscle strength. Further work to investigate the optimal timing and combination of nerve transfer operations, the combination of these with traditional treatments (tendon transfer and functional electrical stimulation), and measurement of outcomes is imperative for determining the precise role of these operations. Therapeutic, IV.

  12. Treatment of transected peripheral nerves with artemin improved motor neuron regeneration, but did not reduce nerve injury-induced pain behaviour.

    PubMed

    Widenfalk, Johan; Wu, Weiping; Hao, Jingxia; Person, Jonas K E; Wiesenfeldt-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Risling, Mårten

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete recovery of function and neuropathic pain are common problems after peripheral nerve injury. To develop new treatment strategies for peripheral nerve injuries we investigated whether the neurotrophic factor artemin could improve outcome after sciatic nerve injuries in rats. Artemin is a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family and exerts neuroprotective effects on sensory neurons as well as influencing behavioural thermal sensitivity. We additionally evaluated if fibrin sealant, which is sometimes used as a nerve glue, had any effects on neuropathic pain-related behaviour. After the sciatic nerve had been transected, 30 animals were randomised to one of three groups: treatment with a fibrin sealant that contained artemin in conjunction with sutures; fibrin sealant with no artemin (sham) in conjunction with sutures; or sutures alone (n=10 in each group). Motor function, sensory function, and autotomy were evaluated from 1 to 12 weeks after injury. Retrograde flourogold tracing 12 weeks after injury showed that the addition of artemin increased the number of regenerating motor neurons. However, it did not improve their performance, as measured by the Sciatic Function Index, compared with sham or suture alone. Animals treated with artemin had a non-significant increase in motor nerve conduction velocity compared with sham. However, artemin did not reverse nerve injury-induced pain behaviour such as cold or heat hypersensitivity. Fibrin sealant in itself did not ameliorate motor performance, or regeneration of motor neurons, or give rise to nerve injury-induced pain behaviour. The results indicate that artemin is of value as a treatment for peripheral nerve injuries, although the effects were limited. As the artemin high-affinity receptor GFRalpha-3 is present in Schwann cells and not in motor neurons, the effect on motor neuron axon regeneration may result from an indirect effect through Schwann cells in the injured nerve.

  13. The role of spinal serotonin receptor and alpha adrenoceptor on the antiallodynic effects induced by intrathecal milnacipran in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takehiro; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Takeda, Ryuichiro; Igawa, Kaori; Naono-Nakayama, Rumi; Sakoda, Sumio; Nishimori, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yasushi

    2014-09-05

    Milnacipran, a reuptake inhibitor of noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT), elicits an antiallodynic effect in rats with neuropathic pain; however, the role of NA and 5-HT receptors in the induction of the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran remains unclear. Thus, we examined the effects of prazosin as an α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine as an α2 adrenoceptor antagonist, metergoline as a 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, cyanopindolol as a 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonist, ketanserin as a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, and ondansetoron as a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist on the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran in neuropathic rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). The CCI rats expressed mechanical and thermal allodynia, which was attenuated by intrathecal injection of milnacipran. Yohimbine, but not prazosin, reversed the milnacipran-induced antiallodynic effect. The antiallodynic effect of milnacipran was also reversed by metergoline, ketanserin and ondansetron, while cyanopindolol reversed the antiallodynic effect on mechanical, but not thermal stimulation. Furthermore, c-Fos expression in lamina I/II of the spinal dorsal horn was enhanced by thermal stimulation and the enhanced expression of c-Fos was suppressed by milnacipran. This effect of milnacipran was reversed by yohimbine, metergoline, katanserin and ondansetron, but not prazosin. These results indicate that the effect of milnacipran on mechanical and thermal allodynia and c-Fos expression is elicited through the α2 adrenoceptor, but not α1 adrenoceptor, and 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors; furthermore, the 5-HT1A/1B receptor is involved in mechanical allodynia, but not thermal allodynia.

  14. Localized and sustained delivery of erythropoietin from PLGA microspheres promotes functional recovery and nerve regeneration in peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Jianheng; Zhang, Licheng; Long, Anhua; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery.

  15. Time-course of Changes in Activation Among Facial Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fu-Long; Gao, Pei-Yi; Sui, Bin-Bin; Wan, Hong; Lin, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Tian-Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Dezhi; Liu, Song

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients suffering different intervals of facial nerve injury were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging to study changes in activation within cortex. Forty-five patients were divided into 3 groups based on intervals of facial nerve injury. Another 16 age and sex-matched healthy participants were included as a control group. Patients and healthy participants underwent task functional magnetic resonance imaging (eye blinking and lip pursing) examination. Functional reorganization after facial nerve injury is dynamic and time-dependent. Correlation between activation in sensorimotor area and intervals of facial nerve injury was significant, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of −0.951 (P < 0.001) in the left sensorimotor area and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.333 (P = 0.025) in the right sensorimotor area. Increased activation in integration areas, such as supramarginal gyrus and precunes lobe, could be detected in the early-middle stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Decreased activation in sensorimotor area contralateral to facial nerve injury could be found in late stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Dysfunction in the facial nerve has devastating effects on the activity of sensorimotor areas, whereas enhanced intensity in the sensorimotor area ipsilateral to the facial nerve injury in middle stage of facial dysfunction suggests the possible involvement of interhemispheric reorganization. Behavioral or brain stimulation technique treatment in this stage could be applied to alter reorganization within sensorimotor area in the rehabilitation of facial function, monitoring of therapeutic efficacy, and improvement in therapeutic intervention along the course of recovery. PMID:26512554

