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Sample records for nerve growth factor-sensitive

  1. Nerve growth factor-sensitive S6 kinase in cell-free extracts from PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Nakanishi, N.; Dickens, G.; Guroff, G.

    1986-05-01

    Soluble extracts from nerve growth factor (NGF)-stimulated PC12 cells prepared by alkaline lysis show a 2-10 fold increase in the ability to phosphorylate the ribosomal protein S6. The alkaline lysis method yields a preparation of much higher specific activity than does sonication. Half-maximal incorporation of (/sup 32/P) from (/sup 32/P)ATP into S6 occurred after 4-7 minutes of nerve growth factor treatment. The partially purified NGF-sensitive S6 kinase has a molecular weight of 45,000 and is not inhibited by the inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, NaCl, or trifluoperazine, nor is it activated by the addition of diolein plus phosphatidylserine. Trypsin treatment of either crude extracts or partially purified S6 kinase from control or NGF-treated cells was without effect. These data suggest that the S6 kinase stimulated by NGF is neither cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, nor the result of proteolytic activation of an inactive proenzyme. Treatment of intact cells with dibutyryl cyclic AMP or 5'-N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine also increases the subsequent cell-free phosphorylation of S6. But the effect of NGF in increasing S6 kinase activity cannot be mimicked by treatment of control extract with cAMP-dependent protein kinase in vitro. Thus, it is unlikely to result from the phosphorylation of a less active form of the S6 kinase by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  2. Optogenetic control of nerve growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjun; Koppes, Ryan A.; Froriep, Ulrich P.; Jia, Xiaoting; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H.; McLaughlin, Bryan L.; Anikeeva, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical stimulation. In this report, we explore optogenetic control of neurite growth as a cell-specific alternative to electrical stimulation. By investigating a broad range of optical stimulation parameters on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) expressing channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2), we identified conditions that enhance neurite outgrowth by three-fold as compared to unstimulated or wild-type (WT) controls. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of ChR2 expressing DRGs induces directional outgrowth in WT DRGs co-cultured within a 10 mm vicinity of the optically sensitive ganglia. This observed enhancement and polarization of neurite growth was accompanied by an increased expression of neural growth and brain derived neurotrophic factors (NGF, BDNF). This work highlights the potential for implementing optogenetics to drive nerve growth in specific cell populations. PMID:25982506

  3. Studies on nerve growth and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatius, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transition of nerve cell from a dividing undifferentiated cell to a morphologically differentiated nondividing cell was studied. Pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) by extending electrically excitable neurites. Yet by labeling these cells with /sup 3/H-thymidine and examining them autoradiographically, evidence for continued DNA replication in neurite bearing neurons was found. NGF receptors of two classes are expressed on PC12 cells and other NGF dependent neurons. By labeling differentiated PC12s in culture with /sup 125/I-NGF and examining them autoradiographically both receptor classes were found evenly distributed on the growth cones, neurites and cell bodies. Cytoskeletal associated receptors were found in these areas as well. The purification and identification of a soluble, extracellular protein of 37,000 molecular weight whose synthesis and accumulation is increased after injury of a rat sciatic nerve is described.

  4. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  5. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  6. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  7. Regulated plasmalemmal expansion in nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Miller, V E; Pfenninger, K H

    1991-03-01

    To study the mechanisms underlying plasmalemmal expansion in the nerve growth cone, a cell-free assay was developed to quantify membrane addition, using ligand binding and sealed growth cone particles isolated by subcellular fractionation from fetal rat brain. Exposed versus total binding sites of 125I-wheat germ agglutinin were measured in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively, after incubation with various agents. Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 in the presence of Ca2+ increases the number of binding sites (Bmax) but does not change their affinity (KD), indicating that new receptors appear on the plasma membrane. Similarly, membrane depolarization by high K+ or veratridine significantly induces, in a Ca2(+)-dependent manner, the externalization of lectin binding sites from an internal pool. Morphometric analysis of isolated growth cones indicates that A23187 and high K+ treatment cause a significant reduction in a specific cytoplasmic membrane compartment, thus confirming the lectin labeling results and identifying the plasmalemmal precursor. The isolated growth cones take up gamma-amino-butyric acid and serotonin, but show no evidence for Ca2(+)-dependent transmitter release so that transmitter exocytosis is dissociated from plasmalemmal expansion. The data demonstrate that plasmalemmal expansion in the growth cone is a regulated process and identify an internal pool of precursor membrane.

  8. Regulated plasmalemmal expansion in nerve growth cones

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To study the mechanisms underlying plasmalemmal expansion in the nerve growth cone, a cell-free assay was developed to quantify membrane addition, using ligand binding and sealed growth cone particles isolated by subcellular fractionation from fetal rat brain. Exposed versus total binding sites of 125I-wheat germ agglutinin were measured in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively, after incubation with various agents. Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 in the presence of Ca2+ increases the number of binding sites (Bmax) but does not change their affinity (KD), indicating that new receptors appear on the plasma membrane. Similarly, membrane depolarization by high K+ or veratridine significantly induces, in a Ca2(+)-dependent manner, the externalization of lectin binding sites from an internal pool. Morphometric analysis of isolated growth cones indicates that A23187 and high K+ treatment cause a significant reduction in a specific cytoplasmic membrane compartment, thus confirming the lectin labeling results and identifying the plasmalemmal precursor. The isolated growth cones take up gamma-amino-butyric acid and serotonin, but show no evidence for Ca2(+)-dependent transmitter release so that transmitter exocytosis is dissociated from plasmalemmal expansion. The data demonstrate that plasmalemmal expansion in the growth cone is a regulated process and identify an internal pool of precursor membrane. PMID:1999470

  9. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Coughlin, M.D.; Bienenstock, J.; Denburg, J.A. )

    1988-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been clones. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. These experiments indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by {sup 125}I-polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. The authors conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, they postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes.

  10. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with ({sup 125}I)NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and ({sup 125}I)NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations.

  11. Let-7 microRNAs Regenerate Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Targeting Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly targeting NGF and suppressing its protein translation. Following sciatic nerve injury, the temporal change in let-7 miRNA expression was negatively correlated with that in NGF expression. Inhibition of let-7 miRNAs increased NGF secretion by primary cultured SCs and enhanced axonal outgrowth from a coculture of primary SCs and dorsal root gangalion neurons. In vivo tests indicated that let-7 inhibition promoted SCs migration and axon outgrowth within a regenerative microenvironment. In addition, the inhibitory effect of let-7 miRNAs on SCs apoptosis might serve as an early stress response to nerve injury, but this effect seemed to be not mediated through a NGF-dependent pathway. Collectively, our results provide a new insight into let-7 miRNA regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration and suggest a potential therapy for repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25394845

  12. Aligned SF/P(LLA-CL)-blended nanofibers encapsulating nerve growth factor for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kuihua, Zhang; Chunyang, Wang; Cunyi, Fan; Xiumei, Mo

    2014-08-01

    Artificial nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) containing bioactive neurotrophic factors and topographical structure to biomimic native tissues are essential for efficient regeneration of nerve gaps. In this study, aligned SF/P(LLA-CL) nanofibers encapsulating nerve growth factor (NGF), which was stabilized by SF in core, were fabricated via a coaxial electrospinning technique. The controlled release of NGF from the nanofibers was evaluated using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) and PC12 cell-based bioassay over a 60-day time period. The results demonstrated that NGF presented a sustained release and remained biological activity over 60 days. Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) were fabricated by reeling the aligned SF/P(LLA-CL) nanofibrous scaffolds encapsulating NGF and then used as a bridge implanted across a 15-mm defect in the sciatic nerve of rats to promote nerve regeneration. The outcome in terms of regenerated nerve at 12 weeks was evaluated by a combination of electrophysiological assessment, histochemistry, and electron microscopy. All results clarified that the NGF-encapsulated-aligned SF/P(LLA-CL) NGCs promoted peripheral nerve regeneration significantly better than the aligned SF/P(LLA-CL) NGCs, suggesting that the released NGF from nanofibers could effectively promote the regeneration of peripheral nerve.

  13. A photon-driven micromotor can direct nerve fibre growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Nieminen, Timo A.; Mohanty, Samarendra; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal path-finding is important in the development of the nervous system, nerve repair and nerve regeneration. The behaviour of the growth cone at the tip of the growing axon determines the direction of axonal growth and migration. We have developed an optical-based system to control the direction of growth of individual axons (nerve fibres) using laser-driven spinning birefringent spheres. One or two optical traps position birefringent beads adjacent to growth cones of cultured goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons. Circularly polarized light with angular momentum causes the trapped bead to spin. This creates a localized microfluidic flow generating an estimated 0.17 pN shear force against the growth cone that turns in response to the shear. The direction of axonal growth can be precisely manipulated by changing the rotation direction and position of this optically driven micromotor. A physical model estimating the shear force density on the axon is described.

  14. Nerve growth factor facilitates perivascular innervation in neovasculatures of mice.

    PubMed

    Goda, Mitsuhiro; Takatori, Shingo; Atagi, Saori; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that blood vessels including arterioles have a perivascular innervation. It is also widely accepted that perivascular nerves maintain vascular tone and regulate blood flow. Although there are currently prevailing opinions, unified views on the innervation of microcirculation in any organs have not been established. The present study was designed to investigate whether there are perivascular nerves innervated in microvessels and neovessels. Furthermore, we examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF) can exert a promotional effect on perivascular nerve innervation in neovessels of Matrigel plugs. A Matrigel was subcutaneously implanted in mouse. The presence of perivascular nerves in Matrigel on Day 7-21 after the implantation was immunohistochemically studied. NGF or saline was subcutaneously administered by an osmotic mini-pump for a period of 3-14 days. The immunostaining of neovasculatures in Matrigel showed the presence of perivascular nerves on Day 21 after Matrigel injection. Perivascular nerve innervation of neovessels within Matrigel implanted in NGF-treated mice was observed in Day 17 after Matrigel implantation. However, NGF treatment did not increase numbers of neovessels in Matrigel. These results suggest that perivascular nerves innervate neovessels as neovasculatures mature and that NGF accelerates the innervation of perivascular nerves in neovessels. PMID:27493098

  15. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  16. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  17. Assaying binding of nerve growth factor to cell surface receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes methods both for the radioiodination of nerve growth factor (NGF) and for assaying NFG receptors by reversible binding techniques. Preparation of (/sup 125/I)NGF along with a rapid method for determining the amount of cell-bound ligand have allowed the detection of NGF receptors on a number of cell types.

  18. Nerve Growth Factor: A Focus on Neuroscience and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Omar Balzamino, Bijorn; Micera, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the firstly discovered and best characterized neurotrophic factor, known to play a critical protective role in the development and survival of sympathetic, sensory and forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF promotes neuritis outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro and nerve cell recovery after ischemic, surgical or chemical injuries. Recently, the therapeutic property of NGF has been demonstrated on human cutaneous and corneal ulcers, pressure ulcer, glaucoma, maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. NGF eye drops administration is well tolerated, with no detectable clinical evidence of systemic or local adverse effects. The aim of this review is to summarize these biological properties and the potential clinical development of NGF. PMID:26411962

  19. Nerve growth factor mRNA in brain: localization by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Rennert, P.D.; Heinrich, G.

    1986-07-31

    Nerve Growth Factor is a 118 amino acid polypeptide that plays an important role in the differentiation and survival of neurons. The recent discovery that a mRNA that encodes beta Nerve Growth Factor is present in brain suggests that the Nerve Growth Factor gene may not only regulate gene expression of peripheral but also of central neurons. To identify the site(s) of Nerve Growth Factor mRNA production in the brain and to determine which cells express the Nerve Growth Factor gene, the technique of in situ hybridization was employed. A 32P-labeled RNA probe complementary to Nerve Growth Factor mRNA hybridized to cells in the stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus and the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampus. These observations identify for the first time cellular sites of Nerve Growth Factor gene expression in the central nervous system, and suggest that Nerve Growth Factor mRNA is produced by neurons.

  20. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  1. Aged adrenal medullary tissue survives intraocular grafting, forms nerve fibers and responds to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, I; Ebendal, T

    1989-06-01

    Adrenal medullary tissue from aged (24 months old) and young adult (2 months old) rats was grafted to the anterior chamber of the eye of previously sympathectomized animals. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was administered by weekly bilateral intraocular injections. Five weeks postgrafting, irides were prepared as whole mounts and processed for Falck-Hillarp histochemistry for visualization of catecholamines. NGF appeared to partially prevent the reduction in volume that both old and young grafts underwent. In the presence of NGF, an extensive, dense fiber network, closely resembling the normal adrenergic innervation, was formed in the host irides by grafts from aged donors. The area of outgrowth from aged transplants without NGF treatment was as large as with NGF treatment but less dense. The reinnervation of irides by NGF-treated young adult grafts occupied a similar area as that seen with aged grafts, but the pattern of innervation was irregular, particularly close to the transplants. Transplants from young adult donors without NGF treatment generated a sparse, limited network of nerves in the irides. All grafts were tyrosine hydroxylase-, adrenaline-, and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive in about the same proportion of cells, but the grafts from the young donors were smaller in size. We concluded that the ability of chromaffin cells to transform toward a neuronal phenotype, produce nerve fibers, and respond to exogenous NGF is maintained in aged adrenals. PMID:2754763

  2. Peripheral nerve regeneration using composite poly(lactic acid-caprolactone)/nerve growth factor conduits prepared by coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Jian; Wang, Chun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Guang; Ruan, Hong-Jiang; Fan, Cun-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Many neurotrophic factors have been shown to promote neurite outgrowth by improving the microenvironment that is required for nerve regeneration. However, the delivery of these bioactive agents to the nerve injury site, as well as effective and local release, remains a challenging problem. We have developed a novel composite nerve conduit comprised of poly(lactic acid-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) and nerve growth factor (NGF). This was developed from core-shell structured biodegradable nanofibers, which were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning of P(LLA-CL) for the shell and bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA/NGF for the core. In rats, gaps of 10-mm long sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, an empty P(LLA-CL) conduit, a NGF injection P(LLA-CL) conduit, a P(LLA-CL)/NGF composite conduit, respectively. Regenerated nerve fibers were harvested and morphological and functional evaluation of nerve regeneration was performed at 12 weeks postsurgery. Although partial biodegradation and small cracks in the conduits were observed, the conduit outlines remained intact for 12 weeks after surgery. Based on functional and histological observations, the number and arrangement of regenerated nerve fibers, myelination, and nerve function reconstruction was similar in the P(LLA-CL)/NGF conduit group to that of the nerve autograft group (p > 0.05), but was significantly greater to the empty P(LLA-CL) and injection NGF P(LLA-CL) conduit groups (both p < 0.05). Therefore, the composite P(LLA-CL)/NGF conduit, which exhibited favorable mechanical properties and biocompatibility, could effectively promote sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  3. Development of neural crest cells expressing nerve growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examines the ontogeny of the nerve growth factor receptor of neural crest cells in vitro and the phenotypic nature of the neural crest cells expressing this receptor. /sup 125/I-NGF binding assays and autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques have demonstrated the presence of a subpopulation of quail neural crest cells that express specific NGF receptors after 3-4 days in vitro. This subpopulations represents approximately 28% of the cells in 5-day primary cultures and 30-35% of the cells in secondary cultures; these cells generally exhibited a flattened, phase-dark morphology. Approximately one-third of these cells also labeled with a 2 hr pulse of /sup 3/H thymidine. Catecholamine-containing neural crest cells generally lacked NGF receptors. NGF receptor-positive cells also failed to demonstrate somatostatin-, neuron-specific enolase-, or S-100-like immunoreactivity. Melanocytes do not appear to express NGF receptors. Exogenous nerve growth factor did not influence the morphology or mitotic status of the cells in culture.

  4. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  5. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  6. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  7. Lipid rafts mediate chemotropic guidance of nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Guirland, Carmine; Suzuki, Shingo; Kojima, Masami; Lu, Bai; Zheng, James Q

    2004-04-01

    Axon guidance requires signal transduction of extracellular cues through the plasma membrane for directional motility. Here we present evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) mediate specific guidance responses of nerve growth cones. Disruption of lipid rafts by various approaches targeting cholesterol or gangliosides selectively abolished growth cone attraction and repulsion in BDNF and netrin-1 gradients, respectively, without affecting glutamate-induced attraction. Interestingly, local raft disruption on one side of the growth cone in bath BDNF or netrin-1 produced opposite turning responses to that induced by the gradients. Raft manipulation also blocked Semaphorin 3A-induced growth cone repulsion, inhibition, and collapse. Finally, guidance responses appeared to involve raft-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK and ligand-induced receptor recruitment to lipid rafts. Together with the observation of asymmetric receptor-raft associations at the growth cone in guidance gradients, our findings indicate that localized signaling through membrane rafts plays a role in mediating guidance actions of extracellular cues on developing axons. PMID:15066264

  8. [Antifibrillatory activity of dipeptide antagonist of nerve growth factor].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A; Stoliarchuk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Tsorin, I B; Pekel'dina, E S; Gudasheva, T A

    2012-01-01

    In experiments on anesthetized rats were assessed antifibrillatoty action of dipeptide GK-1. This compound is the fragment of fourth loop of nerve growth factor (NGF) and manifests antagonistic activity in respect to TrkA receptor, that specified for NGF. It is shown that this compound is able to significantly increase the threshold of electrical fibrillation of the heart and its effectiveness is not inferior to the reference antiarrhythmics I and III class on Vaughan Williams classification. However, unlike the latter, antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1 was delayed and realized within 40-60 minutes after its administration. It is discussed possible mechanisms underlying antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1, that, to some extent, may be associated with its ability to change the reactivity of beta-adrenergic structures of the heart.

  9. Nerve growth factor: stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gee, A P; Boyle, M D; Munger, K L; Lawman, M J; Young, M

    1983-01-01

    Topical application of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) to superficial skin wounds of mice has previously been shown to accelerate the rate of wound contraction. Results of the present study reveal that NGF in the presence of plasma is also chemotactic for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, and the concentration of NGF required for this effect is similar to that which stimulates ganglionic neurite outgrowth. This property does not arise from liberation of the C5a fragment of complement, nor does it require the known enzymic activity of NGF. (NGF inactivated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate is equally active.) We conclude that NGF can display biological effects on cells of nonneural origin and function, and this feature might play a role in the early inflammatory response to injury. PMID:6580641

  10. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  11. Controlled release of nerve growth factor from heparin-conjugated fibrin gel within the nerve growth factor-delivering implant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although nerve growth factor (NGF) could promote the functional regeneration of an injured peripheral nerve, it is very difficult for NGF to sustain the therapeutic dose in the defect due to its short half-life. In this study, we loaded the NGF-bound heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) gel in the NGF-delivering implants and analyzed the time-dependent release of NGF and its bioactivity to evaluate the clinical effectiveness. Materials and Methods NGF solution was made of 1.0 mg of NGF and 1.0 mL of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Experimental group A consisted of three implants, in which 0.25 µL of NGF solution, 0.75 µL of HCF, 1.0 µL of fibrinogen and 2.0 µL of thrombin was injected via apex hole with micropipette and gelated, were put into the centrifuge tube. Three implants of experimental group B were prepared with the mixture of 0.5 µL of NGF solution, 0.5 µL HCF, 1.0 µL of fibrinogen and 2.0 µL of thrombin. These six centrifuge tubes were filled with 1.0 mL of PBS and stirred in the water-filled beaker at 50 rpm. At 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 days, 1.0 mL of solution in each tubes was collected and preserved at -20℃ with adding same amount of fresh PBS. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was done to determine in vitro release profile of NGF and its bioactivity was evaluated with neural differentiation of pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Results The average concentration of released NGF in the group A and B increased for the first 5 days and then gradually decreased. Almost all of NGF was released during 10 days. Released NGF from two groups could promote neural differentiation and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and these bioactivity was maintained over 14 days. Conclusion Controlled release system using NGF-HCF gel via NGF-delivering implant could be an another vehicle of delivering NGF to promote the nerve regeneration of dental implant related nerve damage. PMID:24627836

  12. Nerve growth factor regulates gene expression by several distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.O.; Skarnes, W.C. ); Minsk, B.; Palmier, S. ); Jackson-Grusby, L.; Wagner, J.A. . Dept. of Biological Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates gene expression, the authors have identified and studied four genes (a-2, d-2, d-4, and d-5) that are positively regulated by NGF in PC12 cells, including one (d-2) which has previously been identified as a putative transcription factor (NGF I-A). Three of these genes, including d-2, were induced very rapidly at the transcriptional level, but the relative time courses of transcription and mRNA accumulation of each of these three genes were distinct. The fourth gene (d-4) displayed no apparent increase in transcription that corresponded to the increase in its mRNA, suggesting that NGF may regulate its expression at a posttranscriptional level. Thus NGF positively regulates gene expression by more than one mechanism. The study of the regulation of the expression of these and other NGF-inducible genes should provide valuable new information concerning how NGF and other growth factors cause neural differentiation.

  13. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo.

  14. Potential mechanisms for hypoalgesia induced by anti-nerve growth factor immunoglobulin are identified using autoimmune nerve growth factor deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E M; Zhang, Z; Anderson, M B; Schechter, R; Miller, K E

    2011-10-13

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) antagonism has long been proposed as a chronic pain treatment. In 2010, the FDA suspended clinical trials using tanezumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-NGF antibody, to treat osteoarthritis due to worsening joint damage in 16 patients. Increased physical activity in the absence of acute pain which normally prevents self-harm was purported as a potential cause. Such an adverse effect is consistent with an extension of tanezumab's primary mechanism of action by decreasing pain sensitivity below baseline levels. In animal inflammatory pain models, NGF antagonism decreases intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and attenuates increases in expression of nociception-related proteins, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Little is known of the effects of NGF antagonism in noninflamed animals and the hypoalgesia that ensues. In the current study, we immunized rats with NGF or cytochrome C (cytC) and examined (1) nocifensive behaviors with thermal latencies, mechanical thresholds, the hot plate test, and the tail flick test, (2) IENF density, and (3) expression of CGRP, SP, voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (Nav1.8), and glutaminase in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons separated by size and isolectin B4 (IB4) labeling. Rats with high anti-NGF titers had delayed responses on the hot plate test but no other behavioral abnormalities. Delayed hot plate responses correlated with lower IENF density. CGRP and SP expression was decreased principally in medium (400-800 μm(2)) and small neurons (<400 μm(2)), respectively, regardless of IB4 labeling. Expression of Nav1.8 was only decreased in small and medium IB4 negative neurons. NGF immunization appears to result in a more profound antagonism of NGF than tanezumab therapy, but we hypothesize that decreases in IENF density and nociception-related protein expression are potential mechanisms for tanezumab-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:21802499

  15. Retrograde axonal transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-12-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor (/sup 125/I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The /sup 125/I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar /sup 125/I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 125/I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of /sup 125/I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported /sup 125/I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions.

  16. Anti-nerve growth factor in pain management: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David S; Hsu, Eugene; Hottinger, Daniel G; Cohen, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be an unmet need for safe and effective pain medications. Opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) dominate the clinical landscape despite limited effectiveness and considerable side-effect profiles. Although significant advancements have identified myriad potential pain targets over the past several decades, the majority of new pain pharmacotherapies have failed to come to market. The discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its interaction with tropomyosin receptor kinase A (trkA) have been well characterized as important mediators of pain initiation and maintenance, and pharmacotherapies targeting this pathway have the potential to be considered promising methods in the treatment of a variety of nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Several methodologic approaches, including sequestration of free NGF, prevention of NGF binding and trkA activation, and inhibition of trkA function, have been investigated in the development of new pharmacotherapies. Among these, NGF-sequestering antibodies have exhibited the most promise in clinical trials. However, in 2010, reports of rapid joint destruction leading to joint replacement prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to place a hold on all clinical trials involving anti-NGF antibodies. Although the FDA has since lifted this hold and a number of new trials are under way, the long-term efficacy and safety profile of anti-NGF antibodies are yet to be established. PMID:27354823

  17. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  19. Morphology and Nanomechanics of Sensory Neurons Growth Cones following Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Vivien; Végh, Attila-Gergely; Lucas, Olivier; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-01-01

    A prior peripheral nerve injury in vivo, promotes a rapid elongated mode of sensory neurons neurite regrowth in vitro. This in vitro model of conditioned axotomy allows analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to an improved neurite re-growth. Our differential interference contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry results show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, did not increase somatic size of adult lumbar sensory neurons from mice dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons but promoted the appearance of larger neurites and growth cones. Using atomic force microscopy on live neurons, we investigated whether membrane mechanical properties of growth cones of axotomized neurons were modified following sciatic nerve injury. Our data revealed that neurons having a regenerative growth were characterized by softer growth cones, compared to control neurons. The increase of the growth cone membrane elasticity suggests a modification in the ratio and the inner framework of the main structural proteins. PMID:23418549

  20. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries.

  1. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  2. Transcriptional down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by nerve growth factor treatment of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, M; Lazarovici, P; Johnson, A C; Katagiri, Y; Guroff, G

    1998-03-20

    Treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor leads to a decrease in the number of epidermal growth factor receptors on the cell membrane. The mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor decreases in a comparable fashion. This decrease appears due to a decrease in the transcription of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene because first, there is no difference in the stability of the epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA, second, newly transcribed epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA is decreased in nerve growth factor-differentiated cells, and third, constructs containing the promoter region of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene are transcribed much less readily in nerve growth factor-differentiated cells than in untreated cells. The decreases in mRNA are not seen in the p140(trk)-deficient variant PC12nnr5 cells nor in cells containing either dominant-negative Ras or dominant-negative Src. Treatment with nerve growth factor also increases the cellular content of GCF2, a putative transcription factor inhibitory for the transcription of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene. The increase in GCF2, like the decrease in the epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA, is not seen in PC12nnr5 cells nor in cells expressing either dominant-negative Ras or dominant-negative Src. The results suggest that nerve growth factor-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor is under transcriptional control, is p140(trk)-, Ras-, and Src-dependent, and may involve transcriptional repression by GCF2.

  3. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  4. A constitutive promoter directs expression of the nerve growth factor receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, A.; Patil, N.; Chao, M.

    1988-08-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor receptor is normally restricted to cells derived from the neural crest in a developmentally regulated manner. The authors analyzed promoter sequences for the human nerve growth factor receptor gene and found that the receptor promoter resembles others which are associated with constitutively expressed genes that have housekeeping and growth-related functions. Unlike these other genes, the initiation of transcription occurred at one major site rather than at multiple sites. The constitutive nature of the nerve growth factor receptor promoter may account for the ability of this gene to be transcribed in a diverse number of heterologous cells after gene transfer. The intron-exon structure of the receptor gene indicated that structural features are precisely divided into discrete domains.

  5. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liu-lin; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Ting-hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  6. Nerve growth factor and its low-affinity receptor promote Schwann cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Anton, E S; Weskamp, G; Reichardt, L F; Matthew, W D

    1994-01-01

    Migrating Schwann cells in developing or regenerating peripheral nerves are known to express dramatically increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and the low-affinity NGF receptor (LNGFR). Schwann cells do not express detectable pp140trk, the NGF-activated receptor tyrosine kinase which is essential for neuronal responses to NGF. The temporal correlation observed in Schwann cells between migration and the enhanced expression of NGF and LNGFR suggests that NGF and LNGFR may promote Schwann cell migration. To test this possibility, we examined the effects of NGF on Schwann cell migration on cryostat sections of biologically relevant NGF-poor and NGF-rich substrates--normal or denervated peripheral (sciatic) nerve, untreated or pretreated with NGF. Results show that Schwann cells migrate more rapidly on denervated than on normal sciatic nerve. Antibodies to NGF or to LNGFR strongly, but incompletely, inhibit enhanced migration on denervated nerves. Pretreatment of denervated nerve sections with NGF increases further the rate of Schwann cell migration. The same antibodies to NGF or to LNGFR abolish this response. These results suggest that one function of the elevated levels of NGF known to be present in embryonic and regenerating peripheral nerves is to promote the migration of Schwann cells. In contrast to neurons, where pp140trk appears to be the functionally critical NGF receptor, NGF responses in Schwann cells depend on LNGFR. Images PMID:8146193

  7. Effects of a synthetic bioactive peptide on neurite growth and nerve growth factor release in chondroitin sulfate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron W; Beier, Brooke L; Irazoqui, Pedro P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has revealed robust dorsal root ganglia neurite growth in hydrogels of chondroitin sulfate. In the current work, it was determined whether addition of a synthetic bioactive peptide could augment neurite growth in these matrices via enhanced binding and sequestering of growth factors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that addition of peptide slowed nerve growth factor diffusivity in chondroitin sulfate gels, but not in control gels of hyaluronic acid. Furthermore, cultures of chick dorsal root ganglia in gels of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate revealed enhanced growth in chondroitin sulfate gels only upon addition of peptide. Taken together, these results suggest a synergistic nerve growth factor-binding activity between this peptide and chondroitin sulfate. PMID:23507745

  8. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques.

  9. Nano-scale Topographical Studies on the Growth Cones of Nerve Cells using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Nerve cells are the fundamental units which are responsible for intercommunication within the nervous system. The neurites, fibrous cable-like extensions for information delivery, of nerve cells are tipped by highly motile sensory structures known as the growth cones which execute important functions; neural construction, decision making and navigation during development and regeneration of the nervous system. The highly dynamic subcomponents of the growth cones are important in neural activity. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the most powerful microscopy technique which is capable of imaging without conductivity constraint and in liquid media. AFM providing nano-scale topographical information on biological structures is also informative on the physical properties such as: elasticity, adhesion, and softness. This contribution focuses on AFM analysis of the growth cones of the nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis. The results of nano-scale topography and softness analysis on growth cone central domain, filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) are presented. The subcomponents of the growth cones of different nerve cells are compared to each other. The results of the analysis are linked to the mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution of the growth cones.

  10. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily.

  11. Plasticity in rat uterine sympathetic nerves: the role of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richeri, Analía; Bianchimano, Paola; Mármol, Nelson M; Viettro, Lorena; Cowen, Timothy; Brauer, M Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sympathetic innervation undergoes profound remodelling in response to physiological and experimental changes in the circulating levels of sex hormones. It is not known, however, whether this plasticity results from changes in the innervating neurons, the neuritogenic properties of the target tissue or both. Using densitometric immunohistochemistry, we analysed the effects of prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment (three subcutaneous injections of 20 µg of β-oestradiol 17-cypionate on days 25, 27 and 29 after birth), natural peripubertal transition and late pregnancy (19–20 days post coitum) on the levels of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors in uterine-projecting sympathetic neurons of the thoraco-lumbar paravertebral sympathetic chain (T7–L2) identified using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold. For comparative purposes, levels of TrkA and p75 were assessed in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) following prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment. These studies showed that the vast majority of uterine-projecting neurons expressed both TrkA and p75. Both prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment and the peripubertal transition increased the ratio p75 to TrkA in uterine-projecting neurons, whereas pregnancy elicited the opposite effect. Prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment had no effects on levels of TrkA or p75 in sympathetic neurons of the SCG. Taken together, our data suggest that neurotrophin receptor-mediated events may contribute to regulate sex hormone-induced plasticity in uterine sympathetic nerves, and are in line with the idea that, in vivo, plasticity in uterine nerves involves changes in both the target and the innervating neurons. PMID:16050899

  12. Soft Graphene Nanofibers Designed for the Acceleration of Nerve Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang-Qi; Wang, Ting; Zhao, Bin; Li, Jiacheng; Jin, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Soft graphene nanofibers with recoverable electrical conductivity and excellent physicochemical stability are prepared by a controlled assembly technique. By using the soft graphene nanofibers for cellular electrical stimulation, the common inhibitory effect of long-term electrical stimulation on nerve growth and development is avoided, which usually happens with traditional 2D conductive materials.

  13. Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Micera, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate. PMID:27439311

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve. PMID:25600702

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve.

  16. The potential role of nerve growth factor in cryoneurolysis-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Gao, Zhifeng; Yang, Ba-Xian

    2012-10-01

    Cryoanalgesia is suggested as a risk factor of neuropathic pain. The current study investigated the pain behavior of sciatic nerve cryoneurolysis (SCN) in adult male rats. The role of nerve growth factor (NGF) was also studied. The mechanical threshold was significantly elevated in SCN group than sham-operation group within 14days after surgery. After 28days, 22 out of 39 SCN rats (56.4%) represented mechanical hyperalgesia. There were much more NGF-immunoreactive nerve cells expressed in the dorsal horn in SCN rats with hyperalgesia. The NGF protein levels of SCN rats measured by Western blot were higher than sham-operation rats, while they were significantly higher in SCN rats with hyperalgesia than those without hyperalgesia. Pain-related behavior improved after anti-NGF treatment, compared with vehicle control group. NGF is associated with SCN-induced neuropathic pain. Peripherally secreted NGF may play an important role in this mechanism. PMID:22580175

  17. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  18. Complementary Effects of Two Growth Factors in Multifunctionalized Silk Nanofibers for Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Rodrigo R.; Vigneron, Pascale; Bresson, Damien; Fitzpatrick, Vincent; Marin, Frédéric; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of forming bioactive guides for peripheral nerve regeneration, silk fibroin was electrospun to obtain aligned nanofibers. These fibers were functionalized by incorporating Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Ciliary NeuroTrophic Factor (CNTF) during electrospinning. PC12 cells grown on the fibers confirmed the bioavailability and bioactivity of the NGF, which was not significantly released from the fibers. Primary neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were grown on the nanofibers and anchored to the fibers and grew in a directional fashion based on the fiber orientation, and as confirmed by growth cone morphology. These biofunctionalized nanofibers led to a 3-fold increase in neurite length at their contact, which was likely due to the NGF. Glial cell growth, alignment and migration were stimulated by the CNTF in the functionalized nanofibers. Organotypic culture of rat fetal DRGs confirmed the complementary effect of both growth factors in multifunctionalized nanofibers, which allowed glial cell migration, alignment and parallel axonal growth in structures resembling the ‘bands of Bungner’ found in situ. Graftable multi-channel conduits based on biofunctionalized aligned silk nanofibers were developed as an organized 3D scaffold. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent new options for a biological and biocompatible nerve guidance conduit. PMID:25313579

  19. Single vesicle imaging indicates distinct modes of rapid membrane retrieval during nerve growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During nerve growth, cytoplasmic vesicles add new membrane preferentially to the growth cone located at the distal tip of extending axons. Growth cone membrane is also retrieved locally, and asymmetric retrieval facilitates membrane remodeling during growth cone repulsion by a chemorepellent gradient. Moreover, growth inhibitory factors can stimulate bulk membrane retrieval and induce growth cone collapse. Despite these functional insights, the processes mediating local membrane remodeling during axon extension remain poorly defined. Results To investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of membrane retrieval in actively extending growth cones, we have used a transient labeling and optical recording method that can resolve single vesicle events. Live-cell confocal imaging revealed rapid membrane retrieval by distinct endocytic modes based on spatial distribution in Xenopus spinal neuron growth cones. These modes include endocytic "hot-spots" triggered at the base of filopodia, at the lateral margins of lamellipodia, and along dorsal ridges of the growth cone. Additionally, waves of endocytosis were induced when individual filopodia detached from the substrate and fused with the growth cone dorsal surface or with other filopodia. Vesicle formation at sites of membrane remodeling by self-contact required F-actin polymerization. Moreover, bulk membrane retrieval by macroendocytosis correlated positively with the substrate-dependent rate of axon extension and required the function of Rho-family GTPases. Conclusions This study provides insight into the dynamic membrane remodeling processes essential for nerve growth by identifying several distinct modes of rapid membrane retrieval in the growth cone during axon extension. We found that endocytic membrane retrieval is intensified at specific subdomains and may drive the dynamic membrane ruffling and re-absorption of filopodia and lamellipodia in actively extending growth cones. The findings offer a platform

  20. Radixin Is Involved in Lamellipodial Stability during Nerve Growth Cone Motility

    PubMed Central

    Castelo, Leslie; Jay, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry and in vitro studies have suggested that the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein, radixin, may have a role in nerve growth cone motility. We tested the in situ role of radixin in chick dorsal root ganglion growth cones by observing the effects of its localized and acute inactivation. Microscale chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (micro-CALI) of radixin in growth cones causes a 30% reduction of lamellipodial area within the irradiated region whereas all control treatments did not affect lamellipodia. Micro-CALI of radixin targeted to the middle of the leading edge often split growth cones to form two smaller growth cones during continued forward movement (>80%). These findings suggest a critical role for radixin in growth cone lamellipodia that is similar to ezrin function in pseudopodia of transformed fibroblasts. They are consistent with radixin linking actin filaments to each other or to the membrane during motility. PMID:10233159

  1. Molecular cloning of a human gene that is a member of the nerve growth factor family

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Reichardt, L.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Cell death within the developing vertebrate nervous system is regulated in part by interactions between neurons and their innervation targets that are mediated by neurotrophic factors. These factors also appear to have a role in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Two neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, share substantial amino acid sequence identity. The authors have used a screen that combines polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA and low-stringency hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides to isolate human BDNF and a human gene, neurotrophin-3, that is closely related to both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. mRNA products of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 genes were detected in the adult human brain, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Neurotrophin-3 is also expected to function in embryonic neural development.

  2. Nerve growth factor-like activity detected in equine peripheral blood after running exercise.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Koyama, H; Oikawa, M; Yoshihara, T; Kaneko, M

    1991-08-01

    Addition of sera, collected from Thoroughbred horses after sprint exercise, induced significant neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia after a 24-hour culture. The nerve growth factor (NGF)-like activity was detected in sera collected immediately, or 1 hour or more, after the exercise. These findings suggest a possible role of serum NGF-like activity under stress conditions (running exercise) of horses.

  3. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Local administration of PDGF-B combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27274342

  4. Angelica injection promotes peripheral nerve structure and function recovery with increased expressions of nerve growth factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Zhang, Junjian; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Qin; Liu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    Several nervous system injury models, such as sciatic crush and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have been well studied in terms of neuroprotective effect of angelica injection. However, definitive experimental studies are lacking on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This study sought to investigate the effects of angelica injection on DPN in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). To examine whether DPN model succeeded, tail-flick latency (TFL) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were measured at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. Then, diabetic rats were treated with high- and low-dose angelica injection for 4 weeks. TFL, MNCV, morphology of sciatic nerve, myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in soleus and sciatic nerve were measured at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. The results showed the TFL was significantly shortened (p<0.001) and the MNCV was reduced (p<0.01) in diabetic rats compared with normal control rats at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. The TFL was obviously prolonged and the MNCV was further reduced in diabetic control group at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. TFL, MNCV and morphology of sciatic nerve were remarkably ameliorated and myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of NGF and BDNF in soleus and sciatic nerve were increased in the angelica treatment groups. This study suggests angelica injection has potential therapeutic effects on DPN, and the mechanism might be related to direct increase in NGF expression and direct or indirect increase in BDNF expression.

  5. The myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein directly binds nerve growth factor to modulate central axon circuitry.

    PubMed

    von Büdingen, H-Christian; Mei, Feng; Greenfield, Ariele; Jahn, Sarah; Shen, Yun-An A; Reid, Hugh H; McKemy, David D; Chan, Jonah R

    2015-09-14

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a central nervous system myelin-specific molecule expressed on the outer lamellae of myelin. To date, the exact function of MOG has remained unknown, with MOG knockout mice displaying normal myelin ultrastructure and no apparent specific phenotype. In this paper, we identify nerve growth factor (NGF) as a binding partner for MOG and demonstrate that this interaction is capable of sequestering NGF from TrkA-expressing neurons to modulate axon growth and survival. Deletion of MOG results in aberrant sprouting of nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord. Binding of NGF to MOG may offer widespread implications into mechanisms that underlie pain pathways.

  6. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  7. Norepinephrine-induced nerve growth factor depletion causes cardiac sympathetic denervation in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kensuke; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Miyake, Yoshiko; Yagi, Takashi; Arai, Takahide; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-08-25

    In severe congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic overactivity correlates with the exacerbation of cardiac performance. To test the hypothesis that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density dramatically changes with the acceleration of circulating norepinephrine (NE) concentration, we investigated the temporal association of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the heart and cardiac sympathetic nerve density during the development of CHF in the continuous NE-infused rats. The animals were analyzed at 0-, 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day after implantation of osmotic pump at a rate of 0.05 mg/kg/hr. The cardiac performance was temporally facilitated in NE-exposed rats at 3-day in accordance with the sympathetic hyper-innervation induced by the augmentation of NGF mRNA expression in the heart. In NE-treated rats, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly increased after 7-day and marked left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic fluid retention were observed at 28-day. CHF-induced sympathetic overactivity further increased plasma NE concentration in NE-treated rats and finally reached to 16.1+/-5.6 ng/ml at 28-day (control level was 0.39+/-0.1 ng/ml, p<0.01). In the decompensated CHF rats at 28-day, the NGF mRNA expression was conspicuously reduced concomitant with the obvious nerve fiber loss confirmed by the immunostaining of nerve axonal marker, PGP9.5 and sympathetic neuron marker, tyrosine hydroxylase. This resulted in the attenuated tissue NE contents and the exacerbating cardiac performance. The cardiac sympathetic fiber loss was also confirmed in NE-exposed DBH (dopamine beta-hydroxylase)-Cre/Floxed-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice with severe CHF, in which sympathetic nerve could be traced by EGFP. Our results suggest that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density is strictly regulated by the NGF expression in the heart and long-exposure of high plasma NE concentration caused myocardial NGF reduction, following sympathetic fiber loss

  8. Binding, sequestration, and processing of epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor by PC12 cells. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, C.E.; Herschman, H.R.

    1983-03-01

    Th rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line exhibits biological responses to both nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The existence of receptors and biological responses on a common cell for these two well-characterized polypeptide growth factors makes this an attractive system for comparison of ligand binding and processing. Both NGF and EGF are bound to PC12 cells in a competable form at 4/sup 0/C. At 37/sup 0/C both ligands are ''sequestered,'' but at different rates and to different extents. While sequestration happens rapidly and nearly quantitatively for bound EGF, the dissociation reaction appears to compete favorably with NFG sequestration. Both EGF and NGF are degraded by PC12 cells. Sequestered EGF, however, is degraded to a greater extent than sequestered NGF.

  9. Nerve growth factor promotes killing of Leishmania donovani by macrophages through the induction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Rieko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Katakura, Ken; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is protozoonosis that occurs worldwide and still requires effective therapies with less toxicity. In this study, we examined the antileishmanial effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) using a murine infection model. NGF blocked the infection of macrophages by Leishmania donovani, which was completely cancelled by a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor. In vivo, not only did NGF show antileishmanial effects, but combination therapy of NGF and sodium stibogluconate synergistically exhibited the activity more potently than each monotherapy. These results indicate that NGF exerts antileishmanial effect by stimulating hydrogen peroxide production in macrophages and can be a novel therapy for leishmaniasis.

  10. Measuring nerve growth factor in saliva by immunoassay: A cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Matin, Marla J; Li, Daming; Peterson, Jon; Taylor, Marcus K; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Lucas, Todd; Granger, Steve J; Granger, Douglas A; Granger, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophin, modulates a diverse set of physiologic processes in the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Studies suggest that NGF can be measured in saliva (sNGF). Historically, the method for measuring sNGF involves the off-label use of an enzyme immunoassay designed for use with cell-culture supernatants/tissue extracts (Nam et al., 2007; Ruhl et al., 2004). In a series of experiments we reveal this measurement strategy is subject to non-specific interference by constituents present in oral fluids. We conclude that the measurement of sNGF by this assay is not optimal for use with oral fluid specimens.

  11. Diffusion of Nerve Growth Factor in Rat Striatum as Determined by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Mark; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Webb, Watt W.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2003-01-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) may be useful for treating diseases in the central nervous system; our ability to harness the potential therapeutic benefit of NGF is directly related to our understanding of the fate of exogenously supplied factors in brain tissue. We utilized multiphoton microscopy to quantify the dynamic behavior of NGF in coronal, 400-μm thick, fresh rat brain tissue slices. We administered a solution containing bioactive rhodamine nerve growth factor conjugate via pressure injection and monitored the dispersion in the striatal region of the coronal slices. Multiphoton microscopy facilitated repeated imaging deep (∼200 μm) into tissue slices with minimal photodamage of tissue and photobleaching of label. The pressure injection paradigm approximated diffusion from a point source, and we therefore used the corresponding solution to the diffusion equation to estimate an apparent diffusion coefficient in brain tissue (Db(34°C)) of 2.75 ± 0.24 × 10−7 cm2/s (average ± SE). In contrast, we determined a corresponding free diffusion coefficient in buffered solution (Df(34°C)) of 12.6 ± 0.9 × 10−7 cm2/s using multiphoton fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The tortuosity, defined as the square root of the ratio of Df to Db, was 2.14 and moderate in magnitude. PMID:12829512

  12. Identification of a peripheral nerve neurite growth-promoting activity by development and use of an in vitro bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, A W; Matthew, W D

    1987-01-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay. Images PMID:3477817

  13. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  14. Nerve growth factor improves visual loss in childhood optic gliomas: a randomized, double-blind, phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Falsini, Benedetto; Chiaretti, Antonio; Rizzo, Daniela; Piccardi, Marco; Ruggiero, Antonio; Manni, Luigi; Soligo, Marzia; Dickmann, Anna; Federici, Matteo; Salerni, Annabella; Timelli, Laura; Guglielmi, Gaspare; Lazzareschi, Ilaria; Caldarelli, Massimo; Galli-Resta, Lucia; Colosimo, Cesare; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Paediatric optic pathway gliomas are low-grade brain tumours characterized by slow progression and invalidating visual loss. Presently there is no strategy to prevent visual loss in this kind of tumour. This study evaluated the effects of nerve growth factor administration in protecting visual function in patients with optic pathway glioma-related visual impairment. A prospective randomized double-blind phase II clinical trial was conducted in 18 optic pathway glioma patients, aged from 2 to 23 years, with stable disease and severe visual loss. Ten patients were randomly assigned to receive a single 10-day course of 0.5 mg murine nerve growth factor as eye drops, while eight patients received placebo. All patients were evaluated before and after treatment, testing visual acuity, visual field, visual-evoked potentials, optic coherence tomography, electroretinographic photopic negative response, and magnetic resonance imaging. Post-treatment evaluations were repeated at 15, 30, 90, and 180 days Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and at 180 days. Treatment with nerve growth factor led to statistically significant improvements in objective electrophysiological parameters (electroretinographic photopic negative response amplitude at 180 days and visual-evoked potentials at 30 days), which were not observed in placebo-treated patients. Furthermore, in patients in whom visual fields could still be measured, visual field worsening was only observed in placebo-treated cases, while three of four nerve growth factor-treated subjects showed significant visual field enlargement. This corresponded to improved visually guided behaviour, as reported by the patients and/or the caregivers. There was no evidence of side effects related to nerve growth factor treatment. Nerve growth factor eye drop administration appears a safe, easy and effective strategy for the treatment of visual loss associated with optic pathway gliomas. PMID:26767384

  15. [Effect of embryonic anlage allografts of the rat spinal cord on growth of regenerating fibers of the recipient nerve].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E S; Isaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of the effect of tissue and suspension allografts of an embryonic spinal cord on regeneration of nerve fibers of impaired (by application of a ligature) sciatic nerve in rats was conducted. It was demonstrated that unlike tissue grafts that reach a large volume 21 and 60 days after transplantation, suspension grafts do not inhibit the growth of axons of the recipient to the periphery. It was established that introduction of a suspension of dissociated cells of the spinal cord embryonic anlages (but not fragments of these anlages) into the impaired sciatic nerve in rats results in an increase in the amount of myelinated regenerating nerve fibers of the recipient 60 days after the operation.

