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Sample records for nerve head blood

  1. Blood flow velocity response of the ophthalmic artery and anterior optic nerve head capillaries to carbogen gas in the rhesus monkey model of optic nerve head ischemia.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Dennis E; Komaromy, Andras M; Kallberg, Maria E; Miyabashi, Taka; Ollivier, Franck J; Lambrou, George N

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effect on blood flow velocity of the ophthalmic artery and anterior superficial optic nerve head (ONH) capillaries by changing inhaled gas from 100% oxygen to carbogen (95% oxygen, 5% CO(2)) in rhesus monkeys receiving chronic unilateral orbital endothelin-1 administration. The right eye of six young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) received endothelin-1 (ET-1) by osmotic minipumps to the perineural optic nerve (0.3 microg/day) for 8 months. Three additional monkeys (control group) received the ET-1 vehicle (Sham) solution to the right optic nerve for the same period of time. The left eye served as a nontreated control in both groups. The blood flow velocities of the anterior ONH capillaries and ophthalmic artery were assessed in both eyes using confocal laser scanning flowmetry (CSLF) and color Doppler imaging (CDI), respectively. A slight increase in the CDI blood flow velocities and a small decrease in the resistive index of the ophthalmic artery, and increased flow of the ONH capillaries in rhesus monkeys were detected when inhaled gas was changed from 100% oxygen to carbogen. The difference in CSLF blood flow in the nasal ONH between the endothelin-1 (ET-1) treated right eye and the normal left eye of the same individual monkeys was significantly greater than the difference in blood flow between the Sham-treated right eye and the normal left eye in control animals under the conditions of carbogen and oxygen inhalation. Carbogen inhalation slightly influences the microcirculation of the globe and ONH in rhesus monkeys. These data suggest that low dose ET-1 administration has a subtle vasorelaxing effect in the ONH microcirculation in this animal model of ONH ischemia.

  2. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head

    SciTech Connect

    Riva, C.E.; Grunwald, J.E.; Sinclair, S.H.

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  3. Diurnal Variations in Blood Flow at Optic Nerve Head and Choroid in Healthy Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the diurnal variations of the ocular blood flow in healthy eyes using laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), and to determine the relationship of the diurnal variations between the ocular blood flow and other ocular parameters. This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at Nagoya University Hospital. We studied 13 healthy volunteers whose mean age was 33.5 ± 7.6 years. The mean blur rate (MBR), expressing the relative blood flow, on the optic nerve head (ONH) and choroidal blood flow was determined by LSFG (LSFG-NAVI) every 3 hours from 6:00 to 24:00 hours. The intraocular pressure (IOP), choroidal thickness measured by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, and heart rate (HR) in the brachial artery were also recorded. We evaluated the diurnal variations of the parameters and compared the MBR to the other parameters using a linear mixed model. The diurnal variations of the MBR on the ONH varied significantly with a trough at 9:00 hours and a peak at 24:00 hours (P < 0.001, linear mixed model). The MBR of choroid also had significant diurnal variations with a trough at 15:00 hours and a peak at 18:00 hours (P = 0.001). The IOP (P < 0.001), choroidal thickness (P < 0.001), SBP (P = 0.005), DBP (P = 0.001), and HR (P < 0.001) also had significant diurnal variations. Although the diurnal variation of the MBR on the ONH was different from the other parameters, that on the choroid was significantly and positively correlated with the DBP (P = 0.002), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.023), and mean ocular perfusion pressure (P = 0.047). We found significant diurnal variations in the ONH and choroidal blood flow. Although the ONH blood flow had its own diurnal variation because of strong autoregulation, the choroidal blood flow was more likely affected by systemic circulatory factors because of poor autoregulation. PMID:25674750

  4. Breakdown of the normal optic nerve head blood-brain barrier following acute elevation of intraocular pressure in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Five hours of elevated intraocular pressure produced evidence of an altered blood-brain barrier at the optic nerve head in 27 of 29 monkey eyes. The change in vascular permeability was documented by fluorescein angiography (18 of 21 eyes), by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy (21 of 23 eyes), or by both methods. Leakage occurred from major blood vessels as well as from microvasculature of the nerve head. In 22 eyes, rapid axonal transport was studied after intravitreal injection of tritiated leucine. In 18 of these 22 eyes, autoradiography demonstrated a local interruption of axonal transport. In 15 eyes examined by all three methods, leakage from microvasculature (as opposed to leakage from the major vessels) was loosely associated with severe and widespread blockade of axonal transport at the lamina cribrosa. Although cause-and-effect relationships are not proved, ischemia may be responsible both for the focal endothelial damage with breakdown of the normal blood-brain barrier and for the local abnormalities of axonal transport.