  16. Peripheral nerve regeneration following transection injury to rat sciatic nerve by local application of adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Yadegarazadi, Mohammad-Javad; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess local effect of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) on the functional recovery of the sciatic nerve in a transection model. Sixty male healthy white Wistar rats were randomized into four experimental groups of 15 animals each: In the sham-operated group (SHAM), the sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. In the transected group (TC), the left sciatic nerve was transected and the cut nerve ends were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In the silicone graft group (SIL) a 10-mm defect was made and bridged using a silicone tube. The graft was filled with phosphated-buffer saline alone. In the treatment group a silicone tube (SIL/ACTH) was filled with 10 μL ACTH (0.1 mg/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibres were studied at 4, 8 and 12 weeks post operation. Behavioral testing, functional, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/ACTH than in SIL group (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry clearly showed more positive location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/ACTH than in SIL group. ACTH improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. This finding supports role of ACTH after peripheral nerve repair and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after nerve transection.

  17. The effect of aloe vera on ischemia--Reperfusion injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Guven, Mustafa; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Aslan, Esra; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Akman, Tarik; Cosar, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Aloe vera is compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of aloe vera treatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury. Twenty-eight male Wistar Albino rats were divided equally into 4 groups. Groups; Control group (no surgical procedure or medication), sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion group, sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion+aloe vera group and sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion+methylprednisolone group. Ischemia was performed by clamping the infrarenal abdominal aorta. 24 hours after ischemia, all animals were sacrificed. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically and biochemically. Ischemic fiber degeneration significantly decreased in the pre-treated with aloe vera and treated with methylprednisolone groups, especially in the pre-treated with aloe vera group, compared to the sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion group (p<0.05). A significant decrease in MDA, an increase in NRF1 level and SOD activity were observed in the groups which obtained from the AV and MP groups when compared to the sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion group. When all results were analysed it was seen that the aloe vera group was not statistically different compared to the MP group (p>0.05). Aloe vera is effective neuroprotective against sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Also aloe vera was found to be as effective as MP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of the effects of peripheral nerves injury on the muscle control - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaj, Anna; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Impairment of motor function following peripheral nerve injury is a serious clinical problem. Generally nerve injury leads to erroneous control of muscle activity that results in gait and voluntary movement abnormalities followed by muscle atrophy. This article presents a review of studies on the effects of peripheral nerve injury on the motor system performed on animal models. We focused our attention on the results that are fundamental for better understanding of the degenerative and regenerative processes induced by nerve injury as well as of the mechanisms of structural changes in neuronal networks controlling movement. Quoted results are also important for clinical applications because they allow to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that can be used after nerve injury inducing motor deficits. However, till now no efficient therapy inducing satisfactory recovery was found. There is still a need to continue an advanced basic research directed to develop effective therapies. Thus the aim of this review is to compare the results of recent studies performed on various animal models in order to propose new methods for identification of mechanisms responsible for muscle deficits and propose targets for new pharmacological therapies.

  19. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods We performed literature investigation through MEDLINE (PubMed) electronic database and manual search through dental journals to find articles concerning inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement. The search was restricted to English language articles published during the last 10 years, from December 2004 to March 2014. Results In total, we found 33 articles related to the topic, of which 27 were excluded due to incompatibility with established inclusion criteria. Six articles were eventually chosen to be suitable. The studies presented diagnostic methods of inferior alveolar nerve sensory deficit, and we carried out an assessment of the proportion of patients diagnosed within different time intervals from the time the injury occurred. Conclusions Various diagnostic methods have been developed throughout the years for dealing with 1 quite frequent complication in the implantology field - inferior alveolar nerve injury. Concurrently, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment was proved repeatedly. According to the results of the data analysis, a relatively high percentage of the practitioners successfully accomplished this target and achieved good treatment outcomes. PMID:25635209

  20. Motor cortex neuroplasticity associated with lingual nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kazunori; Lee, Jye-Chang; Hu, James W; Yao, Dongyuan; Sessle, Barry J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if lingual nerve trauma affects the features of face primary motor cortex (MI) defined by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). The left lingual nerve was transected in adult male rats by an oral surgical procedure; sham rats (oral surgery but no nerve transection) as well as naive intact rats served as control groups. ICMS was applied at post-operative days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 to map the jaw and tongue motor representations in face MI by analyzing ICMS-evoked movements and electromyographic activity recorded in the genioglossus (GG) and anterior digastric (AD) muscles. There were no statistically significant effects of acute (day 0) nerve transection or sham procedure (p > 0.05). The surgery in the sham animals was associated with limited post-operative change; this was reflected in a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the number of GG sites in left MI at post-operative day 14 compared to day 0. However, nerve transection was associated with significant increases in the total number of AD and GG sites in left or right MI or specifically the number of GG sites in rats at post-operative days 21 or 28 compared to earlier time periods. There were also significant differences between nerve-transected and sham groups at post-operative days 7, 14, or 21. These findings suggest that lingual nerve transection is associated with significant time-dependent neuroplastic changes in the tongue motor representations in face MI.