  16. Blocking Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Reduces the Neural Invasion Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Aditi A.; Munoz, Ruben M.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is thought to be one of the factors responsible for the high rate of tumor recurrence after surgery and the pain generation associated with pancreatic cancer. Signaling via the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway between pancreatic cancer cells and the surrounding nerves has been implicated in PNI, and increased levels of these proteins have been correlated to poor prognosis. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism of the NGF signaling pathway in PNI in pancreatic cancer. We show that knocking down NGF or its receptors, TRKA and p75NTR, or treatment with GW441756, a TRKA kinase inhibitor, reduces the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer cells migrate towards dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a co-culture assay, indicating a paracrine NGF signaling between the DRGs and pancreatic cancer cells. Knocking down the expression of NGF pathway proteins or inhibiting the activity of TRKA by GW441756 reduced the migratory ability of Mia PaCa2 towards the DRGs. Finally, blocking NGF signaling by NGF neutralizing antibodies or GW441756 inhibited the neurite formation in PC-12 cells in response to conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, indicating a reciprocal signaling pathway between the pancreatic cancer cells and nerves. Our results indicate that NGF signaling pathway provides a potential target for developing molecularly targeted therapies to decrease PNI and reduce pain generation. Since there are several TRKA antagonists currently in early clinical trials they could now be tested in the clinical situation of pancreatic cancer induced pain. PMID:27792755

  17. Nerve growth factor contribution via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to ectopic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Asano, Masatake; Omagari, Daisuke; Honda, Kuniya; Hitomi, Suzuro; Katagiri, Ayano; Iwata, Koichi

    2011-05-11

    It is well known that oral inflammation causes tenderness in temporomandibular joints or masseter muscles. The exact mechanism of such an orofacial ectopic hyperalgesia remains unclear. Here, we investigated the functional significance of interaction of nerve growth factor (NGF) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in relation to heat hyperalgesia in the whisker pad skin caused by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection into the lower lip. CFA injection induced heat hyperalgesia of the ipsilateral whisker pad skin. Moreover, it leads to enhancement of spontaneous activity and heat responses in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons that was elicited by heat stimulation of the whisker pad skin. The heat hyperalgesia was dose-dependently reversed by intraperitoneal TRPV1 antagonist administration, also diminished by neutralizing anti-NGF antibody administration into the lower lip and intraganglionic administration of K252a, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. Nerve fibers in bundle of mandibular nerve and TG neurons that innervates the whisker pad skin and lower lip both expressed labeled NGF, which was administrated into the lower lip. Moreover, the NGF concentrations in ophthalmic-maxillary and mandibular divisions of the TG increased after CFA injection into the lower lip. The number of TRPV1-positive neurons that innervates the whisker pad skin and lower lip was increased after CFA injection into the lower lip, and this increase was annulled by anti-NGF administration. The present findings suggest that inflammation in the lower lip induces release of NGF that regulates TRPV1 expression in TG neurons. This TRPV1 overexpression may underlie ectopic heat hyperalgesia in the whisker pad skin.

  18. Nerve Growth Factor-Immobilized Electrically Conducting Fibrous Scaffolds for Potential Use in Neural Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Y.; Bashur, Chris A.; Milroy, Craig A.; Forciniti, Leandro; Goldstein, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered scaffolds simultaneously exhibiting multiple cues are highly desirable for neural tissue regeneration. To this end, we developed a neural tissue engineering scaffold that displays submicrometer-scale features, electrical conductivity, and neurotrophic activity. Specifically, electrospun poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers were layered with a nanometer thick coating of electrically conducting polypyrrole (PPy) presenting carboxylic groups. Then, nerve growth factor (NGF) was chemically immobilized onto the surface of the fibers. These NGF-immobilized PPy-coated PLGA (NGF-PPyPLGA) fibers supported PC12 neurite formation (28.0±3.0% of the cells) and neurite outgrowth (14.2 µm median length), which were comparable to that observed with NGF (50 ng/mL) in culture medium (29.0±1.3%, 14.4 µm). Electrical stimulation of PC12 cells on NGF-immobilized PPyPLGA fiber scaffolds was found to further improve neurite development and neurite length by 18% and 17%, respectively, compared to unstimulated cells on the NGF-immobilized fibers. Hence, submicrometer-scale fibrous scaffolds that incorporate neurotrophic and electroconducting activities may serve as promising neural tissue engineering scaffolds such as nerve guidance conduits. PMID:21712166

  19. Neurogenic Inflammation in Stress-Induced Termination of Murine Hair Growth Is Promoted by Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Eva Milena J.; Handjiski, Bori; Kuhlmei, Arne; Hagen, Evelin; Bielas, Hannes; Braun, Armin; Klapp, Burghard F.; Paus, Ralf; Arck, Petra Clara

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have revealed the existence of a “brain-hair follicle axis” in murine skin and have identified the neuropeptide substance P (SP) as a key mediator of stress-induced hair growth inhibition in vivo. Published evidence suggests that increased numbers of SP-immunoreactive sensory fibers, as seen in the dermis of stressed mice in anagen-catagen transition, are a result of transient high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF). Thus, we now aimed at dissecting the role of NGF in stress-triggered hair growth termination in our murine model. By real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, stress-exposed mice showed an up-regulation of NGF and its low-affinity receptor p75NTR; the NGF high-affinity receptor TrkA was moderately down-regulated. On neutralization of NGF, premature onset of catagen, apoptosis, and increased number/activation of perifollicular mast cells and antigen-presenting cells, which reflects the skin response to stress, was significantly abrogated. Stress or subcutaneous injection of recombinant NGF (to mimic stress) resulted in an increased percentage of SP+ neurons in dorsal root ganglia, as measured by retrograde tracing. Taken together, these data suggest that NGF is a central element in the perifollicular neurogenic inflammation that develops during the murine skin response to stress and antagonizing NGF may be a promising therapeutic approach to counter the negative effect of stress on hair growth. PMID:15215181

  20. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. S.; Hill, C. C.; Calero, G. A.; Myers, C. R.; Lee, K. H.; Sethna, J. P.; Cerione, R. A.

    2004-10-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  1. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Improved procedure for the purification of an iodinated protein: beta nerve growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ennulat, D.J.; Stach, R.W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved procedure for the isolation of iodinated beta Nerve Growth Factor ( SVI-beta NGF) has been devised. Use of Centricon microconcentrators (Amicon) has allowed the facile and efficient recovery of ultrapure SVI-beta NGF in high yields. Centricon microconcentrators are supplied with two molecular weight cutoffs of 10 K and 30 K daltons. beta NGF is a basic protein with a molecular weight of 26 K daltons. It is therefore possible to filter the SVI-beta NGF through the 30 K filter (30 K Filtrate) leaving behind any aggregates or reactants greater than 30 K while the SVI-beta NGF can be retained and concentrated on the 10 K filter (10 K Retentate). Any free SVI is easily removed, passing through the 10 K filter and then being discarded. In this way SVI-beta NGF can be easily purified.

  3. Effects of nerve growth factor on X-irradiated reaggregation cultures of rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Dimberg, Y; Aspberg, A; Tottmar, O

    1993-12-01

    The effects of exogenously added nerve growth factor (NGF) on reaggregation cultures of foetal rat brain cells after X-irradiation with 2 Gy were studied. Irradiation caused decreased protein and DNA levels, which was not prevented by NGF. The activities of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyl transferase and acetylcholine esterase were increased in irradiated cultures. However, no difference in the activities of these enzymes was found between irradiated and unirradiated NGF-treated cultures. Irradiation did not affect the activity of the marker enzyme for oligodendrocytes (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), but caused an increase in the astrocyte marker (glutamine synthetase) activity. This effect on astrocytes was prevented by NGF. PMID:7903341

  4. Angiogenic Effects of Dimeric Dipeptide Mimetic of Loop 4 of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskii, S A; Antipova, T A; Tsorin, I B; Pekeldina, E S; Stolyaruk, V N; Nikolaev, S V; Sorokina, A V; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenic action of compound GK-2, a dimeric dipeptide mimetic of loop 4 of nerve growth factor (NGF), was studied in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Experiments on human endothelial cell culture HUVEC showed that compound GK-2 significantly (p<0.05) stimulated the initial stage of angiogenesis, and its angiogenic activity was not inferior to the reference neurotrophin NGF. In experiments with hindlimb ischemia modeled in rats, GK-2 (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 14 days) significantly increased the total length of capillary vessels (p<0.003) and the number of vessels per 1 mm2 ischemic tissue (p<0.001) in comparison with the control. Our findings indicate that under experimental conditions compound GK-2 exhibits not only angiogenic, but also anti-ischemic activity. PMID:27590760

  5. Effect of an Adipose-Derived Stem Cell and Nerve Growth Factor-Incorporated Hydrogel on Recovery of Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Gul; Piao, Shuyu; Lee, Ji Young; Hong, Sung Hoo; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong; Kim, Choung Soo; Ra, Jeong Chan; Noh, Insup

    2013-01-01

    Postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction (ED) is the major problem for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Recently, gene and stem cell-based therapy of the corpus cavernosum has been attempted for postprostatectomy ED, but those therapies are limited by rapid blood flow and disruption of the normal architecture of the corpus cavernosum. In this study, we attempted to regenerate the damaged cavernous nerve (CN), which is the main cause of ED. We investigated the effectiveness of human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC) and nerve growth factor-incorporated hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (NGF-hydrogel) application on the CN in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. Four weeks after the operation, erectile function was assessed by detecting the intracavernous pressure (ICP)/arterial pressure level by CN electrostimulation. The ICP was significantly increased by application of hADSC with NGF-hydrogel compared to the other experimental groups. CN and penile tissue were collected for histological examination. PKH-26 labeled hADSC colocalized with beta III tubulin were shown in CN tissue sections. hADSC/NGF-hydrogel treatment prevented smooth muscle atrophy in the corpus cavernosum. In addition, the hADSC/NGF-hydrogel group showed increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. This study suggests that application of hADSCs with NGF-hydrogel on the CN might be a promising treatment for postprostatectomy ED. PMID:22834730

  6. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance

    PubMed Central

    Turney, Stephen G.; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B.; Goeckeler, Zoe M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Whitesides, George M.; Bridgman, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion–cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. PMID:26631553

  7. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases: a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Chun-ying; Zou, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections; patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.0001, RR: 1.35, 95%CI: 1.30–1.40). The average nerve conduction velocity in the nerve growth factor group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, MD: 4.59 m/s, 95%CI: 4.12–5.06). The incidence of pain or scleroma at the injection site in the nerve growth factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, RR: 6.30, 95%CI: 3.53

  8. Hypertrophy of Neurons Within Cardiac Ganglia in Human, Canine, and Rat Heart Failure: The Potential Role of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S.; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S.; Nee, Lisa M.; Wurster, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Methods and Results Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm2; P<0.01) and canine hearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm2; P<0.01) failing secondary to ischemia and neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm2; P<0.01) failing secondary to hypertension reveal significant hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Conclusions Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia. PMID:23959444

  9. Uptake of nerve growth factor along peripheral and spinal axons of primary sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P.M.; Riopelle, R.J.

    1984-07-01

    To investigate the distribution of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on peripheral and central axons, (/sup 125/I)NGF was injected into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of adult rats. Accumulation of (/sup 125/I)NGF in lumbar dorsal root ganglia was monitored by gamma emission counting and radioautography. (/sup 125/I)NGF, injected endoneurially in small quantities, was taken into sensory axons by a saturable process and was transported retrogradely to their cell bodies at a maximal rate of 2.5 to 7.5 mm/hr. Because very little (/sup 125/I)NGF reached peripheral terminals, the results were interpreted to indicate that receptors for NGF are present on nonterminal segments of sensory axons. The specificity and high affinity of NGF uptake were illustrated by observations that negligible amounts of gamma activity accumulated in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after comparable intraneural injection of (/sup 125/I) cytochrome C or (/sup 125/I)oxidized NGF. Similar techniques were used to demonstrate avid internalization and retrograde transport of (/sup 125/I)NGF by intraspinal axons arising from dorsal root ganglia. Following injection of (/sup 125/I)NGF into lumbar or cervical regions of the spinal cord, neuronal perikarya were clearly labeled in radioautographs of lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Sites for NGF uptake on primary sensory neurons in the adult rat are not restricted to peripheral axon terminals but are extensively distributed along both peripheral and central axons. Receptors on axons provide a mechanism whereby NGF supplied by glia could influence neuronal maintenance or axonal regeneration.

  10. A nerve growth factor-regulated messenger RNA encodes a new intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Differential screening of a cDNA library from the PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line previously revealed a clone, clone 73, whose corresponding mRNA is induced by nerve growth factor (NGF). Induction parallels NGF-stimulated PC12 differentiation from a chromaffinlike phenotype to a sympathetic neuronlike phenotype. We report that DNA sequence analysis reveals that clone 73 mRNA encodes an intermediate filament (IF) protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is distinct from the known sequences of other members of the IF protein family. The sequence has highest homology with desmin and vimentin and includes the highly conserved central alpha-helical rod domain with the characteristic heptad repeat of hydrophobic residues, but has lower homology in the amino-terminal head and carboxyl-terminal tail domains. The head domain contains a large number of serine residues which are potential phosphorylation sites. The expression of clone 73 in vivo in the nervous system of the adult rat was investigated by in situ hybridization of clone 73 probes to tissue sections. The mRNA is expressed at high levels in ganglia of the peripheral nervous system, including the superior cervical ganglion (sympathetic), ciliary ganglion (parasympathetic), and dorsal root ganglion (sensory). In the central nervous system, motor nuclei of cranial nerves III, IV, V, VI, VII, X, and XII as well as ventral horn motor neurons and a restricted set of other central nervous system nuclei express the clone 73 mRNA. Tissues apart from those of the nervous system did not in general express the mRNA, with only very low levels detected in adrenal gland. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of NGF- induced PC12 cell differentiation, the pathways of neuronal development in vivo, and the possible function of the clone 73 IF protein and its relationship to other IF proteins. PMID:3339087

  11. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-10-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. SVI-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin.

  12. Expression and modulation of nerve growth factor in murine keratinocytes (PAM 212)

    SciTech Connect

    Tron, V.A.; Coughlin, M.D.; Jang, D.E.; Stanisz, J.; Sauder, D.N. )

    1990-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide that is required for normal development and maintenance of the sympathetic and sensory nervous systems. Skin has been shown to contain relatively high amounts of NGF, which is in keeping with the finding that the quantity of NGF in a tissue is proportional to the extent of sympathetic innervation of that organ. Since the keratinocyte, a major cellular constituent of the skin, is known to produce other growth factors and cytokines, our experiments were designed to determine whether keratinocytes are a source of NGF. Keratinocyte-conditioned media from the keratinocyte cell line PAM 212 contained NGF-like activity, approximately 2-3 ng/ml, as detected by the neurite outgrowth assay. Freshly isolated BALB/c keratinocytes contained approximately 0.1 ng/ml. Using a cDNA probe directed against NGF, we demonstrated the presence of a 1.3-kb NGF mRNA in both PAM 212 and BALB/c keratinocytes. Since ultraviolet radiation (UV) is a potentially important modulating factor for cytokines in skin, we examined the effect of UV on NGF mRNA expression. Although UV initially inhibited the expression of keratinocyte NGF mRNA (4 h), by 24 h an induction of NGF mRNA was seen. The NGF signal could also be induced by phorbol esters. Thus, keratinocytes synthesize and express NGF, and its expression is modulated by UVB and phorbol esters.

  13. Nerve growth factor in the urinary bladder of the adult regulates neuronal form and function.

    PubMed Central

    Steers, W D; Kolbeck, S; Creedon, D; Tuttle, J B

    1991-01-01

    Urethral obstruction produces increased voiding frequency (0.7 +/- 0.06 to 1.1 +/- 0.08 h-1) and hypertrophy of the urinary bladder (89 +/- 1.7 to 708 +/- 40 mg) with profound increments in the dimensions of afferent (4, 6) and efferent neurons (299 +/- 4.7 to 573 +/- 8.6 microns2) supplying this organ in the rat. We discovered that hypertrophied bladders of rat and human contain significantly more nerve growth factor (NGF) per milligram wet weight, protein, and DNA than normal bladders. The temporal correlation between NGF content, neuronal hypertrophy, and bladder weight was consistent with a role for this growth factor in the neurotrophic effects associated with obstruction. Autoimmunity to NGF abolished the hypertrophy of NGF-sensitive bladder neurons in the pelvic ganglion after obstruction. Relief of urethral obstruction reduced bladder size (349 +/- 78 mg), but neuronal hypertrophy (460.2 +/- 10.2 microns2) and elevated NGF levels were only partially reversed. Bladder hypertrophy (133 +/- 4.3 mg) induced by osmotic diuresis slightly increased ganglion cell area (365.2 +/- 6.1 microns2) and only doubled NGF content of the bladder. These findings provide important new evidence that parenchymal cells in the hypertrophied bladder can synthesize NGF and possibly other molecular messengers that act to alter the size and function of neurons in adult animals and man. Images PMID:1939656

  14. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  15. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Ning; Liu, Zun-Wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-Fei; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  16. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  17. The effects of nerve growth factor on endothelial cells seeded on different titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guang, M; Yao, Y; Zhang, L; Huang, B; Ma, L; Xiang, L; Jin, J; Gong, P

    2015-12-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for peri-implant bone regeneration and osseointegration. Endothelial cells (ECs) play an important role in angiogenesis during the early stage of bone formation. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is also reported to function as an angiogenic growth factor. The effects of NGF on ECs seeded on titanium surfaces are unclear. This study was done to investigate the influence of NGF on peri-implant angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We used two different titanium surfaces. ECs seeded on these surfaces were treated with indicated concentrations of NGF or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation, differentiation, morphological features, and amounts attached were assessed. Chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) was adopted to evaluate the effect of NGF in vivo. The results showed that NGF could promote EC proliferation on both titanium surfaces (F1d=2.083, P=0.156; F3d=30.857, P=0.0002; F5d=4.440, P=0.041; F7d=11.065, P=0.001). NGF and the SLA surface upregulated mRNA of NGF, TrkA, and p75 expression (FNGF=11.941, P=0.003; FTrkA=28.514, P=0.004; Fp75=7.725, P=0.01). In vivo, the supernatants of the NGF-treated group could promote neovascularization in CAM (F=17.662, P=0.009). This study demonstrated that NGF could enhance EC proliferation, gene expression on different titanium surfaces, and neovascularization in CAM. This provides novel information in relation to the promotion of early dental implant osseointegration.

  18. Nerve Growth Factor mRNA Expression in the Regenerating Antler Tip of Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyi; Stanton, Jo-Ann L.; Robertson, Tracy M.; Suttie, James M.; Sheard, Philip W.; John Harris, A.; Clark, Dawn E.

    2007-01-01

    Deer antlers are the only mammalian organs that can fully regenerate each year. During their growth phase, antlers of red deer extend at a rate of approximately 10 mm/day, a growth rate matched by the antler nerves. It was demonstrated in a previous study that extracts from deer velvet antler can promote neurite outgrowth from neural explants, suggesting a possible role for Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) in antler innervation. Here we showed using the techniques of Northern blot analysis, denervation, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization that NGF mRNA was expressed in the regenerating antler, principally in the smooth muscle of the arteries and arterioles of the growing antler tip. Regenerating axons followed the route of the major blood vessels, located at the interface between the dermis and the reserve mesenchyme of the antler. Denervation experiments suggested a causal relationship exists between NGF mRNA expression in arterial smooth muscle and sensory axons in the antler tip. We hypothesize that NGF expressed in the smooth muscle of the arteries and arterioles promotes and maintains antler angiogenesis and this role positions NGF ahead of axons during antler growth. As a result, NGF can serve a second role, attracting sensory axons into the antler, and thus it can provide a guidance cue to define the nerve track. This would explain the phenomenon whereby re-innervation of the regenerating antler follows vascular ingrowth. The annual growth of deer antler presents a unique opportunity to better understand the factors involved in rapid nerve regeneration. PMID:17215957

  19. Neuroprotection by Cocktails of Dietary Antioxidants under Conditions of Nerve Growth Factor Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Amara, Flavio; Berbenni, Miluscia; Fragni, Martina; Leoni, Giampaolo; Viggiani, Sandra; Ippolito, Vita Maria; Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Alberghina, Lilia; Riccio, Paolo; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants may be useful in counteracting the chronic inflammatory status in neurodegenerative diseases by reducing oxidative stress due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we newly described the efficacy of a number of dietary antioxidants (polyphenols, carotenoids, thiolic compounds, and oligoelements) on viability of neuronal PC12 cells following Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) deprivation, a model of age-related decrease of neurotrophic support that triggers neuronal loss. Neuroprotection by antioxidants during NGF deprivation for 24 h was largely dependent on their concentrations: all dietary antioxidants were able to efficiently support cell viability by reducing ROS levels and restoring mitochondrial function, while preserving the neuronal morphology. Moreover, ROS reduction and neuroprotection during NGF withdrawal were also achieved with defined cocktails of 3-6 different antioxidants at concentrations 5-60 times lower than those used in single treatments, suggesting that their antioxidant activity was preserved also at very low concentrations. Overall, these data indicate the beneficial effects of antioxidants against oxidative stress induced by decreased NGF availability and suggest that defined cocktails of dietary factors at low concentrations might be a suitable strategy to reduce oxidative damage in neurodegenerative diseases, while limiting possible side effects.

  20. Amplification and Temporal Filtering during Gradient Sensing by Nerve Growth Cones Probed with a Microfluidic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mathieu; Shynkar, Vasyl; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Dupin, Isabelle; Bouzigues, Cedric; Studer, Vincent; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth cones (GCs) are chemical sensors that convert graded extracellular cues into oriented axonal motion. To ensure a sensitive and robust response to directional signals in complex and dynamic chemical landscapes, GCs are presumably able to amplify and filter external information. How these processing tasks are performed remains however poorly known. Here, we probe the signal-processing capabilities of single GCs during γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) directional sensing with a shear-free microfluidic assay that enables systematic measurements of the GC output response to variable input gradients. By measuring at the single molecule level the polarization of GABAA chemoreceptors at the GC membrane, as a function of the external GABA gradient, we find that GCs act as i), signal amplifiers over a narrow range of concentrations, and ii), low-pass temporal filters with a cutoff frequency independent of stimuli conditions. With computational modeling, we determine that these systems-level properties arise at a molecular level from the saturable occupancy response and the lateral dynamics of GABAA receptors. PMID:23083707

  1. Imbalance of the nerve growth factor and its precursor as a potential biomarker for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Mysona, B A; Matragoon, S; Stephens, M; Mohamed, I N; Farooq, A; Bartasis, M L; Fouda, A Y; Shanab, A Y; Espinosa-Heidmann, D G; El-Remessy, A B

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that diabetes-induced oxidative stress alters homeostasis of retinal nerve growth factor (NGF) resulting in accumulation of its precursor, proNGF, at the expense of NGF which plays a critical role in preserving neuronal and retinal function. This imbalance coincided with retinal damage in experimental diabetes. Here we test the hypothesis that alteration of proNGF and NGF levels observed in retina and vitreous will be mirrored in serum of diabetic patients. Blood and vitreous samples were collected from patients (diabetic and nondiabetic) undergoing vitrectomy at Georgia Regents University under approved IRB. Levels of proNGF, NGF, and p75(NTR) shedding were detected using Western blot analysis. MMP-7 activity was also assayed. Diabetes-induced proNGF expression and impaired NGF expression were observed in vitreous and serum. Vitreous and sera from diabetic patients (n = 11) showed significant 40.8-fold and 3.6-fold increases, respectively, compared to nondiabetics (n = 9). In contrast, vitreous and sera from diabetic patients showed significant 44% and 64% reductions in NGF levels, respectively, compared to nondiabetics. ProNGF to NGF ratios showed significant correlation between vitreous and serum. Further characterization of diabetes-induced imbalance in the proNGF to NGF ratio will facilitate its utility as an early biomarker for diabetic complications. PMID:25853140

  2. Binding and internalization of nerve growth factor by PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasaian, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of nerve growth factor (NGF) with its cell surface receptors has been studied using both fluorescent- and radio-labelled NGF. The fluorescence studies were done by flow cytometry, and gave information about the concentration dependence and time course of NGF binding to rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) and human melanoma cells (A875). /sup 125/I-NGF was used to study the fate of NGF in PC12 cells following its association with cell surface receptors. Variations of the PC12 binding assay were used to distinguish ligand bound to fast and slowly dissociating receptors at the cell surface, internalized ligand, and cytoskeletally-associated NGF. Ligand uptake into each of these pools was followed in untreated cells, as well as in cells exposed to colchicine and/or cytochalasin B to disrupt the cytoskeleton. NGF degradation was also followed in these cells, and chloroquine was used to inhibit this process. In a separate project, NGF activity was assayed in samples of human amniotic fluid and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A range of activities was found in these samples, with the CSF samples containing somewhat more activity than the amniotic fluid samples.

  3. Nerve growth induces 5-HT sub 3 recognition sites in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.C.; Rowland, H.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, nerve growth factor (7S NGF) induced the expression of recognition sites that bind the specific 5-HT{sub 3} antagonist (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride. Culturing PC12 cells for 8-12 days in the presence of 50 ng/ml NGF increased the density (B{sub max}) of (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride binding sites in cell membranes (0-100,000 x g fraction) from 0 to 105 fmoles/mg protein. This binding exhibited high affinity for (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride (K{sub d}=0.8 nM), was specific (>95%), and was inhibited by 5-HT{sub 3} compounds with a rank of potency (quipazine>ICS 205-930 > GR38032F > BRL 24924{approx}MDL 72222 > phenylbiguanide {le} seroton-in > 2-methyl-serotonin > metoclopramide) which was distinct from neuroblastoma cells. Thus, NGF-differentiated PC12 cells possess a 5-HT{sub 3} receptor and should be useful to investigate its regulation and biochemical mechanism of action.

  4. Nerve growth factor & TrkA as novel therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schorn, Stephan; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2016-08-01

    In the past 20years, nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors TrkA & p75NTR were recognized to be overexpressed in the overwhelming majority of human solid cancers. Recent studies discovered the presence of overactive TrkA signaling due to TrkA rearrangements or TrkA fusion products in frequent cancers like colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, targeting TrkA/NGF via selective small-molecule-inhibitors or antibodies has gained enormous attention in the drug discovery sector. Clinical studies on the anti-cancer impact of NGF-blocking antibodies are likely to be accelerated after the recent removal of clinical holds on these agents by regulatory authorities. Based on these current developments, the present review provides not only a broad overview of the biological effects of NGF-TrkA-p75NTR on cancer cells and their microenvironment, but also explains why NGF and its receptors are going to evoke major interest as promising therapeutic anti-cancer targets in the coming decade. PMID:27264679

  5. Effects of different kinds of acute stress on nerve growth factor content in rat brain.

    PubMed

    von Richthofen, Sita; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer

    2003-10-17

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has several effects on the central nervous system; on the one hand NGF fosters survival and function of cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain, on the other hand this protein is implicated in the stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA). In this study we tested the influence of threatening and painful stress treatments in three different intensities as well as forced motoric activity on NGF content in different brain areas in adult rats. We found that threatening treatment with or without painful stimuli was followed by a significant decrease of NGF concentration in the amygdala (44.5%; P=0.03) and the frontal cortex (-45.5%; P=0.02). We also observed that after stress of forced motoric activity NGF content in the frontal cortex (-32%; P=0.01) and the hippocampus (-32%; P=0.006) was significantly reduced. Thus, NGF content in distinct brain regions is decreased, following different forms of acute stress. This might be relevant for the pathophysiological understanding of psychiatric diseases, such as depression, which are associated with stress.

  6. Enhanced bioavailability of nerve growth factor with phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles in cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Meng; Tang, Jingling; Wei, Yinghui; Sun, Yanhui; Wang, Xinyu; Wu, Linhua; Liu, Hongzhuo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Supplementation of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) into the cochlea of deafened animals rescues spiral ganglion cells from degeneration. However, a safe and potent delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as NGF, to spiral ganglion cells remains one of the greatest challenges. This study presents the development of self-assembled cubic lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to enhance inner ear bioavailability of bioactive NGF via a round window membrane route. Methods A novel nanocarrier-entrapped NGF was developed based on phytantriol by a liquid precursor dilution, with Pluronic® F127 and propylene glycol as the surfactant and solubilizer, respectively. Upon dilution of the liquid lipid precursors, monodispersed submicron-sized particles with a slight negative charge formed spontaneously. Results Biological activity of entrapped NGF was assessed using pheochromocytoma cells with NGF-loaded reservoirs to induce significant neuronal outgrowth, similar to that seen in free NGF-treated controls. Finally, a 3.28-fold increase in inner ear bioavailability was observed after administration of phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles as compared to free drug, contributing to an enhanced drug permeability of the round window membrane. Conclusion Data presented here demonstrate the potential of lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to improve the outcomes of patients bearing cochlear implants. PMID:26604754

  7. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects.

  8. Expression of the gene for nerve growth factor (NGF) in the monkey central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Yamashita, A; Shimizu, K; Sogawa, K; Fujii, Y

    1993-07-30

    The expression of the gene for nerve growth factor (NGF) was examined in the central nervous system of adult and fetal monkeys. In adults, the highest level of NGF mRNA was found in the hippocampus and relatively high levels were observed in the cerebral cortices and thalamus. NGF mRNA was also detected in the cerebellum and the caudate nucleus. In the spinal cord, there was no evidence of the mRNA. The levels of NGF mRNA were closely correlated with those of NGF. At embryonic day 140 (E140), levels of NGF mRNA in the visual cortex and cerebellum were three times higher than those at the adult stage. Our previous study on the ontogeny of NGF (Hayashi, M. et al., Neuroscience, 36 (1990) 683-689) showed that the level of NGF in the visual cortex at E140 is the same as that at adult stage. Thus, at the fetal stage, NGF may be actively transported from the cerebral cortex to other regions of the brain, such as the basal forebrain area. By contrast, the levels of NGF and NGF mRNA in the cerebellum were almost the same at the adult and fetal stages, suggesting that NGF, which is synthesized in the cerebellum, may be taken up locally by cerebellar cells.

  9. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Neurolymphatic Remodeling during Corneal Inflammation and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Darci M.; Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Steele, Maria M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular and physiologic mechanisms that regulate the resolution of inflammation remain poorly defined despite their widespread importance in improving inflammatory disease outcomes. We studied the resolution of two cardinal signs of inflammation–pain and swelling–by investigating molecular mechanisms that regulate neural and lymphatic vessel remodeling during the resolution of corneal inflammation. A mouse model of corneal inflammation and wound recovery was developed to study this process in vivo. Administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) increased pain sensation and inhibited neural remodeling and lymphatic vessel regression processes during wound recovery. A complementary in vivo approach, the corneal micropocket assay, revealed that NGF-laden pellets stimulated lymphangiogenesis and increased protein levels of VEGF-C. Adult human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells did not express canonical NGF receptors TrkA and p75NTR or activate downstream MAPK- or Akt-pathway effectors in the presence of NGF, although NGF treatment increased their migratory and tubulogenesis capacities in vitro. Blockade of the VEGF-R2/R3 signaling pathway ablated NGF-mediated lymphangiogenesis in vivo. These findings suggest a hierarchical relationship with NGF functioning upstream of the VEGF family members, particularly VEGF-C, to stimulate lymphangiogenesis. Taken together, these studies show that NGF stimulates lymphangiogenesis and that NGF may act as a pathogenic factor that negatively regulates the normal neural and lymphatic vascular remodeling events that accompany wound recovery. PMID:25383879

  10. Can urinary nerve growth factor be a biomarker for overactive bladder?

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chancellor, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of overactive bladder (OAB) greatly varies and is based on subjective symptoms. A more objective method to diagnose and assess therapeutic outcome in OAB patients, especially for health care providers not trained in urology, needs to be found. Evidence has shown that urinary proteins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and prostaglandin E(2) levels increase in patients with OAB, bladder outlet obstruction, and detrusor overactivity. Urinary NGF level increases physiologically in normal subjects at urge to void, but increases pathologically in OAB patients at a small bladder volume and with a sensation of urgency. Recent studies have shown that patients with OAB dry and OAB wet have significantly higher urinary NGF levels compared with control groups and patients with increased bladder sensation. Urinary NGF levels decrease after antimuscarinic therapy and further decrease after detrusor botulinum toxin injections in refractory OAB. Urinary NGF level could be a potential biomarker for diagnosis of OAB and assessment of the therapeutic effect of antimuscarinic therapy. The latest medical advances in this field are reviewed herein.

  11. Elevated nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of children with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, Frederike; Koehne, Petra; Schäper, Christoph; Butenandt, Otfrid; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Ring-Mrozik, Elfride; Obladen, Michael; Bührer, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) resulting from impaired drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) causes hydrocephalus with damage to the central nervous system. Clinical symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in infants may be difficult to diagnose, leading to delayed treatment by shunt placement. Until now, no biochemical marker of elevated ICP has been available for clinical diagnosis and monitoring. In experimental animal models, nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) have been shown to be produced by glial cells as an adaptive response to hypoxia. We investigated whether concentrations of NGF and NT-3 are increased in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus. Methods NGF was determined in CSF samples collected from 42 hydrocephalic children on 65 occasions (taps or shunt placement surgery). CSF samples obtained by lumbar puncture from 22 children with suspected, but unconfirmed bacterial infection served as controls. Analysis was performed using ELISA techniques. Results NGF concentrations in hydrocephalic children were over 50-fold increased compared to controls (median 225 vs 4 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). NT-3 was detectable (> 1 pg/mL) in 14/31 hydrocephalus samples at 2–51 pg/mL but in none of 11 control samples (p = 0.007). Conclusion NGF and NT-3 concentrations are increased in children with hydrocephalus. This may represent an adaptive response of the brain to elevated ICP. PMID:11580868

  12. Exogenous nerve growth factor stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in aging Fischer 344 male rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1991-01-01

    The effect of age and exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) specific activity is examined in microdissections of cerebral and hippocampal cortices, and the cholinergic nuclei of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), and striatum of Fischer 344 male rats. Significant, 20% losses in ChAT activity are found in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats (n = 21) compared to 4-month-old animals, but there is no apparent loss of enzyme activity in the NBM. Loss of ChAT activity in the MS/DB is only observed in animals older than 19 months of age, while a striatal deficit is found in animals older than 7 months. Treatment for 2 weeks with NGF at 1.2 micrograms/day results in significant 70% increases of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats compared to untreated and vehicle-treated 4-month-old rats, but does not stimulate activity in the NBM. Sensitivity of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum to exogenous NGF increases with age. These experiments indicate that in the MS/DB, NBM, and striatum of Fischer 344 male rat there is an age-associated, differential regulation of ChAT enzyme activity and sensitivity to exogenous NGF.

  13. Nerve growth factor induces survival and differentiation through two distinct signaling cascades in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Klesse, L J; Meyers, K A; Marshall, C J; Parada, L F

    1999-03-25

    Nerve growth factor induces differentiation and survival of rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. The activation of the erk cascade has been implicated in transducing the multitude of signals induced by NGF. In order to explore the role of this signaling cascade in NGF mediated survival, differentiation and proliferation, we generated recombinant adenoviruses which express the intermediates of the erk cascade in their wild type, dominant negative and constitutively activated forms. We show that differentiation of PC12 cells requires activity of the ras/erk pathway, whereas inhibition of this pathway had no effect on survival or proliferation. Constitutively active forms of ras, raf and mek induced PC12 cell differentiation, while dominant interfering forms inhibited differentiation. Survival of PC12 cells in serum-free medium did not require activity of the ras/erk pathway. Instead, PI3 Kinase signaling was necessary for PC12 cell survival. Interestingly, constitutively activated versions of raf and mek were able to promote survival, but again this was dependent on activation of PI3 Kinase. Therefore, at least two distinct signaling pathways are required in PC12 cells for mediation of NGF functions.

  14. Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2013-07-14

    Fruits rich in phytochemicals have been shown to improve memory by protecting or enhancing neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), in the hippocampus. Mori Fructus (Morus alba L., Moraceae), also called mulberry, is used as a food, dietary supplement and an anti-ageing agent in traditional Oriental medicine. It is also known to contain abundant flavonoid compounds and to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus extract (ME) in mice, with a focus on NGF regulation. ME (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg per d for 7 d, per os) dose-dependently promoted NGF release in the mouse hippocampus, leading to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. ME significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation, acetylcholine synthesisation, neuronal cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, ME significantly increased latency time in the passive avoidance task (P< 0·001) and recognition time of novel objects in the object recognition test (P< 0·05), indicating improvements in learning and memory. Taken together, these data suggest that ME exhibits a memory-enhancing effect via up-regulation of NGF.

  15. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects. PMID:1295750

  16. Hyperalgesia induced in the rat by the amino-terminal octapeptide of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Y O; Levine, J D; Burch, R M; Woo, J E; Mobley, W C

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the mouse submandibular gland undergoes cleavage of its amino-terminal octapeptide when salivation is induced by epinephrine. The significance of this event is uncertain; cleaved NGF demonstrates bioactivity and no function has been attributed to the octapeptide produced (NGF-OP; Ser-Ser-Thr-His-Pro-Val-Phe-His). Enzyme inhibition studies indicating structural relatedness of NGF-OP and bradykinin (BK) prompted us to determine whether NGF-OP would elicit BK-like actions. We found that like BK, NGF-OP induced a decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold (i.e., produced hyperalgesia) in the hairy skin of the rat. This effect was dose-dependent and sequence-specific; like BK it was attenuated by sympathectomy and indomethacin pretreatment. However, NGF-OP actions appeared to be distinct from those for BK in that tissue injury was required for NGF-OP to induce hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we found no evidence that NGF-OP bound to or activated BK receptors. Our data indicate that NGF-OP is a distinct mediator of hyperalgesia. We suggest that NGF-OP alters pain threshold in the injured target regions of NGF-responsive neurons. PMID:1647026

  17. Structural And Mechanistic Insights Into Nerve Growth Factor Interactions With the Trka And P75 Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrman, T.; He, X.; Raab, B.; Dukipatti, A.; Blau, H.; Garcia, K.C.; /Howard Hughes Med. Inst. /Stanford U., Med. School

    2007-07-13

    Nerve growth factor engages two structurally distinct transmembrane receptors, TrkA and p75, which have been proposed to create a ''high-affinity'' NGF binding site through formation of a ternary TrkA/NGF/p75 complex. To define a structural basis for the high-affinity site, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of a complete extracellular domain of TrkA complexed with NGF. The complex reveals a crab-shaped homodimeric TrkA structure, but a mechanism for p75 coordination is not obvious. We investigated the heterodimerization of membrane-bound TrkA and p75, on intact mammalian cells, using a beta-gal protein-protein interaction system. We find that NGF dimerizes TrkA and that p75 exists on the cell surface as a preformed oligomer that is not dissociated by NGF. We find no evidence for a direct TrkA/p75 interaction. We propose that TrkA and p75 likely communicate through convergence of downstream signaling pathways and/or shared adaptor molecules, rather than through direct extracellular interactions.

  18. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor decreased in chronic ketamine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaoyin; Ding, Yi; Xu, Ke; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Minling; Wang, Daping; Deng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Xifan; Zhou, Chao; Liu, Yuping; Ning, Yuping; Fan, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigated the serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in a group of chronic ketamine abusers in comparison to healthy controls. The correlations between the serum BDNF, NGF level with the subjects’ demographic, pattern of ketamine use were also examined. Methods 93 subjects who met the criteria of ketamine dependence and 39 healthy subjects were recruited. Serum BDNF and NGF levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Psychopathological symptoms were assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results Both serum levels of BDNF and NGF were significant lower in the ketamine users compared to the healthy control subjects (9.50 ± 6.68 versus 14.37 ± 6.07 ng/ml, p = 0.019 for BDNF; 1.93 ± 0.80 versus 2.60 ± 1.07 ng/ml, p = 0.011 for NGF). BDNF level was negatively associated with current frequency of ketamine use (r = −0.209, p = 0.045). Conclusions Both BDNF and NGF serum concentrations were significantly lower among chronic ketamine users than among health controls. PMID:25064020

  19. Imbalance of the Nerve Growth Factor and Its Precursor: Implication in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Riyaz; El-Remessy, Azza B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age in US and worldwide. Neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) are known to be essential for growth, differentiation and survival of neurons in the developing and mature retina. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence supports an emerging role of neurotrophins in retinal diseases and in particular, diabetic retinopathy. Neurotrophins are initially synthesized in a pro-form and undergo proteolytic cleavage to produce the mature form that activates two distinctive receptors, the tyrosine kinase tropomycin receptor (Trk) and, to lesser extent, the common low affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Despite tight glycemic and metabolic control, many diabetic patients continue to experience progressive retinal damage. Understanding the molecular events involved in diabetic retinopathy is extremely important to identify novel therapeutic strategies to halt the disease progression. Diabetes induces imbalance in neurotrophins by increasing its proform, which is associated with upregulation of the p75NTR receptor in the retina. A growing body of evidence supports a link between the imbalance of pro-neurotrophins and early retinal inflammation, neuro-and microvascular degeneration. Therefore, examining changes in the levels of neurotrophins and its receptors might provide a therapeutically beneficial target to combat disease progression in diabetic patients. This commentary aims to highlight the impact of diabetes-impaired balance of neurotrophins and in particular, the NGF and its receptors; TrkA and p75NTR in the pathology of DR. PMID:26807305

  20. Nerve growth factor injected into the gastric ulcer base incorporates into endothelial, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells: implications for angiogenesis, mucosal regeneration and ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Ahluwalia, A; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T; Tarnawski, A S

    2015-08-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that locally administered growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor can accelerate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats. That study indicates that locally administered growth factors can exert potent biological effects resulting in enhanced gastric ulcers healing. However, the fate of injected growth factors, their retention and localization to specific cellular compartments have not been examined. In our preliminary study, we demonstrated that local injection of nerve growth factor to the base of experimental gastric ulcers dramatically accelerates ulcer healing, increases angiogenesis - new blood vessel formation, and improves the quality of vascular and epithelial regeneration. Before embarking on larger, definitive and time sequence studies, we wished to determine whether locally injected nerve growth factor is retained in gastric ulcer's tissues and taken up by specific cells during gastric ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced in anesthetized rats by local application of acetic acid using standard methods; and, 60 min later fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor was injected locally to the ulcer base. Rats were euthanized 2, 5 and 10 days later. Gastric specimens were obtained and processed for histology. Unstained paraffin sections were examined under a fluorescence microscope, and the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor into various gastric tissue cells was determined and quantified. In addition, we performed immunostaining for S100β protein that is expressed in neural components. Five and ten days after ulcer induction labeled nerve growth factor (injected to the gastric ulcer base) was incorporated into endothelial cells of blood vessels, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells, myofibroblasts and muscle cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that during gastric ulcer healing

  1. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1. PMID:27588730

  2. Polymer-encapsulated cells genetically modified to secrete human nerve growth factor promote the survival of axotomized septal cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, S R; Hammang, J P; Emerich, D F; Lee, A; Palmiter, R D; Baetge, E E

    1994-01-01

    Effective treatments for neurodegenerative disorders are limited by our inability to alter the progression of the diseases. A number of proteins have specific neuroprotective activities in vitro; however, the delivery of these factors into the central nervous system over the long term at therapeutic levels has been difficult to achieve. BHK cells engineered to express and release human nerve growth factor were encapsulated in an immunoisolation polymeric device and transplanted into both fimbria-fornix-lesioned rat brains and naive controls. In the lesioned rat brain, chronic delivery of human nerve growth factor by the encapsulated BHK cells provided nearly complete protection of axotomized medial septal cholinergic neurons. Human nerve growth factor continued to be released by encapsulated cells upon removal from the aspirative site after 3 weeks or from normal rat striatum after 3 and 6 months in vivo. Long-term encapsulated cell survival was confirmed by histologic analysis. This encapsulated xenogeneic system may provide therapeutically effective amounts of a number of neurotrophic factors, alone or in combination, to virtually any site within the body. Images PMID:8134395

  3. Effect of exercise on the expression of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the impact of exercise on the expression pattern of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] To produce monosodium iodoacetate-induced arthritis, rats were administered 3 mg/50 µL monosodium iodoacetate through the interarticular space of the right knee. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: rats sacrificed 3 weeks after 0.9% saline solution injection (shame group, n = 10), rats sacrificed 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (control group, n = 10), rats with 4 weeks rest from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (no exercise group, n = 10), and rats with 4 weeks treadmill training from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (exercise group, n = 10). Serial coronal sections of the lumbar spine were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. [Results] The expression of nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the EG compared with the SG, CG, and NEG. [Conclusion] Increased nerve growth factor expression in the spinal cord due to exercise-induced stimulation can be effective in treating chronic pain. Such treatment will contribute not only to improving the joint function of patients with chronic pain but also their quality of life. PMID:26357438

  4. [Construction of recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-β-NGF) eukaryotic vector and its expression in HEK293 cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchuan; Xue, Bofu; Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Mo; Zhu, Lin; Milburn, Rebecca; Le, Li; Hu, Peizhen; Ye, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) is a nerve cell growth regulation factor, which can provide nutrition for the neurons and promote the neurites outgrowth. In order to produce large-scale recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-beta-NGF), we constructed a plasmid vector, which can stably express the rh-beta-NGF in the HEK293 cell lines. First, the plasmid of pCMV-beta-NGF-IRES-dhfr was constructed and transformed into HEK293 cells. Then MTX pressurized filter and limiting dilution methods were used to obtain monoclonal HEK293 cell lines. After stepwise reducing serum in culture media, the cells eventually adapted to serum-free medium and secreted rh-beta-NGF. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression product owned a molecular weight of about 13 kDa and a purity of more than 50%. The peptide mapping sequencing analysis demonstrated the sequences of rh-beta-NGF matched with the theoretical ones. Later we purified this protein by ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatograph. Finally, our experimental results exhibited that the recombinant cell lines can stably express rh-beta-NGF with a high efficiency of more than 20 pg/cell x day. In addition, this protein could successfully induce differentiation of PC12 cells. In summary, our recombinant HEK293 cells can express bio-active rh-beta-NGF with great efficiency and stability, which supply a valid basis to large-scale production of rh-beta-NGF.