  5. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  6. The effects of a fixed combination of 0.5% timolol and 1% dorzolamide on optic nerve head blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Ohguro, Ikuyo; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of a fixed combination of 0.5% timolol maleate (TM) and 1% dorzolamide hydrochloride (DZ) (FCTD(1%)) on optic nerve head (ONH) blood circulation. A drop of 0.5% TM, 1% DZ, or FCTD(1%) was topically administered to the right eyes of 15 healthy Japanese subjects, and a drop of saline was likewise administrated to their left eyes. Systemic blood pressure, heart rates (HRs), intraocular pressures (IOPs), ocular perfusion pressures, and blood circulation by a laser speckle flowgraphy at the ONH were measured before administration, and again at 1.5 and 6 h afterward. FCTD(1%) caused a significant increase in ONH blood circulation 6 h after the administration, while 0.5% TM and 1% DZ had no significant effect. The IOPs were significantly decreased in 0.5% TM (P<0.01) and FCTD(1%) (P<0.05) when compared with the saline-treated eyes at 1.5 and 6 h after administration, while 1% DZ did not show a statistically significant decrease. There were no significant changes in other systemic parameters except for a significant transient decrease in the HRs observed in 0.5% TM (P<0.01) when compared with the baseline at 1.5 h after the administration. Our current results suggest that FCTD(1%) caused a significant increase in ocular blood circulation on the ONH in healthy Japanese subjects, presumably by a synergistic effect of 0.5% TM and 1% DZ, although neither 0.5% TM nor 1% DZ on their own had a significant effect.

  7. Impaired Autoregulation of Blood Flow at the Optic Nerve Head During Vitrectomy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryuya; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Masahara, Hidetaka; Sakamoto, Masashi; Ubuka, Makoto; Maeno, Takatoshi

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) influences autoregulation of optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow during vitrectomy. Cohort study. Thirteen eyes of 13 subjects with T2DM and 30 eyes of 30 controls without T2DM undergoing vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane or macular hole were included. Following 25 gauge vitrectomy, we measured the mean blur rate (MBR), an index of ONH blood flow, in the vascular area (vascular MBR) and in the tissue area (tissue MBR) using laser speckle flowgraphy. We performed measurements before and 5 and 10 minutes after intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation of approximately 15 mm Hg; both parameters represent relative values (%, compared with baseline). We calculated the vascular MBR recovery rate as (vascular MBR at 10 min-vascular MBR at 5 min)/(vascular MBR at baseline-vascular MBR at 5 min). Vascular MBR in T2DM subjects was significantly lower than that in controls at 5 and 10 minutes after IOP elevation (P = .0328 and P < .0001, respectively). Tissue MBR was also significantly lower in T2DM subjects than in controls at both time points (P = .0253 and P = .0004, respectively). Vascular MBR recovery rate was significantly lower in the T2DM than in the control group (P = .0090). Furthermore, the vascular MBR recovery rate was significantly negatively correlated with hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose levels (P = .0284 and P = .0381, respectively). T2DM is associated with impaired ONH blood flow autoregulation in both vascular and tissue areas when subjected to change in IOP during vitrectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of intraocular pressure on changes of blood flow in the retina, choroid, and optic nerve head in rats investigated by optical microangiography.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Cepurna, William O; Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical coherence tomography/optical microangiography (OCT/OMAG) to image and measure the effects of acute intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation on retinal, choroidal and optic nerve head (ONH) perfusion in the rat eye. In the experiments, IOP was elevated from 10 to 100 mmHg in 10 mmHg increments. At each IOP level, three-dimensional data volumes were captured using an ultrahigh sensitive (UHS) OMAG scanning protocol for 3D volumetric perfusion imaging, followed by repeated B-scans for Doppler OMAG analysis to determine blood flow velocity. Velocity and vessel diameter measurements were used to calculate blood flow in selected retinal blood vessels. Choroidal perfusion was calculated by determining the peripapillary choroidal filling at each pressure level and calculating this as a percentage of area filling at baseline (10 mmHg). ONH blood perfusion was calculated as the percentage of blood flow area over a segmented ONH area to a depth 150 microns posterior to the choroidal opening. We show that volumetric blood flow reconstructions revealed detailed 3D maps, to the capillary level, of the retinal, choroidal and ONH microvasculature, revealing retinal arterioles, capillaries and veins, the choroidal opening and a consistent presence of the central retinal artery inferior to the ONH. While OCT structural images revealed a reversible compression of the ONH and vasculature with elevated IOP, OMAG successfully documented changes in retinal, choroidal and ONH blood perfusion and allowed quantitative measurements of these changes. Starting from 30 mm Hg, retinal blood flow (RBF) diminished linearly with increasing IOP and was nearly extinguished at 100 mm Hg, with full recovery after return of IOP to baseline. Choroidal filling was unaffected until IOP reached 60 mmHg, then decreased to 20% of baseline at IOP 100 mmHg, and normalized when IOP returned to baseline. A reduction in ONH blood perfusion at higher IOP's was also

  9. Hyperemic responses of the optic nerve head blood flow to chromatic equiluminant flicker are reduced by ocular hypertension and early glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsini, Benedetto; Riva, Charles E.; Salgarello, Tommaso; Logean, Eric; Colotto, Alberto; Giudiceandrea, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated in ocular hypertension (OHT) and early glaucoma (EOAG) patients the optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow response (RF) to chromatic equiluminant flicker. This stimulus generates neural activity dominated by the parvo-cellular system. Eleven EOAG, 20 OHT patients, and 8 age-matched control subjects were examined. The blood flow (F) at the neuroretinal rim was continuously monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry before, during, and after a 60-s exposure to a 4 Hz, red-green equiluminant flicker stimulus (30 deg field). RF was expressed as percentage F-change during the last 20 s of flicker relative to baseline F. Responses were collected at a number of temporal sites. The highest RF value was used for subsequent analysis. As compared to controls, both OHT and EOAG patients showed a decrease (p<0.01) in mean RF. We conclude that RF elicited by chromatic equiluminant flicker is abnormally reduced in OHT and EOAG patients indicating an impairment of the parvo-cellular-mediated vasoactivity. This decrease of vascular response may occur independently of neural activity loss early in the disease process.