  1. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  2. Preoperative evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries: What is the place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Toia, Francesca; Gagliardo, Andrea; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Gagliardo, Cesare; Gagliardo, Giuseppe; Cordova, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound in the preoperative workup of peripheral nerve lesions and illustrate how nerve ultrasonography can be integrated in routine clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and in the management of focal peripheral nerve injuries. The diagnostic role and therapeutic implications of ultrasonography for different neuropathies are described. METHODS The authors analyzed the use of ultrasound in 119 entrapment, tumoral, posttraumatic, or postsurgical nerve injuries of limbs evaluated in 108 patients during 2013 and 2014. All patients were candidates for surgery, and in all cases the evaluation included clinical examination, electrodiagnostic studies (nerve conduction study and electromyography), and ultrasound nerve study. Ultrasound was used to explore the nerve fascicular echotexture, continuity, and surrounding tissues. The maximum cross-sectional area (CSA) and the presence of epineurial hyperechogenicity or intraneural hyper- or hypoechogenicity, of anatomical anomalies, dynamic nerve dislocations, or compressions were recorded. The concordance rate of neurophysiological and ultrasonographic data was analyzed, classifying ultrasound findings as confirming, contributive, or nonconfirming with respect to electrodiagnostic data. The correlation between maximum nerve CSA and neurophysiological severity degree in entrapment syndromes was statistically analyzed. RESULTS Ultrasonography confirmed electrodiagnostic findings in 36.1% of cases and showed a contributive role in the diagnosis and surgical planning in 53.8% of all cases; the findings were negative ("nonconfirming") in only 10.1% of the patients. In 16% of cases, ultrasound was not only contributive, but had a key diagnostic role in the presence of doubtful electrodiagnostic findings. The contributive role differed according to etiology, being higher for tumors (100%) and for posttraumatic or postsurgical neuropathies (72.2%) than for

  3. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Bradley C.; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M.; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S.

    2013-01-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of βII-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas βII-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and βII-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury. PMID:23152293

  4. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Gill, Bradley C; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S

    2013-02-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of β(II)-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas β(II)-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and β(II)-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury.

  5. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia.

  6. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model.

    PubMed

    Machado, J A; Ghizoni, M F; Bertelli, J; Teske, Gabriel C; Teske, Guilherme C; Martins, D F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Cargnin-Ferreira, E; Santos, A R S; Piovezan, A P

    2013-11-06

    The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP) on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36) underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001), compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05). Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001), in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05) and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01). Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  7. The pathogenesis of non-freezing cold nerve injury. Observations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jia, J; Pollock, M

    1997-04-01

    Non-freezing cold nerve injury is uncommon in civilian practice, but may reach epidemic proportions in war zones. Studied since the time of Hippocrates, its aetiology has remained elusive. We sought to replicate experimentally, a peripheral nerve cold temperature gradient, since this has been emphasized in clinical descriptions. Our observations, in the rat, of the vasa nervorum show that cold-induced intravascular aggregation is followed by a 'no-reflow' phenomenon which culminates in endothelial damage and delayed thrombotic occlusion.

  8. New synthetic prosthesis for peripheral nerve injuries: an experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, Selman; Bretthauer, Georg; Nagele-Moser, Doris; Saliba, Sarah; Tomasch, Gordana; Rafolt, Dietmar; Justich, Ivo; Waldert, Jörg; Berghold, Andrea; Kleinert, Reinhold; Becker, Heinz; Voges, Udo; Wiederstein-Grasser, Iris; Koch, Horst

    2013-04-01

    Even the most modern technology has failed to induce satisfactory functional regeneration of traumatically severed peripheral nerves. Delayed neural regeneration and in consequence, slower neural conduction seriously limit muscle function in the area supplied by the injured nerve. This study aimed to compare a new nerve coaptation system involving an innovative prosthesis with the classical clinical method of sutured nerve coaptation. Besides the time and degree of nerve regeneration, the influence of electrostimulation was also tested. The sciatic nerve was severed in 14 female Göttingen minipigs with an average weight of 40.4 kg. The animals were randomized into 2 groups: One group received the new prosthesis and the other underwent microsurgical coaptation. In each group, according to the randomization a part of the animals received postoperative electrostimulation. Postoperative monitoring and the stimulation schedule covered a period of 9 months, during which axonal budding was evaluated monthly. The data from the pilot study indicate that results with the nerve prosthesis were comparable with those of conventional coaptation. The results indicate that implantation of the nerve prosthesis allows for good and effective neural regeneration. This new and simple treatment option for peripheral nerve injuries can be performed in any hospital with surgical facilities as it does not involve the demanding microsurgical suture technique that can only be performed in specialized centers.