  5. Cytotoxic effects of acrylamide in nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor 1-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Lee, Don-Ching; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2014-03-01

    Acrylamide is a neurological and reproductive toxicant in humans and laboratory animals; however, the neuron developmental toxicity of acrylamide remains unclear. The aims of this study are to investigate the cytotoxicity and neurite outgrowth inhibition of acrylamide in nerve growth factor (NGF)- or fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1)-mediated neural development of PC12 cells. MTS assay showed that acrylamide treatment suppresses NGF- or FGF1-induced PC12 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Quantification of neurite outgrowth demonstrated that 0.5 mM acrylamide treatment resulted in significant decrease in differentiation of NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. This decrease is accompanied with the reduced expression of growth-associated protein-43, a neuronal marker. Moreover, relative levels of pERK, pAKT, pSTAT3 and pCREB were increased within 5-10 min when PC12 cells were treated with NGF or FGF1. Acrylamide (0.5 mM) decreases the NGF-induced activation of AKT-CREB but not ERK-STAT3 within 20 min. Similarly, acrylamide (0.5 mM) decreases the FGF1-induced activation of AKT-CREB within 20 min. In contrast to the NGF treatment, the ERK-STAT3 activation that was induced by FGF1 was slightly reduced by 0.5 mM acrylamide. We further showed that PI3K inhibitor (LY294002), but not MEK inhibitor (U0126), could synergize with acrylamide (0.5 mM) to reduce the cell viability and neurite outgrowth in NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. Moreover, acrylamide (0.5 mM) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) activities in NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. This increase was reversed by Trolox (an ROS scavenging agent) co-treatment. Together, our findings reveal that NGF- or FGF1-stimulation of the neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells is attenuated by acrylamide through the inhibition of PI3K-AKT-CREB signaling, along with the production of ROS.

  6. Nerve growth factor receptor gene is at human chromosome region 17q12-17q22, distal to the chromosome 17 breakpoint in acute leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Chao, M.; Bothwell, M.; Ross, A.H.; Finan, J.; Hoxie, J.A.; Sehgal, A.; Buck, C.R.; Lanahan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones for the human nerve growth factor receptor have been used in conjunction with somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization to localize the nerve growth factor receptor locus to human chromosome region 17q12-q22. Additionally, part, if not all, of the nerve growth factor receptor locus is present on the translocated portion of 17q (17q21-qter) from a poorly differential acute leukemia in which the chromosome 17 breakpoint was indistinguishable cytogenetically from the 17 breakpoint observed in the t(15;17)(q22;q21) translocation associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thus the nerve growth factor receptor locus may be closely distal to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated chromosome 17 breakpoint at 17q21.

  7. Salivary nerve growth factor response to intense stress: effect of sex and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Larson, Gerald E; Rauh, Mitchell J; Hiller Lauby, Melissa D; Granger, Douglas A

    2014-05-01

    Ample evidence links stress to psychiatric and neurological disease. Although many studies examine stress hormone secretion and receptor activity, exciting new developments signify a shift in focus to neuromodulatory systems influencing neuronal development, survival, and neuroplasticity. The purpose of this study was to characterize salivary nerve growth factor (sNGF) responses to intense stress exposure in healthy military members undergoing survival training. A second purpose was to explore effects of age, sex, education, and body mass index (BMI). One hundred sixteen military members (80% male) were studied before, during, and 24 h after a stressful mock-captivity exercise. sNGF was measured at all three time points. Reactivity, recovery, and residual elevation of sNGF were computed. General linear modeling with repeated measures evaluated effect of stress exposure, as well as the roles of age, sex, education, and BMI. sNGF increased 137% from baseline to intense stress. During recovery, sNGF remained elevated an average of 67% above baseline (i.e., residual elevation). Men showed greater sNGF reactivity than women quantified by larger absolute T1-T2Δ (+148.1 pg/mL vs. +64.9 pg/mL, p<0.017). A noteworthy trend of higher sNGF concentrations in low BMI participants was observed (p=0.058). No effects of age or education were shown. This study shows substantial reactivity and residual elevation of sNGF in response to intense stress exposure in healthy humans. Further research is needed to refine the sNGF assay, fully characterize the sNGF stress response, delineate correlates and mechanisms, and validate therapeutic applications.

  8. Prognostic roles for fibroblast growth factor receptor family members in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fengju; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are rare, highly malignant, and poorly understood sarcomas. The often poor outcome of MPNST highlights the necessity of identifying prognostic predictors for this aggressive sarcoma. Here, we investigate the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family members in human MPNSTs. Results aCGH and bioinformatics analysis identified frequent amplification of the FGFR1 gene. FISH analysis revealed that 26.9% MPNST samples had amplification of FGFR1, with both focal and polysomy patterns observed. IHC identified that FGFR1 protein expression was positively correlated with FGFR1 gene amplification. High expression of FGFR1 protein was associated with better overall survival (OS) and was an independent prognostic predictor for OS of MPNST patients. Additionally, combined expression of FGFR1 and FGFR2 protein characterized a subtype of MPNST with better OS. FGFR4 protein was expressed 82.3% of MPNST samples, and was associated with poor disease-free survival. Materials and Methods We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to validate the gene amplification detected by aCGH analysis. Another cohort of 63 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MPNST samples (including 52 samples for FISH assay) was obtained to explore FGFR1, 2, 3, and 4 protein expression by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that FGFRs play different prognostic roles in MPNST. PMID:26993773

  9. Nerve Growth Factor Is Regulated by Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Human Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Currie, J Brooke; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Haglund, Lisbet

    2016-02-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes to the development of chronic pain associated with degenerative connective tissue pathologies, such as intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of NGF in these conditions. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors classically associated with innate immunity but more recently were found to be activated by endogenous alarmins such as fragmented extracellular matrix proteins found in degenerating discs or cartilage. In this study we investigated if TLR activation regulates NGF and which signaling mechanisms control this response in intervertebral discs. TLR2 agonists, TLR4 agonists, or IL-1β (control) treatment increased NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and IL-1β gene expression in human disc cells isolated from healthy, pain-free organ donors. However, only TLR2 activation or IL-1β treatment increased NGF protein secretion. TLR2 activation increased p38, ERK1/2, and p65 activity and increased p65 translocation to the cell nucleus. JNK activity was not affected by TLR2 activation. Inhibition of NF-κB, and to a lesser extent p38, but not ERK1/2 activity, blocked TLR2-driven NGF up-regulation at both the transcript and protein levels. These results provide a novel mechanism of NGF regulation in the intervertebral disc and potentially other pathogenic connective tissues. TLR2 and NF-κB signaling are known to increase cytokines and proteases, which accelerate matrix degradation. Therefore, TLR2 or NF-κB inhibition may both attenuate chronic pain and slow the degenerative progress in vivo. PMID:26668319

  10. Nerve growth factor-treated, neurite-bearing PC12 cells continue to synthesize DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatius, M.J.; Chandler, C.R.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-02-01

    Cultures of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells treated with beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) for up to 15 days continue to synthesize DNA. The present study compares the extent of maintained DNA synthesis in cells with and without processes and asks whether the observed DNA synthesis in differentiated PC12 cells reflects either the continued division of the cells or the formation of polyploid cells, or both. PC12 cells were grown on tissue coverslips for various lengths of time with or without 50 ng/ml of beta-NGF and then assayed for DNA synthesis by (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling and autoradiography. In 8-day-old control cultures (no NGF), 30% of the cells had labeled nuclei after a 2-hr (/sup 3/H)thymidine pulse. In contrast, in cultures treated for 8 days with NGF, only 7% of the cells were labeled (i.e., still synthesizing DNA). The fractions of process-bearing and non-process-bearing cells with labeled nuclei were identical. Even after 14 days in NGF, 7% of the cells with neurites were still synthesizing DNA during any 2-hr period. With continuous (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling in the presence of NGF from 8 to 13 days, nearly 70% of the cells with neurites were labeled. The presence of neurites induced by NGF does not preclude continued (albeit reduced) DNA synthesis in these PC12 cells. To determine the fate of this newly synthesized DNA, nuclei extracted from NGF-treated PC12 cells were analyzed for the cellular distribution of DNA by combined propidium iodine staining and flow microfluorimetry. NGF treatment resulted in a 3-fold increase in the number of G2+M/4N cells along with the appearance of 8N cells.

  11. Characterization and localization of nerve growth factor receptors in the embryonic otic vesicle and cochleovestibular ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd, P.; Represa, J. )

    1989-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility that nerve growth factor (NGF) may play a role in the development of the inner ear. Primordia of the inner ear, the otic vesicle (OV) and cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG), were isolated from 72-hr (stage 19-20) quail embryos and examined for the presence of NGF receptors. Quantitative binding studies revealed that both OV and CVG exhibited specific 125I-NGF binding; levels of nonspecific binding were 6 to 26% of total binding. Scatchard analysis yielded a linear plot, indicating the presence of a single class of NGF receptor. The average binding constant (Kd) was 8.0 nM for OV and 8.6 nM for CVG, corresponding to the low affinity (site II) NGF receptor. Examination of light microscopic radioautographs indicated that most of the specific 125I-NGF binding was located in the ventromedial wall of the OV, with little or no binding in the lateral wall and endolymphatic primordia. These studies were corroborated by microdissection of OV, in which 70% of the radioactivity was found to be localized in the medial half of the OV. In CVG, specific 125I-NGF binding was more concentrated in the cochlear portion of the ganglion, with silver grains primarily over areas containing support cells and immature neurons. Quantitative binding studies with isolated cochlear and vestibular ganglia obtained from 144-hr (stage 29-30) quail embryos revealed that the cochlear ganglion exhibited three times more specific 125I-NGF binding than the vestibular ganglion. The presence of NGF receptors on OV and CVG suggests that these structures are responsive to and/or dependent upon NGF. The following paper examines the question of whether NGF serves either as a mitogen, a survival factor, or a differentiation factor in this system.

  12. Nerve growth factor translates stress response and subsequent murine abortion via adhesion molecule-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tometten, Mareike; Blois, Sandra; Kuhlmei, Arne; Stretz, Anna; Klapp, Burghard F; Arck, Petra C

    2006-04-01

    Spontaneous abortion is a frequent threat affecting 10%-25% of human pregnancies. Psychosocial stress has been suggested to be attributable for pregnancy losses by challenging the equilibrium of systems mandatory for pregnancy maintenance, including the nervous, endocrine, and immune system. Strong evidence indicates that stress-triggered abortion is mediated by adhesion molecules, i.e., intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and leukocyte function associated molecule 1, now being referred to as integrin alpha L (ITGAL), which facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells to the feto-maternal interface. The neurotrophin beta-nerve growth factor (NGFB), which has been shown to be upregulated in response to stress in multiple experimental settings including in the uterine lining (decidua) during pregnancy, increases ICAM1 expression on endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether and how NGFB neutralization has a preventive effect on stress-triggered abortion in the murine CBA/J x DBA/2J model. We provide experimental evidence that stress exposure upregulates the frequency of abortion and the expression of uterine NGFB. Further, adhesion molecules ICAM1 and selectin platelet (SELP, formerly P-Selectin) and their ligands ITGAL and SELP ligand (SELPL, formerly P selectin glycoprotein ligand 1) respectively increase in murine deciduas in response to stress. Subsequently, decidual cytokines are biased toward a proinflammatory and abortogenic cytokine profile. Additionally, a decrease of pregnancy protective CD8alpha(+) decidual cells is present. Strikingly, all such uterine stress responses are abrogated by NGFB neutralization. Hence, NGFB acts as a proximal mediator in the hierarchical network of immune rejection by mediating an abortogenic environment comprised of classical signs of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:16371592

  13. Nerve growth factor alters the sensitivity of rat masseter muscle mechanoreceptors to NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hayes; Dong, Xu-Dong; Cairns, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into rat masseter muscle induces a local mechanical sensitization that is greater in female than in male rats. The duration of NGF-induced sensitization in male and female rats was associated with an increase in peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression by masseter muscle afferent fibers that began 3 days postinjection. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of increased NMDA expression on the response properties of masseter muscle mechanoreceptors. In vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiological recordings of trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the masseter muscle were performed in anesthetized rats 3 days after NGF injection (25 μg/ml, 10 μl) into the masseter muscle. Mechanical activation threshold was assessed before and after intramuscular injection of NMDA. NMDA injection induced mechanical sensitization in both sexes that was increased significantly following NGF injection in the male rats but not in the female rats. However, in female but not male rats, further examination found that preadministration of NGF induced a greater sensitization in slow Aδ-fibers (2-7 m/s) than fast Aδ-fibers (7-12 m/s). This suggests that preadministration of NGF had a different effect on slowly conducting mechanoreceptors in the female rats compared with the male rats. Although previous studies have found an association between estrogenic tone and NMDA activity, no correlation was observed between NMDA-evoked mechanical sensitization and plasma estrogen level. This study suggests NGF alters NMDA-induced mechanical sensitization in the peripheral endings of masseter mechanoreceptors in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  14. Promise of Urinary Nerve Growth Factor for Assessment of Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Guan, Zhonghong; Tyagi, Pradeep; Chancellor, Michael B

    2011-04-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is highly prevalent bladder disorder in men and women. About 10-15% of the population suffers from urgency frequency with or without urgency urinary incontinence. It is estimated that 50-75% of patients with OAB may have urodynamic detrusor overactivity (DO). Urodynamic study invasive and most of the OAB patients might not accept it as a routine assessment. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive test for diagnosis and assessing DO from OAB patients is needed. Recently, urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) has gained great interest in detecting DO in patients with OAB. Urinary NGF level was found to increase in OAB and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. Patients with either idiopathic or neurogenic DO may have increased urinary NGF levels. Urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease in patients with patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, but not in those with persistent OAB after treatment. Not all patients with OAB can have an elevated urinary NGF level; it may also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and other lower urinary tract diseases, suggesting urinary NGF expression could be a product of bladder inflammation and a limited specificity of urinary NGF for diagnosing DO. The source of urinary NGF has not yet been fully explored yet. Nevertheless, urinary NGF level is likely to be a promising biomarker for diagnosis of DO from OAB patients, to monitor therapeutic outcome and predict disease progression.

  15. Single Cycle Structure-Based Humanization of an Anti-Nerve Growth Factor Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates. In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles. PMID:22403636

  16. Nerve growth factor downregulates inflammatory response in human monocytes through TrkA.

    PubMed

    Prencipe, Giusi; Minnone, Gaetana; Strippoli, Raffaele; De Pasquale, Loredana; Petrini, Stefania; Caiello, Ivan; Manni, Luigi; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels are highly increased in inflamed tissues, but their role is unclear. We show that NGF is part of a regulatory loop in monocytes: inflammatory stimuli, while activating a proinflammatory response through TLRs, upregulate the expression of the NGF receptor TrkA. In turn, NGF, by binding to TrkA, interferes with TLR responses. In TLR-activated monocytes, NGF reduces inflammatory cytokine production (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8) while inducing the release of anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonist). NGF binding to TrkA affects TLR signaling, favoring pathways that mediate inhibition of inflammatory responses: it increases Akt phosphorylation, inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3 activity, reduces IκB phosphorylation and p65 NF-κB translocation, and increases nuclear p50 NF-κB binding activity. Use of TrkA inhibitors in TLR-activated monocytes abolishes the effects of NGF on the activation of anti-inflammatory signaling pathways, thus increasing NF-κB pathway activation and inflammatory cytokine production while reducing IL-10 production. PBMC and mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis show marked downregulation of TrkA expression. In ex vivo experiments, the addition of NGF to LPS-activated juvenile idiopathic arthritis to both mononuclear cells from synovial fluid and PBMC fails to reduce the production of IL-6 that, in contrast, is observed in healthy donors. This suggests that defective TrkA expression may facilitate proinflammatory mechanisms, contributing to chronic tissue inflammation and damage. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel regulatory mechanism of inflammatory responses through NGF and its receptor TrkA, for which abnormality may have pathogenic implications for chronic inflammatory diseases.

  17. Radix Bupleuri ameliorates depression by increasing nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Qing; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese herb Radix Bupleuri has been regarded effective to improve treatment of depression, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Low levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the likelihood of developing the depression. Therefore, we want to know whether Radix Bupleuri affects the levels of these factors. Methods: A total 160 hemodialysis patients were diagnosed with depression and randomly assigned to two groups: Radix Bupleuri group (received 1 g root power of Radix Bupleuri in a capsule daily Radix Bupleuri) and control group (receive placebo). Results: After three-month follow-up, the patients who received Radix Bupleuri had greater improvement in depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and general functioning via controls after three-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Serum NGF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (178.64 ± 52.18 pg/mL) when compared to a control (103.54 ± 31.23 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). Similarly, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (1635.26 ± 121.66 pg/ml) when compared to a control (516.38 ± 44.89 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). The serum levels of NGF and BDNF were negatively related with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and positively related with scores of RAND-36 item Health Survey (RAND-36) (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Thus, Radix Bupleuri ameliorates the patients with depression by increasing serum levels of NGF and BDNF. Radix Bupleuri should be developed a new drug for the therapy of depression. PMID:26309578

  18. Cross Talk between Neuroregulatory Molecule and Monocyte: Nerve Growth Factor Activates the Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Mitra, Ananya; Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Mitra, Anupam; Raychaudhuri, Siba P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence points to a role for the extra-neuronal nerve growth factor (NGF) in acquired immune responses. However, very little information is available about its role and underlying mechanism in innate immunity. The role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases is becoming increasingly important. In this study, we explored the contribution of pleiotropic NGF in the innate immune response along with its underlying molecular mechanism with respect to IL-1β secretion. Methods Human monocytes, null and NLRP3 deficient THP-1 cell lines were used for this purpose. We determined the effect of NGF on secretion of IL-1β at the protein and mRNA levels. To determine the underlying molecular mechanism, the effect of NGF on NLRP1/NLRP3 inflammasomes and its downstream key protein, activated caspase-1, were evaluated by ELISA, immunoflorescence, flow cytometry, and real-time PCR. Results In human monocytes and null THP-1 cell line, NGF significantly upregulates IL-1β at protein and mRNA levels in a caspase-1 dependent manner through its receptor, TrkA. Furthermore, we observed that NGF induces caspase-1 activation through NLRP1/NLRP3 inflammasomes, and it is dependent on the master transcription factor, NF-κB. Conclusions To best of our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the mechanistic aspect of a neuroregulatory molecule, NGF, in innate immune response, and thus enriches our understanding regarding its pathogenic role in inflammation. These observations add further evidence in favor of anti-NGF therapy in autoimmune diseases and also unlock a new area of research about the role of NGF in IL-1β mediated diseases. PMID:25876154

  19. Chronic nerve growth factor administration increases the peripheral exocytotic activity of capsaicin-sensitive cutaneous neurons.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Walter R; Sabino, Ma'lou; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2006-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in inflammation and pain and has been suggested to regulate the responsiveness and sensitivity of nociceptive fibers. However, no study has evaluated whether chronic NGF alters the exocytotic capacity of peripheral terminals of peptidergic fibers. To test this hypothesis, rats were injected subcutaneously every other day with either murine recombinant NGF (mNGF; 1.0 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 days; or mNGF (0.1 mg/kg), mNGF (1 mg/kg) or vehicle every other day for 13 days. Treatment of rats with NGF over a 13-day period produced a significant increase in capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release from isolated biopsies of hindpaw skin, as assessed by in vitro superfusion and RIA. This effect was dose-dependent and exhibited a temporal requirement, because the enhancement was only observed after 13 days of treatment and was not evident after 7 days of treatment. This NGF enhancement of capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release was not due solely to increases in peripheral iCGRP content since only the 1mg/kg dose of NGF elevated cutaneous pools of iCGRP, whereas both doses significantly increased capsaicin-evoked peptide release. Moreover, NGF also enhanced capsaicin-evoked thermal hyperalgesia under similar dose- and time-related conditions. Collectively, the chronic administration of NGF not only increases capsaicin-evoked hyperalgesia, but also significantly primes peripheral fibers to enhanced peptidergic exocytosis following activation of the capsaicin receptor. Collectively, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that persistently elevated NGF levels may contribute to enhanced neurogenic regulation of inflammatory and wound healing processes in injured tissue.

  20. Nerve growth factor regulates the firing patterns and synaptic composition of motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Davis-López de Carrizosa, María A; Morado-Díaz, Camilo J; Morcuende, Sara; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Pastor, Angel M

    2010-06-16

    Target-derived neurotrophins exert powerful synaptotrophic actions in the adult brain and are involved in the regulation of different forms of synaptic plasticity. Target disconnection produces a profound synaptic stripping due to the lack of trophic support. Consequently, target reinnervation leads to synaptic remodeling and restoration of cellular functions. Extraocular motoneurons are unique in that they normally express the TrkA neurotrophin receptor in the adult, a feature not seen in other cranial or spinal motoneurons, except after lesions such as axotomy or in neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We investigated the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) by retrogradely delivering this neurotrophin to abducens motoneurons of adult cats. Axotomy reduced the density of somatic boutons and the overall tonic and phasic firing modulation. Treatment with NGF restored synaptic inputs and firing modulation in axotomized motoneurons. When K252a, a selective inhibitor of tyrosine kinase activity, was applied to specifically test TrkA effects, the NGF-mediated restoration of synapses and firing-related parameters was abolished. Discharge variability and recruitment threshold were, however, increased by NGF compared with control or axotomized motoneurons. Interestingly, these parameters returned to normal following application of REX, an antibody raised against neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)). In conclusion, NGF, acting retrogradely through TrkA receptors, supports afferent boutons and regulates the burst and tonic signals correlated with eye movements. On the other hand, p75(NTR) activation regulates recruitment threshold, which impacts on firing regularity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing powerful synaptotrophic effects of NGF on motoneurons in vivo.

  1. Lower Levels of Urinary Nerve Growth Factor Might Predict Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes in urinary nerve growth factor (uNGF) levels after acute urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the role of uNGF in predicting UTI recurrence in women. Methods: Women with uncomplicated, symptomatic UTIs were enrolled. Cephalexin 500 mg (every 6 hours) was administered for 7–14 days to treat acute UTIs. Subsequently, the patients were randomized to receive either sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 800 mg/160 mg daily at bedtime, or celecoxib 200 mg daily for 3 months and were monitored for up to 12 months. NGF levels in the urine were determined at baseline, 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the initiation of prophylactic therapy, and were compared between women with first-time UTIs and recurrent UTIs, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and celecoxib-treated women, and no UTI recurrence and UTI recurrence that occurred during the follow-up period. Twenty women free of UTIs served as controls. Results: A total of 139 women with UTI and 20 controls were enrolled in the study, which included 50 women with a first-time UTI and 89 women with recurrent UTIs. Thirty-seven women completed the study. Women with recurrent UTIs (n=23) had a trend of lower uNGF levels than women with first-time UTIs (n=14). During follow-up, 9 women had UTI recurrence. The serial uNGF levels in women with UTI recurrence were significantly lower than those in women who did not have UTI recurrence during the follow-up period. Conclusions: The lower levels of uNGF in women with recurrent UTI and the incidence of UTI recurrence during follow-up suggest that lower uNGF might reflect the defective innate immunity in women with recurrent UTI. PMID:27032555

  2. [The development of a pharmacologically active low-molecular mimetic of the nerve growth factor].

    PubMed

    Seredenin, S B; Gudasheva, T A

    2015-01-01

    Authors present an overview of theirs author's works on the design of low-molecular mimetic of the nerve growth factor and studies of mechanisms of action and pharmacological properties of the compound. The original working hypothesis, underlying the design of the compound, posited that different neurotrophin hairpin loops could activate different signaling cascades by interaction with the receptor and so be responsible for different effects. The mimetic bis(N-succinyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine)hexametylendiamide (GK-2), that was designed on the basis of NGF loop 4 β-turn sequence, activated TrkA and PI3K/Akt, but not MAPK/Erk. GK-2 showed neuroprotective activity in concentrations up to 10-9М against H(2)O(2) or glutamate or MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in РС12, НТ22 cells and primary rat hippocampal neurons. At that, GK-2 has no differentiating activity. In in vivo experiments, GK-2 exhibited significant anti-ischemic, anti-parkinsonic effect, reversed impaired cognitive functions in models of Alzheimer's disease in doses 0.01 - 5 mg/kg intraperitoneally and 5-10 mg/kg orally, but does not induce side effects accompanying the full-length neurotrophin treatment, which are hyperalgesia and weight loss. It was shown that GK-2 was a low-toxicity compound (LD50=700 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, mice) and capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. The agent GK-2 is promising for development as a neuroprotective agent and is currently in preclinical studies. PMID:26356399

  3. Carnosic acid, a component of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), promotes synthesis of nerve growth factor in T98G human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Kunio; Yokoi, Toshio

    2003-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a factor vital for the growth and functional maintenance of nerve tissue. The authors found that a rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract enhanced the production of NGF in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, the results indicated that carnosic acid and carnosol, which are major components of the rosemary extract, were able to promote markedly enhanced synthesis of NGF. PMID:14600414

  4. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75(NTR) in Developing Human Fetal Teeth.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75(NTR) and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75(NTR) expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75(NTR) in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues. PMID:27536251

  5. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75(NTR) in Developing Human Fetal Teeth.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75(NTR) and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75(NTR) expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75(NTR) in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues.

  6. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  7. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  8. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75NTR in Developing Human Fetal Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75NTR and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75NTR expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75NTR in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues. PMID:27536251

  9. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K.; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-03-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  10. Recombinant human nerve growth factor for clinical trials: protein expression, purification, stability and characterisation of binding to infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Robertson, A G; Tyler, S J; Wilcock, G K; Dawbarn, D

    2001-02-26

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been suggested to be of therapeutic benefit to patients with Alzheimer's disease. One of the early changes in this disease is a loss of cholinergic function within the brain, and NGF is able to rescue cholinergic neurons both in vitro and in vivo. We describe the production of recombinant human beta-NGF (rhNGF), using baculovirus infection of insect cells; its purification, formulation and subsequent stability for use in clinical trials. Tests were also carried out to monitor release of protein from infusion pumps and catheters for intracerebroventricular administration (icv). Initial problems with non-specific binding were overcome using a blocking formula. PMID:11245895

  11. A Nerve Growth Factor Peptide Retards Seizure Development and Inhibits Neuronal Sprouting in a Rat Model of Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Kashif; van der Zee, Catharina E. E. M.; Ross, Gregory M.; Chapman, C. Andrew; Stanisz, Jolanta; Riopelle, Richard J.; Racine, Ronald J.; Fahnestock, Margaret

    1995-10-01

    Kindling, an animal model of epilepsy wherein seizures are induced by subcortical electrical stimulation, results in the upregulation of neurotrophin mRNA and protein in the adult rat forebrain and causes mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampus. Intraventricular infusion of a synthetic peptide mimic of a nerve growth factor domain that interferes with the binding of neurotrophins to their receptors resulted in significant retardation of kindling and inhibition of mossy fiber sprouting. These findings suggest a critical role for neurotrophins in both kindling and kindling-induced synaptic reorganization.

  12. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  13. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Majuta, Lisa A; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal pain-related behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of anti-nerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains.

  14. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Majuta, Lisa A.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal pain–related behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of anti–nerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains. PMID:25599311

  15. Reactive astrocytosis-induced perturbation of synaptic homeostasis is restored by nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Bianco, Maria Rosaria; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Cavaliere, Carlo; Daniele, De Luca; Zaccaro, Laura; Alberghina, Lilia; Papa, Michele

    2011-03-01

    Reactive gliosis has been implicated in both inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. However, mechanisms by which astrocytic activation affects synaptic efficacy have been poorly elucidated. We have used the spared nerve injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve to induce reactive astrocytosis in the lumbar spinal cord and investigate its potential role in disrupting the neuro-glial circuitry. Analysis of spinal cord sections revealed that SNI was associated with an increase of microglial (Iba1) and astrocytic (GFAP) markers. These changes, indicative of reactive gliosis, were paralleled by (i) a decrease of glial amino acid transporters (GLT1 and GlyT1) and increased levels of (ii) neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1, (iii) neuronal vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) and (iv) the GABAergic neuron marker GAD65/67. Besides the increase of Glutamate/GABA ratio, indicative of the perturbation of synaptic circuitry homeostasis, the boost of glutamate also compromised glial function in neuroprotection by up-regulating the xCT subunit of the glutamate-cystine antiport system and reducing glutathione (GSH) production. Finally, this study also shows that all these structural changes were linked to an alteration of endogenous NGF metabolism, as demonstrated by the decrease of endogenous NGF expression levels and increased activity of the NGF-degrading metalloproteinases. All the changes displayed by SNI-animals were reversed by a 7-days i.t. administration of NGF or GM6001, a generic metalloproteinase inhibitor, as compared to vehicle (ACSF)-treated animals. All together, these data strongly support the correlation between reactive astrogliosis and mechanisms underlying the perturbation of the synaptic circuitry in the SNI model of peripheral nerve injury, and the essential role of NGF in restoring both synaptic homeostasis and the neuroprotective function of glia.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor I receptors of fetal brain are enriched in nerve growth cones and contain a beta-subunit variant.

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, S; Garofalo, R S; Pfenninger, K H

    1995-01-01

    Nerve growth cones isolated from fetal rat brain are highly enriched in a 97-kDa glycoprotein, termed beta gc, that comigrates with the beta subunit of the IGF-I receptor upon two-dimensional PAGE and is disulfide-linked to this receptor's alpha subunit. Antibodies prepared to a conserved domain shared by the insulin and IGF-I receptor beta subunits (AbP2) or to beta gc were used to study receptor distribution further. Subcellular fractionation of the fetal brain segregated most AbP2 immunoreactivity away from growth cones, whereas most beta gc immunoreactivity copurified with growth cones. Experiments involving ligand-activated receptor autophosphorylation confirmed the concentration of IGF-I but not of insulin receptors in growth cone fractions. These results indicate the enrichment of IGF-I receptors in (presumably axonal) growth cones of the differentiating neuron. Furthermore, the segregation of beta gc from AbP2 immunoreactivity suggests that such neurons express an immunochemically distinct variant of the IGF-I receptor beta subunit at the growth cone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7753803

  17. Rare human nerve growth factor-β mutation reveals relationship between C-afferent density and acute pain evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perini, Irene; Tavakoli, Mitra; Marshall, Andrew; Minde, Jan; Morrison, India

    2016-08-01

    The rare nerve growth factor-β (NGFB) mutation R221W causes a selective loss of thinly myelinated fibers and especially unmyelinated C-fibers. Carriers of this mutation show altered pain sensation. A subset presents with arthropathic symptoms, with the homozygous most severely affected. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between peripheral afferent loss and pain evaluation by performing a quantification of small-fiber density in the cornea of the carriers, relating density to pain evaluation measures. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) was used to quantify C-fiber loss in the cornea of 19 R221W mutation carriers (3 homozygous) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. Pain evaluation data via the Situational Pain Questionnaire (SPQ) and the severity of neuropathy based on the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) were assessed. Homozygotes, heterozygotes, and control groups differed significantly in corneal C-nerve fiber density, with the homozygotes showing a significant afferent reduction. Importantly, peripheral C-fiber loss correlated negatively with pain evaluation, as revealed by SPQ scores. This study is the first to investigate the contribution of small-fiber density to the perceptual evaluation of pain. It demonstrates that the lower the peripheral small-fiber density, the lower the degree of reported pain intensity, indicating a functional relationship between small-fiber density and higher level pain experience. PMID:27146986

  18. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor release the capsaicin receptor from PtdIns(4,5)P2-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, H H; Prescott, E D; Kong, H; Shields, S; Jordt, S E; Basbaum, A I; Chao, M V; Julius, D

    2001-06-21

    Tissue injury generates endogenous factors that heighten our sense of pain by increasing the response of sensory nerve endings to noxious stimuli. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor (NGF) are two such pro-algesic agents that activate G-protein-coupled (BK2) and tyrosine kinase (TrkA) receptors, respectively, to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways in primary afferent neurons. How these actions produce sensitization to physical or chemical stimuli has not been elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we show that bradykinin- or NGF-mediated potentiation of thermal sensitivity in vivo requires expression of VR1, a heat-activated ion channel on sensory neurons. Diminution of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) levels through antibody sequestration or PLC-mediated hydrolysis mimics the potentiating effects of bradykinin or NGF at the cellular level. Moreover, recruitment of PLC-gamma to TrkA is essential for NGF-mediated potentiation of channel activity, and biochemical studies suggest that VR1 associates with this complex. These studies delineate a biochemical mechanism through which bradykinin and NGF produce hypersensitivity and might explain how the activation of PLC signalling systems regulates other members of the TRP channel family. PMID:11418861

  19. Effect of helium/neon laser irradiation on nerve growth factor synthesis and secretion in skeletal muscle cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Fidi; Brodie, Chaya; Appel, Elana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Shainberg, Asher

    2002-04-01

    Low energy laser irradiation therapy in medicine is widespread but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which the light might induce therapeutic effects. Skeletal muscle cultures were chosen as a target for light irradiation and nerve growth factor (NGF) was the biochemical marker for analysis. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation (P<0.001). Preincubation of the myotubes with either the photosensitizers 5-amino-levulinic acid (5-ALA), or with hematoporphyrin (Hp) enhanced the elevation of cytosolic calcium (P<0.001) after helium/neon irradiation (633 nm) with an energy of 3 J/cm(2). In addition, helium/neon irradiation augmented the level of NGF mRNA fivefold and increased NGF release to the medium of the myotubes. Thus, it is speculated that transient changes in calcium caused by light can modulate NGF release from the myotubes and also affect the nerves innervating the muscle. The NGF is probably responsible for the beneficial effects of low-level light.

  20. Combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine effectively inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by targeting complementary signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C; Roth, Kevin A; Carroll, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. In addition, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis.

  1. Nerve growth factor acutely reduces chemical transmission by means of postsynaptic TrkA-like receptors in squid giant synapse

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Herman; Nadal, Marcela; Leznik, Elena; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph; Llinás, Rodolfo

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been shown to be an important modulator of synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such findings hint toward the existence of extracellular ligands capable of activating this widely represented signaling mechanism at or close to the synapse. Examples of such ligands are the peptide growth factors which, on binding, activate receptor tyrosine kinases. To gain insight into the physiological consequences of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in squid giant synapse, a series of growth factors was tested in this preparation. Electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical analysis demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) triggers an acute and specific reduction of the postsynaptic potential amplitude, without affecting the presynaptic spike generation or presynaptic calcium current. The NGF target is localized at a postsynaptic site and involves a new TrkA-like receptor. The squid receptor crossreacts with antibodies generated against mammalian TrkA, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to NGF stimulation, and is blocked by specific pharmacological inhibitors. The modulation described emphasizes the important role of growth factors on invertebrate synaptic transmission. PMID:9844004

  2. Nerve growth factor acutely reduces chemical transmission by means of postsynaptic TrkA-like receptors in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Nadal, M; Leznik, E; Sugimori, M; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J; Llinás, R

    1998-12-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been shown to be an important modulator of synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such findings hint toward the existence of extracellular ligands capable of activating this widely represented signaling mechanism at or close to the synapse. Examples of such ligands are the peptide growth factors which, on binding, activate receptor tyrosine kinases. To gain insight into the physiological consequences of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in squid giant synapse, a series of growth factors was tested in this preparation. Electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical analysis demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) triggers an acute and specific reduction of the postsynaptic potential amplitude, without affecting the presynaptic spike generation or presynaptic calcium current. The NGF target is localized at a postsynaptic site and involves a new TrkA-like receptor. The squid receptor crossreacts with antibodies generated against mammalian TrkA, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to NGF stimulation, and is blocked by specific pharmacological inhibitors. The modulation described emphasizes the important role of growth factors on invertebrate synaptic transmission.

  3. Chromosomal locations of the human and mouse genes for precursors of epidermal growth factor and the. beta. subunit of nerve growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.U.; Eddy, R.L.; Lalley, P.A.; Scott, J.; Bell, G.I.; Shows, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    DNA probes for pre-pro-epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the precursor of the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGF) were used to chromosomally map human and mouse EGF and NGF genes in panels of human-mouse and mouse-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids. The EGF and NGF genes were mapped to human chromosomes 4 and 1, respectively, by using human-mouse cell hybrids. A combination of regional mapping using a chromosome 1 translocation and comparative gene mapping suggests that the human NGF gene is in the p21-p22.1 region of chromosome 1. In mouse-Chinese hamster cell hybrids, both genes were assigned to mouse chromosome 3. A knowledge of the chromosomal assignment of these genes should help in our understanding of their regulation and role in development and disease.

  4. Linear Ordered Collagen Scaffolds Loaded with Collagen-Binding Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Facilitate Recovery of Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    Natural biological functional scaffolds, consisting of biological materials filled with promoting elements, provide a promising strategy for the regeneration of peripheral nerve defects. Collagen conduits have been used widely due to their excellent biological properties. Linear ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) fibers are good lumen fillers that can guide nerve regeneration in an ordered direction. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is important in the recovery of nerve injury. However, the traditional method for delivering bFGF to the lesion site has no long-term effect because of its short half-life and rapid diffusion. Therefore, we fused a specific collagen-binding domain (CBD) peptide to the N-terminal of native basic fibroblast growth factor (NAT-bFGF) to retain bFGF on the collagen scaffolds. In this study, a natural biological functional scaffold was constructed using collagen tubes filled with collagen-binding bFGF (CBD-bFGF)-loaded LOCS to promote regeneration in a 5-mm rat sciatic nerve transection model. Functional evaluation, histological investigation, and morphometric analysis indicated that the natural biological functional scaffold retained more bFGF at the injury site, guided axon growth, and promoted nerve regeneration as well as functional restoration. PMID:24188561

  5. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nerve growth factor synergistically induce iNOS in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N J; Taglialatela, G

    2000-11-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been reported in tangle-bearing neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can be induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). High CNS levels of TNFalpha are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, where neurons dependent on neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) are particularly affected. In this study we determined the effect of TNFalpha on iNOS in NGF-responsive pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We found that while TNFalpha and NGF alone were unable to induce iNOS, their simultaneous addition resulted in iNOS induction and the release of nitric oxide. Our results suggest that synergistic iNOS induction by TNFalpha and NGF may occur in selective population of NGF-responsive neurons in the presence of elevated CNS levels of TNFalpha.

  7. Nerve growth factor variations in patients with mood disorders: no changes in eight weeks of clinical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Tianhong; He, Shen; Hong, Bo; Peng, Daihui; Su, Hui; Li, Fei; Tang, Yingying; Lin, Zhiguang; Fang, Yiru; Jiang, Kaida

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve growth factor (NGF) has received much attention for its role in mood disorders. The primary objective of the present study was to examine serum NGF levels in Chinese inpatients with depressive or manic episodes in the acute phase and to explore the changes in NGF levels after effective clinical treatments. Methods One hundred and seven consecutive inpatients and outpatients with mood disorders (30 with unipolar depression, 23 with bipolar depression, and 54 with bipolar mania), and 50 healthy controls were recruited. The serum NGF levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Patients with bipolar mania presented higher serum NGF levels compared to those of healthy controls. After 8 weeks of medical treatment, there were significant improvements in symptoms in patients, but no significant changes in NGF levels. Conclusion The present findings may help to strengthen and expand the understanding of the role of NGF in the acute stages of mood disorders. PMID:24868159

  8. Crystal structure of a coagulogen, the clotting protein from horseshoe crab: a structural homologue of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, A; Oganessyan, V; Muta, T; Iwanaga, S; Typke, D; Huber, R; Bode, W

    1996-01-01

    The clotting cascade system of the horseshoe crab (Limulus) is involved in both haemostasis and host defence. The cascade results in the conversion of coagulogen, a soluble protein, into an insoluble coagulin gel. The clotting enzyme excises the fragment peptide C from coagulogen, giving rise to aggregation of the monomers. The crystal structure of coagulogen reveals an elongated molecule that embraces the helical peptide C fragment. Cleavage and removal of the peptide C would expose an extended hydrophobic cove, which could interact with the hydrophobic edge of a second molecule, leading to a polymeric fibre. The C-terminal half of the coagulogen molecule exhibits a striking topological similarity to the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), providing the first evidence for a neurotrophin fold in invertebrates. Similarities between coagulogen and Spatzle, the Drosophila ligand of the receptor Toll, suggest that the neurotrophin fold might be considered more ancient and widespread than previously realized. Images PMID:9003754

  9. Expression of nerve growth factor is upregulated in the rat thymic epithelial cells during thymus regeneration following acute thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Woo; Kim, Sung-Min; Shim, Na-Ri; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Jung, Il-Gun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jae-Bong; Moon, Jeon-Ok; Chung, Joo-Seop; Yoon, Sik

    2007-06-01

    Neuroimmune networks in the thymic microenvironment are thought to be involved in the regulation of T cell development. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increasingly recognized as a potent immunomodulator, promoting "cross-talk" between various types of immune system cells. The present study describes the expression of NGF during thymus regeneration following acute involution induced by cyclophosphamide in the rat. Immunohistochemical stain demonstrated not only the presence of NGF but also its upregulated expression mainly in the subcapsular, paraseptal, and perivascular epithelial cells, and medullary epithelial cells including Hassall's corpuscles in both the normal and regenerating thymus. Biochemical data obtained using Western blot and RT-PCR supported these results and showed that thymic extracts contain NGF protein and mRNA, at higher levels during thymus regeneration. Thus, our results suggest that NGF expressed in these thymic epithelial cells plays a role in the T lymphopoiesis associated with thymus regeneration during recovery from acute thymic involution.

  10. Lateral diffusion of nerve growth factor receptor: modulation by ligand-binding and cell-associated factors.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, G; McKinnon, C A; Ross, A H; Wolf, D E

    1990-01-01

    We compared the properties in human melanoma cell line A875 and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 of nerve growth factor receptor (NGFr). We also analyzed NGFr and a truncated NGFR lacking the cytoplasmic domain, which were transiently expressed in COS cells. The full-length NGFR expressed in COS cells bound nerve growth factor (NGF) with positive cooperativity, but A875 NGFr and truncated NGFr in COS cells did not display positive cooperativity. The anti-human NGFr monoclonal antibody NGFR5 was characterized and found not to compete with NGF for binding to NGFr. Fabs were prepared from NGFR5 and 192, an anti-rat NGFR monoclonal antibody that was previously shown not to compete with NGF for binding. Fluorescein-labeled Fabs were used to measure the distribution and lateral diffusion of the NGFr. NGFr expressed on COS and A875 cells are diffusely distributed, but NGFr on the surface of PC12 cells appeared, for some cells, to be patched. In A875 cells, 51% of the NGFr was free to diffuse with diffusion coefficient (D) approximately 7 X 10(-10) cm2/s. In COS cells, 43% diffused with D approximately 5 X 10(-10) cm2/s. There was no significant difference in diffusibility between the full-length NGFr and the truncated NGFr. We compared NGFr diffusion on PC12 cells in suspension or adherent to collagen-coated coverslips. For suspension cells, we obtained 32% recovery with D approximately 2.5 X 10(-9) cm2/s. On adherent cells, we obtained 17% recovery with 6 X 10(-9) cm2/s. Binding of NGF enhanced lateral diffusion of NGFr in A875 cells and in PC12 cells in suspension but did not alter lateral diffusion of NGFr in COS cells or in adherent PC12 cells. NGF had no effect on the diffusing fraction or the distribution of NGFR for any cell line. Images PMID:1964090

  11. Method to form a fiber/growth factor dual-gradient along electrospun silk for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinis, Tony M; Elia, Roberto; Vidal, Guillaume; Auffret, Adrien; Kaplan, David L; Egles, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Concentration gradients of guidance molecules influence cell behavior and growth in biological tissues and are therefore of interest for the design of biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine. We developed an electrospining method to generate a dual-gradient of bioactive molecules and fiber density along electrospun nanofibers without any post spinning treatment. Functionalization with fluorescent molecules demonstrated the efficiency of the method to generate a discontinuous concentration gradient along the aligned fibers. As a proof of concept for tissue engineering, the silk nanofibers were functionalized with increasing concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) and the biological activity was assessed and quantified with rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons cultures. Protein assays showed the absence of passive release of NGF from the functionalized fibers. The results demonstrated that the NGF concentration gradient led to an oriented and increased growth of DRG neurons (417.6 ± 55.7 μm) compared to a single uniform NGF concentration (264.5 ± 37.6 μm). The easy-to-use electrospinning technique combined with the multiple molecules that can be used for fiber functionalization makes this technique versatile for a broad range of applications from biosensors to regenerative medicine.

  12. Method to form a fiber/growth factor dual-gradient along electrospun silk for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinis, Tony M; Elia, Roberto; Vidal, Guillaume; Auffret, Adrien; Kaplan, David L; Egles, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Concentration gradients of guidance molecules influence cell behavior and growth in biological tissues and are therefore of interest for the design of biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine. We developed an electrospining method to generate a dual-gradient of bioactive molecules and fiber density along electrospun nanofibers without any post spinning treatment. Functionalization with fluorescent molecules demonstrated the efficiency of the method to generate a discontinuous concentration gradient along the aligned fibers. As a proof of concept for tissue engineering, the silk nanofibers were functionalized with increasing concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) and the biological activity was assessed and quantified with rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons cultures. Protein assays showed the absence of passive release of NGF from the functionalized fibers. The results demonstrated that the NGF concentration gradient led to an oriented and increased growth of DRG neurons (417.6 ± 55.7 μm) compared to a single uniform NGF concentration (264.5 ± 37.6 μm). The easy-to-use electrospinning technique combined with the multiple molecules that can be used for fiber functionalization makes this technique versatile for a broad range of applications from biosensors to regenerative medicine. PMID:25203247

  13. DOSE-DEPENDENT INCREASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM-INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory


    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthma as well as in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated ...

  14. INCREASED PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM -INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthmatics and in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated pulmona...

  15. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events.

  16. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  17. Lesion-induced increase in nerve growth factor mRNA is mediated by c-fos

    SciTech Connect

    Hengerer, B.; Lindholm, D.; Heumann, R.; Thoenen, H. ); Ruether, U. ); Wagner, E.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Lesion of the sciatic nerve caused a rapid increase in c-fos and c-jun mRNA that was followed about 2 hr later by an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA. To evaluate whether the initial increase in c-fos mRNA is casually related to the subsequent increase in NGF mRNA, the authors performed experiments with fibroblasts of transgenic mice carrying an exogenous c-fos gene under the control of a metallothionein promoter. In primary cultures of these fibroblasts, CdCl{sub 2} evoked a rapid increase in exogenous c-fos mRNA, followed immediately by an increase in endogenous c-jun mRNA and with a slight delay by an increase in NGF mRNA. In fibroblasts of C3H control mice, CdCl{sub 2} had no effect on the mRNA levels of the protooncogenes c-fos and c-jun or of NGF. Additional evidence for a casual relationship between c-fos induction and the subsequent increase in NGF mRNA was obtained in cotransfection experiments. DNase I footprint experiments demonstrated that a binding site for transcription factor AP-1 in the first intron of the NGF gene was protected following c-fos induction. That this protected AP-1 site indeed was functional in the regulation of NGF expression was verified by deletion experiments and by a point mutation in the corresponding AP-1 binding region in the NGF promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct.

