Science.gov

Sample records for nerve growth factor-sensitive

  1. Nerve growth factor-sensitive S6 kinase in cell-free extracts from PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Nakanishi, N.; Dickens, G.; Guroff, G.

    1986-05-01

    Soluble extracts from nerve growth factor (NGF)-stimulated PC12 cells prepared by alkaline lysis show a 2-10 fold increase in the ability to phosphorylate the ribosomal protein S6. The alkaline lysis method yields a preparation of much higher specific activity than does sonication. Half-maximal incorporation of (/sup 32/P) from (/sup 32/P)ATP into S6 occurred after 4-7 minutes of nerve growth factor treatment. The partially purified NGF-sensitive S6 kinase has a molecular weight of 45,000 and is not inhibited by the inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, NaCl, or trifluoperazine, nor is it activated by the addition of diolein plus phosphatidylserine. Trypsin treatment of either crude extracts or partially purified S6 kinase from control or NGF-treated cells was without effect. These data suggest that the S6 kinase stimulated by NGF is neither cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, nor the result of proteolytic activation of an inactive proenzyme. Treatment of intact cells with dibutyryl cyclic AMP or 5'-N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine also increases the subsequent cell-free phosphorylation of S6. But the effect of NGF in increasing S6 kinase activity cannot be mimicked by treatment of control extract with cAMP-dependent protein kinase in vitro. Thus, it is unlikely to result from the phosphorylation of a less active form of the S6 kinase by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor sensitizes brain tumors to c-MET kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Farenholtz, Kaitlyn E.; Yang, Yanzhi; Guessous, Fadila; diPierro, Charles G.; Calvert, Valerie S.; Deng, Jianghong; Schiff, David; Xin, Wenjun; Lee, Jae K.; Purow, Benjamin; Christensen, James; Petricoin, Emanuel; Abounader, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-MET and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are deregulated and promote malignancy in cancer and brain tumors. Consequently, clinically applicable c-MET inhibitors have been developed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the not well known molecular determinants that predict responsiveness to c-MET inhibitors, and to explore new strategies for improving inhibitor efficacy in brain tumors. Experimental design We investigated the molecular factors and pathway activation signatures that determine sensitivity to c-MET inhibitors in a panel of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), and established cell line-derived xenografts using functional assays, reverse protein microarrays, and in vivo tumor volume measurements, but validation with animal survival analyses remains to be done. We also explored new approaches for improving the efficacy of the inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Results We found that HGF co-expression is a key predictor of response to c-MET inhibition among the examined factors, and identified an ERK/JAK/p53 pathway activation signature that differentiates c-MET inhibition in responsive and non-responsive cells. Surprisingly, we also found that short pre-treatment of cells and tumors with exogenous HGF moderately but statistically significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effects of c-MET inhibition. We observed a similar ligand-induced sensitization effect to an EGFR small molecule kinase inhibitor. Conclusions These findings allow the identification of a subset of patients that will be responsive to c-MET inhibition, and propose ligand pre-treatment as a potential new strategy for improving the anti-cancer efficacy of RTK inhibitors. PMID:23386689

  3. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  4. Altered growth factor sensitivity in EL2 rat fibroblasts: influence of this biological characteristic on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Testa, E P; Testa, U; Liboi, E

    1989-06-01

    Extensive evidence indicate that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) play a key role in the stimulation of the 3T3 fibroblast replication: in this connection, PDGF and EGF act as a competence and a progression factor, respectively. We have previously demonstrated that EGF alone leads density-arrested EL2 rat fibroblasts to synthesize DNA and proliferate in serum-free cultures. Here, we have analyzed the role of EGF in the control of EL2 cell proliferation. Our data show a dose-related effect of EGF on DNA synthesis and cell growth, with maximal stimulation for both parameters at 20 ng/ml. On the other hand, autocrine production of PDGF or PDGF-like substances by EL2 cells is seemingly excluded by experiments with anti-PDGF serum or medium conditioned by EL2 fibroblasts. EGF binding studies show that EL2 cells possess high affinity EGF receptors, at a density level 3 to 4-fold higher than other fibroblastic lines. In addition, EL2 cells show a normal down-regulation of EGF receptors, following exposure to EGF, but PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) and bombesin have not decreased the affinity of EGF receptor for its ligand. Moreover, in EL2 cells, the EGF is able to induce the synthesis of putative intracellular regulatory proteins that govern the PDGF-induced competence in 3T3 cells. Our data indicate that EGF in EL2 cells may act as both a competence and a progression factor, via induction of the mechanisms, regulated in other cell lines by cooperation between different growth factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  6. Sciatic nerve regeneration using a nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengzhong; Peng, Changliang; Wu, Shiqing; Wu, Dongjin; Gao, Chunzheng

    2013-12-25

    Our previous findings confirmed that the nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane provides a good microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) plays an important role in the regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that a nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane can promote neural regeneration by up-regulating p75(NTR) expression. In this study, we used a silicon nerve conduit to bridge a 15 mm-long sciatic nerve defect and injected a mixture of nerve growth factor and fibrin glue at the anastomotic site of the nerve conduit and the sciatic nerve. Through RT-PCR and western blot analysis, nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane significantly increased p75(NTR) mRNA and protein expression in the Schwann cells at the anastomotic site, in particular at 8 weeks after injection of the nerve growth factor/fibrin glue mixture. These results indicate that nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane can promote peripheral nerve regeneration by up-regulating p75(NTR) expression in Schwann cells.

  7. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  8. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor in distracted tibial nerve after limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Shao, Heng; Shu, Hengsheng; Wang, Chunmei; Yuan, Wu; Li, Yunsheng

    2013-02-01

    Despite many experimental and clinical studies conducted on distraction osteogenesis (DO) in the past decade, changes in the surrounding tissues that occur after the procedure remains poorly understood. To study the biochemical changes of recovery in nerve tissues upon DO-induced nerve injury, we prepared a rabbit model of tibia lengthening to observe the expression pattern of nerve growth factor (NGF) and low-affinity NGF receptor (p75NGFR) in the distracted tibial nerve. The distracted tibial nerve was harvested at various time points during the consolidation period of new bone formation and immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expression of NGF and p75NGFR. The expression levels of NGF and p75NGFR were found to be different at various times after DO. The changes in expression of these two cellular factors show similar tendencies with significantly elevated expression in Schwann cells at 7 and 14 days after distraction, but low or undetectable levels of expression at 0, 28, and 56 days. These results suggest that NGF and p75NGFR may play important roles in the adaptive process of the distracted nerve. NGF and p75NGFR are autocrine growth factors present in the distracted nerve during the early consolidation period. NGF interacts with p75NGFR to promote damage repair and reconstruction of nerves. Together, this study furthers the understanding of the relative mechanisms of nerve repair, as well as provides a further basis for the clinical application of neurotrophins.

  10. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with ({sup 125}I)NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and ({sup 125}I)NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations.

  11. Nerve growth factor enhances sleep in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Krueger, J M

    1999-04-02

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) elicits rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) in cats. Removal of NGF receptor-positive cholinergic basal forebrain neurons inhibits REMS in rats. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of NGF on sleep and brain temperature (Tbr) in rabbits. Male rabbits were implanted with electroencephalograph (EEG) electrodes, a brain thermistor and an intraventricular (i.c.v.) guide cannula. Rabbits received human beta-NGF i.c.v. (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 or 10 microg] and on a separate day, 25 microl pyrogen-free saline i.c.v. as control. EEG and Tbr were recorded for 23 h after injections. The highest two doses of NGF increased both non-REMS and REMS across the 23-h recording period. REMS was enhanced dose-dependently. Tbr was not affected by any dose of NGF. These results suggest that NGF is involved in both REMS and non-REMS regulation.

  12. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, H; Coughlin, M D; Bienenstock, J; Denburg, J A

    1988-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been cloned. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. NGF also causes histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, and we have shown elsewhere that it causes significant, dose-dependent, generalized mast cell proliferation in the rat in vivo when administered neonatally. Our experiments now indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. We conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, we postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes. PMID:3413109

  13. Let-7 microRNAs regenerate peripheral nerve regeneration by targeting nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly targeting NGF and suppressing its protein translation. Following sciatic nerve injury, the temporal change in let-7 miRNA expression was negatively correlated with that in NGF expression. Inhibition of let-7 miRNAs increased NGF secretion by primary cultured SCs and enhanced axonal outgrowth from a coculture of primary SCs and dorsal root gangalion neurons. In vivo tests indicated that let-7 inhibition promoted SCs migration and axon outgrowth within a regenerative microenvironment. In addition, the inhibitory effect of let-7 miRNAs on SCs apoptosis might serve as an early stress response to nerve injury, but this effect seemed to be not mediated through a NGF-dependent pathway. Collectively, our results provide a new insight into let-7 miRNA regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration and suggest a potential therapy for repair of peripheral nerve injury.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor mediates corneal nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Charles Q; Zhang, Min; Matis, Krisztina I; Kim, Charles; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2008-09-01

    To examine the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors in the cornea and the trigeminal ganglion and to characterize the role of VEGF in mediating corneal nerve repair. Regeneration of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus after epithelial debridement was measured. The expression of VEGF and its receptors was examined in the trigeminal ganglia and in the cornea by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. VEGF-mediated nerve growth was measured in a trigeminal ganglia explant assay. Anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody was used to examine the VEGF-dependent growth of neurons in vitro and regeneration of the corneal nerves in vivo. After two distinct patterns of nerve regeneration, the subbasal nerves recovered to 65% of the preinjury density after 28 days. RT-PCR demonstrated gene expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors in the trigeminal ganglia. Immunohistochemistry showed staining for VEGF and its receptors in the trigeminal ganglia and for VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and neuropilin (NRP)-1 in the cornea. Western blot confirmed these results. In vitro, VEGF promoted the growth of explanted trigeminal ganglia by 91%. Blockage of VEGF signaling with anti-VEGF antibody reduced the growth of cultured neurons by 17% and the regeneration of subbasal neurons by 23%. In addition to providing new information on the regeneration of murine corneal nerves, this study presents evidence that VEGF signaling influences the repair of corneal nerves by demonstrating that VEGF and VEGF receptors are present in the trigeminal ganglia and that abrogation of VEGF signaling reduces nerve growth in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Elf5 is an epithelium-specific, fibroblast growth factor-sensitive transcription factor in the embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Metzger, David E; Xu, Yan; Shannon, John M

    2007-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling has been shown to be essential for many aspects of normal lung development. To determine epithelial targets of FGF signaling, we cultured embryonic day (E) 11.5 mouse lungs for 24 hr in the presence or absence of the FGF receptor antagonist SU5402, which inhibited branching morphogenesis. Affymetrix gene chip analysis of treated and control epithelia identified several genes regulated by FGF signaling, including Elf5, a member of the Epithelial-specific Ets family of transcription factors. SU5402 reduced Elf5 expression in mesenchyme-free cultures of E12.5 epithelium, demonstrating that the inhibition was direct. In situ hybridization revealed that Elf5 had a dynamic pattern of expression during lung development. We found that expression of Elf5 was induced by FGF7 and FGF10, ligands that primarily bind FGFR2b. To further define the pathways by which FGFs activate Elf5 expression, we cultured E11.5 lung tips in the presence of compounds to inhibit FGF receptors (SU5402), PI3-Kinase/Akt-mediated signaling (LY294002), and MAP Kinase/Erk-mediated signaling (U0126). We found that SU5402 and LY294002 significantly reduced Elf5 expression, whereas U0126 had no effect. LY294002 also reduced Elf5 expression in cultures of purified epithelium. Finally, pAkt was coexpressed with Elf5 in the proximal epithelial airways of E17.5 lungs. These results demonstrate that Elf5 is an FGF-sensitive transcription factor in the lung with a dynamic pattern of expression and that FGF regulation of Elf5 by means of FGFR2b occurs through the PI3-Kinase/Akt pathway.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  17. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  18. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor Decreases in Sympathetic and Sensory Nerves of Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the maintenance and survival of both sympathetic and sensory nerves. Also, NGF can regulate receptor expression and neuronal activity in the sympathetic and sensory neurons. Abnormalities in NGF regulation are observed in patients and animals with heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the effects of chronic HF on the levels of NGF within the sympathetic and sensory nerves are not known. Thus, the ELISA method was used to assess the levels of NGF in the stellate ganglion (SG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of control rats and rats with chronic HF induced by myocardial infarction. Our data show for the first time that the levels of NGF were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the SG and DRG neurons 6–20 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. In addition, a close relation was observed between the NGF levels and the left ventricular function. In conclusion, chronic HF impairs the expression of NGF in the sympathetic and sensory nerves. Given that sensory afferent nerves are engaged in the sympathetic nervous responses to somatic stimulation (i.e. muscle activity during exercise) via a reflex mechanism, our data indicate that NGF is likely responsible for the development of muscle reflex-mediated abnormal sympathetic responsiveness observed in chronic HF. PMID:24913185

  2. Nerve Growth Factor: A Focus on Neuroscience and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Omar Balzamino, Bijorn; Micera, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the firstly discovered and best characterized neurotrophic factor, known to play a critical protective role in the development and survival of sympathetic, sensory and forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF promotes neuritis outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro and nerve cell recovery after ischemic, surgical or chemical injuries. Recently, the therapeutic property of NGF has been demonstrated on human cutaneous and corneal ulcers, pressure ulcer, glaucoma, maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. NGF eye drops administration is well tolerated, with no detectable clinical evidence of systemic or local adverse effects. The aim of this review is to summarize these biological properties and the potential clinical development of NGF. PMID:26411962

  3. Nerve growth factor gene therapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H

    2007-01-01

    Nervous system growth factors potently stimulate cell function and prevent neuronal death. These broad effects on survival and function arise from direct downstream activation of antiapoptotic pathways, inhibition of proapoptotic pathways, and stimulation of functionally important cellular mechanisms including ERK/MAP kinase and CREB. Thus, as a class, growth factors offer the potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders for the first time by preventing neuronal degeneration rather than compensating for cell loss after it has occurred. Different growth factors affect distinct and specific populations of neurons: the first nervous system growth factor identified, nerve growth factor, potentially stimulates the survival and function of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, suggesting that nerve growth factor could be a means for reducing the cholinergic component of cell degeneration in Alzheimer disease. This review will discuss the transition of growth factors from preclinical studies to human clinical trials in Alzheimer disease. The implementation of clinical testing of growth factor therapy for neurologic disease has been constrained by the dual need to achieve adequate concentrations of these proteins in specific brain regions containing degenerating neurons, and preventing growth factor spread to nontargeted regions to avoid adverse effects. Gene therapy is one of a limited number of potential methods for achieving these requirements.

  4. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  5. Polyethlyene glycol microgels to deliver bioactive nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Stukel, Jessica; Thompson, Susan; Simon, Laurent; Willits, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Delivery of bioactive molecules is a critical step in fabricating materials for regenerative medicine, yet, this step is particularly challenging in hydrated scaffolds such as hydrogels. Although bulk photocrosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels have been used for a variety of tissue engineering applications, their capability as drug delivery scaffolds has been limited due to undesirable release profiles and reduction in bioactivity of molecules. To solve these problems, this article presents the fabrication of degradable PEG microgels, which are micron-sized spherical hydrogels, to deliver bioactive nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF release and activity was measured after encapsulation in microgels formed from either 3 kDa or 6 kDa PEG to determine the role of hydrogel mesh size on release. Microgels formed from 6 kDa PEG were statistically larger and had a higher swelling ratio than 3 kDa PEG. The 6 kDa PEG microgels provided a Fickian release with a reduced burst effect and 3 kDa microgels provided anomalous release over ≥20 days. Regardless of molecular weight of PEG, NGF bioactivity was not significantly reduced compared to unprocessed NGF. These results demonstrate that microgels provide easy mechanisms to control the release while retaining the activity of growth factors. As this microgel-based delivery system can be injected at the site of nerve injury to promote nerve repair, the potential to deliver active growth factors in a controlled manner may reduce healing time for neural tissue engineering applications.

  6. Comparison of rabbit facial nerve regeneration in nerve growth factor-containing silicone tubes to that in autologous neural grafts.

    PubMed

    Spector, J G; Lee, P; Derby, A; Roufa, D G

    1995-11-01

    Previous reports suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF) enhanced nerve regeneration in rabbit facial nerves. We compared rabbit facial nerve regeneration in 10-mm silicone tubes prefilled with NGF or cytochrome C (Cyt C), bridging an 8-mm nerve gap, to regeneration of 8-mm autologous nerve grafts. Three weeks following implantation, NGF-treated regenerates exhibited a more mature fascicular organization and more extensive neovascularization than Cyt C-treated controls. Morphometric analysis at the middle of the tube of 3- and 5-week regenerates revealed no significant difference in the mean number of myelinated or unmyelinated axons between NGF- and Cyt C-treated implants. However, when the numbers of myelinated fibers in 5-week regenerates were compared to those in their respective preoperative controls, NGF-treated regenerates had recovered a significantly greater percentage of myelinated axons than Cyt C-treated implants (46% versus 18%, respectively). The number of regenerating myelinated axons in the autologous nerve grafts at 5 weeks was significantly greater than the number of myelinated axons in the silicone tubes. However, in the nerve grafts the majority of the axons were found in the extrafascicular connective tissue (66%). The majority of these myelinated fibers did not find their way into the distal nerve stump. Thus, although the number of regenerating myelinated axons within the nerve grafts is greater than that of axons within silicone tube implants, functional recovery of autologous nerve graft repairs may not be superior to that of intubational repairs.

  7. NERVE GROWTH FACTOR MAINTAINS POTASSIUM CONDUCTANCE AFTER NERVE INJURY IN ADULT CUTANEOUS AFFERENT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    EVERILL, B.; KOCSIS, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the effects of nerve growth factor on voltage-dependent potassium conductance in normal and axotomized identified large cutaneous afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons (48–50 μm diameter) many of which probably give rise to myelinated Aβ fibers. K-currents were isolated by blocking Na- and Ca-currents with appropriate ion replacement and channel blockers. Separation of current components was achieved on the basis of response to variation in conditioning voltage. Cutaneous afferents were labeled by the retrograde marker hydroxy-stilbamide (FluoroGold) which was injected into the skin of the foot. The sciatic nerve was either ligated or crushed with fine forceps five to seven days later. Neurons were dissociated 14–17 days after injury. The cut ends of the sciatic nerves were positioned into polyethylene tubes, which were connected to mini-osmotic pumps filled with either nerve growth factor or sterile saline. Control neurons displayed a prominent sustained K-current and the transient potassium currents “A” and “D”. Nerve ligation, which blocks target reconnection resulted in near 50% reduction of total outward current; isolated sustained K-current and transient A-current were reduced by a comparable amount. Nerve crush, which allows regeneration to peripheral targets and exposure of the regenerating nerve to the distal nerve segment, resulted in a small reduction in sustained K-current but no reduction in transient A-current compared to controls. Levels of transient A-current and sustained K-current were maintained at control levels after nerve growth factor treatment. These results indicate that the large reduction in transient A-current, and in sustained K-current, observed in cutaneous afferent cell bodies after nerve ligation is prevented by application of nerve growth factor. PMID:11008179

  8. Nerve growth factor induces sensitization of nociceptors without evidence for increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Michael; Rukwied, Roman; Gromann, Alois; Turnquist, Brian; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Francke, Klaus; Albrecht, Philip; Rice, Frank; Hägglöf, Björn; Ringkamp, Matthias; Engelhardt, Maren; Schultz, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Obreja, Otilia

    2013-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in the long-term sensitization of nociceptive processing linked to chronic pain. Functional and structural ("sprouting") changes can contribute. Thus, humans report long-lasting hyperalgesia to mechanical and electrical stimulation after intradermal NGF injection and NGF-induced sprouting has been reported to underlie cancer bone pain and visceral pain. Using a human-like animal model we investigated the relationship between the structure and function of unmyelinated porcine nociceptors 3 weeks after intradermal NGF treatment. Axonal and sensory characteristics were studied by in vivo single-fiber electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry. C fibers recorded extracellularly were classified based on mechanical response and activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of conduction velocity. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities were assessed by immunohistochemistry in pigs and in human volunteers using the same NGF model. NGF increased conduction velocity and reduced ADS and propagation failure in mechano-insensitive nociceptors. The proportion of mechano-sensitive C nociceptors within NGF-treated skin areas increased from 45.1% (control) to 71% and their median mechanical thresholds decreased from 40 to 20 mN. After NGF application, the mechanical receptive fields of nociceptors increased from 25 to 43 mm(2). At the structural level, however, IENF density was not increased by NGF. In conclusion, intradermal NGF induces long-lasting axonal and mechanical sensitization in porcine C nociceptors that corresponds to hyperalgesia observed in humans. Sensitization is not accompanied by increased IENF density, suggesting that NGF-induced hyperalgesia might not depend on changes in nerve fiber density but could be linked to the recruitment of previously silent nociceptors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discovery of SNPs in the swine nerve growth factor gene.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Kim, J Y

    2010-10-01

    This study was aimed to search genetic variants for the swine nerve growth factor gene that associated with regulation of proliferation and differentiation of nervous systems. The swine nerve growth factor gene was screened with 5 primer sets for random populations of crossbred pigs born 2005-2007 at National Institute of Animal Science (NIAS). To verify genetic variants of miniature pigs, a total of 288,000 BAC clones generated from NIAS in 2007 were used. The selection of primer sequences was based on sequences of the swine in GenBank (L31898), and genetic variants have been discovered in the crossbred population positioned at 381 (A/C), 412 (C/T), 422 (G/A), 468 (G/C), 496 (A/G), 538 (T/C), 540 (G/A), and 547 (A/G) showing substitutions of amino acids. The identified sequences of miniature pigs including SNPs were submitted into GenBank with an accession number (GQ423508). The sequence alignment conducted to compare genetic distances between species, revealing not many high similarities between swine and human as approximately 0.89 that was a little bit high value than expected. Consequently, we suggest that the identified SNPs of the swine NGF gene may be used in the future to identify genetic markers in coding regions, regarding explanations of phenotypic variations.

  10. Neurotrophic Factor Receptor Expression and in vitro Nerve Growth of Geniculate Ganglion Neurons That Supply Divergent Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yamout, Adam; Spec, Andrej; Cosmano, Jason; Kashyap, Manoj; Rochlin, M. William

    2016-01-01

    We investigated which neurotrophic factors may contribute to the divergence of two peripheral nerves emanating from the geniculate ganglion. We compared receptor mRNA profiles of the neurons that supply the nerves, and also the growth of their neurites in response to neurotrophic factors in culture. Three mRNAs, Gfra2, TrkA, and TrkC, were differentially expressed. Only one ligand, Neurturin, promoted substantially different nerve regrowth from the nerves, and therefore may contribute to nerve divergence. Three receptor mRNAs were expressed in 100% of the neurons: TrkB, TrkB.T2 (kinaselacking isoform), and NCAM-140. Ligands for these Trks and FRα-1 promoted more outgrowth than ligands for the other receptors. NT-3 and BDNF synergistically promoted outgrowth. Finally, receptors are coexpressed at random rates, arguing against the existence of neuronal subtypes defined by a combinatorial code of these receptors. PMID:16137986

  11. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  12. Nerve growth factor combined with an epineural conduit for bridging a short nerve gap (10 mm). A study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barmpitsioti, Antonia; Konofaos, Petros; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Zoubos, Aristides B; Soucacos, Panagiotis N

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of direct administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) into an epineural conduit across a short nerve gap (10 mm) in a rabbit sciatic nerve model. The animals were divided into two groups. In group 1, n = 6, a 10-mm defect was created in the sciatic nerve and bridged with an epineural flap. A dose of 1 μg of NGF was locally administered daily for the first 21 days. NGF administration was made inside the epineural flap using a silicone reservoir connected to a silicone tube. In group 2, n = 6, the 10-mm defect was bridged with a nerve graft. This group did not receive any further treatment. At 13 weeks, all animals, before euthanasia, underwent electromyography (EMG) studies and then specimen sent for histology morphometric analysis. NGF administration ensured a significantly increased average number of myelinated axons per μm(2) (P = 0.028) and promoted fiber maturation (P = 0.031) and better EMG results (P = 0.046 for latency P = 0.048 for amplitude), compared with the control group. Although nerve grafts remain the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair, NGF-treated epineural conduits represent a good alternative, particularly when an unfavorable environment for nerve grafts is present.

  13. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  14. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  15. Efficacy of glial growth factor and nerve growth factor on the recovery of traumatic facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mucahit; Karlidag, Turgut; Yalcin, Sinasi; Ozogul, Candan; Keles, Erol; Alpay, Hayrettin Cengiz; Yanilmaz, Muhammed

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Glial growth factor (GGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on nerve regeneration in facial nerve anastomosis. In this study, approximately a 1-mm segment was resected from the facial nerve and the free ends were anastomosed. All animals underwent the same surgical procedure and 30 rabbits were grouped randomly in three groups. Control group, the group without any medications; NGF group, the group receiving 250 ng/0.1 ml NGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis; GBF group, the group receiving 500 ng/0.1 ml GGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis. Medications were given at the time of surgery, and at 24 and 48 h postoperatively. After 2 months, the sites of anastomosis were excised and examined using the electron microscope. It was found that the best regeneration was in the group receiving GGF as compared to the control group in terms of nerve regeneration. Schwann cell and glial cell proliferation were found to be significantly higher in the group receiving GGF as compared to the group receiving NGF. Besides, the number of myelin debris, an indicator of degeneration, was significantly lower in the group with GGF as compared to NGF and control groups (p < 0.005). Using GGF and NGF in order to increase regeneration after nerve anastomosis in experimental traumatic facial nerve paralysis may be a hopeful alternative treatment option in the future. However, further studies on human studies are required to support these results.

  16. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  17. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  18. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding β-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  19. Nerve growth factor: stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gee, A P; Boyle, M D; Munger, K L; Lawman, M J; Young, M

    1983-01-01

    Topical application of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) to superficial skin wounds of mice has previously been shown to accelerate the rate of wound contraction. Results of the present study reveal that NGF in the presence of plasma is also chemotactic for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, and the concentration of NGF required for this effect is similar to that which stimulates ganglionic neurite outgrowth. This property does not arise from liberation of the C5a fragment of complement, nor does it require the known enzymic activity of NGF. (NGF inactivated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate is equally active.) We conclude that NGF can display biological effects on cells of nonneural origin and function, and this feature might play a role in the early inflammatory response to injury. PMID:6580641

  20. Nerve Growth Factor Potentiates the Neurotoxicity of β Amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Caceres, Alfredo; Duffy, Lawrence K.

    1990-11-01

    The role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease is unknown. The β-amyloid protein accumulates abnormally in the brain in Alzheimer disease and is neurotoxic to differentiated hippocampal neurons in culture. Nerve growth factor (NGF) increased the neurotoxic potency of a β-amyloid polypeptide by a factor of ≈100,000, which resulted in a reduction of the β-amyloid neurotoxic EC50 from 0.1 μM to 1 pM. This potentiating effect of NGF was reversed by a monoclonal antibody against NGF and was not observed for a variety of other neurotrophic growth factors. Exposure of hippocampal neurons to very low concentrations of β amyloid alone resulted in a marked induction of immunoreactive NGF receptors. Addition of NGF with β amyloid resulted in the appearance of neurodegenerative changes in NGF receptor-positive neurons. The early and profound degeneration of hippocampal and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that occurs in Alzheimer disease may result from a neurotoxic interaction of β amyloid with NGF.

  1. [Nerve growth factor in neurodegeneration and neurorestorative therapy].

    PubMed

    Lorigados-Pedre, L; Bergado-Rosado, J

    The purpose of this work was to gather the information currently available about the content of nerve growth factor (NGF) in experimental models of neurodegeneration and in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, as well as to analyse how NGF content is affected by the application of different neurorestorative therapies (transplant and trophic therapy) in these neurological entities. Neurotrophins are proteins that promote the differentiation, growth and survival of many populations of peripheral neurons and the central nervous system during development and adulthood. NGF is the best known and most widely researched member of this family, which is also made up of the growth factor derived from the brain and neurotrophins 3, 4/5, 6 and 7. In the last few decades, significant progress has been made in the knowledge available about the biological role played by these factors, their molecular characterisation and regulation, as well as their signalling mechanisms. Yet, little is known about the role played by the neurotrophic factors in neurodegenerative diseases or whether the levels of these factors are modified following the use of neurorestorative treatment. Neurodegenerative disorders, especially Parkinson and Alzheimer, are accompanied by modifications in the levels of NGF that depend on the extent to which the disease has progressed. A model of the changes in NGF content during neurodegenerative processes is also proposed.

  2. Intrathecal administration of nerve growth factor delays GAP 43 expression and early phase regeneration of adult rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akira; Masaki, Toshihiro; Motoyoshi, Kazuo; Kamakura, Keiko

    2002-07-19

    Whether nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo, in particular in adults, is controversial. We therefore examined the effect of exogenous NGF on nerve regeneration and the expression of GAP 43 (growth-associated protein 43) in adult rats. NGF was infused intrathecally via an osmotic mini-pump, while control rats received artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Two days after the infusion was initiated, the right sciatic nerves were transected or crushed, and the animals allowed to survive for 3 to 11 days. The right DRG, the right proximal stump of the transected sciatic nerve, and the posterior horn of the spinal cord were examined by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. GAP 43 immunoreactivity in the NGF-treated animals was significantly lower than in the aCSF-treated controls. Electron microscopy showed that the number of myelinated and unmyelinated axons decreased significantly in the NGF-treated rats as compared with the controls. These findings are indicative that exogenous NGF delayed GAP 43 induction and the early phase of peripheral nerve regeneration and supports the hypothesis that the loss of NGF supply from peripheral targets via retrograde transport caused by axotomy serves as a signal for DRG neurons to invoke regenerative responses. NGF administered intrathecally may delay the neurons' perception of the reduction of the endogenous NGF, causing a delay in conversion of DRG neurons from the normal physiological condition to regrowth state.

  3. alpha-Adrenergic regulation of secretion of mouse saliva rich in nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L J; Partlow, L M

    1976-01-01

    Nerve growth factor has been quantified by both bioassay and radial immunodiffusion in mouse saliva elicited by several secretagogues. The concentrations by bioassay of nerve growth factor in both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-induced saliva (3400 and 900 mug/ml, respectively) are higher than reported in any other source. In contrast, the concentrations of nerve growth factor in isoproterenol- and pilocarpine-induced saliva are relatively low (17 and 2 mug/ml, respectively). The specific activity of the salivary nerve growth factor was 41, 36, 2, and 0.6 mug/mg of protein in secretions elicited by epinephrine, norepinephrine, pilocarpine, and isoproterenol, respectively. Salivation after administration of either epinephrine or norepinephrine was completely inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic blocker, phenoxybenzamine. These results suggest that the release of saliva rich in nerve growth factor is primarily regulated through alpha-adrenergic receptors. Images PMID:186790

  4. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  5. Temporal mismatch between pain behaviour, skin Nerve Growth factor and intra-epidermal nerve fibre density in trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Evans, Laura J; Loescher, Alison R; Boissonade, Fiona M; Whawell, Simon A; Robinson, Peter P; Andrew, David

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophin Nerve Growth factor (NGF) is known to influence the phenotype of mature nociceptors, for example by altering synthesis of neuropeptides, and changes in NGF levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions such as neuropathic pain. We have tested the hypothesis that after partial nerve injury, NGF accumulates within the skin and causes 'pro-nociceptive' phenotypic changes in the remaining population of sensory nerve fibres, which could underpin the development of neuropathic pain. Eleven days after chronic constriction injury of the rat mental nerve the intra-epidermal nerve fibre density of the chin skin from had reduced from 11.6 ± 4.9 fibres/mm to 1.0 ± 0.4 fibres/mm; this slowly recovered to 2.4 ± 2.0 fibres/mm on day 14 and 4.0 ± 0.8 fibres/mm on day 21. Cold hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral lower lip was detectable 11 days after chronic constriction injury, although at this time skin [NGF] did not differ between sides. At 14 days post-injury, there was a significantly greater [NGF] ipsilaterally compared to contralaterally (ipsilateral = 111 ± 23 pg/mg, contralateral = 69 ± 13 pg/mg), but there was no behavioural evidence of neuropathic pain at this time-point. By 21 days post-injury, skin [NGF] was elevated bilaterally and there was a significant increase in the proportion of TrkA-positive (the high-affinity NGF receptor) intra-epidermal nerve fibres that were immunolabelled for the neuropeptide Calcitonin Gene-related peptide. The temporal mismatch in behaviour, skin [NGF] and phenotypic changes in sensory nerve fibres indicate that increased [NGF] does not cause hyperalgesia after partial mental nerve injury, although it may contribute to the altered neurochemistry of cutaneous nerve fibres.

  6. Manipulation of the nerve growth factor network in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Papatsoris, Athanasios G; Liolitsa, Danae; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2007-03-01

    Autocrine and paracrine events regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) and relevant receptors (low- and high affinity; p75 neurotrophin receptor [p75(NTR)] and TrkA, respectively) seem to play a significant role in prostate carcinogenesis. Studies reveal that p75(NTR) is both a tumor suppressor of growth and a metastasis suppressor of human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, p75(NTR) is progressively lost during prostate carcinogenesis. An imbalance between p75(NTR) and tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA)-mediated signals may be involved in the progression of prostate cancer through increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of GnRH analogs in prostate cancer cells may be mediated by altering the TrkA:p75(NTR) NGF receptor ratio. Administration of NGF induces a reversion of the androgen-independent/androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer cell lines to a less malignant phenotype. Finally, Trk inhibition is a novel, attractive and rational approach for prostate cancer therapy. This review unravels the NGF 'circuitry' in prostate cancinogenesis for relevant pharmacologic manipulation to lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  7. Upregulation of nerve growth factor following cortical trauma.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, S T; Goss, J R; Miller, P D; Styren, S D; Kochanek, P M; Marion, D

    1994-12-01

    As part of the inflammatory response to brain injury, CSF and tissue levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) are elevated after trauma. This elevation in IL-1 beta initiates a cascade of events among which may be an upregulation in nerve growth factor (NGF) in brain tissue. We infused IL-1 beta into the ventricle of adult rats and found a two- to fourfold increase in NGF in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, suggesting that IL-1 beta induced in vivo may also increase NGF in the brain. To test this hypothesis we utilized two models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the rat and examined NGF protein and RNA in the cortex over a period of several days. Both weight drop and controlled cortical contusion models of CNS trauma demonstrated large and significant increases in NGF protein in the cortex. NGF RNA was assessed in the controlled cortical contusion model and increased approximately fivefold by 1 day post-trauma. The remarkable elevation of NGF observed following TBI suggests that its role in response to injury may be other than as a target-derived growth substance. We hypothesize that the elevation of NGF in trauma induces upregulation of enzymes which suppress free-radical formation after injury.

  8. Nerve growth factor signaling in prostate health and disease.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Zani, Danilo; Simeone, Claudio; Cunico, Sergio Cosciani; Missale, Cristina; Spano, Pierfranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2010-06-01

    The prostate is one of the most abundant sources of nerve growth factor (NGF) in different species, including humans. NGF and its receptors are implicated in the control of prostate cell proliferation and apoptosis and it can either support or suppress cell growth. The co-expression of both NGF receptors, p75(NGFR) and tropomyosin-related kinase A (trkA), represents a crucial condition for the antiproliferative effect of NGF; indeed, p75(NGFR) is progressively lost during prostate tumorigenesis and its disappearance represents a malignancy marker of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). Interestingly, a dysregulation of NGF signal transduction was found in a number of human tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of NGF and its receptors in prostate and in PCa. Conclusions bring to the hypothesis that the NGF network could be a candidate for future pharmacological manipulation in the PCa therapy: in particular the re-expression of p75(NTR) and/or the negative modulation of trkA could represent a target to induce apoptosis and to reduce proliferation and invasiveness of PCa.

  9. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  10. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Jin, Wei-Peng; Seo, Na Ri; Pang, Kang-Mi; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-04-01

    Several studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) can directly affect axon regeneration after peripheral nerve damage. In this study, we performed sensory tests and histological analyses to study the effect of recombinant human FGF-2 (rhFGF2) treatment on damaged mental nerves. The mental nerves of 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were crush-injured for 1 minute and then treated with 10 or 50 μg/mL rhFGF2 or PBS in crush injury area with a mini Osmotic pump. Sensory test using von Frey filaments at 1 week revealed the presence of sensory degeneration based on decreased gap score and increased difference score. However, at 2 weeks, the gap score and difference score were significantly rebounded in the mental nerve crush group treated with 10 μg/mL rhFGF2. Interestingly, treatment with 10 μg/mL rhFGF had a more obviously positive effect on the gap score than treatment with 50 μg/mL rhFGF2. In addition, retrograde neuronal tracing with Dil revealed a significant increase in nerve regeneration in the trigeminal ganglion at 2 and 4 weeks in the rhFGF2 groups (10 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL) than in the PBS group. The 10 μg/mL rhFGF2 group also showed an obviously robust regeneration in axon density in the mental nerve at 4 weeks. Our results demonstrate that 10 μg/mL rhFGF induces mental nerve regeneration and sensory recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

  11. Potential mechanisms for hypoalgesia induced by anti-nerve growth factor immunoglobulin are identified using autoimmune nerve growth factor deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Anderson, Michael B.; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) antagonism has long been proposed as a chronic pain treatment. In 2010, the FDA suspended clinical trials using tanezumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-NGF antibody, to treat osteoarthritis due to worsening joint damage in 16 patients. Increased physical activity in the absence of acute pain which normally prevents self harm was purported as a potential cause. Such an adverse effect is consistent with an extension of tanezumab's primary mechanism of action by decreasing pain sensitivity below baseline levels. In animal inflammatory pain models, NGF antagonism decreases intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and attenuates increases in expression of nociception related proteins, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Little is known of the effects of NGF antagonism in noninflamed animals and the hypoalgesia that ensues. In the current study, we immunized rats with NGF or cytochrome C (cytC) and examined 1) nocifensive behaviors with thermal latencies, mechanical thresholds, the hot plate test, and the tail flick test, 2) IENF density, and 3) expression of CGRP, SP, voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (Nav1.8), and glutaminase in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons separated by size and isolectin B4 (IB4) labeling. Rats with high anti-NGF titers had delayed responses on the hot plate test but no other behavioral abnormalities. Delayed hot plate responses correlated with lower IENF density. CGRP and SP expression was decreased principally in medium (400-800 μm2) and small neurons (<400 μm2), respectively, regardless of IB4 labeling. Expression of Nav1.8 was only decreased in small and medium IB4 negative neurons. NGF immunization appears to result in a more profound antagonism of NGF than tanezumab therapy, but we hypothesize that decreases in IENF density and nociception related protein expression are potential mechanisms for tanezumab induced hypoalgesia. PMID:21802499

  12. Anti-nerve growth factor in pain management: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David S; Hsu, Eugene; Hottinger, Daniel G; Cohen, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be an unmet need for safe and effective pain medications. Opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) dominate the clinical landscape despite limited effectiveness and considerable side-effect profiles. Although significant advancements have identified myriad potential pain targets over the past several decades, the majority of new pain pharmacotherapies have failed to come to market. The discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its interaction with tropomyosin receptor kinase A (trkA) have been well characterized as important mediators of pain initiation and maintenance, and pharmacotherapies targeting this pathway have the potential to be considered promising methods in the treatment of a variety of nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Several methodologic approaches, including sequestration of free NGF, prevention of NGF binding and trkA activation, and inhibition of trkA function, have been investigated in the development of new pharmacotherapies. Among these, NGF-sequestering antibodies have exhibited the most promise in clinical trials. However, in 2010, reports of rapid joint destruction leading to joint replacement prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to place a hold on all clinical trials involving anti-NGF antibodies. Although the FDA has since lifted this hold and a number of new trials are under way, the long-term efficacy and safety profile of anti-NGF antibodies are yet to be established. PMID:27354823

  13. Anti-nerve growth factor in pain management: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Chang, David S; Hsu, Eugene; Hottinger, Daniel G; Cohen, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be an unmet need for safe and effective pain medications. Opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) dominate the clinical landscape despite limited effectiveness and considerable side-effect profiles. Although significant advancements have identified myriad potential pain targets over the past several decades, the majority of new pain pharmacotherapies have failed to come to market. The discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its interaction with tropomyosin receptor kinase A (trkA) have been well characterized as important mediators of pain initiation and maintenance, and pharmacotherapies targeting this pathway have the potential to be considered promising methods in the treatment of a variety of nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Several methodologic approaches, including sequestration of free NGF, prevention of NGF binding and trkA activation, and inhibition of trkA function, have been investigated in the development of new pharmacotherapies. Among these, NGF-sequestering antibodies have exhibited the most promise in clinical trials. However, in 2010, reports of rapid joint destruction leading to joint replacement prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to place a hold on all clinical trials involving anti-NGF antibodies. Although the FDA has since lifted this hold and a number of new trials are under way, the long-term efficacy and safety profile of anti-NGF antibodies are yet to be established.

  14. Nerve growth factor signal transduction in mature pig oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Althaus, H H; Hempel, R; Klöppner, S; Engel, J; Schmidt-Schultz, T; Kruska, L; Heumann, R

    1997-12-01

    It has previously been shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) is of functional significance for mature pig oligodendrocytes (OLs) in culture. The present data give evidence for the expression of TrkA, the so-called high-affinity NGF receptor, and of p75NTR, the so-called low-affinity NGF receptor. TrkA is upregulated during culturing, in contrast to the p75 receptor. Exposure of OLs to NGF induces an autophosphorylation of TrkA via its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. K-252a inhibits the TrkA autophosphorylation, which reduces the OL process formation to control levels. To the tyrosine-phosphorylated sites of TrkA several proteins, such as phospholipase C-gamma1, the adaptor protein SHC, the phosphotyrosine phosphatase SH-PTP2 (SYP) associate via their SH2 phosphotase SH-PTP2 domain. The association of SHC to TrkA is shown by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect evidence for a possible activation of PLC-gamma1 is given by an NGF-induced increase of oligodendroglial [Ca2+]i. Downstream from TrkA, a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, which includes Erk1 and Erk2, is operating. An in-gel myelin basic protein kinase assay revealed that NGF activates predominantly Erk1. Finally, it is shown that NGF stimulates expression of c-fos.

  15. Electroacupucture and nerve growth factor: potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Manni, Luigi; Rocco, M L; Barbaro Paparo, Samuele; Guaragna, Morena

    2011-06-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin regulating the survival and function peripheral sensory and sympathetic neurons and of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Both peripheral neuropathies and brain cholinergic dysfunctions could benefit from NGFbased therapies, but the clinical use of NGF has been so far hampered by the development of important side effects, like hyperalgesia and autonomic dysfunctions. Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and is a part of traditional Chinese medicine. Western descriptions of the clinical efficacy of acupuncture on pain, inflammation, motor dysfunction, mood disorders, and seizures are based on the stimulation of several classes of sensory afferent fibers and the consequent activation of physiological processes similar to those resulting from physical exercise or deep massage. Recently, it has been shown that peripheral sensory stimulation by electroacupuncture (EA) could improve brain NGF availability and utilization, at the same time counteracting the major sideeffects induced by NGF administration. This review focuses on the emerging links between EA and NGF with special emphasis on the work carried out in the last decade in our laboratory, investigating the role of NGF as a mediator of EA effects in the central nervous system and as a modulator of sensory and autonomic activity.

  16. Herpesvirus-mediated systemic delivery of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, D; Goins, W F; Kaplan, T J; Capuano, S V; Fradette, J; Murphey-Corb, M; Robbins, P D; Cohen, J B; Glorioso, J C

    2001-01-01

    Sustained systemic dissemination of therapeutic proteins from peripheral sites is an attractive prospect for gene therapy applications. Replication-defective genomic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vectors were evaluated for their ability to express nerve growth factor (NGF) as a model gene product both locally and systemically. Intra-articular inoculation of NGF expression vectors in rabbits resulted in significant increases in joint lavage and blood plasma NGF that persisted for 1 year. A rhesus macaque injected intra-articularly displayed a comparable increase in plasma NGF for at least 6 months, at which time the serum NGF levels of this animal were sufficient to cause differentiation of PC12 cells in culture, but not to increase footpad epidermis innervation. Long-term reporter transgene expression was observed primarily in ligaments, a finding confirmed by direct inoculation of patellar ligament. Patellar ligament inoculation with a NGF vector resulted in elevated levels of circulating NGF similar to those observed following intra-articular vector delivery. These results represent the first demonstration of sustained systemic release of a transgene product using HSV vectors, raising the prospect of new applications for HSV-1 vectors in the treatment of systemic disease.

  17. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  18. Retrograde axonal transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-12-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor (/sup 125/I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The /sup 125/I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar /sup 125/I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 125/I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of /sup 125/I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported /sup 125/I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions.

  19. The Glucuronyltransferase GlcAT-P Is Required for Stretch Growth of Peripheral Nerves in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rahul; Blanco, Jorge; Udolph, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    During development, the growth of the animal body is accompanied by a concomitant elongation of the peripheral nerves, which requires the elongation of integrated nerve fibers and the axons projecting therein. Although this process is of fundamental importance to almost all organisms of the animal kingdom, very little is known about the mechanisms regulating this process. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of novel mutant alleles of GlcAT-P, the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian glucuronyltransferase b3gat1. GlcAT-P mutants reveal shorter larval peripheral nerves and an elongated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We show that GlcAT-P is expressed in a subset of neurons in the central brain hemispheres, in some motoneurons of the ventral nerve cord as well as in central and peripheral nerve glia. We demonstrate that in GlcAT-P mutants the VNC is under tension of shorter peripheral nerves suggesting that the VNC elongates as a consequence of tension imparted by retarded peripheral nerve growth during larval development. We also provide evidence that for growth of peripheral nerve fibers GlcAT-P is critically required in hemocytes; however, glial cells are also important in this process. The glial specific repo gene acts as a modifier of GlcAT-P and loss or reduction of repo function in a GlcAT-P mutant background enhances VNC elongation. We propose a model in which hemocytes are required for aspects of glial cell biology which in turn affects the elongation of peripheral nerves during larval development. Our data also identifies GlcAT-P as a first candidate gene involved in growth of integrated peripheral nerves and therefore establishes Drosophila as an amenable in-vivo model system to study this process at the cellular and molecular level in more detail. PMID:22132223

  20. Influence of congenital facial nerve palsy on craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehoon; Park, Sang Woo; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Jae Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-11-01

    Facial muscles are of major importance in human craniofacial growth and development. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether congenital facial nerve palsy influences craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia. Fifty-one patients with unilateral craniofacial microsomia and no history of craniofacial skeletal surgery whose radiographs were taken after craniofacial growth was complete were included in this study. These patients were divided into groups in which the facial nerve was involved or uninvolved. The authors evaluated a total of seven measurement items to analyze the midface and mandibular asymmetry. Twenty patients had facial nerve involvement, and 31 had no involvement. None of the measurement items revealed any significant differences between the facial nerve-involved group and the uninvolved group within the same modified Pruzansky grade. There was no correlation between the type of facial nerve involvement and the measurement items. In relationships among the measurement items within each group, maxillary asymmetry was indirectly correlated with mandibular asymmetry or midline deviation through the occlusal plane angle in the uninvolved groups. However, in the facial nerve-involved group, the relationships disappeared. When the correlations in the facial nerve-involved group were compared with those of the uninvolved group, the relationships in the uninvolved group appeared more significant than in the facial nerve-involved group. The loss of relationships between the upper and lower jaw in the facial nerve-involved group might have been caused by subtle changes, which occur in midfacial bones and in the mandible due to facial nerve palsy. The main limitation of our study is that aside from facial nerve palsy, craniofacial microsomia has many factors that can influence craniofacial growth, such as hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle and soft tissue deficiencies. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and

  1. Nerve growth factor and associated nerve sprouting contribute to local mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of bone injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Shiraishi, Y; Ozaki, N; Hayashi, K; Hori, K; Ichiyanagi, M; Sugiura, Y

    2012-08-01

    To clarify the mechanism of tenderness after bone injury, we investigated changes in the withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, nerve distribution and nerve growth factor (NGF)-expression in a rat model of bone injury without immobilization for bone injury healing. Rats were divided into three groups as follows: (1) rats incised in the skin and periosteum, followed by drilling a hole in the tibia [bone lesion group (BLG)]; (2) those incised in the skin and periosteum without bone drilling [periosteum lesion group (PLG)]; and (3) those incised in the skin [skin lesion group (SLG)]. Mechanical hyperalgesia continued for 28 days at a lesion in the BLG, 21 days in PLG and 5 days in SLG after treatments, respectively. Endochondral ossification was observed on days 5-28 in BLG and on days 5-21 in PLG. Nerve growth appeared in deep connective tissue (DCT) at day 28 in BLG. Nerve fibres increased in both cutaneous tissue and DCT at day 7 in PLG, but they were not found at day 28. Mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied with endochondral ossification and nerve fibres increasing at the lesion in both BLG and PLG. NGF was expressed in bone-regenerating cells during the bone injury healing. Anti-NGF and trk inhibitor K252a inhibited hyperalgesia in the different time course. This study shows that localized tenderness coincides with the bone healing and involves NGF expression and nerve sprouting after bone injury. The findings present underlying mechanisms and provide pathophysiological relevance of local tenderness to determination of bone fracture and its healing.

  2. Nerve growth factor in human semen: Effect of nerve growth factor on the normozoospermic men during cryopreservation process

    PubMed Central

    Saeednia, Sara; Bahadoran, Hosein; Amidi, Fardin; Asadi, Mohammad Hosein; Naji, Mohammad; Fallahi, Parvin; Nejad, Nahid Ataie

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Although routinely applied in assisted reproductive technology, human sperm cryopreservation is not a completely successful procedure. Adverse effects of cryopreservation on the fertilization capacity, motility, morphology, and viability of spermatozoa have been proven; cryopreservation has also shown a role in sperm DNA fragmentation and infertility. The post-thaw survival of spermatozoa improved after addition of supplementation of antioxidant molecules to freezing media. Nerve growth factor (NGF) as one of the prosurvival substances has gained great attention in recent years. The aim of this study was the usage of NGF as prosurvival factor after cryopreservation process of human semen samples to assess the motility and viability of sperm, nitric oxide (NO) concentration, and DNA fragmentation in normozoospermic men. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from 25 normozoospermic men and were divided into fresh semen samples as control group, frozen–thawed semen samples without addition of exogenous NGF, and three groups of semen samples cryopreserved with addition of exogenous NGF (0.5, 1, and 5 ng/ml) in freezing medium. Viability was assessed by eosin-negrosin staining technique. Motility was evaluated with inverted microscope. NO concentration and apoptosis content were measured with flow cytometry. Results: Results showed that exogenous NGF at 0.5 ng/ml could significantly (P-value <0.05) influence viability, motility, nitric oxide, and DNA fragmentation content. Conclusion: Exogenous NGF as cryoprotectant improved sperm viability and motility, increased intracellular NO concentration, and decreased apoptosis content in normal human spermatozoa. PMID:25945243

  3. Coordinated Movement of Vesicles and Actin Bundles during Nerve Growth Revealed by Superresolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nozumi, Motohiro; Nakatsu, Fubito; Katoh, Kaoru; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-02-28

    The growth cone is an essential structure for nerve growth. Although its membrane and cytoskeleton are likely to interact coordinately during nerve growth, the mechanisms are unknown due to their close proximity. Here, we used superresolution microscopy to simultaneously observe vesicles and F-actin in growth cones. We identified a novel vesicular generation mechanism that is independent of clathrin and dependent on endophilin-3- and dynamin-1 and that occurs proximal to the leading edge simultaneously with fascin-1-dependent F-actin bundling. In contrast to conventional clathrin-dependent endocytosis, which occurs distal from the leading edge at the basal surfaces of growth cones, this mechanism was distinctly observed at the apical surface using 3D imaging and was involved in mediating axon growth. Reduced endophilin or fascin inhibited this endocytic mechanism. These results suggest that, at the leading edge, vesicles are coordinately generated and transported with actin bundling during nerve growth.

  4. Can amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes carry functional nerve growth factor?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Xiong, Qing; Ren, Quanxia; Guo, Yake; Li, Gao

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes can carry protein into cells to induce biological effects. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes are soluble and biocompatible, have high reactivity and low toxicity, and can help promote nerve cell growth. In this study, amino-functionalized ethylenediamine-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to prepare carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes by non-covalent grafting. The physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity to PC12 and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion, and biological activity of the carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes were investigated. The results showed that amino functionalization improved carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complex dispersibility, reduced their toxicity to PC12 cells, and promoted PC12 cell differentiation and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion. PMID:25206814

  5. Adipose-derived stem cells stimulate regeneration of peripheral nerves: BDNF secreted by these cells promotes nerve healing and axon growth de novo.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Tatiana; Kalinina, Natalia; Karagyaur, Maxim; Stambolsky, Dmitry; Rubina, Kseniya; Revischin, Alexander; Pavlova, Galina; Parfyonova, Yelena; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2011-03-14

    Transplantation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) induces tissue regeneration by accelerating the growth of blood vessels and nerve. However, mechanisms by which they accelerate the growth of nerve fibers are only partially understood. We used transplantation of ASCs with subcutaneous matrigel implants (well-known in vivo model of angiogenesis) and model of mice limb reinnervation to check the influence of ASC on nerve growth. Here we show that ASCs stimulate the regeneration of nerves in innervated mice's limbs and induce axon growth in subcutaneous matrigel implants. To investigate the mechanism of this action we analyzed different properties of these cells and showed that they express numerous genes of neurotrophins and extracellular matrix proteins required for the nerve growth and myelination. Induction of neural differentiation of ASCs enhances production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as ability of these cells to induce nerve fiber growth. BDNF neutralizing antibodies abrogated the stimulatory effects of ASCs on the growth of nerve sprouts. These data suggest that ASCs induce nerve repair and growth via BDNF production. This stimulatory effect can be further enhanced by culturing the cells in neural differentiation medium prior to transplantation.

  6. Temporal mismatch between pain behaviour, skin Nerve Growth Factor and intra-epidermal nerve fibre density in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The neurotrophin Nerve Growth factor (NGF) is known to influence the phenotype of mature nociceptors, for example by altering synthesis of neuropeptides, and changes in NGF levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions such as neuropathic pain. We have tested the hypothesis that after partial nerve injury, NGF accumulates within the skin and causes ‘pro-nociceptive’ phenotypic changes in the remaining population of sensory nerve fibres, which could underpin the development of neuropathic pain. Results Eleven days after chronic constriction injury of the rat mental nerve the intra-epidermal nerve fibre density of the chin skin from had reduced from 11.6 ± 4.9 fibres/mm to 1.0 ± 0.4 fibres/mm; this slowly recovered to 2.4 ± 2.0 fibres/mm on day 14 and 4.0 ± 0.8 fibres/mm on day 21. Cold hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral lower lip was detectable 11 days after chronic constriction injury, although at this time skin [NGF] did not differ between sides. At 14 days post-injury, there was a significantly greater [NGF] ipsilaterally compared to contralaterally (ipsilateral = 111 ± 23 pg/mg, contralateral = 69 ± 13 pg/mg), but there was no behavioural evidence of neuropathic pain at this time-point. By 21 days post-injury, skin [NGF] was elevated bilaterally and there was a significant increase in the proportion of TrkA-positive (the high-affinity NGF receptor) intra-epidermal nerve fibres that were immunolabelled for the neuropeptide Calcitonin Gene-related peptide. Conclusions The temporal mismatch in behaviour, skin [NGF] and phenotypic changes in sensory nerve fibres indicate that increased [NGF] does not cause hyperalgesia after partial mental nerve injury, although it may contribute to the altered neurochemistry of cutaneous nerve fibres. PMID:24380503

  7. Nerve growth factor protects against aluminum-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, Takao; Satoh, Eiko; Okada, Morihiro; Takadera, Tsuneo; Sahara, Masako

    2002-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effect of two salts of aluminum (Al), aluminum maltolate (Almal) and aluminum chloride (AlCl(3)), on the cell viability of PC12 cells in the absence and presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). A 72-h exposure of PC12 cells to Almal (300 microM) resulted in a marked increase of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from the cells and a decrease of 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) activity. These results indicate that Almal induces a decrease in the cell viability. Under the same conditions, Almal also caused DNA ladder formation and chromatin condensation. In contrast, AlCl(3) did not showed an increased LDH release and a decreased MTT activity in the concentration range of the salt tested (0.1-1 mM). The extent of LDH release and MTT activity decrease induced by Almal treatment closely depended on the amount of Almal incorporated into the cells. An increase in the fluorescence intensity of 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, di(acetoxymethyl ester) (C-DCDHF-DA) which was loaded into the cell by Almal treatment and its prevention by pyrrolodine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant, suggested that Almal-induced cell death partly proceeds via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NGF effectively inhibited the increase of LDH release and the decrease of MTT activity, as well as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. However, NGF did not inhibit the increase of C-DCDHF-DA fluorescence in the cells induced by Almal treatment. From these results, it is suggested that ROS production associated with accumulation of Al is one possible important factor in the onset of Al neurotoxicity via apoptotic cell death and that NGF protects against cell degeneration associated with Al accumulation, but independently of ROS production.