  9. Effects of peripheral nerve injury on parvalbumin expression in adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Medici, Tom; Shortland, Peter J

    2015-12-16

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a calcium binding protein that identifies a subpopulation of proprioceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is also expressed in a high proportion of muscle afferents but its relationship to PV is unclear. Little is known of the phenotypic responses of muscle afferents to nerve injury. Sciatic nerve axotomy or L5 spinal nerve ligation and section (SNL) lesions were used to explore these issues in adult rats using immunocytochemistry. In naive animals, the mean PV expression was 25 % of L4 or L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and this was unchanged 2 weeks after sciatic nerve axotomy. Colocalization studies with the injury marker activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) showed that approximately 24 % of PV neurons expressed ATF3 after sciatic nerve axotomy suggesting that PV may show a phenotypic switch from injured to uninjured neurons. This possibility was further assessed using the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) injury model where injured and uninjured neurons are located in different DRGs. Two weeks after L5 SNL there was no change in total PV staining and essentially all L5 PV neurons expressed ATF3. Additionally, there was no increase in PV-ir in the adjacent uninjured L4 DRG cells. Co-labelling of DRG neurons revealed that less than 2 % of PV neurons normally expressed CGRP and no colocalization was seen after injury. These experiments clearly show that axotomy does not produce down regulation of PV protein in the DRG. Moreover, this lack of change is not due to a phenotypic switch in PV immunoreactive (ir) neurons, or de novo expression of PV-ir in uninjured neurons after nerve injury. These results further illustrate differences that occur when muscle afferents are injured as compared to cutaneous afferents.

  10. Sciatic nerve injury repair: a visualized analysis of research fronts and development trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangyao; Jiang, Rui; Jin, Yan

    2014-09-15

    A total of 3,446 publications regarding sciatic nerve injury repair and protection indexed by Web of Science during 2000-2004 were used for a detailed analysis of temporal-spatial distribution characteristics. Reference co-citation networks of the 100 top-cited publications as per the number of total citations were created using the Web of Science database and the information visualization tool, CiteSpaceIII. The key words that showed high frequency in these publications were included for analyzing the research fronts and development trends for sciatic nerve injury repair and protection. Through word frequency trend analysis, studies on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, and skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells combined with tissue-engineered scaffold material will become the forefronts in the field of sciatic nerve injury repair and protection in the near future.

  11. Optic Nerve Injury Secondary to Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: an Analysis of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hyun Jun; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jeung-Gweon

    2005-01-01

    Major orbital complications after the endoscopic sinus surgeries are rare and of these, optic nerve injury is one of the most serious. This study was to undertaken to analyze 3 cases of optic nerve injury after endoscopic sinus surgery. The three cases included one patient with a loss of visual acuity and visual field defect, and two patients with total blindness. In all cases, no improvement of visual acuity was observed despite treatment. It is important to frequently check the location and direction of the endoscope during surgery to avoid optic nerve injury. In addition, surgeons must have a precise knowledge of the detailed anatomy through cadaver dissections, an ability to interpret the PNS CT scan and experienced procedural surgical skills. PMID:15861507

  12. Inferior alveolar nerve injury following orthognathic surgery: a review of assessment issues

    PubMed Central

    PHILLIPS, C.; ESSICK, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve encode information about facial expressions, speaking and chewing movements, and stimuli that come into contact with the orofacial tissues. Whatever the cause, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve negatively affects the quality of facial sensibility as well as the patient's ability to translate patterns of altered nerve activity into functionally meaningful motor behaviours. There is no generally accepted, standard method of estimating sensory disturbances in the distribution of the inferior alveolar nerve following injury. Assessment of sensory alterations can be conducted using three types of measures: (i) objective electrophysiological measures of nerve conduction, (ii) sensory testing (stimulus) measures and (iii) patient report. Each type of measure with advantages and disadvantages for use are reviewed. PMID:21058973

  13. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  14. Etiology of lingual nerve injuries in the third molar region: a cadaver and histologic study.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M Anthony; Le, Hung