  10. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  11. The effects of dorzolamide 2% and dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination on retinal and optic nerve head blood flow in primary open-angle glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Rolle, T; Tofani, F; Brogliatti, B; Grignolo, F M

    2008-09-01

    To compare the effect of dorzolamide hydrochloride 2%, timolol maleate 0.5%, and their fixed combination on intraocular pressure (IOP)and retinal and optic nerve head haemodynamics in primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Twenty-eight patients with early moderate glaucomatous damage treated with β-blockers (>6 months) with IOP values ranging from 18 to 22 mmHg at trough participated in this trial. After a 4-week washout period,patients were randomised in two groups: group I started with dorzolamide 2% monotherapy and group II with timolol 0.50% monotherapy for 4 weeks. After this period, both groups switched to dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination for 4 weeks. IOP, ocular diastolic perfusion pressure, heart rate, and Scanning Laser Doppler Flowmetry measurements at the peripapillary retina and neuroretinal rim were taken at T0 (enrolment), T1 (wash out), T2(monotherapy), and T3 (dorzolamide/timolol).Data were compared between different study times. Statistical analysis was conducted using a paired t-test. Between T1 and T3, IOP decreased significantly in group I (-21.40%) (P<0.001)and in group II (-21.25%) (P<0.001). At the same time intervals, blood flow increased significantly at rim level for group I (+30.03%)(P<0.05) and also when all patients were considered (rim +20.81%) (P<0.05). Between T1 and T3, we also observed a significant increase of ODPP in group I (+7.24%) (P<0.01)and in group II (+6.08%) (P<0.05) and when all patients were considered (+6.71%)(P<0.001) [corrected]. Dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination increased blood flow significantly at the neuroretinal rim showing a combination of hypotensive and haemodynamic effects.

  12. Reductions in retrobulbar and retinal capillary blood flow strongly correlate with changes in optic nerve head and retinal morphology over four years in open-angle glaucoma patients of African descent compared to patients of European descent

    PubMed Central

    Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon; Carr, Joseph; Vercellin, Alice Verticchio; Hussain, Rehan; Hembree, Priyanka Parekh; Wentz, Scott; Isaacs, Michael; Eckert, George; Moore, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship of changes in ocular blood flow with optic nerve head and retinal morphology in open-angle glaucoma patients of African versus European descent over four years. Materials and Methods In this study, 112 patients with open-angle glaucoma were examined at baseline, 79 (59 European descent, 20 African descent) of which were followed for four years. Retinal capillary blood flow was assessed with Heidelberg retinal flowmetry. Retrobulbar blood flow was measured by color Doppler imaging. Retinal structural changes were examined with optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomography-III. Mixed-model analysis of covariance was used to test for the significance of change from baseline to four-year follow-up, and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate linear associations. Results In open-angle glaucoma patients of African descent, structural changes of the optic nerve head demonstrated a strong association with the end diastolic velocities and resistive indices of the short posterior ciliary arteries over four years. In addition, there was a significantly larger increase in the avascular area of the inferior retina in patients of African descent, and this reduction in retinal capillaries strongly correlated with a reduction in macular thickness. Conclusion Reductions in retinal capillary and retrobulbar blood flow strongly correlated with changes in the optic nerve head and macular thickness over four years in open-angle glaucoma patients of African descent compared to European descent. This data suggests that ocular vascular health may be a more influential contributing factor in the pathophysiology of open-angle glaucoma in patients of African descent compared to European descent. PMID:27561102

  13. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Sassine, Tannus Jorge; Lima, Guilherme de Freitas; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Padua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Nadai, Anderson de

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

  14. Malignant lymphoma involving the optic nerve head and the retina.

    PubMed

    Yen, M Y; Liu, J H

    1985-11-01

    A previously healthy 27-year-old man presented with a history of progressive paraplegia and blurred vision within one year. Physical examination revealed marked posterior column sign. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained a white blood count of 1,940 microL, all lymphocytes. Fundi revealed yellowish infiltration (candle-wax drippings) along retinal vessels and tumefaction of the optic nerve head. He was initially misdiagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis meningitis on the basis of the CSF findings. Sarcoidosis was then suspected because of the unusual fundus appearance. Malignant lymphoma was confirmed by inguinal lymph node biopsy.

  15. Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Downs, J. Crawford

    2015-01-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. PMID:25819451

  16. Anatomy of the optic nerve head and glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of axon damage in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy remains undefined. Interestingly, it has been observed that, although the entire nerve cross-section may be involved by the nerve damage, in many instances, the superior and inferior axon bundles are preferentially affected by the pressure insult. Thus, recent studies by many investigators have stressed a re-examination of the optic nerve head anatomy, including the nerve head microcirculation, the glial and connective tissue elements within the nerve head, and the morphology of the axons themselves. Any correlation between regional differences in this anatomy and the preferential involvement by specific axon bundles within the nerve head by the pressure insult may suggest some further insight into the mechanisms underlying the pressure-induced axon loss in glaucomatous eyes.