  8. Role of Urothelial Nerve Growth Factor in Human Bladder Function

    PubMed Central

    Birder, Lori A.; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Griffiths, Derek; Resnick, Neil M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To test whether nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration in human bladder urothelium/suburothelium is related to detrusor overactivity (DO), bladder sensation, detrusor contractility, or other aspects of lower urinary tract function. Materials and Methods Concentration of NGF was measured (using ELISA) in superficial bladder biopsies from 27 women (mean age 52 years, range 22–82) after comprehensive videourodynamics and bladder diary. Approximately half (12/27) showed clear DO and half did not. Results There was no evidence for increased NGF concentration in subjects with DO (association negative by Mann–Whitney test, P = 0.23). NGF was not significantly associated with two measures of detrusor contractility (Spearman’s r = −0.29, P = 0.17; r = −0.20, P = 0.33); nor with four measures inversely related to sensation: volume at strong desire to void and maximum capacity on cystometry (r = −0.13, P = 0.53; r = −0.23, P = 0.28), and maximum voided volume and mean daytime voided volume on bladder diary (r = −0.29, P = 0.16; r = −0.16, P = 0.44). It was significantly associated with 24-hr urine output on bladder diary (Spearman’s r = −0.55, P = 0.004). Conclusions Elevated NGF levels in human urothelium/suburothelium are not strongly associated with DO, detrusor contractility or increased bladder sensation. NGF levels are lower in subjects with higher 24-hr urine output. This observation is consistent with a role for NGF in an active process (trafficking) involved in bladder filling. PMID:17266135

  9. Beta-nerve growth factor levels in newborn cord sera.

    PubMed

    Haddad, J; Vilge, V; Juif, J G; Maitre, M; Donato, L; Messer, J; Mark, J

    1994-06-01

    This study was designed to examine beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in human cord blood by a two-site enzyme immunoassay using MAb 27/21 to mouse NGF and to determine whether beta-NGF levels show developmental changes. Blood was collected at delivery from 61 newborns, 55 neonates appropriate for gestational age (46 term infants and 9 premature infants), 5 neonates small for gestational age, and 1 neonate with congenital hydrocephalus. In addition, samples were collected from 2 microcephalic children (microcephaly vera) aged 15 and 18 mo, 2 control children, and 4 healthy adults. Mean levels of NGF in preterm infants (n = 9; 13.7 +/- 8 pg/mL) were significantly lower than levels in term infants (n = 47; 21.2 +/- 8.8 pg/mL; p = 0.034 by Mann-Whitney U test). There was no correlation between birth weight, length, head circumference, and beta-NGF levels. In microcephalic children, NGF levels were low (8 pg/mL) compared with control infants' values (22 pg/mL). In adults, beta-NGF levels were higher and ranged between 238 and 292 pg/mL. Our study demonstrates that beta-NGF levels can be assessed in human newborn sera using a two-site enzyme immunoassay with MAb 27/21 to mouse beta-NGF, that beta-NGF levels are extremely low in newborns compared with adults, that beta-NGF levels seems to show developmental changes, and that beta-NGF levels may be used to assess NGF utilization under normal and pathologic conditions such as cerebral malformations.

  10. Mental disorders, functional impairment, and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Fanny Helena Martins; Soares, Pedro San Martin; Wiener, Carolina David; Mondin, Thaise Campos; da Silva, Paula Moraes; Jansen, Karen; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Oses, Jean Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important member of the neurotrophin family and its alteration has been associated with psychiatric disorders. Functionality consists of the activities that an individual can perform, as well as their social participation, which is an important factor in analyzing the carrier living conditions of subjects with psychiatric suffering. Several studies have evaluated functionality in bipolar disorder; however, no studies have evaluated the functionality in other mental disorders. There are also few studies investigating the association between functionality and the biological bases of mental disorders. This study aimed to evaluate the serum NGF levels in psychiatric patients and to verify a possible association between the serum neurotrophic levels and functionality. This was a cross-sectional study with a convenient sample obtained from the Public Mental Health Service from the south of Brazil. The final sample was composed of 286 patients enrolled from July 2013 to October 2014. Data was collected using a sociodemographic questionnaire, and the diagnosis was confirmed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I) and a Functioning Assessment Short Test. The serum NGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistic 21.0 software. NGF serum levels were increased significantly in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder compared with patients with no obsessive–compulsive disorder (P=0.015). An increase in serum NGF levels in generalized anxiety disorder patients was observed compared with patients with no generalized anxiety disorder (P=0.047). NGF was negatively associated with autonomy (P=0.024, r=−0.136), work (P=0.040, r=−0.124), and cognition (P=0.024, r=−0.137), thereby showing that changes in serum levels of NGF are associated with functionality in mental disorders. PMID:28053561

  11. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  12. Increased axonal regeneration through a biodegradable amnionic tube nerve conduit: effect of local delivery and incorporation of nerve growth factor/hyaluronic acid media.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, J A; Warnke, P H; Pan, Y C; Shenaq, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors emphasize the possible pharmacological enhancement of axonal regeneration using a specific growth factor/ extracellular media incorporated in a biodegradable nonneural nerve conduit material. They investigated the early effects on nerve regeneration of continuous local delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and the local incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) inside a newly manufactured nerve conduit material from fresh human amnionic membrane. Human amnionic membrane contains important biochemical factors that play a major neurotrophic role in the nerve regeneration process. The process of manufacturing a nerve conduit from fresh human amnionic membrane is described. This nerve conduit system was used in rabbits to bridge a 25-mm nerve gap over 3 months. NGF was released locally, over 28 days, at the distal end of the tube via a system of slow release, and HA was incorporated inside the lumen of the tube at the time of surgery. NGF/HA treatment promoted axonal regeneration across the amnionic tube nerve conduit (8,962 +/- 383 myelinated axons) 45% better than the nontreated amnionic tube group (6,180 +/- 353 myelinated axons). The authors demonstrate that NGF/HA media enhances additional axonal regeneration in the amnionic tube nerve conduit. This result is secondary to the effect of the amnion promoting biochemical factors, in combination with the NGF/HA effect on facilitating early events in the nerve regeneration process.

  13. The chemokine CXCL12 mediates the anti-amyloidogenic action of painless human nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Capsoni, Simona; Malerba, Francesca; Carucci, Nicola Maria; Rizzi, Caterina; Criscuolo, Chiara; Origlia, Nicola; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Viegi, Alessandro; Meli, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor is a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer’s disease. Due to its pain-inducing activity, in current clinical trials nerve growth factor is delivered locally into the brain by neurosurgery, but data on the efficacy of local nerve growth factor delivery in decreasing amyloid-β deposition are not available. To reduce the nerve growth factor pain-inducing side effects, thus avoiding the need for local brain injection, we developed human painless nerve growth factor (hNGFp), inspired by the human genetic disease hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V. hNGFp has identical neurotrophic potency as wild-type human nerve growth factor, but a 10-fold lower pain sensitizing activity. In this study we first mimicked, in the 5xFAD mouse model, the intraparenchymal delivery of hNGFp used in clinical trials and found it to be ineffective in decreasing amyloid-β plaque load. On the contrary, the same dose of hNGFp delivered intranasally, which was widely biodistributed in the brain and did not induce pain, showed a potent anti-amyloidogenic action and rescued synaptic plasticity and memory deficits. We found that hNGFp acts on glial cells, modulating inflammatory proteins such as the soluble TNFα receptor II and the chemokine CXCL12. We further established that the rescuing effect by hNGFp is mediated by CXCL12, as pharmacological inhibition of CXCL12 receptor CXCR4 occludes most of hNGFp effects. These findings have significant therapeutic implications: (i) we established that a widespread exposure of the brain is required for nerve growth factor to fully exert its neuroprotective actions; and (ii) we have identified a new anti-neurodegenerative pathway as a broad target for new therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28031222

  14. The chemokine CXCL12 mediates the anti-amyloidogenic action of painless human nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Capsoni, Simona; Malerba, Francesca; Carucci, Nicola Maria; Rizzi, Caterina; Criscuolo, Chiara; Origlia, Nicola; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Viegi, Alessandro; Meli, Giovanni; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease. Due to its pain-inducing activity, in current clinical trials nerve growth factor is delivered locally into the brain by neurosurgery, but data on the efficacy of local nerve growth factor delivery in decreasing amyloid-β deposition are not available. To reduce the nerve growth factor pain-inducing side effects, thus avoiding the need for local brain injection, we developed human painless nerve growth factor (hNGFp), inspired by the human genetic disease hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V. hNGFp has identical neurotrophic potency as wild-type human nerve growth factor, but a 10-fold lower pain sensitizing activity. In this study we first mimicked, in the 5xFAD mouse model, the intraparenchymal delivery of hNGFp used in clinical trials and found it to be ineffective in decreasing amyloid-β plaque load. On the contrary, the same dose of hNGFp delivered intranasally, which was widely biodistributed in the brain and did not induce pain, showed a potent anti-amyloidogenic action and rescued synaptic plasticity and memory deficits. We found that hNGFp acts on glial cells, modulating inflammatory proteins such as the soluble TNFα receptor II and the chemokine CXCL12. We further established that the rescuing effect by hNGFp is mediated by CXCL12, as pharmacological inhibition of CXCL12 receptor CXCR4 occludes most of hNGFp effects. These findings have significant therapeutic implications: (i) we established that a widespread exposure of the brain is required for nerve growth factor to fully exert its neuroprotective actions; and (ii) we have identified a new anti-neurodegenerative pathway as a broad target for new therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  16. Integrin antagonists affect growth and pathfinding of ventral motor nerves in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; McLane, Mary Ann; Becker, Catherina G

    2003-05-01

    Integrins are thought to be important receptors for extracellular matrix (ECM) components on growing axons. Ventral motor axons in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish grow in a midsegmental pathway through an environment rich in ECM components. To test the role of integrins in this process, integrin antagonists (the disintegrin echistatin in native and recombinant form, as well as the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide) were injected into embryos just prior to axon outgrowth at 14-16 h postfertilization (hpf). All integrin antagonists affected growth of ventral motor nerves in a similar way and native echistatin was most effective. At 24 hpf, when only the three primary motor axons per trunk hemisegment had grown out, 80% (16 of 20) of the embryos analyzed had abnormal motor nerves after injection of native echistatin, corresponding to 19% (91 of 480) of all nerves. At 33 hpf, when secondary motor axons were present in the pathway, 100% of the embryos were affected (24 of 24), with 20% of all nerves analyzed (196 of 960) being abnormal. Phenotypes comprised abnormal branching (64% of all abnormal nerves) and truncations (36% of all abnormal nerves) of ventral motor nerves at 24 hpf and mostly branching of the nerves at 33 hpf (94% of all abnormal nerves). Caudal branches were at least twice as frequent as rostral branches. Surrounding trunk tissue and a number of other axon fascicles were apparently not affected by the injections. Thus integrin function contributes to both growth and pathfinding of axons in ventral motor nerves in the trunk of zebrafish in vivo.

  17. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-05

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries.

  18. Nerve Growth Factor Inhibits Sympathetic Neurons' Response to an Injury Cytokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadiack, Annette M.; Vaccariello, Stacey A.; Sun, Yi; Zigmond, Richard E.

    1998-06-01

    Axonal damage to adult peripheral neurons causes changes in neuronal gene expression. For example, axotomized sympathetic, sensory, and motor neurons begin to express galanin mRNA and protein, and recent evidence suggests that galanin plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Previous studies in sympathetic and sensory neurons have established that galanin expression is triggered by two consequences of nerve transection: the induction of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and the reduction in the availability of the target-derived factor, nerve growth factor. It is shown in the present study that no stimulation of galanin expression occurs following direct application of LIF to intact neurons in the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. Injection of animals with an antiserum to nerve growth factor concomitant with the application of LIF, on the other hand, does stimulate galanin expression. The data suggest that the response of neurons to an injury factor, LIF, is affected by whether the neurons still receive trophic signals from their targets.

  19. Nerve growth factor from cobra venom inhibits the growth of Ehrlich tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Terpinskaya, Tatiana I; Kryukova, Elena V; Ulaschik, Vladimir S; Paulovets, Lubov V; Petrova, Elena A; Blagun, Ekaterina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Utkin, Yuri N

    2014-02-26

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) from cobra venom (cvNGF) on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells inoculated subcutaneously in mice have been studied. The carcinoma growth slows down, but does not stop, during a course of cvNGF injections and restores after the course has been discontinued. The maximal anti-tumor effect has been observed at a dose of 8 nmoles cvNGF/kg body weight. cvNGF does not impact on lifespan of mice with grafted EAC cells. K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates the anti-tumor effect of cvNGF indicating the involvement of TrkA receptors in the process. cvNGF has induced also increase in body weight of the experimental animals. In overall, cvNGF shows the anti-tumor and weight-increasing effects which are opposite to those described for mammalian NGF (mNGF). However in experiments on breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cvNGF showed the same proliferative effects as mNGF and had no cytotoxic action on tumor cells in vitro. These data suggest that cvNGF slows down EAC growth via an indirect mechanism in which TrkA receptors are involved.

  20. Nerve Growth Factor from Cobra Venom Inhibits the Growth of Ehrlich Tumor in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Alexey V.; Terpinskaya, Tatiana I.; Kryukova, Elena V.; Ulaschik, Vladimir S.; Paulovets, Lubov V.; Petrova, Elena A.; Blagun, Ekaterina V.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Utkin, Yuri N.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) from cobra venom (cvNGF) on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells inoculated subcutaneously in mice have been studied. The carcinoma growth slows down, but does not stop, during a course of cvNGF injections and restores after the course has been discontinued. The maximal anti-tumor effect has been observed at a dose of 8 nmoles cvNGF/kg body weight. cvNGF does not impact on lifespan of mice with grafted EAC cells. K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates the anti-tumor effect of cvNGF indicating the involvement of TrkA receptors in the process. cvNGF has induced also increase in body weight of the experimental animals. In overall, cvNGF shows the anti-tumor and weight-increasing effects which are opposite to those described for mammalian NGF (mNGF). However in experiments on breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cvNGF showed the same proliferative effects as mNGF and had no cytotoxic action on tumor cells in vitro. These data suggest that cvNGF slows down EAC growth via an indirect mechanism in which TrkA receptors are involved. PMID:24577582

  1. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) are aggressive malignancies that arise within peripheral nerves. These tumors occur with increased...and abnormal expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We previously found that MPNSTs express increased levels of the CD44 family...kinase activity (and not increased Ras-GTP) contributes to MPNST cell invasion. We further find that EGFR contributes at least part of the elevated Src

  2. Neurotrophins enhance electric field-directed growth cone guidance and directed nerve branching.

    PubMed

    McCaig, C D; Sangster, L; Stewart, R

    2000-03-01

    Neurotrophins play major roles in the developing nervous system in controlling neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, guidance and branching, synapse formation and maturation, and neuronal survival or death. There is increasing evidence that nervous system construction takes place in the presence of dc electric fields, which fluctuate dynamically in space and time during embryonic development. These have their origins in the neural tube itself, as well as in surrounding skin and gut. Early disruption of these endogenous electric fields causes failure of the nervous system to form, or else it forms aberrantly. Nerve growth, guidance, and branching are controlled tightly during pathway construction and in vitro dc electric fields have profound effects on each of these behaviours. We have used cultured neurones to ask whether neurotrophins and dc electric fields might interact in shaping neuronal growth, given their coexistence in vivo. Electric field-directed nerve growth generally was enhanced by the simultaneous presentation of several neurotrophins to the growth cone. Under certain circumstances, more nerves turned cathodally, they turned faster, further, and in lower field strengths. Intriguingly, other combinations of dc electric field and neurotrophins (low field strength and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) switched the direction of growth cone turning. Additionally, cathodally directed nerve growth was faster and directed branching was much more common when electric fields and neurotrophins interacted with neuronal growth cones. Given such profound changes in growth cone behaviour in vitro, neurotrophins and endogenous electric fields are likely to interact in vivo.

  3. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liu-lin; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Ting-hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  4. Sustained Growth Factor Delivery Promotes Axonal Regeneration in Long Gap Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kokai, Lauren E.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Weber, Douglas; McAtee, Jedidiah

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of localized growth factor delivery on sciatic nerve regeneration in a critical-size (>1 cm) peripheral nerve defect. Previous work has demonstrated that bioactive proteins can be encapsulated within double-walled, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(lactide) microspheres and embedded within walls of biodegradable polymer nerve guides composed of poly(caprolactone). Within this study, nerve guides containing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were used to bridge a 1.5-cm defect in the male Lewis rat for a 16-week period. Nerve repair was evaluated through functional assessment of joint angle range of motion using video gait kinematics, gastrocnemius twitch force, and gastrocnemius wet weight. Histological evaluation of nerve repair included assessment of Schwann cell and neurofilament location with immunohistochemistry, evaluation of tissue integration and organization throughout the lumen of the regenerated nerve with Masson's trichrome stain, and quantification of axon fiber density and g-ratio. Results from this study showed that the measured gastrocnemius twitch force in animals treated with GDNF was significantly higher than negative controls and was not significantly different from the isograft-positive control group. Histological assessment of explanted conduits after 16 weeks showed improved tissue integration within GDNF releasing nerve guides compared to negative controls. Nerve fibers were present across the entire length of GDNF releasing guides, whereas nerve fibers were not detectable beyond the middle region of negative control guides. Therefore, our results support the use of GDNF for improved functional recovery above negative controls following large axonal defects in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:21189072

  5. Effects of nerve growth factor delivery via a gel to inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Jian; Lei, De-lin; Cheng, Xiao-bing; Yang, Yao-wu; Hou, Rui; Zhao, Ying-hua; Cui, Fu-zhai

    2009-11-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury is a concern in mandible distraction osteogenesis (DO). We have previously demonstrated that repeated local injections of human nerve growth factor beta (NGF-beta) have significantly enhanced the histologic recovery of the IAN in a rabbit model of DO. This study was to further test the effect of a single injection of human NGF-beta delivered via a collagen/nanohydroxyapatite/kappa-carrageenan gel to the recovery of the IAN in DO. Rabbits underwent mandibular DO at a rate of 0.75 mm/12 h for 6 days. At the end of the distraction period, injections were performed near the IAN percutaneously as follows: group 1, human NGF-beta in the gel; group 2, human NGF-beta in saline; group 3, the gel alone; and group 4, saline alone. At 14 days after the end of distraction, IAN histologic findings and histomorphometric parameters were evaluated. Histologically, there were less myelin debris and more abundant regenerating nerve fibers in group 1 than the other groups. Both the myelinated fiber density and the myelinated axon area in group 1 were significantly higher than groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.01); the myelinated axon area in the group 1 was significantly higher than group 2 (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the delivery of human NGF-beta in the gel leads to a better acceleration of the IAN injury recovery over the saline delivery. It provides a possible way to enhance the recovery of nerve injuries in craniofacial DO clinically.

  6. ATF3 increases the intrinsic growth state of DRG neurons to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Seijffers, Rhona; Mills, Charles D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2007-07-25

    Peripheral axons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but not their central axons in the dorsal columns, regenerate after injury. However, if the neurons are conditioned by a peripheral nerve injury into an actively growing state, the rate of peripheral axonal growth is accelerated and the injured central axons begin to regenerate. The growth-promoting effects of conditioning injuries have two components, increased axonal growth and a reduced response to inhibitory myelin cues. We have examined which transcription factors activated by peripheral axonal injury may mediate the conditioning effect by regulating expression of effectors that increase the intrinsic growth state of the neurons. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a prime candidate because it is induced in all injured DRG neurons after peripheral, but not central, axonal damage. To investigate if ATF3 promotes regeneration, we generated transgenic mice that constitutively express this transcription factor in non-injured adult DRG neurons. The rate of peripheral nerve regeneration was enhanced in the transgenic mice to an extent comparable to that produced by a preconditioning nerve injury. The expression of some growth-associated genes, such as SPRR1A, but not others like GAP-43, was increased in the non-injured neurons. ATF3 increased DRG neurite elongation when cultured on permissive substrates but did not overcome the inhibitory effects of myelin or promote central axonal regeneration in the spinal cord in vivo. We conclude that ATF3 contributes to nerve regeneration by increasing the intrinsic growth state of injured neurons.

  7. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques.

  8. Increased vascular penetration and nerve growth in the meniscus: a potential source of pain in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Sadaf; Wibberley, Helen; Mapp, Paul Ian; Hill, Roger; Wilson, Deborah; Walsh, David Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Meniscal damage is a recognised feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA), although its clinical relevance remains uncertain. This study describes vascular penetration and nerve growth in human menisci, providing a potential mechanism for the genesis of pain in knee OA. Menisci obtained post mortem were screened on the basis of high or low macroscopic tibiofemoral chondropathy as a measure of the presence and degree of OA. Forty cases (20 per group) were selected for the study of meniscal vascularity, and 16 (eight per group) for the study of meniscal innervation. Antibodies directed against α-actin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were used to localise blood vessels and nerves by histochemistry. Image analysis was used to compare vascular and nerve densities between groups. Data are presented as median (IQR). Menisci from knees with high chondropathy displayed degeneration of collagen bundles in their outer regions, which were more vascular than the inner regions, with an abrupt decrease in vascularity at the fibrocartilage junction. Vascular densities were increased in menisci from the high compared with low chondropathy group both in the synovium (3.8% (IQR 2.6-5.2), 2.0% (IQR 1.4-2.9), p=0.002) and at the fibrocartilage junction (2.3% (IQR 1.7-3.1), 1.1% (IQR 0.8-1.9), p=0.003), with a greater density of perivascular sensory nerve profiles in the outer region (high chondropathy group, 144 nerve profiles/mm(2) (IQR 134-189); low chondropathy group, 119 nerve profiles/mm(2) (IQR 104-144), p=0.049). Tibiofemoral chondropathy is associated with altered matrix structure, increased vascular penetration, and increased sensory nerve densities in the medial meniscus. The authors suggest therefore that angiogenesis and associated sensory nerve growth in menisci may contribute to pain in knee OA.

  9. Nerve growth factor-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor expression of astrocyte in retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Kim, You Sun; Jo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hanjae; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-02-22

    The angiogenic aspect of neurotrophins and their receptors rather than the neuroscientific aspect has been focused. However, their role in retinal vascular development is underdiscovered. The purpose of this study is to understand the role of neurotrophin receptors in retinal vascular development and the mechanisms of their action. To identify the expression of tropomyosin receptor kinase receptor (Trk) in developing retina, tissues of 4, 8, 12, 16 and 26 day-old mice were prepared for experiments. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence double staining against glial fibrillary acidic protein and type IV collagen were performed. TrkA was expressed mainly along the vessel structure in inner part of retina, especially in retinal astrocyte. In cultured primary astrocyte, recombinant nerve growth factor (NGF) was used to activate TrkA. NGF induced the phosphorylation of TrkA, and it also enhanced the level of activated Akt and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA. Inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) reversed the NGF-induced activation of these two molecules. This study demonstrated that TrkA activation on NGF leads to VEGF elevation by PI3K-Akt pathway and therefore suggested that TrkA could be a stimulator of retinal vascular development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Silk fibroin matrices for the controlled release of nerve growth factor (NGF).

    PubMed

    Uebersax, Lorenz; Mattotti, Marta; Papaloïzos, Michaël; Merkle, Hans P; Gander, Bruno; Meinel, Lorenz

    2007-10-01

    Nerve conduits (NC) for peripheral nerve repair should guide the sprouting axons and physically protect the axonal cone from any damage. The NC should also degrade after completion of its function to obviate the need of subsequent explanation and should optionally be suitable for controlled drug release of embedded growth factors to enhance nerve regeneration. Silk fibroin (SF) is a biocompatible and slowly biodegradable biomaterial with excellent mechanical properties that could meet the above stated requirements. SF material (films) supported the adherence and metabolic activity of PC12 cells, and, in combination with nerve growth factor (NGF), supported neurite outgrowth during PC12 cell differentiation. NGF-loaded SF-NC were prepared from aqueous solutions of NGF and SF (20%, w/w), which were air-dried or freeze-dried (freezing at -20 or -196 degrees C) in suitable molds. NGF release from the three differently prepared SF-NC was prolonged over at least 3 weeks, but the total amount released depended on the drying procedure of the NC. The potency of released NGF was retained within all formulations. Control experiments with differently dried NGF-lactose solutions did not evidence marked protein aggregation (SEC, HPLC), loss of ELISA-reactivity or PC12 cell bioactivity. This study encourages the further exploitation of SF-NC for growth factor delivery and evaluation in peripheral nerve repair.

  11. Growth of injured rabbit optic axons within their degenerating optic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Lavie, V.; Murray, M.; Solomon, A.; Ben-Bassat, S.; Belkin, M.; Rumelt, S.; Schwartz, M. )

    1990-08-15

    Spontaneous growth of axons after injury is extremely limited in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). It is now clear, however, that injured CNS axons can be induced to elongate when provided with a suitable environment. Thus injured CNS axons can elongate, but they do not do so unless their environment is altered. We now show apparent regenerative growth of injured optic axons. This growth is achieved in the adult rabbit optic nerve by the use of a combined treatment consisting of: (1) supplying soluble substances originating from growing axons to be injured rabbit optic nerves, and (2) application of low energy He-Ne laser irradiation, which appears to delay degenerative changes in the injured axons. Two to 8 weeks after this treatment, unmyelinated and thinly myelinated axons are found at the lesion site and distal to it. Morphological and immunocytochemical evidence indicate that these thinly myelinated and unmyelinated axons are growing in close association with glial cells. Only these axons are identified as being growing axons. These newly growing axons transverse the site of injury and extend into the distal stump of the nerve, which contains degenerating axons. Axons of this type could be detected distal to the lesion only in nerves subjected to the combined treatment. No unmyelinated or thinly myelinated axons in association with glial cells were seen at 6 or 8 weeks postoperatively in nerves that were not treated, or in nerves in which the two stumps were completely disconnected. Two millimeters distal to the site of injury, the growing axons are confined to a compartment comprising 5%-30% of the cross section of the nerve. A temporal analysis indicates that axons have grown as far as 6 mm distal to the site of injury, by 8 weeks postoperatively.

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Delivery of Growth Factors: Stimulation of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannaccini, Martina; Calatayud, M Pilar; Poggetti, Andrea; Corbianco, Silvia; Novelli, Michela; Paoli, Melania; Battistini, Pietro; Castagna, Maura; Dente, Luciana; Parchi, Paolo; Lisanti, Michele; Cavallini, Gabriella; Junquera, Concepción; Goya, Gerardo F; Raffa, Vittoria

    2017-04-01

    The only clinically approved alternative to autografts for treating large peripheral nerve injuries is the use of synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGCs), which provide physical guidance to the regenerating stump and limit scar tissue infiltration at the injury site. Several lines of evidence suggest that a potential future strategy is to combine NGCs with cellular or molecular therapies to deliver growth factors that sustain the regeneration process. However, growth factors are expensive and have a very short half-life; thus, the combination approach has not been successful. In the present paper, we proposed the immobilization of growth factors (GFs) on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for the time- and space-controlled release of GFs inside the NGC. We tested the particles in a rat model of a peripheral nerve lesion. Our results revealed that the injection of a cocktail of MNPs functionalized with nerve growth factor (NGF) and with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) strongly accelerate the regeneration process and the recovery of motor function compared to that obtained using the free factors. Additionally, we found that injecting MNPs in the NGC is safe and does not impair the regeneration process, and the MNPs remain in the conduit for weeks. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily.

  14. Plasticity in rat uterine sympathetic nerves: the role of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richeri, Analía; Bianchimano, Paola; Mármol, Nelson M; Viettro, Lorena; Cowen, Timothy; Brauer, M Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sympathetic innervation undergoes profound remodelling in response to physiological and experimental changes in the circulating levels of sex hormones. It is not known, however, whether this plasticity results from changes in the innervating neurons, the neuritogenic properties of the target tissue or both. Using densitometric immunohistochemistry, we analysed the effects of prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment (three subcutaneous injections of 20 µg of β-oestradiol 17-cypionate on days 25, 27 and 29 after birth), natural peripubertal transition and late pregnancy (19–20 days post coitum) on the levels of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors in uterine-projecting sympathetic neurons of the thoraco-lumbar paravertebral sympathetic chain (T7–L2) identified using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold. For comparative purposes, levels of TrkA and p75 were assessed in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) following prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment. These studies showed that the vast majority of uterine-projecting neurons expressed both TrkA and p75. Both prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment and the peripubertal transition increased the ratio p75 to TrkA in uterine-projecting neurons, whereas pregnancy elicited the opposite effect. Prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment had no effects on levels of TrkA or p75 in sympathetic neurons of the SCG. Taken together, our data suggest that neurotrophin receptor-mediated events may contribute to regulate sex hormone-induced plasticity in uterine sympathetic nerves, and are in line with the idea that, in vivo, plasticity in uterine nerves involves changes in both the target and the innervating neurons. PMID:16050899

  15. Enhancement of sciatic nerve regeneration after vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pereira Lopes, F R; Lisboa, B C G; Frattini, F; Almeida, F M; Tomaz, M A; Matsumoto, P K; Langone, F; Lora, S; Melo, P A; Borojevic, R; Han, S W; Martinez, A M B

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the beneficial effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on neurone survival and Schwann cell proliferation. VEGF is a potent angiogenic factor, and angiogenesis has long been recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Here, we investigated the effects of VEGF on sciatic nerve regeneration. Using light and electron microscopy, we evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after transection and VEGF gene therapy. We examined the survival of the neurones in the dorsal root ganglia and in lumbar 4 segment of spinal cord. We also evaluated the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and gastrocnemius muscle weight. In addition, we evaluated the VEGF expression by immunohistochemistry. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) fluorescence of nerves and muscles revealed intense staining in the VEGF-treated group. Quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of myelinated fibres and blood vessels were significantly higher in VEGF-treated animals. VEGF also increased the survival of neurone cell bodies in dorsal root ganglia and in spinal cord. The sciatic functional index and gastrocnemius muscle weight reached significantly higher values in VEGF-treated animals. We demonstrate a positive relationship between increased vascularization and enhanced nerve regeneration, indicating that VEGF administration can support and enhance the growth of regenerating nerve fibres, probably through a combination of angiogenic, neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  16. Nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor stimulate clusterin gene expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutacker, C; Klock, G; Diel, P; Koch-Brandt, C

    1999-01-01

    Clusterin (apolipoprotein J) is an extracellular glycoprotein that might exert functions in development, cell death and lipid transport. Clusterin gene expression is elevated at sites of tissue remodelling, such as differentiation and apoptosis; however, the signals responsible for this regulation have not been identified. We use here the clusterin gene as a model system to examine expression in PC12 cells under the control of differentiation and proliferation signals produced by nerve growth factor (NGF) and by epidermal growth factor (EGF) respectively. NGF induced clusterin mRNA, which preceded neurite outgrowth typical of neuronal differentiation. EGF also activated the clusterin mRNA, demonstrating that both proliferation and differentiation signals regulate the gene. To localize NGF- and EGF-responsive elements we isolated the clusterin promoter and tested it in PC12 cell transfections. A 2.5 kb promoter fragment and two 1.5 and 0.3 kb deletion mutants were inducible by NGF and EGF. The contribution to this response of a conserved activator protein 1 (AP-1) motif located in the 0.3 kb fragment was analysed by mutagenesis. The mutant promoter was not inducible by NGF or EGF, which identifies the AP-1 motif as an element responding to both factors. Binding studies with PC12 nuclear extracts showed that AP-1 binds to this sequence in the clusterin promoter. These findings suggest that NGF and EGF, which give differential gene regulation in PC12 cells, resulting in neuronal differentiation and proliferation respectively, use the common Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/AP-1 signalling pathway to activate clusterin expression. PMID:10215617

  17. Purinergic signalling underlies transforming growth factor‐β‐mediated bladder afferent nerve hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Nelson, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The sensory components of the urinary bladder are responsible for the transduction of bladder filling and are often impaired with neurological injury or disease.Elevated extracellular ATP contributes, in part, to bladder afferent nerve hyperexcitability during urinary bladder inflammation or irritation.Transforming growth factor‐β1 (TGF‐β1) may stimulate ATP release from the urothelium through vesicular exocytosis mechanisms with minimal contribution from pannexin‐1 channels to increase bladder afferent nerve discharge.Bladder afferent nerve hyperexcitability and urothelial ATP release with CYP‐induced cystitis is decreased with TGF‐β inhibition.These results establish a causal link between an inflammatory mediator, TGF‐β, and intrinsic signalling mechanisms of the urothelium that may contribute to the altered sensory processing of bladder filling. Abstract The afferent limb of the micturition reflex is often compromised following bladder injury, disease and inflammatory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that transforming growth factor‐β (TGF‐β) signalling contributes to increased voiding frequency and decreased bladder capacity with cystitis. Despite the functional presence of TGF‐β in bladder inflammation, the precise mechanisms of TGF‐β mediating bladder dysfunction are not yet known. Thus, the present studies investigated the sensory components of the urinary bladder that may underlie the pathophysiology of aberrant TGF‐β activation. We utilized bladder–pelvic nerve preparations to characterize bladder afferent nerve discharge and the mechanisms of urothelial ATP release with distention. Our findings indicate that bladder afferent nerve discharge is sensitive to elevated extracellular ATP during pathological conditions of urinary bladder inflammation or irritation. We determined that TGF‐β1 may increase bladder afferent nerve excitability by stimulating ATP release from the urothelium via vesicular

  18. Complementary Effects of Two Growth Factors in Multifunctionalized Silk Nanofibers for Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Rodrigo R.; Vigneron, Pascale; Bresson, Damien; Fitzpatrick, Vincent; Marin, Frédéric; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of forming bioactive guides for peripheral nerve regeneration, silk fibroin was electrospun to obtain aligned nanofibers. These fibers were functionalized by incorporating Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Ciliary NeuroTrophic Factor (CNTF) during electrospinning. PC12 cells grown on the fibers confirmed the bioavailability and bioactivity of the NGF, which was not significantly released from the fibers. Primary neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were grown on the nanofibers and anchored to the fibers and grew in a directional fashion based on the fiber orientation, and as confirmed by growth cone morphology. These biofunctionalized nanofibers led to a 3-fold increase in neurite length at their contact, which was likely due to the NGF. Glial cell growth, alignment and migration were stimulated by the CNTF in the functionalized nanofibers. Organotypic culture of rat fetal DRGs confirmed the complementary effect of both growth factors in multifunctionalized nanofibers, which allowed glial cell migration, alignment and parallel axonal growth in structures resembling the ‘bands of Bungner’ found in situ. Graftable multi-channel conduits based on biofunctionalized aligned silk nanofibers were developed as an organized 3D scaffold. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent new options for a biological and biocompatible nerve guidance conduit. PMID:25313579

  19. Rita Levi-Montalcini: the discovery of nerve growth factor and modern neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi

    2004-07-01

    The remarkable accomplishments in developmental neurobiology within the past 60 years have depended on two things: (i) a succession of original histochemical and immunohistochemical methodologies for identifying pathways in the nervous system with increasing precision and sensitivity, and (ii) the discovery of growth factors for neurons. Growth factors are naturally occurring, essential biological mediators that promote cell growth, differentiation, survival and function in specific nerve cell populations. The discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the 1950s represents an important milestone in the processes that led to modern cell biology. NGF was the first growth factor identified, for its action on the morphological differentiation of neural-crest-derived nerve cells. Later, its effect on neuronal cells of the peripheral and central nervous systems, and on several non-neuronal cells was also determined. Thus, Levi-Montalcini's work on NGF represents, as acknowledged by the Nobel Prize Assembly in its press release of 13 October 1986, "a fascinating example of how a skilled observer can create a concept out of apparent chaos".

  20. Nerve Growth Factor Effects on the Immune System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-19

    growth factor protein, NGF, has been shown to play a physiologic role in the development and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system, acting on...determine the effects of NGF on lymphocytes with an aim to understanding the physiological and developmental role of NGF in the immune system. Our approaches...Thorpe and Perez-Polo, 1987). Although the maximal response of these cells occurs at levels significantly above those considered physiological it is

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nerve terminal growth remodels neuromuscular synapses in mice following regeneration of the postsynaptic muscle fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Thompson, Wesley J

    2011-09-14

    Muscle fibers degenerate and regenerate in response to contractile damage, during aging, and in various muscle diseases that weaken the fibers. It is known that degeneration and regeneration of the segment of the postsynaptic fiber produces dramatic alterations in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) that forms on the regenerated fiber, but the mechanisms here are incompletely understood. We have used a laser microbeam to damage the postsynaptic fibers at individual NMJs in the sternomastoid muscle of living young adult mice and then followed the synapses vitally over time using fluorescent proteins expressed in motor neurons and glial cells and staining of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors. We find, in contrast to previous reports, that the mouse nerve terminal retains contact with the synaptic basal lamina marked by cholinesterase staining even in the absence of the target, showing that this terminal does not require a continuous supply of target-derived molecules for its maintenance. Thus, remodeling of the nerve terminal during the period of target absence does not explain the subsequent changes in the new NMJ. Rather, we see that the synapse becomes altered as the new fiber segment regenerates. Mechanisms for remodeling the synapse include failure of the regenerating muscle fiber to contact the old basal lamina and nerve terminal, growth of the nerve terminal and its glia toward the regenerating fiber, and remodeling of the initial contact as the nerve terminal becomes varicose.

  3. Combined treatment with FK506 and nerve growth factor for spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Shouyu; Lv, Decheng

    2013-10-01

    Following spinal cord injury in rats, FK506 is able to protect local nerve tissue, promote neural regeneration, reduce neuronal apoptosis and accelerate the recovery of spinal cord functions. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important in the regulation of central and peripheral nerve cell regeneration, growth differentiation and functions. Previous studies have shown that FK506 and NGF exhibit a synergistic effect in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury; however, it remains unclear whether the synergistic effect is present in the treatment of spinal cord injury. In this study, we combined FK506 and NGF for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The NF200 protein expression in rats with spinal cord injury was determined using immunohistochemical staining and NF200 mRNA expression levels were observed using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The restoration of spinal cord functions was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score. The results demonstrated that the combined treatment significantly enhanced the expression of NF200 and improved spinal cord functions compared with the results of the single treatment. Our experimental observations indicated that FK506 and NGF exhibit a synergistic effect in the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats and that the combined treatment may effectively promote neural regeneration and functional recovery in rats following spinal cord injury.

  4. Mechanisms of nerve growth factor signaling in bone nociceptors and in an animal model of inflammatory bone pain.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Sara; Ringuet, Mitchell; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chen, Yu-Jen; Greenhill, Claire; Ivanusic, Jason J

    2017-01-01

    Sequestration of nerve growth factor has been used successfully in the management of pain in animal models of bone disease and in human osteoarthritis. However, the mechanisms of nerve growth factor-induced bone pain and its role in modulating inflammatory bone pain remain to be determined. In this study, we show that nerve growth factor receptors (TrkA and p75) and some other nerve growth factor-signaling molecules (TRPV1 and Nav1.8, but not Nav1.9) are expressed in substantial proportions of rat bone nociceptors. We demonstrate that nerve growth factor injected directly into rat tibia rapidly activates and sensitizes bone nociceptors and produces acute behavioral responses with a similar time course. The nerve growth factor-induced changes in the activity and sensitivity of bone nociceptors we report are dependent on signaling through the TrkA receptor, but are not affected by mast cell stabilization. We failed to show evidence for longer term changes in expression of TrkA, TRPV1, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in the soma of bone nociceptors in a rat model of inflammatory bone pain. Thus, retrograde transport of NGF/TrkA and increased expression of some of the common nerve growth factor signaling molecules do not appear to be important for the maintenance of inflammatory bone pain. The findings are relevant to understand the basis of nerve growth factor sequestration and other therapies directed at nerve growth factor signaling, in managing pain in bone disease.

  5. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nerve growth factor influences cleavage rate and embryo development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Crispo, M; Dos Santos-Neto, P C; Vilariño, M; Mulet, A P; de León, A; Barbeito, L; Menchaca, A

    2016-10-01

    Recent information about Nerve growth factor (NGF), a protein traditionally associated to the nervous system that regulates survival and maturation of developing neurons, suggests that it may exert action also on different levels in the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NGF added during in vitro oocyte maturation, fertilization or in vitro embryo development in sheep. Nerve growth factor was supplemented to the culture medium at 0, 100, or 1,000 ng/mL, during either in vitro maturation (Exp. 1), in vitro fertilization (Exp. 2), or in vitro culture (Exp. 3). In addition, NGF mRNA expression was determined in cumulus cells and oocytes. Nerve growth factor induced early cleavage when added during oocyte maturation or fertilization, improved embryo development when added during fertilization, and had no significant effect when added during embryo culture. In general, the effect was more evident with 100 rather than 1,000 ng/mL (P < 0.05). Expression of endogenous NGF was not detected in oocytes, and increased in cumulus cells when 1,000 ng/mL of NGF was added during fertilization, but not during maturation and embryo culture. In conclusion, the addition of NGF during oocyte maturation and fertilization affects in vitro cleavage and embryo development in sheep. We suggest a possible effect of this growth factor on oocyte maturation and mainly on the fertilization process.

  6. Molecular cloning of a human gene that is a member of the nerve growth factor family

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Reichardt, L.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Cell death within the developing vertebrate nervous system is regulated in part by interactions between neurons and their innervation targets that are mediated by neurotrophic factors. These factors also appear to have a role in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Two neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, share substantial amino acid sequence identity. The authors have used a screen that combines polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA and low-stringency hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides to isolate human BDNF and a human gene, neurotrophin-3, that is closely related to both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. mRNA products of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 genes were detected in the adult human brain, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Neurotrophin-3 is also expected to function in embryonic neural development.

  7. Nerve growth factor corrects developmental impairments of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the trisomy 16 mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, P; Coyle, J T

    1991-01-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, which shares genetic and phenotypic homologies with Down syndrome, exhibits impaired development of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Basal forebrains obtained from Ts16 and euploid littermate fetuses at 15 days of gestation were dissociated and cultured in completely defined medium, with cholinergic neurons identified by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. The Ts16 cultures exhibited fewer ChAT-immunoreactive neurons, which were smaller and emitted shorter, smoother, and more simplified neurites than those from euploid littermates. Whereas the addition of beta-nerve growth factor (100 ng/ml) augmented the specific activity of ChAT and neuritic extension for both Ts16 and euploid cholinergic neurons, only Ts16 cultures exhibited an increase in the number and size of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons. Furthermore, Ts16 ChAT-immunoreactive neurites formed varicosities only in the presence of beta-nerve growth factor. Images PMID:2000385

  8. Soft Graphene Nanofibers Designed for the Acceleration of Nerve Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang-Qi; Wang, Ting; Zhao, Bin; Li, Jiacheng; Jin, Lin

    2015-11-04

    Soft graphene nanofibers with recoverable electrical conductivity and excellent physicochemical stability are prepared by a controlled assembly technique. By using the soft graphene nanofibers for cellular electrical stimulation, the common inhibitory effect of long-term electrical stimulation on nerve growth and development is avoided, which usually happens with traditional 2D conductive materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  10. Human Adenomyosis Endometrium Stromal Cells Secreting More Nerve Growth Factor: Impact and Effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zou, Shien; Xia, Xian; Zhang, Shaofen

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) was found in adenomyosis (AM). We collected AM foci from patients and eutopic endometrium from non-AM controls. Endometrium stromal cells (ESCs) were cultured. Different levels of 17β-estradiol, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), CoCl2, and H2O2 were added to the culture system separately, then the expression level of NGF in ESCs was detected. After adding different levels of NGF, the proliferation and apoptosis of ESCs and aromatase expression were detected. We found that 17β-estradiol promoted NGF production in AM ESCs but not in control ESCs; TNF promoted NGF production in both AM and control ESCs; and CoCl2 inhibited NGF production in control ESCs, but had no effect in AM ESCs. Nerve growth factor promoted the proliferation and synthesis of aromatase in AM ESCs. In conclusion, locally increased estrogen levels and inflammation may cause increased NGF production in the uterus of patients with AM. Nerve growth factor stimulated the proliferation and increased aromatase expression of ESCs from AM foci, suggesting NGF might contribute to the pathology and etiology of AM.

  11. Immunity to nerve growth factor and the effect on motor unit reinnervation in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, D I; Luff, A R; Schuijers, J A

    1992-05-01

    The trophic effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on sympathetic, peripheral afferent, and other neural crest-derived cells have been intensively investigated. More recently, NGF has been shown to have an influence on motoneurons. This study was undertaken to investigate whether NGF had any influence on the mechanical or histological properties of reinnervated motor units. Three groups of rabbits were used: normal rabbits, rabbits in which the nerve to medial gastrocnemius (MG) was cut and allowed to reinnervate for 56 days, and rabbits in which the MG nerve reinnervated in the presence of immunity to NGF. Immunity to NGF did not affect the ability of motor axons to reinnervate a muscle, nor were the contractile characteristics of the motor units altered. The size of horseradish peroxidase-labeled motoneurons was not influenced by immunization against NGF; however, the distribution of afferent neuron sizes was altered. Conduction velocity of motor axons proximal to the neuroma was significantly faster after immunization against NGF. Transection and subsequent reinnervation by a peripheral nerve normally causes an increase in myelin thickness proximal to the neuroma. However, immunization against NGF appeared to decrease the magnitude of myelin thickening. It was concluded that immunization against NGF affects motor axonal conduction velocity via an influence on the neural crest-derived Schwann cells.

  12. Chondroitinase C Selectively Degrades Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans that Inhibit Axonal Growth within the Endoneurium of Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The success of peripheral nerve regeneration is highly dependent on the regrowth of axons within the endoneurial basal lamina tubes that promote target-oriented pathfinding and appropriate reinnervation. Restoration of nerve continuity at this structural level after nerve transection injury by direct repair and nerve grafting remains a major surgical challenge. Recently, biological approaches that alter the balance of growth inhibitors and promoters in nerve have shown promise to improve appropriate axonal regeneration and recovery of peripheral nerve function. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are known inhibitors of axonal growth. This growth inhibition is mainly associated with a CSPG's glycosaminoglycan chains. Enzymatic degradation of these chains with chondroitinase eliminates this inhibitory activity and, when applied in vivo, can improve the outcome of nerve repair. To date, these encouraging findings were obtained with chondroitinase ABC (a pan-specific chondroitinase). The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of CSPG subtypes in rodent, rabbit, and human peripheral nerve and to test more selective biological enzymatic approaches to improve appropriate axonal growth within the endoneurium and minimize aberrant growth. Here we provide evidence that the endoneurium, but not the surrounding epineurium, is rich in CSPGs that have glycosaminoglycan chains readily degraded by chondroitinase C. Biochemical studies indicate that chondroitinase C has degradation specificity for 6-sulfated glycosaminoglycans found in peripheral nerve. We found that chondroitinase C degrades and inactivates inhibitory CSPGs within the endoneurium but not so much in the surrounding nerve compartments. Cryoculture bioassays (neurons grown on tissue sections) show that chondroitinase C selectively and significantly enhanced neuritic growth associated with the endoneurial basal laminae without changing growth-inhibiting properties of the surrounding epineurium

  13. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and diabetic neuropathy in the rat: morphological investigations of the sural nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Unger, J W; Klitzsch, T; Pera, S; Reiter, R

    1998-09-01

    A number of functions for nerve growth factor (NGF) have been described over the past years, including its role for neuronal function and regeneration during toxic or metabolic neuropathies. In order to further assess the effects of NGF on the somatosensory system in diabetic neuropathy, the sural nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and dorsal horn of the spinal cord were investigated by morphological and quantitative methods in rats after 12 weeks of uncontrolled streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. The results from our study suggest a twofold effect of NGF: (1) In sural nerve treatment with NGF (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg) for 12 weeks was able to reverse distinct diabetes-related alterations in myelinated nerve fiber morphology, such as myelin thickness. These changes occurred in the entire myelinated population of sensory nerves and were not restricted to nociceptive nerve fibers. (2) The NGF effect on neurotransmitters of the sensory, nociceptive system was reflected by increased CGRP and substance P content in the DRG and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. No change of trkA receptor immunostaining was seen in DRGs of diabetic rats; however, a reduction of trkA immunoreactivity of DRG neurons was noted after long-term NGF treatment of healthy controls. The data demonstrate that NGF regulates a number of neuronal parameters along peripheral and central parts of the somatosensory pathway in the adult. This neurotrophic support may be essential for inducing functionally significant regenerative mechanisms in diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Local administration of PDGF-B combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27274342

  15. Effects of locally applied nerve growth factor to the inferior alveolar nerve histology in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cheng, X; Yang, Y; Liu, G; Ma, Q; Shang, H; Tian, L; Lei, D

    2009-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is widely used in deformities and defects of the craniofacial bone. Accelerating inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) recovery would aid the process. Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a vital role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the ability of locally applied human NGF beta (hNGFbeta) to enhance the morphological recovery of the IAN in a rabbit model of mandibular DO was studied. Rabbits underwent bilateral DO with a rate of 0.5mm per 12h. Two doses of 40 microg hNGFbeta in buffer were injected into callus at the beginning the of consolidation time. The contralateral side received injections of placebo. Rabbits were killed at 14 and 28 days. IAN specimens were subjected to histological and histomorphometric analysis. In both 14 and 28 days consolidation experiments, nerve histological analysis showed less degeneration and more regeneration in nerve fibers on the hNGFbeta treated side than the control side. Histomorphometric analysis showed that the myelinated fiber density on the hNGFbeta treated side was significantly higher than on the control side (p<0.01). The data indicate that locally applied hNGFbeta can accelerate the morphological recovery of the IAN and may play a role in reducing nerve injury in mandibular DO clinically.

  16. The effects of gradients of nerve growth factor immobilized PCLA scaffolds on neurite outgrowth in vitro and peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuo; Zhu, Jixiang; Xu, Yangbin; Xiang, Andy Peng; Jiang, Mei Hua; Quan, Daping

    2013-09-01

    Introducing concentration gradients of nerve growth factor (NGF) into conduits for repairing of peripheral nerve injury is crucial for nerve regeneration and guidance. Herein, combining differential adsorption of NGF/silk fibroin (SF) coating, the gradient of NGF-immobilized membranes (G-Ms) and nanofibrous nerve conduits (G-nNCs) were successfully fabricated. The efficacy of NGF gradients was confirmed by a quantitative comparison of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurite outgrowth on the G-Ms or uniform NGF-immobilized membranes (U-Ms). Significantly, the neurite turning ratio was 0.48 ± 0.11 for G-M group, but it was close to zero for U-M group. The neurite length of DRGs in the middle of the G-Ms was significantly longer than that of U-M group, even though the average NGF concentration was approximated. Furthermore, 12 weeks after implantation in rats with a 14 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, G-nNCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration associated with morphological and functional improvements, which was superior to that of the uniform NGF-immobilized nNCs (U-nNCs). Sciatic function index (SFI), compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), total number of myelinated nerve fibers, thickness of myelin sheath were similar for the G-nNCs and autografts, with the G-nNCs having a higher density of axons than the autografts. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing NGF gradients into scaffolds in promoting nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Angelica injection promotes peripheral nerve structure and function recovery with increased expressions of nerve growth factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Zhang, Junjian; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Qin; Liu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    Several nervous system injury models, such as sciatic crush and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have been well studied in terms of neuroprotective effect of angelica injection. However, definitive experimental studies are lacking on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This study sought to investigate the effects of angelica injection on DPN in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). To examine whether DPN model succeeded, tail-flick latency (TFL) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were measured at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. Then, diabetic rats were treated with high- and low-dose angelica injection for 4 weeks. TFL, MNCV, morphology of sciatic nerve, myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in soleus and sciatic nerve were measured at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. The results showed the TFL was significantly shortened (p<0.001) and the MNCV was reduced (p<0.01) in diabetic rats compared with normal control rats at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. The TFL was obviously prolonged and the MNCV was further reduced in diabetic control group at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. TFL, MNCV and morphology of sciatic nerve were remarkably ameliorated and myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of NGF and BDNF in soleus and sciatic nerve were increased in the angelica treatment groups. This study suggests angelica injection has potential therapeutic effects on DPN, and the mechanism might be related to direct increase in NGF expression and direct or indirect increase in BDNF expression.