    2006-12-01

    It has been suggested that different etiologies of lingual nerve damage in the third molar area will produce a different clinical and histologic appearance in the nerve. If the clinical and histologic pictures were different, it could result in different treatments being recommended. Eight preserved cadavers (16 lingual nerves) were used for this study. As far as possible, the nerves were left in situ and damaged in a way that could be envisaged during third molar surgery. In each case, the damaged sections of nerve were photographed, resected, embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned in 5 mum sections, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and examined histologically. The scalpel clinically produced a clean wound with sharply defined edges; this was confirmed histologically with minimal disruption to the fascicles. The 702 fissure bur produced a ragged stretch-type injury clinically, and histologically this was confirmed with an irregular-edged border to the lesion and stretching and internal damage to the fascicles immediately adjacent to the wound. The crush injury clinically caused considerable apparent damage to the nerve, which was confirmed histologically with crushing and disruption of the fascicles and reduction to approximately 25% of their preinjury thickness. The stretch injury clinically showed no damage, but histologically showed irregular internal disruption of the fascicles over the whole area subject to stretching movements. It does appear that different modalities in nerve injury produce a different type of injury both clinically and histologically. This information has implications for both natural clinical recovery and the indications for surgical intervention. Clinical recovery may occur best with close approximation of a sharp scalpel-type wound or excision of a crushed area of nerve with reapproximation of the nerve endings, but a ragged wound caused by a fissure bur may require excision back to healthy nerve with subsequent reapproximation, whereas

  15. Risk factors for permanent injury of inferior alveolar and lingual nerves during third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Edward; Grubor, Dragan; Chandu, Arun

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for permanent neurologic injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or lingual nerve (LN) after the removal of third molars. This report also describes the use of a Clinical Incident Review (CIR) process, allowing close monitoring of all patients with neurologic injuries as a result of dentoalveolar surgery. A database associated with a CIR process at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne from January 2006 through December 2009 was assessed. Factors assessed included gender, age, operator class, method of anesthesia, spacial relation, depth of impaction, ramus relation, proximity of the IAN on orthopantomogram, cone-beam computed tomographic usage, and side of injury. During this 4-year period, 11,599 lower third molars were removed in 6,803 patients. The incidence of an IAN injury was 0.68%, and the incidence of an LN injury was 0.15%. Important risk factors for permanent IAN injury were increasing age, surgery performed by staff dentists, type of anesthesia, and mesioangular impactions. The mean time of complete resolution was 4.3 months. No factors were found to statistically increase the risk of LN injury, although most injuries were seen in patients with a distoangular impaction. The overall incidences of IAN and LN injuries were low. Some risk factors for permanent IAN nerve injury were identified. Important risk factors for permanent IAN injury were increasing age (≥25 yr old), surgery performed by staff dentists, surgery under general anesthesia, and mesioangular impaction. No factors were found to statistically increase the risk of LN injury. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic injury of the obturator nerve during fertility-sparing procedure for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intraoperative injury of the obturator nerve has rarely been reported in patients with gynecological malignancies undergoing extensive radical surgeries. Irreversible damage of this nerve causes thigh paresthesia and claudication. Intraoperative repair may be done by end-to-end anastomosis or grafting when achieving tension-free anastomosis is not possible. Case presentation A 28-year-old woman with stage IB cervical cancer underwent fertility–sparing surgery, including conization and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. The left obturator nerve was damaged intraoperatively during pelvic dissection. Conclusion Immediate laparoscopic repair was successful and there was no functional deficit in the left thigh for six months postoperatively. PMID:22931409

  17. Functional recovery guided by an electrospun silk fibroin conduit after sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Young; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Kwang Gill; Kang, Seok Woo; Kweon, Hae Yong; Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the regenerative capacity of a newly developed nerve guidance conduit using electrospun silk fibroin (SFNC) implanted in a 10-mm defect of the sciatic nerve in rats. After evaluating the physical properties and cytocompatibility of SFNC in vitro, rats were randomly allocated into three groups: defect only, autograft and SFNC. To compare motor function and abnormal sensation among groups, ankle stance angle (ASA) and severity of autotomy were observed for 10 weeks after injury. Immunostaining with axonal neurofilament (NF) and myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies were performed to investigate regenerated nerve fibres inside SFNC. ASA increased significantly in the SFNC group at 1, 7 and 10 weeks after injury compared to the defect only group (p<0.05). At one week, mean ASA of the SFNC group was significantly higher than that of the autograft group (p<0.05). Onset and severity of autotomy decreased significantly in the SFNC group compared to other groups (p<0.05). Autotomy in the SFNC group started at 4 weeks and maximally reached toe level. However, the defect only and autograft groups first showed autotomy at 2 and 1 weeks following injury, respectively, and then reached the sole level. Well myelinated nerve fibres stained with NF and MBP were found inside SFNC. In conclusion, SFNC could be helpful in restoring motor function and preventing abnormal sensations after nerve injury.