  17. Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yu; Toda, Masahiro; Shibao, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve runs over the posterior petroclinoid ligament. Because edema of the damaged oculomotor nerve might result in constriction at the point where the nerve pierces the dura of the cavernous sinus, symptoms of oculomotor nerve palsy appeared late after trauma. Steroid treatment reducing edema could be effective for delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. PMID:28217399

  18. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. Methods We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Results Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT–PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1–2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6–7, TRPP1–2, and Piezo1–2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1–2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Conclusions Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury. PMID:26236150

  19. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2015-01-01

    To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1-2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6-7, TRPP1-2, and Piezo1-2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1-2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury.

  20. Optic nerve head biomechanics in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Downs, J Crawford

    2015-04-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Y-39983, a selective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, on blood flow in optic nerve head in rabbits and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Tokushige, Hideki; Waki, Mitsunori; Takayama, Yoshiko; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of Y-39983, a selective Rho-associated coiled coil-forming protein kinase inhibitor, on blood flow in the optic nerve head (ONH) in rabbits and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rats. Blood flow in ONH was measured by the laser speckle method after topical administration of 0.05% Y-39983 solution or its vehicle in rabbit eyes. To investigate the effects of Y-39983 on axonal regeneration of RGCs, RGCs purified from rat eyes were cultured with or without 10 μM Y-39983 and morphologically observed by phase-contrast microscopy. Moreover, the effects of intravitreal administration of Y-39983 were evaluated using an in vivo model of axotomized RGCs in peripheral nerve-grafted rats. Topical administration of 0.05% Y-39983 solution significantly increased blood flow in ONH compared with the vehicle group in rabbits. Maximum increase in blood flow in the 0.05% Y-39983 group was 122.84 ± 5.98 % (Mean ± S.E.) at 90 minutes after administration compared with before administration. Neurites in rat RGCs treated with 10 μM Y-39983 were extended compared with those without Y-39983 treatment of RGCs in vitro. Y-39983 dose-dependently increased the number of RGCs with regenerating axons in vivo. The numbers of RGCs with regenerating axons in 10 and 100 μM Y-39983-treated rats were 99.3 ± 10.5 and 169.5 ± 43.3 cells/mm(2) (Mean ± S.D.), respectively, and significantly increased compared with those in saline-treated rats (43.3 ± 6.0 cells/mm(2)). Y-39983 may be a candidate drug not only for lowering of IOP but also for increasing of blood flow in ONH in the treatment of glaucoma. Moreover, Y-39983 may have therapeutic potential for axonal regeneration of RGCs in the treatment of diseases with degenerating axons of RGCs including glaucoma, although improvements of formulation or route of administration are needed in order to reach an effective concentration in retina.

  2. Effects of scleral stiffness properties on optic nerve head biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Eilaghi, Armin; Flanagan, John G; Simmons, Craig A; Ethier, C Ross

    2010-04-01

    The biomechanical environment within the optic nerve head, important in glaucoma, depends strongly on scleral biomechanical properties. Here we use a range of measured nonlinear scleral stress-strain relationships in a finite element (FE) model of the eye to compute the biomechanical environment in the optic nerve head at three levels of intraocular pressure (IOP). Three stress-strain relationships consistent with the 5th, 50th and 95th percentiles of measured human scleral stiffness were selected from a pool of 30 scleral samples taken from 10 eyes and implemented in a generic FE model of the eye using a hyperelastic five-parameter Mooney-Rivlin material model. Computed strains within optic nerve head tissues depended strongly on scleral properties, with most of this difference occurring between the compliant and median scenarios. Also, the magnitudes of strains were found to be substantial even at normal IOP (up to 5.25% in the lamina cribrosa at 15 mmHg), being larger than previously reported values even at normal levels of IOP. We conclude that scleras that are "weak", but still within the physiologic range, will result in appreciably increased optic nerve head strains and could represent a risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Estimations of the deformation at the optic nerve head region, particularly at elevated IOP, should take into account the nonlinear nature of scleral stiffness.

  3. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suneeta

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy leading to changes in the intrapaillary and parapaillary regions of the optic disk. Despite technological advances, clinical identification of optic nerve head characteristics remains the first step in diagnosis. Careful examination of the disk parameters including size, shape, neuroretinal rim shape and pallor; size of the optic cup in relation to the area of the disk; configuration and depth of the optic cup; ratios of cup-to-disk diameter and cup-to-disk area; presence and location of splinter-shaped hemorrhages; occurrence, size, configuration, and location of parapapillary chorioretinal atrophy; and visibility of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is important to differentiate between the glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Gandhi M, Dubey S. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(3):106-114. PMID:26997792

  4. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Dubey, Suneeta

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy leading to changes in the intrapaillary and parapaillary regions of the optic disk. Despite technological advances, clinical identification of optic nerve head characteristics remains the first step in diagnosis. Careful examination of the disk parameters including size, shape, neuroretinal rim shape and pallor; size of the optic cup in relation to the area of the disk; configuration and depth of the optic cup; ratios of cup-to-disk diameter and cup-to-disk area; presence and location of splinter-shaped hemorrhages; occurrence, size, configuration, and location of parapapillary chorioretinal atrophy; and visibility of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is important to differentiate between the glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Gandhi M, Dubey S. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(3):106-114.