  18. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  19. Nerve Growth Factor Promoter Activity Revealed in Mice Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kawaja, Michael D.; Smithson, Laura J.; Elliott, Janet; Trinh, Gina; Crotty, Anne-Marie; Michalski, Bernadeta; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its precursor proNGF are perhaps the best described growth factors of the mammalian nervous system. There remains, however, a paucity of information regarding the precise cellular sites of proNGF/NGF synthesis. Here we report the generation of transgenic mice in which the NGF promoter controls the ectopic synthesis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). These transgenic mice provide an unprecedented resolution of both neural cells (e.g., neocortical and hippocampal neurons) and non-neural cells (e.g., renal interstitial cells and thymic reticular cells) that display NGF promoter activity from postnatal development to adulthood. Moreover, the transgene is inducible by injury. At 2 days after sciatic nerve ligation, a robust population of EGFP-positive cells is seen in the proximal nerve stump. These transgenic mice offer novel insights into the cellular sites of NGF promoter activity and can be used as models for investigating the regulation of proNGF/NGF expression after injury. PMID:21456011

  20. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  1. Primary neuron culture for nerve growth and axon guidance studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheyan; Lee, Han; Henle, Steven J; Cheever, Thomas R; Ekker, Stephen C; Henley, John R

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a widely used model organism in genetics and developmental biology research. Genetic screens have proven useful for studying embryonic development of the nervous system in vivo, but in vitro studies utilizing zebrafish have been limited. Here, we introduce a robust zebrafish primary neuron culture system for functional nerve growth and guidance assays. Distinct classes of central nervous system neurons from the spinal cord, hindbrain, forebrain, and retina from wild type zebrafish, and fluorescent motor neurons from transgenic reporter zebrafish lines, were dissociated and plated onto various biological and synthetic substrates to optimize conditions for axon outgrowth. Time-lapse microscopy revealed dynamically moving growth cones at the tips of extending axons. The mean rate of axon extension in vitro was 21.4±1.2 µm hr(-1) s.e.m. for spinal cord neurons, which corresponds to the typical ∼0.5 mm day(-1) growth rate of nerves in vivo. Fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy demonstrated that bundled microtubules project along axons to the growth cone central domain, with filamentous actin enriched in the growth cone peripheral domain. Importantly, the growth cone surface membrane expresses receptors for chemotropic factors, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Live-cell functional assays of axon extension and directional guidance demonstrated mammalian brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent stimulation of outgrowth and growth cone chemoattraction, whereas mammalian myelin-associated glycoprotein inhibited outgrowth. High-resolution live-cell Ca(2+)-imaging revealed local elevation of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration in the growth cone induced by BDNF application. Moreover, BDNF-induced axon outgrowth, but not basal outgrowth, was blocked by treatments to suppress cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals. Thus, this primary neuron culture model system may be useful for studies of neuronal development, chemotropic axon

  2. Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells Promote Nerve Growth in Long-Term 3-Dimensional Gelfoam®-Supported Histoculture

    PubMed Central

    Mii, Sumiyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Yano, Shuya; Tran, Benjamin; Miwa, Shinji; Hiroshima, Yukihiro; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that hair follicles contain multipotent stem cells which express nestin. The nestin-expressing cells form the hair follicle sensory nerve. In vitro, the nestin-expressing hair follicle cells can differentiate into neurons, Schwann cells, and other cell types. In the present study, the sciatic nerve was excised from transgenic mice in which the nestin promoter drives green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP mice). The ND-GFP cells of the sciatic nerve were also found to be multipotent as the ND-GFP cells in the hair follicle. When the ND-GFP cells in the mouse sciatic nerve cultured on Gelfoam® and were imaged by confocal microscopy, they were observed forming fibers extending the nerve. The fibers consisted of ND-GFP-expressing spindle cells, which co-expressed the neuron marker β-III tubulin, the immature Schwann-cell marker p75NTR and TrkB which is associated with neurons. The fibers also contain nestin-negative spherical cells expressing GFAP, a Schwann-cell marker. The β-III tubulin-positive fibers had growth cones on their tips expressing F-actin, indicating they are growing axons. When the sciatic nerve from mice ubiquitously expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) was co-cultured on Gelfoam® with the sciatic nerve from ND-GFP transgenic mice, the interaction of nerves was observed. Proliferating nestin-expressing cells in the injured sciatic nerve were also observed in vivo. Nestin-expressing cells were also observed in posterior nerves but not in the spinal cord itself, when placed in 3-D Gelfoam® culture. The results of the present report suggest a critical function of nestin-expressing cells in peripheral nerve growth and regeneration. PMID:23840607

  3. Incorporation of Chitosan Microspheres into Collagen-Chitosan Scaffolds for the Controlled Release of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Qi, Fengyu; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2014-01-01

    Background Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support. Methods Microsphere–Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF–CMSs) into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH) with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF–CMSs/CCH). The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF–CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH), CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed. Results The NGF–CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF–CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF–CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH. Conclusion Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF–CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects. PMID:24983464

  4. Expression of nerve growth factor receptor in paraffin-embedded soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Perosio, P. M.; Brooks, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    Identification of growth factors and receptors in mesenchymal tumors may be crucial to understanding of growth regulation in sarcomas. During an immunohistochemical study of the expression of growth factors and receptors in human soft tissue tumors (STT), only 1 antisera capable of working in paraffin-embedded tissue was noted. A detailed study of 141 STT was undertaken to determine the frequency of expression of nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R), its specificity and sensitivity for neural tumors, and the effect of fixation on detection. In normal mesenchymal tissue, only nerve sheath and perivascular staining was seen. No immunoreactivity was seen in many tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma, angiosarcoma, liposarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and alveolar soft part sarcoma. Less than 15% of tumors of smooth muscle, fibrous, or fibrohistiocytic origin showed immunoreactivity, usually focal. In contrast, a high frequency of immunoreactivity was noted in tumors of neural origin (74%). This included granular cell tumors (100%), Schwannoma/neurofibroma (91%), malignant Schwannoma (78%), neuroblastoma/neuroepithelioma (60%), and paraganglioma (57%). A high rate of reactivity was also seen in synovial sarcomas (80%), undifferentiated sarcomas (60%), and hemangiopericytomas (43%), suggesting a potential relationship to the neural phenotype. Among the neural tumors, Bouin's fixation was superior to formalin, suggesting that immunoreactivity for NGF-R is affected by fixation. This antibody may be a useful adjunct marker diagnostically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2456020

  5. Corneal sulfated glycosaminoglycans and their effects on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior in vitro: roles for ECM in cornea innervation.

    PubMed

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W

    2012-12-13

    Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM-GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C-rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea.

  6. Corneal Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Their Effects on Trigeminal Nerve Growth Cone Behavior In Vitro: Roles for ECM in Cornea Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J.; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM–GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Methods. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. Results. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C–rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Conclusions. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea. PMID:23132805

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes anatomical and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves in the avascular cornea

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zan; Fukuoka, Shima; Karagianni, Natalia; Guaiquil, Victor H.; Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a major neurological disorder that can cause severe motor and sensory dysfunction. Neurogenic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been found in the central nervous system, and we examined whether VEGF could promote anatomical and functional recovery of peripheral nerves after injury using an avascular corneal nerve injury model. We found that VEGF enhanced neurite elongation in isolated trigeminal ganglion neurons in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was suppressed by neutralizing antibodies for VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 1 and 2 or neuropilin receptor 1 or by VEGFR2 inhibitors (SU 1498 and Ki 8751). In vivo, mice receiving sustained VEGF via implanted pellets showed increased corneal nerve regeneration after superficial injury compared with those receiving vehicle. VEGF injected subconjunctivally at the time of injury accelerated reinnervation, the recovery of mechanosensation, and epithelial wound healing. Endogenous VEGF expression was up-regulated in the corneal epithelium and stroma after wounding. Thus, VEGF can mediate peripheral neuron growth but requires the activation of multiple VEGF receptor types. In addition, VEGF can accelerate the return of sensory and trophic functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Wounding induces the expression of VEFG, which may modulate physiological nerve repair.—Pan, Z., Fukuoka, S., Karagianni, N., Guaiquil, V. H., Rosenblatt, M. I. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes anatomical and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves in the avascular cornea. PMID:23568776

  8. Increased severity of inflammation correlates with elevated expression of TRPV1 nerve fibers and nerve growth factor on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-long; Yang, Fei; Zhan, Hai-lun; Feng, Zhi-ying; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Li, Wen-biao; Zhou, Xiang-fu

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence supports a role for inflammation in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), the mechanism remains unknown. We determined whether inflammation causes an elevated expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) and correlated them with the symptoms. Bladder biopsies were obtained from 53 IC/BPS patients and 27 controls, and hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunostaining and Western blotting were performed to detect inflammation, TRPV1-immunoreactive and PGP9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers, and NGF, respectively. Symptoms were assessed using the Pelvic Pain/Urgency/Frequency (PUF) questionnaire and pain visual analogue scale scores. Suburothelial nerve fiber density was quantified and correlated with PUF scores. Increased severity of inflammation was correlated with a higher TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fiber density (r = 0.4113, p = 0.0024) and higher NGF levels (r = 0.3775, p = 0.0052). Suburothelial TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fiber density was significantly correlated with pain scores and urgency scores (r = 0.3320, p = 0.0145 and r = 0.3823, p = 0.0039, respectively). PGP9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers were significantly increased in IC/BPS (p = 0.0193) and had a positive relationship with inflammation severity (r = 0.6138, p < 0.0001). Our study revealed increased severity of inflammation correlated with a higher expression of TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibers and NGF in IC/BPS and correlated with clinical symptoms. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Single injection of a novel nerve growth factor coacervate improves structural and functional regeneration after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Wu, Jiang; Lin, Zhenkun; Nangle, Matthew R; Li, Yi; Cai, Pingtao; Liu, Dan; Ye, Libin; Xiao, Zecong; He, Chaochao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhao, Yingzheng; Wang, Jian; Li, Xiaokun; He, Yan; Ye, Qingsong; Xiao, Jian

    2017-02-01

    The prototypical neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF), plays an important role in the development and maintenance of many neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, and can promote functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury in adulthood. However, repair of peripheral nerve defects is hampered by the short half-life of NGF in vivo, and treatment with either NGF alone or NGF contained in synthetic nerve conduits is inferior to the use of nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the reparative ability of a single local injection of a polyvalent coacervate containing polycation-poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride; PEAD), heparin, and NGF, in adult rats following sciatic nerve crush injury, using molecular, histological and behavioral approaches. In vitro assays demonstrated that NGF was loaded into the coacervate at nearly 100% efficiency, and was protected from proteolytic degradation. In vivo, the coacervate enhanced NGF bioavailability, leading to a notable improvement in motor function (track walking analysis) after 30days. The NGF coacervate treatment was also associated with better weight gain and reduction in atrophy of the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, light and electron microscopy showed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in NGF coacervate-treated rats compared with control groups. Expression of markers of neural tissue regeneration (MAP-2, S-100β, MBP and GAP-43), as well as proliferating Schwann cells and myelin-axon relationships (GFAP and NF200), were also increased. These observations suggest that even a single administration of NGF coacervate could have therapeutic value for peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

  10. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75(NTR), TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75(NTR) enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75(NTR) contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  11. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A.; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration. PMID:28067793

  12. Nerve growth factor promotes killing of Leishmania donovani by macrophages through the induction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Rieko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Katakura, Ken; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is protozoonosis that occurs worldwide and still requires effective therapies with less toxicity. In this study, we examined the antileishmanial effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) using a murine infection model. NGF blocked the infection of macrophages by Leishmania donovani, which was completely cancelled by a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor. In vivo, not only did NGF show antileishmanial effects, but combination therapy of NGF and sodium stibogluconate synergistically exhibited the activity more potently than each monotherapy. These results indicate that NGF exerts antileishmanial effect by stimulating hydrogen peroxide production in macrophages and can be a novel therapy for leishmaniasis.

  13. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and NGF mRNA change in rat uterus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Varol, F G; Duchemin, A M; Neff, N H; Hadjiconstantinou, M

    2000-11-10

    During pregnancy, the uterus undergoes a profound sympathetic denervation. To explore whether this is associated with changes in neurotrophic factors, we assayed nerve growth factor (NGF) and NGF mRNA in the uterus of non-pregnant and pregnant rats. In the uterine horn, the concentration of NGF and its mRNA decreased during middle and late pregnancy. However, when values were corrected for the increase of uterine weight and total RNA yield during pregnancy, NGF content and mRNA per horn increased during middle and late pregnancy. Similar, but less pronounced, changes were observed in the cervix. By seven days postpartum, both parameters returned to near normal.

  14. Response of the regenerating telencephalon of Lacerta viridis to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Del Grande, P; Minelli, G

    1980-01-01

    To identify the nature of the dividing cells during the regenerative process of the telencephalon, the authors administered nerve growth factor (NGF) to Lacerta viridis with a wedge of telencephalon removed. Some known centers of cell proliferation were unresponsive to the treatment, whereas the ventral end of the telencephalic ventricle underwent an increase of up to 200% in proliferation rate. On the basis of this observation and data in the literature, the authors propose that the cell proliferation beginning in the medial area during the regeneration of the telencephalic ventricle is due to catecholaminergic neuroblasts still present in the adult.

  15. Altered levels of nerve growth factor in the thymus of subjects with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Stampachiacchiere, Barbara; Marinova, Tsvetana; Velikova, Kamelia; Philipov, Stanislav; Stankulov, Ivan S; Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF), a polypeptide known for its neurotrophic activities, is also involved in the differentiation and survival of immune cells, and that NGF and its high-affinity receptor are present in the thymus. We here demonstrate that the thymus of humans affected by myasthenia gravis (MG) contains significant concentrations of NGF. These observations support our hypothesis of a role for NGF in the thymus and suggest that the changes observed in the thymus of subject with MG may have functional significance.

  16. Measuring nerve growth factor in saliva by immunoassay: A cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Matin, Marla J; Li, Daming; Peterson, Jon; Taylor, Marcus K; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Lucas, Todd; Granger, Steve J; Granger, Douglas A; Granger, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophin, modulates a diverse set of physiologic processes in the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Studies suggest that NGF can be measured in saliva (sNGF). Historically, the method for measuring sNGF involves the off-label use of an enzyme immunoassay designed for use with cell-culture supernatants/tissue extracts (Nam et al., 2007; Ruhl et al., 2004). In a series of experiments we reveal this measurement strategy is subject to non-specific interference by constituents present in oral fluids. We conclude that the measurement of sNGF by this assay is not optimal for use with oral fluid specimens.

  17. Nerve growth factor induces the expression of chaperone protein calreticulin in human epithelial ovarian cells.

    PubMed

    Vera, C; Tapia, V; Kohan, K; Gabler, F; Ferreira, A; Selman, A; Vega, M; Romero, C

    2012-07-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is highly angiogenic and high expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), a proangiogenic protein. Calreticulin is a multifunctional protein with anti-angiogenic properties and its translocation to the tumor cell membrane promotes recognition and engulfment by dendritic cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate calreticulin expression in human normal ovaries, benign and borderline tumors, and epithelial ovarian cancer samples and to evaluate whether NGF regulates calreticulin expression in human ovarian surface epithelium and in epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. Calreticulin mRNA and protein levels were analyzed using RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in 67 human ovarian samples obtained from our Institution. Calreticulin expression induced by NGF stimulation in cell lines was evaluated using RT-PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. We found a significant increase of calreticulin mRNA levels in epithelial ovarian cancer samples as compared to normal ovaries, benign tumors, and borderline tumors. Calreticulin protein levels, evaluated by Western blot, were also increased in epithelial ovarian cancer with respect to benign and borderline tumors. When HOSE and A2780 cell lines were stimulated with Nerve Growth Factor, we found an increase in calreticulin protein levels compared to controls. This effect was reverted by GW441756, a TRKA specific inhibitor. These results suggest that NGF regulates calreticulin protein levels in epithelial ovarian cells through TRKA receptor activation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The Role of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Its Precursor Forms in Oral Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Karl; Schreurs, Olav; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Helgeland, Kristen

    2017-02-11

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its different precursor forms are secreted into human saliva by salivary glands and are also produced by an array of cells in the tissues of the oral cavity. The major forms of NGF in human saliva are forms of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF) and not mature NGF. The NGF receptors tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) are widely expressed on cells in the soft tissues of the human oral cavity, including keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and leukocytes, and in ductal and acinar cells of all types of salivary glands. In vitro models show that NGF can contribute at most stages in the oral wound healing process: restitution, cell survival, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. NGF may therefore take part in the effective wound healing in the oral cavity that occurs with little scarring. As pro-NGF forms appear to be the major form of NGF in human saliva, efforts should be made to study its function, specifically in the process of wound healing. In addition, animal and clinical studies should be initiated to examine if topical application of pro-NGF or NGF can be a therapy for chronic oral ulcerations and wounds.

  19. Nerve growth factor-immobilized polypyrrole: Bioactive electrically conducting polymer for enhanced neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Natalia; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials that present multiple stimuli are attractive for a number of biomedical applications. In particular, electrical and biological cues are important factors to include in interfaces with neurons for applications such as nerve conduits and neural probes. Here, we report the combination of these two stimuli, by immobilizing nerve growth factor (NGF) on the surface of the electrically conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy). NGF was immobilized using an intermediate linker provided by a layer of polyallylamine conjugated to an arylazido functional group. Upon exposure to UV light and activation of the azido groups, NGF was fixed to the substrate. Three different surface concentrations were obtained (0.21–0.98 ng/mm2) and similar levels of neurite extension were observed on immobilized NGF as with soluble NGF. Additionally, electrical stimulation experiments were conducted with the modified polymer and revealed a 50% increase in neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells compared to experiments without electrical stimulation. This novel modification of PPy provides both electrical and biological stimulation, by presenting tethered growth factors and only producing a small decrease in the material's properties (conductivity ~10 S cm−1) when compared to other modification techniques (conductivity ~10−3–10−6 S cm−1. PMID:17111407

  20. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Postnatal expression of nerve growth factor receptors in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Djakiew, D; Pflug, B; Dionne, C; Onoda, M

    1994-08-01

    Because nerve growth factor beta (NGF beta) and its corresponding receptors have been implicated in the paracrine regulation of spermatogenesis, we examined the postnatal developmental expression of the low- and high-affinity NGF receptors in the rat testis, and localized their expression to specific testicular cell types. The neurotropin receptors consist of a low-affinity p75 nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR) and a family of high-affinity tyrosine receptor kinases (trk). Both the p75 LNGFR gene product and the trk receptor gene product were detected in immature rat testes, with maximal expression in 10- and 20-day-old rats. Expression of the testicular p75 LNGFR and the trk receptor progressively declined in older animals so that they were barely detectable in 90-day-old adult rats. The 75-kDa LNGFR was detected in membrane fractions of Sertoli cells, whereas the p75 LNGFR was not detected by Western blot in membrane fractions of round spermatids and primary spermatocytes. Interestingly, microsomal fractions of peritubular myoid cells were immunoreactive for a 65-kDa band on Western blots with the p75 LNGFR monoclonal antibody. Immunoblot analysis of the trk receptor in cell lysates of isolated cell types was inconclusive. Excess NGF beta and round spermatid protein, which is known to contain a NGF-like protein, were both capable of displacing the binding of 125I-NGF beta from the surface of Sertoli cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The Role of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Its Precursor Forms in Oral Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Karl; Schreurs, Olav; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Helgeland, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its different precursor forms are secreted into human saliva by salivary glands and are also produced by an array of cells in the tissues of the oral cavity. The major forms of NGF in human saliva are forms of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF) and not mature NGF. The NGF receptors tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) are widely expressed on cells in the soft tissues of the human oral cavity, including keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and leukocytes, and in ductal and acinar cells of all types of salivary glands. In vitro models show that NGF can contribute at most stages in the oral wound healing process: restitution, cell survival, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. NGF may therefore take part in the effective wound healing in the oral cavity that occurs with little scarring. As pro-NGF forms appear to be the major form of NGF in human saliva, efforts should be made to study its function, specifically in the process of wound healing. In addition, animal and clinical studies should be initiated to examine if topical application of pro-NGF or NGF can be a therapy for chronic oral ulcerations and wounds. PMID:28208669

  3. Recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bo-Sheng; Lou, Ji-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is required for the differentiation and maintenance of sympathetic and sensory neurons. In the present study, the recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta (hNGF-β) gene in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) was undertaken. Recombinant vector containing hNGF-β was constructed and transferred into rMSCs, the expressions of the exogenous in rMSCs were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), ELISA and Western blot, whereas the biological activity of recombinant hNGF-β was confirmed using PC12 cells and cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons from chicken embryos. The results showed that the hNGF-β gene expressed successfully in the rMSCs, a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa was detected. The maximal expression level of recombinant hNGF-β in rMSCs reached 126.8012 pg/10(6) cells, the mean concentration was 96.4473 pg/10(6) cells. The recombinant hNGF-β in the rMSCs showed full biological activity when compared to commercial recombinant hNGF-β.

  4. Specific binding of nerve growth factor (NGF) by murine C 1300 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R; Bertolini, L; Pediconi, M; Vigneti, E

    1974-08-01

    Murine C 1300 neuroblastoma cells bind with high avidity on their membrane surface the nerve growth factor (NGF), a protein capable of inducing differentiation of sympathetic nerve cells. The total binding capacity of NGF by the cells was quantitatively measured by a radioimmunoassay technique, using (125)I-labeled NGF. An average number of about 10(6) molecules of NGF could be bound, at saturation, by each cell with an average relative association constant of about 10(7) liters/mol. Using synchronized cells, it was found, however, that either the number of molecules of ligand bound or the avidity of the binding interaction between NGF and cells varied depending upon their growth cycle, the maximal-binding occurring during the G(1) and early S phase. Binding of [(125)I]NGF was suppressed by trypsin treatment of the cells, however new receptor sites were rapidly replaced onto the membrane surface within 1-2 h. Cells exposed to 3 M KCl released into the supernate a protein product exhibiting similar high avidity for NGF. Acrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested a restricted molecular heterogeneity of this product, with a major component in the 52,000 mol wt region. Antibodies made specific to this protein were capable, in the absence of the complement, of inhibiting the binding of [(125)I]NGF by the cells and in the presence of the complement they killed them.

  5. Selective decrease in axonal nerve growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I immunoreactivity in axonopathies of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Fressinaud, Catherine; Jean, Isabelle; Dubas, Frédéric

    2003-05-01

    In an attempt to approach the mechanisms underlying axonopathies of unknown etiology, we have studied by immunocytochemistry the fate of several growth factors in eight of such cases that we had previously analyzed by morphometry and which were characterized by a decrease in neurofilaments and an increase in beta tubulin immunostaining. Here we establish that, contrary to beta tubulin, growth-associated protein43 (GAP-43) immunolabeling is not up-regulated in theses cases, correlating well with the failure of regeneration. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its receptor TrkC were not modified compared to controls (five cases). On the contrary, we observed in all cases a pronounced decrease in the number of fibers labeled for nerve growth factor (NGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), which were both approximately half of control values. This decrease could not be ascribed to the reduction in fiber density since it was also present in cases without fiber loss (isolated large fiber atrophy). The fact that only around 50% of fibers were stained, versus all fibers in controls, probably accounted for this decrease. It contrasted also with the normality of NGF and IGF-I immunolabeling in six cases of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy that were investigated in parallel. These results differ from those reported in experimental diabetic neuropathy, during which NT-3 is also decreased. A deficient supply of specific growth factors delivered by neuronal targets may be responsible for these neuropathies and their associated axonal cytoskeleton abnormalities.

  6. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  7. A phase 1 clinical trial of nerve growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Thal, Leon; Pay, Mary; Salmon, David P; U, Hoi Sang; Bakay, Roy; Patel, Piyush; Blesch, Armin; Vahlsing, H Lee; Ho, Gilbert; Tong, Gang; Potkin, Steven G; Fallon, James; Hansen, Lawrence; Mufson, Elliott J; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gall, Christine; Conner, James

    2005-05-01

    Cholinergic neuron loss is a cardinal feature of Alzheimer disease. Nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates cholinergic function, improves memory and prevents cholinergic degeneration in animal models of injury, amyloid overexpression and aging. We performed a phase 1 trial of ex vivo NGF gene delivery in eight individuals with mild Alzheimer disease, implanting autologous fibroblasts genetically modified to express human NGF into the forebrain. After mean follow-up of 22 months in six subjects, no long-term adverse effects of NGF occurred. Evaluation of the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subcomponent suggested improvement in the rate of cognitive decline. Serial PET scans showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in cortical 18-fluorodeoxyglucose after treatment. Brain autopsy from one subject suggested robust growth responses to NGF. Additional clinical trials of NGF for Alzheimer disease are warranted.

  8. Rita Levi-Montalcini and the discovery of NGF, the first nerve cell growth factor.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi

    2011-06-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) is a signaling protein, discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the early 1950's for its effect on growth and differentiation of specific populations of neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Originally identified as neurite outgrowth-stimulating factor, later studies revealed that the purified molecule has a number of target cells in the central nervous system and on nonneuronal cells. Moreover, recent studies showed the potential therapeutic properties of NGF in neuropathies of the central and peripheral nervous system and diseases of the eye and skin. Here I briefly describe the discovery of NGF, the early studies of Rita LeviMontalcini, a pioneer in modern neuroscience, and my scientific and human experience working in her laboratory for over 40 years.

  9. Identification of a Peripheral Nerve Neurite Growth-Promoting Activity by Development and Use of an in vitro Bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Alfred W.; Matthew, William D.

    1987-10-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay.

  10. Expression and significance of nerve growth factor receptor p75 in rats' cathartic colonic wall.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi Hong; Lu, Bin; Wang, Mei; Ni, Gui Bao; Chen, Ming Tao; Xu, Yi

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of nerve growth factor receptor p75 in a normal and cathartic colon and its significance in the formation of the cathartic colon in rats. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into normal control group, rhubarb group and phenolphthalein group. A model of the cathartic colon was constructed by gastric infusion with rhubarb or phenolphthalein in rats. The first dose of rhubarb and phenolphthalein was both 200 mg/kg/d and was increased by 200 mg/kg/d with each passing day. The last dose of rhubarb and phenolphthalein was 3200 mg/kg/d and 4200 mg/kg/d, respectively. The transit function of colon was measured by the Chinese ink expulsion test; the p75 in colon wall was determined by the immunohistochemical method. The transit speed was much slower in the cathartic colon group than that in the control group. The imprinted Chinese ink length and the ratio of imprinted length/total colon length in the rhubarb-induced cathartic colon was significantly shorter than that of the control group (77.38 +/- 8.42 vs 94.25 +/- 7.07 cm, P < 0.01). Those in the phenolphthalein-induced group (83.38 +/- 9.75 cm) were also significantly shorter than those of the control group but to a lesser degree (P < 0.05). p75 was abundantly expressed in the submucosal nerve plexus and weakly expressed in the myenteric plexus. The expression of p75 was much higher in the rhubarb-induced group. The expression was strongly positive in the submucosal nerve plexus, significantly higher than that in the controls (P < 0.01). In the myenteric plexus, p75 was also highly expressed (P < 0.05). In the case of the phenolphthalein-induced group, the expression of p75 was positive in the submucosal nerve plexus but was positive in the myenteric plexus of three rats only. The remaining rats were negative or weakly positive. This was not significantly different from that of the control group. The abnormal expression of p75 in cathartic colon probably has some effect on the

  11. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-10-25

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents.

  12. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-01-01

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents. Images PMID:7937971

  13. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Martin A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-04-25

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer's disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain.

  14. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Martin A.; Cuello, A. Claudio

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer’s disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain. PMID:16618925

  15. PC12 cell mutants that possess low- but not high-affinity nerve growth factor receptors neither respond to nor internalize nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Four mutant PC12 pheochromocytoma cell lines that are nerve growth factor (NGF)-nonresponsive (PC12nnr) have been selected from chemically mutagenized cultures by a double selection procedure: failure both to grow neurites in the presence of NGF and to survive in NGF-supplemented serum-free medium. The PC12nnr cells were deficient in all additional NGF responses surveyed: abatement of cell proliferation, changes in glycoprotein composition, induction of ornithine decarboxylase, rapid changes in protein phosphorylation, and cell surface ruffling. However, PC12nnr cells closely resembled non-NGF-treated PC12 cells in most properties tested: cell size and shape; division rate; protein, phosphoprotein, and glycoprotein composition; and cell surface morphology. All four PC12nnr lines differed from PC12 cells in three ways in addition to failure of NGF response: PC12nnr cells failed to internalize bound NGF by the normal, saturable, high-affinity mechanism present in PC12 cells. The PC12nnr cells bound NGF but entirely, or nearly entirely, at low-affinity sites only, whereas PC12 cells possess both high- and low-affinity NGF binding sites. The responses to dibutyryl cyclic AMP that were tested appeared to be enhanced or altered in the PC12nnr cells compared to PC12 cells. Internalization of, and responses to, epidermal growth factor were normal in the PC12nnr cells ruling out a generalized defect in hormonal binding, uptake, or response mechanisms. These findings are consistent with a causal association between the presence of high-affinity NGF receptors and of NGF responsiveness and internalization. A possible relationship is also suggested between regulation of cAMP responses and regulation of NGF responses or NGF receptor affinity. PMID:3005338

  16. Nerve growth factor injected systemically improves the recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhao-jie; Wang, Lei; Lei, De-lin; Liu, Bao-lin; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Qin

    2011-10-01

    Our aim was to find out if nerve growth factor (NGF) injected systemically could improve the recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis. We used 48 New Zealand white rabbits that were treated with bilateral distraction osteogenesis at a rate of 0.5mm/12h for 10 days. Immediately postoperatively, NGF or sodium chloride 0.6 μg/day was injected intramuscularly for 20 days. At the end of distraction and after consolidation times of 1, 2, and 4 weeks, the inferior alveolar nerves were evaluated histologically and histomorphometrically. Histologically, at 2 and 4 weeks there was less myelin debris, and more regenerating axons were present, in the NGF than the control groups. The density of myelinated axons was significantly greater in groups with NGF than controls at 2 and 4 weeks (p<0.05). NGF given systemically can accelerate the recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve in rabbits after mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and is a promising treatment option for neurological complications of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes anatomical and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves in the avascular cornea.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zan; Fukuoka, Shima; Karagianni, Natalia; Guaiquil, Victor H; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a major neurological disorder that can cause severe motor and sensory dysfunction. Neurogenic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been found in the central nervous system, and we examined whether VEGF could promote anatomical and functional recovery of peripheral nerves after injury using an avascular corneal nerve injury model. We found that VEGF enhanced neurite elongation in isolated trigeminal ganglion neurons in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was suppressed by neutralizing antibodies for VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 1 and 2 or neuropilin receptor 1 or by VEGFR2 inhibitors (SU 1498 and Ki 8751). In vivo, mice receiving sustained VEGF via implanted pellets showed increased corneal nerve regeneration after superficial injury compared with those receiving vehicle. VEGF injected subconjunctivally at the time of injury accelerated reinnervation, the recovery of mechanosensation, and epithelial wound healing. Endogenous VEGF expression was up-regulated in the corneal epithelium and stroma after wounding. Thus, VEGF can mediate peripheral neuron growth but requires the activation of multiple VEGF receptor types. In addition, VEGF can accelerate the return of sensory and trophic functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Wounding induces the expression of VEFG, which may modulate physiological nerve repair.

  18. Schwann cell-neuronal interactions in the rat involve nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Urschel, B A; Hulsebosch, C E

    1990-06-01

    To gain some insight into possible functions of nerve growth factor (NGF), we suppressed the endogenous levels of NGF in newborn rats by subcutaneous injections (3 microliters/g body weight) of rabbit antibodies to purified mouse beta-NGF (ANTI-NGF). Fiber and axonal areas and perimeters were measured for unmyelinated and myelinated sensory fibers in T9 dorsal roots (DR) in three groups of animals: 1) ANTI-NGF treated littermates, 2) preimmune sera treated littermates (PREIMM), and 3) untreated littermates (UNTR). In some rats, fibers in ventral roots (VR) were measured and, in other rats, sensory processes in peripheral nerves (PN) were measured following radical ventral rhizotomy. The only outer area and perimeter measurements that were statistically different were those in the ventral root (P less than 0.013 and P less than 0.043, respectively). However, myelin thickness was significantly thinner in the dorsal roots of the ANTI-NGF group than in the dorsal roots of the UNTR and PREIMM groups (P less than 0.000009 and P less than 10(-6), respectively). Myelin thickness in the ventral roots of the ANTI-NGF group was also statistically thinner than that in the UNTR group (P less than 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences when comparing the UNTR group to the PREIMM group. In the peripheral nerves studied, there was no significant change in the myelin thickness between the ANTI-NGF and UNTR groups of animals. These results indicate that Schwann cell-neuronal interactions are altered by the inactivation of NGF, and that 1) the central processes of sensory fibers are affected and not the peripheral processes and 2) motor fiber myelination is altered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Effect of embryonic anlage allografts of the rat spinal cord on growth of regenerating fibers of the recipient nerve].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E S; Isaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of the effect of tissue and suspension allografts of an embryonic spinal cord on regeneration of nerve fibers of impaired (by application of a ligature) sciatic nerve in rats was conducted. It was demonstrated that unlike tissue grafts that reach a large volume 21 and 60 days after transplantation, suspension grafts do not inhibit the growth of axons of the recipient to the periphery. It was established that introduction of a suspension of dissociated cells of the spinal cord embryonic anlages (but not fragments of these anlages) into the impaired sciatic nerve in rats results in an increase in the amount of myelinated regenerating nerve fibers of the recipient 60 days after the operation.

  20. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. S.; Hill, C. C.; Calero, G. A.; Myers, C. R.; Lee, K. H.; Sethna, J. P.; Cerione, R. A.

    2004-10-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  1. Balanced levels of nerve growth factor are required for normal pregnancy progression.

    PubMed

    Frank, Pierre; Barrientos, Gabriela; Tirado-González, Irene; Cohen, Marie; Moschansky, Petra; Peters, Eva M; Klapp, Burghard F; Rose, Matthias; Tometten, Mareike; Blois, Sandra M

    2014-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), the first identified member of the family of neurotrophins, is thought to play a critical role in the initiation of the decidual response in stress-challenged pregnant mice. However, the contribution of this pathway to physiological events during the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy remains largely elusive. Using NGF depletion and supplementation strategies alternatively, in this study, we demonstrated that a successful pregnancy is sensitive to disturbances in NGF levels in mice. Treatment with NGF further boosted fetal loss rates in the high-abortion rate CBA/J x DBA/2J mouse model by amplifying a local inflammatory response through recruitment of NGF-expressing immune cells, increased decidual innervation with substance P(+) nerve fibres and a Th1 cytokine shift. Similarly, treatment with a NGF-neutralising antibody in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice, a normal-pregnancy model, also induced abortions associated with increased infiltration of tropomyosin kinase receptor A-expressing NK cells to the decidua. Importantly, in neither of the models, pregnancy loss was associated with defective ovarian function, angiogenesis or placental development. We further demonstrated that spontaneous abortion in humans is associated with up-regulated synthesis and an aberrant distribution of NGF in placental tissue. Thus, a local threshold of NGF expression seems to be necessary to ensure maternal tolerance in healthy pregnancies, but when surpassed may result in fetal rejection due to exacerbated inflammation.

  2. Nerve growth factor-immobilized electrically conducting fibrous scaffolds for potential use in neural engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Y; Bashur, Chris A; Milroy, Craig A; Forciniti, Leandro; Goldstein, Aaron S; Schmidt, Christine E

    2012-03-01

    Engineered scaffolds simultaneously exhibiting multiple cues are highly desirable for neural tissue regeneration. To this end, we developed a neural tissue engineering scaffold that displays submicrometer-scale features, electrical conductivity, and neurotrophic activity. Specifically, electrospun poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers were layered with a nanometer thick coating of electrically conducting polypyrrole (PPy) presenting carboxylic groups. Then, nerve growth factor (NGF) was chemically immobilized onto the surface of the fibers. These NGF-immobilized PPy-coated PLGA (NGF-PPyPLGA) fibers supported PC12 neurite formation ( 28.0±3.0% of the cells) and neurite outgrowth (14.2 μm median length), which were comparable to that observed with NGF (50 ng/mL) in culture medium ( 29.0±1.3%, 14.4 μm). Electrical stimulation of PC12 cells on NGF-immobilized PPyPLGA fiber scaffolds was found to further improve neurite development and neurite length by 18% and 17%, respectively, compared to unstimulated cells on the NGF-immobilized fibers. Hence, submicrometer-scale fibrous scaffolds that incorporate neurotrophic and electroconducting activities may serve as promising neural tissue engineering scaffolds such as nerve guidance conduits.

  3. Nerve Growth Factor-Immobilized Electrically Conducting Fibrous Scaffolds for Potential Use in Neural Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Y.; Bashur, Chris A.; Milroy, Craig A.; Forciniti, Leandro; Goldstein, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered scaffolds simultaneously exhibiting multiple cues are highly desirable for neural tissue regeneration. To this end, we developed a neural tissue engineering scaffold that displays submicrometer-scale features, electrical conductivity, and neurotrophic activity. Specifically, electrospun poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers were layered with a nanometer thick coating of electrically conducting polypyrrole (PPy) presenting carboxylic groups. Then, nerve growth factor (NGF) was chemically immobilized onto the surface of the fibers. These NGF-immobilized PPy-coated PLGA (NGF-PPyPLGA) fibers supported PC12 neurite formation (28.0±3.0% of the cells) and neurite outgrowth (14.2 µm median length), which were comparable to that observed with NGF (50 ng/mL) in culture medium (29.0±1.3%, 14.4 µm). Electrical stimulation of PC12 cells on NGF-immobilized PPyPLGA fiber scaffolds was found to further improve neurite development and neurite length by 18% and 17%, respectively, compared to unstimulated cells on the NGF-immobilized fibers. Hence, submicrometer-scale fibrous scaffolds that incorporate neurotrophic and electroconducting activities may serve as promising neural tissue engineering scaffolds such as nerve guidance conduits. PMID:21712166

  4. Pincher, a pinocytic chaperone for nerve growth factor/TrkA signaling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yufang; Akmentin, Wendy; Toledo-Aral, Juan Jose; Rosenbaum, Julie; Valdez, Gregorio; Cabot, John B.; Hilbush, Brian S.; Halegoua, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Acentral tenet of nerve growth factor (NGF) action that is poorly understood is its ability to mediate cytoplasmic signaling, through its receptor TrkA, that is initiated at the nerve terminal and conveyed to the soma. We identified an NGF-induced protein that we termed Pincher (pinocytic chaperone) that mediates endocytosis and trafficking of NGF and its receptor TrkA. In PC12 cells, overexpression of Pincher dramatically stimulated NGF-induced endocytosis of TrkA, unexpectedly at sites of clathrin-independent macropinocytosis within cell surface ruffles. Subsequently, a system of Pincher-containing tubules mediated the delivery of NGF/TrkA-containing vesicles to cytoplasmic accumulations. These vesicles selectively and persistently mediated TrkA-erk5 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. A dominant inhibitory mutant form of Pincher inhibited the NGF-induced endocytosis of TrkA, and selectively blocked TrkA-mediated cytoplasmic signaling of erk5, but not erk1/2, kinases. Our results indicate that Pincher mediates pinocytic endocytosis of functionally specialized NGF/TrkA endosomes with persistent signaling potential. PMID:12011113

  5. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Chen, Pei-Ling; Lu, Dongsi; Lind, Anne C; Dehner, Louis P

    2014-02-01

    The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve

  7. Angiogenic Effects of Dimeric Dipeptide Mimetic of Loop 4 of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskii, S A; Antipova, T A; Tsorin, I B; Pekeldina, E S; Stolyaruk, V N; Nikolaev, S V; Sorokina, A V; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenic action of compound GK-2, a dimeric dipeptide mimetic of loop 4 of nerve growth factor (NGF), was studied in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Experiments on human endothelial cell culture HUVEC showed that compound GK-2 significantly (p<0.05) stimulated the initial stage of angiogenesis, and its angiogenic activity was not inferior to the reference neurotrophin NGF. In experiments with hindlimb ischemia modeled in rats, GK-2 (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 14 days) significantly increased the total length of capillary vessels (p<0.003) and the number of vessels per 1 mm2 ischemic tissue (p<0.001) in comparison with the control. Our findings indicate that under experimental conditions compound GK-2 exhibits not only angiogenic, but also anti-ischemic activity.

  8. Antagonism of nerve growth factor-TrkA signaling and the relief of pain.

    PubMed

    Mantyh, Patrick W; Koltzenburg, Martin; Mendell, Lorne M; Tive, Leslie; Shelton, David L

    2011-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally discovered as a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons during development. However, in the adult NGF has been found to play an important role in nociceptor sensitization after tissue injury. The authors outline mechanisms by which NGF activation of its cognate receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor, regulates a host of ion channels, receptors, and signaling molecules to enhance acute and chronic pain. The authors also document that peripherally restricted antagonism of NGF-tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor signaling is effective for controlling human pain while appearing to maintain normal nociceptor function. Understanding whether there are any unexpected adverse events and how humans may change their behavior and use of the injured/degenerating tissue after significant pain relief without sedation will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from these therapies targeting NGF.

  9. Tiam1 as a signaling mediator of nerve growth factor-dependent neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; Kele, Julianna; Vilar, Marçal; Paratcha, Gustavo; Ledda, Fernanda

    2010-03-19

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation requires the activation of members of the Rho family of small GTPases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which NGF regulates cytoskeletal changes and neurite outgrowth are not totally understood. In this work, we identify the Rac1-specific guanine exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 as a novel mediator of NGF/TrkA-dependent neurite elongation. In particular, we report that knockdown of Tiam1 causes a significant reduction in Rac1 activity and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. Physical interaction between Tiam1 and active Ras (Ras-GTP), but not tyrosine phosphorylation of Tiam1, plays a central role in Rac1 activation by NGF. In addition, our findings indicate that Ras is required to associate Tiam1 with Rac1 and promote Rac1 activation upon NGF stimulation. Taken together, these findings define a novel molecular mechanism through which Tiam1 mediates TrkA signaling and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF.

  10. 'Mature' nerve growth factor is a minor species in most peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Michael A; Jones, Elizabeth E; Crutcher, Keith A; Isaacson, Lori G

    The classic neurotrophin hypothesis is based on the idea that innervating neurons derive 'mature' neurotrophin provided by the target for their survival. Yet large precursor forms of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) have been reported in both central and peripheral tissues. In the present study, immunoblotting was used to survey peripheral tissues containing NGF-responsive neurons and to characterize various NGF species. These results demonstrate that 'mature' forms of NGF, i.e., the 13 and 16kDa species, are rare in sympathetic and sensory ganglia and in their peripheral targets, and that large molecular weight NGF precursors are abundant. In addition, certain NGF forms predominate in a given tissue, with each tissue exhibiting a characteristic NGF expression pattern. These findings suggest that NGF processing in peripheral tissues and in NGF-responsive ganglia may involve a variety of NGF species.

  11. Analytical modelling of retrograde transport of nerve growth factors in an axon: a transient problem.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to develop an analytical solution describing retrograde transport of nerve growth factors (NGFs) from a target tissue to the neuron soma. The obtained solution is applied to describe two situations: (1) when all dynein motors are moving at a constant velocity and (2) when the dynein velocity distribution is described by a probability density function. The dynamics of NGF concentrations and fluxes is investigated. It is established that the magnitude of the diffusion flux forms a wave localised in space and propagating towards the neuron soma; the magnitude of this wave decreases as the wave propagates downstream. The dynein-driven flux of NGFs is demonstrated to be the main component in the NGF flux, which is shown to be strongly correlated with the NGF concentration.

  12. Nerve growth factor is an autocrine factor essential for the survival of macrophages infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Garaci, E; Caroleo, M C; Aloe, L; Aquaro, S; Piacentini, M; Costa, N; Amendola, A; Micera, A; Caliò, R; Perno, C F; Levi-Montalcini, R

    1999-11-23

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin with the ability to exert specific effects on cells of the immune system. Human monocytes/macrophages (M/M) infected in vitro with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) are able to produce substantial levels of NGF that are associated with enhanced expression of the high-affinity NGF receptor (p140 trkA) on the M/M surface. Treatment of HIV-infected human M/M with anti-NGF Ab blocking the biological activity of NGF leads to a marked decrease of the expression of p140 trkA high-affinity receptor, a concomitant increased expression of p75(NTR) low-affinity receptor for NGF, and the occurrence of apoptotic death of M/M. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for NGF as an autocrine survival factor that rescues human M/M from the cytopathic effect caused by HIV infection.

  13. Cortical peroxynitration of nerve growth factor in aged and cognitively impaired rats.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Martin A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN), a system involved in learning and memory processes, are highly dependent on a continuous supply of biologically active nerve growth factor (NGF). Age-related cholinergic atrophy and cell loss in normal brains is apparently not complemented by reductions in the levels of NGF as could be expected. In the present work, cortical proNGF/NGF were immunoprecipitated from cortical brain homogenates from young and aged and behaviorally characterized rats and resolved with antinitrotyrosine antibodies to reveal nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins. Cortical proNGF in aged and cognitively impaired rats was found to be a target for peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage with correlative impact on decrease in choline acetyltransferase activity. These studies provide evidence for oxidative stress damage of NGF molecules in the cerebral cortex of cognitively impaired aged rats as previously shown in AD human brains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antagonism of Nerve Growth Factor-TrkA Signaling and the Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Mendell, Lorne M.; Tive, Leslie; Shelton, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally discovered as a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons during development. However in the adult, NGF has been found to play an important role in nociceptor sensitization following tissue injury. Here we outline mechanisms by which NGF activation of its cognate receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor, regulates a host of ion channels, receptors, and signaling molecules to enhance acute and chronic pain. Further, we document that peripherally restricted antagonism of NGF-tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor signaling is effective for controlling human pain while appearing to maintain normal nociceptor function. Understanding whether there are any unexpected adverse events as well as how humans may change their behavior and use of the injured/degenerating tissue following significant pain relief without sedation will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from these therapies targeting NGF. PMID:21602663

  15. Axonal regeneration and remyelination evaluation of chitosan/gelatin-based nerve guide combined with transforming growth factor-β1 and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Deng, Manjing; Yang, Maojin; Liu, Luchuan; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Xiujie

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, it is difficult to achieve a functional recovery following extended peripheral nerve lesions. Even if artificial nerve conduit, cell components and growth factors can enhance nerve regeneration, integration in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration remains yet to be explored. For this study, we used chitosan/gelatin nerve graft constructed with collagenous matrices as a vehicle for Schwann cells and transforming growth factor-β1 to bridge a 10-mm gap of the sciatic nerve and explored the feasibility of improving regeneration and reinnervation in rats. The nerve regeneration was assessed with functional recovery, electrophysiological test, retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry analysis during the post-operative period of 16 weeks. The results showed that the internal sides of the conduits were compact enough to prevent the connective tissues from ingrowth. Nerve conduction velocity, average regenerated myelin area, and myelinated axon count were similar to those treated with autograft (p > 0.05) but significantly higher than those bridged with chitosan/gelatin nerve graft alone (p < 0.05). Evidences from retrograde labeling and immunohistochemistry analysis are further provided in support of improving axonal regeneration and remyelination. A designed graft incorporating all of the tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration may provide great progress in tissue engineering for nerve repair.

  16. Nerve growth factor partially recovers inflamed skin from stress-induced worsening in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Spatz, Katharina; Daniltchenko, Maria; Joachim, Ricarda; Gimenez-Rivera, Andrey; Hendrix, Sven; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Brandner, Johanna M; Klapp, Burghard F

    2011-03-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation characterizes atopic disease, but its nature and clinical impact remain ill-defined. Induced by stress, the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) may worsen cutaneous inflammation. We therefore studied the role of NGF in the cutaneous stress response in a mouse model for atopic dermatitis-like allergic dermatitis (AlD). Combining several methods, we found that stress increased cutaneous but not serum or hypothalamic NGF in telogen mice. Microarray analysis showed increased mRNAs of inflammatory and growth factors associated with NGF in the skin. In stress-worsened AlD, NGF-neutralizing antibodies markedly reduced epidermal thickening together with NGF, neurotrophin receptor (tyrosine kinase A and p75 neurotrophin receptor), and transforming growth factor-β expression by keratinocytes but did not alter transepidermal water loss. Moreover, NGF expression by mast cells was reduced; this corresponded to reduced cutaneous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA levels but not to changes in mast cell degranulation or in the T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine balance. Also, eosinophils expressed TNF receptor type 2, and we observed reduced eosinophil infiltration after treatment with NGF-neutralizing antibodies. We thus conclude that NGF acts as a local stress mediator in perceived stress and allergy and that increased NGF message contributes to worsening of cutaneous inflammation mainly by enhancing epidermal hyperplasia, pro-allergic cytokine induction, and allergy-characteristic cellular infiltration.

  17. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases: a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Chun-ying; Zou, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections; patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.0001, RR: 1.35, 95%CI: 1.30–1.40). The average nerve conduction velocity in the nerve growth factor group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, MD: 4.59 m/s, 95%CI: 4.12–5.06). The incidence of pain or scleroma at the injection site in the nerve growth factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001, RR: 6.30, 95%CI: 3.53

  18. Therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor on cerebral infarction in dogs using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhe; Geng, Zuojun; Liu, Huaijun; Yang, Haiqing; Song, Peng; Liu, Qing

    2012-08-25

    A model of focal cerebral ischemic infarction was established in dogs through middle cerebral artery occlusion of the right side. Thirty minutes after occlusion, models were injected with nerve growth factor adjacent to the infarct locus. The therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor against cerebral infarction was assessed using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio, a quantitative index of diffusion-weighted MRI. At 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days and 3 months after modeling, the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio was significantly reduced after treatment with nerve growth factor. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and neurological function scores showed that infarct defects were slightly reduced and neurological function significantly improved after nerve growth factor treatment. This result was consistent with diffusion-weighted MRI measurements. Experimental findings indicate that nerve growth factor can protect against cerebral infarction, and that the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effect.

  19. Therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor on cerebral infarction in dogs using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging★

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhe; Geng, Zuojun; Liu, Huaijun; Yang, Haiqing; Song, Peng; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A model of focal cerebral ischemic infarction was established in dogs through middle cerebral artery occlusion of the right side. Thirty minutes after occlusion, models were injected with nerve growth factor adjacent to the infarct locus. The therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor against cerebral infarction was assessed using the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio, a quantitative index of diffusion-weighted MRI. At 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days and 3 months after modeling, the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio was significantly reduced after treatment with nerve growth factor. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and neurological function scores showed that infarct defects were slightly reduced and neurological function significantly improved after nerve growth factor treatment. This result was consistent with diffusion-weighted MRI measurements. Experimental findings indicate that nerve growth factor can protect against cerebral infarction, and that the hemisphere anomalous volume ratio of diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effect. PMID:25624813

  20. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the uterus of rabbits: functional involvement in prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maranesi, M; Parillo, F; Leonardi, L; Rebollar, P G; Alonso, B; Petrucci, L; Gobbetti, A; Boiti, C; Arruda-Alencar, J; Moura, A; Zerani, M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate: (1) the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), and nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) in the rabbit uterus; and (2) the in vitro effects of NGF on PGF2α and PGE2 synthesis and on the PGE2-9-ketoreductase (PGE2-9-K) activity by the rabbit uterus. Nerve growth factor, NTRK1, and NGFR were immunolocalized in the luminal and glandular epithelium and stroma cells of the endometrium. reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction indicated the presence of messenger RNA for NGF, NTRK1, and NGFR in the uterus. Nerve growth factor increased (P < 0.01) in vitro secretions of PGF2α and PGE2 but coincubation with either NTRK1 or oxide nitric synthase (NOS) inhibitors reduced (P < 0.01) PGF2α production and blocked (P < 0.01) PGE2 secretion. Prostaglandins releases were lower (P < 0.01) than control when uterine samples were treated with NGF plus cyclooxygenase inhibitor. However, addition of NGFR inhibitor reduced (P < 0.01) PGF2α secretion less efficiently than NTRK1 or NOS inhibitors but had no effect on PGE2 yield. Nerve growth factor increased (P < 0.01) the activity of PGE2-9-K, whereas coincubation with NTRK1 or NOS inhibitors abolished (P < 0.01) this increase in PGE2-9-K activity. However, cotreatment with either cyclooxygenase or NGFR inhibitors had no effect on PGE2-9-K activity. This is the first study to document the distribution of NGF/NTRK1 and NGFR systems and their effects on prostaglandin synthesis in the rabbit uterus. NGF/NTRK1 increases PGF2α and PGE2 productions by upregulating NOS and PGE2-9-K activities, whereas NGF/NGFR augments only PGF2α secretion, through an intracellular mechanism that is still unknown.

  1. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); P<0.01) and canine hearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm(2); P<0.01) failing secondary to ischemia and neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm(2); P<0.01) failing secondary to hypertension reveal significant hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  2. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide and nerve growth factor use the proteasome to rescue nerve growth factor-deprived sympathetic neurons cultured from chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Przywara, D A; Kulkarni, J S; Wakade, T D; Leontiev, D V; Wakade, A R

    1998-11-01

    Removal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic neurons initiates a neuronal death program and apoptosis. We show that pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) prevents apoptosis in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons. PACAP (100 nM) added to culture medium at the time of plating failed to support neuronal survival. However, in neurons grown for 2 days with NGF and then deprived of NGF, PACAP prevented cell death for the next 24-48 h. Uptake of [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) was used as an index of survival and decreased >50% in NGF-deprived cultures within 24 h. PACAP (1-100 nM) restored [3H]NE uptake to 92 +/- 8% of that of NGF-supported controls. Depolarization-induced [3H]NE release in neurons rescued by PACAP was the same as that in NGF-supported neurons. PACAP rescue was not mimicked by forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and was not blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate. Mobilization of phosphatidylinositol by muscarine failed to support NGF-deprived neurons. Thus, PACAP may use novel signaling to promote survival of sympathetic neurons. The apoptosis-associated caspase CPP32 activity increased approximately fourfold during 6 h of NGF withdrawal (145 +/- 40 versus 38 +/- 17 nmol of substrate cleaved/min/mg of protein) and returned to even below the control level in NGF-deprived, PACAP-rescued cultures (14 +/- 7 nmol/min/mg of protein). Readdition of NGF or PACAP to NGF-deprived cultures reversed CPP32 activation, and this was blocked by lactacystin, a potent and specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that NGF and PACAP target CPP32 for destruction by the proteasome. As PACAP is a preganglionic neurotransmitter in autonomic ganglia, we propose a novel function for this transmitter as an apoptotic rescuer of sympathetic neurons when the supply of NGF is compromised.

  3. Expression of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mRNAs in hippocampal interneurons: morphological characterization, levels of expression, and colocalization of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Rocamora, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F; Soriano, E

    1998-05-25

    We have investigated the distribution and morphology of hippocampal interneurons that express the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in the rat. For this study, we combined in situ hybridization for the detection of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs and immunocytochemistry against the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PARV), calretinin (CALR), and calbindin (CALB). Whereas the majority of PARV+ interneurons expressed NGF mRNA, only subsets of CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons (23% and 24%, respectively) displayed NGF hybridization. Most CALB/NGF+ cells were located in the stratum oriens/alveus of the CA3-CA1 regions, suggesting that they may include the population of CALB+, hippocamposeptal, nonpyramidal neurons. Most of the nonspiny CALR/NGF+ neurons were located within or in the vicinity of the pyramidal layer and had faint CALR immunostaining and stellate, thin dendrites. Regarding the spiny CALR-immunoreactive cells, we found that most of these neurons in the hilus were NGF+, whereas only 59% of displayed NGF hybridization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. A small subset of PARV- and CALR-immunoreactive cells expressed NT-3 mRNA (16% and 13%, respectively). NT-3 message was not found in the large basket cells of the dentate gyrus, whereas the distribution and morphology of CALR/NT-3+ cells were similar to those of nonspiny CALR/NGF+ cells. In fact, double in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that most NT-3+ neurons also expressed NGF mRNA, indicating coexpression of both neurotrophins in subpopulations of PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. Moreover, the level of NGF mRNA expression was higher in PARV+ neurons than in CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons, whereas NT-3 message was expressed similarly in PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. The present findings show a differential expression of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs in subsets of hippocampal interneurons and suggest that the expression of these transcripts depends on factors intrinsic to

  4. Lithium ion inhibits nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth and phosphorylation of nerve growth factor-modulated microtubule-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    LiCl (2.5-20 mM) reversibly suppressed nerve growth factor (NGF)- induced neurite outgrowth by cultured rat PC 12 pheochromocytoma cells. Similar concentrations of LiCl also reversibly blocked NGF-dependent regeneration of neurites by PC12 cells that had been primed by long- term pre-exposure to NGF and by cultured newborn mouse sympathetic neurons. In contrast, transcription-dependent responses of PC12 cells to NGF such as priming and induction of the NGF-inducible large external glycoprotein, occurred despite the presence of Li+. SDS PAGE analysis of total cellular phosphoproteins (labeled by 2-h exposure to 32P-orthophosphate) from neurite-bearing primed PC12 cells revealed that Li+ reversibly inhibited the phosphorylation of a band of Mr 64,000 that was barely detectable in NGF-untreated PC12 cells. However, Li+ did not appear to affect the labeling of other phosphoproteins in either NGF-primed or untreated PC12 cultures, nor did it affect the rapid increase in phosphorylation of several proteins that occurs when NGF is first added to unprimed cultures. Several criteria indicated that the NGF-inducible phosphoprotein of Mr 64,000 is a microtubule- associated protein (MAP). Of the NGF-inducible phosphorylated MAPs that have been detected in PC12 cells (Mr 64,000, 72,000, 80,000, and 320,000), several (Mr 64,000, 72,000, and 80,000) were found to be substantially less phosphorylated in the presence of Li+. Neither a phorbol ester tumor promotor nor permeant cAMP analogs reversed the inhibitory effects of Li+ on neurite outgrowth or on phosphorylation of the component of Mr 64,000. Microtubules are a major and required constituent of neurites, and MAPs may regulate the assembly and stability of neuritic microtubules. The observation that Li+ selectively inhibits NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and MAP phosphorylation suggests a possible causal relationship between these two events. PMID:4030895

  5. Exploring Serum Levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Nerve Growth Factor Across Glaucoma Stages

    PubMed Central

    Busanello, Anna; Bonini, Stefano; Quaranta, Luciano; Agnifili, Luca; Manni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the serum levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) in patients affected by primary open angle glaucoma with a wide spectrum of disease severity compared to healthy controls and to explore their relationship with morphological and functional glaucoma parameters. Materials and Methods 45 patients affected by glaucoma at different stages and 15 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent visual field testing, peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurement using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and blood collection for both neurotrophins detection by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Statistical analysis and association between biostrumental and biochemical data were investigated. Results Serum levels of BDNF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in healthy controls (261.2±75.0 pg/ml vs 313.6±79.6 pg/ml, p = 0.03). Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of BDNF were significantly lower in early (253.8±40.7 pg/ml, p = 0.019) and moderate glaucoma (231.3±54.3 pg/ml, p = 0.04) but not in advanced glaucoma (296.2±103.1 pg/ml, p = 0.06) compared to healthy controls. Serum levels of NGF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in the healthy controls (4.1±1 pg/mL vs 5.5±1.2 pg/mL, p = 0.01). Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of NGF were significantly lower in early (3.5±0.9 pg/mL, p = 0.0008) and moderate glaucoma (3.8±0.7 pg/ml, p<0.0001) but not in advanced glaucoma (5.0±0.7 pg/ml, p = 0.32) compared to healthy controls. BDNF serum levels were not related to age, visual field mean deviation or retinal nerve fibre layer thickness either in glaucoma or in controls while NGF levels were significantly related to visual field mean deviation in the glaucoma group (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.004). Conclusions BDNF and NGF serum levels are reduced in the early and moderate glaucoma stages, suggesting the possibility that

  6. Uptake of nerve growth factor along peripheral and spinal axons of primary sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P.M.; Riopelle, R.J.