  18. Nerve growth factor-mediated regulation of pain signalling and proposed new intervention strategies in clinical pain management.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Laura; Shorten, George D; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2013-02-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the founding member of the neurotrophins family of proteins. It was discovered more than half a century ago through its ability to promote sensory and sympathetic neuronal survival and axonal growth during the development of the peripheral nervous system, and is the paradigmatic target-derived neurotrophic factor on which the neurotrophic hypothesis is based. Since that time, NGF has also been shown to play a key role in the generation of acute and chronic pain and in hyperalgesia in diverse pain states. NGF is expressed at high levels in damaged or inflamed tissues and facilitates pain transmission by nociceptive neurons through a variety of mechanisms. Genetic mutations in NGF or its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkA, lead to a congenital insensitivity or a decreased ability of humans to perceive pain. The hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) encompass a spectrum of neuropathies that affect one's ability to perceive sensation. HSAN type IV and HSAN type V are caused by mutations in TrkA and NGF respectively. This review will focus firstly on the biology of NGF and its role in pain modulation. We will review neuropathies and clinical presentations that result from the disruption of NGF signalling in HSAN type IV and HSAN type V and review current advances in developing anti-NGF therapy for the clinical management of pain.

  19. Tensile stimuli increase nerve growth factor in human dermal fibroblasts independent of tension-induced TGFβ production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina; Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Hyunjun; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) regulate wound-healing processes in human skin, including the regeneration of skin sensory fibres, in response to various mechanical stimuli. Because nerve growth factor (NGF) has an essential role in sensory regeneration, we evaluated the possible association of NGF with mechanical stimulus-dependent cellular responses in HDFs. A cyclic tensile stimulus increased both NGF and transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 production, yet with different gene transcription and signal desensitization profiles. Neutralizing TGFβ with antibodies did not affect the tension-induced NGF upregulation, with significant inhibition of endogenous TGFβ2 transcription. The treatment with LY294002, SP600125 or U0126 hindered the tension-induced TGFβ2 upregulation, although the increase in NGF was regulated only by SP600125 or U0126, indicating the involvement of three signalling kinase pathways in the upregulation of TGFβ2. However, the upregulation of NGF was shown to be independent of PI3K, demonstrating the independent regulation of tension-induced NGF and TGFβ production in HDFs.

  20. Effect of acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine on nerve growth factor levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Most inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism produce hypertyrosinemia. Neurological manifestations are variable and some patients are developmentally normal, while others show different degrees of developmental retardation. Considering that current data do not eliminate the possibility that elevated levels of tyrosine and/or its derivatives may have noxious effects on central nervous system development in some patients, the present study evaluated nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in hippocampus, striatum and posterior cortex of young rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal administration of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old); the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. NGF levels were then evaluated. Our findings showed that acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased NGF levels in striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, NGF levels were decreased in hippocampus and posterior cortex. On the other hand, chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased NGF levels in posterior cortex. Decreased NGF may impair growth, differentiation, survival and maintenance of neurons. PMID:23690230

  1. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  2. Nerve growth factor stimulates the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in PC-12 cells: A mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, B.L.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Chao, M.V. )

    1989-03-01

    Treatment of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) results in the differentiation of these cells into a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype. Although the initial intracellular signals elicited by NGF remain unknown, some of the cellular effects of NGF are similar to those of other growth factors, such as insulin. The authors have investigated the involvement of a newly identified inositol-containing glycolipid in signal transduction for the actions of NGF. NGF stimulates the rapid generation of a species of diacylglycerol that is labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristate but not with ({sup 3}H)arachidonate. NGF stimulates ({sup 3}H)myristate- or ({sup 32}P)phosphate-labeled phosphatidic acid production over the same time course. Although NGF alone has no effect on the turnover of inositol phospholipids, it does stimulate the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The NGF-dependent cleavage of this lipid is accompanied by an increase in the accumulation of its polar head group, an inositol phosphate glycan, which is generated within 30-60 sec of NGF treatment. In an unresponsive PC-12 mutant cell line, neither the diacylglycerol nor inositol phosphate glycan response is detected. A possible role for the NGF-stimulated diacylglycerol is suggested by the inhibition of NGF-dependent c-fos induction by staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C. These results suggest that, like insulin, some of the cellular effects of NGF may be mediated by the phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol.

  3. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  4. A modular, plasmin-sensitive, clickable poly(ethylene glycol)-heparin-laminin microsphere system for establishing growth factor gradients in nerve guidance conduits.

    PubMed

    Roam, Jacob L; Yan, Ying; Nguyen, Peter K; Kinstlinger, Ian S; Leuchter, Michael K; Hunter, Daniel A; Wood, Matthew D; Elbert, Donald L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex problem that, despite many advancements and innovations, still has sub-optimal outcomes. Compared to biologically derived acellular nerve grafts and autografts, completely synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGC), which allow for precise engineering of their properties, are promising but still far from optimal. We have developed an almost entirely synthetic NGC that allows control of soluble growth factor delivery kinetics, cell-initiated degradability and cell attachment. We have focused on the spatial patterning of glial-cell derived human neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which promotes motor axon extension. The base scaffolds consisted of heparin-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres. The modular microsphere format greatly simplifies the formation of concentration gradients of reversibly bound GDNF. To facilitate axon extension, we engineered the microspheres with tunable plasmin degradability. 'Click' cross-linking chemistries were also added to allow scaffold formation without risk of covalently coupling the growth factor to the scaffold. Cell adhesion was promoted by covalently bound laminin. GDNF that was released from these microspheres was confirmed to retain its activity. Graded scaffolds were formed inside silicone conduits using 3D-printed holders. The fully formed NGC's contained plasmin-degradable PEG/heparin scaffolds that developed linear gradients in reversibly bound GDNF. The NGC's were implanted into rats with severed sciatic nerves to confirm in vivo degradability and lack of a major foreign body response. The NGC's also promoted robust axonal regeneration into the conduit.

  5. Perinatal Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Blockade Prevents Peripheral Nerve Disruption in a Mouse Model Reminiscent of Benign World Health Organization Grade I Neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Crimmins, Jason T.; Monk, Kelly R.; Williams, Jon P.; Fitzgerald, Maureen E.; Tedesco, Susan; Ratner, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Benign peripheral nerve tumors called neurofibromas are a major source of morbidity for patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. Some neurofibroma Schwann cells aberrantly express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In a mouse model in which the CNPase promoter drives expression of human EGFR in Schwann cells, nerves develop hypertrophy, mast cell accumulation, collagen deposition, disruption of axon-glial interactions, characteristics of neurofibroma and are hypoalgesic. Administration of the EGFR antagonist cetuximab (IMC-C225) for 2 weeks beginning at birth in CNPase-hEGFR mice normalized all pathologies at 3 months of age as evaluated by hotplate testing or histology and by electron microscopy. Mast cell chemoattractants brain-derived neurotrophic factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β1, which may account for mast cell accumulation and fibrosis, were reduced by cetuximab. Later treatment was much less effective. A birth to 2-week pulse of cetuximab blocked hEGFR phosphorylation and Schwann cell proliferation in perinatal mutant nerve, so CNPase-hEGFR Schwann cell numbers correlate with the cetuximab effect. A >250-fold enlarged population of EGFR+/p75+ cells was detected in newborn Nf1+/− mouse nerves. These results suggest the existence of an EGFR+ cell enriched in the perinatal period capable of driving complex changes characteristic of neurofibroma formation. PMID:16651634

  6. A modular, plasmin-sensitive, clickable poly(ethylene glycol)-heparin-laminin microsphere system for establishing growth factor gradients in nerve guidance conduits.

    PubMed

    Roam, Jacob L; Yan, Ying; Nguyen, Peter K; Kinstlinger, Ian S; Leuchter, Michael K; Hunter, Daniel A; Wood, Matthew D; Elbert, Donald L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex problem that, despite many advancements and innovations, still has sub-optimal outcomes. Compared to biologically derived acellular nerve grafts and autografts, completely synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGC), which allow for precise engineering of their properties, are promising but still far from optimal. We have developed an almost entirely synthetic NGC that allows control of soluble growth factor delivery kinetics, cell-initiated degradability and cell attachment. We have focused on the spatial patterning of glial-cell derived human neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which promotes motor axon extension. The base scaffolds consisted of heparin-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres. The modular microsphere format greatly simplifies the formation of concentration gradients of reversibly bound GDNF. To facilitate axon extension, we engineered the microspheres with tunable plasmin degradability. 'Click' cross-linking chemistries were also added to allow scaffold formation without risk of covalently coupling the growth factor to the scaffold. Cell adhesion was promoted by covalently bound laminin. GDNF that was released from these microspheres was confirmed to retain its activity. Graded scaffolds were formed inside silicone conduits using 3D-printed holders. The fully formed NGC's contained plasmin-degradable PEG/heparin scaffolds that developed linear gradients in reversibly bound GDNF. The NGC's were implanted into rats with severed sciatic nerves to confirm in vivo degradability and lack of a major foreign body response. The NGC's also promoted robust axonal regeneration into the conduit. PMID:26352518

  7. Heparin modulation of the neurotropic effects of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors and nerve growth factor on PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, G.; Gospodarowicz, D.; Dodge, L.; Fujii, D.K.

    1987-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF and bFGF, respectively) induce neurite outgrowth from the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. The neurites induced by these three factors are stable for up to a month in cell culture in the continued presence of any of the above growth factors. bFGF (ED50 = 30 pg/ml) is 800 fold more potent in stimulating neurite outgrowth than aFGF (ED50 = 25 ng/ml) and 260 fold more potent than NGF (ED50 = 8 ng/ml). While the neurotropic activities of aFGF and NGF are potentiated by heparin, that of bFGF is both partially inhibited or stimulated, depending upon the concentration of bFGF. Radioreceptor binding experiments show that aFGF and bFGF bind to a common binding site on the PC12 cell surface. Affinity labeling studies demonstrate a single receptor with an apparent molecular weight of 145,000 daltons, which corresponds to the high molecular weight receptor identified in BHK-21 cells. NGF does not appear to compete with aFGF or bFGF for binding to the receptor. Heparin blocked the binding of bFGF to the receptor but had only a small inhibitory effect on the binding of aFGF to the receptor. Thus, it appears that heparin inhibition of the neurotropic effects of bFGF occurs, at least in part, by impairing the interaction of bFGF with the receptor, while having little effect on that of aFGF. The stimulatory effects of heparin on the neurotropic activity of aFGF, bFGF, and NGF may occur through a site not associated with the respective cellular receptor for the growth factors.

  8. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shotaro; Uchida, Kentaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Fujimaki, Hisako; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b- cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b- cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  9. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of nerve growth factor receptor-like proteins identified with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, D.E.; Beck, C.E.; Werrbach-Perez, K.; Perez-Polo, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH-SY5Y (SY5Y) and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells are model cell lines used in the study of nerve growth factor (NGF) effect. The effects of NGF are initiated by binding to cell surface receptors (NGFR). The amino acid sequence for NGFR has been deduced based on the identification of a single gene for NGFR. However, there are two kinds of NGF binding activities and several reported molecular weights of NGFR. We report here on the demonstration of NGFR-like proteins from PC12 and SY5Y cells by sequential lectin chromatography, reverse-phase HPLC, and SDS-PAGE analysis of immunoprecipitates obtained with NGFR-specific monoclonal antibodies. For both human and rodent NGFR, there was a tendency for the higher molecular-weight species of NGFR-like proteins to be eluted in more hydrophobic fractions. Also, the expression of different species of NGFR could be modified by treatment with retinoic acid (RA). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the different molecular species of NGFR may result from the generation of a truncated form of NGFR, the presence of sugar residues on the NGFR protein, dimer formation between NGFR, or the association of NGFR with a receptor-associated protein.

  10. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Emerich, D F; Thanos, C; Torp, M; Bintz, B; Tornøe, J; Johnsen, A H; Wahlberg, L U

    2012-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202, capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty transposon expression technology to establish a new clinical grade cell line, NGC0211, with at least 10 times higher NGF production than that of NGC-0295. To test whether encapsulation of this cell line provides a relevant dose escalation step in delivering NGF for treatment of the cognitive decline in AD patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatum as well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both cases correlate with highly improved potency.

  11. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  12. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain.

  13. CDNA microarray analysis of nerve growth factor-regulated gene expression profile in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Eunjoo H

    2005-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-driven differentiation of PC12 cells into neuronal-like cells provides a representative model system for studying neuronal differentiation processes. Despite of extensive research, gene regulation associated with the differentiation program in PC12 cells still needs to be elucidated. We used cDNA microarray analysis to characterize the response of PC12 cells to NGF at mRNA expression. Forty-six genes were reproducibly influenced by 2-fold or more after NGF treatment for 5 days. Twenty-five of the regulated transcripts were matched to genes which have known functions. Among the microarray results confirmed with real-time reverse transcriptase assay, several genes have not previously known to be modulated by NGF. The results mostly reflected changes in molecules regulating neural plasticity, cytoskeletal organization, and lipid metabolism, which include neuritin, PDZ protein Mrt1, lipoprotein lipase, tropomodulin 1 and rhoB. These observed genetic changes may provide new information about molecular mechanisms underlying NGF-promoted differentiation of PC12 cells. PMID:16076023

  14. Vitamin A increases nerve growth factor and retinoic acid receptor beta and improves diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Ordoñez, Graciela; Pineda, Benjamin; Rangel-López, Edgar; Salazar-Ramiro, Aleli; Arrieta, Oscar; Sotelo, Julio

    2014-09-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) promotes the endogenous expression of both nerve growth factor (NGF) and retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β). We have previously shown that the administration of ATRA partly reverts the damage induced by diabetic neuropathy (DN). In this investigation, we evaluated the effects of vitamin A, a commercial, inexpensive compound of retinoic acid, on the therapy of DN. A total of 70 rats were randomized into 4 groups. Group A was the control, and groups B, C, and D received a total dose of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin intraperitoneally. When signs of DN developed, groups C and D were treated either with vitamin A (20,000 IU) or with ATRA 25 mg/kg for 60 days. Plasma glucose, contents of NGF, thermal and nociceptive tests, and RAR-β expression were evaluated. All diabetic rats developed neuropathy. The treatment with vitamin A and ATRA reverted similarly the sensorial disturbances, which was associated with increased contents of NGF and RAR-β expression. Our results indicate that the administration of vitamin A has the same therapeutic effect as ATRA on peripheral neuropathy and suggest its potential therapeutic use in patients with diabetes.

  15. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  16. Maslinic Acid Protected PC12 Cells Differentiated by Nerve Growth Factor against β-Amyloid-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-wan; Tsai, Chia-wen; Mong, Mei-chin; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-12-01

    β-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) was used to induce apoptosis in PC12 cells differentiated by nerve growth factor, and the protective activities of maslinic acid (MA) at 2-16 μM were examined. Abeta treatment lowered Bcl-2 expression, raised Bax expression, and decreased cell viability. MA pretreatments decreased Bax expression, raised the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and increased cell viability. MA pretreatments retained glutathione content and decreased subsequent Abeta-induced release of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Abeta treatment up-regulated protein expression of p47(phox), gp91(phox), mitogen-activated protein kinase, advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE), and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB). MA pretreatments at 2-16 μM suppressed the expression of proteins including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p-p38, and NF-κB p65, at 4-16 μM down-regulated RAGE and NF-κB p50 expression, and at 8 and 16 μM reduced p-ERK1/2 expression. These novel findings suggest that maslinic acid is a potent compound against Abeta-induced cytotoxicity.

  17. Evidence for nerve growth factor-potentiating activities of the nonpeptidic compound SR 57746A in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Pradines, A; Magazin, M; Schiltz, P; Le Fur, G; Caput, D; Ferrara, P

    1995-05-01

    SR 57746A (1-[2-(naphth-2-yl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1,2,5,6- tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride) exhibits neurotrophic activities in vivo and in vitro. We used the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line to investigate in vitro cellular changes induced by SR 57746A. A significant increase in the percentage of cells bearing neurite-like processes was obtained in cells treated by SR 57746A and nerve growth factor (NGF) compared with NGF treatment alone. SR 57746A added alone, however, had no effect on morphogenesis or on survival of cells in serum-free medium. In contrast, SR 57746A induced a "priming" effect on PC12 cells for neurite outgrowth within 6 h of addition of the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. An increase in alpha-actinin content resulted from treatment with SR 57746A. Expression of NGF-mediated acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase was enhanced within 5 days by SR 57746A. The molecule also induced rapid F-actin redistribution. Within 2 min of incubation, outgrowth of F-actin-containing filopodia was clearly visible at the cell periphery, as previously shown with NGF. It is interesting that this effect of SR 57746A could be mimicked by protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors and abolished by preincubation with sodium orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor. PMID:7722483

  18. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  19. Nerve growth factor in the hippocamposeptal system: evidence for activity-dependent anterograde delivery and modulation of synaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan; Yeh, Mason L; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Yeh, Hermes H

    2012-05-30

    Neurotrophins have been implicated in regulating neuronal differentiation, promoting neuronal survival, and modulating synaptic efficacy and plasticity. The prevailing view is that, depending on the target and mode of action, most neurotrophins can be trafficked and released either anterogradely or retrogradely in an activity-dependent manner. However, the prototypic neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF), is not thought to be anterogradely delivered. Here we provide the neuroanatomical substrate for an anterograde hippocamposeptal transport of NGF by demonstrating its presence in mouse hippocampal GABAergic neurons and in their hippocamposeptal axons that ramify densely and abut neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB). We also demonstrate an activity-dependent increase in septal NGF levels that is dependent on the pattern of intrahippocampal stimulation. In addition, we show that acute exposure to NGF, via activation of TrkA, attenuates GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic currents and reduces sensitivity to exogenously applied GABA. These acute actions of NGF display cell type and functional selectivity insofar as (1) they were found in cholinergic, but not GABAergic, MS/DB neurons, and (2) glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic activity as well as AMPA-activated current responses were unaffected. Our results advocate a novel anterograde, TrkA-mediated NGF signaling in the CNS. PMID:22649248

  20. Differential role of entorhinal and hippocampal nerve growth factor in short- and long-term memory modulation.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Reinke, A; Martins, M R; Quevedo, J; Izquierdo, I

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g, N = 11-13 per group) on inhibitory avoidance retention. In order to evaluate the modulation of entorhinal and hippocampal NGF in short- and long-term memory, animals were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (foot shock, 0.4 mA). Retention tests were carried out 1.5 h or 24 h after training to measure short- and long-term memory, respectively. Immediately after training, rats received 5 microl NGF (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng) or saline per side into the CA1 area and entorhinal cortex. The correct position of the cannulae was confirmed by histological analysis. The highest dose of NGF (5.0 ng) into the hippocampus blocked short-term memory (P < 0.05), whereas the doses of 0.5 (P < 0.05) and 5.0 ng (P < 0.01) NGF enhanced long-term memory. NGF administration into the entorhinal cortex improved long-term memory at the dose of 5.0 ng (P < 0.05) and did not alter short-term memory. Taken as a whole, our results suggest a differential modulation by entorhinal and hippocampal NGF of short- and long-term memory.

  1. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-08-07

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-β mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-β was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression.

  2. Up-Regulation of Nerve Growth Factor in Cholestatic Livers and Its Hepatoprotective Role against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lin, Yu-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Huang, Shih-Che; Lee, Po-Huang; Kao, Ying-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    The role of nerve growth factor (NGF) in liver injury induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) remains elusive. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between inflammation and hepatic NGF expression, to explore the possible upstream molecules up-regulating NGF, and to determine whether NGF could protect hepatocytes from oxidative liver injury. Biochemical and molecular detection showed that NGF was up-regulated in cholestatic livers and plasma, and well correlated with systemic and hepatic inflammation. Conversely, systemic immunosuppression reduced serum NGF levels and resulted in higher mortality in BDL-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that the up-regulated NGF was mainly localized in parenchymal hepatocytes. In vitro mechanistic study further demonstrated that TGF-β1 up-regulated NGF expression in clone-9 and primary rat hepatocytes. Exogenous NGF supplementation and endogenous NGF overexpression effectively protected hepatocytes against TGF-β1- and oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro, along with reduced formation of oxidative adducted proteins modified by 4-HNE and 8-OHdG. TUNEL staining confirmed the involvement of anti-apoptosis in the NGF-exhibited hepatoprotection. Moreover, NGF potently induced Akt phosphorylation and increased Bcl-2 to Bax ratios, whereas these molecular alterations by NGF were only seen in the H2O2-, but not TGF-β1-treated hepatocytes. In conclusion, NGF exhibits anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects and is suggested to be therapeutically applicable in treating cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:25397406

  3. Age-Related Yield of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Bearing the Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    González-Garza, Maria Teresa; Cardenas-Lopez, Alejandro; Chavez-Castilla, Luis; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a heterogeneous cell population that may be enriched by positive selection with antibodies against the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR or CD271), yielding a selective cell universe with higher proliferation and differentiation potential. This paper addresses the need for determining the quantity of ADSCs positive for the CD271 receptor and its correlation with donor's age. Mononuclear cells were harvested from the lower backs of 35 female donors and purified using magnetic beads. Multipotency capacity was tested by the expression of stemness genes and through differentiation into preosteoblasts and adipocytes. A significant statistical difference was found in CD271+ concentrations between defined age intervals. The highest yield was found within women on the 30–40-year-old age range. CD271+ ADSCs from all age groups showed differentiation capabilities as well as expression of typical multipotent stem cell genes. Our data suggest that the amount of CD271+ cells correlates inversely with age. However, the ability to obtain these cells was maintained through all age ranges with a yield higher than what has been reported from bone marrow. Our findings propose CD271+ ADSCs as the primary choice for tissue regeneration and autologous stem cell therapies in older subjects. PMID:24376462

  4. A role for the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase in nerve growth-induced PC12 cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J H; Drueckes, P; Bartoe, J; Zhao, Z; Shen, S H; Krebs, E G

    1997-01-01

    SHP-1 and SHP-2 are intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatases containing two adjacent src homology 2 domains that target these phosphatases to cell surface receptor signaling complexes and play a role in receptor signal transduction. In this report the PC12 cell system was used to investigate the potential roles of SHP-1 and SHP-2 in the induction of neuronal differentiation by nerve growth factor (NGF). By using neurite outgrowth as a marker for differentiation, the effects of transfected constructs of SHP-1 and SHP-2 were assessed. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-2, but not a catalytically inactive SHP-1, blocked NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade is important for the morphological differentiation in PC12 cells, and both SHP-1 and SHP-2 have been implicated to act upstream of MAPK in other receptor signaling systems. A positive role for SHP-2 but not SHP-1 in the activation of MAPK by NGF was demonstrated by introduction of the SHP-2 phosphatase mutants along with hemagglutinin-tagged MAPK. Coexpression studies with the SHP-2 mutant along with mutant forms of MAPK kinase suggested that SHP-2 functions upstream of MAPK kinase and MAPK in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Images PMID:9285826

  5. Long-term Delivery of Nerve Growth Factor by Encapsulated Cell Biodelivery in the Göttingen Minipig Basal Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens; Juliusson, Bengt; Torp, Malene; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Nielsen, Mette S; Handberg, Aase; Sørensen, Jens Christian H; Wahlberg, Lars U

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device, capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetically modified to secrete NGF. Bioactivity and correct processing of NGF was confirmed in vitro. NsG0202 devices were implanted in the basal forebrain of Göttingen minipigs and the function and retrievability were evaluated after 7 weeks, 6 and 12 months. All devices were implanted and retrieved without associated complications. They were physically intact and contained a high number of viable and NGF-producing NGC-0295 cells after explantation. Increased NGF levels were detected in tissue surrounding the devices. The implants were well tolerated as determined by histopathological brain tissue analysis, blood analysis, and general health status of the pigs. The NsG0202 device represents a promising approach for treating the cognitive decline in AD patients. PMID:20664524

  6. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Emerich, D F; Thanos, C; Torp, M; Bintz, B; Tornøe, J; Johnsen, A H; Wahlberg, L U

    2012-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202, capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty transposon expression technology to establish a new clinical grade cell line, NGC0211, with at least 10 times higher NGF production than that of NGC-0295. To test whether encapsulation of this cell line provides a relevant dose escalation step in delivering NGF for treatment of the cognitive decline in AD patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatum as well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both cases correlate with highly improved potency. PMID:22113314

  7. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D. PMID:26739521

  8. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors.

  9. The Evaluation of Nerve Growth Factor Over Expression on Neural Lineage Specific Genes in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Yousef; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh; Khamisipour, Gholamreza Khamisipour; Soleimani, Masoud; Teimuri, Ali; Shokri, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment and repair of neurodegenerative diseases such as brain tumors, spinal cord injuries, and functional disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are challenging problems. A common treatment approach for such disorders involves the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source to replace injured cells. However, use of these cells in hosts may potentially cause adverse outcomes such as tumorigenesis and uncontrolled differentiation. In attempt to generate mesenchymal derived neural cells, we have infected MSCs with recombinant lentiviruses that expressed nerve growth factor (NGF) and assessed their neural lineage genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we cloned the NGF gene sequence into a helper dependent lentiviral vector that contained the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The recombinant vector was amplified in DH5 bacterial cells. Recombinant viruses were generated in the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) packaging cell line with the helper vectors and analyzed under fluorescent microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were infected by recombinant viruses for three days followed by assessment of neural differentiation. We evaluated expression of NGF through measurement of the NGF protein in culture medium by ELISA; neural specific genes were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed neural morphological changes after three days. Quantitative PCR showed that expressions of NESTIN, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) genes increased following induction of NGF overexpression, whereas expressions of endogenous NGF and brain derived neural growth factor (BDNF) genes reduced. Conclusion Ectopic expression of NGF can induce neurogenesis in MSCs. Direct injection of MSCs may cause tumorigenesis and an undesirable outcome. Therefore an alternative choice to overcome this obstacle may

  10. Regulatory effect of nerve growth factor in α9β1 integrin–dependent progression of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meghan C.; Staniszewska, Izabela; Lazarovici, Philip; Tuszynski, George P.; Del Valle, Luis; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we described the role of α9β1 integrin in glioblastoma progression following its interaction with nerve growth factor (NGF). The level of expression of α9β1 on astrocytomas is correlated with increased grade of this brain tumor and is highest on glioblastoma, whereas normal astrocytes do not express this integrin. Two glioblastoma cell lines, LN229 and LN18, that are α9β1 integrin positive and negative, respectively, were used for α9β1 integrin–dependent NGF-induced tumor progression. NGF was a significant promoter of promigratory and pro-proliferative activities of glioblastoma cells through direct interaction with α9β1 integrin and activation of MAPK Erk1/2 pathway. The level of NGF increases approximately threefold in the most malignant glioma tissue when compared with normal brain. This increase is related to secretion of NGF by tumor cells. Specific inhibitors of α9β1 integrin or gene silencing inhibited NGF-induced proliferation of LN229 cell line to the level shown by LN18 cells. VLO5 promoted α9β1-dependent programmed cell death by induction of intrinsic apoptosis pathway in cancer cells. LN229 cells were rescued from proapoptotic effect of VLO5 by the presence of NGF. This disintegrin significantly inhibited tumor growth induced by implantation of LN229 cells to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryonic model, and this inhibitory effect was significantly abolished by the presence of NGF. α9β1 integrin appears to be an interesting target for blocking the progression of malignant gliomas, especially in light of the stimulatory effect of NGF on the development of these tumors and its ability to transfer proapoptotic signals in cancer cells. PMID:19074980

  11. Selective inhibition of responses to nerve growth factor and of microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation by activators of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Greene, L A; Drexler, S A; Connolly, J L; Rukenstein, A; Green, S H

    1986-11-01

    To study the influence of cAMP on cellular responses to nerve growth factor (NGF) and to use elevation of intracellular cAMP to probe the NGF mechanism, cultured PC12 pheochromocytoma cells were exposed to forskolin and cholera toxin. As in other cell types, the latter agents greatly increased PC12 cell cAMP levels. Such treatment also brought about a reversible, dose-dependent suppression of NGF-promoted regeneration of neurites. In support of the role of cAMP in this effect, regeneration blockage by forskolin was potentiated by phosphodiesterase inhibitors. When tested on NGF-stimulated initiation of process outgrowth, cholera toxin and forskolin exerted a dual effect. As in previous studies, these drugs, when applied along with NGF, significantly enhanced the initial formation of short cytoplasmic extensions. However, after approximately 3 d of NGF exposure, at which time such extensions begin to acquire the morphological and ultrastructural features of neurites, these agents suppressed process outgrowth. That is, the neurites were fewer in number, significantly less branched, and much shorter than in control cultures. Such changes also occurred when these drugs were added to cultures that had been pretreated with NGF alone. Whereas forskolin and cholera toxin affect the formation and regeneration of neurites, these drugs did not interfere with the short-latency, transient changes in surface morphology that are triggered by NGF, nor did they inhibit transcription-dependent priming. In contrast, the rapidly occurring NGF-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase was suppressed. Moreover, forskolin and cholera toxin rapidly and selectively blocked the NGF-promoted phosphorylation of a set of microtubule-associated proteins known as chartins. Previous observations have suggested a causal relationship between NGF-induced chartin microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation and the formation and outgrowth of neurites. This is supported by the present data and

  12. CSK negatively regulates nerve growth factor induced neural differentiation and augments AKT kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nandini . E-mail: Don_Durden@oz.ped.emory.edu

    2005-07-01

    Src family kinases are involved in transducing growth factor signals for cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types. The activity of all Src family kinases (SFKs) is controlled by phosphorylation at their C-terminal 527-tyrosine residue by C-terminal SRC kinase, CSK. There is a paucity of information regarding the role of CSK and/or specific Src family kinases in neuronal differentiation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP1, blocked NGF-induced activation of SFKs and obliterated neurite outgrowth. To confirm a role for CSK and specific isoforms of SFKs in neuronal differentiation, we overexpressed active and catalytically dead CSK in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. CSK overexpression caused a profound inhibition of NGF-induced activation of FYN, YES, RAS, and ERK and inhibited neurite outgrowth, NGF-stimulated integrin-directed migration and blocked the NGF-induced conversion of GDP-RAC to its GTP-bound active state. CSK overexpression markedly augmented the activation state of AKT following NGF stimulation. In contrast, kinase-dead CSK augmented the activation of FYN, RAS, and ERK and increased neurite outgrowth. These data suggest a distinct requirement for CSK in the regulation of NGF/TrkA activation of RAS, RAC, ERK, and AKT via the differential control of SFKs in the orchestration of neuronal differentiation.

  13. Single Mr approximately 103,000 /sup 125/I-beta-nerve growth factor-affinity-labeled species represents both the low and high affinity forms of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.H.; Greene, L.A.

    1986-11-15

    Both high and low affinity receptors for nerve growth factor (NGF) have been described, but only the former appear to mediate NGF actions and uptake. To specifically characterize the molecular identity of the high affinity site and to compare it with the low affinity site, the water-soluble carbodiimide EDC was used to cross-link /sup 125/I-NGF to NGF receptors on: rat PC12 cells, PC12nnr5 cells (PC12 mutants that have only low affinity NGF binding), SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells (which have only high affinity binding sites), and cultured rat sympathetic ganglion cells. A variety of criteria were used to distinguish the two classes of affinity-labeled receptors: competition with unlabeled NGF, dissociation rate, and selective solubilization by 0.1% Triton X-100. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that cross-linking generated only a single Mr approximately 103,000 /sup 125/I-NGF affinity-labeled species which represents both the low and high affinity forms of the receptor. The /sup 125/I-NGF X receptor complexes formed with both affinity classes of the receptor were quantitatively immunoprecipitated by the monoclonal anti-NGF-receptor antibody 192-IgG and both showed identical shifts in mobility when subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions. These findings indicate that both high and low affinity NGF receptors possess apparently identical NGF-binding moieties. The differences between the kinetic and functional properties of the two receptor types may therefore result from their interactions with other membrane components or with cytoplasmic proteins.

  14. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  15. Effects of nerve growth factor antagonist K252a on peritoneal mast cell degranulation: implications for rat postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Berdún, Sergio; Rychter, Jakub; Vergara, Patri

    2015-11-15

    Stabilization of mast cell (MC) degranulation has been proposed to prevent postoperative ileus (POI). Nerve growth factor (NGF) mediates MC degranulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether NGF receptor antagonist K252a acts as a MC stabilizer in vitro and in vivo model of POI. Peritoneal mast cells (PMCs) were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and were incubated with K252a and exposed to NGF or Compound 48/80 (C48/80). MC degranulation was assessed by β-hexosaminidase assay. POI was induced in rats by intestinal manipulation (IM). Rats were pretreated with K252a (100 μg/kg sc) 20 min prior to POI induction. At 20 min after IM, release of rat mast cell protease 6 (RMCP-6) was evaluated in peritoneal lavage. At 24 h, intestinal transit (IT) and gastric emptying (GE) were evaluated. Ileal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, expression of IL-6, NGF, TrkA, RMCP-2 and 6, and MC density within the full-thickness ileum. C48/80 and NGF evoked degranulation of PMCs in a dose-dependent manner. K252a prevented NGF-evoked, but not C48/80-evoked, MC degranulation. IM evoked the release of peritoneal RMCP-6 and subsequently delayed IT and GE. IM increased MPO activity and expression of IL-6. In IM rats, K252a prevented upregulation of IL-6 expression and reduced TrkA. IT, GE, and inflammation were not affected by K252a. K252a inhibited NGF-evoked degranulation of PMCs in vitro. In vivo, K252a decreased IL-6 and PMC degranulation. This may be of relevance for the development of new therapeutic targets for POI. PMID:26405114

  16. Strip biosensor for amplified detection of nerve growth factor-beta based on a molecular translator and catalytic DNA circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lai, Ting; Mu, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    We have demonstrated a new visual detection approach based on a molecular translator and a catalytic DNA circuit for the detection of nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-β). In this assay, a molecular translator based on the binding-induced DNA strand-displacement reaction was employed to convert the input protein to an output DNA signal. The molecular translator is composed of a target recognition element and a signal output element. Target recognition is achieved by the binding of the anti-NGF-β antibody to the target protein. Polyclonal anti-NGF-β antibody is conjugated to DNA1 and DNA2. The antibody conjugated DNA1 is initially hybridized to DNA3 to form a stable DNA1/DNA3 duplex. In the presence of NGF-β, the binding of the same target protein brings DNA1 and DNA2 into close proximity, resulting in an increase in their local effective concentration. This process triggers the strand-displacement reaction between DNA2 and DNA3 and releases the output DNA3. The released DNA3 is further amplified by a catalytic DNA circuit. The product of the catalytic DNA circuit is detected by a strip biosensor. This proposed assay has high sensitivity and selectivity with a dynamic response ranging from 10 fM to 10 pM, and its detection limit is 10 fM of NGF-β. This work provides a sensitive, enzyme-free, and universal strategy for the detection of other proteins. PMID:25068151

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  18. Frequency-dependent interference by magnetic fields of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC-12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; Benane, S.G.; House, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have shown that 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields within the 5--10 microTesla ({micro}T) rms range cause an intensity-dependent reduction in nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulation of neurite outgrowth (NO) in PC12- cells. Here they report on the frequency dependence of this response over the 15--70 Hz range at 5 Hz intervals. Primed PC-12 cells were plated in collagen-coated, 60 mm plastic petri dishes with or without 5 ng/ml NGF and were exposed to sinusoidal magnetic fields for 22 h in a CO{sub 2} incubator at 37 C. One 1,000-turn coil, 20 cm in diameter, generated vertically oriented magnetic fields. The dishes were stacked on the center axis of the coil to provide a range of intensities between 3.5 and 9.0 {micro}T rms. The flux density of the ambient DC magnetic field was 37 {micro}T vertical and 29 {micro}T horizontal. The assay consisted of counting over 100 cells in the central portion (radius {le}0.3 cm) of each dish and scoring cells positive for NO. Sham exposure of cells treated identically with NGF demonstrated no difference in the percentage of cells with NO between exposed and magnetically shielded locations within the incubator. Analysis of variance demonstrated flux density-dependent reductions in NGF-stimulated NO over the 35--70 Hz frequency range, whereas frequencies between 15 Hz and 30 Hz produced no obvious reduction. The results also demonstrated a relative maximal sensitivity of cells at 40 Hz with a possible additional sensitivity region at or above 70 Hz. These findings suggest a biological influence of perpendicular AC/DC magnetic fields different from those identified by the ion parametric resonance model, which uses strictly parallel AC/DC fields.

  19. Nerve growth factor receptor immunoreactivity is transiently associated with the subplate neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Allendoerfer, K.L.; Shelton, D.L.; Shooter, E.M.; Shatz, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Nerve growth factor and its receptor (NGFR) are known to be present in diverse embryonic and neonatal central nervous system tissues, including the cerebral cortex. However, the identity of the cortical cells expressing NGFR immunoreactivity has not been established. We have used immunolabeling coupled with (3H)thymidine autoradiography to identify such cells in ferret and cat brain. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a conserved amino acid sequence of the NGFR were used for this purpose. Western (immunologic) blot analyses show that these antibodies specifically recognize NGFR and precursor proteins. In both species, NGFR immunoreactivity is primarily associated with the early generated and transient subplate neuron population of the developing neocortex, as indicated by the following evidence: the immunoreactive cells (i) are located directly beneath the developing cortical plate, (ii) frequently have the inverted pyramid shape characteristic of subplate neurons, and (iii) can be labeled by an injection of (3H)thymidine on embryonic day (E) 28, a time when only subplate neurons are being generated. Intense NGFR immunostaining is seen on the cell bodies of these neurons as early as E30, several days after their last round of cell division, and this immunostaining remains strong for approximately 3 weeks. The NGFR immunoreactivity begins to decline around E52 and has disappeared from the region altogether by E60, at which time subplate neurons begin to die. The cellular localization and timing of expression suggest that the NGFR may play a role in the maintenance of subplate neurons and in the maturation of the cerebral cortex.

  20. Human HOXB cluster and the nerve growth factor receptor gene: Comparison with an orthologous chromosomal domain in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, K.L.; Bradshaw, M.S.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1995-11-01

    The structural organization and nucleotide sequence similarity of mammalian Antennapedia-class homeobox genes support the view that the four homeobox clusters (HOXA, B,C, and D on human chromosomes 7, 17, 12 and 2, respectively) arose through a combination of gene duplication and divergence to form a cluster, followed by several cluster duplications. The duplication events that gave rise to the four clusters appear to have involved chromosomal domains extending well beyond the borders of the clusters in either direction. This evidence arises from the observation that many genes closely linked to the homeobox clusters on different chromosomes show sequence similarity. Here, we present a continuation of physical mapping studies to determine the extent and organization of the duplicated regions surrounding the four homeobox clusters in human. Southern blots prepared from pulsed-field gels of human DNA were probed with cloned segments of human HOXB genes and the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) gene on chromosome 17q21-q22. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed the close physical linkage of these genes within 100 kb. Two yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), 220 and 380 kb in size, were isolated using oligonucleotide primers specific for NGFR. Both YACs contained the entire HOXB cluster. Restriction mapping of the clones indicated that the distance separating these loci could not be greater than 50 kb. This result confirms and extends previous information on the proximity of these genes as determined by genetic linkage analysis and closely parallels the orthologous loci in the mouse. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Nerve growth factor inhibits the synthesis of a single-stranded DNA binding protein in pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12).

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, S; Cattaneo, A; Calissano, P

    1984-01-01

    Arrest of mitosis and neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12) is accompanied by a progressive inhibition of the synthesis of a protein that binds to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. Time course experiments show that this inhibition is already apparent after a 2-day incubation with NGF and is maximum (85-95%) upon achievement of complete PC12 cell differentiation. Inhibition of the synthesis of this single-stranded DNA binding protein after 48 hr of incubation with NGF is potentiated by concomitant treatment of PC12 cells with antimitotic drugs acting at different levels of DNA replication. Purification on a preparative scale of this protein and analysis of its major physicochemical properties show that: (i) it constitutes 0.5% of total soluble proteins of naive PC12 cells; (ii) its molecular weight measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE is Mr 34,000 (sucrose gradient centrifugation under nondenaturing conditions yields a sedimentation coefficient s20,w of 8.1 S, indicating that the native protein is an oligomer); (iii) amino acid analysis demonstrates a preponderance of acidic over basic residues, while electrofocusing experiments show that it has an isoelectric point around 8.0; (iv) approximately 15% of the protein is phosphorylated in vivo. It is postulated that control of the synthesis of this protein is connected with activation of a differentiative program triggered by NGF in the PC12 neoplastic cell line at some step(s) of DNA activity. Images PMID:6585787

  2. Acute and chronic administration of the branched-chain amino acids decreases nerve growth factor in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Furlanetto, Camila B; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mina, Francielle; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Kist, Luiza W; Pereira, Talita C B; Bogo, Maurício R; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-12-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a neurometabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme complex branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding branched-chain α-keto acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acute and chronic administration of BCAA on protein levels and mRNA expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) considering that patients with MSUD present neurological dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Considering previous observations, it is suggested that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurological dysfunction of MSUD. We also investigated the influence of antioxidant treatment (N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine) in order to verify the influence of oxidative stress in the modulation of NGF levels. Our results demonstrated decreased protein levels of NGF in the hippocampus after acute and chronic administration of BCAA. In addition, we showed a significant decrease in the expression of ngf in the hippocampus only following acute administration in 10-day-old rats. Interestingly, antioxidant treatment was able to prevent the decrease in NGF levels by increasing ngf expression. In conclusion, the results suggest that BCAA is involved in the regulation of NGF in the developing rat. Thus, it is possible that alteration of neurotrophin levels during brain maturation could be of pivotal importance in the impairment of cognition provoked by BCAA. Moreover, the decrease in NGF levels was prevented by antioxidant treatment, reinforcing that the hypothesis of oxidative stress can be an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in MSUD. PMID:23559405

  3. Tunicamycin-induced cell death in the trigeminal ganglion is suppressed by nerve growth factor in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Zhao, Bing-Ran; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Terayama, Ruji; Matsuo, Saburo; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2010-04-01

    The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on tunicamycin (Tm)-treated neurons in the trigeminal ganglion was investigated by use of caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. In intact embryos at embryonic day 16.5, only a few caspase-3-immunoreactivity were detected in the ganglion neurons. Mean +/- SE of the density of the immunoreactivity was 0.22 +/- 0.03%. In contrast, the number of the immunoreactive neurons was increased at 24 h after injection of 0.5 microg Tm in 1 microl of 0.05 N NaOH solution into mouse embryos at embryonic day 15.5. The density of immunoreactivity was also increased (mean +/- SE = 1.44 +/- 0.11%) compared to intact and 0.05 N NaOH-treated embryos (mean +/- SE = 0.35 +/- 0.03%). The Tm treatment caused increase of the number of trigeminal neurons representing apoptotic profiles (intact, mean +/- SE = 79.3 +/- 8.5; 0.05 N NaOH, mean +/- SE = 132 +/- 11.5; 0.5 microg Tm, mean +/- SE = 370.2 +/- 64.8). In addition, NGF significantly prevented the increase of density of the immunoreactivity (mean +/- SE = 0.54 +/- 0.16%) and the number of apoptotic cells (mean +/- SE = 146.2 +/- 11.3). Saline application (without NGF) had no effect on Tm-induced increase of the immunoreactivity (mean +/- SE = 1.78 +/- 0.23%) or the apoptotic profiles (mean +/- SE = 431.9 +/- 80.5). These results indicate that Tm-induced cell death in the trigeminal ganglion is suppressed by NGF in the mouse embryo.

  4. Nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mediate survival of pulmonary plasma cells during the allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abram, Melanie; Wegmann, Michael; Fokuhl, Verena; Sonar, Sanchaita; Luger, Elke Olga; Kerzel, Sebastian; Radbruch, Andreas; Renz, Harald; Zemlin, Michael

    2009-04-15

    Allergen-specific Abs play a pivotal role in the induction and maintenance of allergic airway inflammation. During secondary immune responses, plasma cell survival and Ab production is mediated by extrinsic factors provided by the local environment (survival niches). It is unknown whether neurotrophins, a characteristic marker of allergic airway inflammation, influence plasma cell survival in the lung. Using a mouse model of allergic asthma, we found that plasma cells from the lung and spleen are distinct subpopulations exhibiting differential expression patterns of neurotrophins and their receptors (Trks). In vitro, the nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) led to a dose-dependent increase in viability of isolated pulmonary plasma cells due to up-regulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl2 pathway. In parallel, the expression of transcription factors that stimulate the production of immunoglobulins (X-box binding protein 1 and NF-kappaB subunit RelA) was enhanced in plasma cells treated with NGF and NT3. These findings were supported in vivo. When the NGF pathway was blocked by intranasal application of a selective TrkA inhibitor, sensitized mice showed reduced numbers of pulmonary plasma cells and developed lower levels of allergen-specific and total serum IgE in response to OVA inhalation. This suggests that in the allergic airway inflammation, NGF/TrkA-mediated pulmonary IgE production contributes significantly to serum-IgE levels. We conclude that the neurotrophins NGF and NT3 act as survival factors for pulmonary plasma cells and thus are important regulators of the local Ab production in the allergic airway disease.