  5. Basic technique and anatomically imposed limitations of confocal scanning laser Doppler flowmetry at the optic nerve head level.

    PubMed

    Sehi, Mitra

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have suggested an association between blood flow dysregulation and glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve. Confocal scanning laser Doppler flowmetry (CSLDF) is a technique that measures the capillary blood flow of the retina and optic nerve head and provides a two-dimensional map of ocular perfusion in these areas. This review discusses the anatomy of the anterior optic nerve vasculature and the capabilities and limitations of the CSLDF. Methods to minimize error and to acquire more reliable measurements of capillary blood flow are also outlined. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Acta Ophthalmol.

  6. Oxygen saturation changes in the optic nerve head during acute intraocular pressure elevation in monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoobehi, Bahram; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Ning, Jinfeng; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Rice, David A.; Khan, Fareeha; Thompson, Hilary W.; Beach, James M.

    2009-02-01

    Background and Objective: To evaluate the effect of an acute elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) on oxygen saturation of structures of the optic nerve head. Study Design/Materials and Methods: In the cynomolgus monkey eye, IOP was set to 10 mm Hg, and then raised to 30, 45, and 55 mm Hg. The ONH and overlying vessels were imaged using a fundus camera attached to a hyperspectral imaging system (HSI) at 10 and 30 minutes after IOP elevation. Results: Raising IOP from 10 to 30 mm Hg did not significantly (P < 0.0001) change saturation in vessels or ONH tissue structures but at 55 mm Hg, all structures showed significant reduction. Conclusions: Quantitative assay of the blood oxygen saturation in structures on the surface and overlying the optic nerve head is possible using hyperspectral imaging techniques.

  7. Measuring Mean Cup Depth in the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, John K.; Rhodes, Lindsay; Fazio, Massimo; Smith, Brandon; Wang, Lan; Downs, J. Crawford; Owsley, Cynthia; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the deformation of structures in the optic nerve head (ONH) is associated with glaucoma and other diseases of the optic nerve, measurement of this deformation is of current research interest. This paper considers the computation of cup depth, a measurement of the depth of the internal limiting membrane (ILM). The computation of cup depth requires a reference structure against which to measure the ILM, and the construction of two reference structures is discussed, one based on Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) and the other based on the anterior surface of the peripapillary sclera (AS). A main focus of the paper is the robust computation of mean cup depth, which requires a good sampling of a reconstruction of the ILM surface. To evaluate our algorithm, the construction of synthetic datasets is considered. PMID:27942258

  8. [Nitroxidergic nerve fibers of intracerabral blood vessels].

    PubMed

    Kotsiuba, A E; Kotsiuba, E P; Chertok, V M

    2009-01-01

    Methods of light and electron microscopic histochemistry were applied to study the structure and distribution of NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons and processes in the parietal area of rat cerebral cortex. It was found that the most of the neurons displayed close connections with the intracerebral vessels. In the cerebral cortex, the smallest distance between the axonal plasma membrane and smooth muscle cells of the intracerebral arteries was found to be no less than 0.3-0.5 microm. Neuronal cell bodies were located in the functionally important areas of the vessels (in the areas of lateral trunk branching and in arteriolar sources), while their processes accompanied the vessels, tightly embracing them with their branches. Quite often, the neurons, the dendrites of which make contacts with the bodies or processes of over- or underlying neurons, sent their nerve fibers to the arteries, veins and capillaries. Thus, nitroxidergic neurons or their groups may control the blood flow in the different areas of vascular bed, performing the functions of the local nerve center.

  9. Angiogram, fundus, and oxygen saturation optic nerve head image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hua; Khoobehi, Bahram

    2009-02-01

    A novel multi-modality optic nerve head image fusion approach has been successfully designed. The new approach has been applied on three ophthalmologic modalities: angiogram, fundus, and oxygen saturation retinal optic nerve head images. It has achieved an excellent result by giving the visualization of fundus or oxygen saturation images with a complete angiogram overlay. During this study, two contributions have been made in terms of novelty, efficiency, and accuracy. The first contribution is the automated control point detection algorithm for multi-sensor images. The new method employs retina vasculature and bifurcation features by identifying the initial good-guess of control points using the Adaptive Exploratory Algorithm. The second contribution is the heuristic optimization fusion algorithm. In order to maximize the objective function (Mutual-Pixel-Count), the iteration algorithm adjusts the initial guess of the control points at the sub-pixel level. A refinement of the parameter set is obtained at the end of each loop, and finally an optimal fused image is generated at the end of the iteration. It is the first time that Mutual-Pixel-Count concept has been introduced into biomedical image fusion area. By locking the images in one place, the fused image allows ophthalmologists to match the same eye over time and get a sense of disease progress and pinpoint surgical tools. The new algorithm can be easily expanded to human or animals' 3D eye, brain, or body image registration and fusion.