    1984-07-01

    To investigate the distribution of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on peripheral and central axons, (/sup 125/I)NGF was injected into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of adult rats. Accumulation of (/sup 125/I)NGF in lumbar dorsal root ganglia was monitored by gamma emission counting and radioautography. (/sup 125/I)NGF, injected endoneurially in small quantities, was taken into sensory axons by a saturable process and was transported retrogradely to their cell bodies at a maximal rate of 2.5 to 7.5 mm/hr. Because very little (/sup 125/I)NGF reached peripheral terminals, the results were interpreted to indicate that receptors for NGF are present on nonterminal segments of sensory axons. The specificity and high affinity of NGF uptake were illustrated by observations that negligible amounts of gamma activity accumulated in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after comparable intraneural injection of (/sup 125/I) cytochrome C or (/sup 125/I)oxidized NGF. Similar techniques were used to demonstrate avid internalization and retrograde transport of (/sup 125/I)NGF by intraspinal axons arising from dorsal root ganglia. Following injection of (/sup 125/I)NGF into lumbar or cervical regions of the spinal cord, neuronal perikarya were clearly labeled in radioautographs of lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Sites for NGF uptake on primary sensory neurons in the adult rat are not restricted to peripheral axon terminals but are extensively distributed along both peripheral and central axons. Receptors on axons provide a mechanism whereby NGF supplied by glia could influence neuronal maintenance or axonal regeneration.

  7. A nerve growth factor-regulated messenger RNA encodes a new intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Differential screening of a cDNA library from the PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line previously revealed a clone, clone 73, whose corresponding mRNA is induced by nerve growth factor (NGF). Induction parallels NGF-stimulated PC12 differentiation from a chromaffinlike phenotype to a sympathetic neuronlike phenotype. We report that DNA sequence analysis reveals that clone 73 mRNA encodes an intermediate filament (IF) protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is distinct from the known sequences of other members of the IF protein family. The sequence has highest homology with desmin and vimentin and includes the highly conserved central alpha-helical rod domain with the characteristic heptad repeat of hydrophobic residues, but has lower homology in the amino-terminal head and carboxyl-terminal tail domains. The head domain contains a large number of serine residues which are potential phosphorylation sites. The expression of clone 73 in vivo in the nervous system of the adult rat was investigated by in situ hybridization of clone 73 probes to tissue sections. The mRNA is expressed at high levels in ganglia of the peripheral nervous system, including the superior cervical ganglion (sympathetic), ciliary ganglion (parasympathetic), and dorsal root ganglion (sensory). In the central nervous system, motor nuclei of cranial nerves III, IV, V, VI, VII, X, and XII as well as ventral horn motor neurons and a restricted set of other central nervous system nuclei express the clone 73 mRNA. Tissues apart from those of the nervous system did not in general express the mRNA, with only very low levels detected in adrenal gland. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of NGF- induced PC12 cell differentiation, the pathways of neuronal development in vivo, and the possible function of the clone 73 IF protein and its relationship to other IF proteins. PMID:3339087

  8. Tamoxifen inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth in an estrogen receptor–independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Stephanie J.; Eckert, Jenell M.; Brossier, Nicole M.; Clodfelder-Miller, Buffie J.; Turk, Amy N.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Kappes, John C.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Few therapeutic options are available for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), the most common malignancy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Guided by clinical observations suggesting that some NF1-associated nerve sheath tumors are hormonally responsive, we hypothesized that the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator tamoxifen would inhibit MPNST tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we examined tamoxifen effects on MPNST cell proliferation and survival, MPNST xenograft growth, and the mechanism by which tamoxifen impeded these processes. We found that 1–5 μM 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen induced MPNST cell death, whereas 0.01–0.1 μM 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen inhibited mitogenesis. Dermal and plexiform neurofibromas, MPNSTs, and MPNST cell lines expressed ERβ and G-protein-coupled ER-1 (GPER); MPNSTs also expressed estrogen biosynthetic enzymes. However, MPNST cells did not secrete 17β-estradiol, exogenous 17β-estradiol did not stimulate mitogenesis or rescue 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen effects on MPNST cells, and the steroidal antiestrogen ICI-182,780 did not mimic tamoxifen effects on MPNST cells. Further, ablation of ERβ and GPER had no effect on MPNST proliferation, survival, or tamoxifen sensitivity, indicating that tamoxifen acts via an ER-independent mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, inhibitors of calmodulin (trifluoperazine, W-7), another known tamoxifen target, recapitulated 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen effects on MPNST cells. Tamoxifen was also effective in vivo, demonstrating potent antitumor activity in mice orthotopically xenografted with human MPNST cells. We conclude that 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen inhibits MPNST cell proliferation and survival via an ER-independent mechanism. The in vivo effectiveness of tamoxifen provides a rationale for clinical trials in cases of MPNSTs. PMID:21075781

  9. Nerve growth factor stimulates cellular proliferation of human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Urzua, U; Tapia, V; Geraldo, M P; Selman, A; Vega, M; Romero, C

    2012-09-01

    Due to its ability to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression and proliferation, migration, and vasculogenesis of endothelial cells, nerve growth factor (NGF) has been considered as an angiogenic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In this work, we evaluated the angiogenic and proliferative mRNA expression profiles of EOC and addressed the responsiveness of EOC explants to NGF stimulation. Twenty EOC samples were obtained from Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, University of Chile's Clinical Hospital. Global gene expression profiles of selected poorly differentiated serous EOC samples were obtained with DNA oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition, EOC explants were subjected to NGF stimulation and levels of p-AKT, BAX, BCL2, Ki-67, c-MYC, and FOXL2 proteins were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that mRNAs coding for specific transcriptional regulators and antiapoptotic components of the NGF signaling pathway were upregulated in EOC cells. At the protein level, key members of the NGF pathway including p-AKT, BCL2/BAX, Ki-67, and c-MYC were found increased, while FOXL2 was decreased in response to NGF stimulation. These findings strongly suggest that NGF stimulates cellular proliferation of human EOC. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Role of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and miRNAs in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Oróstica, Lorena; Vera, Carolina; Cuevas, Paula; Hernández, Andrea; Hurtado, Iván; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer in women worldwide, and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents 90% of cases. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A receptor (TRKA) have been associated with the development of several types of cancer, including EOC; both NGF and TRKA levels are elevated in this pathology. EOC presents high angiogenesis and several molecules have been reported to induce this process. NGF increases angiogenesis through its TRKA receptor on endothelial cells, and by indirectly inducing vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Other molecules controlled by NGF include ciclooxigenase-2, disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) and calreticulin (CRT), proteins involved in crucial processes needed for EOC progression. These molecules could be modified through microRNA regulation, which could be regulated by NGF. MicroRNAs are the widest family of non-coding RNAs; they bind to 3′-UTR of mRNAs to inhibit their translation, to deadenilate or to degraded them. In EOC, a deregulation in microRNA expression has been described, including alterations of miR-200 family, cluster-17-92, and miR-23b, among others. Since the NGF-microRNA relationship in pathologies has not been studied, this review proposes that some microRNAs could be associated with NGF/TRKA activation, modifying protein levels needed for EOC progression. PMID:28245631

  11. Role of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and miRNAs in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Oróstica, Lorena; Vera, Carolina; Cuevas, Paula; Hernández, Andrea; Hurtado, Iván; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2017-02-26

    Ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer in women worldwide, and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents 90% of cases. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A receptor (TRKA) have been associated with the development of several types of cancer, including EOC; both NGF and TRKA levels are elevated in this pathology. EOC presents high angiogenesis and several molecules have been reported to induce this process. NGF increases angiogenesis through its TRKA receptor on endothelial cells, and by indirectly inducing vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Other molecules controlled by NGF include ciclooxigenase-2, disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) and calreticulin (CRT), proteins involved in crucial processes needed for EOC progression. These molecules could be modified through microRNA regulation, which could be regulated by NGF. MicroRNAs are the widest family of non-coding RNAs; they bind to 3'-UTR of mRNAs to inhibit their translation, to deadenilate or to degraded them. In EOC, a deregulation in microRNA expression has been described, including alterations of miR-200 family, cluster-17-92, and miR-23b, among others. Since the NGF-microRNA relationship in pathologies has not been studied, this review proposes that some microRNAs could be associated with NGF/TRKA activation, modifying protein levels needed for EOC progression.

  12. Conformational Rigidity within Plasticity Promotes Differential Target Recognition of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Francesca; de Chiara, Cesira; Kelly, Geoff; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Malerba, Francesca; Yan, Robert; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), the prototype of the neurotrophin family, is essential for maintenance and growth of different neuronal populations. The X-ray crystal structure of NGF has been known since the early '90s and shows a β-sandwich fold with extensive loops that are involved in the interaction with its binding partners. Understanding the dynamical properties of these loops is thus important for molecular recognition. We present here a combined solution NMR/molecular dynamics study which addresses the question of whether and how much the long loops of NGF are flexible and describes the N-terminal intrinsic conformational tendency of the unbound NGF molecule. NMR titration experiments allowed identification of a previously undetected epitope of the anti-NGF antagonist antibody αD11 which will be of crucial importance for future drug lead discovery. The present study thus recapitulates all the available structural information and unveils the conformational versatility of the relatively rigid NGF loops upon functional ligand binding. PMID:28083536

  13. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-10-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. SVI-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin.

  14. Expression and modulation of nerve growth factor in murine keratinocytes (PAM 212)

    SciTech Connect

    Tron, V.A.; Coughlin, M.D.; Jang, D.E.; Stanisz, J.; Sauder, D.N. )

    1990-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide that is required for normal development and maintenance of the sympathetic and sensory nervous systems. Skin has been shown to contain relatively high amounts of NGF, which is in keeping with the finding that the quantity of NGF in a tissue is proportional to the extent of sympathetic innervation of that organ. Since the keratinocyte, a major cellular constituent of the skin, is known to produce other growth factors and cytokines, our experiments were designed to determine whether keratinocytes are a source of NGF. Keratinocyte-conditioned media from the keratinocyte cell line PAM 212 contained NGF-like activity, approximately 2-3 ng/ml, as detected by the neurite outgrowth assay. Freshly isolated BALB/c keratinocytes contained approximately 0.1 ng/ml. Using a cDNA probe directed against NGF, we demonstrated the presence of a 1.3-kb NGF mRNA in both PAM 212 and BALB/c keratinocytes. Since ultraviolet radiation (UV) is a potentially important modulating factor for cytokines in skin, we examined the effect of UV on NGF mRNA expression. Although UV initially inhibited the expression of keratinocyte NGF mRNA (4 h), by 24 h an induction of NGF mRNA was seen. The NGF signal could also be induced by phorbol esters. Thus, keratinocytes synthesize and express NGF, and its expression is modulated by UVB and phorbol esters.

  15. Cobra Venom Factor and Ketoprofen Abolish the Antitumor Effect of Nerve Growth Factor from Cobra Venom.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Terpinskaya, Tatiana I; Kuznetsova, Tatiana E; Ryzhkovskaya, Elena L; Lukashevich, Vladimir S; Rudnichenko, Julia A; Ulashchyk, Vladimir S; Starkov, Vladislav G; Utkin, Yuri N

    2017-09-06

    We showed recently that nerve growth factor (NGF) from cobra venom inhibited the growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) inoculated subcutaneously in mice. Here, we studied the influence of anti-complementary cobra venom factor (CVF) and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen on the antitumor NGF effect, as well as on NGF-induced changes in EAC histological patterns, the activity of lactate and succinate dehydrogenases in tumor cells and the serum level of some cytokines. NGF, CVF and ketoprofen reduced the tumor volume by approximately 72%, 68% and 30%, respectively. The antitumor effect of NGF was accompanied by an increase in the lymphocytic infiltration of the tumor tissue, the level of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α in the serum, as well as the activity of lactate and succinate dehydrogenases in tumor cells. Simultaneous administration of NGF with either CVF or ketoprofen abolished the antitumor effect and reduced all other effects of NGF, whereas NGF itself significantly decreased the antitumor action of both CVF and ketoprofen. Thus, the antitumor effect of NGF critically depended on the status of the immune system and was abolished by the disturbance of the complement system; the disturbance of the inflammatory response canceled the antitumor effect as well.

  16. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  17. Nerve growth factor modulate proliferation of cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyu; Li, Zhongguo; Qiu, Liangxiu; Zhao, Changsong; Hu, Zhulin

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF. MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570 nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did. Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  18. Reduced maternal and cord nerve growth factor levels in preterm deliveries.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi; Mehendale, Savita; Pisal, Hemlata; Nimbargi, Vandana; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin, which exerts an important role in the development and function of the central and peripheral nervous system. There is limited information regarding the levels of NGF during pregnancy and its role in fetal development. We have earlier reported increased oxidative stress in pregnancy complications. The present study examines the levels of NGF in maternal and cord samples in preterm deliveries and its association with oxidative stress marker. A total number of 96 women delivering preterm (<37 weeks gestation) and 94 women delivering at term (control group) (≥37 weeks gestation) were recruited. Plasma NGF levels were measured in both mother and cord plasma using the Emax Immuno Assay System Promega kit. Maternal and cord plasma NGF levels were significantly reduced (p<0.05 for both) in women delivering preterm as compared to term. There was a positive association between maternal and cord plasma NGF levels (p=0.022). Maternal NGF levels were negatively (p=0.017) associated with maternal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Reduced cord NGF levels may affect fetal growth in preterm deliveries which may have implications for the neurodevelopmental pathologies in later life. Circulating maternal NGF levels in preterm pregnancies may be a useful marker to predict NGF levels in the neonate.

  19. Nerve Growth Factor Signaling from Membrane Microdomains to the Nucleus: Differential Regulation by Caveolins

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ambre; Yu, Lingli; Guili, Vincent; Reynaud, Florie; Ding, Yindi; Ma, Ji; Jullien, Jérôme; Koubi, David; Gauthier, Emmanuel; Cluet, David; Falk, Julien; Castellani, Valérie; Yuan, Chonggang; Rudkin, Brian B.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane microdomains or “lipid rafts” have emerged as essential functional modules of the cell, critical for the regulation of growth factor receptor-mediated responses. Herein we describe the dichotomy between caveolin-1 and caveolin-2, structural and regulatory components of microdomains, in modulating proliferation and differentiation. Caveolin-2 potentiates while caveolin-1 inhibits nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling and subsequent cell differentiation. Caveolin-2 does not appear to impair NGF receptor trafficking but elicits prolonged and stronger activation of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Rsk2 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2), and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). In contrast, caveolin-1 does not alter initiation of the NGF signaling pathway activation; rather, it acts, at least in part, by sequestering the cognate receptors, TrkA and p75NTR, at the plasma membrane, together with the phosphorylated form of the downstream effector Rsk2, which ultimately prevents CREB phosphorylation. The non-phosphorylatable caveolin-1 serine 80 mutant (S80V), no longer inhibits TrkA trafficking or subsequent CREB phosphorylation. MC192, a monoclonal antibody towards p75NTR that does not block NGF binding, prevents exit of both NGF receptors (TrkA and p75NTR) from lipid rafts. The results presented herein underline the role of caveolin and receptor signaling complex interplay in the context of neuronal development and tumorigenesis. PMID:28338624

  20. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  1. Synergistic induction of neurite outgrowth by nerve growth factor or epidermal growth factor and interleukin-6 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Bradshaw, R A

    1996-05-31

    Native PC12 cells respond differentially to nerve growth factor (NGF) but not interleukin-6 (IL-6); PC12-E2 cells, a stable variant, respond to both stimuli (and more rapidly to NGF). Neither responds to epidermal growth factor (EGF). NGF primarily induces the RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and IL-6 activates a JAK (Janus tyrosine kinase)/STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) response. EGF also stimulates RAS/ERK but in a transient manner. When either cell type is treated with combinations of NGF, EGF, and IL-6, at concentrations that produce modest or no response, a substantial augmentation of neurite outgrowth is observed. With PC12-E2 cells, a subthreshold concentration of IL-6 increases NGF response by approximately 2-3-fold after 1-2 days; the increase with EGF is more pronounced. Native PC12 cells show even greater synergistic effects with NGF and IL-6. The most dramatic effect was observed with low levels of EGF, where IL-6 increased the percentage of responsive cells from zero to approximately 60% after 3 days. In addition, two neural-specific transcripts, GAP-43 and SCG-10, are synergistically increased by the combinations of growth factors. Importantly, IL-6 does not enhance ERK phosphorylation in the presence of either NGF or EGF. In contrast, NGF and EGF, in the presence or absence of IL-6, cause mobility shifts of Stat3 that are consistent with serine phosphorylations. Although these modifications do not lead to activation and translocation by themselves, in the presence of the tyrosine phosphorylation induced by IL-6, they may play a role in the synergistic responses. These observations suggest a differentially regulated two-stage mechanism for the differentiative response of PC12 cells to NGF.

  2. Membrane proteins of the nerve growth cone and their developmental regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Simkowitz, P.; Ellis, L.; Pfenninger, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    The membrane polypeptides of growth cone fragments (growth cone particles, GCPs) isolated from fetal rat brain by subcellular fractionation have been analyzed in further detail. The major polypeptides of salt-washed GCP membranes detected by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolve in 2-dimensional gels as a spot of 52 kDa that comigrates with beta-tubulin and reacts with anti-beta-tubulin; a 46 kDa, pl 4.3, polypeptide (pp46) that has no equivalent in the soluble fraction and is identical to one of the GCP's major phosphoproteins and to GAP43; a spot of 42 kDa that comigrates with actin; and a species of 34 kDa (p34) without soluble equivalent. The prominent 38 kDa doublet identified in 1-dimensional gels is difficult to resolve in 2-dimensional gels. The major phosphoproteins pp80ac, pp46, and pp40, as well as p34 partition into the oil phase of Triton X-114 extracts, suggesting that they are integral membrane proteins, at least in our experimental conditions. The properties of pp46 reported here are in conflict with the highly hydrophilic amino acid sequence predicted for GAP43/B50/F1. Growth-cone and presynaptic membrane proteins are compared as follows. After eye injection of 35S-methionine, GCPs and synaptosomes are isolated from the target areas of optic nerve of fetal and adult rats, respectively. Polypeptides are separated by 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the radiolabeled species identified fluorographically. The comparison of labeled GCP and synaptosome polypeptides shows that all 5 major Coomassie blue-stained polypeptides of GCP membranes (52, 46, 42, 38, 34 kDa) are intensely labeled after eye injection. However, in synaptosomes, these polypeptides are weakly labeled if at all; instead, an intensely labeled polypeptide of 28 kDa, and several additional species not seen in GCPs, have appeared.

  3. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy: Activation of Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Yang, Jennifer H; Barba, David; U, Hoi-Sang; Bakay, Roy A E; Pay, Mary M; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and lacks effective disease-modifying therapies. In 2001, we initiated a clinical trial of nerve growth factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in patients with AD. We present postmortem findings in 10 patients with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years after treatment. To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. Patients in this anatomicopathological study were enrolled in clinical trials from March 2001 to October 2012 at the University of California, San Diego, Medical Center in La Jolla. Ten patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all 8 patients in the first phase 1 ex vivo trial and of 2 patients in a subsequent phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In 2 patients, NGF protein levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among 10 patients, degenerating neurons in the AD brain responded to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and nontreated sides of the brain in 3 patients who underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P < .05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers was present in 2 patients who underwent adeno-associated viral vectors (serotype 2)-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology and neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic

  4. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  5. Nerve growth factor (NGF)-conjugated electrospun nanostructures with topographical cues for neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Il; Choi, Ji Suk; Jeong, Seo Young; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2010-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultivated on the surface of nerve growth factor (NGF)-conjugated aligned nanofibrous meshes for neuronal differentiation. Amine-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) was conjugated to poly(ε-caprolactone) to prepare amine-functionalized block copolymers. The synthesized polymer was electrospun in a rotating drum to prepare aligned nanofibrous meshes. A nerve growth factor was chemically immobilized on the surface-exposed amine groups of the electrospun nanofibrous meshes in the aqueous phase. In vitro release profiles of the nerve growth factor were investigated for NGF-immobilized nanofibrous meshes. The conjugated nerve growth factor was not released for 7 days, while the growth factor physically adsorbed on the nanofibrous meshes showed an initial burst release. MSCs were cultivated on the NGF-conjugated nanofibrous meshes for 5 days, and total RNA was extracted from the cultivated cells. mRNA was extracted from cells for measuring expression levels of neuronal differentiation markers, including nestin, tubulin βIII and map2, in the cultivated stem cells. The conjugation of NGF significantly increased the expression levels of the marker proteins for neuron cells while physically adsorbed NGFs on nanofibrous meshes showed low expression of these marker genes. Furthermore, alignments of nanofibrous meshes clearly increased the expression levels of neuronal makers while the nanofibrous mesh without the topographical cue did not affect neuronal differentiation of the cultivated stem cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that the stem cells on the NGF-conjugated aligned nanofibrous meshes showed intense staining with antibodies against neuronal makers as well as elongated morphology compared to other groups. Thus, the NGF-conjugated nanofibrous meshes with topographical cues significantly increased the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in comparison to NGF-adsorbed nanofibrous meshes.

  6. Neuroprotection by Cocktails of Dietary Antioxidants under Conditions of Nerve Growth Factor Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Amara, Flavio; Berbenni, Miluscia; Fragni, Martina; Leoni, Giampaolo; Viggiani, Sandra; Ippolito, Vita Maria; Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Alberghina, Lilia; Riccio, Paolo; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants may be useful in counteracting the chronic inflammatory status in neurodegenerative diseases by reducing oxidative stress due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we newly described the efficacy of a number of dietary antioxidants (polyphenols, carotenoids, thiolic compounds, and oligoelements) on viability of neuronal PC12 cells following Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) deprivation, a model of age-related decrease of neurotrophic support that triggers neuronal loss. Neuroprotection by antioxidants during NGF deprivation for 24 h was largely dependent on their concentrations: all dietary antioxidants were able to efficiently support cell viability by reducing ROS levels and restoring mitochondrial function, while preserving the neuronal morphology. Moreover, ROS reduction and neuroprotection during NGF withdrawal were also achieved with defined cocktails of 3-6 different antioxidants at concentrations 5-60 times lower than those used in single treatments, suggesting that their antioxidant activity was preserved also at very low concentrations. Overall, these data indicate the beneficial effects of antioxidants against oxidative stress induced by decreased NGF availability and suggest that defined cocktails of dietary factors at low concentrations might be a suitable strategy to reduce oxidative damage in neurodegenerative diseases, while limiting possible side effects.

  7. Nerve growth factor-endothelial cell interaction leads to angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Giuseppina; Lempereur, Laurence; Presta, Marco; Ribatti, Domenico; Lombardo, Gabriella; Lazarovici, Philip; Zappalà, Giovanna; Pafumi, Carlo; Bernardini, Renato

    2002-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has important functions during embryonic development and on various tissues and organs under normal and pathological conditions during the extrauterine life. RT-PCR analysis and immunological methods demonstrate that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express the NGF receptors trkA(NGFR) and p75NTR. NGF treatment caused a rapid phosphorylation of trkA(NGFR) in HUVECs, determining a parallel increase of phosphorylated ERK1/2. Accordingly, NGF induced a significant increase in HUVEC proliferation that was abolished by the trkA(NGFR) inhibitor K252a. Also, HUVECs express significant levels of NGF under standard culture conditions that were up-regulated during serum starvation. Endogenous NGF was responsible for the basal levels of trkA(NGFR) and ERK1/2 phosphorylation observed in untreated HUVEC cultures. Finally, NGF exerted a potent, direct, angiogenic activity in vivo when delivered onto the chorioallantoic membrane of the chicken embryo. The data indicate that NGF may play an important role in blood vessel formation in the nervous system and in several pathological processes, including tumors and inflammatory diseases. Unraveling mechanisms of NGF-dependent angiogenesis could provide valuable tools for novel therapeutic approaches in antiangiogenic therapy.

  8. Neuromodulatory loop mediated by nerve growth factor and interleukin 6 in thymic stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Screpanti, I; Meco, D; Scarpa, S; Morrone, S; Frati, L; Gulino, A; Modesti, A

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cell derivatives have been suggested to be involved in thymus development. We established nonlymphoid thymic stromal cell cultures capable of supporting T-cell differentiation. In these nonlymphoid cell cultures, we identified cells with phenotypic and biochemical markers specific for neuronal cells. Neurofilament mRNA and 68- and 160-kDa neurofilament proteins, as well as 74-kDa synapsin I isoform, were expressed in many of the cultured cells. For example, neurofilament immunoreactivity was detected in 20-30% of the cells. To see whether thymic neuronal-like cells were involved in a neural differentiation pathway, we investigated the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two known neurotrophic factors. The expression of the above-described neural markers was enhanced by NGF and IL-6, which we report to be produced in an autocrine way by thymic stromal cell cultures. Finally, we found that IL-6 gene expression in these cell cultures was enhanced by NGF. Evidence is thus offered of a neuromodulatory loop within the thymic stromal cell population supported by local production of NGF and IL-6 and involving neural cell elements. Interestingly, IL-6, which is known to be implicated in thymocyte differentiation, also displays a neuromodulatory activity on thymic stromal cells, suggesting a multivalent role for this cytokine within the thymus. Images PMID:1373490

  9. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations rise after successful cognitive-behavioural therapy of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Jockers-Scherübl, Maria C; Zubraegel, Doris; Baer, Thomas; Linden, Michael; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Schulte-Herbrüggen, Olaf; Neu, Peter; Hellweg, Rainer

    2007-01-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic stress disease with permanent physical tension and cognitive strain. Raised nerve growth factor (NGF) serum levels were reported as an acute stress reaction in soldiers before their first parachute jump even before the rise in cortisol. Taking GAD as a clinical model of chronic stress, we measured NGF in the serum of 22 patients with GAD before and after cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and compared them to those of healthy normal controls. Treatment response was tested by the values of the State and Trait of Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) as treatment outcome variables. The NGF values of patients and controls were similar at baseline (p=0.8941); however, with successful treatment, corresponding to a mean reduction in the HAM-A by more than 50% and a reduction in the clinical global impression scale (CGI) median from 4 to 1, the patients' NGF serum concentrations rose significantly (p=0.0006) which might correspond to an altered stress reaction, possibly contributing to good therapeutic response with CBT. There were 3 patients with a HAM-A decrease of less than 15%. In those patients NGF rose only marginally. Hence, the increase in serum NGF seems to indicate good treatment response.

  10. Bilateral choroidal neovascularization associated with optic nerve head drusen treated by antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delas, Barbara; Almudí, Lorena; Carreras, Anabel; Asaad, Mouafk

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report a good clinical outcome in a patient with bilateral choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injection. Methods A 12-year-old girl was referred for loss of right eye vision detected in a routine check-up. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand movements in the right eye and 0.9 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed the presence of superficial and buried bilateral ONHD, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and computed tomography, and the study was completed with perimetry. The presence of bilateral CNV, active in the right eye, was observed and subsequently confirmed using fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography. Results Treatment with two consecutive injections of intravitreal ranibizumab resulted in inactivation of the neovascular membrane with subretinal fluid reabsorption and improved right eye BCVA. After 12 months’ follow-up, this was 20/60 and stable. Conclusion Although there are no published studies of safety in children, antiangiogenic therapy for CNV secondary to ONHD may be useful and safe. A search of the literature produced only one previously reported case of ONHD-associated CNV treated with antivascular endothelial growth factor alone. PMID:22368440

  11. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative condition and the most common type of amnestic dementia in the elderly. Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk of developing AD in adulthood as a result of chromosome 21 trisomy and triplication of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. In both conditions, the central nervous system (CNS) basal forebrain cholinergic system progressively degenerates, and such changes contribute to the manifestation of cognitive decline and dementia. Given the strong dependency of these neurons on nerve growth factor (NGF), it was hypothesized that their atrophy was caused by NGF deficits. However, in AD, the synthesis of NGF is not affected at the transcript level and there is a marked increase in its precursor, proNGF. This apparent paradox remained elusive for many years. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting a CNS deficit in the extracellular metabolism of NGF, both in AD and in DS brains. We describe the nature of this trophic disconnection and its implication for the atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We further discuss the potential of NGF pathway markers as diagnostic indicators of a CNS trophic disconnection.

  12. Serum levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in patients with major depression disorder and suicide risk.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Carolina David; de Mello Ferreira, Sharon; Pedrotti Moreira, Fernanda; Bittencourt, Guilherme; de Oliveira, Jacqueline Flores; Lopez Molina, Mariane; Jansen, Karen; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; Rizzato Lara, Diogo; Portela, Luiz Valmor; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Oses, Jean Pierre

    2015-09-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important member of the neurotrophins group and their involvement in the pathophysiology of major depression disorder (MDD) and suicide risk (SR) has been recently suggested. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in NGF serum levels in individuals with MDD and with or without risk of suicide, in subjects from a young population-based sample. This is a paired cross-sectional study nested in a population-based study. Individuals were rated for MDD and SR by a diagnostic interview--Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I). The total population of the sample was comprised of 141 subjects distributed in three groups: 47 healthy controls, 47 subjects with current depressive episode without SR (MDD) and 47 subjects with current depressive episode and with SR (MDD + SR). NGF serum levels were significantly reduced in the MDD and MDD + SR groups when compared with controls (p ≤ 0.001). However, there were no differences in NGF levels between the MDD and MDD + SR groups (p = 1.000). These results suggest that reduced NGF serum levels can be a possible biomarker of MDD.

  13. Nerve growth factor modulates TRPV1 expression and function and mediates pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaohui; Colak, Tugba; Shenoy, Mohan; Liu, Liansheng; Pai, Reetesh; Li, Cuiping; Mehta, Kshama; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay

    2011-07-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a key role in this process via its effects on the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1. CP was induced by intraductal injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats. After 3 weeks, anti-NGF antibody or control serum was administered daily for 1 week. Pancreatic hyperalgesia was assessed by nocifensive behavioral response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas as well as by referred somatic pain assessed by von Frey filament testing. TRPV1 currents in pancreatic sensory neurons were examined by patch-clamp. The expression and function of TRPV1 in pancreas-specific nociceptors was examined by immunostaining and quantification of messenger RNA levels. Blockade of NGF significantly attenuated pancreatic hyperalgesia and referred somatic pain compared with controls. It also decreased TRPV1 current density and open probability and reduced the proportion of pancreatic sensory neurons that expressed TRPV1 as well as levels of TRPV1 in these neurons. These findings emphasize a key role for NGF in pancreatic pain and highlight the role it plays in the modulation of TRPV1 expression and activity in CP. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nerve growth factor preserves a critical motor period in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Wolansky, M J; Paratcha, G C; Ibarra, G R; Azcurra, J M

    1999-01-01

    We previously found the occurrence of a critical motor period during rat postnatal development where circling training starting the 7-day schedule at 30 days-but not before or after-induces a lifetime drop in the binding to cholinergic muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) in striatum. Here, we studied whether nerve growth factor (NGF) participates in this restricted period of muscarinic sensitivity. For this purpose, we administered mouse salival gland 2.5S NGF (1.4 or 0.4 microg/day, infused by means of ALZA minipumps) by intrastriatal unilateral route between days 25 and 39, and then trained rats starting at 40 days. Under these conditions, NGF induced a long-term reduction in the striatal [3H] quinuclidilbenzylate (QNB) binding sites despite the fact that motor training was carried out beyond the natural critical period. Thus, at day 70, measurement of specific QNB binding in infused striata of trained rats showed decreases of 42% (p < .0004) and 33% (p < .02) after administration of the higher and lower NGF doses, respectively, with respect to trained rats treated with cytochrome C, for control. Noncannulated striata of the NGF-treated rats also showed a decrease in QNB binding sites (44%; p < .0001) only at the higher infusion rate. This effect was not found in the respective control groups. Our observations show that NGF modulates the critical period in which activity-dependent mAChR setting takes place during rat striatal maturation.

  15. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  16. The Effect of Vitamin D Treatment On Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Release From Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    GEZEN-AK, Duygu; DURSUN, Erdinç; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D, the main function of which is thought to be the maintenance of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and bone structure, has been shown in recent studies to have important roles in brain development as well. A certain vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene haplotype was reported, for the first time by our group, to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our studies also showed that vitamin D prevents beta amyloid-induced calcium elevation and toxicity that target nerve growth factor (NGF) release in cortical neurons; beta amyloid suppresses VDR expression and the disruption of vitamin D-VDR pathway mimics beta amyloid-induced neurodegeneration. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of vitamin D on the NGF release from hippocampal neurons. Method Primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat embryos were treated with vitamin D for 48 hours. The alteration in the NGF release was determined with ELISA. Cytotoxicity tests were also performed for all groups. Results The NGF release in vitamin D-treated group was significantly higher than in untreated control group. The protective effect of vitamin D against cytotoxicity was also observed. Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D regulates the release of NGF, a very important molecule for neuronal survival of hippocampal neurons as well as cortical neurons.

  17. Urinary nerve growth factor and a variable solifenacin dosage in patients with an overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Seyfettin; Ozkurkcugil, Cuneyd; Yilmaz, Hasan; Ustuner, Murat; Yavuz, Ufuk; Yuksekkaya, Mustafa; Cekmen, Mustafa Baki

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated changes in urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and NGF/creatinine (NGF/Cr) levels after increasing the dosage of solifenacin in overactive bladder patients. The study groups included 59 overactive bladder (OAB) patients and 20 healthy subjects as controls. We measured NGF at baseline for the patients and controls, and used the Overactive Bladder Awareness Tool (OAB-V8) to evaluate urinary symptoms. All patients received a treatment of solifenacin 5 mg for 6 weeks. The responders to treatment served as group 1 and nonresponders received solifenacin 10 mg for an additional 6 weeks. Responders and nonresponders to the 10-mg treatment were defined as groups 2 and 3 respectively. NGF was measured after each treatment using the ELISA method and normalized by the urinary creatinine levels (NGF/Cr). There were 21, 22 and 16 patients in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. At baseline, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels were higher in groups 1, 2, and 3 compared with the controls. After the solifenacin 5 mg treatment, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels of group 1 individuals decreased to those of the control level. After increasing the dosage of solifenacin to 10 mg in group 2, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels decreased to normal levels. In group 3 (patients who did not responded to any treatment), these levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that urinary NGF could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the treatment of symptoms in OAB patients who are treated with solifenacin.

  18. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor A, in rooster testes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Wang, Chunqiang; Su, Yuhong; Tian, Yumin; Zhu, Hongyan

    2015-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), which is required for the survival and differentiation of the nervous system, is also thought to play an important role in the development of mammalian reproductive tissues. To explore the function of NGF in the male reproductive system of non-mammalian animals, we determined the presence of NGF and its receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), in rooster testes and investigated the regulation of NGF and TrkA expression by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The mRNA and protein levels of NGF and TrkA in 6-week-old rooster testes were lower than those in 12-, 16- or 20-week age groups; levels were highest in the 16-week group. Immunohistochemistry showed that NGF and TrkA were both detected in spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids. NGF immunoreactivity was observed in Leydig cells and strong TrkA signals were present in Sertoli cells. Meanwhile, FSH increased TrkA transcript levels in rooster testes in a dose-dependent manner. We present novel evidence for the developmental and FSH-regulated expression of the NGF/TrkA system, and our findings suggest that the NGF/TrkA system may play a prominent role in chicken spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nerve growth factor evokes hyperalgesia in mice lacking the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I; Reiter, R; Toyka, K V; Koltzenburg, M

    1998-10-16

    Endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) has been shown to be an important mediator of inflammatory pain and exogenous application of recombinant human NGF (rhNGF) produces pain and hyperalgesia in animals and humans. Since NGF can act through two receptors types, the high affinity tyrosine kinase A (trkA) receptor and the low affinity p75 receptor, we used transgenic mice lacking p75 to analyse the relative importance of these receptors. After systemic injection of rhNGF (5 mg/ kg), pharmacokinetic studies revealed similar serum levels and elimination profiles of exogenously administered rhNGF in both strains of mice. Although animals lacking p75 have increased mechanical and thermal withdrawal thresholds they developed both heat and mechanical hyperalgesia after systemic injection of rhNGF whose magnitude did not differ significantly from wildtype animals. This means that NGF-induced hyperalgesia can occur in the absence of the p75 receptor and suggests that the trkA receptor is sufficient to mediate the acute noxious action of NGF.

  20. Effects of Myoga on Memory and Synaptic Plasticity by Regulating Nerve Growth Factor-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Ae-Jung; Oh, Myung Sook

    2016-02-01

    The flower bud of Zingiber mioga Roscoe, known as 'myoga' or Japanese ginger, has a pungent aroma and is commonly consumed as a spice, with pickles, or as a health supplement in Eastern Asia. Here, we evaluated the activity of myoga in the brain, focusing especially on nerve growth factor (NGF), which is believed to mediate synaptic plasticity, supporting learning and memory. In a rat primary hippocampal astrocyte culture system, treatment with myoga extract for 24 h significantly stimulated the production of NGF. In mice administered myoga extract for 14 days, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day treatment resulted in increased NGF levels in the hippocampus. Myoga extract treatment also regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cAMP response element-binding protein in the mouse hippocampus, leading to increased synaptic plasticity. In addition, it significantly increased novel object recognition time and spontaneous alternation, indicating improvement in learning and memory. These results suggest that myoga helps regulate NGF and synaptic plasticity, increasing memory ability.

  1. Some characteristics of histamine secretion from rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, F L; Thompson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) isolated from mouse submandibular gland or from snake venom produced a dose-dependent release of histamine from isolated rat peritoneal mast cells. The response was almost totally dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium ions and on added phosphatidylserine or its lyso-derivative. At high concentrations, strontium ions could substitute for calcium. The process was non-cytotoxic, relatively slow, pH dependent and blocked by polyclonal antibodies to NGF. Binding of NGF to the mast cell was not dependent on added calcium. The release was unaffected by low molecular weight glucose polymers or specific quaternary ammonium salts and thus differed from that evoked by clinical dextran or polyamines. The release was not inhibited by soluble rat IgE or IgG and was unimpaired in mast cells recovered from specific pathogen free rats. As such it did not appear to be mediated through interaction with cell-fixed antibodies. The process further differed from anaphylactic histamine release in that there was no accompanying change in the intracellular level of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), the activated state induced by NGF was much more persistent than that evoked by antigen, and there was no cross-desensitization between the two latter stimuli. In total, these data suggest that NGF may induce secretion from rat mast cells by interaction with a specific receptor on the plasma membrane, possibly similar to that present on sensory and sympathetic neurones. PMID:2425086

  2. Serum nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Guney, Esra; Ceylan, Mehmet Fatih; Kara, Mehmet; Tekin, Neslihan; Goker, Zeynep; Senses Dinc, Gulser; Ozturk, Onder; Eker, Sevda; Kizilgun, Murat

    2014-02-07

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. The etiopathogeny of ADHD has not been totally defined. Recent reports have suggested a pathophysiological role of neurotrophins in ADHD. In this study, we evaluated serum levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in patients with ADHD. The sample population consisted of 44 child or adolescent patients diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV criteria; 36 healthy subjects were included in the study as controls. Venous blood samples were collected, and NGF levels were measured. The mean serum NGF levels of the ADHD patients were significantly higher than those of the controls. Age and gender of the patients were not correlated with serum NGF levels. There were no significant differences in NGF levels among the combined and predominantly inattentive subtypes of ADHD. Our study suggests that there are higher levels of serum NGF in drug naive ADHD patients, and that increased levels of NGF might have an important role in the pathophysiology of ADHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Depletion of nerve growth factor in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy associated with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Youk, Jeonghwan; Kim, Young-Sook; Lim, Jung-Ah; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Koh, Youngil; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Inho

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the depletion of nerve growth factor (NGF) is associated with the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in patients with hematologic malignancy. We prospectively enrolled hematologic cancer patients who had a plan to receive bortezomib, thalidomide, or vincristine. Baseline NGF levels were measured within one week before the start date of chemotherapy. Follow-up NGF levels were measured after four months from the start date of chemotherapy or the date when CIPN was initially diagnosed. Baseline and follow-up NGF pairs were measured in 45 patients (male/female = 27/18, median age = 63 years old). CIPN has developed in 28 patients. In the CIPN group, the level of NGF was significantly decreased after chemotherapy compared to the baseline (△NGF = -3.52 ±5.72; p-value = 0.003), while the NGF level of the no-CIPN group was not changed after chemotherapy. The differences in △NGF levels between the CIPN and no-CIPN group were more profound when analyzed in the subgroup of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients (△NGF = -4.14 ± 4.87 pg/ml for the CIPN group and +2.52 ± 8.39 pg/ml for the no-CIPN group; p-value = 0.043). This study shows that the depletion of NGF occurs during the development of CIPN, suggesting pathogenesis based on the role of NGF and therapeutic implications.

  4. Quantitative analysis of nerve growth factor in the amniotic fluid during chick embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Farhad; Dianati, Elham; Moghadam, Lotfali Masomi

    2011-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and most neurotrophic factors support the proliferation and survival of particular types of neurons. Besidesthe pivotal role of NGF in the development of neuronal cells, it also has important functions on non-neuronal cells. The amnion surrounds the embryo, providing an aqueous environment for the embryo. A wide range of proteins has been identified in human amniotic fluid (AF). In this study, total protein concentration (TPC) and NGF level in AF samples from chick embryos were measured using a Bio-Rad protein assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot. TPC increased from days E10 to day E18. There was a rapid increase in AF TPC on day E15 when compared to day E16. No significant changes in NGF levels have been seen from day E10 to day E14. There was a rapid increase in NGF content on days E15 and E16, and thereafter the levels decreased from day E16 to day E18. Since, NGF is important in brain development and changes in AF NGF levels have been seen in some CNS malformations, changes in the TPC and NGF levels in AF during chick embryonic development may be correlated with cerebral cortical development. It is also concluded that NGF is a constant component of the AF during chick embryogenesis.

  5. Differential activation of dendritic cells by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Noga, O; Peiser, M; Altenähr, M; Knieling, H; Wanner, R; Hanf, G; Grosse, R; Suttorp, N

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in inflammatory reactions influencing several cells in health and disease including allergy and asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in the induction of inflammatory processes with an increasing role in allergic diseases as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neurotrophins on DC function. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated from allergic and non-allergic donors. Neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of small GTPases was evaluated by pull-down assays. DCs were incubated with nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and supernatants were collected for measurement of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Receptor proteins were detectable by western blot, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Signalling after neurotrophin stimulation occurred in a ligand-specific pattern. NGF led to decreased RhoA and increased Rac activation, while BDNF affected RhoA and Rac activity in a reciprocal fashion. Cells of allergics released a significantly increased amount of IL-6, while for healthy subjects a significantly higher amount of IL-10 was found. These data indicate that DCs are activated by the neurotrophins NGF and BDNF by different pathways in a receptor-dependant manner. These cells then may initiate inflammatory responses based on allergic sensitization releasing preferred cytokines inducing tolerance or a T-helper type 2 response.

  6. Neuroprotection by Cocktails of Dietary Antioxidants under Conditions of Nerve Growth Factor Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Flavio; Berbenni, Miluscia; Fragni, Martina; Leoni, Giampaolo; Viggiani, Sandra; Ippolito, Vita Maria; Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Alberghina, Lilia; Riccio, Paolo; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants may be useful in counteracting the chronic inflammatory status in neurodegenerative diseases by reducing oxidative stress due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we newly described the efficacy of a number of dietary antioxidants (polyphenols, carotenoids, thiolic compounds, and oligoelements) on viability of neuronal PC12 cells following Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) deprivation, a model of age-related decrease of neurotrophic support that triggers neuronal loss. Neuroprotection by antioxidants during NGF deprivation for 24 h was largely dependent on their concentrations: all dietary antioxidants were able to efficiently support cell viability by reducing ROS levels and restoring mitochondrial function, while preserving the neuronal morphology. Moreover, ROS reduction and neuroprotection during NGF withdrawal were also achieved with defined cocktails of 3–6 different antioxidants at concentrations 5–60 times lower than those used in single treatments, suggesting that their antioxidant activity was preserved also at very low concentrations. Overall, these data indicate the beneficial effects of antioxidants against oxidative stress induced by decreased NGF availability and suggest that defined cocktails of dietary factors at low concentrations might be a suitable strategy to reduce oxidative damage in neurodegenerative diseases, while limiting possible side effects. PMID:26236423

  7. Tiam1 as a Signaling Mediator of Nerve Growth Factor-Dependent Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Marçal; Paratcha, Gustavo; Ledda, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation requires the activation of members of the Rho family of small GTPases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which NGF regulates cytoskeletal changes and neurite outgrowth are not totally understood. In this work, we identify the Rac1-specific guanine exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 as a novel mediator of NGF/TrkA-dependent neurite elongation. In particular, we report that knockdown of Tiam1 causes a significant reduction in Rac1 activity and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. Physical interaction between Tiam1 and active Ras (Ras-GTP), but not tyrosine phosphorylation of Tiam1, plays a central role in Rac1 activation by NGF. In addition, our findings indicate that Ras is required to associate Tiam1 with Rac1 and promote Rac1 activation upon NGF stimulation. Taken together, these findings define a novel molecular mechanism through which Tiam1 mediates TrkA signaling and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. PMID:20333299

  8. Zhangfei, a novel regulator of the human nerve growth factor receptor, trkA.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Ximena; Rapin, Noreen; Misra, Vikram

    2008-10-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in epithelial cells, and during reactivation from latency in sensory neurons, depends on a ubiquitous cellular protein called host cell factor (HCF). The HSV transactivator, VP16, which initiates the viral replicative cycle, binds HCF as do some other cellular proteins. Of these, the neuronal transcription factor Zhangfei suppresses the ability of VP16 to initiate the replicative cycle. It also suppresses Luman, another cellular transcription factor that binds HCF. Interactions of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase (trkA) appear to be critical for maintaining HSV latency. Because the neuronal transcription factor Brn3a, which regulates trkA expression, has a motif for binding HCF, we investigated if Zhangfei had an effect on its activity. We found that Brn3a required HCF for activating the trkA promoter and Zhangfei suppressed its activity in non-neuronal cells. However, in neuron-like NGF-differentiated PC12 cells, both Brn3a and Zhangfei activated the trkA promoter and induced the expression of endogenous trkA. In addition, capsaicin, a stressor, which activates HSV in in vitro models of latency, decreased levels of Zhangfei and trkA transcripts in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  9. Altered expression of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the kidneys of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Rossi, Simona; Manni, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DB) is a multifactorial metabolic disorder characterized by loss of insulin-producing pancreatic ß-cells, and metabolic and functional deficits in a number of cells, including kidney cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a signaling molecule that is up-regulated in cells affected by diabetes-linked disorders. However, whether DB alters the expression of NGF in the kidney is not known. DB was induced in adult male rats with a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and NGF protein levels were analyzed in a time-course study in serum and kidney. The expression of NGF receptors in the kidneys of healthy and DB rats was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. NGF levels as well as apoptotic features in the kidneys of healthy rats injected with purified NGF were also assessed. This study revealed that DB elevates NGF levels in serum and NGF expression in the kidney and that subcutaneous administration of NGF causes a marked uptake of NGF in kidney cells. The elevated presence of NGF in kidney cells is not associated with proapoptotic factor expression. The present data suggest that NGF presence in the kidney might play a survival, and most probably protective, role in kidney cells.

  10. Nerve growth factor localization in the nasal mucosa of patients with persistent allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, M; Lalibertè, F; Lalibertè, M F; Gramiccioni, C; Bonini, S

    2009-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and NGF receptors have been shown to be expressed by structural and infiltrating inflammatory cells in the human allergic bronchial mucosa and conjunctiva. In the nose, a positive immunostaining for NGF was recently reported in biopsies of subjects undergoing surgery for refractory nasal obstruction. This study was aimed at studying by immunohistochemistry NGF expression and localization in the nasal mucosa from subjects with moderate/severe persistent allergic rhinitis and natural allergen exposure. Immunostaining for NGF, tryptase and eosinophil cationic protein was performed in human nasal turbinate sections of 25 patients affected by persistent allergic rhinitis and sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. NGF was consistently expressed in the epithelium and in the submucosa of allergic rhinitic subjects, preferentially localized in eosinophils and mast cells. A strong NGF immunostaining was found in mucous cells of the epithelial lining and in the submucosal glands. As previously shown for allergic asthma and allergic conjunctivitis, NGF is also detectable in the nasal mucosa of patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. The preferential NGF localization in mucous cells of the epithelial lining and in the submucosal glands suggests a possible role for NGF in modulating secretion in allergic rhinitis and possibly other allergic diseases.

  11. The Multiple Life of Nerve Growth Factor: Tribute to Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Chaldakov, George N.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century, it was envisaged by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, but not, proven, that life at the neuronal level requires trophic support. The proof was obtained in the early 1950’s by work initiated by Rita Levi-Montalcini (RLM) discovering the nerve growth factor (NGF). Today, NGF and its relatives, collectively designated neurotrophins, are well recognized as mediators of multiple biological phenomena in health and disease, ranging from the neurotrophic through immunotrophic and epitheliotrophic to metabotrophic effects. Consequently, NGF and other neurotrophins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, from Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases to atherosclerosis and other cardiometabolic diseases. Recent studies demonstrated the therapeutic potentials of NGF in these diseases, including ocular and cutaneous diseases. Furthermore, NGF TrkA receptor antagonists emerged as novel drugs for pain, prostate and breast cancer, melanoma, and urinary bladder syndromes. Altogether, NGF’s multiple potential in health and disease is briefly described here. PMID:25207059

  12. Atlastin regulates store-operated calcium entry for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yan, Bing; Si, Hongjiang; Peng, Xu; Zhang, Shenyuan L.; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a class of dynamin-like GTPases known as atlastin (ATL). Depletion of or mutations in ATL cause an unbranched ER morphology and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by axon shortening in corticospinal motor neurons and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. How ER shaping is linked to neuronal defects is poorly understood. Here, we show that dominant-negative mutants of ATL1 in PC-12 cells inhibit nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of wild-type or mutant ATL1 or depletion of ATLs alters ER morphology and affects store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by decreasing STIM1 puncta formation near the plasma membrane upon calcium depletion of the ER. In addition, blockage of the STIM1-Orai pathway effectively abolishes neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells stimulated by NGF. These results suggest that SOCE plays an important role in neuronal regeneration, and mutations in ATL1 may cause HSP, partly by undermining SOCE. PMID:28240257

  13. Expression Profile of Nerve Growth Factor after Muscle Incision in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chaoran; Erickson, Mark A.; Xu, Jun; Wild, Kenneth D.; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important mediator of pathologic pain. Many studies have focused on cutaneous mechanisms for NGF-induced hyperalgesia; few have examined its contribution in deeper tissues like muscle. This study examined pain behaviors and the expression of NGF in incised hind paw flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with anti-NGF peptibody and underwent skin or skin plus deep fascia and muscle incision. Guarding pain behaviors were measured. Muscle NGF messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by real time polymerase chain reaction. Changes in NGF protein expression were measured using western blot, enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and immunohistochemistry. In situ hybridization for NGF mRNA was also performed. Results Pretreatment with anti-NGF peptibody (100 mg/kg) decreased the guarding behavior caused by deep fascia and muscle incision. Muscle NGF mRNA increased abruptly 2 h after incision and was the same as control by postoperative day 1. NGF protein increased from 4 h after incision, and was sustained for several days. NGF was localized in many calcitonin gene related peptide positive axons, few N52 positive axons, but not isolectin B4 positive axons in incised muscle. The sources of NGF mRNA included keratinocytes in epidermis and fibroblasts in deeper tissues. Conclusion Fibroblasts adjacent to the injury are sources of NGF in incised muscle. NGF is upregulated by incision of muscle and contributes to guarding pain behavior. PMID:19104181

  14. Effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the development of preimplantation rabbit embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the development of preimplantation rabbit embryos in vitro. Zygotes were collected from superovulated New Zealand rabbits 19 h after injection of hCG and immediately mating and cultured in TCM-199 plus fatty-acid free BSA with different concentrations of NGF. Zygotes not treated with NGF served as control. At 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h of the culture, the numbers of the early cleavage stage, morulae, blastocysts and hatching blastocysts were determined. The intrazonal diameter of the blastocyst and the total cell numbers per blastocyst were measured after 96 h of culture. The results showed: (1) NGF at 100 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL could improve the numbers of the hatching blastocysts which developed compared to the control treatment (p < 0.05); (2) All concentrations of NGF increased the total cell numbers in the blastocysts compared to the control treatment (p < 0.05); (3) NGF had no significant effect on the blastocyst intrazonal diameter of the blastocysts at 96 h of culture (p = 0.493); (4) The proportion in the early cleavage stage at 24 h of culture (p = 0.635), of morulae at 48 h of culture (p = 0.812) and of blastocysts at 72 h of culture (p = 0.812) in all treatments were not significantly different.

  15. Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2013-07-14

    Fruits rich in phytochemicals have been shown to improve memory by protecting or enhancing neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), in the hippocampus. Mori Fructus (Morus alba L., Moraceae), also called mulberry, is used as a food, dietary supplement and an anti-ageing agent in traditional Oriental medicine. It is also known to contain abundant flavonoid compounds and to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus extract (ME) in mice, with a focus on NGF regulation. ME (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg per d for 7 d, per os) dose-dependently promoted NGF release in the mouse hippocampus, leading to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. ME significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation, acetylcholine synthesisation, neuronal cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, ME significantly increased latency time in the passive avoidance task (P< 0·001) and recognition time of novel objects in the object recognition test (P< 0·05), indicating improvements in learning and memory. Taken together, these data suggest that ME exhibits a memory-enhancing effect via up-regulation of NGF.

  16. Solubilization of nerve growth factor receptors of rabbit superior cervical ganglia.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S P; Cuatrecasas, P; Snyder, S H

    1976-09-25

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors of rabbit superior cervical ganglia can be solubilized by treatment with detergents and readily assayed in the soluble state. Triton X-100 and deoxycholate reduce specific binding of NGF to ganglia membranes. In membranes treated with Triton X-100 (0.5 to 2.0%) the reduction in NGF binding by membranes is accompanied by a corresponding increase in binding in the supernatant fluid. NGF binding in soluble preparations can be rapidly assayed by precipitating NGF bound to receptors with polyethylene glycol under conditions in which unbound NGF is not precipitated. NGF binding to soluble preparations is saturable whether evaluated by the binding of 125I-NGF or by diluting 125I-NGF with native NGF. Using both techniques, the dissociation constant for NGF binding to soluble receptors is about 0.2 nM, the same as its dissociation constant from receptor sites in intact membranes. NGF binding to soluble receptors displays a high degree of peptide specificity, similar to receptor sites in intact membranes of superior cervical ganglia. A method of labeling NGF with 125I-3(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester is described which leads to binding properties that are superior to those obtained with previously described 125I-NGF preparations.