  5. Viral Vector Based Improvement of Optic Nerve Regeneration: Characterization of Individual Axons’ Growth Patterns and Synaptogenesis in a Visual Target

    PubMed Central

    Yungher, Benjamin J.; Luo, Xueting; Salgueiro, Yadira; Blackmore, Murray G.; Park, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Lack of axon growth ability in the central nervous system poses a major barrier to achieving functional connectivity after injury. Thus, a non-transgenic regenerative approach to reinnervating targets has important implications in clinical and research settings. Previous studies using knockout (KO) mice have demonstrated long distance axon regeneration. Using an optic nerve injury model, here we evaluate the efficacy of viral, RNAi and pharmacological approaches that target the PTEN and STAT3 pathways to improve long distance axon regeneration in wild type (WT) mice. Our data show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PTEN (shPTEN) enhances retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration after crush injury. However, compared to the previous data in PTEN KO mice, AAV-shRNA results in a lesser degree of regeneration, likely due to incomplete gene silencing inherent to RNAi. In comparison, an extensive enhancement in regeneration is seen when AAV-shPTEN is coupled to AAV encoding ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and to a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analogue, allowing axons to travel long distances and reach their target. We apply whole tissue imaging that facilitates three-dimensional visualization of single regenerating axons and document heterogeneous terminal patterns in the targets. This shows that some axonal populations generate extensive arbors and make synapses with the target neurons. Collectively, we show a combinatorial viral RNAi and pharmacological strategy that improves long distance regeneration in WT animals and provide single fiber projection data that indicates a degree of preservation of target recognition. PMID:26005861

  6. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events. PMID:26930162

  7. FRS2 proteins recruit intracellular signaling pathways by binding to diverse targets on fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Ong, S H; Guy, G R; Hadari, Y R; Laks, S; Gotoh, N; Schlessinger, J; Lax, I

    2000-02-01

    The docking protein FRS2 was implicated in the transmission of extracellular signals from the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors to the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. The two members of the FRS2 family, FRS2alpha and FRS2beta, are structurally very similar. Each is composed of an N-terminal myristylation signal, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and a C-terminal tail containing multiple binding sites for the SH2 domains of the adapter protein Grb2 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Here we show that the PTB domains of both the alpha and beta isoforms of FRS2 bind directly to the FGF or NGF receptors. The PTB domains of the FRS2 proteins bind to a highly conserved sequence in the juxtamembrane region of FGFR1. While FGFR1 interacts with FRS2 constitutively, independent of ligand stimulation and tyrosine phosphorylation, NGF receptor (TrkA) binding to FRS2 is strongly dependent on receptor activation. Complex formation with TrkA is dependent on phosphorylation of Y490, a canonical PTB domain binding site that also functions as a binding site for Shc (NPXpY). Using deletion and alanine scanning mutagenesis as well as peptide competition assays, we demonstrate that the PTB domains of the FRS2 proteins specifically recognize two different primary structures in two different receptors in a phosphorylation-dependent or -independent manner. In addition, NGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2alpha is diminished in cells that overexpress a kinase-inactive mutant of FGFR1. This experiment suggests that FGFR1 may regulate signaling via NGF receptors by sequestering a common key element which both receptors utilize for transmitting their signals. The multiple interactions mediated by FRS2 appear to play an important role in target selection and in defining the specificity of several families of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:10629055

  8. Gelatin-methacrylamide gel loaded with microspheres to deliver GDNF in bilayer collagen conduit promoting sciatic nerve growth.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hai; Bu, Shoushan; Hua, Lei; Darabi, Mohammad A; Cao, Xiaojian; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-loaded microspheres, then seeded the microspheres in gelatin-methacrylamide hydrogel, which was finally integrated with the commercial bilayer collagen membrane (Bio-Gide(®)). The novel composite of nerve conduit was employed to bridge a 10 mm long sciatic nerve defect in a rat. GDNF-loaded gelatin microspheres had a smooth surface with an average diameter of 3.9±1.8 μm. Scanning electron microscopy showed that microspheres were uniformly distributed in both the GelMA gel and the layered structure. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in vitro release studies (pH 7.4) of GDNF from microspheres exhibited an initial burst release during the first 3 days (18.0%±1.3%), and then, a prolonged-release profile extended to 32 days. However, in an acidic condition (pH 2.5), the initial release percentage of GDNF was up to 91.2%±0.9% within 4 hours and the cumulative release percentage of GDNF was 99.2%±0.2% at 48 hours. Then the composite conduct was implanted in a 10 mm critical defect gap of sciatic nerve in a rat. We found that the nerve was regenerated in both conduit and autograft (AG) groups. A combination of electrophysiological assessment and histomorphometry analysis of regenerated nerves showed that axonal regeneration and functional recovery in collagen tube filled with GDNF-loaded microspheres (GM + CT) group were similar to AG group (P>0.05). Most myelinated nerves were matured and arranged densely with a uniform structure of myelin in a neat pattern along the long axis in the AG and GM + CT groups, however, regenerated nerve was absent in the BLANK group, left the 10 mm gap empty after resection, and the nerve fiber exhibited a disordered arrangement in the collagen tube group. These results indicated that the hybrid system of bilayer collagen conduit and GDNF-loaded gelatin microspheres combined with gelatin-methacrylamide hydrogels could serve as a new biodegradable

  9. Gelatin-methacrylamide gel loaded with microspheres to deliver GDNF in bilayer collagen conduit promoting sciatic nerve growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hai; Bu, Shoushan; Hua, Lei; Darabi, Mohammad A; Cao, Xiaojian; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-loaded microspheres, then seeded the microspheres in gelatin-methacrylamide hydrogel, which was finally integrated with the commercial bilayer collagen membrane (Bio-Gide®). The novel composite of nerve conduit was employed to bridge a 10 mm long sciatic nerve defect in a rat. GDNF-loaded gelatin microspheres had a smooth surface with an average diameter of 3.9±1.8 μm. Scanning electron microscopy showed that microspheres were uniformly distributed in both the GelMA gel and the layered structure. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in vitro release studies (pH 7.4) of GDNF from microspheres exhibited an initial burst release during the first 3 days (18.0%±1.3%), and then, a prolonged-release profile extended to 32 days. However, in an acidic condition (pH 2.5), the initial release percentage of GDNF was up to 91.2%±0.9% within 4 hours and the cumulative release percentage of GDNF was 99.2%±0.2% at 48 hours. Then the composite conduct was implanted in a 10 mm critical defect gap of sciatic nerve in a rat. We found that the nerve was regenerated in both conduit and autograft (AG) groups. A combination of electrophysiological assessment and histomorphometry analysis of regenerated nerves showed that axonal regeneration and functional recovery in collagen tube filled with GDNF-loaded microspheres (GM + CT) group were similar to AG group (P>0.05). Most myelinated nerves were matured and arranged densely with a uniform structure of myelin in a neat pattern along the long axis in the AG and GM + CT groups, however, regenerated nerve was absent in the BLANK group, left the 10 mm gap empty after resection, and the nerve fiber exhibited a disordered arrangement in the collagen tube group. These results indicated that the hybrid system of bilayer collagen conduit and GDNF-loaded gelatin microspheres combined with gelatin-methacrylamide hydrogels could serve as a new biodegradable

  10. Muscle-targeted hydrodynamic gene introduction of insulin-like growth factor-1 using polyplex nanomicelle to treat peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kazuya; Itaka, Keiji; Baba, Miyuki; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-06-10

    The recovery of neurologic function after peripheral nerve injury often remains incomplete because of the prolonged reinnervation process, which leads to skeletal muscle atrophy and articular contracture from disuse over time. To rescue the skeletal muscle and promote functional recovery, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a potent myogenic factor, was introduced into the muscle by hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA using a biocompatible nonviral gene carrier, a polyplex nanomicelle. In a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury, the introduction of IGF-1 into the skeletal muscle of the paralyzed limb effectively alleviated a decrease in muscle weight compared with that in untreated control mice. Histologic analysis of the muscle revealed the IGF-1-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA) to have a myogenic effect, inducing muscle hypertrophy with the upregulation of the myogenic regulatory factors, myogenin and MyoD. The evaluation of motor function by walking track analysis revealed that the group that received the hydrodynamic injection of IGF-1-expressing pDNA using the polyplex nanomicelle had significantly early recovery of motor function compared with groups receiving negative control pDNA and untreated controls. Early recovery of sensation in the distal area of sciatic nerve injury was also induced by the introduction of IGF-1-expressing pDNA, presumably because of the effect of secreted IGF-1 protein in the vicinity of the injured sciatic nerve exerting a synergistic effect with muscle hypertrophy, inducing a more favorable prognosis. This approach of introducing IGF-1 into skeletal muscle is promising for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury by promoting early motor function recovery. PMID:24657809

  11. Cerebrolysin modulates pronerve growth factor/nerve growth factor ratio and ameliorates the cholinergic deficit in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Rockenstein, Edward; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben; Mante, Michael; Inglis, Chandra; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Fahnestock, Margaret; Doppler, Edith; Novak, Philip; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by degeneration of neocortex, limbic system, and basal forebrain, accompanied by accumulation of amyloid-β and tangle formation. Cerebrolysin (CBL), a peptide mixture with neurotrophic-like effects, is reported to improve cognition and activities of daily living in patients with AD. Likewise, CBL reduces synaptic and behavioral deficits in transgenic (tg) mice overexpressing the human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). The neuroprotective effects of CBL may involve multiple mechanisms, including signaling regulation, control of APP metabolism, and expression of neurotrophic factors. We investigate the effects of CBL in the hAPP tg model of AD on levels of neurotrophic factors, including pro-nerve growth factor (NGF), NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotropin (NT)-3, NT4, and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that levels of pro-NGF were increased in saline-treated hAPP tg mice. In contrast, CBL-treated hAPP tg mice showed levels of pro-NGF comparable to control and increased levels of mature NGF. Consistently with these results, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated increased NGF immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of CBL-treated hAPP tg mice. Protein levels of other neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, NT3, NT4, and CNTF, were unchanged. mRNA levels of NGF and other neurotrophins were also unchanged. Analysis of neurotrophin receptors showed preservation of the levels of TrKA and p75(NTR) immunoreactivity per cell in the nucleus basalis. Cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis were reduced in the saline-treated hAPP tg mice, and treatment with CBL reduced these cholinergic deficits. These results suggest that the neurotrophic effects of CBL might involve modulation of the pro-NGF/NGF balance and a concomitant protection of cholinergic neurons.

  12. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to migraine

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Salih; Varol, Sefer; Ozdemir, Hasan H; Agacayak, Elif; Aydın, Birsen; Kapan, Oktay; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tunc, Saban; Cevik, Mehmet Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurological diseases worldwide. Migraine pathophysiology is very complex. Genetic factors play a major role in migraine. Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), play an important role in central nervous system functioning, development, and modulation of pain. This study investigates whether polymorphisms in the BDNF and NGF genes are associated with migraine disease in a Turkish case–control population. Overall, 576 subjects were investigated (288 patients with migraine and 288 healthy controls) for the following polymorphisms: rs6265(G/A), rs8192466(C/T), rs925946(G/T), rs2049046(A/T), and rs12273363(T/C) in the BDNF gene, and rs6330(C/T), rs11466112(C/T), rs11102930(C/A), and rs4839435(G/A) in the NGF gene using 5′-exonuclease allelic discrimination assays. We found no differences in frequency of the analyzed eight polymorphisms between migraine and control groups. However, the frequency of minor A alleles of rs6265 in BDNF gene was borderline significant in the patients compared with the healthy controls (P=0.049; odds ratios [ORs] [95% confidence intervals {CIs}] =0.723 [0.523–0.999]). Moreover, when the migraine patients were divided into two subgroups, migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), the minor TT genotype of rs6330 in NGF was significantly higher in MA patients than in MO patients (P=0.036) or healthy controls (P=0.026), and this disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Also, the rs6330*T minor allele was more common in the MA group than in the MO group or controls (P=0.011, ORs [95% CIs] =1.626 [1.117–2.365] or P=0.007, ORs [95% CIs] =1.610 [1.140–2.274], respectively). In conclusion, this is the first clinical study to evaluate the association between BDNF and NGF polymorphisms in migraine patients compared with health controls. Our findings suggest that the NGF rs6330*T minor allele might be nominated as a risk

  13. Induction of nerve growth factor expression and release by mechanical and inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes: possible involvement in osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nerve growth factor (NGF) level is increased in osteoarthritis (OA) joints and is involved in pain associated with OA. Stimuli responsible for NGF stimulation in chondrocytes are unknown. We investigated whether mechanical stress and proinflammatory cytokines may influence NGF synthesis by chondrocytes. Methods Primary cultures of human OA chondrocytes, newborn mouse articular chondrocytes or cartilage explants were stimulated by increasing amounts of IL-1β, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) or by cyclic mechanical compression (0.5 Hz, 1 MPa). Before stimulation, chondrocytes were pretreated with indomethacin, Apo866, a specific inhibitor of NAMPT enzymatic activity, or transfected by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. mRNA NGF levels were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and NGF released into media was determined by ELISA. Results Unstimulated human and mouse articular chondrocytes expressed low levels of NGF (19.2 ± 8.7 pg/mL, 13.5 ± 1.0 pg/mL and 4.4 ± 0.8 pg/mL/mg tissue for human and mouse articular chondrocytes and costal explants, respectively). Mechanical stress induced NGF release in conditioned media. When stimulated by IL-1β or visfatin/NAMPT, a proinflammatory adipokine produced by chondocytes in response to IL-1β, a dose-dependent increase in NGF mRNA expression and NGF release in both human and mouse chondrocyte conditioned media was observed. Visfatin/NAMPT is also an intracellular enzyme acting as the rate-limiting enzyme of the generation of NAD. The expression of NGF induced by visfatin/NAMPT was inhibited by Apo866, whereas IL-1β-mediated NGF expression was not modified by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. Interestingly, PGE2, which is produced by chondrocytes in response to IL-1β and visfatin/NAMPT, did not stimulate NGF production. Consistently, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not counteract IL-1β-induced NGF production. Conclusions These

  14. Binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in cultured rat sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Claude, P.; Hawrot, E.; Dunis, D.A.; Campenot, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons internalize nerve growth factor (NGF) and transport it retrogradely to their cell bodies where it appears to serve a trophic function in maintaining neuronal survival. We have characterized the binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF by cultured rat sympathetic neurons. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, sympathetic neurons possessed approximately 2 X 10(7) specific, cell surface NGF binding sites per neuron with an apparent affinity constant of 2 to 5 X 10(9) M. The density of binding sites on the plasma membrane of the neurites approximately twice that on the plasma membrane of the cell bodies. Because of the extensive network of neuronal processes, the neurites probably account for more than 99.5% of the total binding in mature cultures. Using electron microscope autoradiography, we localized the distribution of /sup 125/I-NGF in the cell body following a 1-hr exposure to /sup 125/I-NGF. The majority of silver grains were associated with lysosomal organelles, including secondary lysosomes, residual bodies, and multivesicular bodies (MVB). The MVB were the most heavily labeled, with a labeling density (L.D.) of 21, while the lysosomes had a L.D. of 3.1. To study the retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF, neurons were grown in compartmentalized culture dishes and their distal processes were exposed to /sup 125/I-NGF. Radioactive material was transported to the cell bodies at the rate of approximately 3 mm/hr. The transport mechanism was sensitive to colchicine and was saturable with respect to NGF. After 8 hr of transport, when the radioactivity in the cell bodies had reached a steady state, the label again was localized primarily to the MVB (L.D. . 16.8) and the lysosomes (L.D. . 3.8). The nuclei were not labeled significantly and had an overall L.D. of 0.47. We saw no evidence for the accumulation of NGF by the nuclear membrane, the nucleolus, or chromatin.

  15. Effects of nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor dual gene modification on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into neuron-like cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    HU, YANG; ZHANG, YAN; TIAN, KANG; XUN, CHONG; WANG, SHOUYU; LV, DECHENG

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies regarding regenerative medicine have focused on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), which have the potential to undergo neural differentiation, and may be transfected with specific genes. BMSCs can differentiate into neuron-like cells in certain neurotropic circumstances in vitro. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are often used to induce neural differentiation in BMSCs in vitro. However, previous studies regarding their combined actions are insufficient. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to thoroughly assess the enhancement of neural differentiation of BMSCs following transfection with bFGF and NGF. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat BMSCs were separated through whole bone marrow adherence, and were then passaged to the third generation. The cells were subsequently divided into five groups: The control group, which consisted of untransfected BMSCs; the plv-blank-transfected BMSCs group; the plv-bFGF-trans-fected BMSCs group; the plv-NGF-transfected BMSCs group; and the plv-NGF-bFGF co-transfected BMSCs group. Cell neural differentiation was characterized in terms of stem cell molecular expression, and the neuronal morphology and expression of neural-like molecules was detected in each of the groups. A total of 72 h post-transfection, the expression levels of neuron-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and nestin protein, were higher in the co-transfected group, as compared with the other groups, the expression levels of β-tubulin III were also increased in the co-transfected cells, thus suggesting the maturation of differentiated neuron-like cells. Furthermore, higher neuronal proliferation was observed in the co-transfected group, as compared with the other groups at passages 2, 4, 6 and 8. Western blotting demonstrated that the transfected groups exhibited a simultaneous increase in phosphorylation of the AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling pathway

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Stimulates Interaction of Cayman Ataxia Protein BNIP-H/Caytaxin with Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Differentiating Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Chew, Li Li; Soh, Unice Jim Kim; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Low, Boon Chuan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in ATCAY that encodes the brain-specific protein BNIP-H (or Caytaxin) lead to Cayman cerebellar ataxia. BNIP-H binds to glutaminase, a neurotransmitter-producing enzyme, and affects its activity and intracellular localization. Here we describe the identification and characterization of the binding between BNIP-H and Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase. BNIP-H interacted with Pin1 after nerve growth factor-stimulation and they co-localized in the neurites and cytosol of differentiating pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and the embryonic carcinoma P19 cells. Deletional mutagenesis revealed two cryptic binding sites within the C-terminus of BNIP-H such that single point mutants affecting the WW domain of Pin1 completely abolished their binding. Although these two sites do not contain any of the canonical Pin1-binding motifs they showed differential binding profiles to Pin1 WW domain mutants S16E, S16A and W34A, and the catalytically inert C113A of its isomerase domain. Furthermore, their direct interaction would occur only upon disrupting the ability of BNIP-H to form an intramolecular interaction by two similar regions. Furthermore, expression of Pin1 disrupted the BNIP-H/glutaminase complex formation in PC12 cells under nerve growth factor-stimulation. These results indicate that nerve growth factor may stimulate the interaction of BNIP-H with Pin1 by releasing its intramolecular inhibition. Such a mechanism could provide a post-translational regulation on the cellular activity of BNIP-H during neuronal differentiation. (213 words) PMID:18628984

  17. Effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on blood vessels area and expression of the angiogenic factors VEGF and TGFbeta1 in the rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Pieper, Marcela; Lara, Hernán E; Bravo, Javier A; Romero, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is a crucial process in follicular development and luteogenesis. The nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenesis in various tissues. An impaired production of this neurotrophin has been associated with delayed wound healing. A variety of ovarian functions are regulated by NGF, but its effects on ovarian angiogenesis remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate if NGF modulates 1) the amount of follicular blood vessels and 2) ovarian expression of two angiogenic factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFbeta1), in the rat ovary. Results In cultured neonatal rat ovaries, NGF increased VEGF mRNA and protein levels, whereas TGFbeta1 expression did not change. Sectioning of the superior ovarian nerve, which increases ovarian NGF protein content, augmented VEGF immunoreactivity and the area of capillary vessels in ovaries of prepubertal rats compared to control ovaries. Conclusion Results indicate that NGF may be important in the maintenance of the follicular and luteal vasculature in adult rodents, either indirectly, by increasing the expression of VEGF in the ovary, or directly via promoting the proliferation of vascular cells. This data suggests that a disruption on NGF regulation could be a component in ovarian disorders related with impaired angiogenesis. PMID:17096853

  18. Plasticity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow in the Presence of Conditioned Medium of the Facial Nerve and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Marinho, Maria Jocileide de Medeiros; Pereira, Wogelsanger Oliveira; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Costa, Miriam Stela Mariz de Oliveira; Júnior, Expedito Silva do Nascimento; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa

    2014-01-01

    A number of evidences show the influence of the growth of injured nerve fibers in peripheral nervous system as well as potential implant stem cells (SCs). The SCs implementation in the clinical field is promising and the understanding of proliferation and differentiation is essential. This study aimed to evaluate the plasticity of mesenchymal SCs from bone marrow of mice in the presence of culture medium conditioned with facial nerve explants and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The growth and morphology were assessed for over 72 hours. Quantitative phenotypic analysis was taken from the immunocytochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), protein OX-42 (OX-42), protein associated with microtubule MAP-2 (MAP-2), protein β-tubulin III (β-tubulin III), neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), and neurofilament 200 (NF-200). Cells cultured with conditioned medium alone or combined with FGF-2 showed morphological features apparently similar at certain times to neurons and glia and a significant proliferative activity in groups 2 and 4. Cells cultivated only with conditioned medium acquired a glial phenotype. Cells cultured with FGF-2 and conditioned medium expressed GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200. This study improves our understanding of the plasticity of mesenchymal cells and allows the search for better techniques with SCs. PMID:25614888

  19. Do growth-stimulated retinal ganglion cell axons find their central targets after optic nerve injury? New insights by three-dimensional imaging of the visual pathway.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Heike; Leibinger, Marco; Fischer, Dietmar

    2013-10-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) do not normally regenerate injured axons. However, several strategies to transform RGCs into a potent regenerative state have been developed in recent years. Intravitreal CNTF application combined with conditional PTEN and SOCS3 deletion or zymosan-induced inflammatory stimulation together with cAMP analogue injection and PTEN-deletion in RGCs induce long-distance regeneration into the optic nerve of adult mice. A recent paper by the Benowitz group (de Lima et al.) claimed that the latter treatment enables full-length regeneration, with axons correctly navigating to their central target zones and partial recovery of visual behaviors. To gain a more detailed view of the extent and the trajectories of regenerating axons, Luo et al. applied a tissue clearing method and fluorescent microscopy to allow the tracing of naïve and regenerating RGC axons in whole ON and all the way to their brain targets. Using this approach, the authors found comparable axon regeneration in the optic nerve after both above-mentioned experimental treatments. Regeneration was accompanied by prevalent aberrant axon growth in the optic nerve and significant axonal misguidance at the optic chiasm. Less than 120 axons per animal reached the optic chiasm and only few entered the correct optic tract. Importantly, no axons reached visual targets in the olivary pretectal nucleus, the lateral geniculate nucleus or the superior colliculus, thereby contradicting and challenging previous claims by the Benowitz group. The data provided by Luo et al. rather suggest that potent stimulation of axonal growth per se is insufficient to achieve functional recovery and underscore the need to investigate regeneration-relevant axon guidance mechanisms in the mature visual system. PMID:23816572

  20. Rescue of alpha-SNS sodium channel expression in small dorsal root ganglion neurons after axotomy by nerve growth factor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Cummins, T R; Kenney, A M; Kocsis, J D; Waxman, S G

    1998-05-01

    Small (18-25 microm diam) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are known to express high levels of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium current and the mRNA for the alpha-SNS sodium channel, which encodes a TTX-R channel when expressed in oocytes. These neurons also preferentially express the high affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkA. Levels of TTX-R sodium current and of alpha-SNS mRNA are reduced in these cells after axotomy. To determine whether NGF participates in the regulation of TTX-R current and alpha-SNS mRNA in small DRG neurons in vivo, we axotomized small lumbar DRG neurons by sciatic nerve transection and administered NGF or Ringer solution to the proximal nerve stump using osmotic pumps. Ten to 12 days after pump implant, whole cell patch-clamp recording demonstrated that TTX-R current density was decreased in Ringer-treated axotomized neurons (154 +/- 45 pA/pF; mean +/- SE) compared with nonaxotomized control neurons (865 +/- 123 pA/pF) and was restored partially toward control levels in NGF-treated axotomized neurons (465 +/- 78 pA/pF). The V1/2 for steady-state activation and inactivation of TTX-R currents were similar in control, Ringer- and NGF-treated axotomized neurons. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of alpha-SNS mRNA levels in NGF-treated compared with Ringer-treated axotomized DRG. In situ hybridization showed that alpha-SNS mRNA levels were decreased significantly in small Ringer-treated axotomized DRG neurons in vivo and also in small DRG neurons that were dissociated and maintained in vitro, so as to correspond to the patch-clamp conditions. NGF-treated axotomized neurons had a significant increase in alpha-SNS mRNA expression, compared with Ringer-treated axotomized cells. These results show that the administration of exogenous NGF in vivo, to the proximal nerve stump of the transected sciatic nerve, results in an upregulation of TTX-R sodium current and of alpha-SNS mRNA levels in

  1. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.T.; Seabright, R.; Logan, A.; Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  2. Impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhibin; Ma, Jiaming; Hong, Tao; Zhu, Yongqiang; Li, Hongxi; Pan, Shinong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of μ-opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain. Methods The rats were randomly grouped and then injected with 10 μl of phosphate buffer saline or Walker256 tumor cells into the upper segment of left tibia. Thirteen days after the injection, the intrathecal catheterization was performed, followed by the injection of saline, anti-nerve growth factor, nerve growth factor, and naloxone twice a day. The pain ethological changes were measured at the set time points; the expression changes of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia were detected on the 18th day. Results After the tumor cells were injected into the tibia, hyperalgesia appeared and the expression of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia was increased, compared with the sham group; after intrathecally injected anti-nerve growth factor, the significant antinociceptive effects appeared, and the μ-opioid receptor expression was increased, compared with the cancer pain group; the μ-opioid receptor expressions in the other groups showed no statistical significance. The naloxone pretreatment could mostly inverse the antinociception effects of anti-nerve growth factor. Conclusions Anti-nerve growth factor could reduce hyperalgesia in the cancer-induced bone pain rats, and the antinociceptive effects were related with the upregulation of μ-opioid receptor. PMID:27118770

  3. In Vivo Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Dorsal Root Ganglia Is Mediated by Nerve Growth Factor-Triggered Akt Activation during Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Li-Ya; Yu, Sharon J.; Kay, Jarren C.; Xia, Chun-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in sensory hypersensitivity has been suggested; however the molecular mechanisms and signal transduction that regulate BDNF expression in primary afferent neurons during visceral inflammation are not clear. Here we used a rat model of cystitis and found that the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF were increased in the L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in response to bladder inflammation. BDNF up-regulation in the L6 DRG was triggered by endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) because neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody reduced BDNF levels during cystitis. The neutralizing NGF antibody also subsequently reduced cystitis-induced up-regulation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt activity in L6 DRG. To examine whether the NGF-induced Akt activation led to BDNF up-regulation in DRG in cystitis, we found that in cystitis the phospho-Akt immunoreactivity was co-localized with BDNF in L6 DRG, and prevention of the endogenous Akt activity in the L6 DRG by inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) with a potent inhibitor LY294002 reversed cystitis-induced BDNF up-regulation. Further study showed that application of NGF to the nerve terminals of the ganglion-nerve two-compartmented preparation enhanced BDNF expression in the DRG neuronal soma; which was reduced by pre-treatment of the ganglia with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and wortmannin. These in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that NGF played an important role in the activation of Akt and subsequent up-regulation of BDNF in the sensory neurons in visceral inflammation such as cystitis. PMID:24303055

  4. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  5. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  6. Nerve growth factor displays stimulatory effects on human skin and lung fibroblasts, demonstrating a direct role for this factor in tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micera, Alessandra; Vigneti, Eliana; Pickholtz, Dalia; Reich, Reuven; Pappo, Orit; Bonini, Sergio; Maquart, François Xavier; Aloe, Luigi; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2001-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide which, in addition to its effect on nerve cells, is believed to play a role in inflammatory responses and in tissue repair. Because fibroblasts represent the main target and effector cells in these processes, to investigate whether NGF is involved in lung and skin tissue repair, we studied the effect of NGF on fibroblast migration, proliferation, collagen metabolism, modulation into myofibroblasts, and contraction of collagen gel. Both skin and lung fibroblasts were found to produce NGF and to express tyrosine kinase receptor (trkA) under basal conditions, whereas the low-affinity p75 receptor was expressed only after prolonged NGF exposure. NGF significantly induced skin and lung fibroblast migration in an in vitro model of wounded fibroblast and skin migration in Boyden chambers. Nevertheless NGF did not influence either skin or lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, or metalloproteinase production or activation. In contrast, culture of both lung and skin fibroblasts with NGF modulated their phenotype into myofibroblasts. Moreover, addition of NGF to both fibroblast types embedded in collagen gel increased their contraction. Fibrotic human lung or skin tissues displayed immunoreactivity for NGF, trkA, and p75. These data show a direct pro-fibrogenic effect of NGF on skin and lung fibroblasts and therefore indicate a role for NGF in tissue repair and fibrosis.

  7. Gelatin Nanostructured Lipid Carriers Incorporating Nerve Growth Factor Inhibit Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Improve Recovery in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Si-Pin; Wang, Zhou-Guang; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wu, Jiang; Shi, Hong-Xue; Ye, Li-Bing; Wu, Fen-Zan; Cheng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Yu; He, Songbin; Wei, Xiaojie; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Li, Xiao-Kun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Clinical translation of growth factor therapies faces multiple challenges; the most significant one is the short half-life of the naked protein. Gelatin nanostructured lipid carriers (GNLs) had previously been used to encapsulate the basic fibroblast growth factor to enhance the functional recovery in hemiparkinsonian rats. In this research, we comparatively study the enhanced therapy between nerve growth factor (NGF) loaded GNLs (NGF-GNLs) and NGF only in spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of NGF-GNLs and NGF only were tested by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotion scale, inclined plane test, and footprint analysis. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent staining were further performed to identify the expression of ER stress-related proteins, neuron-specific marker neuronal nuclei (NeuN), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). Correlated downstream signals Akt/GSK-3β and ERK1/2 were also analyzed with or without inhibitors. Results showed that NGF-GNLs, compared to NGF only, enhanced the neuroprotection effect in SCI rats. The ER stress-induced apoptosis response proteins CHOP, GRP78 and caspase-12 inhibited by NGF-GNL treatment were more obvious. Meanwhile, NGF-GNLs in the recovery of SCI are related to the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell death via the activation of downstream signals PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β and ERK1/2. PMID:26232067

  8. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  9. Nerve growth factor promotes human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Ding, Xue-Feng; Shi, Cui-Ge; Zeng, Dan; QuZong, SuoLang; Liu, Shu-Hong; Wu, Yan; LuoBu, GeSang; Fan, Ming; Zhao, Y-Q

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first found in the central nervous system and is now well known for its multiple pivotal roles in the nervous system and immune system. However, more and more evidences showed that NGF and its receptors TrkA and p75 were also found in the head and tail of spermatozoa, which indicate the possible effect of NGF on the sperm motility. Nevertheless, the exact role of NGF in the human sperm motility remains unclear until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of NGF on human sperm motility, and the results showed that NGF could promote human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa. Further analysis demonstrated that NGF promoted the sperm motility in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results may facilitate the further studies on human fertility and assisted reproduction techniques.

  10. HemoHIM improves ovarian morphology and decreases expression of nerve growth factor in rats with steroid-induced polycystic ovaries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Bae, Chun Sik; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    Estradiol valerate (EV)-induced polycystic ovaries (PCOs) in rats cause the anovulation and cystic ovarian morphology. We investigated whether treatment with HemoHIM influences the ovarian morphology and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in an EV-induced PCO rat model. PCO was induced by a single intramuscular injection of EV (4 mg, dissolved in sesame oil) in adult cycling rats. HemoHIM was either administered orally (100 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 35 consecutive days or injected intraperitoneally (50 mg/kg of body weight) every other day after EV injection. Ovarian morphology was almost normalized, and NGF was normalized in the PCO + HemoHIM group. HemoHIM lowered the high numbers of antral follicles and increased the number of corpora lutea in PCOs. The results are consistent with a beneficial effect of HemoHIM in the prevention and treatment of PCO syndrome. PMID:20041792

  11. HemoHIM improves ovarian morphology and decreases expression of nerve growth factor in rats with steroid-induced polycystic ovaries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Bae, Chun Sik; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    Estradiol valerate (EV)-induced polycystic ovaries (PCOs) in rats cause the anovulation and cystic ovarian morphology. We investigated whether treatment with HemoHIM influences the ovarian morphology and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in an EV-induced PCO rat model. PCO was induced by a single intramuscular injection of EV (4 mg, dissolved in sesame oil) in adult cycling rats. HemoHIM was either administered orally (100 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 35 consecutive days or injected intraperitoneally (50 mg/kg of body weight) every other day after EV injection. Ovarian morphology was almost normalized, and NGF was normalized in the PCO + HemoHIM group. HemoHIM lowered the high numbers of antral follicles and increased the number of corpora lutea in PCOs. The results are consistent with a beneficial effect of HemoHIM in the prevention and treatment of PCO syndrome.

  12. Induction of rapid eye movement sleep by the microinjection of nerve growth factor into the pontine reticular formation of the cat.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1995-05-01

    Nerve growth factor is an endogenous protein which belongs to the neurotrophin family of trophic factors. According to the neurotrophic hypothesis, neurotrophins are synthetized by target tissues and regulate the survival and phenotype of their innervating neurons. Whereas these trophic molecules have been mainly thought to be involved in developmental processes, their existence in the central nervous system of the adult animal suggests that they may play a role in neuronal physiology. Recently, it has been reported that neurons that express messenger RNA for two neurotrophins, namely brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3, are located medial to the locus coeruleus and ventral to the fourth ventricle. This area corresponds to the latero-dorsal tegmental nucleus, which contains cholinergic neurons that have been implicated in the generation of rapid eye movement sleep. In turn, the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus is reciprocally connected with the nucleus pontis oralis in the rostrodorsal pontine reticular formation, which is an area that is involved in the initiation of the physiological patterns of activity that define the state of rapid eye movement sleep. Scattered neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis express the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor which also binds the other neurotrophins with similar affinity. In addition, neurons in the area of the nucleus pontis oralis have been reported to express a subtype of the neurotrophin high affinity receptors. These membrane receptors, independently or in combination with the low affinity receptors, have been proposed to mediate the delayed, long-term effects of neurotrophins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7637879

  13. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration. PMID:23060343

  14. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  15. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  16. Evaluation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and memory in adult rats survivors of the neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Lemos, Joelson C; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Carradore, Mirelle M; Moreira, Ana Paula; Collodel, Allan; Zanatta, Jessiele R; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, causing sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. The survivors from this meningitis can suffer serious long-term neurological consequences, such as, seizures, hearing loss, learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) control the neuronal cell death during the brain development and play an important role in neuronal differentiation, survival and growth of neurons. Neonate Wistar rats, received either 10μL of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of GBS suspension at a concentration of 1×10(6)cfu/mL. Sixty days after induction of meningitis, the animals underwent behavioral tests, after were killed and the hippocampus and cortex were retired for analyze of the BDNF and NGF levels. In the open-field demonstrated no difference in motor, exploratory activity and habituation memory between the groups. The step-down inhibitory avoidance, when we evaluated the long-term memory at 24h after training session, we found that the meningitis group had a decrease in aversive memory when compared with the long-term memory test of the sham group. BDNF levels decreased in hippocampus and cortex; however the NGF levels decreased only in hippocampus. These findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for the study of the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations secondary to GBS meningitis.

  17. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Invasion Requires Aberrantly Expressed Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Receptors and is Variably Enhanced by Multiple EGF Family Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Stephanie J.; Brossier, Nicole M.; Peavler, Lafe T.; Eckert, Jenell M.; Watkins, Stacey; Roth, Kevin A.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression promotes the pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), the most common malignancy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, but the mechanisms by which EGFR expression promotes MPNST pathogenesis are poorly understood. We hypothesized that inappropriately expressed EGFRs promote MPNST invasion and found that these kinases are concentrated in MPNST invadopodia in vitro. EGFR knockdown inhibited the migration of unstimulated MPNST cells in vitro and exogenous EGF further enhanced MPNST migration in a substrate-specific manner, promoting migration on laminin and, to a lesser extent, collagen. Thus, in this setting, EGF acts as a chemotactic factor. We also found that the 7 known EGFR ligands (EGF, betacellulin, epiregulin, heparin-binding EGF, transforming growth factor α [TGFα], amphiregulin, and epigen) variably enhanced MPNST migration in a concentration-dependent manner, with TGFα being particularly potent. With the exception of epigen, these factors similarly promoted the migration of non-neoplastic Schwann cells. Although transcripts encoding all 7 EGFR ligands were detected in human MPNST cells and tumor tissues, only TGFα was consistently overexpressed and was found to colocalize with EGFR in situ. These data indicate that constitutive EGFR activation, potentially driven by autocrine or paracrine TGFα signaling, promotes the aggressive invasive behavior characteristic of MPNSTs. PMID:23399900

  18. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  19. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth.

  20. The nerve growth factor-responsive PC12 cell line does not express the Myc dimerization partner Max.

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, R; Ziff, E B

    1995-01-01

    Heterodimerization of Max with the nuclear oncoprotein Myc and the differentiation-associated proteins Mad and Mxi1 enables these factors to bind E-box sites in DNA and control genes implicated in cell proliferation and differentiation. We show that in the PC12 pheochromocytoma tumor cell line, functional Max protein is not expressed because of the synthesis of a mutant max transcript. This transcript encodes a protein incapable of homo- or heterodimerization. Furthermore, the mutant Max protein, unlike wild-type Max, is incapable of repressing transcription from an E-box element. Synthesis of mutant max transcripts appears to be due to a homozygous chromosomal alteration within the max gene. Reintroduction of max into PC12 cells results in repression of E-box-dependent transcription and a reduction in growth rate, which may explain the loss of Max expression either during the growth of the pheochromocytoma or in subsequent passage of the PC12 cell line in vitro. Finally, the ability of these cells to divide, differentiate, and apoptose in the absence of Max demonstrates for the first time that these processes can occur via Max- and possibly Myc-independent mechanisms. PMID:7791753

  1. High butyric acid amounts induce oxidative stress, alter calcium homeostasis, and cause neurite retraction in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Seki, Keisuke; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2015-07-01

    Butyric acid (BA) is a common secondary metabolite by-product produced by oral pathogenic bacteria and is detected in high amounts in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontal disease. Previous works have demonstrated that BA can cause oxidative stress in various cell types; however, this was never explored using neuronal cells. Here, we exposed nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC1(2) cells to varying BA concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 5.0 mM). We measured total heme, H(2)O(2), catalase, and calcium levels through biochemical assays and visualized the neurite outgrowth after BA treatment. Similarly, we determined the effects of other common periodontal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on neurite outgrowth for comparison. We found that high (1.0 and 5.0 mM) BA concentrations induced oxidative stress and altered calcium homeostasis, whereas low (0.5 mM) BA concentration had no significant effect. Moreover, compared to other SCFAs, we established that only BA was able to induce neurite retraction.

  2. Effects of Comb Tooth Cap Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium ramosum (Higher Basidiomycetes) Mycelia on DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity and Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Suruga, Kohei; Kadokura, Kazunari; Sekino, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Takafumi; Matsuo, Koichi; Irie, Keiichi; Mishima, Kenichi; Yoneyama, Makoto; Komatsu, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant effects of and nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis caused by Hericium ramosum mycelia. Wild mushroom fruiting bodies were collected from nature to isolate their mycelia. Pieces of H. ramosum fruiting bodies were plated onto 90-mm Petri dishes with potato dextrose agar medium to isolate their mycelia. Antioxidant activity was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity in vitro; the ethanol extract from H. ramosum mycelia (63.11 µmol Trolox/g) was more potent than that of other mushroom mycelia extracts. There was a proportional relationship (R2 = 0.7929) between DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content in extracts of different mushroom mycelia. We investigated the ability of H. ramosum mycelia to inducing NGF synthesis in vivo. Oral administration of H. ramosum mycelia significantly increased concentrations of NGF in the hippocampus of intact mice. These results are the first concerning antioxidant activity and NGF synthesis of H. ramosum mycelia. These mushroom mycelia could be useful as food and/or nutritional supplements because of certain biological functions.

  3. Nerve Growth Factor is Required for Induction of c-Fos Immunoreactivity by Serum, Depolarization, Cyclic AMP or Trauma in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, A; Nobes, C D; Edwards, S N; Tolkovsky, A M

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces transient Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) independently of any other factor, both in newly isolated rat sympathetic neurons and in established cultures after NGF deprivation. The same proportion of neurons that express Fos-IR in response to NGF also survive. In addition to direct stimulation of Fos-IR expression, the presence or recent exposure to NGF is required to obtain Fos-IR expression by other stimuli. In newly isolated neurons no Fos-IR is detected in response to stimulation by serum alone and a response to depolarization or cyclic AMP is obtained only if neurons are stimulated within a short period after ganglion excision. In established cultures none of these stimuli, nor the trauma of cutting neurites or spiking cell bodies with a microinjection needle induce Fos-IR unless NGF is present or had been removed for <8 - 16 h. The lack of response is not due to a general decrease in the rate of protein or RNA synthesis. These findings show that in regenerating sympathetic neurons NGF induces c-Fos and suggest that NGF may activate a master trigger that is required for c-Fos expression to be induced by other stimuli.

  4. Intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor levels in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Miriam S W; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Zapelini, Hugo G; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-04-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited aminoacidopathy resulting from dysfunction of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine as well as their corresponding transaminated branched-chain α-ketoacids. This disorder is clinically characterized by ketoacidosis, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation whose pathophysiology is not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. However, the effect of accumulating α-ketoacids in MSUD on neurotrophic factors has not been investigated. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the brains of young male rats. Ours results showed that intracerebroventricular administration of KIC decreased BDNF levels in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, without induce a detectable change in pro-BDNF levels. Moreover, NGF levels in the hippocampus were reduced after intracerebroventricular administration of KIC. In conclusion, these data suggest that the effects of KIC on demyelination and memory processes may be mediated by reduced trophic support of BDNF and NGF. Moreover, lower levels of BDNF and NGF are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in this neurotrophic factor may contribute to the structural and functional alterations of brain underlying the psychopathology of MSUD, supporting the hypothesis of a neurodegenerative process in MSUD.

  5. Stimulation of a Ca sup 2+ -dependent protein kinase by G sub M1 ganglioside in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbush, B.S.; Levine, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have investigated the ability of exogenous gangliosides to modulate nerve growth factor (NGF) signal transduction in PC12 cells. The effects of exogenous ganglioside G{sub M1} on multiple protein kinase activities were assayed by analyzing site-specific serine phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrOHase) by two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping. In the presence of NGF, exogenous G{sub M1} increased {sup 32}P incorporation into TyrOHase phosphopeptide T2, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase substrate whose phosphorylation is not normally affected by NGF treatment. In the absence of NGF, G{sub M1} treatment had no significant effects on TyrOHase phosphorylation. The removal of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} or blockade of dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} channels prevented the G{sub M1}-induced increases in {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphopeptide T2. Exogenous G{sub M1} also potentiated K{sup +} depolarization-induced increases in the phosphorylation of TyrOHase. These results suggest that the stimulatory effects of exogenous G{sub M1} ganglioside on NGF actions may be due to its ability to potentiate a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent signaling pathway.

  6. Functional Ser205Leu polymorphism of the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) gene is associated with vagal autonomic dysregulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chuan-Chia; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Hsin-An; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates that reduced cardiac vagal (parasympathetic) tone, a robust cardiovascular risk factor, is a trait vulnerability marker of major depressive disorder (MDD). The Ser205/Ser205 genotype of the functional polymorphism (Ser205Leu) of the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), also called p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), gene is reported to increase the risk of MDD. Here, we hypothesized that the NGFR Ser205Leu polymorphism may have an effect on vagal control. A sample of 810 healthy, drug-free, unrelated Han Chinese (413 males, 397 females; mean age 35.17 ± 8.53 years) was included in the NGFR genotyping. Short-term heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess vagus-mediated autonomic function. Potential HRV covariates, such as mood/anxiety status and serum metabolic parameters, were assessed. Homozygotes of the Ser205 allele had significantly lower high frequency power and root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences, both HRV indices of vagal modulation, compared to Leu205 allele carriers. Even after adjusting for relevant confounders, these associations remained significant. Further stratification by sex revealed that the associations were observed only in males. Our results implicate that decreased parasympathetic activity is associated with the NGFR Ser205/Ser205 genotype in a gender-specific manner, suggesting a potential role of NGFR polymorphism in modulating cardiac autonomic function. PMID:26278479

  7. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: novel mutations in the TRKA (NTRK1) gene encoding a high-affinity receptor for nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mardy, S; Miura, Y; Endo, F; Matsuda, I; Sztriha, L; Frossard, P; Moosa, A; Ismail, E A; Macaya, A; Andria, G; Toscano, E; Gibson, W; Graham, G E; Indo, Y

    1999-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained fever, anhidrosis (inability to sweat), absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, self-mutilating behavior, and mental retardation. Human TRKA encodes a high-affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), a member of the neurotrophin family that induces neurite outgrowth and promotes survival of embryonic sensory and sympathetic neurons. We have recently demonstrated that TRKA is responsible for CIPA by identifying three mutations in a region encoding the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain of TRKA in one Ecuadorian and three Japanese families. We have developed a comprehensive strategy to screen for TRKA mutations, on the basis of the gene's structure and organization. Here we report 11 novel mutations, in seven affected families. These are six missense mutations, two frameshift mutations, one nonsense mutation, and two splice-site mutations. Mendelian inheritance of the mutations is confirmed in six families for which parent samples are available. Two mutations are linked, on the same chromosome, to Arg85Ser and to His598Tyr;Gly607Val, hence, they probably represent double and triple mutations. The mutations are distributed in an extracellular domain, involved in NGF binding, as well as the intracellular signal-transduction domain. These data suggest that TRKA defects cause CIPA in various ethnic groups. PMID:10330344

  8. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  9. Changes in levels of nerve growth factor in nasal secretions after capsaicin inhalation in patients with airway symptoms from scents and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva; Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa; Ståhl, Arne; Bende, Mats

    2005-07-01

    Patients complaining of upper and lower airway symptoms caused by scents and chemicals have previously been shown to have increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, but the precise mechanisms behind this reaction are unknown. Hypothesizing that a neurochemical alteration related to sensory hyperreactivity (SHR) of the airway mucosa occurs, we measured levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in nasal lavage fluid (NAL) before and after capsaicin inhalation provocations and related the capsaicin cough sensitivity to the NGF levels. Thirteen patients with SHR and 14 control subjects were provoked with capsaicin inhalation at three different doses. We measured NGF in NAL before and after provocation and recorded cough and capsaicin-induced symptoms. All subjects demonstrated a dose-dependent cough response to capsaicin inhalation, with a more pronounced effect in patients than in controls. Basal levels of NGF were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control subjects (p < 0.01). After capsaicin provocation, the patients showed a significant increase in NGF (p < 0.01), which was related to capsaicin cough sensitivity. The findings demonstrate that, in patients with airway symptoms induced by scents and chemicals, SHR is real and measurable, demonstrating a pathophysiology in the airways of these patients compared to healthy subjects.