  10. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  11. Intracranial Pressure Influences the Behavior of the Optic Nerve Head.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi; Tong, Junfei; Ghate, Deepta; Kedar, Sachin; Gu, Linxia

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the biomechanical responses of the optic nerve head (ONH) to acute elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP) were systematically investigated through numerical modeling. An orthogonal experimental design was developed to quantify the influence of ten input factors that govern the anatomy and material properties of the ONH on the peak maximum principal strain (MPS) in the lamina cribrosa (LC) and postlaminar neural tissue (PLNT). Results showed that the sensitivity of ONH responses to various input factors was region-specific. In the LC, the peak MPS was most strongly dependent on the sclera thickness, LC modulus, and scleral canal size, whereas in the PLNT, the peak MPS was more sensitive to the scleral canal size, neural tissue modulus, and pia mater modulus. The enforcement of clinically relevant ICP in the retro-orbital subarachnoid space influenced the sensitivity analysis. It also induced much larger strains in the PLNT than in the LC. Moreover, acute elevation of ICP leads to dramatic strain distribution changes in the PLNT, but had minimal impact on the LC. This work could help to better understand patient-specific responses, to provide guidance on biomechanical factors resulting in optic nerve diseases, such as glaucoma, papilledema, and ischemic optic neuropathy, and to illuminate the possibilities for exploiting their potential to treat and prevent ONH diseases.

  12. Effect of perineurial window size on nerve regeneration, blood-nerve barrier integrity, and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Walker, J Clinton; Brenner, Michael J; Mackinnon, Susan E; Winograd, Jonathan M; Hunter, Daniel A

    2004-02-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is used clinically to reconstruct nerve injuries when the lack of a suitable proximal nerve stump precludes conventional approaches to microsurgical repair. In end-to-side neurorrhaphy, the distal stump of a transected nerve is sutured to the side of an intact nerve that serves as an axon donor. Prior studies suggest that this perineurial window is a prerequisite for effective nerve regeneration into the recipient nerve. However, the optimal size for this perineurial window remains uncertain. This study evaluated the effect of perineurial window size on collateral axonal sprouting, blood-nerve barrier architecture, and functional impairment of the donor nerve. One hundred twenty Lewis rats were randomized to 1 and 5 mm perineurial window groups and examined at serial time points. The 5 mm perineurial window group exhibited significantly greater fiber counts at the repair zone than the 1mm group within 4 weeks (p < 0.005). Marked breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier was present 2 week postoperatively and resolved by 4 weeks regardless of 1 versus 5 mm perineurial window size. Tibial function indices in both groups normalized between 4 and 6 weeks postoperatively. A large (5 mm) perineurial window induced greater collateral sprouting or regenerative response than a small (1 mm) perineurial window without increasing cross sectional nerve injury or delaying functional recovery.

  13. The peripapillary glia of the optic nerve head in the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    Schuck, J; Gerhardt, H; Wolburg, H

    2000-07-01

    Abstract The eye of reptiles and birds is characterized by an avascular retina and a vascular convolute called conus papillaris in reptiles and pecten oculi in birds which arises from the papilla nervi optici (PNO) or optic nerve head into the vitreous. At least in birds, this central part of the retina is the site of a heterogeneous population of glial cells. Müller cells reside in the retina, astrocytes in the optic nerve, and pecteneal glial cells in the pecten. The latter are developmentally related to the pigment epithelial cells. In addition to these established types of cells, there is a population of glial cells lining the base of the pecten oculi. In the present study, we investigated both the morphology and the development of these glial cells of the PNO in a series of chicken embryos. These cells were called peripapillary glial cells. They were characterized by their morphology and by their spatiotemporal expression of antigens typical of glial cells (intermediate filaments and glutamine synthetase). They reside at the border between the retina and the optic nerve and at the innermost border of the ventricular cleft representing transitional forms among Müller cells, astrocytes, and pigment epithelial cells. The developmental data suggest a migration of the perikarya of the peripapillary glia in vitread direction, which may coincide with that of the pecteneal glia. Whereas the pecteneal glial cells differentiate morphologically from E16 on, the peripapillary glia retain characteristics of radial glia by spanning the distance from the vitreous to the ventricular cleft. Blood vessels only occurred in the optic nerve head and the pecten oculi. No capillaries were found in the retinal tissue, beyond the peripapillary glia, leading us to suggest that these cells may play a role in demarcating the outer limit of vascularization. The functional properties of these cells are unknown but were discussed to include prevention of vessel growth into the avascular

  14. Evaluation of Coexisting Optic Nerve Head Drusen and Glaucoma with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Shiyoung; Noecker, Robert J.; Schuman, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Optic nerve head drusen often make evaluation of the nerve head difficult to interpret. In addition, visual field defects are known to occur in patients with optic disk drusen, resembling glaucomatous damage. The authors report two cases of coincident optic nerve head drusen and glaucoma, in which the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in evaluating the nerve fiber layer was beneficial. Participants Two patients with both optic nerve head drusen and glaucoma, one with primary open angle glaucoma, the other with pseudoexfoliation glaucoma were evaluated. Both patients had asymmetric optic disk drusen, with clinically visible drusen only in one eye. intervention Ophthalmologic examination, color and red-free photography, automated Humphrey visual field testing and OCT were performed. Results Nerve fiber layer loss as measured by OCT was found to be greater than expected by the appearance of the optic nerve head and red-free photography, with visual fields consistent with findings in case 1. In case 2, visual fields were full, despite nerve fiber layer thinning seen by OCT and red-free photography. Conclusions There can be significant nerve fiber layer thinning in patients with both glaucoma and optic disk drusen, despite the appearance of the optic nerve head in these patients. The cup margin may be obscured by the drusen, giving rise to a falsely full-appearing disk. In such cases, OCT may provide a useful means to quantitatively measure the nerve fiber layer thickness and to aid in the management of these patients by detecting nerve fiber layer thinning earlier than would otherwise be possible. PMID:9224467