  17. Locally applied nerve growth factor enhances bone consolidation in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Shuxia; Liu, Baolin; Lei, Delin; Zhao, Yinghua; Lu, Chao; Tan, Aixing

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in treating deformities, defects, and fractures of both long bones and craniofacial bones. Demands for acceleration of bone consolidation are increased in distraction osteogenesis. Nerve growth factor (NGF) can enhance innervation and bone regeneration in a fracture model and stimulate differentiation of osteoblastic cells. In this study, we tested the ability of locally applied NGF to enhance bone regeneration in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Twenty rabbits underwent bilateral distraction osteogenesis with a rate of 0.5 mm per 12 h. Two times 0.04 mg human NGFbeta (hNGFbeta) in buffer was injected into the callus after distraction. The contralateral side received placebo injections. Rabbits were euthanized at consolidation times of 14 and 28 days. Specimens were subjected to radiography, callus dimensions measurement, mechanical testing, and bone histological and histomorphometric analysis. The maximum load, bone volume/total volume, mineral apposition rate of the 1st to 11th day, and mineralized bone percentage were significantly higher in the hNGFbeta side at 14 and 28 days (p<0.05). The data indicate that locally applied hNGFbeta can accelerate callus maturation and may be an option to shorten the consolidation period in distraction osteogenesis.

  18. Nerve growth factor induced hyperalgesia in the rat hind paw is dependent on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G; al-Rashed, S; Hoult, J R; Brain, S D

    1998-09-01

    The mechanisms by which nerve growth factor (NGF) induces thermal hyperalgesia and neutrophil accumulation have been investigated in the rat. Thermal nociceptive thresholds in rat hind paw were measured as the time taken for paw withdrawal from a heat source and neutrophil accumulation was measured in hind paw and dorsal skin samples using a myeloperoxidase assay. NGF (23-80 pmol intraplantar (i.pl.) injection) induced a significant (P < 0.05, n = 6-16) thermal hyperalgesia at 5 h after injection and significant neutrophil accumulation (P < 0.05, n = 6) was observed with NGF (40 pmol). In dorsal skin, where multiple samples can be assessed, intradermal (i.d.) NGF was 10-30 times less potent than interleukin-1beta in inducing neutrophil accumulation. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZM230487 (10 nmol co-injected with NGF) significantly attenuated neutrophil accumulation and hyperalgesia induced by NGF; unlike the histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists (mepyramine and methysergide) which were without effect at the times measured. Furthermore, depletion of circulating neutrophils (using a rabbit anti-rat neutrophil antibody) abolished NGF induced hyperalgesia. These results indicate that neutrophils, which accumulate in response to a 5-lipoxygenase product, play a crucial role in NGF-induced hyperalgesia.

  19. Nerve growth factor receptor from rabbit sympathetic ganglia membranes. Relationship between subforms.

    PubMed

    Kouchalakos, R N; Bradshaw, R A

    1986-12-05

    The receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) was purified from Triton X-100 extracts of sympathetic ganglia membranes by affinity chromatography on NGF-Sepharose. Elution of purified receptor was accomplished at pH 5 in the presence of 1 M NaCl. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the purified iodinated receptor showed three major bands at Mr = 126,000, Mr = 105,000, and Mr = 81,000. Affinity labeling of the purified receptor using 125I-NGF and the photoreactive agent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-p-azidobenzoate resulted in two major cross-linked complexes corresponding to Mr = 135,000 and Mr = 110,000. This labeling pattern is similar to that observed with sympathetic ganglia membranes (Massague, J., Guillette, B. J., Czech, M. P., Morgan, C. J., and Bradshaw, R. A. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 9419-9424) and indicates that these two forms do not arise from the cross-linking procedure. Reaction of the photoaffinity labeled NGF receptors with increasing amounts of trypsin resulted in a progressive decrease in the high molecular weight complex with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight form. When the larger complex was isolated by electroelution from a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel and treated with trypsin, a species corresponding to Mr = 100,000 was generated. These observations are best explained by a precursor-product relationship for the two NGF receptor species of sympathetic neurons.

  20. Nerve growth factor and nociception: from experimental embryology to new analgesic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gary R; Lechner, Stefan G; Smith, Ewan St John

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is central to the development and functional regulation of sensory neurons that signal the first events that lead to pain. These sensory neurons, called nociceptors, require NGF in the early embryo to survive and also for their functional maturation. The long road from the discovery of NGF and its roles during development to the realization that NGF plays a major role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory pain will be reviewed. In particular, we will discuss the various signaling events initiated by NGF that lead to long-lasting thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in animals and in man. It has been realized relatively recently that humanized function blocking antibodies directed against NGF show remarkably analgesic potency in human clinical trials for painful conditions as varied as osteoarthritis, lower back pain, and interstitial cystitis. Thus, anti-NGF medication has the potential to make a major impact on day-to-day chronic pain treatment in the near future. It is therefore all the more important to understand the precise pathways and mechanisms that are controlled by NGF to both initiate and sustain mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Recent work suggests that NGF-dependent regulation of the mechanosensory properties of sensory neurons that signal mechanical pain may open new mechanistic avenues to refine and exploit relevant molecular targets for novel analgesics.

  1. Nerve growth factor in the adult brain of a teleostean model for aging research: Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, L; Castaldo, L; Cellerino, A; de Girolamo, P; Lucini, C

    2014-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) acts on central nervous system neurons, regulating naturally occurring cell death, synaptic connectivity, fiber guidance and dendritic morphology. The dynamically regulated production of NGF beginning in development, extends throughout adult life and aging, exerting numerous roles through a surprising variety of neurons and glial cells. This study analyzes the localization of NGF in the brain of the teleost fish Nothobranchius furzeri, an emerging model for aging research due to its short lifespan. Immunochemical and immunohistochemical experiments were performed by employing an antibody mapping at the N-terminus of the mature chain human origin NGF. Western blot analysis revealed an intense and well defined band of 20 kDa, which corresponds to proNGF of N. furzeri. Immunohistochemistry revealed NGF immunoreactivity (IR) diffused throughout all regions of telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon and rhomboencephalon. It was detected in neurons and in glial cells, the latter mostly lining the mesencephalic and rhomboencephalic ventricles. Particularly in neurons, NGF IR was localized in perikarya and, to a less extent, in fibers. The widespread distribution of proNGF suggests that it might modulate numerous physiological functions in the adult brain of N. furzeri. The present survey constitutes a baseline study to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of NGF during aging processes.

  2. Amplification and Temporal Filtering during Gradient Sensing by Nerve Growth Cones Probed with a Microfluidic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mathieu; Shynkar, Vasyl; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Dupin, Isabelle; Bouzigues, Cedric; Studer, Vincent; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth cones (GCs) are chemical sensors that convert graded extracellular cues into oriented axonal motion. To ensure a sensitive and robust response to directional signals in complex and dynamic chemical landscapes, GCs are presumably able to amplify and filter external information. How these processing tasks are performed remains however poorly known. Here, we probe the signal-processing capabilities of single GCs during γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) directional sensing with a shear-free microfluidic assay that enables systematic measurements of the GC output response to variable input gradients. By measuring at the single molecule level the polarization of GABAA chemoreceptors at the GC membrane, as a function of the external GABA gradient, we find that GCs act as i), signal amplifiers over a narrow range of concentrations, and ii), low-pass temporal filters with a cutoff frequency independent of stimuli conditions. With computational modeling, we determine that these systems-level properties arise at a molecular level from the saturable occupancy response and the lateral dynamics of GABAA receptors. PMID:23083707

  3. Reduced nerve growth factor levels in stress-related brain regions of folate-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Eckart, S; Hörtnagl, H; Kronenberg, G; Gertz, K; Hörster, H; Endres, M; Hellweg, R

    2013-08-15

    Folate deficiency has been linked to neurodegenerative and stress-related diseases such as stroke, dementia and depression. The role of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in stress-related disorders and neurodegeneration has garnered increasing attention in recent years. Uracil misincorporation is involved in the neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deprivation. However, the effects of folate deficiency on the expression of NGF and NT-3 in brain tissue have not yet been investigated. In a 2×2 design, aged mice lacking uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (Ung(-/-)) versus wild-type (Ung(+/+)) controls were subjected to a folate-deficient diet versus a regular diet for three months. Independent of genotype, folate deficiency led to decreased NGF protein levels in the frontal cortex and amygdala. In the hippocampus, NGF levels were increased in UNG(-/-) mice on the normal diet, but not under folate deficiency, while in UNG(+/+) mice, folate deprivation did not affect hippocampal NGF content. NT-3 protein concentrations were neither affected by genotype nor by folate deficiency. Altogether, the results of our study show that folate deficiency affects NGF levels in the frontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. The decrease in NGF content in the hippocampus in response to folate deficiency in Ung(-/-) mice may contribute to their phenotype of enhanced anxiety and despair-like behavior as well as to selective hippocampal neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amyloid beta-induced nerve growth factor dysmetabolism in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Martin A; Leon, Wanda C; Fragoso, Gabriela; Mushynski, Walter E; Almazan, Guillermina; Cuello, A Claudio

    2009-08-01

    We previously reported that the precursor form of nerve growth factor (pro-NGF) and not mature NGF is liberated in the CNS in an activity-dependent manner, and that its maturation and degradation occur in the extracellular space by the coordinated action of proteases.Here, we present evidence of diminished conversion of pro-NGF to its mature form and of greater NGF degradation in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain samples compared with controls. These alterations of the NGF metabolic pathway likely resulted in the increased pro-NGF levels. The pro-NGF was largely in a peroxynitrited form in the AD samples. Intrahippocampal injection of amyloid-beta oligomers provoked similar upregulation of pro-NGF in naive rats that was accompanied by evidence of microglial activation (CD40), increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and increased activity of the NGF-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9. The elevated inducible nitric oxide synthase provoked the generation of biologically inactive, peroxynitrite-modified pro-NGF in amyloid-beta oligomer-injected rats. These parameters were corrected by minocycline treatment. Minocycline also diminished altered matrix metalloproteinase 9, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and microglial activation (CD40); improved cognitive behavior; and normalized pro-NGF levels in a transgenic mouse AD model. The effects of amyloid-beta amyloid CNS burden on NGF metabolism may explain the paradoxical upregulation of pro-NGF in AD accompanied by atrophy of forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  5. Nerve growth factor plasma levels and ventricular repolarization in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guideri, F; Acampa, M; Calamandrei, G; Aloe, L; Zappella, M; Hayek, Y

    2004-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurological developmental disorder. In this syndrome, the high incidence of sudden death is correlated with an alteration of ventricular repolarization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate plasmatic levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in Rett patients with prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval in comparison with those of Rett patients with normal QTc. We observed 23 female Rett patients (9.9+/-4.7 years). NGF plasma levels and QTc interval were measured in all patients. Student t-test was performed for statistical analysis. NGF plasma levels were significantly lower in Rett patients with QTc interval prolongation (QTc > 0.44 sec) in comparison with Rett patients with a normal QTc interval (4.5+/-4.5 vs 11+/-8.3 pg/ml, p = 0.02). The alteration of NGF levels, observed in Rett patients with a long QTc interval, may explain the presence of an altered ventricular repolarization associated with a higher risk of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. Enhanced bioavailability of nerve growth factor with phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles in cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Meng; Tang, Jingling; Wei, Yinghui; Sun, Yanhui; Wang, Xinyu; Wu, Linhua; Liu, Hongzhuo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Supplementation of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) into the cochlea of deafened animals rescues spiral ganglion cells from degeneration. However, a safe and potent delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as NGF, to spiral ganglion cells remains one of the greatest challenges. This study presents the development of self-assembled cubic lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to enhance inner ear bioavailability of bioactive NGF via a round window membrane route. Methods A novel nanocarrier-entrapped NGF was developed based on phytantriol by a liquid precursor dilution, with Pluronic® F127 and propylene glycol as the surfactant and solubilizer, respectively. Upon dilution of the liquid lipid precursors, monodispersed submicron-sized particles with a slight negative charge formed spontaneously. Results Biological activity of entrapped NGF was assessed using pheochromocytoma cells with NGF-loaded reservoirs to induce significant neuronal outgrowth, similar to that seen in free NGF-treated controls. Finally, a 3.28-fold increase in inner ear bioavailability was observed after administration of phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles as compared to free drug, contributing to an enhanced drug permeability of the round window membrane. Conclusion Data presented here demonstrate the potential of lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to improve the outcomes of patients bearing cochlear implants. PMID:26604754

  7. Nerve growth factor amplifies cyclic AMP production in the HT4 neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; McKay, R; Clarke, W P

    1995-01-01

    There has been considerable interest and controversy in the relationship between nerve growth factor (NGF) and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) second messenger system. We have used a novel, neuronal cell line (HT4) to investigate the effect of NGF on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system. Treatment of cells with NGF (100 ng/ml, 15 min) amplified cAMP accumulation (approximately 75%) in response to activation of adenosine A2 receptors (5 min) with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine or activation of adenylyl cyclase directly with forskolin. Basal cAMP accumulation was not altered by NGF. This amplification appears to be mediated by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) because (1) it was mimicked by activators (phorbol esters and a diacylglycerol analogue) of PKC, (2) the effects of NGF and phorbol ester on cAMP accumulation were not additive, (3) NGF amplification of cAMP accumulation was abolished by down-regulation of PKC, (4) NGF increased cytosolic PKC activity, and (5) inhibitors of PKC blocked the NGF-induced amplification of cAMP accumulation. Although NGF-induced amplification of cAMP accumulation was dependent upon PKC, mechanisms other than the classic activation pathway (i.e., hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids or the production of diacylglycerol) appeared to mediate PKC activation by NGF. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A, blocked NGF-mediated amplification of cAMP accumulation, suggesting a novel interaction between a tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C.

  8. Nerve growth induces 5-HT sub 3 recognition sites in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.C.; Rowland, H.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, nerve growth factor (7S NGF) induced the expression of recognition sites that bind the specific 5-HT{sub 3} antagonist (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride. Culturing PC12 cells for 8-12 days in the presence of 50 ng/ml NGF increased the density (B{sub max}) of (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride binding sites in cell membranes (0-100,000 x g fraction) from 0 to 105 fmoles/mg protein. This binding exhibited high affinity for (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride (K{sub d}=0.8 nM), was specific (>95%), and was inhibited by 5-HT{sub 3} compounds with a rank of potency (quipazine>ICS 205-930 > GR38032F > BRL 24924{approx}MDL 72222 > phenylbiguanide {le} seroton-in > 2-methyl-serotonin > metoclopramide) which was distinct from neuroblastoma cells. Thus, NGF-differentiated PC12 cells possess a 5-HT{sub 3} receptor and should be useful to investigate its regulation and biochemical mechanism of action.

  9. Structure-function studies of nerve growth factor: functional importance of highly conserved amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, C F; Hallböök, F; Ebendal, T; Persson, H

    1990-01-01

    Selected amino acid residues in chicken nerve growth factor (NGF) were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutated NGF sequences were transiently expressed in COS cells and the yield of NGF protein in conditioned medium was quantified by Western blotting. Binding of each mutant to NGF receptors on PC12 cells was evaluated in a competition assay. The biological activity was determined by measuring stimulation of neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic ganglia. The residues homologous to the proposed receptor binding site of insulin (Ser18, Met19, Val21, Asp23) were substituted by Ala. Replacement of Ser18, Met19 and Asp23 did not affect NGF activity. Modification of Val21 notably reduced both receptor binding and biological activity, suggesting that this residue is important to retain a fully active NGF. The highly conserved Tyr51 and Arg99 were converted into Phe and Lys respectively, without changing the biological properties of the molecule. However, binding and biological activity were greatly impaired after the simultaneous replacement of both Arg99 and Arg102 by Gly. The three conserved Trp residues at positions 20, 75 and 98 were substituted by Phe. The Trp mutated proteins retained 15-60% of receptor binding and 40-80% of biological activity, indicating that the Trp residues are not essential for NGF activity. However, replacement of Trp20 significantly reduced the amount of NGF in the medium, suggesting that this residue may be important for protein stability. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2328722

  10. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  11. Nerve growth factor for Bell’s palsy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; LIU, JUAN; HU, YAOZHI; CHEN, JINBO

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of Bell’s palsy. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase and a number of Chinese databases, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine disc, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wan Fang Data, were used to collect randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of NGF for Bell’s palsy. The span of the search covered data from the date of database establishment until December 2013. The included trials were screened comprehensively and rigorously. The efficacies of NGF were pooled via meta-analysis performed using Review Manager 5.2 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis of eight RCTs showed favorable effects of NGF on the disease response rate (n=642; OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.13–7.03; P<0.01; I2=0%). However, evidence supporting the effectiveness of NGF for the treatment of Bell’s palsy is limited. The number and quality of trials are too low to form solid conclusions. Further meticulous RCTs are required to overcome the limitations identified in the present study. PMID:25574223

  12. Nerve growth factor protects against palmitic acid-induced injury in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pan-shi; Tang, Shu; Zhang, Hai-feng; Guo, Yuan-yuan; Zeng, Zhi-wen; Wen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an important role for nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that NGF has a protective effect on rat retinal ganglion RGC-5 cells injured by palmitic acid (PA), a metabolic factor implicated in the development of diabetes and its complications. Our results show that PA exposure caused apoptosis of RGC-5 cells, while NGF protected against PA insult in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, NGF significantly attenuated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in RGC-5 cells. Pathway inhibitor tests showed that the protective effect of NGF was completely reversed by LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), Akt VIII inhibitor, and PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor). Western blot analysis revealed that NGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt/FoxO1 and ERK1/2 and reversed the PA-evoked reduction in the levels of these proteins. These results indicate that NGF protects RGC-5 cells against PA-induced injury through anti-oxidation and inhibition of apoptosis by modulation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:28123432

  13. The interactions between nerve growth factor and gonadotrophins in bovine oviduct.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Ma, Yonghe; Yi, Kangle; Wang, Chunqiang; Li, Wanhong; Liu, Zhuo; Sun, Lina; Chen, Shuxiong; Yu, Jiaxin; Li, Hongjiao; Chen, Lu; Zhou, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Nerve growth factor promotes the survival and differentiation of nervous cells and is thought to play an important role in the development of reproductive tissues. The aims of this work were to detect the presence of NGF and its receptor NTRK1 in bovine oviduct samples, and to investigate the regulatory interactions between NGF/NTRK1 and gonadotrophins in bovine oviduct epithelial cells. Both transcripts and proteins of NGF and NTRK1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the corresponding proteins were specifically immunolocalized in oviduct epithelial cells. In addition, real-time PCR experiments revealed that the levels of NGF and NTRK1 mRNA in oviduct epithelial cells treated with exogenous FSH or LH were greater than those in negative control cells (P<0.05). Similarly, treatment with NGF significantly increased the expression of FSHR and LHR in oviduct epithelial cells via its effects on NTRK1 (P<0.05). This process was suppressed by treatment with the NTRK1 inhibitor K252α. We conclude that NGF/NTRK1 may have a role in regulating the function of bovine oviducts via its interactions with gonadotrophins.

  14. Methamphetamine reversed maternal separation-induced decrease in nerve growth factor in the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dimatelis, J J; Russell, V A; Stein, D J; Daniels, W M

    2014-06-01

    Stress has been suggested to predispose individuals to drug abuse. The early life stress of maternal separation (MS) is known to alter the response to drugs of abuse later in life. Exposure to either stress or methamphetamine has been shown to alter neurotrophic factors in the brain. Changes in neurotrophin levels may contribute to the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for drug use- and stress-induced behaviours. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the individual effects of MS and methamphetamine administration during adolescence and the combined effects of both stressors on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (HC) in adulthood. Methamphetamine administration (1 mg/kg, daily from postnatal day (PND) 33 to 36 and from PND 39 to 42), MS and the combination of the two stressors resulted in decreased BDNF levels in both the dorsal and ventral HC. MS decreased NGF levels in the ventral HC which was restored by methamphetamine administration in adolescence. In the dorsal HC, NGF remained unaltered by either stressor alone or in combination. We propose that the restoration of NGF levels in the ventral HC may reflect a possible compensatory mechanism in response to methamphetamine exposure in adolescence following the early life stress of MS.

  15. Circulating nerve growth factor in primary and secondary Raynaud's syndrome - results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klein-Weigel, P; Gutsche-Petrak, B; Humpel, C; Riemekasten, G; Ivanov, S; Heidrich, H

    2009-02-01

    In this pilot study we examined circulating concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) in controls and patients suffering from primary or secondary Raynaud's syndrome and determined their relation to digital vasospasm. Eighteen controls, 16 patients with primary RP and 19 patients with systemic sclerosis (SScl) were included. Degree of vasospasm was graduated according to the degree of plethysmographically measured vasospastic reaction after cold test. A diary was handed out for documentation of the daily number and duration of RP during a period of 16 days. Circulating NGF levels were analysed by a commercial ELISA (Promega Inc., USA). SScl-patients were significantly older (p < 0.0001) and more severely affected by spontaneously occurring RP (p = 0.03), whereas the severity of the vasospastic reactions after a standard cold test were not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.09). Within each study group and between the study groups elevated NGF levels were observed only in SScl-patients after thermal provocations (p = < 0.05). In a correlation analysis restricted to patients with PRP or SRP, the degree of vasospasm after cold testing as well as the intensity of Raynaud's symptoms were not correlated with NGF-levels (p = n.s.). Our results do not support the hypothesis that NGF plays a major role in the generation of vasospasm in Raynaud's phenomenon.

  16. Response Growth With Sound Level in Auditory-Nerve Fibers After Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Michael G.; Young, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    People with sensorineural hearing loss are often constrained by a reduced acoustic dynamic range associated with loudness recruitment; however, the neural correlates of loudness and recruitment are still not well understood. The growth of auditory-nerve (AN) activity with sound level was compared in normal-hearing cats and in cats with a noise-induced hearing loss to test the hypothesis that AN-fiber rate-level functions are steeper in impaired ears. Stimuli included best-frequency and fixed-frequency tones, broadband noise, and a brief speech token. Three types of impaired responses were observed. 1) Fibers with rate-level functions that were similar across all stimuli typically had broad tuning, consistent with outer-hair-cell (OHC) damage. 2) Fibers with a wide dynamic range and shallow slope above threshold often retained sharp tuning, consistent with primarily inner-hair-cell (IHC) damage. 3) Fibers with very steep rate-level functions for all stimuli had thresholds above approximately 80 dB SPL and very broad tuning, consistent with severe IHC and OHC damage. Impaired rate-level slopes were on average shallower than normal for tones, and were steeper in only limited conditions. There was less variation in rate-level slopes across stimuli in impaired fibers, presumably attributable to the lack of suppression-induced reductions in slopes for complex stimuli relative to BF-tone slopes. Sloping saturation was observed less often in impaired fibers. These results illustrate that AN fibers do not provide a simple representation of the basilar-membrane I/O function and suggest that both OHC and IHC damage can affect AN response growth. PMID:14534289

  17. Pro-nerve growth factor in the ovary and human granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Sabine; Blohberger, Jan; Berg, Dieter; Berg, Ulrike; Dissen, Gregory A.; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Background Pro-nerve growth factor must be cleaved to generate mature NGF, which was suggested to be a factor involved in ovarian physiology and pathology. Extracellular proNGF can induce cell death in many tissues. Whether extracellular proNGF exists in the ovary and may play a role in the death of follicular cells or atresia was unknown. Material and Methods Immunohistochemistry of human and Rhesus monkey ovarian sections was performed. IVF-derived follicular fluid and human granulosa cells were studied by RT-PCR, qPCR, Western blotting, ATP- and caspase-assays. Results and Conclusions Immunohistochemistry of ovarian sections identified proNGF in granulosa cells and Western blotting of human isolated granulosa cells confirmed the presence of proNGF. Ovarian granulosa cells thus produce proNGF. Recombinant human proNGF even at high concentrations did not affect the levels of ATP or the activity of caspase 3/7, indicating that in granulosa cells proNGF does not induce death. In contrast, mature NGF, which was detected previously in follicular fluid, may be a trophic molecule for granulosa cells with unexpected functions. We found that in contrast to proNGF, NGF increased the levels of the transcription factor early growth response 1 and of the enzyme choline acetyl-transferase. A mechanism for the generation of mature NGF from proNGF in the follicular fluid may be extracellular enzymatic cleavage. The enzyme MMP7 is known to cleave proNGF and was identified in follicular fluid and as a product of granulosa cells. Thus the generation of NGF in the ovarian follicle may depend on MMP7. PMID:26457789

  18. Germ cell mitogenic activity is associated with nerve growth factor-like protein(s).

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Pflug, B; Djakiew, D

    1991-12-01

    The mitogenicity of germ cell proteins released from round spermatids (RS) and pachytene spermatocytes (PS) was investigated. Germ cells were isolated by centrifugal elutriation from 90-day-old rat testes and incubated in a supplement enriched culture media that lacked exogenous proteins. The conditioned culture media of RS and PS were dialysed/concentrated and lyophilized to prepare RS protein (RSP) and PS protein (PSP). Mitogenic activity of RSP and PSP was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation into Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. RSP and PSP stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation by fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. At a higher concentration of RSP (300 micrograms/ml), fibroblast proliferation was stimulated from 6- to 20-fold of control cultures, whereas PSP (300 micrograms/ml) stimulated fibroblast proliferation 2.5-fold of control cultures. Since RSP exhibited substantially greater mitogenic activity than PSP we further investigated the RSP mitogenic substance(s) by immunoneutralization with antibodies against several growth factors. The mitogenic activity of RSP was significantly reduced by treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF) antibody, while neither the treatment of RSP with acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) antibody, nor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) antibody significantly modified the mitogenic activity of RSP. Interestingly, murine NGF-beta, recombinant human NGF-beta, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not exhibit mitogenic activity on 3T3 fibroblasts. Nevertheless, the presence of a NGF-like protein in RS and PS was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a murine NGF antibody. Subsequently, a Western blot analysis with the NGF antibody identified two immunoreactive bands of 41 +/- 2 kDa and 51 +/- 1 kDa in both RSP and PSP under reduced conditions. These germ cell NGF-like proteins were apparently different from similarly prepared murine and human NGFs (13 kDa) in their molecular weight. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth

  19. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenesis in the quail chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Lazarovici, Philip; Gazit, Aviv; Staniszewska, Izabela; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lelkes, Peter I

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is tightly regulated by growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). The authors hypothesize that nerve growth factor (NGF), a well known neurotrophin, may play a direct angiogenic role. To test this hypothesis, the authors measured the effects of NGF on the natural vascularization of the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The angiogenic effect of NGF was compared to that of human recombinant VEGF165 (rhVEGF) and basic FGF (rhbFGF). In comparison to phosphate-buffered saline-treated controls, NGFs from different biological sources (mouse, viper, and cobra) increased the rate of angiogenesis in a dose-dependent fashion from 0.5 to 5 microg. For quantitative morphometry, grayscale images of the blood vessels end points of the CAM arteries were binarized for visualization and skeletonized for quantization by fractal analysis. In mouse NGF-treated embryos the fractal dimension (Df), indicative of arterial vessel length and density, increased to 1.266 +/- 0.021 compared to 1.131 +/- 0.018 (p < .001) for control embryos. This effect was similar to that of 0.5 microg rhVEGF (1.290 +/- 0.021, p < .001) and 1.5 microg rhbFGF (1.264 +/- 0.028, p < .001). The mouse NGF-induced angiogenic effect was blocked by 1 microM K252a (1.149 +/- 0.018, p < .001), an antagonist of the NGF/trkA receptor, but not by 1 microM SU-5416 (1.263 +/- 0.029, p < .001), the VEGF/Flk1 receptor antagonist, indicating a direct, selective angiogenic effect of NGF via quail embryo trkA receptor activation. These results confirm previous observations that NGF has angiogenic activity and suggest that this neurotrophin may also play an important role in the cardiovascular system, besides its well-known effects in the nervous system. The angiogenic properties of NGF may be beneficial in engineering new blood vessels and for developing novel antiangiogenesis therapies for cancer.

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor are differentially affected by early chronic ethanol or red wine intake.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Aloe, Luigi; Laviola, Giovanni; Sornelli, Federica; Vitali, Mario; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2009-08-10

    Ethanol intake during pregnancy and lactation induces severe changes in brain and liver throughout mechanisms involving growth factors. These are signaling molecules regulating survival, differentiation, maintenance and connectivity of brain and liver cells. Ethanol is an element of red wine which contains also compounds with antioxidant properties. Aim of the study was to investigate differences in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in brain areas and liver by ELISA of 1-month-old male mice exposed perinatally to ethanol at 11 vol.% or to red wine at same ethanol concentration. Ethanol was administered before and during pregnancy up to pups' weaning. Ethanol per se elevated HGF in liver and cortex, potentiated liver VEGF, reduced GDNF in the liver and decreased NGF content in hippocampus and cortex in the offspring. We did not find changes in HGF or NGF due to red wine exposure. However, we revealed elevation in VEGF levels in liver and reduced GDNF in the cortex of animals exposed to red wine but the VEGF liver increase was more marked in animals exposed to ethanol only compared to the red wine group. In conclusion the present findings in the mouse show differences in ethanol-induced toxicity when ethanol is administered alone or in red wine that may be related to compounds with antioxidant properties present in the red wine.

  1. Effect of administration of antibodies against nerve growth factor in a rat model of muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Although muscle injury is a common source of pain, the mechanism causing such pain is not completely known. We have previously reported nerve growth factor (NGF) as a proinflammatory mediator involved in acute pain, and clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of anti-NGF antibodies for management of low back pain. Here, we aim to examine the effects of anti-NGF antibodies on muscle-derived pain by studying their effects on sensory innervation in a rat muscle injury model. A nervous system tracer, Fluoro-Gold, was applied to both gastrocnemius muscles of 24 male Sprague Dawley rats to stain the sensory nerves. Then, the drop-mass method was used to damage the right gastrocnemius muscle of the posterior limb. Anti-NGF antibodies (50μL) were injected into the injured muscles in 12 rats. Tissues were evaluated 1, 3, and 7 days post-injury by performing haematoxylin-and-eosin (HE) staining. The percentage of the total number of FG-positive cells that were also positive for a pain-related neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was determined for the bilateral dorsal root ganglia from L1 to L6 7 days post-injury. HE staining showed active inflammation, indicated by increased basophil and eosinophil accumulation, at the injury site 1 and 3 days post-injury, as well as scar tissue formation 7 days post-injury. Injection of anti-NGF reduced muscle necrosis 1 and 3 days post-injury, and resulted in replacement of granulation tissue and muscle fibre regeneration 7 days post-injury. Anti-NGF also significantly inhibited CGRP among FG-positive cells (treatment group 38.2%, control group 49.6%; P<0.05). This study found active inflammation induced by NGF, which may contribute to pain after muscle injury. Anti-NGF antibodies successfully suppressed the pain mediator NGF and inhibited inflammation, suggesting NGF as a target for control in pain management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nerve growth factor regulates the expression of bradykinin binding sites on adult sensory neurons via the neurotrophin receptor p75.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M; Segond von Banchet, G; Heppelmann, B; Koltzenburg, M

    1998-03-01

    Neurotrophins mediate specific effects on sensory neurons through tyrosine kinase receptors. Most of these neurons also co-express the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR), but its function has remained obscure. We now show that nerve growth factor but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 selectively increases the expression of bradykinin binding sites on cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons from adult mouse via p75NTR. This up-regulation of bradykinin binding sites did not occur in neurons from mice lacking p75NTR or in neurons from wild-type mice treated with p75NTR-blocking antibody, indicating that tyrosine kinase receptors alone are not sufficient to trigger this physiological neuronal response. Thus, the interaction of nerve growth factor with p75NTR is an important factor contributing to chronic pain conditions.

  3. Clues from Crouzon: Insights into the potential role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Giancarlo A; Tian, Jack J; Apinyawasisuk, Supanut; Kim, Sarah; Akil, Handan; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of bilateral extensive peripapillary myelinated retinal nerve fibers (MRNF) in an individual with Crouzon syndrome, an inherited form of craniosynostosis caused by overactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. As a secondary aim, we examine the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography for visualization of peripapillary vasculature obscured by myelination on other imaging modalities. A 24-year-old woman with Crouzon syndrome was evaluated for suspected optic neuritis in the right eye. Funduscopic examination and photography revealed the incidental finding of bilateral extensive peripapillary MRNF. OCT angiography provided excellent visualization of peripapillary retinal vessels, which were partially obscured by myelination on other imaging modalities. This association of Crouzon syndrome with bilateral peripapillary MRNF may lend insight into the developmental control of optic nerve myelination, the pathogenesis of MRNF, and the potential role of growth factors in these processes. Further, OCT angiography allowed for excellent blood vessel visualization in this case of MRNF.

  4. The topical application of nerve growth factor as a pharmacological tool for human corneal and skin ulcers.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Tirassa, Paola; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    The nerve growth factor is a soluble protein produced by and acting upon a number of different cells located in the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. Recent studies have shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) exerts a critical role on epithelial cells and fibroblasts under normal and pathological conditions. In this review, we present data prospecting the clinical potentiality of NGF in cutaneous and ocular "non-healing" chronic ulcers. A consistent number of in vitro and in vivo studies carried out on animal models and in humans indicated that fibroblasts and epithelial cells are receptive to the action of NGF and that NGF promotes skin and cornea ulcer healing. These observations lead to the hypothesis that NGF can be a potential useful pharmacological agent for clinical investigations. The available clinical evidences suggest that the topical application of NGF promotes healing action without side effects on corneal and cutaneous tissues damaged by chemical, physical and surgical insults and autoimmune disorders.

  5. Nerve growth factor injected into the gastric ulcer base incorporates into endothelial, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells: implications for angiogenesis, mucosal regeneration and ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Ahluwalia, A; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T; Tarnawski, A S

    2015-08-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that locally administered growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor can accelerate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats. That study indicates that locally administered growth factors can exert potent biological effects resulting in enhanced gastric ulcers healing. However, the fate of injected growth factors, their retention and localization to specific cellular compartments have not been examined. In our preliminary study, we demonstrated that local injection of nerve growth factor to the base of experimental gastric ulcers dramatically accelerates ulcer healing, increases angiogenesis - new blood vessel formation, and improves the quality of vascular and epithelial regeneration. Before embarking on larger, definitive and time sequence studies, we wished to determine whether locally injected nerve growth factor is retained in gastric ulcer's tissues and taken up by specific cells during gastric ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced in anesthetized rats by local application of acetic acid using standard methods; and, 60 min later fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor was injected locally to the ulcer base. Rats were euthanized 2, 5 and 10 days later. Gastric specimens were obtained and processed for histology. Unstained paraffin sections were examined under a fluorescence microscope, and the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor into various gastric tissue cells was determined and quantified. In addition, we performed immunostaining for S100β protein that is expressed in neural components. Five and ten days after ulcer induction labeled nerve growth factor (injected to the gastric ulcer base) was incorporated into endothelial cells of blood vessels, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells, myofibroblasts and muscle cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that during gastric ulcer healing

  6. Nerve growth factor and cytokines mediate lymphoid tissue-induced neurite outgrowth from mouse superior cervical ganglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Y; Bienenstock, J; Ohta, M; Stanisz, A M; Stead, R H

    1996-07-01

    Superior cervical ganglia (SCG) from neonatal mice were cultured with adult murine lymphoid tissue explants in Matrigel (Collaborative Biomedical, Bedford, MA). After 1 and 2 days in culture, many neurites grew toward thymus and spleen. Normal mesenteric lymph node (MLN) induced a smaller effect; however, activated MLN (isolated from mice 10 days after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; Nb-MLN-10d) caused significantly increased neurite outgrowth. To determine the roles of nerve growth factor (NGF) and cytokines in the promotion of neuritogenesis by lymphoid tissues, anti-NGF and various anti-cytokines were added to cocultures. Anti-NGF inhibited most of the neurite outgrowth toward thymus and spleen but only partially that toward Nb-MLN-10d. Anti-mouse IL-1 beta also significantly reduced the number of neurites growing toward thymus, spleen, and normal MLN. The number of neurites growing toward Nb-MLN-10d was significantly reduced by anti-IL-1 beta, anti-IL-3, anti-IL-6, or anti-GM-CSF. Exogenous IL-1 beta and IL-3 caused neurite outgrowth in single SCG cultures; and the IL-1 beta-, but not the IL-3-, mediated effect was completely blocked by anti-NGF. In one-day thymus/SCG cocultures, endogenous IL-1 was not detectable at concentrations sufficient to cause nerve growth; however, ample NGF was present in the thymic tissues and culture supernatants, but not in SCG. These data suggest that IL-1 mediates NGF production in lymphoid tissues, which in turn induces the growth of sympathetic nerves. Moreover, IL-3, IL-6, or GM-CSF produced during inflammation might also play important roles in the stimulation of nerve growth in vivo.

  7. [Construction of recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-β-NGF) eukaryotic vector and its expression in HEK293 cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchuan; Xue, Bofu; Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Mo; Zhu, Lin; Milburn, Rebecca; Le, Li; Hu, Peizhen; Ye, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) is a nerve cell growth regulation factor, which can provide nutrition for the neurons and promote the neurites outgrowth. In order to produce large-scale recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-beta-NGF), we constructed a plasmid vector, which can stably express the rh-beta-NGF in the HEK293 cell lines. First, the plasmid of pCMV-beta-NGF-IRES-dhfr was constructed and transformed into HEK293 cells. Then MTX pressurized filter and limiting dilution methods were used to obtain monoclonal HEK293 cell lines. After stepwise reducing serum in culture media, the cells eventually adapted to serum-free medium and secreted rh-beta-NGF. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression product owned a molecular weight of about 13 kDa and a purity of more than 50%. The peptide mapping sequencing analysis demonstrated the sequences of rh-beta-NGF matched with the theoretical ones. Later we purified this protein by ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatograph. Finally, our experimental results exhibited that the recombinant cell lines can stably express rh-beta-NGF with a high efficiency of more than 20 pg/cell x day. In addition, this protein could successfully induce differentiation of PC12 cells. In summary, our recombinant HEK293 cells can express bio-active rh-beta-NGF with great efficiency and stability, which supply a valid basis to large-scale production of rh-beta-NGF.

  8. Axonal Growth Arrests After an Increased Accumulation of Schwann Cells Expressing Senescence Markers and Stromal Cells in Acellular Nerve Allografts.

    PubMed

    Poppler, Louis H; Ee, Xueping; Schellhardt, Lauren; Hoben, Gwendolyn M; Pan, Deng; Hunter, Daniel A; Yan, Ying; Moore, Amy M; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K; Stewart, Sheila A; Mackinnon, Susan E; Wood, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) and other nerve constructs do not reliably facilitate axonal regeneration across long defects (>3 cm). Causes for this deficiency are poorly understood. In this study, we determined what cells are present within ANAs before axonal growth arrest in nerve constructs and if these cells express markers of cellular stress and senescence. Using the Thy1-GFP rat and serial imaging, we identified the time and location of axonal growth arrest in long (6 cm) ANAs. Axonal growth halted within long ANAs by 4 weeks, while axons successfully regenerated across short (3 cm) ANAs. Cellular populations and markers of senescence were determined using immunohistochemistry, histology, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Both short and long ANAs were robustly repopulated with Schwann cells (SCs) and stromal cells by 2 weeks. Schwann cells (S100β(+)) represented the majority of cells repopulating both ANAs. Overall, both ANAs demonstrated similar cellular populations with the exception of increased stromal cells (fibronectin(+)/S100β(-)/CD68(-) cells) in long ANAs. Characterization of ANAs for markers of cellular senescence revealed that long ANAs accumulated much greater levels of senescence markers and a greater percentage of Schwann cells expressing the senescence marker p16 compared to short ANAs. To establish the impact of the long ANA environment on axonal regeneration, short ANAs (2 cm) that would normally support axonal regeneration were generated from long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest ("stressed" ANAs). These stressed ANAs contained mainly S100β(+)/p16(+) cells and markedly reduced axonal regeneration. In additional experiments, removal of the distal portion (4 cm) of long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest and replacement with long isografts (4 cm) rescued axonal regeneration across the defect. Neuronal culture derived from nerve following axonal growth arrest in long ANAs revealed no

  9. Axonal Growth Arrests After an Increased Accumulation of Schwann Cells Expressing Senescence Markers and Stromal Cells in Acellular Nerve Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Poppler, Louis H.; Ee, Xueping; Schellhardt, Lauren; Hoben, Gwendolyn M.; Pan, Deng; Hunter, Daniel A.; Yan, Ying; Moore, Amy M.; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K.; Stewart, Sheila A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) and other nerve constructs do not reliably facilitate axonal regeneration across long defects (>3 cm). Causes for this deficiency are poorly understood. In this study, we determined what cells are present within ANAs before axonal growth arrest in nerve constructs and if these cells express markers of cellular stress and senescence. Using the Thy1-GFP rat and serial imaging, we identified the time and location of axonal growth arrest in long (6 cm) ANAs. Axonal growth halted within long ANAs by 4 weeks, while axons successfully regenerated across short (3 cm) ANAs. Cellular populations and markers of senescence were determined using immunohistochemistry, histology, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Both short and long ANAs were robustly repopulated with Schwann cells (SCs) and stromal cells by 2 weeks. Schwann cells (S100β+) represented the majority of cells repopulating both ANAs. Overall, both ANAs demonstrated similar cellular populations with the exception of increased stromal cells (fibronectin+/S100β−/CD68− cells) in long ANAs. Characterization of ANAs for markers of cellular senescence revealed that long ANAs accumulated much greater levels of senescence markers and a greater percentage of Schwann cells expressing the senescence marker p16 compared to short ANAs. To establish the impact of the long ANA environment on axonal regeneration, short ANAs (2 cm) that would normally support axonal regeneration were generated from long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest (“stressed” ANAs). These stressed ANAs contained mainly S100β+/p16+ cells and markedly reduced axonal regeneration. In additional experiments, removal of the distal portion (4 cm) of long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest and replacement with long isografts (4 cm) rescued axonal regeneration across the defect. Neuronal culture derived from nerve following axonal growth arrest in long ANAs revealed no deficits

  10. Nerve Regeneration in Vitro: Comparative Effects of Direct and Induced Current and NGF. Appendix.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-26

    neurito- genically ineffective on nerve growth factor-sensitive PCI2 pheochromocytoma cells in culture. Media from ganglia in which triethanolamine...cells in which neuritogenesis can occur, such as rat pheochromocytoma PCI2 cells, and rather tightly packed communities of cells in which neural and...Cell Culture. Rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) were grown routinely without antibiotics on uncoated Coming plastic tissue culture dishes using RPMI

  11. Nerve growth cone lamellipodia contain two populations of actin filaments that differ in organization and polarity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The organization and polarity of actin filaments in neuronal growth cones was studied with negative stain and freeze-etch EM using a permeabilization protocol that caused little detectable change in morphology when cultured nerve growth cones were observed by video- enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy. The lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton was composed of two distinct subpopulations: a population of 40-100-nm-wide filament bundles radiated from the leading edge, and a second population of branching short filaments filled the volume between the dorsal and ventral membrane surfaces. Together, the two populations formed the three- dimensional structural network seen within expanding lamellipodia. Interaction of the actin filaments with the ventral membrane surface occurred along the length of the filaments via membrane associated proteins. The long bundled filament population was primarily involved in these interactions. The filament tips of either population appeared to interact with the membrane only at the leading edge; this interaction was mediated by a globular Triton-insoluble material. Actin filament polarity was determined by decoration with myosin S1 or heavy meromyosin. Previous reports have suggested that the polarity of the actin filaments in motile cells is uniform, with the barbed ends toward the leading edge. We observed that the actin filament polarity within growth cone lamellipodia is not uniform; although the predominant orientation was with the barbed end toward the leading edge (47-56%), 22-25% of the filaments had the opposite orientation with their pointed ends toward the leading edge, and 19-31% ran parallel to the leading edge. The two actin filament populations display distinct polarity profiles: the longer filaments appear to be oriented predominantly with their barbed ends toward the leading edge, whereas the short filaments appear to be randomly oriented. The different length, organization and polarity of the two filament

  12. Atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs is mediated by eosinophils and nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Verbout, Norah G; Jacoby, David B; Gleich, Gerald J; Fryer, Allison D

    2009-08-01

    Although anticholinergic therapy inhibits bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients and antigen-challenged animals, administration of atropine 1 h before antigen challenge significantly potentiates airway hyperreactivity and eosinophil activation measured 24 h later. This potentiation in airway hyperreactivity is related to increased eosinophil activation and is mediated at the level of the airway nerves. Since eosinophils produce nerve growth factor (NGF), which is known to play a role in antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity, we tested whether NGF mediates atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity. Antibody to NGF (Ab NGF) was administered to sensitized guinea pigs with and without atropine pretreatment (1 mg/kg iv) 1 h before challenge. At 24 h after challenge, animals were anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated. Electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves caused bronchoconstriction that was increased in challenged animals. Atropine pretreatment potentiated antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity. Ab NGF did not affect eosinophils or inflammatory cells in any group, nor did it prevent hyperreactivity in challenged animals that were not pretreated with atropine. However, Ab NGF did prevent atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity and eosinophil activation (assessed by immunohistochemistry). This effect was specific to NGF, since animals given control IgG remained hyperreactive. These data suggest that anticholinergic therapy amplifies eosinophil interactions with airway nerves via NGF. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target both eosinophil activation and NGF-mediated inflammatory processes in allergic asthma are likely to be beneficial.

  13. Atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs is mediated by eosinophils and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Verbout, Norah G.; Jacoby, David B.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2009-01-01

    Although anticholinergic therapy inhibits bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients and antigen-challenged animals, administration of atropine 1 h before antigen challenge significantly potentiates airway hyperreactivity and eosinophil activation measured 24 h later. This potentiation in airway hyperreactivity is related to increased eosinophil activation and is mediated at the level of the airway nerves. Since eosinophils produce nerve growth factor (NGF), which is known to play a role in antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity, we tested whether NGF mediates atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity. Antibody to NGF (Ab NGF) was administered to sensitized guinea pigs with and without atropine pretreatment (1 mg/kg iv) 1 h before challenge. At 24 h after challenge, animals were anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated. Electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves caused bronchoconstriction that was increased in challenged animals. Atropine pretreatment potentiated antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity. Ab NGF did not affect eosinophils or inflammatory cells in any group, nor did it prevent hyperreactivity in challenged animals that were not pretreated with atropine. However, Ab NGF did prevent atropine-enhanced, antigen challenge-induced hyperreactivity and eosinophil activation (assessed by immunohistochemistry). This effect was specific to NGF, since animals given control IgG remained hyperreactive. These data suggest that anticholinergic therapy amplifies eosinophil interactions with airway nerves via NGF. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target both eosinophil activation and NGF-mediated inflammatory processes in allergic asthma are likely to be beneficial. PMID:19447892

  14. Growth-associated protein43 (GAP43) is a biochemical marker for the whole period of fish optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Manabu; Nagashima, Mikiko; Mawatari, Kazuhiro; Nunome, Tomoya; Muramoto, Kenichiro; Sugitani, Kayo; Kato, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    In adult visual system, goldfish can regrow their axons and fully restore their visual function even after optic nerve transection. The optic nerve regeneration process in goldfish is very long and it takes about a half year to fully recover visual function via synaptic refinement. Therefore, we investigated time course of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) expression in the goldfish retina for over 6 months after axotomy. In the control retina, very weak immunoreactivity could be seen in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The immunoreactivity of GAP43 started to increase in the RGCs at 5 days, peaked at 7-20 days and then gradually decreased at 30-40 days after axotomy. The weak but significant immunoreactivity of GAP43 in the RGCs continued during 50-90 days and slowly returned to the control level by 180 days after lesion. The levels of GAP43 mRNA showed a biphasic pattern; a short-peak increase (9-folds) at 1-3 weeks and a long plateau increase (5-folds) at 50-120 days after axotomy. Thereafter, the levels declined to the control value by 180 days after axotomy. The changes of chasing behavior of pair of goldfish with bilaterally axotomized optic nerve also showed a slow biphasic recovery pattern in time course. Although further experiment is needed to elucidate the role of GAP43 in the regrowing axon terminals, the GAP43 is a good biochemical marker for monitoring the whole period of optic nerve regeneration in fish.

  15. Replacement of Nerve-Growth Factor by Ganglionic Non-Neuronal Cells for the Survival In Vitro of Dissociated Ganglionic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Patricia; Raiborn, Charles; Varon, Silvio

    1972-01-01

    Nerve-growth factor is known to cause a considerable increase in the number of neurons putting out processes and surviving in cell cultures of dissociated dorsal-root and sympathetic ganglia from embryonic chicks. Similar effects of nerve-growth factor have now been noted with cultures of dissociated dorsal-root ganglia from newborn mice or rats. In all three sensory ganglionic systems, the effects of the nerve-growth factor on fiber production and neuronal survival could be mimicked, in the absence of the factor, by adequate increase of the non-neuronal cells in the cultures. The results suggest a hypothesis that views the role of the nerve-growth factor as subordinate to that of the non-neuronal cells. PMID:4509314

  16. Upregulation of Nerve Growth Factor in Central Amygdala Increases Sensitivity to Opioid Reward

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Bihua; Wang, Yan; Cai, You-Qing; Zhang, Zhi; Hou, Yuan-Yuan; Pan, Zhizhong Z

    2012-01-01

    The rewarding properties of opioids are essential driving force for compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in the development of opioid-mediated drug addiction. Prior drug use enhances sensitivity to the rewarding effects of subsequently used drugs, increasing vulnerability to relapse. The molecular mechanisms underlying this reward sensitization are still unclear. We report here that morphine that induced reward sensitization, as demonstrated by reinstatement of the behavior of conditioned place preference (CPP) with sub-threshold priming morphine, epigenetically upregulated the output activity of Ngf encoding the nerve growth factor (NGF) by increasing histone H4 acetylation in the rat central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). NGF locally infused into the CeA mimicked the morphine effect in inducing new functional delta-opioid receptor (DOR) that was required for the reward sensitization, and morphine-induced reward sensitization was inhibited by blocking NGF receptor signaling in the CeA. Histone deacetylase inhibitors that increased the acetylation level at the Ngf promoter and NGF expression in the CeA also induced reward sensitization in a CeA NGF signaling- and DOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, CeA-applied NGF substituted prior morphine to induce reward sensitization in naive rats and also substituted priming morphine to reinstate the CPP induced by prior morphine. Thus, epigenetic upregulation of NGF activity in the CeA may promote the behavior of opioid reward and increase the sensitivity to the rewarding effect of subsequent opioids, a potentially important mechanism in drug addiction. PMID:22871918

  17. Neuroactive conducting scaffolds: nerve growth factor conjugation on active ester-functionalized polypyrrole

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Joo-Woon; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Electrically conductive and biologically active scaffolds are desirable for enhancing adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of a number of cell types such as neurons. Hence, the incorporation of neuroactive molecules into electroconductive polymers via a specific and stable method is essential for neuronal tissue engineering applications. Traditional conjugation approaches dramatically impair conductivities and/or stabilities of the scaffolds and ligands. In this study, we developed copolymers (PPy-NSE) of N-hydroxyl succinimidyl ester pyrrole and regular pyrrole, which can be immobilized with nerve growth factor (NGF) without significantly hindering electroconductivity. The presence of active ester groups was confirmed using reflectance infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the copolymers prepared from different monomer compositions. We selected PPy-NSE50 (polymerized from a 50 : 50 monomer ratio of pyrrole : pyrrole-NSE) for further modification with NGF because this copolymer retains good conductivity (approx. 8 S cm−1) and presents active ester groups for NGF immobilization. We tethered NGF on the PPy-NSE50 surface, and found that PC12 cells extended neurites similarly to cells cultured in NGF-containing medium. XPS and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed that NGF immobilized via the active ester on the PPy-NSE50 film was stable for up to 5 days in phosphate-buffered saline solution. Also, application of an external electrical potential to NGF-immobilized PPy films did not cause a significant release of NGF nor reduce their neurotrophic activity. This novel scaffold, providing electroconductive and neurotrophic activities, has potential for neural applications, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and biosensors. PMID:19068472

  18. Anti-nerve growth factor antibody attenuates chronic morphine treatment-induced tolerance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cheppudira, Bopaiah P; Trevino, Alex V; Petz, Lawrence N; Christy, Robert J; Clifford, John L

    2016-09-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to induce inflammation and pain; however its role in opioid-induced tolerance has not been studied. This study investigated the effects of an anti-NGF neutralizing antibody on the development of tolerance following chronic morphine treatment in naïve rats. Four groups of rats were used in this study; one treated with saline alone, one with 10 mg/kg of morphine, one with 10 μg of anti-NGF and the other with 10 mg/kg of morphine + 10 μg of anti-NGF, twice per day for 5 days. The route of treatment was subcutaneous (S.C.) for morphine and saline, and intraperitoneal (i.p.) for anti-NGF. Response to a noxious thermal stimulus during the course of drug treatment was assessed (Hargreaves' test). Further, the change in the NGF levels in the lumbar spinal cord was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that repeated administration of morphine produced an apparent tolerance which was significantly attenuated by co-administration of anti-NGF (P < 0.001). Additionally, the area under the curve (AUC) of the analgesic effect produced by the combination of morphine and anti-NGF was significantly (P < 0.001) greater than for saline controls and chronic morphine treated rats. Moreover, the level of NGF in the spinal cord of chronic morphine treated rats was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in both the saline control group and the group receiving simultaneous administration of anti-NGF with morphine. These results indicate that anti-NGF has the potential to attenuate morphine-induced tolerance behavior by attenuating the effects of NGF at the spinal level. Taken together, our study strongly suggests that the NGF signaling system is a potential novel target for treating opioid-induced tolerance.

  19. Persistent Nociception Triggered by Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Is Mediated by TRPV1 and Oxidative Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Michael A; Ruparel, Shivani; Green, Dustin P; Chen, Paul B; Por, Elaine D; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Gao, Xiaoli; Flores, Eric R; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2015-06-03

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in certain chronic pain conditions and is a sufficient stimulus to cause lasting pain in humans, but the actual mechanisms underlying the persistent effects of NGF remain incompletely understood. We developed a rat model of NGF-induced persistent thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia to determine the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and oxidative mechanisms in the persistent effects of NGF. Persistent thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia require de novo protein translation and are mediated by TRPV1 and oxidative mechanisms. By comparing effects after systemic (subcutaneous), spinal (intrathecal) or hindpaw (intraplantar) injections of test compounds, we determined that TRPV1 and oxidation mediate persistent thermal hypersensitivity via peripheral and spinal sites of action and mechanical allodynia via only a spinal site of action. Therefore, NGF-evoked thermal and mechanical allodynia are mediated by spatially distinct mechanisms. NGF treatment evoked sustained increases in peripheral and central TRPV1 activity, as demonstrated by increased capsaicin-evoked nocifensive responses, increased calcitonin gene-related peptide release from hindpaw skin biopsies, and increased capsaicin-evoked inward current and membrane expression of TRPV1 protein in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Finally, we showed that NGF treatment increased concentrations of linoleic and arachidonic-acid-derived oxidized TRPV1 agonists in spinal cord and skin biopsies. Furthermore, increases in oxidized TRPV1-active lipids were reduced by peripheral and spinal injections of compounds that completely blocked persistent nociception. Collectively, these data indicate that NGF evokes a persistent nociceptive state mediated by increased TRPV1 activity and oxidative mechanisms, including increased production of oxidized lipid TRPV1 agonists.