  18. Reversal of peripheral nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity in the postpartum period: role of spinal oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Liu, Baogang; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Houle, Timothy T; Eisenach, James C

    2013-01-01

    Physical injury, including surgery, can result in chronic pain; yet chronic pain following childbirth, including cesarean delivery in women, is rare. The mechanisms involved in this protection by pregnancy or delivery have not been explored. We examined the effect of pregnancy and delivery on hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli of the rat hindpaw induced by peripheral nerve injury (spinal nerve ligation) and after intrathecal oxytocin, atosiban, and naloxone. Additionally, oxytocin concentration in lumbar spinal cerebrospinal fluid was determined. Spinal nerve ligation performed at mid-pregnancy resulted in similar hypersensitivity to nonpregnant controls, but hypersensitivity partially resolved beginning after delivery. Removal of pups after delivery prevented this partial resolution. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of oxytocin were greater in normal postpartum rats prior to weaning. To examine the effect of injury at the time of delivery rather than during pregnancy, spinal nerve ligation was performed within 24 h of delivery. This resulted in acute hypersensitivity that partially resolved over the next 2-3 weeks. Weaning of pups resulted only in a temporary return of hypersensitivity. Intrathecal oxytocin effectively reversed the hypersensitivity following separation of the pups. Postpartum resolution of hypersensitivity was transiently abolished by intrathecal injection of the oxytocin receptor antagonist, atosiban. These results suggest that the postpartum period rather than pregnancy protects against chronic hypersensitivity from peripheral nerve injury and that this protection may reflect sustained oxytocin signaling in the central nervous system during this period.

  19. Early extraction: a silver bullet to avoid nerve injury in lower third molar removal?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-B; Zhang, Z-Q

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the effects of early extraction of immature lower third molar on preventing complications, particularly nerve injury following lower third molar removal. Patients were grouped according to age and radiographic results: group A (518 patients, ≤23 years, immature teeth with apical foramen not closed); group B (532 patients, >23 years, mature teeth with closed apical foramen). Group A included 230 males and 288 females (average age 17 years). In group A, 808 lower mandibular third molars were extracted bilaterally in 290 and unilaterally in 228 patients; the incidence of complications was 2.48% (20/808) (all were temporary), the incidence of nerve injury was 0%. Group B included 250 males and 282 females (average age 39 years). In group B, 810 lower third molars were extracted bilaterally in 278 and unilaterally in 254 patients; the incidence of complications was 10% (81/810), the incidence of nerve injury was 1.6% (13/810). All complications were temporary, except two removals of permanent inferior alveolar nerve numbness (>6 months). In this study, early removal of the lower third molar was effective in avoiding some postoperative complications, especially nerve injury. Early extraction of lower third molar in youngsters is recommended following a team consultation.

  20. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fei; Zhang, Hong; Qi, Chao; Gao, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Xia-qing

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immunofluorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clusters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. PMID:26487864

  1. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  2. Reducing the risk of nerve injury during Bernese periacetabular osteotomy: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, M; Gharehdaghi, J; Schoeniger, R; Ganz, R

    2015-05-01

    The modified Smith-Petersen and Kocher-Langenbeck approaches were used to expose the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh and the femoral, obturator and sciatic nerves in order to study the risk of injury to these structures during the dissection, osteotomy, and acetabular reorientation stages of a Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. Injury of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh was less likely to occur if an osteotomy of the anterior superior iliac spine had been carried out before exposing the hip. The obturator nerve was likely to be injured during unprotected osteotomy of the pubis if the far cortex was penetrated by > 5 mm. This could be avoided by inclining the osteotome 45° medially and performing the osteotomy at least 2 cm medial to the iliopectineal eminence. The sciatic nerve could be injured during the first and last stages of the osteotomy if the osteotome perforated the lateral cortex of ischium and the ilio-ischial junction by > 10 mm. The femoral nerve could be stretched or entrapped during osteotomy of the pubis if there was significant rotational or linear displacement of the acetabulum. Anterior or medial displacement of < 2 cm and lateral tilt (retroversion) of < 30° were safe margins. The combination of retroversion and anterior displacement could increase tension on the nerve. Strict observation of anatomical details, proper handling of the osteotomes and careful manipulation of the acetabular fragment reduce the neurological complications of Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Martín Noguerol, Teodoro; Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus.

  4. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors relieve morphine resistance in neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsushita, Yosuke; Araki, Kohei; Mukae, Takehiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is often insensitive to morphine. Our previous study has demonstrated that neuron-restrictive silencer factor represses mu opioid receptor (MOP) gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) via histone hypoacetylation-mediated mechanisms after peripheral nerve injury, thereby causing loss of peripheral morphine analgesia. Here, we showed that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and valproic acid, restored peripheral and systemic morphine analgesia in neuropathic pain. Also, these agents blocked nerve injury-induced MOP down-regulation in the DRG. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors could serve as adjuvant analgesics to morphine for the management of neuropathic pain.

  6. Role of macrophages in Wallerian degeneration and axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Piao, Xianhua; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) has remarkable regenerative abilities after injury. Successful PNS regeneration relies on both injured axons and non-neuronal cells, including Schwann cells and immune cells. Macrophages are the most notable immune cells that play key roles in PNS injury and repair. Upon peripheral nerve injury, a large number of macrophages are accumulated at the injury sites, where they not only contribute to Wallerian degeneration, but also are educated by the local microenvironment and polarized to an anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2), thus contributing to axonal regeneration. Significant progress has been made in understanding how macrophages are educated and polarized in the injured microenvironment as well as how they contribute to axonal regeneration. Following the discussion on the main properties of macrophages and their phenotypes, in this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of macrophage infiltration after PNS injury. Moreover, we will discuss the recent findings elucidating how macrophages are polarized to M2 phenotype in the injured PNS microenvironment, as well as the role and underlying mechanisms of macrophages in peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration and regeneration. Furthermore, we will highlight the potential application by targeting macrophages in treating peripheral nerve injury and peripheral neuropathies.