  10. Intranasal “painless” Human Nerve Growth Factors Slows Amyloid Neurodegeneration and Prevents Memory Deficits in App X PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Capsoni, Simona; Marinelli, Sara; Ceci, Marcello; Vignone, Domenico; Amato, Gianluca; Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Meli, Giovanni; Viegi, Alessandro; Pavone, Flaminia; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V), which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that “painless” hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8), hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of “painless” hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22666365

  11. Nerve growth factor-mediated inhibition of apoptosis post-caspase activation is due to removal of active caspase-3 in a lysosome-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Mnich, K; Carleton, L A; Kavanagh, E T; Doyle, K M; Samali, A; Gorman, A M

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is well characterised as an important pro-survival factor in neuronal cells that can inhibit apoptotic cell death upstream of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation. Here we addressed the question of whether NGF can also protect against apoptosis downstream of caspase activation. NGF treatment promoted a rapid reduction in the level of the p17 subunit of active caspase-3 in PC12 cells that had been induced to undergo apoptosis by various cytotoxins. The mechanism involved TrkA-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and de novo protein synthesis. Involvement of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and proteasomal degradation were ruled out. In contrast, inhibition of lysosome function using chloroquine and concanamycin A reversed NGF-induced removal of p17. Moreover, in NGF-treated cells, active caspases were found to be localised to lysosomes. The involvement of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy were ruled out. Taken together, these findings suggest an anti-apoptotic mechanism by which NGF induces removal of active caspase-3 in a lysosome-dependent manner. PMID:24787014

  12. Chemical and biological evaluation of nephrocizin in protecting nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells by 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2012-12-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. This model is crucial in the search for compounds that diminish 6-OHDA-induced nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cell death. Nephrocizin (luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside), a flavone glycoside, was isolated from widely distributed plants. The protective effects of pre-treatment with nephrocizin on the induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by 6-OHDA and its oxidative products, H₂O₂-, and p-quinone, were evaluated herein. Nephrocizin promoted cell viability, scavenged ROS-related products, increased cellular glutathione (GSH) levels, and reduced caspase-3 and -8 activities in 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂-, or p-quinone-treated PC12 cells. Furthermore, nephrocizin-conjugated metabolites in PC12 cells were identified with the boronate-affinity method and LC-MS technology, and preferential regioselectivity at the C2' and C5' positions by the nephrocizin-GSH (or NAC) adduct method was observed. These lines of evidence established that nephrocizin could form a dimer to diminish the intracellular ROS. These results demonstrate the first neuroprotective mechanism of nephrocizin against 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂- or p-quinone-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via chemical and biological studies. These dietary antioxidants are potential candidates for use in intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Asarone from Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma Potentiates the Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neuronal Differentiation in Cultured PC12 Cells: A Signaling Mediated by Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kelly Y. C.; Chen, Jianping; Lam, Candy T. W.; Wu, Qiyun; Yao, Ping; Dong, Tina T. X.; Lin, Huangquan; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma (ATR), the rhizome of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, is being used clinically to treat neurological disorders. The volatile oil of ATR is being considered as an active ingredient. Here, α-asarone and β-asarone, accounting about 95% of ATR oil, were evaluated for its function in stimulating neurogenesis. In cultured PC12 cells, application of ATR volatile oil, α-asarone or β-asarone, stimulated the expression of neurofilaments, a bio-marker for neurite outgrowth, in a concentration-dependent manner. The co-treatment of ATR volatile oil, α-asarone or β-asarone, with low concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) potentiated the NGF-induced neuronal differentiation in cultured PC12 cells. In addition, application of protein kinase A inhibitors, H89 and KT5720, in cultures blocked the ATR-induced neurofilament expression, as well as the phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In the potentiation of NGF-induced signaling in cultured PC12 cells, α-asarone and β-asarone showed synergistic effects. These results proposed the neurite-promoting asarone, or ATR volatile oil, could be useful in finding potential drugs for treating various neurodegenerative diseases, in which neurotrophin deficiency is normally involved. PMID:27685847

  14. Peripheral Nerve Transplantation Combined with Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Chondroitinase Induces Regeneration and Improves Urinary Function in Complete Spinal Cord Transected Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Lin, Ching-Yi; Silver, Jerry; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    The loss of lower urinary tract (LUT) control is a ubiquitous consequence of a complete spinal cord injury, attributed to a lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways controlling the bladder. Previous work in our lab has utilized a combinatorial therapy of peripheral nerve autografts (PNG), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to treat a complete T8 spinal cord transection in the adult rat, resulting in supraspinal control of bladder function. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the use of the combinatorial PNG+aFGF+ChABC treatment in a T8 transected mouse model, which more closely models human urinary deficits following spinal cord injury. Cystometry analysis and external urethral sphincter electromyograms reveal that treatment with PNG+aFGF+ChABC reduced bladder weight, improved bladder and external urethral sphincter histology, and significantly enhanced LUT function, resulting in more efficient voiding. Treated mice’s injured spinal cord also showed a reduction in collagen scaring, and regeneration of serotonergic and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons across the lesion and into the distal spinal cord. Regeneration of serotonin axons correlated with LUT recovery. These results suggest that our mouse model of LUT dysfunction recapitulates the results found in the rat model and may be used to further investigate genetic contributions to regeneration failure. PMID:26426529

  15. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)−1 and (−)−1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)−1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (−)−1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)−1 and (−)−1. PMID:26585042

  16. Src mediates endocytosis of TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ 1 channels in PC12 cells in response to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hidetada; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-08-15

    TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels produce background K(+) currents. We elucidated that TASK1 channels in rat adrenal medullary cells and PC12 cells are internalized in a clathrin-dependent manner in response to nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, the molecular mechanism for this internalization in PC12 cells was explored. The combination of enzyme inhibitors with tropomyosin receptor kinase A mutants revealed that the internalization was mediated by both phospholipase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways that converge on protein kinase C with the consequent activation of Src, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. The NGF-induced endocytosis of TASK1 channels did not occur in the presence of the Src inhibitor or with the expression of a kinase-dead Src mutant. Additionally, NGF induced a transient colocalization of Src with the TASK1 channel, but not the TASK1 mutant, in which tyrosine at 370 was replaced with phenylalanine. This TASK1 mutant showed no increase in tyrosine phosphorylation and markedly diminished internalization in response to NGF. We concluded that NGF induces endocytosis of TASK1 channels via tyrosine phosphorylation in its carboxyl terminus.

  17. [Follow-up study of the evolution of the quantitative EEG in intraventricular infusion of nerve growth factor in an aged baboon].

    PubMed

    Morales-Chacón, L; Báez-Martín, M; Fernández-Verdecia, I; López, V; Díaz, L

    1997-06-01

    The animal model of aged monkeys is a good homologue of Alzheimer's disease in humans, in which it has been shown that there is disproportionate slowing of the EEG when compared with healthy subjects paired for age. This is found both on the conventional EEG and quantitatively. In the latter, relative energy has been the measurement most commonly used for diagnosis and follow-up with various treatments. The follow-up parameters evaluated in this study were: absolute and relative energy of the quantitative EEG (EEGq) obtained in an aged (39 year old) baboon (Papio hamadryas) before and after infusion of intraventricular nerve growth factor (NGF). These findings were compared with those of a young animal (6 year old) of the same species, treated in the same way. Since the animals were first anaesthetized with ketamine and diacepam so as to be able to carry out the study, we used a cerebral function analyzer which allowed us to ascertain that the changes found on analysis of the EEGq were not due to the depth of anaesthesia. The analyzer evaluated the tendencies of amplitude and frequency of the EEG, which is a method widely used for the indirect evaluation of the level of anaesthesia.

  18. Intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor levels in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Miriam S W; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Zapelini, Hugo G; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-04-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited aminoacidopathy resulting from dysfunction of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine as well as their corresponding transaminated branched-chain α-ketoacids. This disorder is clinically characterized by ketoacidosis, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation whose pathophysiology is not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. However, the effect of accumulating α-ketoacids in MSUD on neurotrophic factors has not been investigated. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the brains of young male rats. Ours results showed that intracerebroventricular administration of KIC decreased BDNF levels in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, without induce a detectable change in pro-BDNF levels. Moreover, NGF levels in the hippocampus were reduced after intracerebroventricular administration of KIC. In conclusion, these data suggest that the effects of KIC on demyelination and memory processes may be mediated by reduced trophic support of BDNF and NGF. Moreover, lower levels of BDNF and NGF are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in this neurotrophic factor may contribute to the structural and functional alterations of brain underlying the psychopathology of MSUD, supporting the hypothesis of a neurodegenerative process in MSUD. PMID:26586008

  19. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  20. The exposure to nicotine affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang

    2015-02-01

    In the current study effect of nicotine on expression of neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) has been studied in hippocampus and frontal cortex during development of brain in rats. Neurotrophins are factors that help in development of brain among which BDNF and NGF are very important, expressed at different stages during the developmental process. Different sedatives are reported to alter the expression of these factors. In this study, three groups of neonate rats (1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 days age) were used each having 20 rats. Ten were subjected to a dose of 66 μg of nicotine while other ten received the same amount of saline at the same time interval. Then expression of the BDNF and NGF was observed in hippocampus and frontal cortex tissue using immunoassay. Western blotting was used to observe the presence of BDNF in hippocampus as well as frontal cortex. In all groups there was a significant decrease in concentration of neurotrophic factors where nicotine was applied as compared to control. The highest expression of BDNF and NGF in hippocampus and frontal cortex was observed in 10-15 days group (G3) and in 5-10 group (G2) as compared to the control, P < 0.01. It was concluded that exposure of neonate rats to nicotine causes a decrease in the expression of NGF and BDNF and it effects the development of brain in neonates that can further impair brain functions.

  1. Chemical and biological evaluation of nephrocizin in protecting nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells by 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2012-12-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. This model is crucial in the search for compounds that diminish 6-OHDA-induced nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cell death. Nephrocizin (luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside), a flavone glycoside, was isolated from widely distributed plants. The protective effects of pre-treatment with nephrocizin on the induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by 6-OHDA and its oxidative products, H₂O₂-, and p-quinone, were evaluated herein. Nephrocizin promoted cell viability, scavenged ROS-related products, increased cellular glutathione (GSH) levels, and reduced caspase-3 and -8 activities in 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂-, or p-quinone-treated PC12 cells. Furthermore, nephrocizin-conjugated metabolites in PC12 cells were identified with the boronate-affinity method and LC-MS technology, and preferential regioselectivity at the C2' and C5' positions by the nephrocizin-GSH (or NAC) adduct method was observed. These lines of evidence established that nephrocizin could form a dimer to diminish the intracellular ROS. These results demonstrate the first neuroprotective mechanism of nephrocizin against 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂- or p-quinone-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via chemical and biological studies. These dietary antioxidants are potential candidates for use in intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22954731

  2. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)-1 and (-)-1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)-1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (-)-1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)-1 and (-)-1.

  3. Levels of nerve growth factor and its mRNA in the central nervous system of the rat correlate with cholinergic innervation.

    PubMed Central

    Korsching, S; Auburger, G; Heumann, R; Scott, J; Thoenen, H

    1985-01-01

    The levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its mRNA in the rat central nervous system were determined by two-site enzyme immunoassay and quantitative Northern blots, respectively. Relatively high NGF levels (0.4-1.4 ng NGF/g wet weight) were found both in the regions innervated by the magnocellular cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (hippocampus, olfactory bulb, neocortex) and in the regions containing the cell bodies of these neurons (septum, nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca, nucleus basalis of Meynert). Comparatively low, but significant NGF levels (0.07-0.21 ng NGF/g wet weight) were found in various other brain regions. mRNANGF was found in the hippocampus and cortex but not in the septum. This suggests that magnocellular cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain are supplied with NGF via retrograde axonal transport from their fields of innervation. These results, taken together with those of previous studies showing that these neurons are responsive to NGF, support the concept that NGF acts as trophic factor for magnocellular cholinergic neurons. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2411537

  4. Pro-nerve growth factor induces autocrine stimulation of breast cancer cell invasion through tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) and sortilin protein.

    PubMed

    Demont, Yohann; Corbet, Cyril; Page, Adeline; Ataman-Önal, Yasemin; Choquet-Kastylevsky, Genevieve; Fliniaux, Ingrid; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Bradshaw, Ralph A; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2012-01-13

    The precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF) has been described as a biologically active polypeptide able to induce apoptosis in neuronal cells, via the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) and the sortilin receptor. Herein, it is shown that proNGF is produced and secreted by breast cancer cells, stimulating their invasion. Using Western blotting and mass spectrometry, proNGF was detected in a panel of breast cancer cells as well as in their conditioned media. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated an overproduction of proNGF in breast tumors, when compared with benign and normal breast biopsies, and a relationship to lymph node invasion in ductal carcinomas. Interestingly, siRNA against proNGF induced a decrease of breast cancer cell invasion that was restored by the addition of non-cleavable proNGF. The activation of TrkA, Akt, and Src, but not the MAP kinases, was observed. In addition, the proNGF invasive effect was inhibited by the Trk pharmacological inhibitor K252a, a kinase-dead TrkA, and siRNA against TrkA sortilin, neurotensin, whereas siRNA against p75(NTR) and the MAP kinase inhibitor PD98059 had no impact. These data reveal the existence of an autocrine loop stimulated by proNGF and mediated by TrkA and sortilin, with the activation of Akt and Src, for the stimulation of breast cancer cell invasion.

  5. Seasonal changes in expression of nerve growth factor and its receptors TrkA and p75 in the ovary of wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Sheng, Xia; Bao, Lihong; Huang, Shiyang; Li, Qinglin; Liu, Yuning; Han, Yingying; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Weng, Qiang

    2014-01-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) and p75 in the ovaries of the wild ground squirrels during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In the breeding period, NGF, TrkA and p75 were immunolocalized in granulosa cells, thecal cells, interstitial cells and luteal cells whereas in the nonbreeding period, both of them were detected only in granulosa cells, thecal cells and interstitial cells. Stronger immunostaining of NGF, TrkA and p75 were observed in granulosa cells, thecal cells and interstitial cells in the breeding season compared to the nonbreeding season. Corresponding for the immunohistochemical results, immunoreactivities of NGF and its two receptors were greater in the ovaries of the breeding season then decreased to a relatively low level in the nonbreeding season. The mean mRNA levels of NGF, TrkA and p75 were significantly higher in the breeding season than in the nonbreeding season. In addition, plasma gonadotropins, estradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations were significantly higher in the breeding season than in the nonbreeding season, suggesting that the expression patterns of NGF, and TrkA and p75 were correlated with changes in plasma gonadotropins, estradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations. These results indicated that NGF and its receptors, TrkA and p75 may be involved in the regulation of seasonal changes in the ovarian functions of the wild ground squirrel.

  6. Improved restriction landmark cDNA scanning and its application to global analysis of genes regulated by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, K; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Kojima, S; Watanabe, S; Suzuki, H

    1998-07-30

    Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS) is a novel method by which more than 1000 genes can be simultaneously and quantitatively displayed as two-dimensional gel spots. Here we present an adaptation that allows an individual spot to correspond to a unique gene species without redundancy in more than two gel patterns. Using this improved RLCS, we examined global changes on the gene expression of PC12 cells before and after treatment with nerve growth factor. Among a total of 3000 spots, 21 (0.70%) and 91 (3.03%) spots newly appeared and became more intense with treatment. On the other hand, 15 (0.50%) and 44 (1.47%) spots disappeared, becoming less intense with treatment. These observations suggest that approx. 6% of the detected PC12 genes are up-(3.73%) or down-(1.97%) regulated when the cells differentiate to neuronal cells. In comparison with the results obtained using the expressed-sequence-tag approach, previously reported by Lee et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92 (1995) 8303-8307), RLCS should be useful for quantitatively examining the global change of differentially expressed genes of various expression levels. PMID:9714711

  7. Nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated regulation of p75(NTR) expression contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Reka; Mnich, Katarzyna; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-09-30

    Triple negative breast cancer [TNBC] cells are reported to secrete the neurotrophin nerve growth factor [NGF] and express its receptors, p75 neurotrophin receptor [p75(NTR)] and TrkA, leading to NGF-activated pro-survival autocrine signaling. This provides a rationale for NGF as a potential therapeutic target for TNBC. Here we show that exposure of TNBC cells to NGF leads to increased levels of p75(NTR), which was diminished by NGF-neutralizing antibody or NGF inhibitors [Ro 08-2750 and Y1086]. NGF-mediated increase in p75(NTR) levels were partly due to increased transcription and partly due to inhibition of proteolytic processing of p75(NTR). In contrast, proNGF caused a decrease in p75(NTR) levels. Functionally, NGF-induced increase in p75(NTR) caused a decrease in the sensitivity of TNBC cells to apoptosis induction. In contrast, knock-down of p75(NTR) using shRNA or small molecule inhibition of NGF-p75(NTR) interaction [using Ro 08-2750] sensitized TNBC cells to drug-induced apoptosis. In patient samples, the expression of NGF and NGFR [the p75(NTR) gene] mRNA are positively correlated in several subtypes of breast cancer, including basal-like breast cancer. Together these data suggest a positive feedback loop through which NGF-mediated upregulation of p75(NTR) can contribute to the chemo-resistance of TNBC cells. PMID:27577679

  8. Designing ideal conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve tubes, guides, or conduits are a promising alternative for autologous nerve graft repair. The first biodegradable empty single lumen or hollow nerve tubes are currently available for clinical use and are being used mostly in the repair of small-diameter nerves with nerve defects of < 3 cm. These nerve tubes are made of different biomaterials using various fabrication techniques. As a result these tubes also differ in physical properties. In addition, several modifications to the common hollow nerve tube (for example, the addition of Schwann cells, growth factors, and internal frameworks) are being investigated that may increase the gap that can be bridged. This combination of chemical, physical, and biological factors has made the design of a nerve conduit into a complex process that demands close collaboration of bioengineers, neuroscientists, and peripheral nerve surgeons. In this article the authors discuss the different steps that are involved in the process of the design of an ideal nerve conduit for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:19435445

  9. Testosterone, but not nonaromatizable dihydrotestosterone, improves working memory and alters nerve growth factor levels in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A; Singleton, Rachel S; Nelson, Matthew E; Eckman, Christopher B; Barber, John; Scott, Tonetta Y; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that testosterone levels are lower in men with Alzheimer's disease and that testosterone treatment improves cognition in older men. Since testosterone can be aromatized to estrogen, testosterone's effects could be due to conversion into estrogen. We treated aged male rats with either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the latter of which is not aromatized to estrogen, in order to determine whether these treatments improve spatial working and reference memory as assessed in the water radial arm maze. We also tested whether such effects are related to beta-amyloid levels in the hippocampus or neurotrophin levels in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, frontal cortex, or striatum. Aged rats made more errors than young rats on all memory measures. Testosterone, but not DHT, improved working memory and decreased hippocampal NGF protein in aged rats, while having no effect on beta-amyloid. However, higher beta-amyloid levels were correlated with poorer working memory performance in young rats. Neurotrophin levels in entorhinal cortex were positively correlated with errors for all memory measures in androgen-treated rats. Similar to findings in human studies, in our study androgen treatment lowered circulating estradiol levels in aged rats, suggesting that androgen treatment exerts feedback to the hypothalamic pituitary axis and that conversion to estrogen may not be the underlying biological mechanism of testosterone's effects on memory and growth factor levels. The ratio of estradiol to testosterone, or the actions of the aromatase enzyme itself, may be responsible for the observed effects. These data support the hypothesis that testosterone therapy in aging men may provide positive effects on cognition and that neural regions that are linked to cognition, such as the hippocampus and/or entorhinal cortex, may be involved in such effects.

  10. The Effect of Antenatal Depression and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment on Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Kaihola, Helena; Olivier, Jocelien; Poromaa, Inger Sundström; Åkerud, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a child during pregnancy. In addition, serotonin (5-HT) exerts neurotrophic actions with thus far not fully known effects in the offspring. The neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) is involved in neuronal cell survival and differentiation, and altered placenta levels have been found to increase the risk for pregnancy complications, similar to those found in women treated with SSRIs. We therefore investigated whether the NGF signaling pathway was altered in the placenta from women treated with SSRIs (n = 12) and compared them with placenta from depressed (n = 12) and healthy mothers (n = 12). Results from immunohistochemical stainings revealed that placental NGF protein levels of SSRI-treated women were increased in both trophoblasts and endothelial cells compared with depressed and control women. In addition, downstream of the NGF receptor TrkA, increased levels of the signaling proteins ROCK2 and phosphorylated Raf-1 were found in stromal cells and a tendency towards increased levels of ROCK2 in trophoblasts and endothelial cells in SSRI-treated women when compared to healthy controls. SSRI-treated women also displayed increased levels of phosphorylated ROCK2 in all placental cell types studied in comparison with depressed and control women. Interestingly, in placental endothelial cells from depressed women, NGF levels were significantly lower compared to control women, but ROCK2 levels were increased compared with control and SSRI-treated women. Taken together, these results show that the NGF signaling and downstream pathways in the placenta are affected by SSRI treatment and/or antenatal depression. This might lead to an altered placental function, although the clinical

  11. A comparative analysis of the structural, functional and biological differences between Mouse and Human Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Francesca; Malerba, Francesca; Ercole, Bruno Bruni; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-03-01

    NGF is the prototype member of the neurotrophin family of proteins that promote the survival and growth of selected neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. As for all neurotrophins, NGF is translated as a pre-pro-protein. Over the years, NGF and proNGF of either human or mouse origin, given their high degree of homology, have been exploited for numerous applications in biomedical sciences. The mouse NGF has been considered the golden-standard for bioactivity. Indeed, due to evolutionary relatedness to human NGF and to its ready availability and by assuming identical properties to its human counterpart, the mouse NGF, isolated and purified from sub-maxillary glands, has been tested not only in laboratory practice and in preclinical models, but it has also been evaluated in several human clinical trials. Aiming to validate this assumption, widely believed, we performed a comparative study of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the mouse and human counterparts of NGF and proNGF. The mature and the precursor proteins of either species strikingly differ in their biophysical profiles and, when tested for ligand binding to their receptors, in their in vitro biological activities. We provide a structural rationale that accounts for their different functional behaviors. Despite being highly conserved during evolution, NGF and proNGF of mouse and human origins show distinct properties and therefore special care must be taken in performing experiments with cross-species systems in the laboratory practice, in developing immunoassays, in clinical trials and in pharmacological treatments. PMID:25496838

  12. Autologous fibrin glue in peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Han, Sang-Gyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Zhu, Shi-Jiang; Huh, Jin-Young; Jung, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Yong

    2005-01-01

    The activity of several growth factors on peripheral nerve regeneration is reported. Autologous fibrin glue contains a large number of platelets, which release significant quantities of growth factors. In order to understand the role of autologous fibrin glue in peripheral nerve regeneration, a 15-mm rabbit peroneal nerve defect was repaired using a vein graft filled with autologous fibrin glue. Axonal regeneration was examined using histological and electrophysiological methods. The extent of axonal regeneration was superior when treated with autologous fibrin glue. Our data suggest that fibrin nets formed by fibrinogen, in combination with growth factors present in autologous fibrin glue, might effectively promote peripheral nerve regeneration in nerve defects.

  13. Expression patterns of T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice after sciatic nerve axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Bing; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-10-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) contribute to pain hypersensitivity within primary sensory nerves. A recent study suggested that activation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) could increase Cav3.2 channel currents and further contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the expression patterns of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R and their colocalization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in chronic neuropathic pain condition remain unknown. In this study, we explored expression patterns of Cav3.2, IGF-1R and their colocalization, and whether phenotypic switch occurs in a subpopulation of Cav3.2 or IGF-1R neurons in mouse DRGs after sciatic nerve axotomy with immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. We found that expressions of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R, and their colocalization were not increased in DRGs of mice following axotomy. In addition, Cav3.2 or IGF-1R subpopulation neurons did not acquire significant switch in expression phenotype after sciatic nerve axotomy. Our findings argue for an upregulation of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R expression in lumbar DRGs post-sciatic nerve axotomy and provided an insight for understanding the functions of peripheral afferent Cav3.2 channel and IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27571431

  14. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  15. Nerve growth factor exhibits an antioxidant and an autocrine activity in mouse liver that is modulated by buthionine sulfoximine, arsenic, and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos-Flores, C; Gonsebatt, M E

    2013-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is one of the several structurally related proteins, named neurotrophins (NTs), that regulate neuronal survival, development, function, and plasticity. Moreover, NGF is an important activator of antioxidant mechanisms. These NGF functions are mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase receptor A (TrkA). Although NTs and their receptors have been shown to be expressed in visceral tissues, the extent to which NTs are involved in the physiology of visceral tissues is less clear. NGF is the most expressed NT in adult mouse livers. Although NGF is an important modulator of antioxidant mechanisms in neural tissues, few studies describe the relationship between oxidative stress and NGF expression in the liver. In this study, we demonstrate that ngfb mRNA is positively modulated in mouse livers after oxidative injury via intraperitoneal injection of 14 mg/kg sodium arsenite, 6 mmol/kg L-buthionine-S-R-sulfoximine (BSO), or 300 mg/kg acetaminophen (APAP). In addition to the upregulation of ngfb, we observed the phosphorylation of the NGF high-affinity receptor TrkA in the liver as well as the downstream phosphorylation of Akt, NF-kB nuclear migration and iκbα and tx-1 mRNA upregulation. These effects were abolished when a neutralizing anti-NGF antibody was used. Furthermore, this anti-NGF antibody alone induced oxidative stress in the liver by decreasing the reduced glutathione, increasing the oxidized glutathione, and downregulating tx-1 mRNA. Thus, NGF plays a critical role in liver protection against oxidative stress and xenobiotic injury as well as maintains a reduced thiol state.

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Mediates a Switch in Intracellular Signaling for PGE2-Induced Sensitization of Sensory Neurons from Protein Kinase A to Epac

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Habashy Malty, Ramy; Guo, Chunlu; Duarte, Djane B.; Zhang, Yihong; Nicol, Grant D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to chronic hypersensitivity, alters the intracellular signaling that mediates the sensitizing actions of PGE2 from activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs). When isolated sensory neurons are grown in the absence of added NGF, but not in cultures grown with 30 ng/ml NGF, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity blocks the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP and to increase the number of action potentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of current. Growing sensory neurons in culture in the presence of increasing concentrations of NGF increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1. An intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the rat hindpaw also increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord: an effect blocked by intraplantar administration of NGF antibodies. Treating cultures grown in the presence of 30 ng/ml NGF with Epac1siRNA significantly reduced the expression of Epac1, but not Epac2, and did not block the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from sensory neurons. Exposing neuronal cultures grown in NGF to Epac2siRNAreduced the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 and prevented the PGE2-induced augmentation of capsaicin and potassium-evoked CGRP release in sensory neurons and the PGE2-induced increase in the number of APs generated by a ramp of current. In neurons grown with no added NGF, Epac siRNAs did not attenuate PGE2-induced sensitization. These results demonstrate that NGF, through increasing Epac2 expression, alters the signaling cascade that mediates PGE2-induced sensitization of sensory neurons, thus providing a novel mechanism for maintaining PGE2-induced hypersensitivity during inflammation. PMID:25126967

  17. Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation regulates expression of growth differentiation factor 11 and activin-like kinase 5 in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingxi; Zhang, Lina; He, Guoqian; Tan, Xiaodan; Jin, Xinhao; Li, Changqing

    2016-10-15

    Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), as a rejuvenation factor in heterochronic parabiosis, can increase proliferation of primary brain capillary endothelial cells (ECs). However, the angiogenic role of GDF11 in ischemia-induced brain injury is still unclear. There are no previous reports on the spatiotemporal expression of GDF11 in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rats. Our recent work has strongly suggested that transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) reduces infarct size and induces angiogenesis in focal cerebral I/R rats. This study focused on expression of GDF11 and activin-like kinase 5 (ALK5) and the effects of ta-VNS in a rat cerebral I/R model. For ta-VNS, electrical stimulation of the left cavum concha (1h duration) using percutaneous needles was initiated 30min after induction of ischemia. Expression of GDF11 was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blot 24h, 3d, and 7d after reperfusion. In addition, neurobehavioral function, EC proliferation, and expression of ALK5 in ECs in the peri-infarct cortex were measured. Results showed that levels of GDF11 were significantly elevated after cerebral I/R, both in plasma and the peri-infarct cerebral cortex. Interestingly, splenic GDF11 levels decreased after ischemia. ALK5 was expressed in ECs in the peri-infarct cerebral cortex where active vessel remodeling was noted. ta-VNS improved neurobehavioral recovery, upregulated cerebral GDF11 and downregulated splenic GDF11, indicating a brain-spleen communication during stroke. ta-VNS also increased expression of ALK5 in ECs and stimulated proliferation of ECs. These results suggest that, after cerebral ischemia, GDF11 redistributes and participates in angiogenesis as an angiogenic factor that acts at least in part through ALK5. GDF11/ALK5 may represent a new potential therapy target for stroke. PMID:27653860

  18. Molecular evolution of vertebrate neurotrophins: co-option of the highly conserved nerve growth factor gene into the advanced snake venom arsenalf.

    PubMed

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N W; Casewell, Nicholas R; Undheim, Eivind A B; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A; King, Glenn F; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation.

  19. Ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced cholinergic imbalance in the hippocampus of Aldh2-knockout mice does not affect nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Ruby, Mostofa; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Nakamura, Yu; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2013-11-20

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play an important role in the maintenance of cholinergic-neuron function. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ethanol (EtOH)- and acetaldehyde (AcH)- induced cholinergic effects would cause neurotrophic alterations in the hippocampus of mice. We used Aldh2 knockout (Aldh2-KO) mice, a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2)-deficiency in humans, to examine the effects of acute administration of EtOH and the role of AcH. Hippocampal slices were collected and the mRNA and protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), NGF and BDNF were analyzed 30 min after the i.p. administration of EtOH (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g/kg). We show that treatment with 2.0 g/kg of EtOH decreased ChAT mRNA and protein levels in Aldh2-KO mice but not in wild-type (WT) mice, which suggests a role for AcH in the mechanism of action of EtOH. The administration of 2.0 g/kg of EtOH increased AChE mRNA in both strains of mice. EtOH failed to change the levels of NGF or BDNF at any dose. Aldh2-KO mice exhibited a distinctly lower expression of ChAT and a higher expression of NGF both at mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus compared with WT mice. Our observations suggest that administration of EtOH and elevated AcH can alter cholinergic markers in the hippocampus of mice, and this effect did not change the levels of NGF or BDNF. PMID:24096209

  20. Nerve growth factor exhibits an antioxidant and an autocrine activity in mouse liver that is modulated by buthionine sulfoximine, arsenic, and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos-Flores, C; Gonsebatt, M E

    2013-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is one of the several structurally related proteins, named neurotrophins (NTs), that regulate neuronal survival, development, function, and plasticity. Moreover, NGF is an important activator of antioxidant mechanisms. These NGF functions are mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase receptor A (TrkA). Although NTs and their receptors have been shown to be expressed in visceral tissues, the extent to which NTs are involved in the physiology of visceral tissues is less clear. NGF is the most expressed NT in adult mouse livers. Although NGF is an important modulator of antioxidant mechanisms in neural tissues, few studies describe the relationship between oxidative stress and NGF expression in the liver. In this study, we demonstrate that ngfb mRNA is positively modulated in mouse livers after oxidative injury via intraperitoneal injection of 14 mg/kg sodium arsenite, 6 mmol/kg L-buthionine-S-R-sulfoximine (BSO), or 300 mg/kg acetaminophen (APAP). In addition to the upregulation of ngfb, we observed the phosphorylation of the NGF high-affinity receptor TrkA in the liver as well as the downstream phosphorylation of Akt, NF-kB nuclear migration and iκbα and tx-1 mRNA upregulation. These effects were abolished when a neutralizing anti-NGF antibody was used. Furthermore, this anti-NGF antibody alone induced oxidative stress in the liver by decreasing the reduced glutathione, increasing the oxidized glutathione, and downregulating tx-1 mRNA. Thus, NGF plays a critical role in liver protection against oxidative stress and xenobiotic injury as well as maintains a reduced thiol state. PMID:23472850

  1. Development of a method that eliminates false-positive results due to nerve growth factor interference in the assessment of fulranumab immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Sheng; Schantz, Allen; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Cannon, Michael; Shankar, Gopi

    2014-05-01

    Fulranumab, a human IgG2 monoclonal antibody that neutralizes nerve growth factor (NGF), is currently in development for the treatment of pain. Our initial immunogenicity test method was found to be prone to NGF interference, leading to a high apparent incidence of anti-drug antibody (ADA) in phase 1 studies. The ADA immunoassay comprised a homogeneous bridging electrochemiluminescence (ECL) format with biotin and ruthenium-labeled fulranumab bound together ("bridged") by ADA in test samples for detection. In this assay, NGF produced a false-positive signal due to its ability to bridge fulranumab molecules. Thus, we developed a specificity assay to eliminate the NGF false-positive results. We encountered the challenge of eliminating drug interference as well as drug target interference, and discovered that the acid-dissociation-based pretreatment of samples used for mitigating drug interference dramatically increased drug target interference. Several strategies were investigated to eliminate the NGF interference; yet only one strategy specifically removed NGF and produced true fulranumab-specific ADA results by using competitive inhibition with fulranumab and utilizing an alternative NGF binding antibody to eliminate NGF interference. Using this new method, we confirmed that the high apparent anti-fulranumab antibody incidence (>60%) in clinical study samples was in fact due to fulranumab-bound NGF released during the acid-dissociation step of the ADA testing method. We conclude that our revised method accurately identifies anti-fulranumab antibodies by incorporating steps to eliminate fulranumab and NGF interference. We advise that acid-dissociation pretreatment must not be universally applied to improve ADA assays without investigating its bioanalytical risks versus benefits.

  2. Molecular evolution of vertebrate neurotrophins: co-option of the highly conserved nerve growth factor gene into the advanced snake venom arsenalf.

    PubMed

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N W; Casewell, Nicholas R; Undheim, Eivind A B; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A; King, Glenn F; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation. PMID:24312363

  3. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, R K; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity which has been identified as B-Raf. PC12 cells express both B-Raf and c-Raf1; however, the MEK-activating activity was found only in fractions containing B-Raf. c-Raf1-containing fractions did not exhibit a MEK-activating activity. Gel filtration analysis revealed that the B-Raf eluted with an apparent M(r) of 250,000 to 300,000, indicating that it is present within a stable complex with other unidentified proteins. Immunoprecipitation with B-Raf-specific antisera quantitatively precipitated all MEK activator activity from these fractions. We also demonstrate that B-Raf, as well as c-Raf1, directly interacted with activated p21ras immobilized on silica beads. NGF treatment of the cells had no effect on the ability of B-Raf or c-Raf1 to bind to activated p21ras. These data indicate that this interaction was not dependent upon the activation state of these enzymes; however, MEK kinase activity was found to be associated with p21ras following incubation with NGF-treated samples at levels higher than those obtained from unstimulated cells. These data provide direct evidence that NGF-stimulated B-Raf is responsible for the activation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells, whereas c-Raf1 activity was not found to function within this pathway. Images PMID:7935411

  4. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  5. Repeated, Intermittent Exposures to diisopropylfluorophosphate in Rats: Protracted Effects on Cholinergic Markers, Nerve Growth Factor-Related Proteins, and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Alvin V.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Gearhart, Debra A.; Beck, Wayne D.; Middlemore-Risher, Mary-Louise; Truan, Jacob N.; Schwarz, Gary M.; Xu, Meng; Bartlett, Michael G.; Kutiyanawala, Ammar; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pose a constant threat to human health due to their widespread use as pesticides and their potential employment in military and terrorist attacks. The acute toxicity of OPs has been extensively studied; however, the consequences of prolonged or repeated exposure to levels of OPs that produce no overt signs of acute toxicity (i.e., subthreshold levels) are poorly understood. Further, there is clinical evidence that such repeated exposures to OPs lead to prolonged deficits in cognition, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. In this study, the behavioral and neurochemical effects of repeated, intermittent, and subthreshold exposures to the alkyl OP, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were investigated. Rats were injected with DFP subcutaneously (dose range, 0.25-1.0 mg/kg) every other day over the course of 30 days, and then given a two week, DFP-free washout period. In behavioral experiments conducted at various times during the washout period, dose dependent decrements in a water maze hidden platform task and a spontaneous novel object recognition (NOR) procedure were observed, while prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was unaffected. There were modest decreases in open field locomotor activity and grip strength (particularly during the DFP exposure period); however, rotarod performance and water maze swim speeds were not affected. After washout, DFP concentrations were minimal in plasma and brain, however, cholinesterase inhibition was still detectable in the brain. Moreover, the 1.0 mg/kg dose of DFP was associated with (brain region-dependent) alterations in nerve growth factor-related proteins and cholinergic markers. The results of this prospective animal study thus provide evidence to support two novel hypotheses: 1) that intermittent, subthreshold exposures to alkyl OPs can lead to protracted deficits in specific domains of cognition and 2) that such cognitive deficits may be related to persistent functional

  6. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat. PMID:26285082

  7. Nuclear factor kappaB/p49 is a negative regulatory factor in nerve growth factor-induced choline acetyltransferase promoter activity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Toliver-Kinsky, T; Wood, T; Perez-Polo, J R

    2000-12-01

    Anovel nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding site has been identified within the promoter region of the mouse gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine and has been implicated in the cognitive deficits associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. This binding site, which is located within the nerve growth factor (NGF)-responsive enhancer element, was recognized by the NF-kappaB protein p49 but not p65 or p50. p49 from both basal forebrain and PC12 nuclear extracts interacted with this specific sequence in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Mutation of the NF-kappaB site caused an increase in NGF-induced promoter activation, whereas overexpression of p49 in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells caused a decrease in endogenous ChAT enzyme activity and a decrease in promoter activity that was specifically mediated through this NF-kappaB binding site. Treatment of PC12 cells with NGF resulted in a drastic reduction in nuclear p49 binding to the ChAT NF-kappaB site after 24 h, but nuclear p49 levels were not altered, suggesting that late NGF-mediated events prevent binding of p49 to the ChAT promoter by an unknown mechanism other than nuclear translocation. Decreased ChAT expression and increased NF-kappaB activity in the brain are associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. These data indicate that p49 is a negative regulator of ChAT expression and suggest a possible mechanism for aging-associated declines in cholinergic function.

  8. ERK5/KLF4 signaling as a common mediator of the neuroprotective effects of both nerve growth factor and hydrogen peroxide preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Su, Chang; Sun, Fen; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Singh, Meharvan

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. While high levels of oxidative stress are generally associated with cell death, a slight rise of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels can be protective by "preconditioning" cells to develop a resistance against subsequent challenges. However, the mechanisms underlying such preconditioning (PC)-induced protection are still poorly understood. Previous studies have supported a role of ERK5 (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase 5) in neuroprotection and ischemic tolerance in the hippocampus. In agreement with these findings, our data suggest that ERK5 mediates both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced PC as well as nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuroprotection. Activation of ERK5 partially rescued pheochromocytoma PC12 cells as well as primary hippocampal neurons from H2O2-caused death, while inhibition of ERK5 abolished NGF or PC-induced protection. These results implicate ERK5 signaling as a common downstream pathway for NGF and PC. Furthermore, both NGF and PC increased the expression of the transcription factor, KLF4, which can initiate an anti-apoptotic response in various cell types. Induction of KLF4 by NGF or PC was blocked by siERK5, suggesting that ERK5 is required in this process. siKLF4 can also attenuate NGF- or PC-induced neuroprotection. Overexpression of active MEK5 or KLF4 in H2O2-stressed cells increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and the expression of NAIP (neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein). Taken together, our data suggest that ERK5/KLF4 cascade is a common signaling pathway shared by at least two important mechanisms by which neurons can be protected from cell death. PMID:25015774

  9. The transcription factor nerve growth factor-inducible protein a mediates epigenetic programming: altering epigenetic marks by immediate-early genes.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ian C G; D'Alessio, Ana C; Brown, Shelley E; Hellstrom, Ian C; Dymov, Sergiy; Sharma, Shakti; Szyf, Moshe; Meaney, Michael J

    2007-02-14

    Maternal care alters epigenetic programming of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression in the hippocampus, and increased postnatal maternal licking/grooming (LG) behavior enhances nerve growth factor-inducible protein A (NGFI-A) transcription factor binding to the exon 1(7) GR promoter within the hippocampus of the offspring. We tested the hypothesis that NGFI-A binding to the exon 1(7) GR promoter sequence marks this sequence for histone acetylation and DNA demethylation and that such epigenetic alterations subsequently influence NGFI-A binding and GR transcription. We report that (1) NGFI-A binding to its consensus sequence is inhibited by DNA methylation, (2) NGFI-A induces the activity of exon 1(7) GR promoter in a transient reporter assay, (3) DNA methylation inhibits exon 1(7) GR promoter activity, and (4) whereas NGFI-A interaction with the methylated exon 1(7) GR promoter is reduced, NGFI-A overexpression induces histone acetylation, DNA demethylation, and activation of the exon 1(7) GR promoter in transient transfection assays. Site-directed mutagenesis assays demonstrate that NGFI-A binding to the exon 1(7) GR promoter is required for such epigenetic reprogramming. In vivo, enhanced maternal LG is associated with increased NGFI-A binding to the exon 1(7) GR promoter in the hippocampus of pups, and NGFI-A-bound exon 1(7) GR promoter is unmethylated compared with unbound exon 1(7) GR promoter. Knockdown experiments of NGFI-A in hippocampal primary cell culture show that NGFI-A is required for serotonin-induced DNA demethylation and increased exon 1(7) GR promoter expression. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that NGFI-A participates in epigenetic programming of GR expression.

  10. Microarray and synchronization of neuronal differentiation with pathway changes in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databank in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Feng, Wayne

    2012-08-01

    The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database creates networks from interrelations between molecular biology and underlying chemical elements. This allows for analysis of biologic networks, genomic information, and higher-order functional information at a systems level. We performed microarray experiments and used the KEGG database, systems biology analysis, and annotation of pathway function to study nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Cells were cultured to 70%-80% confluence, treated with NGF for 1 or 3 hours (h), and RNA was extracted. Stage 1 data analysis involved analysis of variance (ANOVA), and stage 2 involved cluster analysis and heat map generation. We identified 2020 NGF-induced PC12 genes (1038 at 1 h and 1554 at 3 h). Results showed changes in gene expression over time. We compared these genes with 6035 genes from the KEGG database. Cross-matching resulted in 830 genes. Among these, we identified 395 altered genes (155 at 1 h and 301 at 3 h; 2-fold increase from 1 h to 3 h). We identified 191 biologic pathways in the KEGG database; the top 15 showed correlations with neuronal differentiation (mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] pathway: 35 genes at 1 h, 54 genes at 3 h; genes associated with axonal guidance: 12 at 1 h, 26 at 3 h; Wnt pathway: 16 at 1 h, 25 at 3 h; neurotrophin pathway: 4 at 1 h, 14 at 3 h). Thus, we identified changes in neuronal differentiation pathways with the KEGG database, which were synchronized with NGF-induced differentiation.

  11. Activation of A(1) adenosine or mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors enhances the release of nerve growth factor and S-100beta protein from cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, R; Di Iorio, P; Bruno, V; Battaglia, G; D'Alimonte, I; D'Onofrio, M; Nicoletti, F; Caciagli, F

    1999-09-01

    Pharmacological activation of A(1) adenosine receptor with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) or mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors with (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2', 3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) or aminopyrrolidine-2R, 4R-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) enhanced the release of nerve growth factor (NGF) or S-100beta protein from rat cultured astrocytes. Stimulation of release by CCPA and DCG-IV or 2R,4R-APDC was inhibited by the A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine and by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist (2S,1'S, 2'S,3'R)-2-(2'-carboxy-3'-phenylcyclopropyl)glycine (PCCG-4), respectively. Time-course studies revealed a profound difference between the release of S-100beta protein and the release of NGF in response to extracellular signals. Stimulation of S-100beta protein exhibited rapid kinetics, peaking after 1 h of drug treatment, whereas the enhancement of NGF release was much slower, requiring at least 6 h of A(1) adenosine or mGlu3 receptor activation. In addition, stimulation of NGF but not S-100beta release was substantially reduced in cultures treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In addition, a 6-8 h treatment of cultured astrocytes with A(1) or mGlu3 receptor agonists increased the levels of both NGF mRNA and NGF-like immunoreactive proteins, including NGF prohormone. We conclude that activation of A(1) adenosine or mGlu3 receptors produces pleiotropic effects in astrocytes, stimulating the synthesis and/or the release of protein factors. Astrocytes may therefore become targets for drugs that stimulate the local production of neurotrophic factors in the CNS, and this may provide the basis for a novel therapeutic strategy in chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:10457374

  12. Seminal Plasma Induces Ovulation in Llamas in the Absence of a Copulatory Stimulus: Role of Nerve Growth Factor as an Ovulation-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Berland, Marco A; Ulloa-Leal, Cesar; Barría, Miguel; Wright, Hollis; Dissen, Gregory A; Silva, Mauricio E; Ojeda, Sergio R; Ratto, Marcelo H

    2016-08-01

    Llamas are considered to be reflex ovulators. However, semen from these animals is reported to be rich in ovulation-inducing factor(s), one of which has been identified as nerve growth factor (NGF). These findings suggest that ovulation in llamas may be elicited by chemical signals contained in semen instead of being mediated by neural signals. The present study examines this notion. Llamas displaying a preovulatory follicle were assigned to four groups: group 1 received an intrauterine infusion (IUI) of PBS; group 2 received an IUI of seminal plasma; group 3 was mated to a male whose urethra had been surgically diverted (urethrostomized male); and group 4 was mated to an intact male. Ovulation (detected by ultrasonography) occurred only in llamas mated to an intact male or given an IUI of seminal plasma and was preceded by a surge in plasma LH levels initiated within an hour after coitus or IUI. In both ovulatory groups, circulating β-NGF levels increased within 15 minutes after treatment, reaching values that were greater and more sustained in llamas mated with an intact male. These results demonstrate that llamas can be induced to ovulate by seminal plasma in the absence of copulation and that copulation alone cannot elicit ovulation in the absence of seminal plasma. In addition, our results implicate β-NGF as an important mediator of seminal plasma-induced ovulation in llamas because ovulation does not occur if β-NGF levels do not increase in the bloodstream, a change that occurs promptly after copulation with an intact male or IUI of seminal plasma. PMID:27355492

  13. Characterization of the recombinant extracellular domain of the neurotrophin receptor TrkA and its interaction with nerve growth factor (NGF).

    PubMed Central

    Woo, S. B.; Whalen, C.; Neet, K. E.