  20. Internalization of nerve growth factor by pheochromocytoma PC12 cells: absence of transfer to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, H; Schäfer, T; Korsching, S; Thoenen, H

    1982-06-01

    The intracellular distribution of 125I-labeled nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells was studied by quantitative electron microscopic (EM) autoradiography and by subcellular fractionation. PC12 cells were grown as monolayer cultures in medium supplemented with serum in the presence of 125I-NGF. EM autoradiography showed that 125I-NGF was localized at the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments but did not accumulate in the nuclear chromatin or in the nuclear membrane compartment of cells analyzed after 1 hr and 1, 2, and 8 d of incubation with 125I-NGF. 125I-NGF also was not detected in nuclear subcellular fractions prepared from cells grown in serum-supplemented medium either in suspension for 1 d or in monolayer cultures for 1 to 8 d. In contrast, and in confirmation of the results of Yankner and Shooter (Yankner, B. A., and E. M. Shooter (1979) Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 76: 1269-1273), about 60% of the cell-bound 125I-NGF was found in the nuclear pellet after cell fractionation if the cells had been kept previously in suspension for 1 d in phosphate-buffered saline supplemented with 0.2% glucose, 0.1% bovine serum albumin, and 125I-NGF. The ultrastructure of PC12 cells grown under such conditions, however, revealed signs of varying degrees of damage. Autoradiography of the nuclear pellet from these cells showed the grains to be located mainly over damaged nuclei or over cell debris between nuclei. It is concluded that NGF, after binding to specific receptors at the plasma membrane, is transferred to membrane-confined cytoplasmic compartments but does not have to be transferred further to the nuclear membrane or to the nuclear chromatin as a prerequisite for its physiological action.

  1. Radix Bupleuri ameliorates depression by increasing nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Qing; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese herb Radix Bupleuri has been regarded effective to improve treatment of depression, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Low levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the likelihood of developing the depression. Therefore, we want to know whether Radix Bupleuri affects the levels of these factors. Methods: A total 160 hemodialysis patients were diagnosed with depression and randomly assigned to two groups: Radix Bupleuri group (received 1 g root power of Radix Bupleuri in a capsule daily Radix Bupleuri) and control group (receive placebo). Results: After three-month follow-up, the patients who received Radix Bupleuri had greater improvement in depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and general functioning via controls after three-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Serum NGF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (178.64 ± 52.18 pg/mL) when compared to a control (103.54 ± 31.23 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). Similarly, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (1635.26 ± 121.66 pg/ml) when compared to a control (516.38 ± 44.89 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). The serum levels of NGF and BDNF were negatively related with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and positively related with scores of RAND-36 item Health Survey (RAND-36) (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Thus, Radix Bupleuri ameliorates the patients with depression by increasing serum levels of NGF and BDNF. Radix Bupleuri should be developed a new drug for the therapy of depression. PMID:26309578

  2. Urinary nerve growth factor levels in overactive bladder syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Chia-Yen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2010-12-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome based on self-reported symptoms of urgency and frequency with or without urge incontinence. Although urgency is the core symptom of OAB, patients might have difficulty to distinguish urgency from the urge to void. Urodynamic study is a useful diagnostic tool to discover detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with OAB; however, not all OAB patients have DO. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive way to diagnose and assess OAB including DO is needed. Recent research has focused on urinary biomarkers in assessment of OAB. Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) level increases in patients with OAB-wet, bladder outlet obstruction, mixed urinary incontinence and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels are correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. In patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease significantly in association with reduction of urgency severity. However, not all patients with OAB have an elevated urinary NGF level. It might also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, cerebrovascular accident and lower urinary tract diseases such as urinary tract stone, bacterial infection and urothelial tumor. It is possible to use urinary NGF levels as a bio-marker for diagnosis of OAB as well as for the assessment of therapeutic outcome in patients with OAB or DO. Here, we review the latest medical advances in this field. Copyright © 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone interacts with nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors, preventing neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Iakovos; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Avlonitis, Nicolaos; Pediaditakis, Iosif; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Castanas, Elias; Gravanis, Achille

    2011-04-01

    The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), produced by neurons and glia, affects multiple processes in the brain, including neuronal survival and neurogenesis during development and in aging. We provide evidence that DHEA interacts with pro-survival TrkA and pro-death p75(NTR) membrane receptors of neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), acting as a neurotrophic factor: (1) the anti-apoptotic effects of DHEA were reversed by siRNA against TrkA or by a specific TrkA inhibitor; (2) [(3)H]-DHEA binding assays showed that it bound to membranes isolated from HEK293 cells transfected with the cDNAs of TrkA and p75(NTR) receptors (K(D): 7.4 ± 1.75 nM and 5.6 ± 0.55 nM, respectively); (3) immobilized DHEA pulled down recombinant and naturally expressed TrkA and p75(NTR) receptors; (4) DHEA induced TrkA phosphorylation and NGF receptor-mediated signaling; Shc, Akt, and ERK1/2 kinases down-stream to TrkA receptors and TRAF6, RIP2, and RhoGDI interactors of p75(NTR) receptors; and (5) DHEA rescued from apoptosis TrkA receptor positive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia in NGF null embryos and compensated NGF in rescuing from apoptosis NGF receptor positive sympathetic neurons of embryonic superior cervical ganglia. Phylogenetic findings on the evolution of neurotrophins, their receptors, and CYP17, the enzyme responsible for DHEA biosynthesis, combined with our data support the hypothesis that DHEA served as a phylogenetically ancient neurotrophic factor.

  4. Nerve growth factor attenuates cholinergic deficits following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, C E; Flinn, P; Bao, J; Venya, R; Hayes, R L

    1997-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in chronic derangements in central cholinergic neurotransmission that may contribute to posttraumatic memory deficits. Intraventricular cannula (IVC) nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion can reduce axotomy-induced spatial memory deficits and morphologic changes observed in medial septal cholinergic neurons immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). We examined the efficacy of NGF to (1) ameliorate reduced posttraumatic spatial memory performance, (2) release of hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh), and (3) ChAT immunoreactivity in the rat medial septum. Rats (n = 36) were trained prior to TBI on the functional tasks and retested on Days 1-5 (motor) and on Day 7 (memory retention). Immediately following injury, an IVC and osmotic pump were implanted, and NGF or vehicle was infused for 7 days. While there were no differences in motor performance, the NGF-treated group had significantly better spatial memory retention (P < 0.05) than the vehicle-treated group. The IVC cannula was then removed on Day 7, and a microdialysis probe was placed into the dorsal hippocampus. After a 22-h equilibration period, samples were collected prior to and after administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg), which evoked ACh release by blocking autoreceptors. The posttraumatic reduction in scopolamine-evoked ACh release was completely reversed with NGF. Injury produced a bilateral reduction in the number and cross-sectional area of ChAT immunopositive medial septal neurons that was reversed by NGF treatment. These data suggest that cognitive but not motor deficits following TBI are, in part, mediated by chronic deficits in cholinergic systems that can be modulated by neurotrophic factors such as NGF.

  5. Serum nerve growth factor levels in autistic children in Turkish population: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Dinçel, Nida; Ünalp, Aycan; Kutlu, Ayşe; Öztürk, Aysel; Uran, Nedret; Ulusoy, Sadık

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: It has been hypothesized that abnormal levels of serum nerve growth factor (NGF) may represent a serological marker for autistic children who may develop cognitive impairment, regression and finally epilepsy. The objective of this preliminary study was to measure serum NGF concentrations of autistic children and compare these levels with those of healthy children. Methods: Consecutive children who were referred to the Paediatric Neurology and Child Psychiatry Policlinics of Dr. Behçet Uz Child Disease and Pediatric Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Turkey between February and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum samples were analyzed for NGF levels using ChemiKine NGF Sandwich ELISA Kit. Comparisons between the study and the control groups were made using student's t test and Chi-square test. Results: Forty-nine autistic children and an equal number of healthy children (control group) were included in the study. No significant difference was found between the study and the control groups in terms of children's age, while number of boys was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the study group. Average serum NGF concentrations were 46.94 ± 51.40 and 32.94 ± 12.48 pg/ml in the study and control group, respectively. Serum NGF concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the study group compared with the control group. Interpretation & conclusions: Our preliminary findings show that enhanced serum NGF concentration may be used as a potential diagnostic tool in autism, however, further studies including a large number of patients are required to confirm the findings. PMID:24521633

  6. Intrathecal lidocaine neurotoxicity: combination with bupivacaine and ropivacaine and effect of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyi; Ding, Xudong; Guo, Yao; Chen, Weimin

    2014-09-01

    The study aims to investigate the neurotoxicity induced by combined use of intrathecal lidocaine with bupivacaine and ropivacaine, and to examine the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity. All rats received intrathecal infusion of anesthetics and NGF. To study the neurotoxicity of combined use of lidocaine with bupivacaine and ropivacaine, rats received saline, 5% lidocaine, 1.065% bupivacaine, 1.5% ropivacaine, 5% lidocaine+bupivacaine, or 5% lidocaine+1.5% ropivacaine. To study the neurotoxicity of different proportions of lidocaine and bupivacaine, mixtures were made by mixing 10% lidocaine and 2.5% bupivacaine in ratios of 1:3, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 by volume. To study the effect of NGF on lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity, rats received saline or 10 μg NGF for 1, 2, 5 and 8 days. The neurotoxicity of lidocaine was significantly increased when combined with ropivacaine. A mixture of lidocaine and bupivacaine in a ratio of ≤1:1 did not significantly increase lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity. NGF significantly reduced lidocaine-induced neurobehavioral and morphological damage in the spinal cord. This was accompanied by downregulation of caspase 3 expression. Ropivacaine is not safe when intrathecally administered with lidocaine at the concentrations used in this study. Bupivacaine may be safely used with lidocaine at a ratio of 1:1. NGF can reduce lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity, possibly via inhibition of caspase 3-mediated apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Single cycle structure-based humanization of an anti-nerve growth factor therapeutic antibody.

    PubMed

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates.In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles.

  8. Noninflammatory upregulation of nerve growth factor underlies gastric hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colon inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingjie; Winston, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity is one of the key contributors to the postprandial symptoms of epigastric pain/discomfort, satiety, and fullness in functional dyspepsia patients. Epidemiological studies found that adverse early-life experiences are risk factors for the development of gastric hypersensitivity. Preclinical studies found that neonatal colon inflammation elevates plasma norepinephrine (NE), which upregulates expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the muscularis externa of the gastric fundus. Our goal was to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which NE upregulates the expression of NGF in gastric hypersensitive (GHS) rats, which were subjected previously to neonatal colon inflammation. Neonatal colon inflammation upregulated NGF protein, but not mRNA, in the gastric fundus of GHS rats. Western blotting showed upregulation of p110γ of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1), pAKT(Ser473), and phosphorylated 4E-binding protein (p4E-BP1)(Thr70), suggesting AKT activation and enhanced NGF protein translation. AKT inhibitor MK-2206 blocked the upregulation of NGF in the fundus of GHS rats. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), the major NGF-degrading protease, was suppressed, indicating that NGF degradation was impeded. Incubation of fundus muscularis externa with NE upregulated NGF by modulating the protein translation and degradation pathways. Yohimbine, an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, upregulated plasma NE and NGF expression by activating the protein translation and degradation pathways in naive rats. In contrast, a cocktail of adrenergic receptor antagonists suppressed the upregulation of NGF by blocking the activation of the protein translation and degradation pathways. Our findings provide evidence that the elevation of plasma NE induces NGF expression in the gastric fundus. PMID:26608656

  9. Nerve growth factor translates stress response and subsequent murine abortion via adhesion molecule-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tometten, Mareike; Blois, Sandra; Kuhlmei, Arne; Stretz, Anna; Klapp, Burghard F; Arck, Petra C

    2006-04-01

    Spontaneous abortion is a frequent threat affecting 10%-25% of human pregnancies. Psychosocial stress has been suggested to be attributable for pregnancy losses by challenging the equilibrium of systems mandatory for pregnancy maintenance, including the nervous, endocrine, and immune system. Strong evidence indicates that stress-triggered abortion is mediated by adhesion molecules, i.e., intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and leukocyte function associated molecule 1, now being referred to as integrin alpha L (ITGAL), which facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells to the feto-maternal interface. The neurotrophin beta-nerve growth factor (NGFB), which has been shown to be upregulated in response to stress in multiple experimental settings including in the uterine lining (decidua) during pregnancy, increases ICAM1 expression on endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether and how NGFB neutralization has a preventive effect on stress-triggered abortion in the murine CBA/J x DBA/2J model. We provide experimental evidence that stress exposure upregulates the frequency of abortion and the expression of uterine NGFB. Further, adhesion molecules ICAM1 and selectin platelet (SELP, formerly P-Selectin) and their ligands ITGAL and SELP ligand (SELPL, formerly P selectin glycoprotein ligand 1) respectively increase in murine deciduas in response to stress. Subsequently, decidual cytokines are biased toward a proinflammatory and abortogenic cytokine profile. Additionally, a decrease of pregnancy protective CD8alpha(+) decidual cells is present. Strikingly, all such uterine stress responses are abrogated by NGFB neutralization. Hence, NGFB acts as a proximal mediator in the hierarchical network of immune rejection by mediating an abortogenic environment comprised of classical signs of neurogenic inflammation.

  10. Nerve Growth Factor Promotes Reorganization of the Axonal Microtubule Array at Sites of Axon Collateral Branching

    PubMed Central

    Ketschek, Andrea; Jones, Steven; Spillane, Mirela; Korobova, Farida; Svitkina, Tatyana; Gallo, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The localized debundling of the axonal microtubule array and the entry of microtubules into axonal filopodia are two defining features of collateral branching. We report that nerve growth factor (NGF), a branch inducing signal, increases the frequency of microtubule debundling along the axon shaft of chicken embryonic sensory neurons. Sites of debundling correlate strongly with the localized targeting of microtubules into filopodia. Platinum replica electron microscopy suggests physical interactions between debundled microtubules and axonal actin filaments. However, as evidenced by depolymerization of actin filaments and inhibition of myosin II, actomyosin force generation does not promote debundling. In contrast, loss of actin filaments or inhibition of myosin II activity promotes debundling, indicating that axonal actomyosin forces suppress debundling. MAP1B is a microtubule associated protein that represses axon branching. Following treatment with NGF, microtubules penetrating filopodia during the early stages of branching exhibited lower levels of associated MAP1B. NGF increased and decreased the levels of MAP1B phosphorylated at a GSK-3β site (pMAP1B) along the axon shaft and within axonal filopodia, respectively. The levels of MAP1B and pMAP1B were not altered at sites of debundling, relative to the rest of the axon. Unlike the previously determined effects of NGF on the axonal actin cytoskeleton, the effects of NGF on microtubule debundling were not affected by inhibition of protein synthesis. Collectively, these data indicate that NGF promotes localized axonal microtubule debundling, that actomyosin forces antagonize microtubule debundling and that NGF regulates pMAP1B in axonal filopodia during the early stages of collateral branch formation. PMID:25846486

  11. Can proline-rich polypeptide complex mimic the effect of nerve growth factor?

    PubMed

    Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Urbaniak, Anna; Kuropatwa, Marianna; Zyzak, Joanna; Rossowska, Joanna; Janusz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring compounds that can act as prosurvival factors and neurite formation stimulants in the conditions of reduced neurotrophins production are important both in neuronal protection and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the role of proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) and its nonapeptide fragment (NP) in the promotion of pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) survival and neurite outgrowth pathway is presented. It was shown that PRP/NP did not affect the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) at the transcriptional and protein level. However, the activity of nNOS and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) concentration was markedly increased after treatment of PC12 cells with peptides. This reaction was inhibited by L-NAME-nNOS inhibitor. It was shown that PRP and NP induce the soluble guanylyl cyclase to release higher amount of cyclic GMP (cGMP), and subsequently, the increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) is observed. This effect was abolished by both U0126 (inhibitor of ERK1/2) and also by L-NAME. Reduction of ERK1/2 activity observed in the presence of nNOS inhibitor suggests that its activation is NO-dependent. The presented results shed some light on the mechanism of action of PRP complex. PRP and NP can activate NO/cGMP/ERK1/2 signaling pathway, similarly to nerve growth factor (NGF). The prosurvival action and short fibers formation suggest the role of PRP and NP in neuroprotection and the initiation of neuritogenesis. They can also participate in the amplification of signals controlling the survival and differentiation of neurons effect when the deficit of NGF takes place.

  12. Exploring the role of nerve growth factor in multiple sclerosis: implications in myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Acosta, C M R; Cortes, C; MacPhee, H; Namaka, M P

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease resulting from targeted destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. MS is suggested to be an autoimmune disease involving the pathogenic activation of CD4(+) T cells by a foreign antigen in the peripheral blood. The activated CD4(+) T cells liberate inflammatory cytokines that facilitate the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) promoting their passage into the CNS. Inside the CNS, CD4(+) T cells become re-activated by myelin proteins sharing a similar structure to the foreign antigen that initially triggered the immune response. The CD4(+) T cells continue to liberate inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which activates macrophages and antibodies responsible for the phagocytosis of myelin. Acute CNS lesions can be re-myelinated, however, the repair of chronic demyelinating lesions is limited, leading to permanent neurological deficits. Although current MS treatments reduce severity and slow disease progression, they do not directly repair damaged myelin. Henceforth, recent treatment strategies have focused on neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) for myelin repair. NGF promotes axonal regeneration, survival, protection and differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OGs) and facilitates migration and proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) to the sites of myelin damage. NGF also directly regulates key structural proteins that comprise myelin. Interestingly, NGF also induces the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), another integral neurotrophin involved in myelination. The intricate signaling between neurotrophins and cytokines that governs myelin repair supports the role of NGF as a leading therapeutic candidate in white matter disorders, such as MS.

  13. Discoordinate regulation of different K channels in cultured rat skeletal muscle by nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vigdor-Alboim, S; Rothman, C; Braiman, L; Bak, A; Langzam, L; Yosef, O; Sterengarz, B B; Nawrath, H; Brodie, C; Sampson, S R

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on expression of K+ channels in cultured skeletal muscle. The channels studied were (1) charybdotoxin (ChTx)-sensitive channels by using a polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against ChTx, (2) Kv1.5 voltage-sensitive channels, and (3) apamin-sensitive (afterhyperpolarization) channels. Crude homogenates were prepared from cultures made from limb muscles of 1-2-day-old rat pups for identification of ChTx-sensitive and Kv1.5 channels by Western blotting techniques. Apamin-sensitive K+ channels were studied by measurement of specific [125I]-apamin binding by whole cell preparations. ChTx-sensitive channels display a fusion-related increase in expression, and NGF downregulates these channels in both myoblasts and myotubes. Voltage-dependent Kv1.5 channel expression is low in myoblasts and increases dramatically with fusion; NGF induces early expression of these channels and causes expression after fusion to increase even further. NGF downregulates apamin-sensitive channels. NGF increases the rate of fall of the action potential recorded intracellularly from single myotubes with intracellular microelectrodes. The results confirm and extend those of previous studies in showing a functional role for NGF in the regulation of membrane properties of skeletal muscle. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the different K+ channels in this preparation are regulated in a discoordinate manner. The divergent effects of NGF on expression of different K+ channels, however, do not appear sufficient to explain the NGF-induced increase in the rate of fall of the action potential. The changes during the falling phase may rather be due to increases in channel properties or may result from an increased driving force on the membrane potential secondary to the NGF-induced hyperpolarization.

  14. Maternal nerve growth factor levels during pregnancy in women with preeclampsia: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Vandita; Kilari, Anitha; Pisal, Hemlata; Patil, Vidya; Mehendale, Savita; Wagh, Girija; Gupte, Sanjay; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-12-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Improper development of the placenta due to altered angiogenesis is the main culprit in PE. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an angiogenic factor which is expressed and localized in the placenta. Our earlier cross sectional study has shown altered NGF levels at delivery in women with PE. However, there are no studies on NGF levels in PE early in pregnancy before manifestation of the disease. Thus, there is a need to examine the role of NGF in vascular development during different stages of gestation in PE. A longitudinal study was carried out where pregnant women were enrolled from two major hospitals from Pune, Bharati hospital and Gupte hospital. They were followed at three different time points [16-20 weeks (T1), 26-30 weeks (T2) and at delivery (T3)] during pregnancy and maternal blood at every time point and cord blood at delivery was collected and processed. This study included normotensive women (n=88) and women with PE (n=48). NGF levels were measured from maternal and cord plasma using the Emax Immuno Assay System (Promega). The data was analyzed using the SPSS/PC+ package (Version 20.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Maternal NGF levels did not change at all time points while cord NGF levels were higher (p<0.05) in women with PE. Further, maternal NGF levels were negatively associated with blood pressure while cord NGF levels were positively associated with baby head circumference. Our data suggests that there may possibly be a compensatory role for NGF in the foeto-placental circulation in PE.

  15. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  16. Microtubules and Microfilaments in Fixed and Permeabilized Cells are Selectively Decorated by Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasi, S.; Cirillo, D.; Naldini, L.; Marchisio, P. C.; Calissano, P.

    1982-02-01

    A specific antibody against nerve growth factor (NGF) and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy have been used to follow the in vitro binding of NGF to cells made permeable to large molecules. All cells tested, both target (sensory neurons and PC12 cells) and nontarget (3T3, BKH 2I, C6 glioma cells), revealed a decoration of cytoskeletal structures which on the basis of their form, reactivity with antibodies, and sensitivity to specific drugs may be identified as microtubules (MTs) and microfilaments (MFs). The decoration of either structure depends on the fixation and permeabilization conditions: MFs, in the form of stress fibers, are stained by NGF when the plasma membrane is permeabilized with methanol/acetone; MTs become intensely stained when the plasma membrane is solubilized with a nonionic detergent in the presence of a MT-stabilizing medium. The two procedures do not affect the staining of these structures with specific antibodies. Binding of 125I-labeled NGF to PC12 cells was not competitively inhibited by a 100-fold excess of several positively charged proteins but it was markedly decreased in the presence of DNase I. 125I-Labeled NGF interacted with MTs and F-actin (fixed with paraformaldehyde) in a range of concentrations similar to that used for their cellular localization with NGF-anti-NGF. Our studies show that the specificity and affinity of NGF binding to MTs and MFs is in the range of that of antibodies against tubulin and actin. The possible relevance of these findings to the mechanism of action of NGF in target cells is discussed.

  17. [Clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor in the treatment of sudden deafness].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Xiao, Dajiang; Wu, Sihai; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-05-01

    To study the clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of sudden deafness. A retrospective analysis was performed on 115 cases of hospitalized patients who were suffered from sudden deafness. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment medicine. Control group: patients were treated with intravenous vasodilators, energy mixture, steroid pulse therapy, and methylcobalamin neurotrophic therapy. NGF group: intramuscular NGF treatment was added on the basis of conventional therapy mentioned above. Both treatments lasted 14 days, the total efficiency were compared. Patients were further divided into sub-groups according to age, duration and the level of pre-treatment PTA, and the treatment efficiency was further compared. By SPSS 11.0 statistical analysis, a P < 0.05 was considered as statistical significant difference. (1) The total efficiency of NGF group was significantly higher than control group. (2) Regard of age, the efficiency of NGF treatment group was significantly higher than control group. (3) For the patients whose duration were less than 7 d, or the PTA < or = 60 dBHL, the efficiency of NGF group were significantly higher. For the patients whose duration were more than 7 d, or the PTA>60 dBHL, the efficiency of NGF therapy was not superior to the traditional treatment. NGF can significantly improve the symptom of patients with short duration or low PTA. For this kind of patients, NGF adjuvant therapy should be recommended. For the patients with longer duration and higher level of PTA, NGF therapy is not advocated. NGF treatment should not be in consideration of the age.

  18. Lower Levels of Urinary Nerve Growth Factor Might Predict Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes in urinary nerve growth factor (uNGF) levels after acute urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the role of uNGF in predicting UTI recurrence in women. Methods: Women with uncomplicated, symptomatic UTIs were enrolled. Cephalexin 500 mg (every 6 hours) was administered for 7–14 days to treat acute UTIs. Subsequently, the patients were randomized to receive either sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 800 mg/160 mg daily at bedtime, or celecoxib 200 mg daily for 3 months and were monitored for up to 12 months. NGF levels in the urine were determined at baseline, 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the initiation of prophylactic therapy, and were compared between women with first-time UTIs and recurrent UTIs, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and celecoxib-treated women, and no UTI recurrence and UTI recurrence that occurred during the follow-up period. Twenty women free of UTIs served as controls. Results: A total of 139 women with UTI and 20 controls were enrolled in the study, which included 50 women with a first-time UTI and 89 women with recurrent UTIs. Thirty-seven women completed the study. Women with recurrent UTIs (n=23) had a trend of lower uNGF levels than women with first-time UTIs (n=14). During follow-up, 9 women had UTI recurrence. The serial uNGF levels in women with UTI recurrence were significantly lower than those in women who did not have UTI recurrence during the follow-up period. Conclusions: The lower levels of uNGF in women with recurrent UTI and the incidence of UTI recurrence during follow-up suggest that lower uNGF might reflect the defective innate immunity in women with recurrent UTI. PMID:27032555

  19. Salivary nerve growth factor response to intense stress: effect of sex and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Larson, Gerald E; Rauh, Mitchell J; Hiller Lauby, Melissa D; Granger, Douglas A

    2014-05-01

    Ample evidence links stress to psychiatric and neurological disease. Although many studies examine stress hormone secretion and receptor activity, exciting new developments signify a shift in focus to neuromodulatory systems influencing neuronal development, survival, and neuroplasticity. The purpose of this study was to characterize salivary nerve growth factor (sNGF) responses to intense stress exposure in healthy military members undergoing survival training. A second purpose was to explore effects of age, sex, education, and body mass index (BMI). One hundred sixteen military members (80% male) were studied before, during, and 24 h after a stressful mock-captivity exercise. sNGF was measured at all three time points. Reactivity, recovery, and residual elevation of sNGF were computed. General linear modeling with repeated measures evaluated effect of stress exposure, as well as the roles of age, sex, education, and BMI. sNGF increased 137% from baseline to intense stress. During recovery, sNGF remained elevated an average of 67% above baseline (i.e., residual elevation). Men showed greater sNGF reactivity than women quantified by larger absolute T1-T2Δ (+148.1 pg/mL vs. +64.9 pg/mL, p<0.017). A noteworthy trend of higher sNGF concentrations in low BMI participants was observed (p=0.058). No effects of age or education were shown. This study shows substantial reactivity and residual elevation of sNGF in response to intense stress exposure in healthy humans. Further research is needed to refine the sNGF assay, fully characterize the sNGF stress response, delineate correlates and mechanisms, and validate therapeutic applications.

  20. Nerve growth factor regulates axial rotation during early stages of chick embryo development.

    PubMed

    Manca, Annalisa; Capsoni, Simona; Di Luzio, Anna; Vignone, Domenico; Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; Cattaneo, Antonino; Levi-Montalcini, Rita

    2012-02-07

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was discovered because of its neurotrophic actions on sympathetic and sensory neurons in the developing chicken embryo. NGF was subsequently found to influence and regulate the function of many neuronal and non neuronal cells in adult organisms. Little is known, however, about the possible actions of NGF during early embryonic stages. However, mRNAs encoding for NGF and its receptors TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed at very early stages of avian embryo development, before the nervous system is formed. The question, therefore, arises as to what might be the functions of NGF in early chicken embryo development, before its well-established actions on the developing sympathetic and sensory neurons. To investigate possible roles of NGF in the earliest stages of development, stage HH 11-12 chicken embryos were injected with an anti-NGF antibody (mAb αD11) that binds mature NGF with high affinity. Treatment with anti-NGF, but not with a control antibody, led to a dose-dependent inversion of the direction of axial rotation. This effect of altered rotation after anti NGF injection was associated with an increased cell death in somites. Concurrently, a microarray mRNA expression analysis revealed that NGF neutralization affects the expression of genes linked to the regulation of development or cell proliferation. These results reveal a role for NGF in early chicken embryo development and, in particular, in the regulation of somite survival and axial rotation, a crucial developmental process linked to left-right asymmetry specification.

  1. Single Cycle Structure-Based Humanization of an Anti-Nerve Growth Factor Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates. In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles. PMID:22403636

  2. Nerve growth factor reduces amiloride‐sensitive Na+ transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimko, Michael J.; Zaccone, Eric J.; Thompson, Janet A.; Schwegler‐Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor (NGF) is overexpressed in patients with inflammatory lung diseases, including virus infections. Airway surface liquid (ASL), which is regulated by epithelial cell ion transport, is essential for normal lung function. No information is available regarding the effect of NGF on ion transport of airway epithelium. To investigate whether NGF can affect ion transport, human primary air‐interface cultured epithelial cells were placed in Ussing chambers to obtain transepithelial voltage (−7.1 ± 3.4 mV), short‐circuit current (Isc, 5.9 ± 1.0 μA), and transepithelial resistance (750 Ω·cm2), and to measure responses to ion transport inhibitors. Amiloride (apical, 3.5 × 10−5 mol/L) decreased Isc by 55.3%. Apically applied NGF (1 ng/mL) reduced Isc by 5.3% in 5 min; basolaterally applied NGF had no effect. The response to amiloride was reduced (41.6%) in the presence of NGF. K‐252a (10 nmol/L, apical) did not itself affect Na+ transport, but it attenuated the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport, indicating the participation of the trkA receptor in the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport. PD‐98059 (30 μmol/L, apical and basolateral) did not itself affect Na+ transport, but attenuated the NGF‐induced reduction in Na+ transport, indicating that trkA activated the Erk 1/2 signaling cascade. NGF stimulated phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 and the β‐subunit of ENaC. K‐252a and PD‐98059 inhibited these responses. NGF had no effect on Isc in the presence of apical nystatin (50 μmol/L). These results indicate that NGF inhibits Na+ transport through a trkA‐Erk 1/2‐activated signaling pathway linked to ENaC phosphorylation. PMID:25347857

  3. Nerve Growth Factor gene ovarian expression, polymorphism identification, and association with litter size in goats.

    PubMed

    Naicy, T; Venkatachalapathy, R T; Aravindakshan, T V; Radhika, G; Raghavan, K C; Mini, M; Shyama, K

    2016-12-01

    The Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) plays an important role in reproduction by augmenting folliculogenesis. In this study, the coding regions of caprine NGF gene were analyzed to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), their association with litter size, and the relative ovarian expression of NGF gene in the two indigenous goat breeds of South India viz., the prolific Malabari and less-prolific Attappady Black. The sequence analysis of the third exon containing the entire open reading frame of NGF gene was observed to be of 808 bp with one nonsynonymous mutation at 217th position. Later, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to amplify a region of 188 bp covering the region carrying the detected mutation. The genomic DNAs from the goats under study (n = 277) were subjected to PCR and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). On analysis, four diplotypes viz., AA, AB, AC, and AD were observed with respective frequencies of 0.50, 0.22, 0.27, and 0.01. Sequencing of the representative samples revealed an additional synonymous mutation, i.e., g.291C>A. Statistical analysis indicated that NGF diplotypes and the SNP g.217G>A were associated with litter size in goats (P < 0.05). Relative expression of NGF gene was significantly higher in the ovaries of goats with history of multiple than single births (P < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest the significant effect of the NGF gene on litter size in goats and identified SNPs would benefit the selection of prolific animals in future marker-assisted breeding programs. The two novel PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms designed, based on the detected SNPs, would help in the rapid screening of large number of animals in a breeding population for identifying individual animals with desired genetic characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and localization of nerve growth factor receptors in the embryonic otic vesicle and cochleovestibular ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd, P.; Represa, J. )

    1989-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility that nerve growth factor (NGF) may play a role in the development of the inner ear. Primordia of the inner ear, the otic vesicle (OV) and cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG), were isolated from 72-hr (stage 19-20) quail embryos and examined for the presence of NGF receptors. Quantitative binding studies revealed that both OV and CVG exhibited specific 125I-NGF binding; levels of nonspecific binding were 6 to 26% of total binding. Scatchard analysis yielded a linear plot, indicating the presence of a single class of NGF receptor. The average binding constant (Kd) was 8.0 nM for OV and 8.6 nM for CVG, corresponding to the low affinity (site II) NGF receptor. Examination of light microscopic radioautographs indicated that most of the specific 125I-NGF binding was located in the ventromedial wall of the OV, with little or no binding in the lateral wall and endolymphatic primordia. These studies were corroborated by microdissection of OV, in which 70% of the radioactivity was found to be localized in the medial half of the OV. In CVG, specific 125I-NGF binding was more concentrated in the cochlear portion of the ganglion, with silver grains primarily over areas containing support cells and immature neurons. Quantitative binding studies with isolated cochlear and vestibular ganglia obtained from 144-hr (stage 29-30) quail embryos revealed that the cochlear ganglion exhibited three times more specific 125I-NGF binding than the vestibular ganglion. The presence of NGF receptors on OV and CVG suggests that these structures are responsive to and/or dependent upon NGF. The following paper examines the question of whether NGF serves either as a mitogen, a survival factor, or a differentiation factor in this system.

  5. Neurosteroid Dehydroepiandrosterone Interacts with Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Receptors, Preventing Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Avlonitis, Nicolaos; Pediaditakis, Iosif; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Castanas, Elias; Gravanis, Achille

    2011-01-01

    The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), produced by neurons and glia, affects multiple processes in the brain, including neuronal survival and neurogenesis during development and in aging. We provide evidence that DHEA interacts with pro-survival TrkA and pro-death p75NTR membrane receptors of neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), acting as a neurotrophic factor: (1) the anti-apoptotic effects of DHEA were reversed by siRNA against TrkA or by a specific TrkA inhibitor; (2) [3H]-DHEA binding assays showed that it bound to membranes isolated from HEK293 cells transfected with the cDNAs of TrkA and p75NTR receptors (KD: 7.4±1.75 nM and 5.6±0.55 nM, respectively); (3) immobilized DHEA pulled down recombinant and naturally expressed TrkA and p75NTR receptors; (4) DHEA induced TrkA phosphorylation and NGF receptor-mediated signaling; Shc, Akt, and ERK1/2 kinases down-stream to TrkA receptors and TRAF6, RIP2, and RhoGDI interactors of p75NTR receptors; and (5) DHEA rescued from apoptosis TrkA receptor positive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia in NGF null embryos and compensated NGF in rescuing from apoptosis NGF receptor positive sympathetic neurons of embryonic superior cervical ganglia. Phylogenetic findings on the evolution of neurotrophins, their receptors, and CYP17, the enzyme responsible for DHEA biosynthesis, combined with our data support the hypothesis that DHEA served as a phylogenetically ancient neurotrophic factor. PMID:21541365

  6. The potential role of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 in avian cochlear and vestibular ganglia development.

    PubMed

    Bernd, P; Zhang, D; Yao, L; Rozenberg, I

    1994-12-01

    The role of the nerve growth factor family of neurotrophins in the development of cochlear and vestibular ganglia is unclear. In order to predict the potential importance of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3, we examined the expression of neurotrophin mRNA and full-length neurotrophin receptor mRNA by in-situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, as well as whether high affinity 125I-nerve growth factor binding was present, in cochlear and vestibular ganglia of the quail at several stages of development (stages 26, 31 and 36). Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 mRNA was detected at all ages examined, suggesting that these neurotrophins may serve an autocrine or paracrine function, especially prior to target contact. In addition, we found full-length trkA and trkC mRNA was expressed, the products of which are the functional neuronal receptors for nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3, respectively. Although full-length trkA mRNA was found, physiologically important high affinity 125I-nerve growth factor binding was not detected. Since nerve growth factor's effects on survival and neurite outgrowth are mediated through high affinity binding, nerve growth factor may serve an as yet unidentified role in this system. Full-length trkB mRNA, the product of which is the functional neuronal receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, was not detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, however, truncated (non-catalytic) trkB was present, at least in cochlear ganglia at stage 31. It is not known what function may be subserved by these truncated receptors.

  7. Control of Growth Within Drosophila Peripheral Nerves by Ras and Protein Kinase A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    via induced expression of a nuclear -localized GFP. We also visualized the total complement of peripheral nerve nuclei (peripheral and perineurial glial...RafF179 (Brand and Perrimon, 1994), UAS–green fluorescent pro- tein (GFP) nuclear localization signal (nls) (Shiga et al., 1996), and Akt4226 (Perrimon et... nuclear -localized GFP. We also visualized the total complement of peripheral nerve nuclei (peripheral and perineurial glial) via the Hoechst DNA dye. As

  8. Chronic Nerve Growth Factor Exposure Increases Apoptosis in a Model of In Vitro Induced Conjunctival Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Micera, Alessandra; Puxeddu, Ilaria; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Bonini, Stefano; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    In the conjunctiva, repeated or prolonged exposure to injury leads to tissue remodeling and fibrosis associated with dryness, lost of corneal transparency and defect of ocular function. At the site of injury, fibroblasts (FB) migrate and differentiate into myofibroblasts (myoFB), contributing to the healing process together with other cell types, cytokines and growth factors. While the physiological deletion of MyoFB is necessary to successfully end the healing process, myoFB prolonged survival characterizes the pathological process of fibrosis. The reason for myoFB persistence is poorly understood. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), often increased in inflamed stromal conjunctiva, may represent an important molecule both in many inflammatory processes characterized by tissue remodeling and in promoting wound-healing and well-balanced repair in humans. NGF effects are mediated by the specific expression of the NGF neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (trkANGFR) and/or the pan-neurotrophin glycoprotein receptor (p75NTR). Therefore, a conjunctival myoFB model (TGFβ1-induced myoFB) was developed and characterized for cell viability/proliferation as well as αSMA, p75NTR and trkANGFR expression. MyoFB were exposed to acute and chronic NGF treatment and examined for their p75NTR/trkANGFR, αSMA/TGFβ1 expression, and apoptosis. Both NGF treatments significantly increased the expression of p75NTR, associated with a deregulation of both αSMA/TGFβ1 genes. Acute and chronic NGF exposures induced apoptosis in p75NTR expressing myoFB, an effect counteracted by the specific trkANGFR and/or p75NTR inhibitors. Focused single p75NTR and double trkANGFR/p75NTR knocking-down experiments highlighted the role of p75NTR in NGF-induced apoptosis. Our current data indicate that NGF is able to trigger in vitro myoFB apoptosis, mainly via p75NTR. The trkANGFR/p75NTR ratio in favor of p75NTR characterizes this process. Due to the lack of effective pharmacological agents for balanced

  9. Verticillin A Inhibits Leiomyosarcoma and Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zewdu, A; Lopez, G; Braggio, D; Kenny, C; Constantino, D; Bid, HK; Batte, K; Iwenofu, OH; Oberlies, NH; Pearce, CJ; Strohecker, AM; Lev, D; Pollock, RE

    2017-01-01

    Objective The heterogeneity of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) represents a major challenge for the development of effective therapeutics. Comprised of over 50 different histology subtypes of various etiologies, STS subsets are further characterized as either karyotypically simple or complex. Due to the number of genetic anomalies associated with genetically complex STS, development of therapies demonstrating potency against this STS cluster is especially challenging and yet greatly needed. Verticillin A is a small molecule natural product with demonstrated anticancer activity; however, the efficacy of this agent has never been evaluated in STS. Therefore, the goal of this study was to explore verticillin A as a potential STS therapeutic. Methods We performed survival (MTS) and clonogenic analyses to measure the impact of this agent on the viability and colony formation capability of karyotypically complex STS cell lines: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS). The in vitro effects of verticillin A on apoptosis were investigated through annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis and by measuring fluorescently-labeled cleaved caspase 3/7 activity. The impact on cell cycle progression was assessed via cytometric measurement of propidium iodide intercalation. In vivo studies were performed using MPNST xenograft models. Tumors were processed and analyzed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for verticillin A effects on growth (Ki67) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Results Treatment with verticillin A resulted in decreased STS growth and an increase in apoptotic levels after 24 h. 100 nM verticillin A induced significant cellular growth abrogation after 24 h (96.7, 88.7, 72.7, 57, and 39.7% reduction in LMS1, S462, ST88, SKLMS1, and MPNST724, respectively). We observed no arrest in cell cycle, elevated annexin, and a nearly two-fold increase in cleaved caspase 3/7 activity in all MPNST and LMS cell lines. Control normal human Schwann (HSC) and

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P < 0·05) in the VEGF group. The results of

  11. Expression of neuropeptides and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) in cutaneous and mucosal nerve structures of the adult rat lower lip after mental nerve section.

    PubMed

    Verzè, L; Paraninfo, A; Viglietti-Panzica, C; Panzica, G C; Ramieri, G

    2003-01-01

    The reinnervation of the adult rat lower lip has been investigated after unilateral section of the mental nerve. Rats were sacrificed at 4, 7, 9, 14, 30, and 90 days after the operation. A further group of animals with section of the mental nerve and block of the alveolar nerve regeneration, was sacrificed at 14 days. Specimens were processed for immunocytochemistry with antibodies against PGP 9.5, GAP-43 or neuropeptides (CGRP, SP and VIP). Four days after nerve section, axonal degeneration seems evident in the mental nerve branches and inside skin and mucosa. GAP-43 immunoreactivity is intense in the mental nerve 7 days after nerve section and it reaches its maximal expression and distribution in peripheral nerve fibres at 14 days. At 30 days, the decline in its expression is associated with the increase of PGP9.5-, SP-, and CGRP immunopositivity. VIP is observed only in perivascular fibres at all times observed. Present results suggest that, after sensory denervation of the rat lip, nerve fibres in skin and mucosa remain at lower density than normal. The different time courses in the expression of neuropeptides and GAP-43 suggest a possible early involvement of GAP-43 in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  12. Thyroid hormone and androgen regulation of nerve growth factor gene expression in the mouse submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Black, M A; Lefebvre, F A; Pope, L; Lefebvre, Y A; Walker, P

    1992-03-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) content of the mouse submandibular gland (SMG) is under hormonal control and is modulated by both thyroid hormones (TH) and androgens. The sexual dimorphism of the gland is well documented. In the adult male mouse, the SMG contains 10 times more NGF compared to the female. Conversely, castration of male mice reduces the SMG NGF levels to those found in control females. In order to determine the locus at which androgens and TH exert their effect on NGF gene expression in the SMG, steady-state NGF mRNA levels were determined. Daily treatment of adult female mice with TH for 1 week increased NGF mRNA levels 6-fold. Androgen treatment produced a 20-fold increase in SMG NGF mRNA, which was comparable to levels detected in the control adult male SMG. The effect of TH on NGF mRNA levels was time-dependent and coincided with the increase in NGF protein concentrations. At 48 h after a single TH injection, NGF mRNA levels (measured in SMG total RNA) increased 2-4-fold, while heteronuclear (hn) RNA levels were increased 1.5-2-fold. The NGF gene transcription rate was determined by run-on assay following TH treatment. A small but significant 2-fold induction by TH of NGF gene transcription was found at 24-48 h. Cytoplasmic RNA prepared from the same SMGs used in the run-on experiments was tested by S1 nuclease protection; NGF cytoplasmic RNA was increased 7-fold in the SMGs of females treated with TH 48 h previously. These results demonstrate that the effect of TH on NGF gene expression is due in part to an induction of NGF gene transcription. The discrepancies observed between transcription rate and mRNA levels suggest that the major effect of TH is at the post-transcriptional level, possibly mRNA stabilization. The time required to observe an induction of TH on NGF gene transcription is suggestive of an indirect effect, possibly through the induction by TH of another protein which in turn activates the NGF gene.

  13. Cellular processing of the nerve growth factor precursor by the mammalian pro-protein convertases.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Benjannet, S; Pareek, S; Savaria, D; Hamelin, J; Goulet, B; Laliberte, J; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Murphy, R A

    1996-01-01

    In order to define the enzymes responsible for the maturation of the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF), its biosynthesis and intracellular processing by the pro-protein convertases furin, PC1, PC2, PACE4, PC5 and the PC5 isoform PC5/6-B were analysed using the vaccinia virus expression system in cells containing a regulated and/or a constitutive secretory pathway. Results demonstrate that in both cell types furin, and to a lesser extent PACE4 and PC5/6-B, are the best candidate proNGF convertases. Furthermore, two processed NGF forms of 16.5 and 13.5 kDa were evident in constitutively secreting cell lines such as LoVo and BSC40 cells, whereas only the 13.5 kDa form was observed in AtT20 cells, which contain secretory granules. Both forms display the same N-terminal sequence as mature NGF, and were also produced following site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal Arg-Arg sequence of NGF into Ala-Ala, suggesting that the difference between them is not at the C-terminus. Co-expression of proNGF with furin and either chromogranin B or secretogranin II (but not chromogranin A) in BSC40 cells eliminated the 16.5 kDa form. Data also show that N-glycosylation of the pro-segment of proNGF and trimming of the oligosaccharide chains are necessary for the exit of this precursor from the endoplasmic reticulum and its eventual processing and secretion. Sulphate labelling experiments demonstrated that proNGF is processed into mature NGF following the arrival of the precursor in the trans-Golgi network. This comparative study shows that the three candidate mammalian subtilisin/kexin-like convertases identified process proNGF into NGF and that the nature of the final processed products is dependent on the intracellular environment. PMID:8615794

  14. Bradykinin modulates spontaneous nerve growth factor production and stretch-induced ATP release in human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Ochodnický, Peter; Michel, Martina B; Butter, Jan J; Seth, Jai; Panicker, Jalesh N; Michel, Martin C

    2013-04-01

    The urothelium plays a crucial role in integrating urinary bladder sensory outputs, responding to mechanical stress and chemical stimulation by producing several diffusible mediators, including ATP and, possibly, neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). Such urothelial mediators activate underlying afferents and thus may contribute to normal bladder sensation and possibly to the development of bladder overactivity. The muscle-contracting and pain-inducing peptide bradykinin is produced in various inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies associated with bladder overactivity, but the effect of bradykinin on human urothelial function has not yet been characterized. The human urothelial cell line UROtsa expresses mRNA for both B1 and B2 subtypes of bradykinin receptors, as determined by real-time PCR. Bradykinin concentration-dependently (pEC50=8.3, Emax 4434±277nM) increased urothelial intracellular calcium levels and induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2. Activation of both bradykinin-induced signaling pathways was completely abolished by the B2 antagonist icatibant (1μM), but not the B1 antagonist R715 (1μM). Bradykinin-induced (100nM) B2 receptor activation markedly increased (192±13% of control levels) stretch-induced ATP release from UROtsa in hypotonic medium, the effect being dependent on intracellular calcium elevations. UROtsa cells also expressed mRNA and protein for NGF and spontaneously released NGF to the medium in the course of hours (11.5±1.4pgNGF/mgprotein/h). Bradykinin increased NGF mRNA expression and accelerated urothelial NGF release to 127±5% in a protein kinase C- and ERK1/2-dependent manner. Finally, bradykinin up-regulated mRNA for transient-receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) sensory ion channel in UROtsa. In conclusion, we show that bradykinin represents a versatile modulator of human urothelial phenotype, accelerating stretch-induced ATP release, spontaneous release of NGF, as well as

  15. Characterization of antibodies to synthetic nerve growth factor (NGF) and proNGF peptides.

    PubMed

    Ebendal, T; Persson, H; Larhammar, D; Lundströmer, K; Olson, L

    1989-03-01

    Sequence data for the mature nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and its precursor are available from molecular cloning of the NGF gene in several species, including mice, humans, rats, and chickens. Hydrophilicity analysis of the predicted rat and chicken prepro-NGF was carried out to locate putative antigenic determinants. Eight peptides were selected and synthesized based on hydrophilicity profiles. Two peptides represent sequences in the rat (and mouse) pro-NGF, one peptide (our peptide P3) represents a highly conserved region of the mature NGF protein (identical in humans, mice, rats, and chickens), two peptides are specific for the mature chicken NGF, and the remaining three peptides are specific for the mature rat NGF (each with only one amino acid substitution compared with corresponding segments of the mouse NGF). For immunization, the peptides were conjugated to keyhold limpet hemocyanin and used to produce antisera in rabbits. After bleeding, peptide-specific antibodies were purified on affinity columns prepared by coupling each of the synthetic peptides. The different peptide antisera and affinity-purified antibodies then were characterized by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry of the male mouse submandibular gland, a rich exocrine source of NGF. ELISA analysis showed that all peptide antisera bound two to four orders of magnitude better than normal rabbit serum to a coat of their proper peptide. The higher binding was retained by the purified peptide antibodies compared with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. Specific tests, in which one peptide antiserum was checked against different peptide coats in the ELISA, also showed two to four orders of magnitude higher binding of antibodies to the proper synthetic peptide. The peptide antibodies also were tested for their ability to bind to native mouse beta NGF coated to the immunoplates. Only antibodies raised to the conserved P3 peptide recognized native NGF to an extent similar to that

  16. Chronic mild stress influences nerve growth factor through a matrix metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Kurek, Anna; Detka, Jan; Slusarczyk, Joanna; Papp, Mariusz; Tota, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Lason, Wladyslaw; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2016-04-01

    Stress is generally a beneficial experience that motivates an organism to action to overcome the stressful challenge. In particular situations, when stress becomes chronic might be harmful and devastating. The hypothalamus is a critical coordinator of stress and the metabolic response; therefore, disruptions in this structure may be a significant cause of the hormonal and metabolic disturbances observed in depression. Chronic stress induces adverse changes in the morphology of neural cells that are often associated with a deficiency of neurotrophic factors (NTFs); additionally, many studies indicate that insufficient NTF synthesis may participate in the pathogenesis of depression. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression of the nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hypothalamus of male rats subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) or to prenatal stress (PS) and to PS in combination with an acute stress event (AS). It has been found that chronic mild stress, but not prenatal stress, acute stress or a combination of PS with AS, decreased the concentration of the mature form of NGF (m-NGF) in the rat hypothalamus. A discrepancy between an increase in the Ngf mRNA and a decrease in the m-NGF levels suggested that chronic mild stress inhibited NGF maturation or enhanced the degradation of this factor. We have shown that NGF degradation in the hypothalamus of rats subjected to chronic mild stress is matrix metalloproteinase-dependent and related to an increase in the active forms of some metalloproteinases (MMP), including MMP2, MMP3, MMP9 and MMP13, while the NGF maturation process does not seem to be changed. We suggested that activated MMP2 and MMP9 potently cleave the mature but not the pro- form of NGF into biologically inactive products, which is the reason for m-NGF decomposition. In turn, the enhanced expression of Ngf in the hypothalamus of these rats is an attempt to overcome the reduced levels of m-NGF. Additionally, the decreased level of m

  17. Enhancement of musculocutaneous nerve reinnervation after vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is not only a potent angiogenic factor but it also promotes axonal outgrowth and proliferation of Schwann cells. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively assess reinnervation of musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) stumps using motor and primary sensory neurons after plasmid phVEGF transfection and end-to-end (ETE) or end-to-side (ETS) neurorrhaphy. The distal stump of rat transected MCN, was transfected with plasmid phVEGF, plasmid alone or treated with vehiculum and reinnervated following ETE or ETS neurorrhaphy for 2 months. The number of motor and dorsal root ganglia neurons reinnervating the MCN stump was estimated following their retrograde labeling with Fluoro-Ruby and Fluoro-Emerald. Reinnervation of the MCN stumps was assessed based on density, diameter and myelin sheath thickness of regenerated axons, grooming test and the wet weight index of the biceps brachii muscles. Results Immunohistochemical detection under the same conditions revealed increased VEGF in the Schwann cells of the MCN stumps transfected with the plasmid phVEGF, as opposed to control stumps transfected with only the plasmid or treated with vehiculum. The MCN stumps transfected with the plasmid phVEGF were reinnervated by moderately higher numbers of motor and sensory neurons after ETE neurorrhaphy compared with control stumps. However, morphometric quality of myelinated axons, grooming test and the wet weight index were significantly better in the MCN plasmid phVEGF transfected stumps. The ETS neurorrhaphy of the MCN plasmid phVEGF transfected stumps in comparison with control stumps resulted in significant elevation of motor and sensory neurons that reinnervated the MCN. Especially noteworthy was the increased numbers of neurons that sent out collateral sprouts into the MCN stumps. Similarly to ETE neurorrhaphy, phVEGF transfection resulted in significantly higher morphometric quality of myelinated axons, behavioral test and the

  18. Nicotine Stimulates Nerve Growth Factor in Lung Fibroblasts through an NFκB-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakool, Cherry; Grooms, Kora; Bijli, Kaiser M.; Crothers, Kristina; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Hart, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is classically found in asthma, and persistent AHR is associated with poor asthma control. Although airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical pathophysiologic role in AHR, the paracrine contributions of surrounding cells such as fibroblasts to the contractile phenotype of ASM cells have not been examined fully. This study addresses the hypothesis that nicotine promotes a contractile ASM cell phenotype by stimulating fibroblasts to increase nerve growth factor (NGF) secretion into the environment. Methods Primary lung fibroblasts isolated from wild type and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) deficient mice were treated with nicotine (50 µg/ml) in vitro for 72 hours. NGF levels were measured in culture media and in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from asthmatic, smoking and non-smoking subjects by ELISA. The role of the NFκB pathway in nicotine-induced NGF expression was investigated by measuring NFκB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and si-p65 NFκB knockdown. The ability of nicotine to stimulate a fibroblast-mediated, contractile ASM cell phenotype was confirmed by examining expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells cultured with fibroblast-conditioned media or BAL fluid. Results NGF levels were elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of nicotine-exposed mice, current smokers, and asthmatic children. Nicotine increased NGF secretion in lung fibroblasts in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and stimulated NFκB nuclear translocation, p65 binding to the NGF promoter, and NFκB transcriptional activity. These responses were attenuated in α7 nAChR deficient fibroblasts and in wild type fibroblasts following NFκB inhibition. Nicotine-treated, fibroblast-conditioned media increased expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells. Conclusion Nicotine stimulates NGF release by lung fibroblasts through α7 nAChR and NFκB dependent pathways

  19. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h and immunocytochemical staining of cell nuclei. After 6 days in culture in the absence of growth factors, nuclear BrdUrd incorporation was detected in 30% of fetal chromaffin cells, 1.5% of neonatal cells, and 0.1% of adult cells. Addition of 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II increased the fraction of BrdUrd-labeled nuclei to 50% of fetal, 20% of neonatal, and 2% of adult chromaffin cells. The ED50 value of IGF-I- and IGF-II-stimulated BrdUrd labeling in neonatal chromaffin cells was 0.3 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. In neonatal and adult chromaffin cells, addition of 1 nM bFGF or 2 nM NGF stimulated nuclear BrdUrd incorporation to approximately the same level as 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II. However, the response to bFGF or NGF in combination with either IGF-I or IGF-II was more than additive, indicating that the combined effect of the IGFs and bFGF or NGF is synergistic. The degree of synergism was 2- to 4-fold in neonatal chromaffin cells and 10- to 20-fold in adult chromaffin cells compared with the effect of each growth factor alone. In contrast, the action of bFGF and NGF added together in the absence of IGFs was not synergistic or additive. IGF-II acted also as a survival factor on neonatal chromaffin cells and the cell survival was further improved when bFGF or NGF was added together with IGF-II. In conclusion, we propose that IGF-I and IGF-II act in synergy with bFGF and NGF to stimulate proliferation and survival of chromaffin cells during neonatal growth and adult maintenance of the adrenal medulla. Our findings may have implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain. PMID:8127879

  20. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K.; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-03-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  1. Estrogen receptors colocalize with low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors in cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Toran-Allerand, C D; Miranda, R C; Bentham, W D; Sohrabji, F; Brown, T J; Hochberg, R B; MacLusky, N J

    1992-01-01

    The rodent and primate basal forebrain is a target of a family of endogenous peptide signaling molecules, the neurotrophins--nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3--and of the gonadal steroid hormone estrogen, both of which have been implicated in cholinergic function. To investigate whether or not these ligands may act on the same neurons in the developing and adult rodent basal forebrain, we combined autoradiography with 125I-labeled estrogen and either nonisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry or immunohistochemistry. We now report colocalization of intranuclear estrogen binding sites with the mRNA and immunoreactive protein for the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor, which binds all three neurotrophins, and for the cholinergic marker enzyme choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). Colocalization of estrogen and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors implies that their ligands may act on the same neuron, perhaps synergistically, to regulate the expression of specific genes or gene networks that may influence neuronal survival, differentiation, regeneration, and plasticity. That cholinergic neurons in brain regions subserving cognitive functions may be regulated not only by the neurotrophins but also by estrogen may have considerable relevance for the development and maintenance of neural substrates of cognition. If estrogen-neurotrophin interactions are important for survival of target neurons, then clinical conditions associated with estrogen deficiency could contribute to the atrophy or death of these neurons. These findings have implications for the subsequent decline in those differentiated neural functions associated with aging and Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:1316615

  2. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75NTR in Developing Human Fetal Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75NTR and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75NTR expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75NTR in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues. PMID:27536251

  3. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  4. Use of natural neural scaffolds consisting of engineered vascular endothelial growth factor immobilized on ordered collagen fibers filled in a collagen tube for peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Danqing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhu, Jianhong; Dai, Jianwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2014-10-15

    The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  5. Effect of a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor on nerve growth factor-induced thermal hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Amann, R; Schuligoi, R; Lanz, I; Peskar, B A

    1996-06-13

    Intraplantar injection of mouse beta (2.5S) nerve growth factor (NGF) caused thermal hyperalgesia and stimulated release of immunoreactive leukotriene B4 from the rat paw skin. Both effects of NGF were prevented by the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, (R)-2-[4-quinolin-2-yl-methoxy)phenyl]-2-cyclopentyl acetic acid (BAY X1005). BAY X1005 did not affect bradykinin-induced thermal hyperalgesia. These results suggest the participation of 5-lipoxygenase products of arachidonate in NGF-induced local thermal hyperalgesia.