  7. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle--a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPARγ as well as the TGF-β canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries.

  8. Free Functioning Gracilis Muscle Transfer versus Intercostal Nerve Transfer to Musculocutaneous Nerve for Restoration of Elbow Flexion after Traumatic Adult Brachial Pan-Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    After complete five-level root brachial plexus injury, free functional muscle transfer and intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve are two potential reconstructive options for elbow flexion. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of free functional muscle transfer versus intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfers with respect to strength. Sixty-two patients who underwent free functional muscle transfer reconstruction or intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion following a pan-plexus injury were included. The two groups were compared with respect to postoperative elbow flexion strength according to the British Medical Research Council grading system; preoperative and postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores. In the free functional muscle transfer group, 67.7 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. In the intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer group, 41.9 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Changes in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores were not statistically significant. Average time from injury to surgery was significantly different (p < 0.01) in both groups. The number of intercostal nerves used for the musculocutaneous nerve transfer did not correlate with better elbow flexion grade. Based on this study, gracilis free functional muscle transfer reconstruction achieves better elbow flexion strength than intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion after pan-plexus injury. The role of gracilis free functional muscle transfer should be carefully considered in acute reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  9. Long thoracic nerve neurotization for restoration of shoulder function in C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Hoshino, Shushi; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Arakawa, Yuichiro

    2010-09-01

    C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries are usually associated with complete paralysis of the long thoracic nerve. This makes it difficult to provide satisfactory shoulder function by neurotizing only the suprascapular nerve, compared with C5 and C6 preganglionic injuries, in which the long thoracic nerve is spared. We present a case report of a 21-year-old man who sustained a C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injury and obtained excellent shoulder function by intercostal nerve transfer to the long thoracic nerve in addition to neurotization of the suprascapular nerve. Our report emphasizes the importance of restoring the activity of the long thoracic nerve. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Facial nerve injuries cause changes in central nervous system microglial cells].

    PubMed

    Cerón, Jeimmy; Troncoso, Julieta

    2016-12-01

    Our research group has described both morphological and electrophysiological changes in motor cortex pyramidal neurons associated with contralateral facial nerve injury in rats. However, little is known about those neural changes, which occur together with changes in surrounding glial cells. To characterize the effect of the unilateral facial nerve injury on microglial proliferation and activation in the primary motor cortex. We performed immunohistochemical experiments in order to detect microglial cells in brain tissue of rats with unilateral facial nerve lesion sacrificed at different times after the injury. We caused two types of lesions: reversible (by crushing, which allows functional recovery), and irreversible (by section, which produces permanent paralysis). We compared the brain tissues of control animals (without surgical intervention) and sham-operated animals with animals with lesions sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 21 or 35 days after the injury. In primary motor cortex, the microglial cells of irreversibly injured animals showed proliferation and activation between three and seven days post-lesion. The proliferation of microglial cells in reversibly injured animals was significant only three days after the lesion. Facial nerve injury causes changes in microglial cells in the primary motor cortex. These modifications could be involved in the generation of morphological and electrophysiological changes previously described in the pyramidal neurons of primary motor cortex that command facial movements.

  11. Spatiotemporal expression of postsynaptic density 95 in rat retina after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Yi; Liu, ZhiQiang; Tuo, JingSheng; Hu, Nan; Guan, HuaiJin

    2012-03-01

    Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) contains three PSD95/Drosophilia disk large/ZO-1[PDZ] homology domains and links neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with the N-methyl-D: -aspartic acid receptor. Previous studies showed that the assembly of PSD95/nNOS signaling played an important role in rat ischemic brain injury. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the changes of PSD95 expression and location in retina after optic nerve crush. The optic nerve injury model of rats was created by crushing optic nerve at 2 mm retrobulbarly. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were used to analyze mRNA and protein expression of PSD95. The spatial distribution of PSD95 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Immunofluorescence was performed to observe the co-localization of PSD95. The PSD95 expression diminished at 1 day and elevated and peaked on the 7th day of post-injury. The mRNA and protein levels of PSD95 underwent the similar change. The association of PSD95 and rhodopsin was detected by immunofluorescence double staining. The injury-induced expression of PSD95 was physically co-existed with active caspase-3 (apoptotic marker) and nNOS. The spatiotemporal changes of PSD95 expression suggests that this protein likely to play a role in the degenerative process of never cells induced by optic nerve injury in the retina.