    1998-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the prototype of a family of neurotrophins that support important neuronal programs such as differentiation and survival of a subset of sympathetic, sensory, and brain neurons. NGF binds to two classes of cell surface receptors: p75LANR and p140TrkA. NGF binding to p140TrkA initiates the neuronal signaling pathway through activation of the tyrosine kinase activity, which subsequently results in a rapid signal transduction through a phosphorylation cascade. To examine this crucial signaling step in more detail, the TrkA extracellular domain polypeptide (TrkA-RED) was overexpressed in Sf21 insect cells and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant TrkA-RED is a 70 kDa acidic glycoprotein with a pI of 5.1, and mimics the intact TrkA receptor for NGF binding with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.9 nM. Thus, the recombinant TrkA-RED is functionally competent and can be used to elucidate the interaction of NGF and TrkA receptor. Circular dichroism difference spectra indicated that, upon association of NGF with TrkA-RED, a minor conformational change occurred to form a complex with decreased ordered secondary structure. Interaction between NGF and TrkA-RED was also demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography, light scattering, and chemical crosslinking with evidence for formation of a higher molecular weight complex consistent with a (TrkA-RED)2-(NGF dimer) complex. Association and dissociation rates of 5.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1), respectively, were determined by biosensor technology. Thus, initiation of signaling may stem from NGF-induced receptor dimerization concomitant with a small conformational change. PMID:9568907

  14. Nerve growth factor-induced derepression of peripherin gene expression is associated with alterations in proteins binding to a negative regulatory element.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M A; Lee, E; Lawe, D; Gizang-Ginsberg, E; Ziff, E B

    1992-01-01

    The peripherin gene, which encodes a neuronal-specific intermediate filament protein, is transcriptionally induced with a late time course when nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates PC12 cells to differentiate into neurons. We have studied its transcriptional regulation in order to better understand the neuronal-specific end steps of the signal transduction pathway of NGF. By 5' deletion mapping of the peripherin promoter, we have localized two positive regulatory elements necessary for full induction by NGF: a distal positive element and a proximal constitutive element within 111 bp of the transcriptional start site. In addition, there is a negative regulatory element (NRE; -179 to -111), the deletion of which results in elevated basal expression of the gene. Methylation interference footprinting of the NRE defined a unique sequence, GGCAGGGCGCC, as the binding site for proteins present in nuclear extracts from both undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells. However, DNA mobility shift assays using an oligonucleotide probe containing the footprinted sequence demonstrate a prominent retarded complex in extracts from undifferentiated PC12 cells which migrates with slower mobility than do the complexes produced by using differentiated PC12 cell extract. Transfection experiments using peripherin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs in which the footprinted sequence has been mutated confirm that the NRE has a functional, though not exclusive, role in repressing peripherin expression in undifferentiated and nonneuronal cells. We propose a two-step model of activation of peripherin by NGF in which dissociation of a repressor from the protein complex at the NRE, coupled with a positive signal from the distal positive element, results in depression of the gene. Images PMID:1588954

  15. Molecular Evolution of Vertebrate Neurotrophins: Co-Option of the Highly Conserved Nerve Growth Factor Gene into the Advanced Snake Venom Arsenalf

    PubMed Central

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A.; King, Glenn F.; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation. PMID:24312363

  16. Lung dendritic cells undergo maturation and polarization towards a T helper type 2-stimulating phenotype in a mouse model of asthma: Role of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    QIN, QINGWU; WANG, ZHAN; PAN, PINHUA; CAO, ZU; XIA, QING; TAN, HONGYI; HU, CHENGPING

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and dendritic cells (DCs) have been hypothesized to modulate T cell responses in a mouse model of asthma. However, whether NGF plays a role in regulating the maturation and polarization of lung DCs remains unclear. In the present study, the effect of NGF inhibition on the maturation and phenotype of lung DCs was investigated in a mouse model of asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and subsequently received anti-NGF treatment. At 24 h following the last challenge, airway responsiveness and inflammation were examined. The concentrations of NGF, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 were analyzed. In addition, maturation and CD103 expression in the lung DCs were investigated. Anti-NGF treatment was found to significantly reduce airway hyperreactivity and inflammation in asthmatic mice. In addition, a subdued T helper 2 (Th2) response was observed, characterized by the downregulation of IL-4 and the upregulation of IFN-γ. Furthermore, the expression of the DC surface molecules, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II, as well as the proportion of lung CD103+ DCs, decreased in the OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The proportion of lung CD103+ DCs also exhibited a positive correlation with the levels of plasma NGF in the mice. These results may provide an explanation for the role of NGF in amplifying the Th2 response in allergic diseases. Therefore, NGF may promote the maturation and polarization towards a Th2-stimulating phenotype of activated DCs, contributing to an amplification of the Th2 response in asthma. PMID:25289030

  17. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptors TrkA and p75 in the uterus of wild female ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Sheng, Xia; Song, Moshi; Zhang, Haolin; Weng, Jiaju; Zhang, Mengyuan; Hu, Xiao; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) and p75 in the uterus of the wild ground squirrels during the estrous period, early pregnancy and non-breeding period. In the estrous period and early pregnancy, NGF and TrkA were immunolocalized in stromal cells, luminal epithelial cells, glandular cells and smooth muscle cells whereas in the non-breeding period, both of them were detected only in luminal epithelial cells and glandular cells, but not in stromal cells or smooth muscle cells. Stronger immunostaining of NGF and TrkA was observed in luminal epithelial cells and glandular cells in the estrous period and early pregnancy as compared to the non-breeding period. p75 was immunolocalized only in luminal epithelial and glandular cells during the estrous period, early pregnancy and non-breeding period. The intensity of the immunohistochemical signals for p75 did not vary significantly in the estrous period, early pregnancy and non-breeding period. The mean mRNA levels of NGF and TrkA and p75 were significantly higher in the estrous period and early pregnancy as compared to the non-breeding period. Besides, plasma estradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations were higher in the estrous period and early pregnancy than in the non-breeding period, suggesting that the expression patterns of NGF and TrkA are correlated with changes in plasma estradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that NGF and its receptor TrkA may be involved in the regulation of seasonal changes in the uterine functions of wild female ground squirrels.

  18. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  19. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting with Infraorbital Nerve Pathway Protection: Anatomic and Histomorphometric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Joseph; Demsey, Daniel R.B.; Ho, Emily S.; Zuker, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle. This may be explained in part by the larger number of donor motor axons when using the masseter nerve, as studies have shown that only 20% to 50% of facial nerve donor axons successfully cross the nerve graft to innervate their targets. As demonstrated in our animal studies, increasing the number of donor axons that grow into and traverse the CFNG to innervate the free muscle transfer increases muscle movement, and this phenomenon may provide patients with the benefit of improved smile excursion. We have previously shown in animal studies that sensory nerves, when coapted to a nerve graft, improve axonal growth through the nerve graft and improve muscle excursion. Here, we describe the feasibility of and our experience in translating these results clinically by coapting the distal portion of the CFNG to branches of the infraorbital nerve. PMID:27757349

  20. A Novel Internal Fixator Device for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E.; Love, James M.; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension—traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration. PMID

  1. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  2. Phylogenetical aspects on islet hormone families: a minireview with particular reference to insulin as a growth factor and to the phylogeny of PYY and NPY immunoreactive cells and nerves in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Falkmer, S; Dafgård, E; el-Salhy, M; Engström, W; Grimelius, L; Zetterberg, A

    1985-01-01

    A common feature in the phylogeny of the four islet hormones (insulin, somatostatin, glucagon, PP) is that they do not seem to occur in the most primitive metazoan animals investigated so far, namely the coelenterates. However, already in the earliest protostomian invertebrates, such as flatworms and annelids, somatostatin and PP immunoreactive nerve fibres were found. In highly developed forms of protostomian invertebrates, such as insects, all the four islet hormones are represented as immunoreactive nerve cells and nerve fibres in the brain. In deuterostomian invertebrates a brain-gut-axis has evolved as regards somatostatin and PP, whereas insulin and glucagon now seem to occur exclusively as cells of open type in the gut mucosa. This brain-gut-axis for somatostatin and PP persists in all the vertebrates. The insulin cells, however, leave the gut mucosa already in the earliest forms of vertebrates and then appear only as cells in the islet parenchyma and in the mucosa of the bile duct (Agnatha) or in the pancreatic ducts (Gnathostomi). To some extent, glucagon islet cells evolve in a similar manner; here, however, cells immunoreactive with the precursor hormone, glicentin (enteroglucagon), persist in the gastrointestinal tract mucosa. A few PYY immunoreactive cells have been found in the pancreatic islet parenchyma of reptiles and mammals, often as disseminated cells in the acinar tissue. In the pancreas of these phyla NPY only occurs in neurons and nerve fibres. In pilot studies the effects of hagfish insulin as a growth factor have been compared with those of pig insulin on Swiss 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

  3. New approaches to bridge nerve gaps: development of a novel drug-delivering nerve conduit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keng-Min; Sant, Himanshu J; Gale, Bruce K; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary bridging techniques for repairing nerve gaps caused by trauma require autologous nerve grafts, which are difficult to harvest and handle and result in significant donor site deficit. Several nerve conduits with axon growth-enhancing potential have been proposed, developed and tested over the past fifteen years. In this work, prototypes of a nerve conduit designed to bridge large nerve gaps (≥10mm) end-to-end were incorporated with concentric drug reservoirs for constant and controlled drug delivery to enhance axon growth. These devices were designed, fabricated and tested in vitro in amber glass vials with bovine serum albumin in order to determine the drug release kinetics for future application. Our devices have shown the capability to deliver the drug of interest over a 6-day period.

  4. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  5. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  6. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  7. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  8. Nerve Growth Factor Protects the Ischemic Heart via Attenuation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced Apoptosis by Activation of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ke; Liu, Li; Xie, Fei; Hao, Xuechao; Luo, Jie; Min, Su

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) has been found in the myocardium suffered from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). The pro-survival activity of NGF on ischemic heart has been supposed to be mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathway. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is activated initially as a defensive response to eliminate the accumulated unfolded proteins, has shown a critical involvement in the ischemia induced myocardial apoptosis. This study was aimed to investigate whether NGF induced heart protection against I/R injury includes a mechanism of attenuation of ER stress-induced myocardial apoptosis by activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. Methods: Isolated adult rat hearts were perfused with a Langendörff perfusion system. Hearts in the Sham group were subjected to 225 min of continuous Krebs-Henseleit buffer (KHB) perfusion without ischemia. Hearts in I/R group were perfused with KHB for a 75-min of equilibration period followed by 30 min of global ischemia and 120 min of KHB reperfusion. Hearts in the NGF group accepted 45 min of euilibration perfusion and 30 min of NGF pretreatment (with a final concentration of 100 ng/ml in the KHB) before 30 min of global ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. Hearts in K252a and LY294002 groups were pretreated with either a TrkA inhibitor, K252a or a phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002 for 30 min before NGF (100 ng/ml) administration. Cardiac hemodynamics were measured from the beginning of the perfusion. Cardiac enzymes and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were assayed before ischemia and at the end of reperfusion. Myocardial apoptosis rate was measured by TUNEL staining, and expression of glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), caspase-12, total- and phospho-(Ser473)-Akt were assessed by Western blot analyses. Results: NGF pretreatment significantly improved the recovery of post

  9. Bioactivity of ovulation inducing factor (or nerve growth factor) in bovine seminal plasma and its effects on ovarian function in cattle.

    PubMed

    Tribulo, P; Bogle, O; Mapletoft, R J; Adams, G P

    2015-06-01

    To understand the role of ovulation-inducing factor (or nerve growth factor) (OIF [NGF]) in bovine seminal plasma, we (1) used an in vivo llama bioassay to test the hypothesis that bovine seminal plasma induces ovulation and CL development in llamas similar to that of llama seminal plasma when the dose of seminal plasma is adjusted to ovulation-inducing factor content (experiment 1) and (2) determined the effect of bovine seminal plasma on the interval to ovulation and luteal development in heifers (experiment 2). Within species, seminal plasma was pooled (n = 160 bulls, n = 4 llamas), and the volume of seminal plasma used for treatment was adjusted to a total dose of 250 μg of ovulation-inducing factor. In experiment 1, mature female llamas were assigned randomly to four groups and treated intramuscularly with either 10 mL of PBS (negative control, n = 5), 50-μg GnRH (positive control, n = 5), 6-mL of llama seminal plasma (n = 6), or 12 mL of bull seminal plasma (n = 6). Ovulation and CL development were monitored by transrectal ultrasonography. In experiment 2, beef heifers were given a luteolytic dose of prostaglandin followed by 25-mg porcine LH (pLH) 12 hours later to induce ovulation. Heifers were assigned randomly to three groups and given 12 mL bovine seminal plasma intramuscularly 12 hours after pLH treatment (n = 10), within 4 hours after ovulation (n = 9), or no treatment (control, n = 10). Ovulation was monitored by ultrasonography every 4 hours, and the CL development was monitored daily until the next ovulation. In experiment 1, ovulation was detected in 0/5, 4/5, 4/6, 4/6 llamas in the PBS, GnRH, llama seminal plasma, and bovine seminal plasma groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Luteal development was not different among groups. In experiment 2, the interval to ovulation was more synchronous (range: 4 vs. 22 hours; P < 0.0001) in heifers treated with seminal plasma before ovulation compared with the other groups. Luteal development was not different

  10. Benign glandular inclusions in parotid nerve.

    PubMed

    Cramer, S F; Heggeness, L M

    1988-08-01

    Benign salivary ductular and acinar structures were demonstrated within an enlarged, disorderly intraparotid nerve in association with a mucoepidermoid carcinoma that did not, itself, manifest perineural invasion. Salivary gland can thus be added to the growing list of tissues in which "perineural invasion" by noncancerous epithelium has been observed. The proliferative features of the neural tissue in this case support the notion that neural elements may play an active role in the establishment of intimate neural-epithelial relationships. The mechanism for this phenomenon in the present case is postulated to be proliferation and ingrowth of the nerve tissue, possibly mediated by nerve growth factor or some related substance.

  11. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  12. Pleiotrophin and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Jianghai, Chen; Juan, Liu; Hao, Kang

    2009-10-01

    The proto-oncogene pleiotrophin, discovered in 1989, was considered as a multifunctional growth factor, which played an important role in tumor occurrence, development, and central nervous system. The latest research showed that pleiotrophin signal pathway probably participated in neural repair after peripheral nerve injury, especially in the following critical points, such as the protection of spinal cord neuron, the promotion of the speed of neuron axon regeneration, the guidance of neuron axon regeneration, skeleton muscle reinnervation, and so on. It potentially plays a key role in the guidance of neural axon regeneration in peripheral nervous system and muscle reinnervation. With the deepening of related researches, pleiotrophin gene would become a controllable target for improving the repairing effect of peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction of the neuromuscular junction.

  13. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  14. Handcrafted multilayer PDMS microchannel scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ridwan; Kim, Bongkyun; Pankratz, Rachel; Ajam, Ali; Park, Sungreol; Biswal, Sibani L; Choi, Yoonsu

    2015-12-01

    Injuries that result in the loss of limb functionality may be caused by the severing of the peripheral nerves within the affected limb. Several bioengineered peripheral nerve scaffolds have been developed in order to provide the physical support and topographical guidance necessary for the naturally disorganized axon outgrowth to reattach to distal nerve stumps as an alternative to other procedures, like nerve grafting. PDMS has been chosen for the base material of the scaffolds due to its biocompatibility, flexibility, transparency, and well-developed fabrication techniques. The process of observing the axon outgrowth across the nerve gaps with PDMS scaffolds has been challenging due to the limited number and fineness of longitudinal sections that can be extracted from harvested nerve tissue samples after implantation. To address this, multilayer microchannel scaffolds were developed with the object of providing more refined longitudinal observation of axon outgrowth by longitudinally 'sectioning' the device during fabrication, removing the need for much of the sample preparation process. This device was then implanted into the sciatic nerves of Lewis rats, and then harvested after two and four weeks to analyze the difference in nerve regeneration between two different time periods. The present layer by layer structure, which is separable after nerve regeneration and is treated as an individual layer during the histology process, provides the details of biological events during axonal regeneration. Confocal microscopic imaging showed the details of peripheral nerve regeneration including nerve branches and growth cones observable from within the microchannels of the multilayer PDMS microchannel scaffolds.

  15. A Biosynthetic Nerve Guide Conduit Based on Silk/SWNT/Fibronectin Nanocomposite for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Zaminy, Arash; Kokabi, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs) in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs) has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN) containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts. PMID:24098649

  16. Proximal and distal changes in collagen content of peripheral nerve that follow transection and crush lesions.

    PubMed

    Eather, T F; Pollock, M; Myers, D B

    1986-05-01

    Collagen content of rat sciatic nerve was measured 10 weeks after either nerve transection or nerve crush. Nerve transection led to a significant increase in fascicular collagen in nerve segments 2.5 mm proximal and distal to the injury site. Remote from the transection, fascicular collagen was also significantly increased, this effect being most marked distally. Nerve crush by comparison resulted in only a small increase in fascicular collagen, significantly less than after transection. The greater amount of fascicular collagen far distal to the nerve injury could relate to a predominantly caudal endoneurial flow of inflammatory or growth factors. Differences in the amount of fascicular collagen formed after nerve transection compared with nerve crush are clearly due to factors other than axonal degeneration, and may relate to collagen synthesis by denervated Schwann cells or to the severity of the nerve injury.

  17. Trends in the design of nerve guidance channels in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chiono, Valeria; Tonda-Turo, Chiara

    2015-08-01

    The current trend of peripheral nerve tissue engineering is the design of advanced nerve guidance channels (NGCs) acting as physical guidance for regeneration of nerves across lesions. NGCs should present multifunctional properties aiming to direct the sprouting of axons from the proximal nerve end, to concentrate growth factors secreted by the injured nerve ends, and to reduce the ingrowth of scar tissue into the injury site. A critical aspect in the design of NGCs is conferring them the ability to provide topographic, chemotactic and haptotactic cues that lead to functional nerve regeneration thus increasing the axon growth rate and avoiding or minimizing end-organ (e.g. muscle) atrophy. The present work reviews the recent state of the art in NGCs engineering and defines the external guide and internal fillers structural and compositional requirements that should be satisfied to improve nerve regeneration, especially in the case of large gaps (>2 cm). Techniques for NGCs fabrication were described highlighting the innovative approaches direct to enhance the regeneration of axon stumps compared to current clinical treatments. Furthermore, the possibility to apply stem cells as internal cues to the NGCs was discussed focusing on scaffold properties necessary to ensure cell survival. Finally, the optimized features for NGCs design were summarized showing as multifunctional cues are needed to produce NGCs having improved results in clinics.

  18. PERIPHERAL NERVE REGENERATION: CELL THERAPY AND NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Sebben, Alessandra Deise; Lichtenfels, Martina; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for nerve repair. Among these, the tubulization technique can be highlighted: this allows regenerative factors to be introduced into the chamber. Cell therapy and tissue engineering have arisen as an alternative for stimulating and aiding peripheral nerve regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this review was to provide a survey and analysis on the results from experimental and clinical studies that used cell therapy and tissue engineering as tools for optimizing the regeneration process. The articles used came from the LILACS, Medline and SciELO scientific databases. Articles on the use of stem cells, Schwann cells, growth factors, collagen, laminin and platelet-rich plasma for peripheral nerve repair were summarized over the course of the review. Based on these studies, it could be concluded that the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results relating to nerve regeneration, because these cells have a capacity for neuronal differentiation, thus demonstrating effective functional results. The use of tubes containing bioactive elements with controlled release also optimizes the nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Another promising treatment is the use of platelet-rich plasma, which not only releases growth factors that are important in nerve repair, but also serves as a carrier for exogenous factors, thereby stimulating the proliferation of specific cells for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27027067

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  20. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.

  1. Imaging the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew T; Volk, Holger A

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the normal course of the cranial nerves (CN) is essential when interpreting images of patients with cranial neuropathies. CN foramina are depicted best using computed X-ray tomography, but the nerves are depicted best using magnetic resonance imaging. The function and anatomy of the CN in the dog are reviewed and selected examples of lesions affecting the CN are illustrated.

  2. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  3. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  4. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  5. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  6. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  7. Three-dimensional conductive constructs for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    George, Paul M; Saigal, Rajiv; Lawlor, Michael W; Moore, Michael J; LaVan, David A; Marini, Robert P; Selig, Martin; Makhni, Melvin; Burdick, Jason A; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2009-11-01

    The unique electrochemical properties of conductive polymers can be utilized to form stand-alone polymeric tubes and arrays of tubes that are suitable for guides to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. Noncomposite, polypyrrole (PPy) tubes ranging in inner diameter from 25 microm to 1.6 mm as well as multichannel tubes were fabricated by electrodeposition. While oxidation of the pyrrole monomer causes growth of the film, brief subsequent reduction allowed mechanical dissociation from the electrode mold, creating a stand-alone, conductive PPy tube. Conductive polymer nerve guides made in this manner were placed in transected rat sciatic nerves and shown to support nerve regeneration over an 8-week time period.

  8. Local administration of icariin contributes to peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Niu, Su-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Deng, Jiu-Xu; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that systemic administration of the traditional Chinese medicine Epimedium extract promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. Here, we sought to explore the therapeutic effects of local administration of icariin, a major component of Epimedium extract, on peripheral nerve regeneration. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biological conduit sleeve was used to bridge a 5 mm right sciatic nerve defect in rats, and physiological saline, nerve growth factor, icariin suspension, or nerve growth factor-releasing microsphere suspension was injected into the defect. Twelve weeks later, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the number of myelinated fibers were notably greater in the rats treated with icariin suspension or nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres than those that had received nerve growth factor or physiological saline. The effects of icariin suspension were similar to those of nerve growth factor-releasing microspheres. These data suggest that icariin acts as a nerve growth factor-releasing agent, and indicate that local application of icariin after spinal injury can promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25788925

  9. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  10. Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Babyak, J W; Kartush, J M

    1987-02-01

    Neurogenic neoplasms of the intraparotid facial nerve are uncommon and are usually diagnosed intraoperatively by tissue biopsy. Fifty-six cases of primary neurogenic neoplasms involving the facial nerve have been reported. The majority of these have been schwannomas. A case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the main trunk of the facial nerve is presented. Schwannomas and neurofibromas have distinct histological features which must be considered prior to the management of these tumors. The management of neurogenic tumors associated with normal facial function is a particularly difficult problem. A new approach for the diagnosis and management of neurogenic neoplasms is described utilizing electroneurography. PMID:3807626

  11. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  12. Adjuvant neurotrophic factors in peripheral nerve repair with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-reduced acellular nerve allografts

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Nookala, Ratnam; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Tisdale, Keonna Y.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular nerve allografts are now standard tools in peripheral nerve repair due to decreased donor site morbidity and operative time savings. Preparation of nerve allografts involves several steps of decellularization and modification of extracellular matrix to remove chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth through a poorly understood mechanism involving RhoA and ECM-integrin interactions. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is an enzyme that degrades CSPG molecules and has been shown to promote neurite outgrowth following injury of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variable results following chondroitinase ABC treatment make it difficult to predict the effects of this drug in human nerve allografts, especially in the presence of native extracellular signaling molecules. Several studies have shown cross-talk between neurotrophic factor and CSPG signaling pathways, but their interaction remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the adjuvant effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neurite outgrowth post-injury in CSPG-reduced substrates and acellular nerve allografts. Materials and Methods E12 chicken DRG explants were cultured in medium containing ChABC, ChABC + NGF, ChABC + GDNF or control media. Explants were imaged at 3 d and neurite outgrowths measured. The rat sciatic nerve injury model involved a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap that was microsurgically repaired with ChABC pre-treated acellular nerve allografts. Prior to implantation, nerve allografts were incubated in NGF, GDNF or sterile water. Nerve histology was evaluated at 5d and 8wk post-injury. Results The addition of GDNF in vitro produced significant increase in sensory neurite length at 3 d compared to ChABC alone (P < 0.01), while NGF was not significantly different from control. In vivo adjuvant NGF produced increases in total myelinated axon count (P < 0.005) and motor axon

  13. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  14. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Peter C.; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other facial reconstructive options were considered. These three cases illustrate some of the major controversies in facial nerve neuroma management. We discuss our decision-making plan and report our results. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171043

  15. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  17. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  18. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  19. Damaged axillary nerve (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Conditions associated with axillary nerve dysfunction include fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone), pressure from casts or splints, and improper use of crutches. Other causes include systemic disorders that cause neuritis (inflammation of ...

  20. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  1. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  2. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  3. Improved Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Using Acellular Nerve Allografts Loaded with Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Canbin; Huang, Xijun; He, Caifeng; Jiang, Li; Quan, Daping

    2014-01-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) behave in a similar manner to autografts in supporting axonal regeneration in the repair of short peripheral nerve defects but fail in larger defects. The objective of this article is to evaluate the effect of ANA supplemented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve nerve regeneration after surgical repair and to discuss the mechanisms that underlie this approach. Autologous PRP was obtained from rats by double-step centrifugation and was characterized by determining platelet numbers and the release of growth factors. Forty-eight Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (12/group), identified as autograft, ANA, ANA loaded with PRP (ANA+PRP), and ANA loaded with platelet-poor plasma (PPP, ANA+PPP). All grafts were implanted to bridge long-gap (15 mm) sciatic nerve defects. We found that PRP with a high platelet concentration exhibited a sustained release of growth factors. Twelve weeks after surgery, the autograft group displayed the highest level of reinnervation, followed by the ANA+PRP group. The ANA+PRP group showed a better electrophysiology response for amplitude and conduction velocity than the ANA and ANA+PPP groups. Based on histological evaluation, the ANA+PRP and autograft groups had higher numbers of regenerating nerve fibers. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that PRP boosted expression of neurotrophins in the regenerated nerves. Moreover, the ANA+PRP and autograft groups showed excellent physiological outcomes in terms of the prevention of muscle atrophy. In conclusion, ANAs loaded with PRP as tissue-engineered scaffolds can enhance nerve regeneration and functional recovery after the repair of large nerve gaps nearly as well as autografts. PMID:24901030

  4. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  5. The challenges and beauty of peripheral nerve regrowth.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2012-03-01

    This review provides an overview of selected aspects of peripheral nerve regeneration and potential avenues to explore therapeutically. The overall coordinated and orchestrated pattern of recovery from peripheral nerve injury has a beauty of execution and progress that rivals all other forms of neurobiology. It involves changes at the level of the perikaryon, coordination with important peripheral glial partners, the Schwann cells, a controlled inflammatory response, and growth that overcomes surprising intrinsic roadblocks. Both regenerative axon growth and collateral sprouting encompass fascinating aspects of this story. Better understanding of peripheral nerve regeneration may also lead to enhanced central nervous system recovery.

  6. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  7. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  8. Biomaterials for the Development of Peripheral Nerve Guidance Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Nectow, Alexander R.; Marra, Kacey G.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, surgical treatments for peripheral nerve injury are less than satisfactory. The gold standard of treatment for peripheral nerve gaps >5 mm is the autologous nerve graft; however, this treatment is associated with a variety of clinical complications, such as donor site morbidity, limited availability, nerve site mismatch, and the formation of neuromas. Despite many recent advances in the field, clinical studies implementing the use of artificial nerve guides have yielded results that are yet to surpass those of autografts. Thus, the development of a nerve guidance conduit, which could match the effectiveness of the autologous nerve graft, would be beneficial to the field of peripheral nerve surgery. Design strategies to improve surgical outcomes have included the development of biopolymers and synthetic polymers as primary scaffolds with tailored mechanical and physical properties, luminal “fillers” such as laminin and fibronectin as secondary internal scaffolds, surface micropatterning, stem cell inclusion, and controlled release of neurotrophic factors. The current article highlights approaches to peripheral nerve repair through a channel or conduit, implementing chemical and physical growth and guidance cues to direct that repair process. PMID:21812591

  9. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  10. GDF11 forms a bone morphogenetic protein 1-activated latent complex that can modulate nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Gaoxiang; Hopkins, Delana R; Ho, Wen-Bin; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2005-07-01

    All transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily members are synthesized as precursors with prodomain sequences that are proteolytically removed by subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs). For most superfamily members, this is believed sufficient for activation. Exceptions are TGF-betas 1 to 3 and growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), also known as myostatin, which form noncovalent, latent complexes with their SPC-cleaved prodomains. Sequence similarities between TGF-betas 1 to 3, myostatin, and superfamily member GDF11, also known as bone morphogenetic protein 11 (BMP11), prompted us to examine whether GDF11 might be capable of forming a latent complex with its cleaved prodomain. Here we demonstrate that GDF11 forms a noncovalent latent complex with its SPC-cleaved prodomain and that this latent complex is activated via cleavage at a single specific site by members of the developmentally important BMP1/Tolloid family of metalloproteinases. Evidence is provided for a molecular model whereby formation and activation of this complex may play a general role in modulating neural differentiation. In particular, mutant GDF11 prodomains impervious to cleavage by BMP1/Tolloid proteinases are shown to be potent stimulators of neurodifferentiation, with potential for therapeutic applications.

  11. GDF11 Forms a Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1-Activated Latent Complex That Can Modulate Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Differentiation of PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Gaoxiang; Hopkins, Delana R.; Ho, Wen-Bin; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2005-01-01

    All transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily members are synthesized as precursors with prodomain sequences that are proteolytically removed by subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs). For most superfamily members, this is believed sufficient for activation. Exceptions are TGF-βs 1 to 3 and growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), also known as myostatin, which form noncovalent, latent complexes with their SPC-cleaved prodomains. Sequence similarities between TGF-βs 1 to 3, myostatin, and superfamily member GDF11, also known as bone morphogenetic protein 11 (BMP11), prompted us to examine whether GDF11 might be capable of forming a latent complex with its cleaved prodomain. Here we demonstrate that GDF11 forms a noncovalent latent complex with its SPC-cleaved prodomain and that this latent complex is activated via cleavage at a single specific site by members of the developmentally important BMP1/Tolloid family of metalloproteinases. Evidence is provided for a molecular model whereby formation and activation of this complex may play a general role in modulating neural differentiation. In particular, mutant GDF11 prodomains impervious to cleavage by BMP1/Tolloid proteinases are shown to be potent stimulators of neurodifferentiation, with potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:15988002

  12. Peripheral nerve regeneration and neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    TERENGHI, GIORGIO

    1999-01-01

    The role of neurotrophic factors in the maintenance and survival of peripheral neuronal cells has been the subject of numerous studies. Administration of exogenous neurotrophic factors after nerve injury has been shown to mimic the effect of target organ-derived trophic factors on neuronal cells. After axotomy and during peripheral nerve regeneration, the neurotrophins NGF, NT-3 and BDNF show a well defined and selective beneficial effect on the survival and phenotypic expression of primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia and of motoneurons in spinal cord. Other neurotrophic factors such as CNTF, GDNF and LIF also exert a variety of actions on neuronal cells, which appear to overlap and complement those of the neurotrophins. In addition, there is an indirect contribution of GGF to nerve regeneration. GGF is produced by neurons and stimulates proliferation of Schwann cells, underlining the close interaction between neuronal and glial cells during peripheral nerve regeneration. Different possibilities have been investigated for the delivery of growth factors to the injured neurons, in search of a suitable system for clinical applications. The studies reviewed in this article show the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury and for neuropathies. PMID:10227662

  13. Morphological response of injured adult rabbit optic nerve to implants containing media conditioned by growing optic nerves.

    PubMed

    Lavie, V; Harel, A; Doron, A; Solomon, A; Lobel, D; Belkin, M; Ben-Basat, S; Sharma, S; Schwartz, M

    1987-09-01

    Adult rabbit retina can express regeneration-associated characteristics after optic nerve injury, provided it is supplied with appropriate diffusible substances originating from media conditioned by regenerating fish optic nerves or by optic nerves of a newborn rabbit [Hadani et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 81 (1984) 7965; Schwartz et al., Science, 228 (1985) 600]. This was shown by applying the active substances to the injured axons in the form of 'wrap-around' implants, consisting of collagen-coated silicone tubes which had been soaked in the conditioned media (CM). The regeneration-associated response was manifested biochemically and by sprouting of nerve fibers in culture. The present work provides morphological evidence that the implantation prolongs survival of ganglion cells and optic nerve fibers and induces new growth. Light microscopic analysis (using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for labeling the fibers) revealed, 1 week following optic nerve injury, labeled fibers and ganglion cells in both the implanted and control (injured only or injured and implanted with collagen-coated silicone tubes free of CM) nerves. However, from the second week after the injury, distinct differences in the appearance of viable ganglion cells and labeled fibers, were seen between experimental and control preparations. In sections taken through the optic nerve, at the region distal to the site of injury, HRP-labeled fibers were seen in the experimental nerves 1 week, 2 weeks and to a significantly lesser extent 1 month after injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3676722

  14. Exposure of nerve growth factor-treated PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells to a modulated radiofrequency field at 836.55 MHz: Effects on c-jun and c-fos expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivaschuk, O.I.; Jones, R.A.; Ishida-Jones, T.; Haggren, W.; Adey, W.R.; Phillips, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells have been treated with nerve growth factor and then exposed to athermal levels of a packet-modulated radiofrequency field at 836.55 MHz. This signal was produced by a prototype time-domain multiple-access (TDMA) transmitter that conforms to the North American digital cellular telephone standard. Three slot average power densities were used: 0.09, 0.9, and 9 mW/cm{sup 2}. Exposures were for 20, 40, and 60 min and included an intermittent exposure regime, resulting in total incubation times of 20, 60, and 100 min, respectively. Concurrent controls were sham exposed. After extracting total cellular RNA, Northern blot analysis was used to assess the expression of the immediate early genes, c-fos and c-jun, in all cell populations. No change in c-fos transcript levels were detected after 20 min exposure at each field intensity. Transcript levels for c-jun were altered only after 20 min exposure to 9 mW/cm{sup 2}. 51 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation of Cyclin D1 in PC12 Cells through a p21RAS Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway Requires Cooperative Interactions between Sp1 and Nuclear Factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Marampon, Francesco; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Fu, Maofu; Powell, Michael J.; Popov, Vladimir M.; Lindsay, Jaime; Zani, Bianca M.; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Watanabe, Genichi; Lee, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line responds to nerve growth factor (NGF) by exiting from the cell cycle and differentiating to induce extending neurites. Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of G1/S phase cell cycle progression, and it is known to play a role in myocyte differentiation in cultured cells. Herein, NGF induced cyclin D1 promoter, mRNA, and protein expression via the p21RAS pathway. Antisense- or small interfering RNA to cyclin D1 abolished NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth, demonstrating the essential role of cyclin D1 in NGF-mediated differentiation. Expression vectors encoding mutants of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and chemical inhibitors, demonstrated NGF induction of cyclin D1 involved cooperative interactions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways downstream of p21RAS. NGF induced the cyclin D1 promoter via Sp1, nuclear factor-κB, and cAMP-response element/activated transcription factor sites. NGF induction via Sp1 involved the formation of a Sp1/p50/p107 complex. Cyclin D1 induction by NGF governs differentiation and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. PMID:18367547

  16. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 expression is not linked to nerve growth factor-induced differentiation, cell survival or cell cycle control in PC12 rat pheocromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bortul, R; Aluigi, M; Tazzari, P L; Tabellini, G; Baldini, G; Bareggi, R; Narducci, P; Martelli, A M

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 expression is linked to neuronal differentiation in different experimental models. We sought to determine whether or not this is also true for nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation of rat PC12 cells. However, we did not find differences in the expression of both the forms of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 (a and b) during sympathetic differentiation of these cells. Also, PC12 cell clones stably overexpressing phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 were not more susceptible to the differentiating effect of NGF. Furthermore, since it is well established that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 affects cell proliferation, we investigated whether or not PC12 cell clones stably overexpressing phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 showed differences in survival to serum deprivation and cell cycle, when compared to wild type cells. Nevertheless, we did not find any differences in these parameters between wild type cells and the overexpressing clones. Interestingly, in PC12 cells the overexpressed phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 did not localize to the nucleus, but by immunofluorescence analysis, was detected in the cytoplasm. Therefore, our findings may represent another important clue to the fact that only when it is located within the nucleus phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 is able to influence cell proliferation.

  17. Chronic exposure to nerve growth factor increases acetylcholine and glutamate release from cholinergic neurons of the rat medial septum and diagonal band of Broca via mechanisms mediated by p75NTR.

    PubMed

    Huh, Carey Y L; Danik, Marc; Manseau, Frédéric; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Williams, Sylvain

    2008-02-01

    Basal forebrain neurons play an important role in memory and attention. In addition to cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, glutamatergic neurons and neurons that can corelease acetylcholine and glutamate have recently been described in the basal forebrain. Although it is well known that nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes synaptic function of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, how NGF affects the newly identified basal forebrain neurons remains undetermined. Here, we examined the effects of NGF on synaptic transmission of medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) neurons expressing different neurotransmitter phenotypes. We used MS-DBB neurons from 10- to 13-d-old rats, cultured on astrocytic microislands to promote the development of autaptic connections. Evoked and spontaneous postsynaptic currents were recorded, and neurotransmitters released were characterized pharmacologically. We found that chronic exposure to NGF significantly increased acetylcholine and glutamate release from cholinergic MS-DBB neurons, whereas glutamate and GABA transmission from noncholinergic MS-DBB neurons were not affected by NGF. Interestingly, the NGF-induced increase in neurotransmission was mediated by p75(NTR). These results demonstrate a previously unidentified role of NGF and its receptor p75(NTR); their interactions are crucial for cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission in the septohippocampal pathway. PMID:18256260

  18. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures.

  19. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  20. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  1. The nuclear events guiding successful nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons survive and regenerate after nerve injury, whereas central nervous system (CNS) neurons lack the capacity to do so. The inability of the CNS to regenerate presumably results from a lack of intrinsic growth activity and a permissive environment. To achieve CNS regeneration, we can learn from successful nerve regeneration in the PNS. Neurons in the PNS elicit dynamic changes in gene expression in response to permissive environmental cues following nerve injury. To switch gene expression on and off in injured neurons, transcription factors and their networks should be carefully orchestrated according to the regeneration program. This is the so-called “intrinsic power of axonal growth.” There is an increasing repertoire of candidate transcription factors induced by nerve injury. Some of them potentiate the survival and axonal regeneration of damaged neurons in vivo; however, our knowledge of transcriptional events in injured neurons is still limited. How do these transcription factors communicate with each other? How does the transcriptional machinery regulate the wide variety of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) in the properly coordinated manner? In this review, we describe our current understanding of the injury-inducible transcriptional factors that enhance the intrinsic growth capacity, and propose a potential role for specificity protein 1 (Sp1), which provides a platform to recruit injury-inducible transcription factors, in simultaneous gene regulation. Finally, we discuss an additional mechanism that is involved in epigenetic modifications in damaged neurons. A comprehensive understanding of the nuclear events in injured neurons will provide clues to clinical interventions for successful nerve regeneration. PMID:22180737

  2. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mabray, M C; Glastonbury, C M; Mamlouk, M D; Punch, G E; Solomon, D A; Cha, S

    2015-07-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare, with only 11 cases reported in the literature before 2014, including 8 with imaging. We present 8 additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by a glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion compared with the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature for recognizing direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerves.

  3. Peptide growth factors, part B

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: Platelet-Derived Growth Factor;Nerve and Glial Growth Factors;PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Genetic Approaches and Biological Effects.

  4. Peripheral nerve response to injury.

    PubMed

    Steed, Martin B

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons caring for patients who have sustained a nerve injury to a branch of the peripheral trigeminal nerve must possess a basic understanding of the response of the peripheral nerves to trauma. The series of events that subsequently take place are largely dependent on the injury type and severity. Regeneration of the peripheral nerve is possible in many instances and future manipulation of the regenerative microenvironment will lead to advances in the management of these difficult injuries.

  5. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  6. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  7. Injured Nerve Regeneration using Cell-Based Therapies: Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research progress in the past several years on promoting peripheral nerve recovery using stem and progenitory cells. The emphasis is placed on studies aimed at assessing various stem cells capable of expressing neurotrophic and growth factors and surviving after implantation in the nerve or a conduit. Approaches to improving nerve conduit design are summarized. The contribution of stem cells to axonal regeneration and neural repair is discussed. The side effects associated with cell-based treatment are highlighted. From the studies reviewed, it is concluded that the fate of transplanted stem cells needs further elucidation in a microenvironment-dependent manner. PMID:26483958

  8. Systems pharmacology of the nerve growth factor pathway: use of a systems biology model for the identification of key drug targets using sensitivity analysis and the integration of physiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil; Matsuura, Tomomi; Smirnov, Sergey; Demin, Oleg; Jones, Hannah M; Dua, Pinky; van der Graaf, Piet H

    2013-04-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway is of great interest as a potential source of drug targets, for example in the management of certain types of pain. However, selecting targets from this pathway either by intuition or by non-contextual measures is likely to be challenging. An alternative approach is to construct a mathematical model of the system and via sensitivity analysis rank order the targets in the known pathway, with respect to an endpoint such as the diphosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase concentration in the nucleus. Using the published literature, a model was created and, via sensitivity analysis, it was concluded that, after NGF itself, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) was one of the most sensitive druggable targets. This initial model was subsequently used to develop a further model incorporating physiological and pharmacological parameters. This allowed the exploration of the characteristics required for a successful hypothetical TrkA inhibitor. Using these systems models, we were able to identify candidates for the optimal drug targets in the known pathway. These conclusions were consistent with clinical and human genetic data. We also found that incorporating appropriate physiological context was essential to drawing accurate conclusions about important parameters such as the drug dose required to give pathway inhibition. Furthermore, the importance of the concentration of key reactants such as TrkA kinase means that appropriate contextual data are required before clear conclusions can be drawn. Such models could be of great utility in selecting optimal targets and in the clinical evaluation of novel drugs.

  9. Time-dependent enhancement of inhibitory avoidance retention and MAPK activation by post-training infusion of nerve growth factor into CA1 region of hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Lenz, G; Roesler, R; Vianna, M M; Martins, V; Brentani, R; Rodnight, R; Izquierdo, I

    2000-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that chronic intracerebroventricular nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion has a beneficial effect on cognitive performance of lesioned as well as old and developing animals. Here we investigate: (i) the effect of post-training infusion of NGF into the CA1 region of hippocampus on inhibitory avoidance (IA) retention in rats; (ii) the extension of the effect, in time and space, of NGF infusion into CA1 on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, syn: ERK1/2, p42/p44 MAPK). NGF was bilaterally injected into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng diluted in 0.5 microL of saline per side ) at 0, 120 or 360 min after IA training in rats. Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. The injection of 5.0 and 0.5, but not 0.05, ng per side of NGF at 0 and 120 min after IA training enhanced IA retention. The highest dose used was ineffective when injected 360 min after training. The infusion of 0. 5 microL of NGF (5.0 ng) induced a significant enhancement of MAPK activity in hippocampal microslices; this enhancement was restricted to a volume with 0.8 mm radius at 30 min after injection. The MAPK activation was still seen 180 min after NGF infusion, although this value showed only a tendency. In conclusion, localized infusion of NGF into the CA1 region enhanced MAPK activity, restricted in time and space, and enhanced IA retention in a time- and dose-dependent manner.

  10. Introduction of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors into a medulloblastoma cell line results in expression of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors but not NGF-mediated differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Pleasure, S J; Reddy, U R; Venkatakrishnan, G; Roy, A K; Chen, J; Ross, A H; Trojanowski, J Q; Pleasure, D E; Lee, V M

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the cloned human nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) cDNA in cell lines can generate both high- and low-affinity binding sites. Since the inability to respond appropriately to differentiation factors such as NGF may contribute to determining the malignant phenotype of neuroblastomas, we sought to determine whether the same is true of medulloblastomas. To generate a human central nervous system neuronal cell line that would respond to NGF, we infected the medulloblastoma cell line D283 MED with a defective retrovirus carrying the cDNA coding for the human NGFR. The resultant cells (MED-NGFR) expressed abundant low- and high-affinity NGFRs, and NGF treatment induced a rapid transient increase of c-fos mRNA in the NGFR-expressing cells but not in the parent line or in cells infected with virus lacking the cDNA insert. However, the MED-NGFR cells did not internalize the NGFR at high efficiency, nor did they differentiate in response to NGF. Three important conclusions emerge from this study: (i) internalization of NGFRs is not necessary for some early rapid transcriptional effects of NGF; (ii) an unknown factor(s) that cooperates with the cloned NGFR in allowing high-affinity NGF binding is found in a primitive central nervous system cell line; and (iii) NGFRs introduced into and expressed by D283 MED (i.e., MED-NGFR) cells are partially functional but are unable to induce differentiation in these primitive neuron-like tumor cells, implying that high-efficiency receptor-mediated endocytosis of NGF and its receptor may be a necessary step in the cascade of events leading to NGF-mediated differentiation. Images PMID:2172988

  11. Hibernating myocardium results in partial sympathetic denervation and nerve sprouting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stanley F; Ovchinnikov, Vladislav; Canty, John M; Fallavollita, James A

    2013-01-15

    Hibernating myocardium due to chronic repetitive ischemia is associated with regional sympathetic nerve dysfunction and spontaneous arrhythmic death in the absence of infarction. Although inhomogeneity in regional sympathetic innervation is an acknowledged substrate for sudden death, the mechanism(s) responsible for these abnormalities in viable, dysfunctional myocardium (i.e., neural stunning vs. sympathetic denervation) and their association with nerve sprouting are unknown. Accordingly, markers of sympathetic nerve function and nerve sprouting were assessed in subendocardial tissue collected from chronically instrumented pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 18) as well as sham-instrumented controls (n = 7). Hibernating myocardium exhibited evidence of partial sympathetic denervation compared with the normally perfused region and sham controls, with corresponding regional reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase protein (-32%, P < 0.001), norepinephrine uptake transport protein (-25%, P = 0.01), and tissue norepinephrine content (-45%, P < 0.001). Partial denervation induced nerve sprouting with regional increases in nerve growth factor precursor protein (31%, P = 0.01) and growth associated protein-43 (38%, P < 0.05). All of the changes in sympathetic nerve markers were similar in animals that developed sudden death (n = 9) compared with electively terminated pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 9). In conclusion, sympathetic nerve dysfunction in hibernating myocardium is most consistent with partial sympathetic denervation and is associated with regional nerve sprouting. The extent of sympathetic remodeling is similar in animals that develop sudden death compared with survivors; this suggests that sympathetic remodeling in hibernating myocardium is not an independent trigger for sudden death. Nevertheless, sympathetic remodeling likely contributes to electrical instability in combination with other factors.

  12. Decellularisation and histological characterisation of porcine peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zilic, Leyla; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Haycock, John W

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries affect a large proportion of the global population, often causing significant morbidity and loss of function. Current treatment strategies include the use of implantable nerve guide conduits (NGC's) to direct regenerating axons between the proximal and distal ends of the nerve gap. However, NGC's are limited in their effectiveness at promoting regeneration Current NGCs are not suitable as substrates for supporting either neuronal or Schwann cell growth, as they lack an architecture similar to that of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) of the nerve. The aim of this study was to create an acellular porcine peripheral nerve using a novel decellularisation protocol, in order to eliminate the immunogenic cellular components of the tissue, while preserving the three-dimensional histoarchitecture and ECM components. Porcine peripheral nerve (sciatic branches were decellularised using a low concentration (0.1%; w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate in conjunction with hypotonic buffers and protease inhibitors, and then sterilised using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Quantitative and qualitative analysis revealed a ≥95% (w/w) reduction in DNA content as well as preservation of the nerve fascicles and connective tissue. Acellular nerves were shown to have retained key ECM components such as collagen, laminin and fibronectin. Slow strain rate to failure testing demonstrated the biomechanical properties of acellular nerves to be comparable to fresh controls. In conclusion, we report the production of a biocompatible, biomechanically functional acellular scaffold, which may have use in peripheral nerve repair. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2041-2053. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26926914

  13. Dynamic Regulation of Schwann Cell Enhancers after Peripheral Nerve Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Holly A.; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-01-01

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. PMID:25614629

  14. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  15. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  16. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident

  17. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil İbrahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  18. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  19. Molecular examination of bone marrow stromal cells and chondroitinase ABC-assisted acellular nerve allograft for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Jia, Hua; Li, Wen-Yuan; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan-Cui; Liu, Gui-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs). After 8 weeks, the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the regenerated tissues were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Axonal regeneration, motor neuron protection and functional recovery were examined by immunohistochemistry, horseradish peroxidase retrograde neural tracing and electrophysiological and tibialis anterior muscle recovery analyses. It was observed that combination therapy enhances the growth response of the donor nerve locally as well as distally, at the level of the spinal cord motoneuron and the target muscle organ. This phenomenon is likely due to the propagation of retrograde and anterograde transport of growth signals sourced from the graft site. Collectively, growth improvement on the donor nerve, target muscle and motoneuron ultimately contribute to efficacious axonal regeneration and functional recovery. Thorough investigation of molecular peripheral nerve injury combinatorial strategies are required for the optimization of efficacious therapy and full functional recovery following ANA. PMID:27698684

  20. Molecular examination of bone marrow stromal cells and chondroitinase ABC-assisted acellular nerve allograft for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Jia, Hua; Li, Wen-Yuan; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan-Cui; Liu, Gui-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs). After 8 weeks, the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the regenerated tissues were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Axonal regeneration, motor neuron protection and functional recovery were examined by immunohistochemistry, horseradish peroxidase retrograde neural tracing and electrophysiological and tibialis anterior muscle recovery analyses. It was observed that combination therapy enhances the growth response of the donor nerve locally as well as distally, at the level of the spinal cord motoneuron and the target muscle organ. This phenomenon is likely due to the propagation of retrograde and anterograde transport of growth signals sourced from the graft site. Collectively, growth improvement on the donor nerve, target muscle and motoneuron ultimately contribute to efficacious axonal regeneration and functional recovery. Thorough investigation of molecular peripheral nerve injury combinatorial strategies are required for the optimization of efficacious therapy and full functional recovery following ANA.