  6. Expression of growth-associated protein 43 in the skin nerve fibers of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bursova, Sarka; Dubovy, Petr; Vlckova-Moravcova, Eva; Nemec, Martin; Klusakova, Ilona; Belobradkova, Jana; Bednarik, Josef

    2012-04-15

    The growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) is known as a marker of regenerating nerve fibers and their continuous remodeling in the adult human skin. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a possible role for GAP-43 in the detection of the early stages of small-fiber neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) as compared with a well- established and validated parameter - intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactive intra-epidermal C fibers. In a group of 21 patients with DM2 within three years of diagnosis (13 men, 8 women; mean age 53.9±12.8; range 30-74) and a group of 17 healthy volunteers (8 men, 9 women; mean age 55.8±8.5; range 45-70 years), skin punch biopsies were taken from a distal calf and double immunostained with both PGP 9.5 and GAP-43. In healthy controls, 96.8% of 629 PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers were immunostained with GAP-43; the proportion of PGP 9.5 intra-epidermal nerve fibers immunoreactive for GAP-43 in control subjects ranged from 86.5 to 100%. In DM2 patients, IENFD was significantly lower compared to controls (median, 1.5 vs. 11.2/mm; p<0.001). The proportion of GAP-43 immunoreactive intraepidermal nerve fibers was significantly lower in DM2 patients compared to healthy controls (73.6% of 337 PGP 9.5 positive fibers; p<0.001); ranged from 0 to 98.1%. In conclusion, these results show that impaired regeneration of intra-epidermal C fibers in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as indicated by GAP-43, might be a marker of incipient diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Immunohistochemical profile of cytokines and growth factors expressed in vestibular schwannoma and in normal vestibular nerve tissue.

    PubMed

    Taurone, Samanta; Bianchi, Enrica; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Di Gioia, Cira; Ierinó, Rocco; Carubbi, Cecilia; Galli, Daniela; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Giangaspero, Felice; Filipo, Roberto; Zanza, Christian; Artico, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, also known as acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors, which originate from myelin-forming Schwann cells. They develop in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. The clinical progression of the condition involves slow and progressive growth, eventually resulting in brainstem compression. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression level and the localization of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the adhesion molecules, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in order to determine whether these factors are involved in the transformation and development of human vestibular schwannoma. The present study investigated whether changes in inflammation are involved in tumor growth and if so, the mechanisms underlying this process. The results of the current study demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β1, IL-1β and IL-6 exhibited increased expression in human vestibular schwannoma tissue compared with normal vestibular nerve samples. TNF-α was weakly expressed in Schwann cells, confirming that a lower level of this cytokine is involved in the proliferation of Schwann cells. Neoplastic Schwann cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that may act in an autocrine manner, stimulating cellular proliferation. In addition, the increased expression of VEGF in vestibular schwannoma compared with that in normal vestibular nerve tissue, suggests that this factor may induce neoplastic growth via the promotion of angiogenesis. The present findings suggest that inflammation may promote angiogenesis and consequently contribute to tumor progression. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in vestibular

  8. Short- and long-term peripheral nerve regeneration using a poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid scaffold containing nerve growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor releasing microspheres.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ralph; Borntraeger, Andreas; Knight, Andrew M; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Spinner, Robert J; Malessy, Martijn J A; Yaszemski, Michael J; Windebank, Anthony J

    2012-08-01

    Addition of neural growth factors to bioengineered scaffolds may improve peripheral nerve regeneration. The aim of this study is to evaluate the short- and long term effect of microsphere delivered nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap. Eighty-four rats were assigned to seven groups (n = 6) at two endpoints (6 and 16 weeks): saline, saline NGF, saline NGF-microspheres, saline GDNF, saline GDNF-microspheres, saline blank microspheres, and autologous nerve graft. Total fascicular area and total number of myelinated fibers at mid-tube increased in all conduit groups between 6 and 16 weeks. Autologous, saline NGF-microsphere and saline GDNF-microsphere groups reached maximal histomorphometric values by 6 weeks (p < 0.05). Compound muscle action potentials returned after 6 weeks for the autologous graft and continued to increase to a level of 3.6 ± 1.9 mV at endpoint. No significant differences were found between study groups as measured by ankle angle. These experiments show an initial beneficial effect of incorporation of NGF- or GDNF-microspheres in a PLGA 85/15 nerve conduit, since histomorphometric values reached their maximum by 6 weeks compared to control groups. These results do not yet extrapolate into improved electrophysiological or functional improvement.

  9. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  10. Nerve growth factor combined with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances regeneration of bladder acellular matrix graft in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Vejdani, Kaveh; Kawakami, Kazumori; Fandel, Thomas; Nunes, Lora; Urakami, Shinji; Shiina, Hiroaki; Igawa, Mikio; Tanagho, Emil; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-05-01

    To determine the combined effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on regeneration of the bladder acellular matrix graft (BAMG) in spinal cord injury (SCI)-mediated neurogenic bladder in rats. In all, 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. At 8 weeks after spinalization surgery (neurogenic bladder), they were divided into five groups consisting of untreated controls and those whose bladders were injected with either no growth factor, NGF (2 microg/rat), VEGF (2 microg/rat) or both at partial BAMG replacement surgery. After 8 weeks, bladder function was assessed by urodynamic studies and the bladders were harvested for histological examination. Smooth muscle induction, collagen and nerve fibre regeneration were assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies to smooth muscle actin (alpha-actin), Masson's trichrome and protein gene product 9.5, respectively. Bladder capacity and compliance were significantly increased in all BAMG groups 8 weeks after surgery compared with that before bladder replacement surgery. Bladder capacity and compliance were much higher in the VEGF and NGF combined group than in the control, or NGF and VEGF alone groups. There was no significant difference in the residual volume ratio among all groups. This is the first report showing that NGF has a significant synergistic effect on the development, differentiation and functional restoration of the BAMG when administered with VEGF in neurogenic bladder. Our results indicate that NGF may be a useful cytokine for enhancing the regeneration of a functional bladder following acellular matrix grafting in a neurogenic rat model.

  11. Two populations of cold-sensitive neurons in rat dorsal root ganglia and their modulation by nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Babes, Alexandru; Zorzon, Daniel; Reid, Gordon

    2004-11-01

    Cold sensing in mammals is not completely understood, although significant progress has been made recently with the cloning of two cold-activated ion channels, TRPM8 and TRPA1. We have used rat DRG neurons in primary culture and calcium fluorimetry to identify distinct populations of cold-sensitive neurons, which may underlie different functions. Menthol sensitivity clearly separated two classes of cold-responding neurons. One group was menthol-sensitive (MS), was activated at warmer temperatures and responded faster and with a larger increase in intracellular calcium concentration during cooling; the fraction of MS neurons in culture and their cold sensitivity were both increased in the presence of nerve growth factor. Neurons in the menthol-insensitive (MI) group required stronger cooling for activation than MS cells and neither their proportion nor their cold sensitivity were significantly altered by nerve growth factor. The two groups of cold-sensitive neurons also had different pharmacology. A larger fraction of MS cells were capsaicin-sensitive and coexpression of menthol and capsaicin sensitivity was observed in the absence of NGF. MI neurons were not stimulated by the super-cooling agent icilin or by the irritant mustard oil. Taken together these findings support a picture in which TRPM8 is the major player in detecting gentle cooling, while TRPA1 does not seem to be involved in cold sensing by MI neurons, at least in the temperature range between 32 and 12 degrees C.

  12. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Majuta, Lisa A.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal pain–related behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of anti–nerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains. PMID:25599311

  13. The promotion of endothelial progenitor cells recruitment by nerve growth factors in tissue-engineered blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Yuan, Wei; Li, Li; Mi, Jianhong; Xu, Shangcheng; Wen, Can; Zhou, Zhenhua; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Sun, Jiansen; Ying, Dajun; Yang, Mingcan; Li, Xiaosong; Zhu, Chuhong

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) mobilization and homing are critical to the development of an anti-thrombosis and anti-stenosis tissue-engineered blood vessel. The growth and activation of blood vessels are supported by nerves. We investigated whether nerve growth factors (NGF) can promote EPCs mobilization and endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels. In vitro, NGF promoted EPCs to form more colonies, stimulated human EPCs to differentiate into endothelial cells, and significantly enhanced EPCs migration. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that NGF treatment increased the number of EPCs in the peripheral circulation of C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, the treatment of human EPCs with NGF facilitated their homing into wire-injured carotid arteries after injection into mice. Decellularized rat blood vessel matrix was incubated with EDC cross-linked collagen and bound to NGF protein using the bifunctional coupling agent N-succinmidyl3-(2-pyridyldit-hio) propionate (SPDP). The NGF-bound tissue-engineered blood vessel was implanted into rat carotid artery for 1 week and 1 month. NGF-bound blood vessels possessed significantly higher levels of endothelialization and patency than controls did. These results demonstrated that NGF can markedly increase EPCs mobilization and homing to vascular grafts. Neurotrophic factors such as NGF have a therapeutic potential for the construction of tissue-engineered blood vessels in vivo.

  14. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Majuta, Lisa A; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal pain-related behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of anti-nerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains.

  15. Control of Growth Within Drosophila Peripheral Nerves by Ras and Protein Kinase A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    instar larval neuromuscular junction and peripheral sensory structures. These studies confirmed that gli-Gal4 is expressed in peripheral glia but not...synapse number at the larval neuromuscular junction. This phenotype is also observed in larval motor neurons with decreased activity of PI3K. This... neuromuscular junction to activate PI3K within motor nerve terminals. To assay for PI3K activity we applied an antibody specific for the phosphorylated form of

  16. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing CD44 expression partially inhibits MPNST ...depends on Src kinase and that Src kinase activity promotes MPNST invasion (Su et al., 2003a) . Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on

  17. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing Cc44 expression inhibits MPNST cell...Src kinase. Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on an autocrine loop involving MCF, an MCF activating enzyme (MGFA), and c-Met, all of

  18. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities.

  19. Synergistic effects of cyclic AMP and nerve growth factor on neurite outgrowth and microtubule stability of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The outgrowth of neurites from rat PC12 cells stimulated by combined treatment of nerve growth factor (NGF) with cAMP is significantly more rapid and extensive than the outgrowth induced by either factor alone. We have compared the responses of PC12 cells under three different growth conditions, NGF alone, cAMP alone, and combined treatment, with respect to surface morphology, rapidity of neurite outgrowth, and stability of neurite microtubules, to understand the synergistic action of NGF and cAMP on PC12. Surface events at early times in these growth conditions varied, suggesting divergent pathways of action of NGF and cAMP. This suggestion is strongly supported by the finding that cells exposed to saturating levels of dibutyryl cAMP without substantial neurite outgrowth initiated neurites within 5 min of NGF. This response has been adopted as a convenient assay for NGF. Neurites that regenerated in the three growth conditions showed marked differences in stability to treatments that depolymerize microtubules. The results indicate that microtubules in cells treated with both NGF and cAMP are significantly more stable than in either growth factor alone. We suggest that a shift of the assembly equilibrium favoring tubulin assembly is a necessary prerequisite for the initiation of neurites by PC12. PMID:2982887

  20. Role of nerve growth factor and its TRKA receptor in normal ovarian and epithelial ovarian cancer angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vera, Carolina; Tapia, Verónica; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2014-08-10

    In normal ovarian function a controlled angiogenesis is essential. Several growth factors are involved in this process, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The angiogenesis process in the normal ovary is a tightly controlled process that occurs in each ovarian cycle. Also, angiogenesis is critical for ovarian cancer development and it is responsible for tumor spread, metastasis and its peritoneal dissemination. Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women and it is distinguished as the most lethal gynecologic cancer. In recent years angiogenesis has been given considerable attention in order to identify targets for developing effective anti-tumor therapies. Several molecules have been reported to promote angiogenesis, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors, the angiopoietin/Tie ligand/receptor system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Primarily, VEGF has been identified to play key roles in driving angiogenesis. The above-mentioned molecules are candidate drug targets. Used in combination with other treatments, anti-angiogenic therapies have managed to reduce disease progression. The present review is focused in NGF and its high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (TRKA). The expression of VEGF, proliferation and the angiogenesis process in ovarian cancer is importantly induced by NGF, among other molecules.

  1. Controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor using poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres: In vitro characterization and application in polycaprolactone fumarate nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Jing; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Runge, M. Brett; Spinner, Robert J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic stimulator. Controlled release of such stimulators may enhance and guide the vascularization process, and when applied in a nerve conduit may play a role in nerve regeneration. We report the fabrication and in vitro characterization of VEGF encapsulating poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres and the in vivo application of nerve conduits supplemented with VEGF-containing microspheres. PLGA microspheres containing VEGF were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. This yielded 83.16% of the microspheres with a diameter < 53 µm. VEGF content measured by ELISA indicated 93.79 ±10.64% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics were characterized by an initial burst release of 67.6±8.25% within the first 24 hours, followed by consistent release of approximately 0.34% per day for 4 weeks. Bioactivity of the released VEGF was tested by human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation assay. VEGF released at all time points enhanced HUVEC proliferation confirming that VEGF retained its bioactivity through the 4-week time period. When the microsphere delivery system was placed in a biosynthetic nerve scaffold, robust nerve regeneration was observed. This study established a novel system for controlled release of growth factors and enables in vivo studies of nerve conduits conditioned with this system. PMID:22019759

  2. Antibodies to nerve growth factor reverse established tactile allodynia in rodent models of neuropathic pain without tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wild, Kenneth D; Bian, Di; Zhu, Dawn; Davis, James; Bannon, Anthony W; Zhang, Tie J; Louis, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    A considerable body of evidence implicates endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) in conditions in which pain is a prominent feature, including neuropathic pain. However, previous studies of NGF antagonism in animal models of neuropathic pain have examined only the prevention of hyperalgesia and allodynia after injury, whereas the more relevant issue is whether treatment can provide relief of established pain, particularly without tolerance. In the current work, we studied the effects of potent, neutralizing anti-NGF antibodies on the reversal of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in established models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain in rats and mice. In the complete Freund's adjuvant-induced hind-paw inflammation, spinal nerve ligation and streptozotocin-induced neuropathic pain models, a single intraperitoneal injection of a polyclonal anti-NGF antibody reversed established tactile allodynia from approximately day 3 to day 7 after treatment. Effects on thermal hyperalgesia were variable with a significant effect observed only in the spinal nerve ligation model. In the mouse chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, a mouse monoclonal anti-NGF antibody reversed tactile allodynia when administered 2 weeks after surgery. Repeated administration of this antibody to CCI mice for 3 weeks produced a sustained reversal (days 4 to 21) of tactile allodynia that returned 5 days after the end of dosing. In conclusion, NGF seems to play a critical role in models of established neuropathic and inflammatory pain in both rats and mice, with no development of tolerance to antagonism. Antagonists of NGF, such as fully human monoclonal anti-NGF antibodies, may have therapeutic utility in analogous human pain conditions.

  3. Neuropathic pain and Nerve Growth Factor in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: prospective clinical-pathological study.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Navarro, X; Gil-Gil, M; Herrando-Grabulosa, M; Calls, A; Bruna, J

    2017-08-07

    Neuropathic pain can be present in patients developing chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small sensory fibers and regulates nociception. We investigated the changes in serum NGF and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) in skin biopsies of cancer patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy in a single-center prospective observational study. Patients were evaluated before and after chemotherapy administration. CIPN was graded with Total Neuropathy Score(©), nerve conduction studies, and NCI-CTCAE scale. Neuropathic pain was defined according to the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 questionnaire. Neuropathic pain was present in 13 of 60 patients (21%), who reported shooting or burning pain in the hands (n=9) and the feet (n=12). Patients displaying painful CIPN presented higher NGF after treatment compared to patients with painless or absent CIPN (8.7±11.9 vs 2.5±1.4 pg/mL, p=0.016). The change of NGF significantly correlated with neuropathic pain. Patients with painful CIPN did not show significant loss of IEFND compared to patients with painless or absent CIPN (6.16±3.86 vs 8.37±4.82, p=0.12). No correlation between IEFND and NGF was observed. Serum NGF increases in cancer patients receiving taxane or platinum with painful CIPN, suggesting that it might be a potential biomarker of presence and severity of neuropathic pain in this population. Long-term comprehensive studies to better define the course of NGF in relation with neurological outcomes would be helpful in the further design of therapies for CIPN related neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Development of rat tibia innervation: colocalization of autonomic nerve fiber markers with growth-associated protein 43.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mariusz; Litwin, Jan A; Tabarowski, Zbigniew; Zagólski, Olaf; Cichocki, Tadeusz; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Development of autonomic innervation of the tibia was investigated in rat fetuses on gestational days (GD) 17-21 and in juvenile animals on postnatal days (PD) 1-28. Double immunofluorescence combined with confocal microscopy was applied to study colocalization of neuronal growth- associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and panneuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) with markers of the autonomic nervous system: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) for adrenergic, as well as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) for cholinergic fibers. The first GAP-43-immunoreactive (GAP-IR) nerve fibers were seen on GD17 in the perichondrium of the proximal epiphysis. Further GAP- and PGP-IR innervation appeared in the perichondrium/periosteum of the diaphysis and in the distal epiphysis (GD19), then in the bone marrow and in the intercondylar eminence (GD21). On PD1, NPY-IR and DbetaH-IR fibers appeared within the diaphyseal periosteum and on PD4 within the bone marrow. From PD14, GAP-43 immunoreactivity of NPY-positive fibers decreased. From PD7 on, NPY-IR fibers were observed in cartilage canals of both epiphyses and in the intercondylar eminence. In secondary ossification centers, NPY-IR fibers were seen from PD10, and in the bone marrow of the epiphyses from PD14. First VIP-IR and VAChT-IR fibers were observed on PD4 within the periosteum, bone marrow and patellar ligament. From PD10 on, VIP-positive fibers were seen in the intercondylar eminence, and from PD14 in secondary ossification centers. GAP-43 proved to be superior to PGP 9.5 as marker of growing nerve fibers, mostly due to its earlier appearance. The presence of specific nerve fibers may suggest possible involvement of autonomic innervation in regulation of bone development.

  5. Otoprotective effects of mouse nerve growth factor in DBA/2J mice with early-onset progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Zhao, Hongchun; Zheng, Tihua; Wang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wang, Andi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yanfei; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-10-01

    As it displays progressive hair-cell loss and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) characterized by early-onset progressive hearing loss (ePHL), DBA/2J is an inbred mouse strain widely used in hearing research. Mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF), as a common exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF), has been studied extensively for its ability to promote neuronal survival and growth. To determine whether mNGF can ameliorate progressive hearing loss (PHL) in DBA/2J mice, saline or mNGF was given to DBA/2J mice of either sex by daily intramuscular injection from the 1st to the 9th week after birth. At 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, in comparison with vehicle groups, mNGF groups experienced decreased auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) thresholds and increased distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes, the prevention of hair cell loss, and the inhibition of apoptosis of SGNs. Downregulation of Bak/Bax and Caspase genes and proteins in cochleae of mice receiving the mNGF treatment was detected by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. This suggests that the Bak-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway may be involved in the otoprotective mechanism of mNGF in progressive hearing loss of DBA/2J mice. Our results demonstrate that mNGF can act as an otoprotectant in the DBA/2J mice for the early intervention of PHL and, thus, could become of great value in clinical applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nerve growth factor acutely reduces chemical transmission by means of postsynaptic TrkA-like receptors in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Nadal, M; Leznik, E; Sugimori, M; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J; Llinás, R

    1998-12-08

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been shown to be an important modulator of synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such findings hint toward the existence of extracellular ligands capable of activating this widely represented signaling mechanism at or close to the synapse. Examples of such ligands are the peptide growth factors which, on binding, activate receptor tyrosine kinases. To gain insight into the physiological consequences of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in squid giant synapse, a series of growth factors was tested in this preparation. Electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical analysis demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) triggers an acute and specific reduction of the postsynaptic potential amplitude, without affecting the presynaptic spike generation or presynaptic calcium current. The NGF target is localized at a postsynaptic site and involves a new TrkA-like receptor. The squid receptor crossreacts with antibodies generated against mammalian TrkA, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to NGF stimulation, and is blocked by specific pharmacological inhibitors. The modulation described emphasizes the important role of growth factors on invertebrate synaptic transmission.

  7. Nerve growth factor acutely reduces chemical transmission by means of postsynaptic TrkA-like receptors in squid giant synapse

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Herman; Nadal, Marcela; Leznik, Elena; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph; Llinás, Rodolfo

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been shown to be an important modulator of synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such findings hint toward the existence of extracellular ligands capable of activating this widely represented signaling mechanism at or close to the synapse. Examples of such ligands are the peptide growth factors which, on binding, activate receptor tyrosine kinases. To gain insight into the physiological consequences of receptor tyrosine kinase activation in squid giant synapse, a series of growth factors was tested in this preparation. Electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical analysis demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) triggers an acute and specific reduction of the postsynaptic potential amplitude, without affecting the presynaptic spike generation or presynaptic calcium current. The NGF target is localized at a postsynaptic site and involves a new TrkA-like receptor. The squid receptor crossreacts with antibodies generated against mammalian TrkA, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to NGF stimulation, and is blocked by specific pharmacological inhibitors. The modulation described emphasizes the important role of growth factors on invertebrate synaptic transmission. PMID:9844004

  8. Combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine effectively inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by targeting complementary signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C; Roth, Kevin A; Carroll, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. In addition, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis.

  9. Correlation between nerve growth factor and tissue expression of IL-17 in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Aarão, Tinara Leila de Sousa; de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; Botelho, Beatriz Santos; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a serious public health problem in peripheral and developing countries. Leprosy is a chronic infectious-contagious disease caused by the intracellular, bacillus Mycobacterium leprae, which causes tissue damage and demyelination of peripheral nerves. Recent studies have demonstrated the participation of new subtype's cytokines profile in the inflammatory response of leprosy. Since nerve functions are affected by inflammatory response during the course of leprosy, changes in the production of NGF and its receptor (NGF R) may be directly associated with disability and sensory loss. Skin biopsies were collected and submitted to immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies to IL-17, NGF and NGF R. Quantitative analysis of NGF, NGFR and IL-17 immunostaining showed a significant difference between the clinical forms, with higher expression of NGF and NGFR in lepromatous leprosy and IL-17 in tuberculoid leprosy. The present study showed that IL-17, in addition to stimulating an inflammatory response, negatively regulates the action of NGF and NGF R in the polar forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Control-released basic fibroblast growth factor-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres promote sciatic nerve regeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hai-Bo; Zeng, Yi; Lu, Yan-Rong; Cheng, Jing-Qiu; Shen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although peripheral nerve injury may result in a loss of function in innervated areas, the most effective method for nerve regeneration remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of control-released basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres on sciatic nerve regeneration following injury in rats. bFGF-PLGA microspheres were prepared and their characteristics were evaluated. The sciatic nerve was segmentally resected to create a 10 mm defect in 36 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and, following the anastomosis of the nerve ends with a silicone tube, bFGF-PLGA microspheres, free bFGF or PBS were injected into the tube (n=12 in each group). The outcome of nerve regeneration was evaluated using the sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiological test and histological staining at 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-surgery. The bFGF-PLGA microspheres were successfully synthesized with an encapsulation efficiency of 66.43%. The recovery of SFI and electrophysiological values were significantly greater (P<0.05), and morphological and histological observations were significantly greater (P<0.05) in bFGF-PLGA microspheres and bFGF groups compared with those in the PBS group, and the quickest recovery was observed in the bFGF-PLGA microspheres group. In conclusion, the bFGF-PLGA microspheres may promote nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the sciatic nerve, and may have potential therapeutic applications in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:28352311

  11. Effect of vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy on post-traumatic peripheral nerve regeneration and denervation-related muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Moimas, S; Novati, F; Ronchi, G; Zacchigna, S; Fregnan, F; Zentilin, L; Papa, G; Giacca, M; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I; Arnež, Z M; Raimondo, S

    2013-10-01

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury depends on both improvement of nerve regeneration and prevention of denervation-related skeletal muscle atrophy. To reach these goals, in this study we overexpressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by means of local gene transfer with adeno-associated virus (AAV). Local gene transfer in the regenerating peripheral nerve was obtained by reconstructing a 1-cm-long rat median nerve defect using a vein segment filled with skeletal muscle fibers that have been previously injected with either AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-LacZ, and the morphofunctional outcome of nerve regeneration was assessed 3 months after surgery. Surprisingly, results showed that overexpression of VEGF in the muscle-vein-combined guide led to a worse nerve regeneration in comparison with AAV-LacZ controls. Local gene transfer in the denervated muscle was obtained by direct injection of either AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-LacZ in the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle after median nerve transection and results showed a significantly lower progression of muscle atrophy in AAV2-VEGF-treated muscles in comparison with muscles treated with AAV2-LacZ. Altogether, our results suggest that local delivery of VEGF by AAV2-VEGF-injected transplanted muscle fibers do not represent a rational approach to promote axonal regeneration along a venous nerve guide. By contrast, AAV2-VEGF direct local injection in denervated skeletal muscle significantly attenuates denervation-related atrophy, thus representing a promising strategy for improving the outcome of post-traumatic neuromuscular recovery after nerve injury and repair.

  12. Effect of helium/neon laser irradiation on nerve growth factor synthesis and secretion in skeletal muscle cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Fidi; Brodie, Chaya; Appel, Elana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Shainberg, Asher

    2002-04-01

    Low energy laser irradiation therapy in medicine is widespread but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which the light might induce therapeutic effects. Skeletal muscle cultures were chosen as a target for light irradiation and nerve growth factor (NGF) was the biochemical marker for analysis. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation (P<0.001). Preincubation of the myotubes with either the photosensitizers 5-amino-levulinic acid (5-ALA), or with hematoporphyrin (Hp) enhanced the elevation of cytosolic calcium (P<0.001) after helium/neon irradiation (633 nm) with an energy of 3 J/cm(2). In addition, helium/neon irradiation augmented the level of NGF mRNA fivefold and increased NGF release to the medium of the myotubes. Thus, it is speculated that transient changes in calcium caused by light can modulate NGF release from the myotubes and also affect the nerves innervating the muscle. The NGF is probably responsible for the beneficial effects of low-level light.

  13. A Link Between Nerve Growth Factor Metabolic Deregulation and Amyloid-β-Driven Inflammation in Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iulita, Maria Florencia; Caraci, Filippo; Cuello, Augusto Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome, cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain progressively degenerate. This neurotransmitter system is the main source of acetylcholine to the cortex and hippocampus. In the mature and fully differentiated central nervous system, the phenotype of forebrain cholinergic neurons and their nerve terminals in cortex and hippocampus depend on the continuous endogenous supply of nerve growth factor (NGF). It has been recently demonstrated that NGF is secreted from cortical neurons in an activity-dependent manner as a precursor molecule, proNGF. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome exhibit proNGF accumulation in cortex, yet cholinergic neurons become atrophic in both diseases, despite the apparent abundance of the NGF precursor. This review illustrates the recent evidence that NGF metabolism is affected both in Alzheimer's disease and in Down syndrome brains and also discusses a role for amyloid-β peptides and central nervous system inflammation in unleashing such deficits. It further considers the potential of the NGF metabolic pathway as a new pharmacological target to slow down the neurodegenerative process both in Alzheimer's disease and in individuals with Down syndrome.

  14. Expression of the beta-nerve growth factor gene correlates with the density of sympathetic innervation in effector organs.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, D L; Reichardt, L F

    1984-01-01

    Although beta-nerve growth factor (NGF), a protein necessary for survival and development of sympathetic neurons, is believed to be a trophic factor that is produced by sympathetic effector organs, its synthesis by these tissues has never been conclusively demonstrated. Using an assay capable of detecting 10 fg of mRNA, we measured the level of NGF mRNA in tissues innervated by sympathetic neurons. NGF mRNA was detected unambiguously in each tissue at a level that appeared to be more than enough to account for the low levels of NGF protein previously detected. Tissues that were densely innervated had comparatively high levels of NGF mRNA, while those with sparser innervation had lower levels. There was a strong positive correlation between the NGF mRNA level and norepinephrine content, a measure of the density of sympathetic innervation. NGF gene expression in one of these tissues, the iris, was shown to be induced by denervation. NGF mRNA was also found in other areas, including elements of the adult peripheral nervous system--the sciatic nerve and the sympathetic and sensory ganglia. In the central nervous system, levels of NGF mRNA were found that are too high to be attributed entirely to the vasculature, suggesting a role for NGF in adult central nervous system function. Images PMID:6595669

  15. Linear Ordered Collagen Scaffolds Loaded with Collagen-Binding Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Facilitate Recovery of Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    Natural biological functional scaffolds, consisting of biological materials filled with promoting elements, provide a promising strategy for the regeneration of peripheral nerve defects. Collagen conduits have been used widely due to their excellent biological properties. Linear ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) fibers are good lumen fillers that can guide nerve regeneration in an ordered direction. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is important in the recovery of nerve injury. However, the traditional method for delivering bFGF to the lesion site has no long-term effect because of its short half-life and rapid diffusion. Therefore, we fused a specific collagen-binding domain (CBD) peptide to the N-terminal of native basic fibroblast growth factor (NAT-bFGF) to retain bFGF on the collagen scaffolds. In this study, a natural biological functional scaffold was constructed using collagen tubes filled with collagen-binding bFGF (CBD-bFGF)-loaded LOCS to promote regeneration in a 5-mm rat sciatic nerve transection model. Functional evaluation, histological investigation, and morphometric analysis indicated that the natural biological functional scaffold retained more bFGF at the injury site, guided axon growth, and promoted nerve regeneration as well as functional restoration. PMID:24188561

  16. Effect of transgenic human insulin-like growth factor-1 on spinal motor neurons following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiaxiang; Liu, Hongjun; Zhang, Naichen; Tian, Heng; Pan, Junbo; Zhang, Wenzhong; Wang, Jingcheng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the protective effect of exogenous human insulin-like growth factor-1 (hIGF-1) on spinal motor neurons, following its local transfection into an area of peripheral nerve injury. A total of 90 male Wistar rats that had been established as sciatic nerve crush injury models were randomly divided into three groups: hIGF-1 treatment, sham-transfected control and blank control groups. The different phases of hIGF-1 expression were observed in the spinal cord via postoperative immunostaining and the apoptosis of motor neurons was observed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. Pathological changes of the motor neurons and Nissl bodies within cell bodies were observed via Marsland and Luxol fast blue double staining, while changes in the neuropil of the spinal cord anterior horn were investigated via ultrastructural observation. It was found that hIGF-1, locally transfected into an area of peripheral nerve injury, was expressed in the spinal anterior horn following axoplasmic transport; the peak hIGF-1 expression occurred approximately a week following transfection. The number of apoptotic spinal cord motor neurons observed in the hIGF-1 treatment group was fewer than that in the sham-transfected and blank control groups at days 7, 14 and 21 following transfection (P<0.01). Furthermore, the quantity of motor neuron cells in the anterior horn of the spinal cord in the hIGF-1 treatment group was higher compared with those in the sham-transfected and blank control groups at days 2, 7, 14 and 28 following transfection (P<0.01). The degenerative changes of Nissl bodies within the cytoplasm of the hIGF-1 treatment group were less severe compared with those of the sham-transfected and blank control groups. At day 56 following transfection, the spinal anterior horn neuropil ultrastructure in the hIGF-1 treatment group was generally normal, while the sham-transfected and blank control

  17. Nerve Growth Factor Receptor TrkA, a New Receptor in Insulin Signaling Pathway in PC12 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, Thangiah; Rege, Shraddha D.; Mathews, Salome E.; Meakin, Susan O.; White, Morris F.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    TrkA is a cell surface transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase for nerve growth factor (NGF). TrkA has an NPXY motif and kinase regulatory loop similar to insulin receptor (INSR) suggesting that NGF→TrkA signaling might overlap with insulin→INSR signaling. During insulin or NGF stimulation TrkA, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), INSR (and presumably other proteins) forms a complex in PC12 cells. In PC12 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of INSR and IRS-1 is dependent upon the functional TrkA kinase domain. Moreover, expression of TrkA kinase-inactive mutant blocked the activation of Akt and Erk5 in response to insulin or NGF. Based on these data, we propose that TrkA participates in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells. PMID:23749991

  18. Abnormal neutrophil chemotactic activity in children with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA): the role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Beigelman, Avraham; Levy, Jacov; Hadad, Nurit; Pinsk, Vered; Haim, Alon; Fruchtman, Yariv; Levy, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    A 1926-ins-T mutation in the TrkA gene encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) was previously documented in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA). These patients suffer from skin lacerations which often evolve into deep tissue infections. Abnormality in neutrophil functions may explain this high rate of severe infections. In this study we show that chemotaxis was significantly (P<0.001) suppressed in patients' neutrophils, compared to healthy controls. Although NGF alone did not exert a chemotactic effect, its presence enhanced both migration toward fMLP and phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK) in neutrophils from healthy controls, but not in neutrophils from CIPA patients. The significantly impaired chemotactic activity of neutrophils from a CIPA patient, which has been attributed to the molecular defect in the TrkA receptor, may contribute to the high rate of infection.

  19. Expression of nerve growth factor in rat stomach. Implications for interactions between endothelial, neural and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A S; Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K; Brzozowski, T

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed to determine the expression and localization of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the gastric mucosa. Transmural gastric specimens were obtained from euthanized rats. 1) expression of NGF and TrkA receptor by Western blotting; 2) histological evaluation of gastric wall architecture; 3) expression of NGF using immunostaining. Immunostaining showed strong and differential expression of NGF in neural elements of gastric myenteric and submucosal plexuses; in epithelial cells: mainly in chief and progenitor cells, in enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells; and, in endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels. We concluded that NGF expression in neural elements, epithelial cells and endothelial cells of blood vessels indicated a complex local interaction between neural, epithelial and endothelial cells that regulated gastric mucosal homeostasis and, likely, the protection against gastric injury and ulcer healing.

  20. Development and regional expression of beta nerve growth factor messenger RNA and protein in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, S R; Ebendal, T; Lärkfors, L; Olson, L; Seiger, A; Strömberg, I; Persson, H

    1986-01-01

    The presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA and protein in the rat central nervous system is documented. Blot-hybridization analysis showed an abundance of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and olfactory bulb. Enzyme immunoassay confirmed significant levels of a NGF-like protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Bioassay of a NGF-like immunoaffinity-purified protein from these regions was physiologically indistinguishable from NGF. Immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread distribution of NGF-like reactivity in the adult brain, preferentially in fiber tracts. NGF mRNA accumulation began at birth, with adult levels reached 3 weeks postnatally. Enzyme immunoassay detected the presence of a NGF-like protein in the embryonic rat brain. Postnatally, the level of NGF-like protein reached a maximum at 3 weeks. Additionally, a distinct fetal form of NGF may exist. Images PMID:3456170

  1. Effects of LNG-IUS on nerve growth factor and its receptors expression in patients with adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Sik; Cho, Sihyun; Lim, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Young Eun; Yang, Hyo In; Lee, Kyung Eun; Heena, Kamdar; Seo, Seok Kyo; Kim, Hye Yeon; Lee, Byung Seok

    2010-12-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is effective in the treatment of dysmenorrhea associated with adenomyosis. However, the mechanism of pain relief of LNG-IUS in patients with adenomyosis is unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects of LNG-IUS on the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors, NGFR p75 and TrkA in patients with adenomyosis. Endometrial and myometrial tissues were prepared from 17 LNG-IUS-treated patients and 15 hormonally untreated patients who had undergone hysterectomies for adenomyosis. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies against NGF, NGFR p75, and TrkA, was performed. The expression of NGF, NGFR p75, and TrkA in endometrium and myometrium of LNG-IUS-treated patients was significantly decreased compared to those of hormonally untreated patients. Our findings may indicate that the suppression of NGF and its receptors by LNG-IUS is another possible mechanism of relieving pain in patients with adenomyosis.

  2. Reduced serum concentrations of nerve growth factor, but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor, in chronic cannabis abusers.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Valerio; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Pomponi, Massimiliano; Tonioni, Federico; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bria, Pietro

    2008-12-01

    Chronic cannabis use produces effects within the central nervous system (CNS) which include deficits in learning and attention tasks and decreased brain volume. Neurotrophins, in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are proteins that serve as survival factors for CNS neurons. Deficits in the production and utilization of these proteins can lead to CNS dysfunctions including those associated with cannabis abuse. In this study we measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) the NGF and BDNF serum levels in two groups of subjects: cannabis-dependent patients and healthy subjects. We found that NGF serum levels were significantly reduced in cannabis abusers as compared to healthy subjects. These findings indicate that NGF may have a role in the central action of cannabis and potentially in the neurotoxicity induced by this drug. These data also suggest that chronic cannabis consumption may be a risk factor for developing psychosis among drug users.

  3. Expression of nerve growth factor is upregulated in the rat thymic epithelial cells during thymus regeneration following acute thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Woo; Kim, Sung-Min; Shim, Na-Ri; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Jung, Il-Gun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jae-Bong; Moon, Jeon-Ok; Chung, Joo-Seop; Yoon, Sik

    2007-06-07

    Neuroimmune networks in the thymic microenvironment are thought to be involved in the regulation of T cell development. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increasingly recognized as a potent immunomodulator, promoting "cross-talk" between various types of immune system cells. The present study describes the expression of NGF during thymus regeneration following acute involution induced by cyclophosphamide in the rat. Immunohistochemical stain demonstrated not only the presence of NGF but also its upregulated expression mainly in the subcapsular, paraseptal, and perivascular epithelial cells, and medullary epithelial cells including Hassall's corpuscles in both the normal and regenerating thymus. Biochemical data obtained using Western blot and RT-PCR supported these results and showed that thymic extracts contain NGF protein and mRNA, at higher levels during thymus regeneration. Thus, our results suggest that NGF expressed in these thymic epithelial cells plays a role in the T lymphopoiesis associated with thymus regeneration during recovery from acute thymic involution.

  4. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment.

  5. Nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, a new receptor in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Thangiah; Rege, Shraddha D; Mathews, Salome E; Meakin, Susan O; White, Morris F; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-08-16

    TrkA is a cell surface transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase for nerve growth factor (NGF). TrkA has an NPXY motif and kinase regulatory loop similar to insulin receptor (INSR) suggesting that NGF→TrkA signaling might overlap with insulin→INSR signaling. During insulin or NGF stimulation TrkA, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), INSR (and presumably other proteins) forms a complex in PC12 cells. In PC12 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of INSR and IRS-1 is dependent upon the functional TrkA kinase domain. Moreover, expression of TrkA kinase-inactive mutant blocked the activation of Akt and Erk5 in response to insulin or NGF. Based on these data, we propose that TrkA participates in insulin signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

  6. Crystal structure of a coagulogen, the clotting protein from horseshoe crab: a structural homologue of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, A; Oganessyan, V; Muta, T; Iwanaga, S; Typke, D; Huber, R; Bode, W

    1996-01-01

    The clotting cascade system of the horseshoe crab (Limulus) is involved in both haemostasis and host defence. The cascade results in the conversion of coagulogen, a soluble protein, into an insoluble coagulin gel. The clotting enzyme excises the fragment peptide C from coagulogen, giving rise to aggregation of the monomers. The crystal structure of coagulogen reveals an elongated molecule that embraces the helical peptide C fragment. Cleavage and removal of the peptide C would expose an extended hydrophobic cove, which could interact with the hydrophobic edge of a second molecule, leading to a polymeric fibre. The C-terminal half of the coagulogen molecule exhibits a striking topological similarity to the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), providing the first evidence for a neurotrophin fold in invertebrates. Similarities between coagulogen and Spatzle, the Drosophila ligand of the receptor Toll, suggest that the neurotrophin fold might be considered more ancient and widespread than previously realized. Images PMID:9003754

  7. Retrograde degeneration of neurite membrane structural integrity of nerve growth cones following in vitro exposure to mercury.

    PubMed

    Leong, C C; Syed, N I; Lorscheider, F L

    2001-03-26

    Inhalation of mercury vapor (Hg0) inhibits binding of GTP to rat brain tubulin, thereby inhibiting tubulin polymerization into microtubules. A similar molecular lesion has also been observed in 80% of brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls. However the precise site and mode of action of Hg ions remain illusive. Therefore, the present study examined whether Hg ions could affect membrane dynamics of neurite growth cone morphology and behavior. Since tubulin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein in both vertebrates and invertebrates, we hypothesized that growth cones from animal species could be highly susceptible to Hg ions. To test this possibility, the identified, large Pedal A (PeA) neurons from the central ring ganglia of the snail Lymnoea stagnalis were cultured for 48 h in 2 ml brain conditioned medium (CM). Following neurite outgrowth, metal chloride solution (2 microl) of Hg, Al, Pb, Cd, or Mn (10(-7) M) was pressure applied directly onto individual growth cones. Time-lapse images with inverted microscopy were acquired prior to, during, and after the metal ion exposure. We demonstrate that Hg ions markedly disrupted membrane structure and linear growth rates of imaged neurites in 77% of all nerve growth cones. When growth cones were stained with antibodies specific for both tubulin and actin, it was the tubulin/microtubule structure that disintegrated following Hg exposure. Moreover, some denuded neurites were also observed to form neurofibrillary aggregates. In contrast, growth cone exposure to other metal ions did not effect growth cone morphology, nor was their motility rate compromised. To determine the growth suppressive effects of Hg ions on neuronal sprouting, cells were cultured either in the presence or absence of Hg ions. We found that in the presence of Hg ions, neuronal somata failed to sprout, whereas other metalic ions did not effect growth patterns of cultured PeA cells. We conclude that this

  8. A Systems-Level Analysis of the Peripheral Nerve Intrinsic Axonal Growth Program

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Vijayendran; Coppola, Giovanni; Nawabi, Homaira; Omura, Takao; Versano, Revital; Huebner, Eric A.; Zhang, Alice; Costigan, Michael; Yekkirala, Ajay; Barrett, Lee; Blesch, Armin; Michaelevski, Izhak; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Gao, Fuying; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Steve; He, Zhigang; Benowitz, Larry; Fainzilber, Mike; Tuszynski, Mark; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The regenerative capacity of the injured CNS in adult mammals is severely limited, yet axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) regrow, albeit to a limited extent, after injury. We reasoned that coordinate regulation of gene expression in injured neurons involving multiple pathways was central to PNS regenerative capacity. To provide a framework for revealing pathways involved in PNS axon regrowth after injury, we applied a comprehensive systems biology approach, starting with gene expression profiling of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) combined with multi-level bioinformatic analyses and experimental validation of network predictions. We used this rubric to identify a drug that accelerates DRG neurite outgrowth in vitro and optic nerve outgrowth in vivo by inducing elements of the identified network. The work provides a functional genomics foundation for understanding neural repair and proof of the power of such approaches in tackling complex problems in nervous system biology. PMID:26898779

  9. Chronic upregulation of activated microglia immunoreactive for galectin-3/Mac-2 and nerve growth factor following diffuse axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diffuse axonal injury in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be associated with morbidity ranging from cognitive difficulties to coma. Magnetic resonance imaging scans now allow early detection of axonal injury following TBI, and have linked cognitive disability in these patients to white matter signal changes. However, little is known about the pathophysiology of this white matter injury, and the role of microglial activation in this process. It is increasingly recognized that microglia constitute a heterogeneous population with diverse roles following injury. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that following diffuse axonal injury involving the corpus callosum, there is upregulation of a subpopulation of microglia that express the lectin galectin-3/Mac-2 and are involved in myelin phagocytosis. Methods Adult mice were subject to midline closed skull injury or sham operation and were sacrificed 1, 8, 14 or 28 days later. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques were used to analyze patterns of labelling within the corpus callosum qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Activated microglia immunoreactive for galectin-3/Mac-2 were most abundant 1 day following injury. Their levels were attenuated at later time points after TBI but still were significantly elevated compared to sham animals. Furthermore, the majority of galectin-3/Mac-2+ microglia were immunoreactive for nerve growth factor in both sham and injured animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that galectin-3/Mac-2+ microglia play an important role in the pathogenesis of diffuse axonal injury both acutely and chronically and that they mediate their effects, at least in part by releasing nerve growth factor. PMID:20507613

  10. Limited efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors on nerve growth factor and metalloproteinases expressions in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Makiko; Sawaji, Yasunobu; Endo, Kenji; Kosaka, Taiichi; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2016-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is associated with arthritic pain and metalloproteinases are implicated in collagen and aggrecan degradation. Although selective COX-2 inhibitors are recommended for the treatment of arthritic diseases, their effects on NGF and metalloproteinases remain unclear. This study investigated the regulations of NGF and metalloproteinases by selective COX-2 inhibitors in isolated human synovial cells. The isolated human synovial cells were stimulated with IL-1β in the presence of selective COX-2 inhibitors (NS-398 or celecoxib) with or without exogenous PGE2 or its receptor (EP1-4) agonists. The expressions of NGF, MMP-1, -3, -13, ADAMTS-4, and -5 were quantified by real-time PCR and their proteins were determined by Western blotting. The amount of PGE2 released was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The IL-1β inductions of NGF and MMP-1 and MMP-13 were augmented by the COX-2 inhibitors, whereas the inductions of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 were inhibited. These actions were reversed by supplementing PGE2 or the EP4 agonist exogenously. Our comprehensive analysis revealed that COX-2 inhibitors may be beneficial for suppressing aggrecan degradation and for reducing inflammatory pain by inhibiting PGE2 release, although they may have limited efficacy in suppressing collagen degradation and nerve growth. This study suggests the feedback roles of PGE2 in the negative regulation of NGF and MMP-1 and MMP-13 and the positive regulation of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nerve growth factor withdrawal-induced cell death in neuronal PC12 cells resembles that in sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that in neuronal cells the developmental phenomenon of programmed cell death is an active process, requiring synthesis of both RNA and protein. This presumably reflects a requirement for novel gene products to effect cell death. It is shown here that the death of nerve growth factor-deprived neuronal PC12 cells occurs at the same rate as that of rat sympathetic neurons and, like rat sympathetic neurons, involves new transcription and translation. In nerve growth factor-deprived neuronal PC12 cells, a decline in metabolic activity, assessed by uptake of [3H]2-deoxyglucose, precedes the decline in cell number, assessed by counts of trypan blue-excluding cells. Both declines are prevented by actinomycin D and anisomycin. In contrast, the death of nonneuronal (chromaffin-like) PC12 cells is not inhibited by transcription or translation inhibitors and thus does not require new protein synthesis. DNA fragmentation by internucleosomal cleavage does not appear to be a consistent or significant aspect of cell death in sympathetic neurons, neuronal PC12 cells, or nonneuronal PC12 cells, notwithstanding that the putative nuclease inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid protects sympathetic neurons, as well as neuronal and nonneuronal PC12 cells, from death induced by trophic factor removal. Both phenotypic classes of PC12 cells respond to aurintricarboxylic acid with similar dose-response characteristics. Our results indicate that programmed cell death in neuronal PC12 cells, but not in nonneuronal PC12 cells, resembles programmed cell death in sympathetic neurons in significant mechanistic aspects: time course, role of new protein synthesis, and lack of a significant degree of DNA fragmentation. PMID:1469055

  12. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  13. [Morphological study on development of nerve growth factor-positive neurons in the cerebellum of human fetus].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Rong; Shao, Jin-Gui

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the growth and development of nerve growth factor (NGF)-positive neurons in the cerebellum of midanaphase human fetus. The expression of the NGF-positive neurons in the cerebrum of human fetus was observed by immunohistochemical methods, and the integral absorbance (IA) was detected. By the 3rd to 4th month of gestation, neurons was seen in the ependymal, central, and marginal plate of cerebellum; the nucleus was oval and the neurons had short and small processes. By the 5th to 7th month of gestation, the number of NGF-positive neurons increased, the expressions enhanced, the nucleus was round-, oval-, or fusiform-shaped, the neurons grew larger in size, and the Purkinje cells showed NGF-positive expression. By the 8th to 10th month of gestation, the NGF-positive expression was enhanced with deeper dying, the body of Purkinje cells grew larger gradually, and the number of NGF-positive neurons in the granular cell layer and molecular layer increased. IA of the cerebellar cortical neurons of the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th month of gestation showed an increasing trend, and significant difference was observed (P < 0. 05). NGF-positive neurons in the cerebellum play an important role for differentiation, proliferation, migration, and growth of neurons in the cerebellum.

  14. DOSE-DEPENDENT INCREASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM-INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory


    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthma as well as in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated ...

  15. INCREASED PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM -INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthmatics and in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated pulmona...

  16. INCREASED PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM -INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthmatics and in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated pulmona...

  17. DOSE-DEPENDENT INCREASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM-INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory


    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthma as well as in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated ...

  18. Regulation of growth by a nerve growth factor-like protein which modulates paracrine interactions between a neoplastic epithelial cell line and stromal cells of the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Djakiew, D; Delsite, R; Pflug, B; Wrathall, J; Lynch, J H; Onoda, M

    1991-06-15

    Nerve growth factor-like substance(s) were identified in both conditioned media of a human prostatic tumor epithelial cell line (TSU-pr1) and a human prostatic stromal cell line (HPS) by Western blot analysis and bioassay of neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Nerve growth factor-beta (NGF) immunofluorescence was also localized to secretory vesicles in the cytoplasm of both the TSU-pr1 and HPS cells. Western blot of the TSU-pr1 and HPS cell-secreted protein identified an Mr 65,000 major protein which immunoreacted with murine NGF antibody. NGF Western blot of HPS cell-secreted protein also identified an Mr 42,000 minor band under reduced and nonreduced conditions and an Mr 61,000 minor band under reduced conditions. The secreted protein from the TSU-pr1 cells (50 micrograms/ml) and HPS (50 micrograms/ml), as well as murine NGF (50 ng/ml) or human recombinant NGF (50 ng/ml), stimulated neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells. This neurite outgrowth activity was partially inhibited by treatment with NGF antibody. Neither the serum containing growth medium nor bovine serum albumin (50 micrograms/ml) stimulated neurite outgrowth. The NGF-like secretory protein appeared to play a role in the paracrine regulation of prostatic growth between TSU-pr1 cells and HPS cells. The relative growth of TSU-pr1 cells, as indicated by [3H]thymidine incorporation, in response to HPS secretory protein was stimulated 2.8-fold in a dose-dependent manner. In the converse interaction, the relative growth of HPS cells in response to TSU-pr1 secretory protein was stimulated 1.8-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoneutralization of TSU-pr1 and HPS secretory protein was performed with antibody against NGF, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Removal of the NGF-like protein from the maximal stimulatory dose of TSU-pr1 secretory protein (100 micrograms/ml) with NGF antibody reduced HPS proliferation to 52% of maximal levels, and immunoneutralization of the NGF

  19. Temporal profile of nerve growth factor expression in the partial central nervous system of the Yangtze alligator Alligator sinensis (Reptilia,Crocodylia) during early postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lanrong; Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Renping; Zhou, Yongkang; Wu, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in structures of the partial central nervous system of the Yangtze alligator, Alligator sinensis (Reptilia, Crocodylia) was examined during early postnatal growth using immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays. In animals 0-2 years of age NGF-positive cells in the cerebral cortex increased gradually in number and size, and were predominantly distributed in the molecular layer. NGF-positive cells in the midbrain showed similar increases but with predominant distribution in the ependymal layer. NGF-positive cells increased in the cerebellum between 0 and 1 years of age, with increased NGF expression being seen during the first 2 years of life mostly in the ependymal layer. NGF-positive cells were mainly found in the gray matter of the spinal cord with decreasing cell numbers, NGF expression levels being seen from 0 to 2 years and small processes without synaptic connection from 1 to 2 years. These results suggest that NGF is involved in the early postnatal growth of several structures of Yangtze alligator partial central nervous system, suggesting a possible role of NGF in the Yangtze alligator partial central nervous system.

  20. Nerve growth factor modulates the tumor cells migration in ovarian cancer through the WNT/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Cai, Shaoxi; Zhao, Yi; He, Qiyi; Yu, Xiaodong; Cheng, Longcong; Zhang, Yingfeng; Hu, Xiancheng; Ke, Ming; Chen, Sijia; Zou, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)/nerve growth factor receptors (NGFRs) axis and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway have shown to play crucial roles in tumor initiation, progression and prognosis. But little did we know the relationship between them in modulation of tumor progress. In this report, we found that NGF/NGFRs and β-catenin were coexpression in ovarian cancer cell lines, and NGF can decrease the expression level of β-catenin and affect its activities, which may be related to the NGF-induced down-regulation of B-cell CLL/lymphoma 9-like (BCL9L, BCL9-2). Furthermore, NGF can also increase or decrease the downstream target gene expression levels of WNT/β-catenin depending on the cell types. Especially, we created a novel in vitro cell growth model based on a microfluidic device to intuitively observe the effects of NGF/NGFRs on the motility behaviors of ovarian cancer cells. The results showed that the migration area and maximum distance into three dimensional (3D) matrigel were decreased in CAOV3 and OVCAR3 cells, but increased in SKOV3 cells following the stimulation with NGF. In addition, we found that the cell colony area was down-regulated in CAOV3 cells, however, it was augmented in OVCAR3 cells after treatment with NGF. The inhibitors of NGF/NGFRs, such as Ro 08-2750, K252a and LM11A-31,can all block NGF-stimulated changes of gene expression or migratory behavior on ovarian cancer cells. The different results among ovarian cancer cells illustrated the heterogeneity and complexity of ovarian cancer. Collectively, our results suggested for the first time that NGF is functionally linked to β-catenin in the migration of human ovarian cancer cells, which may be a novel therapeutic perspective to prevent the spread of ovarian carcinomas by studying the interaction between NGF/NGFRs and canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling. PMID:27835587

  1. Nerve growth factor delivery by ultrasound-mediated nanobubble destruction as a treatment for acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhaojun; Wang, Zhigang; Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Shengxi; Hu, Zhenming

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can cause severe disability or death. Treatment options include surgical intervention, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. However, the efficacy of these methods for functional recovery remains unsatisfactory. Purpose This study was conducted to explore the effect of ultrasound (US)-mediated destruction of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanobubbles (NBs) expressing nerve growth factor (NGF) (NGF/PLGA NBs) on nerve regeneration in rats following SCI. Materials and methods Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups after Allen hit models of SCI were established. The groups were normal saline (NS) group, NGF and NBs group, NGF and US group, and NGF/PLGA NBs and US group. Histological changes after SCI were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Neuron viability was determined by Nissl staining. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining was used to examine cell apoptosis. NGF gene and protein expressions were detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Green fluorescent protein expression in the spinal cord was examined using an inverted fluorescence microscope. The recovery of neural function was determined using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan test. Results NGF therapy using US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction significantly increased NGF expression, attenuated histological injury, decreased neuron loss, inhibited neuronal apoptosis in injured spinal cords, and increased BBB scores in rats with SCI. Conclusion US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction effectively transfects the NGF gene into target tissues and has a significant effect on the injured spinal cord. The combination of US irradiation and gene therapy through NGF/PLGA NBs holds great promise for the future of nanomedicine and the development of noninvasive treatment options for SCI and other diseases. PMID:28280337

  2. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  3. Nerve growth factor-induced changes in neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, H M; Moore, S E; Dickson, J G; Doherty, P; Walsh, F S

    1987-01-01

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) in PC12 cells were determined. A quantitative immunoassay was used to show that NGF induces a 4- to 5-fold increase in relative N-CAM levels over a 3-day period. This increase could not be mimicked by cholera toxin suggesting that it is not a simple consequence of morphological differentiation. The changes in N-CAM levels induced by NGF were accompanied by changes in N-CAM molecular forms. The 140-kd N-CAM species is the major N-CAM expressed by naive PC12 cells, while NGF-treated cultures express N-CAM species of 180 kd and 140 kd. Northern analysis showed that naive cells express a 6.7-kd N-CAM mRNA species only, while NGF-treated cultures express both a 6.7-kb and a 7.2-kb transcript. As the 6.7-kb and 7.2-kb mRNAs are alternative spliced transcripts of a single gene, this result shows that NGF can activate a neuron-specific splicing mechanism. This is the first description of control of N-CAM expression by a growth factor. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3308447

  4. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Zhu, Qingchun; Dong, Rui; Zhao, Chengcheng; Li, Guoling; Li, Guo; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Zheng, Enqin; Cai, Gengyuan; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Yang, Huaqiang; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2017-01-24

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μg/mL) was selected. hNGF protein was successfully purified from the saliva of these TG mice and its identity was verified. The purified hNGF was highly functional as it displayed the ability to induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, it strongly promoted proliferation of TF1 cells, above the levels observed with mouse NGF. Additionally, saliva collected from TG mice and containing unpurified hNGF was able to significantly enhance the growth of TF1 cells. This study not only provides a new and efficient approach for the synthesis of therapeutic hNGF but also supports the concept that salivary gland from TG animals is an efficient system for production of valuable foreign proteins.