  15. Oncologic safety of cervical nerve preservation in neck dissection for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Kada, Shinpei; Tsujimura, Takashi; Kataoka, Michiko

    2017-09-01

    Although the functional merits of preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection for head and neck cancer have been reported, the oncologic safety has not yet been determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of cervical nerve preservation. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with head and neck cancer who had been treated by neck dissection between 2009 and 2014 at Kyoto Medical Center. Management of cervical nerves and clinical results were analyzed. A total of 335 sides of neck dissection had been performed in 222 patients. Cervical nerves were preserved in 175 neck sides and resected in 160 sides. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 71%. The 5-year neck control rate was 95% in cervical nerve preserved sides and 89% in cervical nerve resected sides. Preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection is oncologically safe in selected cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pit-like changes of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Radius, R. L.; Maumenee, A. E.; Green, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Six patients with open-angle glaucoma and acquired pit-like changes in the optic nerve head are presented. In 1 patient evolution of the pit-like defect is documented. In all 6 patients progression of associated visual field deficits is described. It is suggested that such pit-like changes in selected patients with glaucoma may not represent congenital lesions but rather local, progressive nerve head disease, occurring particularly in response to raised intraocular pressure. The management of patients with optic nerve head pitting and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy are discussed with respect to this observation. Images PMID:666988

  17. Scanning laser topography and scanning laser polarimetry: comparing both imaging methods at same distances from the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Kremmer, Stephan; Keienburg, Marcus; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Selbach, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of scanning laser topography (SLT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) on the rim of the optic nerve head and its surrounding area and thereby to evaluate whether these imaging technologies are influenced by other factors beyond the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). A total of 154 eyes from 5 different groups were examined: young healthy subjects (YNorm), old healthy subjects (ONorm), patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), patients with open-angle glaucoma and early glaucomatous damage (OAGE) and patients with open-angle glaucoma and advanced glaucomatous damage (OAGA). SLT and SLP measurements were taken. Four concentric circles were superimposed on each of the images: the first one measuring at the rim of the optic nerve head (1.0 ONHD), the next measuring at 1.25 optic nerve head diameters (ONHD), at 1.5 ONHD and at 1.75 ONHD. The aligned images were analyzed using GDx/NFA software. Both methods showed peaks of RNFL thickness in the superior and inferior segments of the ONH. The maximum thickness, registered by the SLT device was at the ONH rim where the SLP device tended to measure the lowest values. SLT measurements at the ONH were influenced by other tissues besides the RNFL like blood vessels and glial tissues. SLT and SLP were most strongly correlated at distances of 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD. While both imaging technologies are valuable tools in detecting glaucoma, measurements at the ONH rim should be interpreted critically since both methods might provide misleading results. For the assessment of the retinal nerve fiber layer we would like to recommend for both imaging technologies, SLT and SLP, measurements in 1.25 and 1.5 ONHD distance of the rim of the optic nerve head.

  18. Clinicopathologic correlation of retinal to choroidal venous collaterals of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Green, W R; Talamo, J H; Hoyt, W F; Johnson, R N; McDonald, H R

    1991-08-01

    An optic nerve meningioma developed in an elderly woman and was followed for 13 years until her death. The optic nerve was initially normal. Over time it became swollen and then atrophic and developed retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals. Five hundred serial sections were prepared through the optic nerve and for approximately 1.5 mm superiorly and inferiorly to the optic nerve to trace the course of the collaterals that were seen ophthalmoscopically and angiographically in the optic nerve head. This clinicopathologic study shows clearly that the abnormal channels are, in fact, retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals (bypass channels). Four collaterals extended around the end of Bruch's membrane at the optic nerve head. Two more collaterals extended through the retinal pigment epithelium to become continuous with a subretinal pigment epithelial neovascular membrane, the vessels of which connected with the choroidal vessels through a defect in Bruch's membrane.