  12. The Effect of Sildenafil on Recuperation from Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Parlakpınar, Hakan; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Şamdancı, Emine; Kekilli, Ersoy; Sağır, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe functional and anatomical defects can be detected after the peripheral nerve injury. Pharmacological approaches are preferred rather than surgical treatment in the treatment of nerve injuries. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform histopathological, functional and bone densitometry examinations of the effects of sildenafil on nerve regeneration in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The study included a total of thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were divided into three groups of ten rats each. In all rats, a crush injury was created by clamping the right sciatic nerve for one minute. One day before the procedure, rats in group 1 were started on a 28-day treatment consisting of a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate given orally via a nasogastric tube, while the rats in group 2 were started on an every-other-day dose of 10 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate. Rats from group 3 were not administered any drugs. Forty-two days after the nerve damage was created, functional and histopathological examination of both sciatic nerves and bone densitometric evaluation of the extremities were conducted. Results: During the rotarod test, rats from group 3 spent the least amount of time on the rod compared to the drug treatment groups at speeds of 20 rpm, 30 rpm and 40 rpm. In addition, the duration for which each animal could stay on the rod throughout the accelerod test significantly reduced in rats from group 3 compared to rats from groups 1 and 2 in the 4-min test. For the hot-plate latency time, there were no differences among the groups in either the basal level or after sciatic nerve injury. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the static sciatic index (SSI) on the 42nd day (p=0.147). The amplitude was better evaluated in group 1 compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Under microscopic evaluation, we observed the greatest amount of

  13. Our experience with triceps nerve reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2012-05-01

    Although elbow extension is facilitated by gravity, triceps muscle provides elbow joint stability; in patients with brachial plexus injuries stable elbow is necessary for obtaining useful hand function. This study presents the senior author's experience with triceps nerve reconstruction and the functional results in patients with brachial plexus injuries. Outcomes were analyzed in relation to denervation time, severity score, length of the interposition nerve graft and donor nerves used. One hundred and sixty two patients with brachial plexus injury had triceps nerve neurotization and elbow extension recovery between 1978 and 2006. The mean patient's age was 25.45 ± 9.90 years and the mean denervation time was 16.90 ± 26.95 months. Two hundred and thirty two motor donors were used in 156 patients; 6 patients underwent neurolysis; 86 intercostal nerves were transferred in 41 patients. Interposition nerve grafts were used in 130 patients. Results were good or excellent in 31.65% of patients. The age of patients and the severity of the brachial plexus lesion are among the factors that significantly influenced functional results. Intraplexus motor donors are always preferable achieving better functional outcomes than extraplexus donors. Intercostal nerves and the posterior division of contralateral C7 proved preferred donors for elbow extension restoration in multiple avulsions. Although it is difficult to restore strong elbow extension, triceps nerve reconstruction is suggested in brachial plexus management, since it provides elbow stability. Satisfactory elbow extension strength was restored in young patients with high severity score. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [The changes of the muscular fiber phynotype at different condition of nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Luo, Quan-feng; Qi, Zuo-liang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xing

    2006-01-01

    To observe the change of the muscular fiber phynotype at different condition of nerve injury. Rabbits were used as an animal model in this study. The trigeminus and facial nerves of the animal were simultaneously severed (group 1) or only the latter was severed (group 2). The morphologic change of the muscular fibers was observed with histochemical methods; the tension of contraction and the threshold value of electrical stimulation were observed with electrical physiological methods. Trigeminus nerve play an important role in delaying muscular atrophy after facial nerve was severed. The atrophy degree of type II a and II b muscular fibers was less in group 2 than that in group 1. The change of type 1 muscular fibers was not affected by trigeminus nerve. New muscular fibers emerged in group 2. The tension of contraction and the threshold value of electrical stimulation were better in group 2 than that of in group 1. Sensory nerve could delay muscle atrophy after denervation. Sensory nerve should be repaired simultaneously when the motor nerve was sutured. The results of this study would facilitate clinical treatment for facial palsy.

  15. Locally Produced BDNF Promotes Sclerotic Change in Alveolar Bone after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Yamada, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is released due to nerve injury, is known to promote the natural healing of injured nerves. It is often observed that damage of mandibular canal induces local sclerotic changes in alveolar bone. We reported that peripheral nerve injury promotes the local production of BDNF; therefore, it was possible to hypothesize that peripheral nerve injury affects sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of BDNF on osteogenesis using in vitro osteoblast-lineage cell culture and an in vivo rat osteotomy model. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured with BDNF and were examined for cell proliferative activity, chemotaxis and mRNA expression levels of osteoblast differentiation markers. For in vivo study, inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury experiments and mandibular cortical osteotomy were performed using a rat model. In the osteotomy model, exogenous BDNF was applied to bone surfaces after corticotomy of the mandible, and we morphologically analyzed the new bone formation. As a result, mRNA expression of osteoblast differentiation marker, osteocalcin, was significantly increased by BDNF, although cell proliferation and migration were not affected. In the in vivo study, osteopontin-positive new bone formation was significantly accelerated in the BDNF-grafted groups, and active bone remodeling, involving trkB-positive osteoblasts and osteocytes, continued after 28 days. In conclusion, BDNF stimulated the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and it promoted new bone formation and maturation. These results suggested that local BDNF produced by peripheral nerve injury contributes to accelerating sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. PMID:28072837