  5. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Zhu, Qingchun; Dong, Rui; Zhao, Chengcheng; Li, Guoling; Li, Guo; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Zheng, Enqin; Cai, Gengyuan; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Yang, Huaqiang; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2017-01-01

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μg/mL) was selected. hNGF protein was successfully purified from the saliva of these TG mice and its identity was verified. The purified hNGF was highly functional as it displayed the ability to induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, it strongly promoted proliferation of TF1 cells, above the levels observed with mouse NGF. Additionally, saliva collected from TG mice and containing unpurified hNGF was able to significantly enhance the growth of TF1 cells. This study not only provides a new and efficient approach for the synthesis of therapeutic hNGF but also supports the concept that salivary gland from TG animals is an efficient system for production of valuable foreign proteins. PMID:28117418

  6. Developmental toxicity assessment of tanezumab, an anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bowman, Christopher J; Evans, Mark; Cummings, Thomas; Oneda, Satoru; Butt, Mark; Hurst, Susan; Gremminger, Jessica-Lyn; Shelton, David; Kamperschroer, Cris; Zorbas, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Two intravenous studies with tanezumab, an anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, were conducted in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys to assess potential effects on pregnancy and pre- and postnatal development. Study 1 evaluated infants up to 12 months of age following weekly maternal dosing (0, 0.5, 4 or 30 mg/kg; 18 per group) from gestation day (GD) 20 through parturition. Study 2 evaluated infants 2 months postnatally following weekly maternal dosing (0, 0.5 or 30 mg/kg; 20-21 per group) from GD 20 through 48. In the absence of maternal toxicity, tanezumab increased stillbirth and post-birth infant mortality/morbidity, decreased infant growth and resulted in microscopic changes in the peripheral sympathetic and sensory nervous system of the infants at all doses. Decreased primary antibody responses and increased incidences in skin changes in infants were also observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level for maternal toxicity was 30 mg/kg and <0.5 mg/kg for developmental toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  8. Expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) isoforms in the rat uterus during pregnancy: accumulation of precursor proNGF.

    PubMed

    Lobos, Edgar; Gebhardt, Claudia; Kluge, Annett; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms that promote the transient degenerative changes in the uterus innervation during pregnancy remain incompletely understood. Signaling by the nerve growth factor (NGF)-beta is important for maintaining the density of peripheral sympathetic innervation. Here, we analyzed the spatial and temporal expression of NGF isoforms in the rat uterus using RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and immunohistochemistry during pregnancy (d 7, 14, and 21), and postpartum (d 1, 8, and 22). Western blot analysis using antibodies to mature NGF-beta and to proNGF domain demonstrated a significant decrease in mature NGF-beta at gestational d 14 and 21 (term pregnancy) and 1 d postpartum, which paralleled a remarkable accumulation of the 26-28-, 32-, and 60-kDa proNGF forms. There were diminished ratios of mature NGF-beta to proNGF independent of uterus growth on the same gestational days. Immunohistochemistry revealed a progressive NGF-beta decline throughout pregnancy in the myometrium and a near absence at term pregnancy, which contrasted with increased NGF immunostaining in the intermyometrial connective tissue layers. More importantly, proNGF-specific antibodies identified the increased NGF immunoreactivity in the intermyometrial layers at term pregnancy as proNGF and not mature NGF-beta. Alterations in the processing of NGF and accumulation of proNGF in the intermyometrial layers, where axonal degeneration occurs, may contribute significantly to the pregnancy-related uterine denervation and to the control of myometrial activity.

  9. Negletein as a neuroprotectant enhances the action of nerve growth factor and induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Bovicelli, Paolo; Righi, Giuliana; Saso, Luciano

    2016-11-12

    Negletein has been shown to have therapeutic potential for inflammation-associated diseases, but its effect on neurite outgrowth is still unknown. The present study showed that negletein alone did not trigger PC12 cells to differentiate and extend neurites. When compared with the cells in the untreated control, a significant (P < 0.05) induction and a higher neurite outgrowth activity was observed when the cells were cotreated with negletein (10 µM) and a low dose of nerve growth factor (NGF; 5 ng/mL). The neurite outgrowth process was blocked by the tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk) inhibitor, K252a, suggesting that the neuritogenic effect was NGF-dependent. Negletein (10 µM) together with NGF (5 ng/mL) enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), protein kinase B (Akt), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and the NGF level were also upregulated by negletein (10 µM) and a low dose of NGF (5 ng/mL). Negletein at nanomolar concentration also was found to be sufficient to mediate the survival of serum-deprived PC12 cells up to 72 h. Taken together, negletein might be useful as an efficient bioactive compound to protect neurons from cell death and promote neuritogenesis. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):591-599, 2016.

  10. Effect of acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine on nerve growth factor levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Most inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism produce hypertyrosinemia. Neurological manifestations are variable and some patients are developmentally normal, while others show different degrees of developmental retardation. Considering that current data do not eliminate the possibility that elevated levels of tyrosine and/or its derivatives may have noxious effects on central nervous system development in some patients, the present study evaluated nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in hippocampus, striatum and posterior cortex of young rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal administration of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old); the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. NGF levels were then evaluated. Our findings showed that acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased NGF levels in striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, NGF levels were decreased in hippocampus and posterior cortex. On the other hand, chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased NGF levels in posterior cortex. Decreased NGF may impair growth, differentiation, survival and maintenance of neurons.

  11. Immobilized nerve growth factor and microtopography have distinct effects on polarization versus axon elongation in hippocampal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Natalia; Lu, Yi; Chen, Shaochen; Schmidt, Christine E

    2007-01-01

    Cell interfacing with biomaterial surfaces dictates important aspects of cell behavior. In particular, axon extension in neurons is effectively influenced by surface properties, both for the initial formation of an axon as well as for the maintenance of axon growth. Here, we investigated how neurons behaved on poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) surfaces decorated with biochemical and physical cues presented individually or in combination. In particular, nerve growth factor (NGF) was covalently tethered to PDMS to create a bioactive surface, and microtopography was introduced to the material in the form of microchannels. Embryonic hippocampal neurons were used to investigate the impact of these surface cues on polarization (i.e., axon initiation or axogenesis) and overall axon length. We found that topography had a more pronounced effect on polarization (68% increase over controls) compared to immobilized NGF (0.1 ng/mm(2)) (27% increase). However, the effect of NGF was negligible when both types of stimuli were simultaneously presented on the biomaterial surface. In addition to axon formation, chemical and physical cues are also involved in axon growth following the initiation process. Interestingly, for the same studies described above, the effects of microchannels and NGF were opposite from the effects on polarization; the most evident effect was for the immobilized growth factor (10% increase in axon length with respect to controls) whereas there was no effect in general for the microtopography. More importantly, when the two surface stimuli were presented in combination, a synergistic increase in axon length was detected (25% increase with respect to controls), which could be a result of faster polarization triggered by topography plus enhanced growth from NGF. Additionally, axon orientation was also analyzed and we found the well-known tendency of perpendicular or parallel axonal alignment to be dependent on the width and depth of the channels. This investigation

  12. Acid fibroblast growth factor and peripheral nerve grafts regulate Th2 cytokine expression, macrophage activation, polyamine synthesis, and neurotrophin expression in transected rat spinal cords.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Huai-Sheng; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Ming-Chao; Chiu, Chuan-Wen; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Lee, Meng-Jen; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Lo; Kuo, Wen-Chun; Cheng, Henrich

    2011-03-16

    Spinal cord injury elicits an inflammatory response that recruits macrophages to the injured spinal cord. Quantitative real-time PCR results have shown that a repair strategy combining peripheral nerve grafts with acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) induced higher interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and IL-13 levels in the graft areas of rat spinal cords compared with transected spinal cords at 10 and 14 d. This led to higher arginase I-positive alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) responses. The gene expression of several enzymes involved in polyamine biosynthesis pathways was also upregulated in the graft areas of repaired spinal cords. The treatment induced a twofold upregulation of polyamine levels at 14 d, as confirmed by HPLC. Polyamines are important for the repair process, as demonstrated by the observation that treatment with inhibitors of arginase I and ornithine decarboxylase attenuates the functional recoveries of repaired rats. After 14 d, the treatment also induced the expression of neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), as well as M2 macrophages within grafted nerves expressing BDNF. IL-4 was upregulated in the injury sites of transected rats that received aFGF alone compared with those that received nerve grafts alone at 10 d. Conversely, nerve graft treatment induced NGF and BDNF expression at 14 d. Macrophages expressing polyamines and BDNF may benefit axonal regeneration at 14 d. These results indicate that aFGF and nerve grafts regulate different macrophage responses, and M2 macrophages may play an important role in axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

  13. Semaphorin III is needed for normal patterning and growth of nerves, bones and heart.

    PubMed

    Behar, O; Golden, J A; Mashimo, H; Schoen, F J; Fishman, M C

    1996-10-10

    The expression patterns of the recently discovered family of semaphorin genes suggests that they have widespread roles in embryonic development. Some seem to guide neuronal growth cones, but otherwise their functions are unknown. Semaphorin III is a membrane-associated secreted protein with a developmentally dynamic pattern of expression, including particular domains of the nervous system, the borders of developing bones, and the heart. In vitro, semaphorin III causes growth-cone collapse, and repels cutaneous sensory axons from the ventral spinal cord. Mutants in the Drosophila gene semaII, which encodes a related semaphorin, die after eclosion, but no responsible abnormality is evident. We have generated mice mutant in the semaIII gene by homologous recombination. Here we show that in the mutants, some sensory axons project into inappropriate regions of the spinal cord where semaIII is normally expressed. The cerebral cortex of homozygous mutant mice shows a paucity of neuropil and abnormally oriented neuronal processes, especially of the large pyramidal neurons. Certain embryonic bones and cartilaginous structures develop abnormally, with vertebral fusions and partial rib duplications. The few mice that survive more than a few days postnatally manifest pronounced and selective hypertrophy of the right ventricle of the heart and dilation of the right atrium. Thus, semaphorin III might serve as a signal that restrains growth in several developing organs.

  14. Changes of phospho-growth-associated protein 43 (phospho-GAP43) in the zebrafish retina after optic nerve injury: a long-term observation.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Manabu; Nagashima, Mikiko; Nunome, Tomoya; Muramatsu, Takanori; Yamada, Yoichi; Kubo, Mamoru; Muramoto, Kenichiro; Matsukawa, Toru; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Sugitani, Kayo; Vachkov, Ivan H; Mawatari, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2008-07-01

    The major model animal of optic nerve regeneration in fish is goldfish. A closely related zebrafish is the most popular model system for genetic and developmental studies of vertebrate central nervous system. A few challenging works of optic nerve regeneration have been done with zebrafish. However, knowledge concerning the long term of optic nerve regeneration apparently lacks in zebrafish. In the present study, therefore, we followed changes of zebrafish behavior and phosphorylated form of growth-associated protein 43 (phospho-GAP43) expression in the zebrafish retina over 100 days after optic nerve transection. Optomotor response was fast recovered by 20-25 days after axotomy whereas chasing behavior (a schooling behavior) was slowly recovered by 80-100 days after axotomy. The temporal pattern of phospho-GAP43 expression showed a biphasic increase, a short-peak (12 folds) at 1-2 weeks and a long-plateau (4 folds) at 1-2 months after axotomy. The recovery of optomotor response well correlated with projection of growing axons to the tectum, whereas the recovery of chasing behavior well correlated with synaptic refinement of retinotectal topography. The present data strongly suggest that phospho-GAP43 plays an active role in both the early and late stages of optic nerve regeneration in fish.

  15. Potential Novel Biomarkers for Diabetic Testicular Damage in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Nerve Growth Factor Beta and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Sisman, Ali Rıza; Kiray, Muge; Camsari, Ulas Mehmet; Evren, Merve; Ates, Mehmet; Aksu, Ilkay; Guvendi, Guven

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is well known that diabetes mellitus may cause testicular damage. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor beta (NGF-β) are important neurotrophic factors for male reproductive system. Objective. We aimed to investigate the correlation between testicular damage and testicular VEGF and NGF-β levels in diabetic rats. Methods. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg/i.p.) in adult rats. Five weeks later testicular tissue was removed; testicular VEGF and NGF-β levels were measured by ELISA. Testicular damage was detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining and periodic acid-Schiff staining, and apoptosis was identified by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Seminiferous tubular sperm formation was evaluated using Johnsen's score. Results. In diabetic rats, seminiferous tubule diameter was found to be decreased; basement membrane was found to be thickened in seminiferous tubules and degenerated germ cells. Additionally, TUNEL-positive cells were increased in number of VEGF+ cells and levels of VEGF and NGF-β were decreased in diabetic testes. Correlation between VEGF and NGF-β levels was strong. Conclusion. These results suggest that the decrease of VEGF and NGF-β levels is associated with the increase of the apoptosis and testicular damage in diabetic rats. Testis VEGF and NGF-β levels could be potential novel biomarkers for diabetes induced testicular damage. PMID:24771956

  16. A Modular, Plasmin-Sensitive, Clickable Poly(ethylene glycol)-Heparin-Laminin Microsphere System for Establishing Growth Factor Gradients in Nerve Guidance Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Roam, Jacob L.; Yan, Ying; Nguyen, Peter K.; Kinstlinger, Ian S.; Leuchter, Michael K; Hunter, Daniel A.; Wood, Matthew D.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex problem that, despite many advancements and innovations, still has sub-optimal outcomes. Compared to biologically derived acelluar nerve grafts and autografts, completely synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGC), which allow for precise engineering of their properties, are promising but still far from optimal. We have developed an almost entirely synthetic NGC that allows control of soluble growth factor delivery kinetics, cell-initiated degradability and cell attachment. We have focused on the spatial patterning of glial-cell derived human neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which promotes motor axon extension. The base scaffolds consisted of heparin-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres. The modular microsphere format greatly simplifies the formation of concentration gradients of reversibly bound GDNF. To facilitate axon extension, we engineered the microspheres with tunable plasmin degradability. ‘Click’ cross-linking chemistries were also added to allow scaffold formation without risk of covalently coupling the growth factor to the scaffold. Cell adhesion was promoted by covalently bound laminin. GDNF that was released from these microspheres was confirmed to retain its activity. Graded scaffolds were formed inside silicone conduits using 3D-printed holders. The fully formed NGC’s contained plasmin-degradable PEG/heparin scaffolds that developed linear gradients in reversibly bound GDNF. The NGC’s were implanted into rats with severed sciatic nerves to confirm in vivo degradability and lack of a major foreign body response. The NGC’s also promoted robust axonal regeneration into the conduit. PMID:26352518

  17. Non-helical DNA Triplex Forms a Unique Aptamer Scaffold for High Affinity Recognition of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Thale C; Davies, Douglas R; Hisaminato, Akihiko; Resnicow, Daniel I; Gupta, Shashi; Waugh, Sheela M; Nagabukuro, Akira; Wadatsu, Takashi; Hishigaki, Haretsugu; Gawande, Bharat; Zhang, Chi; Wolk, Steven K; Mayfield, Wesley S; Nakaishi, Yuichiro; Burgin, Alex B; Stewart, Lance J; Edwards, Thomas E; Gelinas, Amy D; Schneider, Daniel J; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2015-07-07

    Discerning the structural building blocks of macromolecules is essential for understanding their folding and function. For a new generation of modified nucleic acid ligands (called slow off-rate modified aptamers or SOMAmers), we previously observed essential functions of hydrophobic aromatic side chains in the context of well-known nucleic acid motifs. Here we report a 2.45-Å resolution crystal structure of a SOMAmer complexed with nerve growth factor that lacks any known nucleic acid motifs, instead adopting a configuration akin to a triangular prism. The SOMAmer utilizes extensive hydrophobic stacking interactions, non-canonical base pairing and irregular purine glycosidic bond angles to adopt a completely non-helical, compact S-shaped structure. Aromatic side chains contribute to folding by creating an unprecedented intercalating zipper-like motif and a prominent hydrophobic core. The structure provides compelling rationale for potent inhibitory activity of the SOMAmer and adds entirely novel motifs to the repertoire of structural elements uniquely available to SOMAmers.

  18. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  19. Angelica injection reduces cognitive impairment during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Junjian; Liu, Hanxing; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2008-02-01

    The current study investigated whether chronic cerebral hypoperfusion produced by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2-vessel occlusion (2-VO)) induced cognitive impairment and whether angelica injections alleviated the impairment. Furthermore, the study examined whether 2-VO altered the expression patterns of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus of rats and whether angelica injections attenuated the alteration. Rats were divided into four groups to receive either 2-VO surgery or sham surgery followed by either angelica injections or saline injections for eight weeks. Spatial learning in Morris water maze and the expression patterns of BDNF and NGF in the hippocampus of all rats were examined. The results showed that 2-VO significantly impaired spatial learning and memory, and angelica injections significantly reversed the learning and memory impairment. Furthermore, 2-VO resulted in significantly decreased BDNF protein, NGF protein, and NGF mRNA expression in the hippocampus. Angelica injections significantly attenuated the decreased expression. Moreover, spatial learning in Morris water maze was positively correlated to the expression of BDNF and NGF in the hippocampus. Thus, angelica injections might alleviate cognitive impairment during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through BDNF and NGF.

  20. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Role of Nerve Growth Factor in Cutaneous Wound Healing: Accelerating Effects in Normal and Healing-impaired Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Koyama, Hiromi; Sato, Hiroaki; Sawada, Junko; Itakura, Atsuko; Tanaka, Akane; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Konno, Katsuhiko; Ushio, Hiroko; Matsuda, Kuniko

    1998-01-01

    Four full-thickness skin wounds made in normal mice led to the significant increase in levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in sera and in wounded skin tissues. Since sialoadenectomy before the wounds inhibited the rise in serum levels of NGF, the NGF may be released from the salivary gland into the blood stream after the wounds. In contrast, the fact that messenger RNA and protein of NGF were detected in newly formed epithelial cells at the edge of the wound and fibroblasts consistent with the granulation tissue produced in the wound space, suggests that NGF was also produced at the wounded skin site. Topical application of NGF into the wounds accelerated the rate of wound healing in normal mice and in healing-impaired diabetic KK/Ta mice. This clinical effect of NGF was evaluated by histological examination; the increases in the degree of reepithelialization, the thickness of the granulation tissue, and the density of extracellular matrix were observed. NGF also increased the breaking strength of healing linear wounds in normal and diabetic mice. These findings suggested that NGF immediately and constitutively released in response to cutaneous injury may contribute to wound healing through broader biological activities, and NGF improved the diabetic impaired response of wound healing. PMID:9449710

  2. Induction of neuron-specific tropomyosin mRNAs by nerve growth factor is dependent on morphological differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of brain-specific tropomyosins during neuronal differentiation. Both TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 were shown to be neuron specific. TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 mRNA levels increased during the most active phase of neurite outgrowth in the developing rat cerebellum. In PC12 cells stimulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) to differentiate to the neuronal phenotype, TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 levels increased with an increasing degree of morphological differentiation. Induction of TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 expression only occurred under conditions where PC12 cells were permitted to extend neurites. NGF was unable to maintain levels of TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 with the loss of neuronal phenotype by resuspension of differentiated PC12 cells. The unique cellular expression and regulation in vivo and in vitro of TmBr- 1 and TmBr-3 strongly suggests a critical role of these tropomyosins in neuronal microfilament function. The findings reveal that the induction and maintenance of the neuronal tropomyosins is dependent on morphological differentiation and the maintenance of the neuronal phenotype. PMID:8416988

  3. Age-Related Yield of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Bearing the Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    González-Garza, Maria Teresa; Cardenas-Lopez, Alejandro; Chavez-Castilla, Luis; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a heterogeneous cell population that may be enriched by positive selection with antibodies against the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR or CD271), yielding a selective cell universe with higher proliferation and differentiation potential. This paper addresses the need for determining the quantity of ADSCs positive for the CD271 receptor and its correlation with donor's age. Mononuclear cells were harvested from the lower backs of 35 female donors and purified using magnetic beads. Multipotency capacity was tested by the expression of stemness genes and through differentiation into preosteoblasts and adipocytes. A significant statistical difference was found in CD271+ concentrations between defined age intervals. The highest yield was found within women on the 30–40-year-old age range. CD271+ ADSCs from all age groups showed differentiation capabilities as well as expression of typical multipotent stem cell genes. Our data suggest that the amount of CD271+ cells correlates inversely with age. However, the ability to obtain these cells was maintained through all age ranges with a yield higher than what has been reported from bone marrow. Our findings propose CD271+ ADSCs as the primary choice for tissue regeneration and autologous stem cell therapies in older subjects. PMID:24376462

  4. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  5. Nerve growth factor blockade for the management of osteoarthritis pain: what can we learn from clinical trials and preclinical models?

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel E; Block, Joel A; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (NGF) antibodies hold tremendous potential for the management of osteoarthritis pain, but clinical trials have revealed serious adverse effects that are incompletely understood. This review discusses clinical trial results along with preclinical studies that have assessed NGF blockade in experimental osteoarthritis, in order to provide insight for future studies. Systematic reviews have revealed that anti-NGF therapy, including tanezumab, is efficacious in improving pain and function, but serious adverse events, including rapidly progressive osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis, resulted in a moratorium on trials that was only recently lifted. Within the past year, preclinical testing has revealed effects of NGF blockade on both pain behaviors and joint structure in experimental models of osteoarthritis. Similar to clinical trial results, these studies in laboratory animals demonstrated analgesic efficacy of NGF blockade. Interestingly, several animal studies have suggested detrimental effects on joint integrity as a result of treatment, particularly when treatment is started early in the disease, when joint damage is mild to moderate. NGF blockade continues to represent a promising new approach for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but the actual benefits and risks remain to be fully elucidated. Preclinical models may suggest patient populations that could be best served while limiting side-effects, but future work should further investigate the mechanisms of benefits and unwanted side-effects.

  6. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  7. Low-frequency electro-acupuncture reduces the nociceptive response and the pain mediator enhancement induced by nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Manni, Luigi

    2009-01-16

    A number of studies have shown that the potential clinical benefits of nerve growth factor (NGF) administration are limited by its hyperalgesic side effects. The ancient therapeutic technique of acupuncture and its modern derivate electro-acupuncture (EA) have been proven effective in reducing hyperalgesia as well as nociceptive and neuropathic pain in several pathological conditions. The present study addresses the question of whether EA can influence the hyperalgesia induced by NGF administration. We treated adult healthy rats with repeated injections of murine NGF and/or low-frequency electro-acupuncture. We found that EA was able to counteract the NGF-induced hyperalgesic response when assessed by a hot plate test. Moreover, EA counteracted the NGF-driven variation of substance P (SP) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) response in both hind-paw skin as well as the corresponding dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Our findings indicate that low-frequency EA could be useful as a supportive therapy to reduce NGF-induced side effects, such as hypersensitivity and hyperalgesia, when clinical treatment with NGF is necessary.

  8. Fiber-optic immuno-biosensor for rapid and accurate detection of nerve growth factor in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Cha, Yong-Mei; Li, Hongmei; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-01-01

    An accurate and rapid assay of cardiac nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in blood can provide physicians with critical information regarding myocardial injury and neural remodeling in cardiac tissues to identify patients at risk of impending heart attack, thereby enabling them to receive appropriate lifesaving treatment more quickly. Currently used assay methods, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are usually time-consuming (hours to days), expensive and technically complicated. In this paper, we described the development and clinical study of a rapid and sensitive method for detection and quantification of NGF in human blood plasma. This method utilizes a fiber-optic, immuno-biosensing system which performs a fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay on the surface of an optical fiber. Physiological concentrations of NGF could be quantified in both buffer and human blood plasma samples within 5 minutes. The NGF concentrations determined by the fiberoptic sensor were comparable to those by the gold standard, ELISA. Preliminary study of NGF assay in cardiac patient plasma samples showed a great potential of the fiber-optic sensor as a rapid diagnostic and prognostic tool in clinical applications.

  9. Changes in urinary nerve growth factor and prostaglandin E2 in women with overactive bladder after anticholinergics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kang Jun; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung; Kim, Joon Chul

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate changes in urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in women with overactive bladder (OAB) following anticholinergic treatment. A total of 30 female patients with OAB were enrolled and the control group included 15 healthy women who did not present any bladder symptoms. All subjects with OAB recorded voiding diaries, underwent urodynamic study, and were evaluated for urgency grade. They received anticholinergic treatment for 4 weeks, after which they were again evaluated for urinary urgency grade and voiding diaries. OAB patients were classified into three groups according to the change on the 5-point Urinary Sensation Scale after the treatment: group 1 (no change in urgency grade), group 2 (1 point of improvement), and, group 3 (more than 2 points of improvement). Urinary NGF and PGE(2) levels between controls and OAB patients (before and after treatment in groups 1, 2, and 3) were compared. Urinary NGF and PGE(2) levels were significantly higher in OAB patients than in the controls. NGF levels were not significantly different between pre- and post-treatment in groups 1 and 2. However, in group 3, NGF levels were significantly decreased after treatment. PGE(2) levels were not significantly different between pre- and post-treatment in either group. NGF and PGE(2) have important roles in the development of OAB symptoms in women. Initial reduction of urgency severity after anticholinergic treatment in women with OAB could be associated with decreasing urinary NGF levels.

  10. Nerve growth factor and the physiology of pain: lessons from congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Indo, Y

    2012-10-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by insensitivity to pain, anhidrosis (the inability to sweat) and mental retardation. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a well-known neurotrophic factor essential for the survival and maintenance of NGF-dependent neurons, including primary afferent neurons with thin fibers and sympathetic postganglionic neurons, during development. NGF is also considered to be an inflammatory mediator associated with pain, itch and inflammation in adults. CIPA results from loss-of-function mutations in the NTRK1 gene-encoding TrkA (tropomyosin-related kinase A), a receptor tyrosine kinase for NGF. Defects in NGF-TrkA signal transduction lead to the failure of survival of various NGF-dependent neurons. As a result, patients with CIPA lack NGF-dependent neurons. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in the NGFB gene-encoding NGF protein also cause congenital insensitivity to pain. Using the pathophysiology of CIPA as a foundation, this review investigates the ways in which NGF-dependent neurons contribute to interoception, homeostasis and emotional responses and, together with the brain, immune and endocrine systems, play crucial roles in pain, itch and inflammation. The NGF-TrkA system is essential for the establishment of neural networks for interoception, homeostasis and emotional responses. These networks mediate reciprocal communication between the brain and the body in humans.

  11. Increase of hypoxic tolerance in rat hippocampal slices following 3-nitropropionic acid is not mediated by endogenous nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Riepe, M W; Kasischke, K; Gericke, C A; Löwe, A; Hellweg, R

    1996-06-14

    Chemical preconditioning with low dose inhibition of succinic dehydrogenase by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-np) increases tolerance against succeeding hypoxia. Supraphysiological doses of nerve growth factor (NGF) repeatedly were shown to protect against ischemic damage. We investigated whether increased tolerance against hypoxia results from increased or accelerated production of endogenous NGF. Average recovery of population spike amplitude after 15 min of hypoxia and 45 min of reoxygenation was 31 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) in control hippocampal slices. After pretreatment with 3-np (single i.p. injection of 20 mg/kg body weight 1 h to 3 days prior to slice preparation), recovery exceeded 90% (P < 0.01). However, NGF content did not increase upon slice preparation, hypoxia in vitro, and pretreatment with 3-np in vivo 1 h to 1 day prior to slice preparation with and without additional hypoxia in vitro. We conclude that early-onset tolerance to hypoxia induced by 3-np treatment is not caused by induction of endogenous NGF production.

  12. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  13. Nerve growth factor-induced circadian phase shifts and MAP kinase activation in the hamster suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pizzio, Gastón A; Hainich, Ernesto C; Plano, Santiago A; Ralph, Martin R; Golombek, Diego A

    2005-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are entrained by light and by several neurochemical stimuli. In hamsters housed in constant darkness, i.c.v. administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) at various times in their circadian cycle produced phase shifts of locomotor activity rhythms that were similar in direction and circadian timing to those produced by brief pulses of light. Moreover, the effect of NGF and light were not additive, indicating signalling points in common. These points include the immediate-early gene c-fos and ERK1/2, a component of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family. NGF activates c-FOS and ERK1/2-MAPK in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a circadian clock in mammals, when administered during the subjective night but not during the day. The effect of NGF on ERK1/2 activation was not inhibited by the administration of MK-801, a glutamate/NMDA receptor antagonist. These results suggest that NGF, acting through MAPK activation, plays a role in photic entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock.

  14. Vascular and neuronal protection induced by the ocular administration of nerve growth factor in diabetic-induced rat encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tirassa, Paola; Maccarone, Mattia; Florenzano, Fulvio; Cartolano, Sara; De Nicolò, Sara

    2013-05-01

    Based on our previous findings on the efficacy of ocular applied nerve growth factor as eye drops (oNGF) to act in brain and counteract neuronal damage, we hypothesized that oNGF treatment might revert neuronal atrophy occurring in diabetic brain also by controlling neurotrophin system changes. The major NGF brain target areas, such as the septum and the hippocampus, were used as an experimental paradigma to test this hypothesis. Bilateral oNGF treatment was performed twice a day for 2 weeks in full-blown streptozotocin-treated adult male rats. The forebrain distribution of cholinergic and endothelial cell markers and NGF receptors were studied by confocal microscopy. The septo-hippocampal content of NGF mature and precursor form and NGF receptors expression were also analyzed by Elisa and Western blot. oNGF treatment recovers the morphological alterations and the neuronal atrophy in septum and normalized the expression of mature and pro-NGF, as well as NGF receptors in the septum and hippocampus of diabetic rats. In addition, oNGF stimulated brain vascularization and up-regulated the TRKA receptor in vessel endothelium. Our findings confirm that reduced availability of mature NGF and NGF signaling impairment favors vascular and neuronal alterations in diabetic septo-hippocampal areas and corroborate the ability of oNGF to act as a neuroprotective agent in brain. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Maslinic Acid Protected PC12 Cells Differentiated by Nerve Growth Factor against β-Amyloid-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-wan; Tsai, Chia-wen; Mong, Mei-chin; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-12-02

    β-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) was used to induce apoptosis in PC12 cells differentiated by nerve growth factor, and the protective activities of maslinic acid (MA) at 2-16 μM were examined. Abeta treatment lowered Bcl-2 expression, raised Bax expression, and decreased cell viability. MA pretreatments decreased Bax expression, raised the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and increased cell viability. MA pretreatments retained glutathione content and decreased subsequent Abeta-induced release of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Abeta treatment up-regulated protein expression of p47(phox), gp91(phox), mitogen-activated protein kinase, advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE), and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB). MA pretreatments at 2-16 μM suppressed the expression of proteins including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p-p38, and NF-κB p65, at 4-16 μM down-regulated RAGE and NF-κB p50 expression, and at 8 and 16 μM reduced p-ERK1/2 expression. These novel findings suggest that maslinic acid is a potent compound against Abeta-induced cytotoxicity.

  16. The nerve growth factor administrated as eye drops activates mature and precursor cells in subventricular zone of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Tirassa, Paola

    2011-06-01

    The possibility to take advantage from the nerve growth factor (NGF) ability to induce recovery of damaged tissue has been largely explored in animal models and humans. Recently, the successful use of the ocular administration of NGF in ophthalmology, and the evidences that from the eyes NGF can access to the brain have stimulated new fields of research and open further perspectives to the clinical application of this neurotrophin. In our previous studies we have demonstrated the efficacy of NGF eye drop treatment to improved behavioural deficits and recover structural and biochemical alterations occurring follow brain lesion in animals. Since NGF exerts neuroreparative effects in brain by acting on mature neurons and neuronal precursors localised in germinal subventricular zone (SVZ), the present study has been aimed to evaluate the effects of NGF eye drop administration on the expression of the mitotic marker Ki67 in brain of adult rats. We found that a single ocular administration (10 μl) of 200 μg/mL NGF solution is sufficient to enhance the distribution of Ki67 positive cells also expressing p75 neurotrophin receptors in the proliferating layer of the SVZ. In addition, NGF treatment induces an increase of levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in forebrain. This data further supports the efficacy of ocular applied NGF to affect brain activities and suggests that NGF also by inducing local factors, including BDNF, can activate the machinery regulating the proliferation and maturation of neuronal precursor in brain.

  17. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D.

  18. Nerve growth factor in the hippocamposeptal system: Evidence for activity-dependent anterograde delivery and modulation of synaptic activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Yeh, Mason L.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M.; Yeh, Hermes H.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been implicated in regulating neuronal differentiation, promoting neuronal survival, and modulating synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Depending on the target and mode of action, the prevailing view is that most neurotrophins can be trafficked and released either anterogradely or retrogradely in an activity-dependent manner. However, the prototypic neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF), is not thought to be anterogradely delivered. Here we provide the neuroanatomical substrate for an anterograde hippocamposeptal transport of NGF by demonstrating its presence in mouse hippocampal GABAergic neurons and in their hippocamposeptal axons that ramify densely and abut neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB). We also demonstrate an activity-dependent increase in septal NGF levels that is dependent on the pattern of intrahippocampal stimulation. In addition, acute exposure to NGF, via activation of TrkA, attenuated GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic currents and reduced sensitivity to exogenously applied GABA. These acute actions of NGF display cell type and functional selectivity, insofar as (1) they were found in cholinergic, but not GABAergic MS/DB neurons, and (2) glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic activity as well as AMPA-activated current responses were unaffected. Our results advocate a novel anterograde, TrkA-mediated NGF signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:22649248

  19. Nerve growth factor antibody stimulates reactivation of ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hill, J M; Garza, H H; Helmy, M F; Cook, S D; Osborne, P A; Johnson, E M; Thompson, H W; Green, L C; O'Callaghan, R J; Gebhardt, B M

    1997-06-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) antibody has been shown to induce reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. We found that systemically administered anti-NGF induces ocular shedding of HSV-1 in vivo in rabbits harboring latent virus. Rabbits in which HSV-1 latency had been established were given intravenous injections of goat anti-NGF serum daily for 10 days beginning 42 days after primary viral infection. Tears were assayed for virus for 12 days beginning on the day of the first injection. All eight rabbits given high titer anti-NGF had infectious virus in their tears at least once during the 12-day period. Fifteen of 16 eyes were positive and the average duration of viral shedding for these eyes was 4.0 days. Latently infected rabbits receiving daily injections of nonimmune goat serum or saline for 10 consecutive days were controls. Only six of the 16 (38%) eyes from rabbits receiving nonimmune goat serum shed virus. Only one of 12 eyes from untreated rabbits shed virus. Sera from control rabbits had no detectable anti-NGF activity; titers in anti-NGF-treated rabbits ranged between 1:1000 and 1:10,000. NGF deprivation may act as a neuronal stressor and may share a common second messenger pathway with heat- or cold-stress induced reactivation of latent HSV-1.

  20. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D. PMID:26739521

  1. Enhanced downregulation of the p75 nerve growth factor receptor by cholesteryl and bis-cholesteryl antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Epa, W R; Rong, P; Bartlett, P F; Coulson, E J; Barrett, G L

    1998-12-01

    The effects of conjugating cholesterol to either or both ends of a phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotide were analyzed in terms of cellular uptake and antisense efficacy. The oligo sequence was directed against the p75 nerve growth factor receptor (p75), and was tested in differentiated PC12 cells, which express high levels of this protein. The addition of a single cholesteryl group to the 5'-end significantly increased cellular uptake and improved p75 mRNA downregulation compared with the unmodified PS oligo. However, only a minor degree of downregulation of p75 protein was obtained with 5' cholesteryl oligos. Three different linkers was used to attach the 5' cholesteryl group but were found not to have any impact on efficacy. Addition of a single cholesteryl group to the 3'-end led to greater p75 mRNA downregulation (31%) and p75 protein downregulation (28%) than occurred with the 5' cholesteryl oligos. The biggest improvement in antisense efficacy, both at the mRNA and protein levels, was obtained from the conjugation of cholesterol to both ends of the oligo. One of the bischolesteryl oligos was nearly as effective as cycloheximide at decreasing synthesis of p75. The bis-cholesteryl oligos also displayed significant efficacy at 1 microM, whereas the other oligos required 5 microM to be effective. The enhanced efficacy of bis-cholesteryl oligos is likely to be due to a combination of enhanced cellular uptake and resistance to both 5' and 3' exonucleases.

  2. Nerve growth factor induces rapid increases in functional cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Bu, G; Sun, Y; Schwartz, A L; Holtzman, D M

    1998-05-22

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a large endocytic receptor that binds multiple ligands and is highly expressed in neurons. Several LRP ligands, including apolipoprotein E/lipoproteins and amyloid precursor protein, have been shown to participate either in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis or pathology. However, factors that regulate LRP expression in neurons are unknown. In the current study, we analyzed the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment on LRP expression, distribution, and function within neurons in two neuronal cell lines. Our results show that NGF induces a rapid increase of cell surface LRP expression in a central nervous system-derived neuronal cell line, GT1-1 Trk, which was seen within 10 min and reached a maximum at about 1 h of NGF treatment. This increase of cell surface LRP expression is concomitant with an increase in the endocytic activity of LRP as measured via ligand uptake and degradation assays. We also found that the cytoplasmic tail of LRP is phosphorylated and that NGF rapidly increases the amount of phosphorylation. Furthermore, we detected a significant increase of LRP expression at the messenger RNA level following 24 h of NGF treatment. Both rapid and long term induction of LRP expression were also detected in peripheral nervous system-derived PC12 cells following NGF treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NGF regulates LRP expression in neuronal cells.

  3. Activation of microtubule dynamics increases neuronal growth via the nerve growth factor (NGF)- and Gαs-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Tulika; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Yu, Jiang Zhu; Krbanjevic, Aleksandar; Hope, Thomas J; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-04-17

    Signals that activate the G protein Gαs and promote neuronal differentiation evoke Gαs internalization in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These agents also significantly increase Gαs association with microtubules, resulting in an increase in microtubule dynamics because of the activation of tubulin GTPase by Gαs. To determine the function of Gαs/microtubule association in neuronal development, we used real-time trafficking of a GFP-Gαs fusion protein. GFP-Gαs concentrates at the distal end of the neurites in differentiated living PC12 cells as well as in cultured hippocampal neurons. Gαs translocates to specialized membrane compartments at tips of growing neurites. A dominant-negative Gα chimera that interferes with Gαs binding to tubulin and activation of tubulin GTPase attenuates neurite elongation and neurite number both in PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. This effect is greatest on differentiation induced by activated Gαs. Together, these data suggest that activated Gαs translocates from the plasma membrane and, through interaction with tubulin/microtubules in the cytosol, is important for neurite formation, development, and outgrowth. Characterization of neuronal G protein dynamics and their contribution to microtubule dynamics is important for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptor signaling orchestrates neuronal growth and differentiation.

  4. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors.

  5. Regulatory effect of nerve growth factor in α9β1 integrin–dependent progression of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meghan C.; Staniszewska, Izabela; Lazarovici, Philip; Tuszynski, George P.; Del Valle, Luis; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we described the role of α9β1 integrin in glioblastoma progression following its interaction with nerve growth factor (NGF). The level of expression of α9β1 on astrocytomas is correlated with increased grade of this brain tumor and is highest on glioblastoma, whereas normal astrocytes do not express this integrin. Two glioblastoma cell lines, LN229 and LN18, that are α9β1 integrin positive and negative, respectively, were used for α9β1 integrin–dependent NGF-induced tumor progression. NGF was a significant promoter of promigratory and pro-proliferative activities of glioblastoma cells through direct interaction with α9β1 integrin and activation of MAPK Erk1/2 pathway. The level of NGF increases approximately threefold in the most malignant glioma tissue when compared with normal brain. This increase is related to secretion of NGF by tumor cells. Specific inhibitors of α9β1 integrin or gene silencing inhibited NGF-induced proliferation of LN229 cell line to the level shown by LN18 cells. VLO5 promoted α9β1-dependent programmed cell death by induction of intrinsic apoptosis pathway in cancer cells. LN229 cells were rescued from proapoptotic effect of VLO5 by the presence of NGF. This disintegrin significantly inhibited tumor growth induced by implantation of LN229 cells to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryonic model, and this inhibitory effect was significantly abolished by the presence of NGF. α9β1 integrin appears to be an interesting target for blocking the progression of malignant gliomas, especially in light of the stimulatory effect of NGF on the development of these tumors and its ability to transfer proapoptotic signals in cancer cells. PMID:19074980

  6. Nerve growth factor-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells involves sigma-1 receptors: implications for antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Minoru; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2002-12-01

    One theory concerning the action of antidepressants relates to the drugs' ability to induce an adaptive plasticity in neurons such as neurite sprouting. Certain antidepressants are known to bind to sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R) with high affinity. Sig-1R are dynamic endoplasmic reticulum proteins that are highly concentrated at the tip of growth cones in cultured cells. We therefore tested the hypotheses that Sig-1R might participate in the neurite sprouting and that antidepressants with Sig-1R affinity may promote the neuronal sprouting via Sig-1R. The prototypic Sig-1R agonist (+)-pentazocine [(+)PTZ], as well as the Sig-1R-active antidepressants imipramine and fluvoxamine, although ineffective by themselves, were found to enhance the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. A Sig-1R antagonist N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE100) blocked the enhancements caused by these Sig-1R agonists. In separate experiments, we found that NGF dose and time dependently increased Sig-1R in PC12 cells. Chronic treatment of cells with (+)PTZ, imipramine, or fluvoxamine also increased Sig-1R. These latter results suggested that NGF induces the neurite sprouting by increasing Sig-1R. Indeed, the overexpression of Sig-1R per se in PC12 cells enhanced the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Furthermore, antisense deoxyoligonucleotides directed against Sig-1R attenuated the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Thus, when taken together, our results indicate that Sig-1R play an important role in the NGF-induced neurite sprouting and that certain antidepressants may facilitate neuronal sprouting in the brain via Sig-1R.

  7. Selective inhibition of responses to nerve growth factor and of microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation by activators of adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To study the influence of cAMP on cellular responses to nerve growth factor (NGF) and to use elevation of intracellular cAMP to probe the NGF mechanism, cultured PC12 pheochromocytoma cells were exposed to forskolin and cholera toxin. As in other cell types, the latter agents greatly increased PC12 cell cAMP levels. Such treatment also brought about a reversible, dose-dependent suppression of NGF-promoted regeneration of neurites. In support of the role of cAMP in this effect, regeneration blockage by forskolin was potentiated by phosphodiesterase inhibitors. When tested on NGF-stimulated initiation of process outgrowth, cholera toxin and forskolin exerted a dual effect. As in previous studies, these drugs, when applied along with NGF, significantly enhanced the initial formation of short cytoplasmic extensions. However, after approximately 3 d of NGF exposure, at which time such extensions begin to acquire the morphological and ultrastructural features of neurites, these agents suppressed process outgrowth. That is, the neurites were fewer in number, significantly less branched, and much shorter than in control cultures. Such changes also occurred when these drugs were added to cultures that had been pretreated with NGF alone. Whereas forskolin and cholera toxin affect the formation and regeneration of neurites, these drugs did not interfere with the short-latency, transient changes in surface morphology that are triggered by NGF, nor did they inhibit transcription-dependent priming. In contrast, the rapidly occurring NGF- induced phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase was suppressed. Moreover, forskolin and cholera toxin rapidly and selectively blocked the NGF-promoted phosphorylation of a set of microtubule-associated proteins known as chartins. Previous observations have suggested a causal relationship between NGF-induced chartin microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation and the formation and outgrowth of neurites. This is supported by the present data

  8. The Evaluation of Nerve Growth Factor Over Expression on Neural Lineage Specific Genes in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Yousef; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh; Khamisipour, Gholamreza Khamisipour; Soleimani, Masoud; Teimuri, Ali; Shokri, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment and repair of neurodegenerative diseases such as brain tumors, spinal cord injuries, and functional disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are challenging problems. A common treatment approach for such disorders involves the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source to replace injured cells. However, use of these cells in hosts may potentially cause adverse outcomes such as tumorigenesis and uncontrolled differentiation. In attempt to generate mesenchymal derived neural cells, we have infected MSCs with recombinant lentiviruses that expressed nerve growth factor (NGF) and assessed their neural lineage genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we cloned the NGF gene sequence into a helper dependent lentiviral vector that contained the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The recombinant vector was amplified in DH5 bacterial cells. Recombinant viruses were generated in the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) packaging cell line with the helper vectors and analyzed under fluorescent microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were infected by recombinant viruses for three days followed by assessment of neural differentiation. We evaluated expression of NGF through measurement of the NGF protein in culture medium by ELISA; neural specific genes were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed neural morphological changes after three days. Quantitative PCR showed that expressions of NESTIN, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) genes increased following induction of NGF overexpression, whereas expressions of endogenous NGF and brain derived neural growth factor (BDNF) genes reduced. Conclusion Ectopic expression of NGF can induce neurogenesis in MSCs. Direct injection of MSCs may cause tumorigenesis and an undesirable outcome. Therefore an alternative choice to overcome this obstacle may

  9. Effects of olive polyphenols administration on nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    De Nicoló, Sara; Tarani, Luigi; Ceccanti, Mauro; Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Vania, Andrea; Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Polyphenols are chemicals derived from plants known to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High intake of fruit and vegetables is believed to be beneficial to human health. Various studies have suggested that dietary polyphenols may protect against cancer and cardiometabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are neurotrophins that play key roles in brain cell development, growth, and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not administration of olive (Olea europaea L.) polyphenols could have an effect on NGF and BDNF content and the expression of their receptors, TrkA and TrkB, respectively, in the mouse brain. NGF and BDNF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TrkA and TrkB were measured by Western blotting. We found NGF and BDNF elevation in the hippocampus and olfactory bulbs and a decrease in the frontal cortex and striatum. These data were associated with potentiated expression of TrkA and TrkB in the hippocampus and olfactory bulbs but no differences between groups in the striatum and frontal cortex. Polyphenols did not affect some behavioral mouse parameters associated with stressing situations. Altogether, this study shows that olive polyphenols in the mouse may increase the levels of NGF and BDNF in crucial areas of the limbic system and olfactory bulbs, which play a key role in learning and memory processes and in the proliferation and migration of endogenous progenitor cells present in the rodent brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Blockade of spinal nerves inhibits expression of neural growth factor in the myocardium at an early stage of acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Yue, W; Guo, Z

    2012-09-01

    Neural growth factor (NGF) is required for healing and sprouting of cardiac sympathetic and sensory nerves and plays important roles in cardiac protection, sustaining cardiac function and regeneration in ischaemic heart disease. The overexpression or lack of the NGF could be harmful to the heart. In this study, we examined the role of spinal nerves in the modulation of expression of the NGF in the myocardium at risk of ischaemia soon after acute myocardial infarction in rats. Coronary artery occlusion (CAO) was carried out in anaesthetized rats with and without preconditioning of blockade of the spinal nerves. The expression of the NGF protein and mRNA in the myocardium at risk of ischaemia was examined using immunohistochemical assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. In the left ventricle, immunoreactive cells and fibre-like structures were mainly located in the myocardium and in the epicardium. The NGF protein expression was increased by two-fold in the myocardium at risk of ischaemia during the 60 min of CAO, while the NGF mRNA was up-regulated three-fold, at 360 min after acute myocardial infarction. The blockade of the spinal nerves completely abolished the up-regulation of the NGF in the myocardium (P<0.05). The spinal nerves innervating the heart may play an important role in sustaining the up-regulation of the NGF in the myocardium early after acute myocardial infarction, an effect which can be inhibited by the blockade of these nerves.

  11. The Akt-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway contributes to nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Hashikawa, Naoya; Yutani, Chikao; Zamami, Yoshito; Jin, Xin; Takatori, Shingo; Mio, Mitsunobu; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apo)-deficient [apoE(-/-)] mice have peripheral sensory nerve defects and a reduced and delayed response to noxious thermal stimuli. However, to date, no report has focused on the influence of apoE deficiency on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerve fiber extensions. We have shown that the density of CGRP-containing nerve fibers decreases in mesenteric arteries of apoE(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Here, we investigated whether apoE deficiency is involved in nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced CGRP-containing nerve regeneration using apoE(-/-) mice. NGF-mediated CGRP-like immunoreactivity (LI)-neurite outgrowth in apoE(-/-) cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cultures. However, the level of NGF receptor mRNA in apoE(-/-) DRG cells was similar to that in wild-type mice. To clarify the mechanism of the impaired ability of NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth, we focused on the Akt-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. Expression of phosphorylated Akt was significantly reduced in apoE(-/-) DRG. The NO donor, sodium nitroprusside or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, did not affect NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in apoE(-/-) cultured DRG cells. However, 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate sodium salt n-hydrate, a cGMP analog, induced NGF-mediated nerve facilitation similar to wild-type NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth levels. Furthermore, in apoE(-/-) DRG, soluble guanylate cyclase expression was significantly lower than that in wild-type DRG. These results suggest that in apoE(-/-) mice the Akt-NO-cGMP pathway is impaired, which may be caused by NGF-mediated CGRP-LI-neurite outgrowth defects.

  12. Acidic substitution of the activation loop tyrosines in TrkA supports nerve growth factor-dependent, but not nerve growth factor-independent, differentiation and cell cycle arrest in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SY5Y.

    PubMed

    Gryz, Ela A; Meakin, Susan O

    2003-11-27

    TrkA is the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) for nerve growth factor (NGF) and stimulates NGF-dependent cell survival and differentiation in primary neurons and also differentiation of neuroblastomas and apoptosis of medulloblastomas. We have previously shown that aspartic acid and glutamic acid substitution (AspGlu and GluAsp) of the activation loop tyrosines in TrkA (Tyr(683) and Tyr(684)) supports NGF-independent neuritogenesis and cell survival in PC12 cell-derived nnr5 cells. In this study, the AspGlu and GluAsp mutant Trks have been analysed for their ability to support NGF-independent and NGF-dependent neuritogenesis, proliferation and cell signalling in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SY5Y. We find that the AspGlu and GluAsp mutant Trks support NGF-dependent, but not NGF-independent, autophosphorylation, neuritogenic responses and/or inhibit cell cycle progression. The NGF-dependent neuritogenic responses are lower for the mutant Trks (approximately 30-60% for AspGlu and 50-60% for GluAsp), relative to wild-type TrkA. While both the AspGlu and GluAsp mutant Trks support NGF-dependent transient phosphorylation of Shc, PLCgamma-1, AKT, FRS2, SH2B as well as prolonged MAP kinase activation, the GluAsp mutant induces stronger NGF-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 and SH2B, as well as a stronger reduction in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Collectively, these data suggest that neither absolute levels of receptor autophosphorylation, high levels of TrkA expression nor the activation of a specific signalling pathway is dominant and absolutely essential for neuritogenesis and cell cycle arrest of SY5Y cells.

  13. Nerve growth factor and its high-affinity receptor trkA participate in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Campos, Ximena; Muñoz, Yenny; Selman, Alberto; Yazigi, Roberto; Moyano, Leonor; Weinstein-Oppenheimer, Caroline; Lara, Hernán E; Romero, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    To compare the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its high-affinity receptor trkA in normal ovaries and in epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Given NGF acts as an angiogenic factor through a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated mechanism in several types of tissues, we examined whether NGF regulates the expression of VEGF isoforms in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). The expression and localization of NGF and tyrosine kinase receptor A (trkA) in normal ovarian samples and in ovarian cancer samples were analyzed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NGF regulates the expression of three VEGF isoforms (VEGF(121), VEGF(165) and VEGF(189)); these were examined using RT-PCR in explants of EOC and ELISA in culture media. TrkA mRNA levels were over-expressed in ovarian cancer compared to normal ovarian samples, whereas NGF mRNA levels remained unchanged. NGF and trkA proteins were absent or found in very low levels in normal ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), whereas they were highly expressed in epithelial cells of EOC. Additionally, NGF stimulated the expression of VEGF isoforms in cancer explants. The effect was dose-dependent and inhibited by a NGF antibody and by K(252a), a trk receptor inhibitor. The abundance of NGF and trkA receptors in epithelial cells of EOC, together with the ability of NGF to increase VEGF expression strongly suggests an autocrine role of NGF in EOC. These findings suggest that blocking neurotrophin action could be a therapeutic target in treating ovarian cancer.

  14. Oncogene N-ras mediates selective inhibition of c-fos induction by nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in a PC12 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, T M; Green, S H; Trotta, R J; Burstein, D E; Pellicer, A

    1990-01-01

    A cell line was generated from U7 cells (a subline of PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells) that contains a stably integrated transforming mouse N-ras (Lys-61) gene under the control of the long terminal repeat from mouse mammary tumor virus. Such cells, designated UR61, undergo neuronal differentiation upon exposure to nanomolar concentrations of dexamethasone, as a consequence of expression of the activated N-ras gene (I. Guerrero, A. Pellicer, and D.E. Burstein, Biochem, Biophys. Res. Commun. 150:1185-1192, 1988). Exposure of UR61 cells to either nerve growth factor (NGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) results in a marked induction of c-fos RNA, with kinetics paralleling those of NGF- or bFGF-induced expression of c-fos RNA in PC12 cells. Dexamethasone-induced expression of activated N-ras p21 results in blocking of c-fos RNA induction by NGF or bFGF in a time-dependent manner. Activated N-ras p21-mediated inhibition of c-fos RNA induction in UR61 cells is selective for NGF and bFGF and is not due to selective degradation of c-fos RNA. Normal and transforming N-ras can trans activate the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to mouse c-fos regulatory sequences when transient expression assays are performed. Our observations suggest that N-ras p21 selectively interacts with pathways involved in induction of c-fos expression which initiate at the receptors for NGF and bFGF. Images PMID:2108319

  15. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  16. Comparative insights using the molecular homology model of BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor) of Varanus komodoensis and the known NGF (Nerve growth factor) structure of Naja atra

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ankit; Sharma, Dhirendra Kumar; Sarma, Rituparna; Chetia, Hasnahana; Saikia, Juri

    2013-01-01

    BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor) is a secretion protein and a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. Structural and functional characterization of BDNF Varanus komodoensis is of interest while its structure remains unknown. Thus, a homology molecular model of BDNF was constructed for gleaning possible structural insights. The model was compared with the structure of the homologous NGF (Nerve growth factor, another member of neuro-trophin family) from Naja atra. Comparative structural analysis of the models showed structural similarities with their predicted cavities for the interpretation of potential functional analogy. PMID:24