  1. The influence of predegenerated nerve grafts on axonal regeneration from prelesioned peripheral nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, N A; Neumann, M M; de Souky, M A; So, K F; Bedi, K S

    1996-01-01

    Recent in vitro work has indicated that predegenerated segments of peripheral nerve are more capable of supporting neurite growth from adult neurons than fresh segments of nerve, whereas previous in vivo studies which investigated whether predegenerated nerve segments used as grafts are capable of enhancing axonal regeneration produced conflicting results. We have reinvestigated this question by using predegenerated nerve grafts in combination with conditioning lesions of the host nerve to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining the maximal degree of regeneration of myelinated axons. The sciatic nerve of adult Dark Agouti rats were sectioned at midthigh level, and the distal portion was allowed to predegenerate for 0, 6 or 12 d in situ. 10-15 mm lengths of these distal nerve segments were then syngenically grafted onto the central stumps of sciatic nerves which had themselves received a conditioning lesion 0, 6, and 12 d previously, making a total of 9 different donor-host combinations. The grafts were assessed histologically 3 or 8 wk after grafting. Axonal regeneration in the 9 different donor-host combinations was determined by counting the numbers of myelinated axons in transverse sections through the grafts. All grafts examined contained regenerating myelinated axons. The rats given a 3 wk postgrafting survival period had an average of between 1400 and 5300 such axons. The rats given an 8 wk postgrafting survival period had between about 13,000 and 25,000 regenerating myelinated axons. Analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for both the Donor and Host conditions as well as Weeks (i.e. survival period after grafting). These results indicate that both a conditioning lesion of the host neurons and the degree of predegeneration of peripheral nerve segments to be used as grafts are of importance in influencing the degree of axonal regeneration. Of these 2 factors the conditioning lesion of the host appears to have the greater effect on the

  2. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  3. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable. PMID:76410

  4. Nerve Growth Factor, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Osteocalcin Gene Relationship in Energy Regulation, Bone Homeostasis and Reproductive Organs Analyzed by mRNA Quantitative Evaluation and Linear Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camerino, Claudia; Conte, Elena; Cannone, Maria; Caloiero, Roberta; Fonzino, Adriano; Tricarico, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF)/Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and osteocalcin share common effects regulating energy, bone mass, reproduction and neuronal functions. To investigate on the gene-relationship between NGF, BDNF, and Osteocalcin we compared by RT-PCR the transcript levels of Ngf, Bdnf and Osteocalcin as well as of their receptors p75NTR/NTRK1, NTRK2, and Gprc6a in brain, bone, white/brown adipose tissue (WAT/BAT) and reproductive organs of 3 months old female and male mice. Brain and bone were used as positive controls for NGF/BDNF and Osteocalcin respectively. The role of oxitocin(Oxt) and its receptor(Oxtr) was also investigated. Ngf expression shows an opposite trend compared to Bdnf. Ngf /p75NTR expression is 50% higher in BAT than brain, in both genders, but lower in bone. In contrast, Bdnf expression in bone is higher than in brain, but low in BAT/WAT. We found Osteocalcin gene expressed in brain in both genders, but Gprc6a expression is low in brain and BAT/WAT. As expected, Gprc6a gene is expressed in bone. Oxt gene was markedly expressed in brain, Oxtr in the ovaries and in fat and bone in both genders. Ngf is highly expressed in reproductive tissues and p75NTR mRNA levels are respectively 300, 100, and 50% higher in testis/ovaries/uterus than in brain. In contrast, BDNF genes are not expressed in reproductive tissues. As expected, Gprc6a is expressed in testis but not in the ovaries/uterus. A significant correlation was found between the expression levels of the gene ligands and their receptors in brain, BAT and testis suggesting a common pathway of different genes in these tissues in either male and female. Changes in the expression levels of osteocalcin, Ngf, or Bdnf genes may mutually affect the expression levels of the others. Moreover, it may be possible that different ligands may operate through different receptor subtypes. Oxt and Oxtr failed to show significant correlation. The up-regulation of Ngf /p75NTR in BAT is consistent

  5. On the mechanism of divalent metal ion chelator induced activation of the 7S nerve growth factor esteropeptidase. Activation by 2,2',2''-terpyridine and by 8-hydroxyquinoline 5-sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Pattison, S E; Dunn, M F

    1976-08-24

    Our previous studies (Pattison, S. E., and Dunn, M. F. (1975), Biochemistry 14, 2733) have shown that the reaction of divalent metal ion chelators with the 140 000 mol wt mouse submaxillary nerve growth factor protein (7S NGF) activates the iota-subunit esteropeptidase activity ca. sevenfold. Ultraviolet-visible spectral studies with the chelator 2,2',2''-terpyridine (terpyridine) and fluorescence emission studies with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA) in combination with both conventional and rapid-mixing stopped-flow kinetic techniques have been employed in the present study to investigate (a) the mechanism of the chelator-induced activation process, and (b) the identity of the divalent metal ion involved. The spectral studies confirm the presence of stoichiometrically significant amounts of tightly bound zinc ion in native 7S NGF (1-2 g-atoms of An2+/mol of 7S NGF). The kinetic studies show that the reaction of terpyridine with 7S NGF occurs via a two-step process involving first a rapid, apparent second-order step (k1 = 1 x 10(6) M-1 s-1) to form a 7S NGF-Zn2+-chelator monocomplex, then a slow step to form a bis(terpyridine)-Zn(II) complex and activated 7S NGF in an apparent first-order process (kobsd = 0.10 min-1). This rate is, within experimental error, identical with the apparent first-order rate constant for the chelator-induced activation process (monitored by the rate of change in the steady-state rate of hydrolysis of chromophoric substrate, alpha-N-benzoyl-D,L-arginine-p-nitroanilide). Kinetic studies of the reaction of HQSA with native 7S NGF show that, under the same conditions of concentration, the rate of formation of the tris(HQSA)-Zn(II) complex is identical with the rate of the HQSA-induced activation of the 7S NGF esteropeptidase. Thus, these studies unambiguously establish that zinc ion is the metal ion involved in the chelator-induced activation process, and that activation involves removal of zinc ion from native 7S NGF.

  6. ‘Strategic Sequences’ in Adipose Derived Stem Cell Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Widgerow, Alan D.; Salibian, Ara A.; Kohan, Emil; SartiniFerreira, Tadeu; Afzel, Hassaan; Tham, Thanh; Evans, Gregory RD

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injuries (PNI) are a major source of morbidity worldwide. The development of cellular regenerative therapies has the potential to improve outcomes of nerve injuries. However, an ideal therapy has yet to be found. The purpose of this study is to examine the current literature key points of regenerative techniques utilizing human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) for nerve regeneration, and derive a comprehensive approach to hADSC therapy for PNI. Methods A literature review was conducted using the electronic database PubMed to search for current experimental approaches to repairing peripheral nerve injuries using hADSCs. Key search elements focused on specific components of nerve regeneration paradigms, including, 1) support cells, 2) scaffolds and 3) nerve conduits. Results Strategic sequences were developed by optimizing the components of different experimental regenerative therapies. These sequences focus on priming hADSCs within a specialized growth medium, a hydrogel matrix base, and a collagen nerve conduit to achieve neuromodulatory nerve regeneration. Human ADSCs may exert their neuroregenerative influence through paracrine effects on surrounding Schwann cells in addition to physical interactions with injured tissue. Conclusions hADSCs may play a key role in nerve regeneration by acting primarily as support for local neurotrophic mediation and modulation of nerve growth rather than that of a primary neuronal differentiation agent. PMID:24375471

  7. Cellulose/soy protein composite-based nerve guidance conduits with designed microstructure for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Li; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Yanteng; Li, Ke; Tong, Zan; Yi, Li; Wang, Xiong; Li, Yinping; Tian, Weiqun; He, Xiaohua; Zhao, Min; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Objective. The objective of this work was to develop nerve guidance conduits from natural polymers, cellulose and soy protein isolate (SPI), by evaluating the effects of cellulose/SPI film-based conduit (CSFC) and cellulose/SPI sponge-based conduit (CSSC) on regeneration of nerve defects in rats. Approach. CSFC and CSSC with the same chemical components were fabricated from cellulose and SPI. Effects of CSSC and CSFC on regeneration of the defective nerve were comparatively investigated in rats with a 10 mm long gap in sciatic nerve. The outcomes of peripheral nerve repair were evaluated by a combination of electrophysiological assessment, Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing, double NF200/S100 immunofluorescence analysis, toluidine blue staining, and electron microscopy. The probable molecular mechanism was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. Main results. Compared with CSFC, CSSC had 2.69 times higher porosity and 5.07 times higher water absorption, thus ensuring much higher permeability. The nerve defects were successfully bridged and repaired by CSSC and CSFC. Three months after surgery, the CSSC group had a higher compound muscle action potential amplitude ratio, a higher percentage of positive NF200 and S100 staining, and a higher axon diameter and myelin sheath thickness than the CSFC group, showing the repair efficiency of CSSC was higher than that of CSFC. qPCR analysis indicated the mRNA levels of nerve growth factor, IL-10, IL-6, and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were higher in the CSSC group. This also indicated that there was better nerve repair with CSSC due to the higher porosity and permeability of CSSC providing a more favourable microenvironment for nerve regeneration than CSFC. Significance. A promising nerve guidance conduit was developed from cellulose/SPI sponge that showed potential for application in the repair of nerve defect. This work also suggests that nerve guidance conduits with better repair efficiency

  8. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  9. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  10. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  11. Improved peripheral nerve regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral lumbrokinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chung; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic effects of lumbrokinase, a group of enzymes extracted from the earthworm, on peripheral-nerve regeneration using well-defined sciatic nerve lesion paradigms in diabetic rats induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ). We found that lumbrokinase therapy could improve the rats' circulatory blood flow and promote the regeneration of axons in a silicone rubber conduit after nerve transection. Lumbrokinase treatment could also improve the neuromuscular functions with better nerve conductive performances. Immunohistochemical staining showed that lumbrokinase could dramatically promote calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and cause a marked increase in the number of macrophages recruited within the distal nerve stumps. In addition, the lumbrokinase could stimulate the secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1), nerve growth factor (NGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dissected diabetic sciatic nerve segments. In conclusion, the administration of lumbrokinase after nerve repair surgery in diabetic rats was found to have remarkable effects on promoting peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25787300

  12. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  13. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  14. Peripheral nerve explants grafted into the vitreous body of the eye promote the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons severed in the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Berry, M; Carlile, J; Hunter, A

    1996-02-01

    We have conducted experiments in the adult rat visual system to assess the relative importance of an absence of trophic factors versus the presence of putative growth inhibitory molecules for the failure of regeneration of CNS axons after injury. The experiments comprised three groups of animals in which all optic nerves were crushed intra-orbitally: an optic nerve crush group had a sham implant-operation on the eye; the other two groups had peripheral nerve tissue introduced into the vitreous body; in an acellular peripheral nerve group, a frozen/thawed teased sciatic nerve segment was grafted, and in a cellular peripheral nerve group, a predegenerate teased segment of sciatic nerve was implanted. The rats were left for 20 days and their optic nerves and retinae prepared for immunohistochemical examination of both the reaction to injury of axons and glia in the nerve and also the viability of Schwann cells in the grafts. Anterograde axon tracing with rhodamine-B provided unequivocal qualitative evidence of regeneration in each group, and retrograde HRP tracing gave a measure of the numbers of axons growing across the lesion by counting HRP filled retinal ganglion cells in retinal whole mounts after HRP injection into the optic nerve distal to the lesion. No fibres crossed the lesion in the optic nerve crush group and dense scar tissue was formed in the wound site. GAP-43-positive and rhodamine-B filled axons in the acellular peripheral nerve and cellular peripheral nerve groups traversed the lesion and grew distally. There were greater numbers of regenerating fibres in the cellular peripheral nerve compared to the acellular peripheral nerve group. In the former, 0.6-10% of the retinal ganglion cell population regenerated axons at least 3-4 mm into the distal segment. In both the acellular peripheral nerve and cellular peripheral nerve groups, no basal lamina was deposited in the wound. Thus, although astrocyte processes were stacked around the lesion edge, a glia

  15. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  16. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains. PMID:21804177

  17. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains.

  18. Extension of synaptic extracellular matrix during nerve terminal sprouting in living frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Ko, C P

    1994-02-01

    Remodeling of the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) and its dynamic relationship with nerve terminal plasticity have been demonstrated in normal frog neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo (Chen et al., 1991). Our previous work has led to a hypothesis that extension of synaptic ECM precedes nerve terminal growth during synaptic remodeling. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the changes of synaptic ECM in frog NMJs that were primarily undergoing nerve terminal growth and sprouting. Frog sartorius muscles were double stained with a fluorescent nerve terminal dye (4-Di-2-Asp) and rhodamine-tagged peanut agglutinin (PNA), which recognizes synaptic ECM. The double-labeled NMJs were visualized in vivo with video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy. Nerve sprouting was then induced in the muscle by grafting segments of the contralateral sciatic nerve. The identified NMJs were restrained and reexamined 2-3 months later. Extensive sprouting was observed in 46% of 167 identified NMJs. At junctional regions that showed extension or formation of new branches, synaptic ECM was commonly seen to have the same shape and distribution as the nerve terminal. However, extension of synaptic ECM beyond the corresponding nerve terminals, often by tens of microns, was observed in 29% of these newly formed junctional regions. This lack of correlation might be transient, as growth of nerve terminals following extended, PNA-stained ECM was seen. Examination with histological staining not only confirmed a lack of nerve terminal at the extended synaptic ECM region but also indicated an absence of AChE and postsynaptic junctional folds. The absence of these postsynaptic specializations at the extended, PNA-stained ECM region makes it unlikely that this region was previously occupied by nerve terminals that had retracted. Thus, the present study provides further findings consistent with the hypothesis that synaptic ECM precedes nerve terminal outgrowth and that the extension of

  19. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  20. Sports and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Y; Sakakida, K

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is one of the serious complications of athletic injuries; however, they have rarely been reported. According to the report by Takazawa et al., there were only 28 cases of peripheral nerve injury among 9,550 cases of sports injuries which had been treated in the previous 5 years at the clinic of the Japanese Athletic Association. The authors have encountered 1,167 cases of peripheral nerve injury during the past 18 years. Sixty-six of these cases were related to sports (5.7%). The nerves most frequently involved were: brachial plexus, radial nerve, ulnar, peroneal, and axillary nerves (in their order of frequency). The most common causes of such injuries were mountain climbing, gymnastics, and baseball. More often, peripheral nerve injury seemed to be caused by continuous compression and repeated trauma to the involved nerve. Usually it appeared as an entrapment neuropathy and the symptoms could be improved by conservative treatment. Some of the cases were complicated by fractures and surgical exploration became necessary. Results of treatment produced excellent to good improvement in 87.9% of the cases. With regard to compartment syndrome, the authors stress the importance of early and precise diagnosis and a fasciotomy.

  1. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zarina S; Pisapia, Jared M; Ma, Tracy S; Zager, Eric L; Heuer, Gregory G; Khoury, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging modalities for evaluation of peripheral nerves. Of these, ultrasonography (US) is often underused. There are several advantages of this imaging modality, including its cost-effectiveness, time-efficient assessment of long segments of peripheral nerves, ability to perform dynamic maneuvers, lack of contraindications, portability, and noninvasiveness. It can provide diagnostic information that cannot be obtained by electrophysiologic or, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging studies. Ideally, the neurosurgeon can use US as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative assessment of a patient with traumatic, neoplastic, infective, or compressive nerve injury. Perhaps its most unique use is in intraoperative surgical planning. In this article, a brief description of normal US nerve anatomy is presented followed by a description of the US appearance of peripheral nerve disease caused by trauma, tumor, infection, and entrapment.

  2. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  3. Teeth and tooth nerves.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Fried, K; Tuisku, F; Johansson, C S

    1995-02-01

    (1) Although our knowledge on teeth and tooth nerves has increased substantially during the past 25 years, several important issues remain to be fully elucidated. As a result of the work now going on at many laboratories over the world, we can expect exciting new findings and major break-throughs in these and other areas in a near future. (2) Dentin-like and enamel-like hard tissues evolved as components of the exoskeletal bony armor of early vertebrates, 500 million years ago, long before the first appearance of teeth. It is possible that teeth developed from tubercles (odontodes) in the bony armor. The presence of a canal system in the bony plates, of tubular dentin, of external pores in the enamel layer and of a link to the lateral line system promoted hypotheses that the bony plates and tooth precursors may have had a sensory function. The evolution of an efficient brain, of a head with paired sense organs and of toothed jaws concurred with a shift from a sessile filter-feeding life to active prey hunting. (3) The wide spectrum of feeding behaviors exhibited by modern vertebrates is reflected by a variety of dentition types. While the teeth are continuously renewed in toothed non-mammalian vertebrates, tooth turnover is highly restricted in mammals. As a rule, one set of primary teeth is replaced by one set of permanent teeth. Since teeth are richly innervated, the turnover necessitates a local neural plasticity. Another factor calling for a local plasticity is the relatively frequent occurrence of age-related and pathological dental changes. (4) Tooth development is initiated through interactions between the oral epithelium and underlying neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. The interactions are mediated by cell surface molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and soluble molecules. The possibility that the initiating events might involve a neural component has been much discussed. With respect to mammals, the experimental evidence available does not

  4. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  5. Neural tissue engineering options for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Williams, David F

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) have emerged as a potential alternative to autologous nerve grafts, the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair. Typically, TENGs are composed of a biomaterial-based template that incorporates biochemical cues. A number of TENGs have been used experimentally to bridge long peripheral nerve gaps in various animal models, where the desired outcome is nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery. So far, the translation of TENGs to the clinic for use in humans has met with a certain degree of success. In order to optimize the TENG design and further approach the matching of TENGs with autologous nerve grafts, many new cues, beyond the traditional ones, will have to be integrated into TENGs. Furthermore, there is a strong requirement for monitoring the real-time dynamic information related to the construction of TENGs. The aim of this opinion paper is to specifically and critically describe the latest advances in the field of neural tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we delineate new attempts in the design of template (or scaffold) materials, especially in the context of biocompatibility, the choice and handling of support cells, and growth factor release systems. We further discuss the significance of RNAi for peripheral nerve regeneration, anticipate the potential application of RNAi reagents for TENGs, and speculate on the possible contributions of additional elements, including angiogenesis, electrical stimulation, molecular inflammatory mediators, bioactive peptides, antioxidant reagents, and cultured biological constructs, to TENGs. Finally, we consider that a diverse array of physicochemical and biological cues must be orchestrated within a TENG to create a self-consistent coordinated system with a close proximity to the regenerative microenvironment of the peripheral nervous system.

  6. A study of the sympathetic skin response and sensory nerve action potential after median and ulnar nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, M; Ghavanini, M R; Rahimi, H R; Raissi, G R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare SSR with sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) responses in regeneration of injured peripheral nerves after nerve repair. We studied 10 male patients with a mean age of 26.7 years. All the patients had complete laceration of median or ulnar nerves. The patients were followed up at least for six months. SSR and SNAP assessment were performed every one to two months. Normal hands were used as controls. SSR was positive after 15.8 +/- 9.4 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD) and SNAP after 27.8 +/- 12.9 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD). The difference was statistically significant (P value < 0.001). This can be due to more rapid growth of sympathetic unmyelinated fibers relative to sensory myelinated fibers. This study also shows that recovery of the sudomotor activity following nerve repair is satisfactory in general and SSR can be used as a useful and sensitive method in the evaluation of sudomotor nerve regeneration.

  7. Recent advances in nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Quigley, Anita F; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Kapsa, Robert M I; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-04-01

    Nerve injury secondary to trauma, neurological disease or tumor excision presents a challenge for surgical reconstruction. Current practice for nerve repair involves autologous nerve transplantation, which is associated with significant donor-site morbidity and other complications. Previously artificial nerve conduits made from polycaprolactone, polyglycolic acid and collagen were approved by the FDA (USA) for nerve repair. More recently, there have been significant advances in nerve conduit design that better address the requirements of nerve regrowth. Innovations in materials science, nanotechnology, and biology open the way for the synthesis of new generation nerve repair conduits that address issues currently faced in nerve repair and regeneration. This review discusses recent innovations in this area, including the use of nanotechnology to improve the design of nerve conduits and to enhance nerve regeneration.

  8. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor not equal to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1989-01-01

    I am perplexed by the authors' complete lack of definition of neurotrophic factors. The agents Butcher and Woolf want to blame are neurite promoting factors, not neurotrophic factors. Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with NGF antagonists might instead exacerbate the death of both basal forebrain neurons and their cortical target neurons, accelerating the progress of dementia.

  10. Affinity-based release of glial-derived neurotrophic factor from fibrin matrices enhances sciatic nerve regeneration†

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Matthew D.; Moore, Amy M.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Tuffaha, Sami; Borschel, Gregory H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2008-01-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes both sensory and motor neuron survival. The delivery of GDNF to the peripheral nervous system has been shown to enhance regeneration following injury. In this study we evaluated the effect of affinity-based delivery of GDNF from a fibrin matrix in a nerve guidance conduit on nerve regeneration in a 13 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Seven experimental groups were evaluated which received GDNF or nerve growth factor (NGF) with the delivery system within the conduit, control groups excluding one or more components of the delivery system, and nerve isografts. Nerves were harvested 6 weeks after treatment for analysis by histomorphometry and electron microscopy. The use of the delivery system (DS) with either GDNF or NGF resulted in a higher frequency of nerve regeneration vs. control groups, as evidenced by a neural structure spanning the 13 mm gap. The GDNF DS and NGF DS groups were also similar to the nerve isograft group in measures of nerve fiber density, percent neural tissue and myelinated area measurements, but not in terms of total fiber counts. In addition, both groups contained a significantly greater percentage of larger diameter fibers, with GDNF DS having the largest in comparison to all groups, suggesting more mature neural content. The delivery of GDNF via the affinity-based delivery system can enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone conduit across a critical nerve gap and offers insight into potential future alternatives to the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:19103514

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  12. Management of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Greywoode, Jewel D; Ho, Hao H; Artz, Gregory J; Heffelfinger, Ryan N

    2010-12-01

    Management of facial nerve injuries requires knowledge and skills that should be in every facial plastic surgeon's armamentarium. This article will briefly review the anatomy of the facial nerve, discuss the assessment of facial nerve injury, and describe the management of facial nerve injury after soft tissue trauma. PMID:21086238

  13. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  14. [Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tada, M; Nakano, A; Konno, T

    1988-04-01

    The neuroanatomy of the pelvic space was studied in order to clarify the course of cavernous nerves responsible for erectile function. The cavernous nerves travel along the dorsolateral portion at the base toward the apex of the prostate, then penetrate urogenital diaphragm at the lateral aspect of the membranous urethra. According to the anatomical findings, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy was performed through the antegrade approach in 28 patients with prostate cancer. No significant surgical complications were encountered in the present series. Of the 28, evaluable cases were limited to 22 in terms of erection. Fifteen patients (68%) recovered their erectile function after nerve-sparing surgery. Therefore, the present surgical technique seems to be effective for the preservation of male sexual function following radical pelvic surgery.

  15. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  16. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  17. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  18. Mechanisms of trigeminal nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, V B; Assael, L A

    2001-09-01

    Injuries to the trigeminal nerve branches are a known and accepted risk in oral and maxillofacial surgery. It is prudent for the practitioner to explain the risks to patients as part of the informed consent process and to recognize and document the presence of nerve injury postoperatively. Patients should be referred to a surgeon experienced in microsurgical techniques in a timely fashion for evaluation and possible surgical intervention if an injury is not resolving.

  19. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  20. Noninvasive imaging of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rangavajla, Gautam; Mokarram, Nassir; Masoodzadehgan, Nazanin; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of peripheral nerve imaging extend the capabilities of imaging modalities to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peripheral nerve maladies. Methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its derivative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), ultrasound (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of assessing nerve structure and function following injury and relating the state of the nerve to electrophysiological and histological analysis. Of the imaging methods surveyed here, each offered unique and interesting advantages related to the field. MRI offered the opportunity to visualize immune activity on the injured nerve throughout the course of the regeneration process, and DTI offered numerical characterization of the injury and the ability to develop statistical bases for diagnosing injury. US extends imaging to the treatment phase by enabling more precise analgesic applications following surgery, and PET represents a novel method of assessing nerve injury through analysis of relative metabolism rates in injured and healthy tissue. Exciting new possibilities to enhance and extend the abilities of imaging methods are also discussed, including innovative contrast agents, some of which enable multimodal imaging approaches and present opportunities for treatment application. PMID:25766202

  1. Histochemical discrimination of fibers in regenerating rat infraorbital nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Sanger, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    In rat dorsal root ganglia, histochemical staining of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) yields a reciprocal pattern of activity: Sensory processes are CA positive and CE negative, whereas motor processes are CA negative and CE positive. In rat infraorbital nerve (a sensory peripheral nerve), we saw extensive CA staining of nearly 100% of the myelinated axons. Although CE reactivity in myelinated axons was extremely rare, we did observe CE staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers. Four weeks after transection of infraorbital nerves, CA-stained longitudinal sections of the proximal stump demonstrated 3 distinct morphological zones. A fraction of the viable axons retained CA activity to within 2 mm of the distal extent of the stump, and the stain is capable of resolving growth sprouts being regenerated from these fibers. Staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers in serial sections shows that CE activity was not retained as far distally as is the CA sensory staining.

  2. Verapamil inhibits scar formation after peripheral nerve repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Han, A-chao; Deng, Jing-xiu; Huang, Qi-shun; Zheng, Huai-yuan; Zhou, Pan; Liu, Zhi-wei; Chen, Zhen-bing

    2016-01-01

    The calcium channel blocker, verapamil, has been shown to reduce scar formation by inhibiting fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in vitro. It was not clear whether topical application of verapamil after surgical repair of the nerve in vivo could inhibit the formation of excessive scar tissue. In this study, the right sciatic nerve of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was transected and sutured with No. 10-0 suture. The stoma was wrapped with gelfoam soaked with verapamil solution for 4 weeks. Compared with the control group (stoma wrapped with gelfoam soaked with physiological saline), the verapamil application inhibited the secretion of extracellular matrix from fibroblasts in vivo, suppressed type I and III collagen secretion and increased the total number of axons and the number of myelinated axons. These findings suggest that verapamil could reduce the formation of scar tissue and promote axon growth after peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27127494

  3. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): Utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Summary The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception. PMID:22847209

  4. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception.

  5. Electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) biodegradable polymer nanofibre tubes for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, T. B.; Gao, Shujun; Chyan Tan, Ter; Wang, Shu; Lim, Aymeric; Ben Hai, Lim; Ramakrishna, S.

    2004-11-01

    Nanotechnology is an area receiving increasing attention as progress is made towards tailoring the morphology of polymeric biomaterial for a variety of applications. In the present study an attempt was made to electrospin poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) biodegradable polymer nanofibres. In this process, polymer fibres with diameters down to the nanometre range are formed by subjecting a fluid jet to a high electric field. The nanofibres were collected on to a rotating Teflon mandrel and fabricated to tubes or conduits, to function as nerve guidance channels. The feasibility of in vivo nerve regeneration was investigated through several of these conduits. The biological performance of the conduits were examined in the rat sciatic nerve model with a 10 mm gap length. After implantation of the nanofibre nerve guidance conduit to the right sciatic nerve of the rat, there was no inflammatory response. One month after implantation five out of eleven rats showed successful nerve regeneration. None of the implanted tubes showed tube breakage. The nanofibre nerve guidance conduits were flexible, permeable and showed no swelling. Thus, these new poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanofibre conduits can be effective aids for nerve regeneration and repair. Improvements could be done by impregnating nerve growth factors or Schwann cells and may lead to clinical applications.

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  7. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  8. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinwen; Chen, Jianghai; Chen, Yanhua; Cong, Xiaobin; Chen, Zhenbing

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post‑compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR‑labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham‑operated group, however, the numbers of FG‑labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)‑extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p‑c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase and p‑p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF‑β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  9. Magnetite nanoparticles doped photoresist derived carbon as a suitable substratum for nerve cell culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zanzan; Rezhdo, Olijora; Perrone, Matthew; Bao, Zhengzheng; Munir, Ahsan; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, H Susan; Shao, Jiahui

    2013-02-01

    A method which alters the substrate's physical and electrochemical properties by doping photoresist derived carbon with magnetite nanoparticles has been developed to enhance the existing substrate's ability to foster cell growth. Cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to evaluate the characters of the prepared film. And then, the magnetite nanoparticles doped carbon film is used as substrate for the growth of nerve cell. Here, rat pheochromocytoma cells are used for culture to test substrate-cell interactions. The results showed an increase in cell concentration and average neurite length with the increase of nanoparticle concentration on the surface. Importantly, the nerve cells can be grown on the magnetite nanoparticles doped carbon even in the absence of nerve growth factor. This finding will potentially provide a new material for nerve regeneration.

  10. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  11. Cranial Nerve Schwannomas: Diagnostic Imaging Approach.

    PubMed

    Skolnik, Aaron D; Loevner, Laurie A; Sampathu, Deepak M; Newman, Jason G; Lee, John Y; Bagley, Linda J; Learned, Kim O

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that may arise along the complex course of the cranial nerves (CNs), anywhere in the head and neck. Sound knowledge of the CN anatomy and imaging features of schwannomas is paramount for making the correct diagnosis. In this article, we review approaches to diagnosing CN schwannomas by describing their imaging characteristics and the associated clinical presentations. Relevant anatomic considerations are highlighted by using illustrative examples and key differential diagnoses categorized according to regions, which include the anterior skull base, orbit, cavernous sinus, basal cisterns, and neck. The clinical presentations associated with CN schwannomas vary and range from no symptoms to symptoms caused by mass effect or CN deficits. Individuals with the inherited disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 are predisposed to multiple schwannomas. When a lesion follows the course of a CN, the radiologist's roles are to confirm the imaging features of schwannoma and exclude appropriate differential considerations. The characteristic imaging features of CN schwannomas reflect their slow growth as benign neoplasms and include circumscribed margins, displacement of local structures, and smooth expansion of osseous foramina. These neoplasms exhibit various degrees of solid enhancement, often with internal cystic spaces on magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) images and heterogeneous high signal intensity specifically on T2-weighted MR images. Clinical and/or imaging evidence of end-organ compromise of the involved CN may exist and aid in the identification of the nerve of origin. With a detailed understanding of the course of the CNs, the diagnostic features of CN schwannomas, and the correlation between these data and the associated clinical presentations of these tumors, the radiologist can have a key role in the diagnosis of CN schwannomas and the treatment planning for affected patients. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID

  12. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  13. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  14. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Paraskevas, George; Tzika, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An unusual combination of median nerve's variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve's medial root. The latter (fourth) root was united with the lateral (fifth) root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications. PMID:27131354

  15. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  16. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  17. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  18. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length.

  19. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  20. Chronic nerve root entrapment: compression and degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoestenberghe, A.

    2013-02-01

    Electrode mounts are being developed to improve electrical stimulation and recording. Some are tight-fitting, or even re-shape the nervous structure they interact with, for a more selective, fascicular, access. If these are to be successfully used chronically with human nerve roots, we need to know more about the possible damage caused by the long-term entrapment and possible compression of the roots following electrode implantation. As there are, to date, no such data published, this paper presents a review of the relevant literature on alternative causes of nerve root compression, and a discussion of the degeneration mechanisms observed. A chronic compression below 40 mmHg would not compromise the functionality of the root as far as electrical stimulation and recording applications are concerned. Additionally, any temporary increase in pressure, due for example to post-operative swelling, should be limited to 20 mmHg below the patient’s mean arterial pressure, with a maximum of 100 mmHg. Connective tissue growth may cause a slower, but sustained, pressure increase. Therefore, mounts large enough to accommodate the root initially without compressing it, or compliant, elastic, mounts, that may stretch to free a larger cross-sectional area in the weeks after implantation, are recommended.

  1. Rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Shannon, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves pose complex challenges to both military and civilian physicians. Treatment of nerve injuries must consider all aspects of the inherent disability. Pain control is of paramount importance. Little will be accomplished until pain is brought down to tolerable levels. Rehabilitation needs to be instituted as first-line treatment. Focus must be first placed on protection of the affected area from complications stemming from disuse and immobility and then on enhancement of strength, flexibility, sensory discrimination, and dexterity. Early intervention sets the stage for optimal physiologic and functional recovery. PMID:11878078

  2. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  3. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  4. Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Era of Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gurleyik, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (non-RLN) is an anatomical variation increasing the risk of vocal cord palsy. Prediction and early identification of non-RLN may minimize such a risk of injury. This study assessed the effect of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) on the detection of non-RLN. A total of 462 (236 right) nerves in 272 patients were identified and totally exposed, and all intraoperative steps of IONM were sequentially applied on the vagus nerve (VN) and RLN. Right predissection VN stimulation at a distal point did not create a sound signal in three cases (3/236; 1.27%). Proximal dissection of the right VN under IONM guidance established a proximal point, creating a positive signal. The separation point of non-RLN from VN was discovered in all three patients. Non-RLNs were exposed from separation to laryngeal entry. Positive IONM signals were obtained after resection of thyroid lobes, and postoperative period was uneventful in patients with non-RLN. Absence of distal VN signal is a precise predictor of the non-RLN. IONM-guided proximal dissection of the right VN leads to identification of the non-RLN. The prediction of non-RLN by the absence of the VN signal at an early stage of surgery may prevent or minimize the risk of nerve injury.

  5. 3D multi-channel bi-functionalized silk electrospun conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinis, T M; Elia, R; Vidal, G; Dermigny, Q; Denoeud, C; Kaplan, D L; Egles, C; Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances over the past 25 years, a complete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries remains unsatisfactory today. The autograft is still considered the "gold standard" in clinical practice; however, postoperative complications and limited availability of nerve tissue have motivated the development of alternative approaches. Among them, the development of biomimetic nerve graft substitutes is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, multichanneled silk electrospun conduits bi-functionalized with Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Ciliary Neurotropic Factor (CNTF) were fabricated to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. These bioactive guides consisting of longitudinally oriented channels and aligned nanofibers were designed in order to mimic the fascicular architecture and fibrous extracellular matrix found in native nerve. The simple use of the electrospinning technique followed by a manual manipulation to manufacture these conduits provides tailoring of channel number and diameter size to create perineurium-like structures. Functionalization of the silk fibroin nanofiber did not affect its secondary structure and chemical property. ELISA assays showed the absence of growth factors passive release from the functionalized fibers avoiding the topical accumulation of proteins. In addition, our biomimetic multichanneled functionalized nerve guides displayed a mechanical behavior comparable to that of rat sciatic nerve with an ultimate peak stress of 4.0 ± 0.6 MPa and a corresponding elongation at failure of 156.8 ± 46.7%. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time our ability to design and characterize a bi-functionalized nerve conduit consisting of electrospun nanofibers with multichannel oriented and nanofibers aligned for peripheral regeneration. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent a new and promising technique towards the creation of a biocompatible nerve guidance conduit. PMID:25460402

  6. Nestin-expressing hair follicle-accessible pluripotent stem cells for nerve and spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle, discovered by our laboratory, have been shown to be able to form neurons and other nonfollicle cell types. We have shown that the nestin-expressing stem cells from the hair follicle can effect the repair of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. The hair follicle stem cells differentiate into neuronal and glial cells after transplantation to the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord, and enhance injury repair and locomotor recovery. We have termed these cells hair follicle-accessible pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. When the excised hair follicle with its nerve stump was placed in Gelfoam 3D histoculture, HAP stem cells grew and extended the hair follicle nerve which consisted of βIII-tubulin-positive fibers with F-actin expression at the tip. These findings indicate that βIII-tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in HAP stem cells, which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D Gelfoam histoculture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. Our results suggest that a major function of the HAP stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. HAP stem cells have critical advantages over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells in that they are highly accessible, require no genetic manipulation, are nontumorigenic, and do not present ethical issues for regenerative medicine.

  7. Growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Golde, D.W.; Herschman, H.R.; Lusis, A.J.; Groopman, J.E.

    1980-05-01

    Humoral regulation of somatic and hematopoietic cell growth has been intensely investigated during the past decade. Growth hormone is unique because it regulates the size of the person within the constraints of the genetic program. The somatomedins and insulin growth factors are low molecular weight polypeptides believed to mediate some functions of growth hormone. Epithelial growth factor and nerve growth factor are well-characterized polypeptides that influence the growth and differentiation of epithelial and neural tissues and interact with specific cell surface receptors. The hematopoietins are a family of polypeptide hormones that specifically regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells giving rise to erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, megakaryocytes, and B and T lymphocytes. Platelet-derived growth factor modulates the proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro and may have a role in the development of atherosclerosis and myelofibrosis. New knowledge on the biochemistry and physiology of growth factors will probably have a substantial impact on our understanding of human diseases involving abnormal cell growth.

  8. Initial formation and secondary condensation of nerve pathways in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Jellies, J; Kopp, D M; Johansen, K M; Johansen, J

    1996-09-01

    Invertebrates have proved to be important experimental systems for examining questions related to growth cone navigation and nerve formation, in large part because of their simpler nervous systems. However, such apparent simplicity can be deceiving because the final stereotyped patterns may be the result of multiple developmental mechanisms and not necessarily the sole consequence of the pathway choices of individual growth cones. We have examined the normal sequence of events that are involved in the formation of the major peripheral nerves in leech embryos by employing (1) an antibody directed against acetylated tubulin to label neurons growing out from the central nervous system, (2) the Lan3-2 antibody to label a specific population of peripheral neurons growing into the central nervous system, and (3) intracellular dye filling of single cells. We found that the mature pattern of nerves was characterized by a pair of large nerve roots, each of which branched into two major tracts. The earliest axonal projections did not, however, establish this pattern definitively. Rather, each of the four nerves initially formed as discrete, roughly parallel tracts without bifurcation, with the final branching pattern of the nerve roots being generated by a secondary condensation. In addition, we found that some of the nerves were pioneered in different ways and by different groups of neurons. One of the nerves was established by central neurons growing peripherally, another by peripheral neurons growing centrally. These results suggest that the formation of common nerves and neuronal pathfinding in the leech involves multiple sets of growth cone guidance strategies and morphogenetic mechanisms that belie its apparent simplicity. PMID:8876458

  9. Effect of Limb Lengthening on Internodal Length and Conduction Velocity of Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Anderson, Heather; Cottrell, David; Sherman, Diane L.; Ribchester, Richard R.; Brophy, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The influences of axon diameter, myelin thickness, and internodal length on the velocity of conduction of peripheral nerve action potentials are unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated a strong dependence of conduction velocity on internodal length. However, a theoretical analysis has suggested that this relationship may be lost above a nodal separation of ∼0.6 mm. Here we measured nerve conduction velocities in a rabbit model of limb lengthening that produced compensatory increases in peripheral nerve growth. Divided tibial bones in one hindlimb were gradually lengthened at 0.7 mm per day using an external frame attached to the bone. This was associated with a significant increase (33%) of internodal length (0.95–1.3 mm) in axons of the tibial nerve that varied in proportion to the mechanical strain in the nerve of the lengthened limb. Axonal diameter, myelin thickness, and g-ratios were not significantly altered by limb lengthening. Despite the substantial increase in internodal length, no significant change was detected in conduction velocity (∼43 m/s) measured either in vivo or in isolated tibial nerves. The results demonstrate that the internode remains plastic in the adult but that increases in internodal length of myelinated adult nerve axons do not result in either deficiency or proportionate increases in their conduction velocity and support the view that the internodal lengths of nerves reach a plateau beyond which their conduction velocities are no longer sensitive to increases in internodal length. PMID:23467369

  10. In vivo study of novel nanofibrous intra-luminal guidance channels to promote nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, H. S.; Yong, T.; Teo, W. E.; Chan, C. K.; Puhaindran, M. E.; Tan, T. C.; Lim, A.; Lim, B. H.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2010-08-01

    A novel nanofibrous construct for promoting peripheral nerve repair was fabricated and tested in a rat sciatic nerve defect model. The conduit is made out of bilayered nanofibrous membranes with the nanofibers longitudinally aligned in the lumen and randomly oriented on the outer surface. The intra-luminal guidance channel is made out of aligned nanofibrous yarns. In addition, biomolecules such as laminin and nerve growth factor were incorporated in the nanofibrous nerve construct to determine their efficacy in in vivo nerve regeneration. Muscle reinnervation, withdrawal reflex latency, histological, axon density and electrophysiology tests were carried out to compare the efficacy of nanofibrous constructs with an autograft. Our study showed mixed results when comparing the artificial constructs with an autograft. In some cases, the nanofibrous conduit with aligned nanofibrous yarn as an intra-luminal guidance channel performs better than the autograft in muscle reinnervation and withdrawal reflex latency tests. However, the axon density count is highest in the autograft at mid-graft. Functional recovery was improved with the use of the nerve construct which suggested that this nerve implant has the potential for clinical usage in reconstructing peripheral nerve defects.

  11. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  12. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  13. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  14. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... pathways to the brain results in loss of vision. At a structure in the brain called the optic chiasm, each optic nerve splits, ... both eyes, and the left side of the brain receives information from the right visual field of both eyes. ... occurs. Resources ...

  15. Bidirectional inhibitory interactions between the embryonic chicken metanephros and lumbosacral nerves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Silver, Lee; Qiang, Liang; Loudon, Robert; Gallo, Gianluca

    2004-09-01

    During chicken embryonic development the metanephros forms from the uretic duct at embryonic day (E) 7. As the metanephric tissue develops between E7 and E10, it comes into close apposition with lumbosacral nerves. Coculturing of metanephric and nerve explants demonstrated that the Schwann cells of the sciatic nerve inhibit the migration of metanephric cells in a contact-dependent manner. Conversely, metanephric cells inhibit dorsal root ganglion axon extension in a contact-dependent manner. However, metanephric cells are not inhibited by contact with growth cones or axons. Dorsal root ganglion growth cones become sensitive to the inhibitory signals on the surfaces of metanephric cells around E8, a time when the metanephros is expanding into the territory occupied by nerves in vivo. These observations demonstrate inhibitory bidirectional tissue-tissue interactions in vitro and provide a novel model system for the study of contact-based guidance of both neuronal and non-neuronal cell migration.

  16. Cryoanalgesia for painful peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, J K

    1985-06-01

    Twelve patients with chronically painful peripheral nerve lesions were treated with cryoanalgesia. The pain was relieved in 6 patients for 1-12 months. Although the pain eventually recurred, the patients resumed normal activities during remission. It is necessary to improve the techniques of nerve localization and to determine the proper mode of nerve freezing. PMID:2995903

  17. Altered peripheral nerve function resulting from haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E; Brown, J C; Pryor, J S

    1977-01-01

    The amplitudes of muscle and nerve action potentials evoked median nerve stimulation were recorded just before and immediately after haemodialysis. These revealed a growht of action potential amplitude during dialysis. It is suggested that some component of the defective peripheral nerve function that inevitably accompanies uraemia is temporarily improved during dialysis. PMID:845605

  18. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  19. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  20. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing.

  1. Peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone chamber implanted with negative carbon ions: Possibility to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether a tube with its inner surface implanted with negative-charged carbon ions (C- ions) would enable axons to extend over a distance greater than 10 mm. The tube was found to support nerves regenerating across a 15-mm-long inter-stump gap. We also investigated whether a C- ion-implanted tube pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. The C- ion implanted tube accelerated nerve regeneration, and this effect was enhanced by bFGF. Silicone treated with C- ions showed increased hydrophilic properties and cellular affinity, and axon regeneration was promoted with this increased biocompatibility.

  2. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  3. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  4. Generalised peripheral nerve dysfunction in acromegaly: a study by conventional and novel neurophysiological techniques.

    PubMed

    Jamal, G A; Kerr, D J; McLellan, A R; Weir, A I; Davies, D L

    1987-07-01

    Twenty four patients with clinical, radiological and biochemical evidence of acromegaly were investigated by a number of independent neurophysiological tests. Two-thirds of the patients showed evidence of generalised peripheral nerve dysfunction. A significant correlation was found between total exchangeable body sodium, an indicator of disease activity, and the severity of the neuropathy. The generalised peripheral nerve abnormality was found to occur independently of the associated carbohydrate intolerance human growth hormone levels and other endocrinological dysfunction in this disorder.

  5. Identification of adequate vehicles to carry nerve regeneration inducers using tubulisation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Axonal regeneration depends on many factors, such as the type of injury and repair, age, distance from the cell body and distance of the denervated muscle, loss of surrounding tissue and the type of injured nerve. Experimental models use tubulisation with a silicone tube to research regenerative factors and substances to induce regeneration. Agarose, collagen and DMEM (Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium) can be used as vehicles. In this study, we compared the ability of these vehicles to induce rat sciatic nerve regeneration with the intent of finding the least active or inert substance. The experiment used 47 female Wistar rats, which were divided into four experimental groups (agarose 4%, agarose 0.4%, collagen, DMEM) and one normal control group. The right sciatic nerve was exposed, and an incision was made that created a 10 mm gap between the distal and proximal stumps. A silicone tube was grafted onto each stump, and the tubes were filled with the respective media. After 70 days, the sciatic nerve was removed. We evaluated the formation of a regeneration cable, nerve fibre growth, and the functional viability of the regenerated fibres. Results Comparison among the three vehicles showed that 0.4% agarose gels had almost no effect on provoking the regeneration of peripheral nerves and that 4% agarose gels completely prevented fibre growth. The others substances were associated with profuse nerve fibre growth. Conclusions In the appropriate concentration, agarose gel may be an important vehicle for testing factors that induce regeneration without interfering with nerve growth. PMID:22889258

  6. Benign Nerve Sheath Myxoma in an Infant Misdiagnosed as Infantile Digital Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Şule; Şişman, Servet; Kocaturk, Emek; Oguz Topal, Ilteris; Yıldırım, Selda

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present the case of a 16-month boy, clinically diagnosed with infantile digital fibromatosis, but 9 months after continued growth, the mass was excised and the histopathologic diagnosis was that of a benign nerve sheath myxoma. We present this case to emphasize that nerve sheath myxomas (also known as myxoid neurothekeoma) should be included in the differential diagnosis of dermal nodules in infants. PMID:27196676

  7. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  8. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management compli