  19. Optic nerve head morphology of the Eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Lindsay A; Komáromy, András M; Brooks, Dennis E; Lewis, Patricia A; Bennett, Fred; Chisholm, Mae

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the morphology of the Eastern gray squirrel optic nerve head, using histochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy, in order to make comparisons with other mammalian species. Eyes of three Eastern gray squirrels were enucleated, fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin, and embedded in paraffin. Sections through the optic nerve head were made in the three different planes, and staining was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin and Gomori's trichrome stain. Stained sections were examined using light microscopy. The surface of the optic nerve head and the peripapillary retina were evaluated using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The anterior optic nerve head of the Eastern gray squirrel was found to be horizontally elongated and tapers to a more conventional round shape after it exits the eye. Retinal nerve fiber axons converge on the optic nerve head from all directions. Anterior to the lamina cribrosa, the mean (+/- SD) optic nerve axon bundle diameter was 27 +/- 11 microm. The lamina cribrosa measured 363 microm dorsal to ventral and 3.60 mm nasal to temporal. The thickness of the lamina was 125 micro m anterior to posterior with a mean (+/- SD) laminar pore size of 45 +/- 12 microm. The optic nerve head measured 3.65 mm nasal to temporal and 330 microm dorsal to ventral. Trichrome staining indicated the presence of collagen in the lamina cribrosa. This is the first detailed description of the squirrel optic nerve head. It has an unusual shape among mammals with a dramatic horizontal elongation. The purpose of this shape is not apparent. The presence of collagen in the scleral lamina cribrosa indicates a similar extracellular matrix composition as in other species.

  20. A rare case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with radial head fracture.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen D; Rebella, Gregory S; Sansone, Jason M; Kim, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring about the elbow in adults, but there have been few reported cases of associated nerve injury. The little-known posterior interosseous nerve travels in close proximity to the radial head and is particularly susceptible to injury. The objectives of this case report include raising awareness of the possibility of posterior interosseous nerve palsy after radial head fracture and reviewing the clinical assessment of the posterior interosseous nerve to exclude occult injury. Here we report a case of a 21-year-old man who developed a posterior interosseous nerve palsy after a fracture of the radial head sustained during a wrestling match. He also sustained frostbite to the extremity due to overaggressive icing of the injury. Physicians should screen patients with radial head fractures for associated nerve injury. A thorough neurovascular examination with attention to the motor innervation patterns in the hand and wrist will help identify posterior interosseous nerve involvement. Careful discharge instructions will help prevent iatrogenic frostbite from overaggressive icing of injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Astrocytes in the Optic Nerve Head of Glaucomatous Mice Display a Characteristic Reactive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Seifert, Philip; Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Optic nerve head astrocytes, a subtype of white-matter astrocytes, become reactive early in the course of glaucoma. It was shown recently that in the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma optic nerve astrocytes extend new longitudinal processes into the axon bundles before ganglion cell loss becomes apparent. The present study aims at testing whether this behavior of astrocytes is typical of early glaucomatous damage. Methods Mice expressing green fluorescent protein in individual astrocytes were used to evaluate the early response of astrocytes in the glial lamina of the optic nerve head after increasing the IOP using the microbead occlusion method. Tissue sections from the glial lamina were imaged consecutively by confocal and electron microscopy. Results Confocal and electron microscope images show that astrocytes close to the myelination transition zone in the hypertensive nerve heads extend new processes that follow the longitudinal axis of the optic nerve and invade axon bundles in the nerve head. Ultrastructurally, the longitudinal processes were largely devoid of subcellular organelles except for degenerating mitochondria. Conclusions The longitudinal processes are a common feature of glaucomatous optic nerve astrocytes, whereas they are not observed after traumatic nerve injury. Thus, astrocytes appear to fine-tune their responses to the nature and/or timing of the injury to the neurons that they surround. PMID:28170536

  2. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity in blood pressure control against gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Mano, T

    2001-10-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) can be directly recorded from human peripheral nerves in situ using microneurography. MSNA plays an essential role to control systemic blood pressure against gravitational stress. MSNA was enhanced by changing posture against terrestrial gravity from lying to sitting, and from sitting to standing. This activity was enhanced by head-up tilt depending on the gravitational input from the head to the leg (+Gz) in the human body. Orthostatic hypotension occurred when MSNA response to gravitational stress was impaired both in high and low responders of this sympathetic outflow. Syncope was preceded and/or associated by a withdrawal of MSNA. MSNA was suppressed by short-term exposure to microgravity but was enhanced after long-term exposure to microgravity. Orthostatic intolerance after exposure to prolonged microgravity was associated with a reduction of increased MSNA response to gravitational stress. Aging influenced gravity-related responses of MSNA.

  3. Identification of the optic nerve head with genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Enrique J; Rincón, Mariano; García-Feijoó, Julián; Martínez-de-la-Casa, José M

    2008-07-01

    This work proposes creating an automatic system to locate and segment the optic nerve head (ONH) in eye fundus photographic images using genetic algorithms. Domain knowledge is used to create a set of heuristics that guide the various steps involved in the process. Initially, using an eye fundus colour image as input, a set of hypothesis points was obtained that exhibited geometric properties and intensity levels similar to the ONH contour pixels. Next, a genetic algorithm was used to find an ellipse containing the maximum number of hypothesis points in an offset of its perimeter, considering some constraints. The ellipse thus obtained is the approximation to the ONH. The segmentation method is tested in a sample of 110 eye fundus images, belonging to 55 patients with glaucoma (23.1%) and eye hypertension (76.9%) and random selected from an eye fundus image base belonging to the Ophthalmology Service at Miguel Servet Hospital, Saragossa (Spain). The results obtained are competitive with those in the literature. The method's generalization capability is reinforced when it is applied to a different image base from the one used in our study and a discrepancy curve is obtained very similar to the one obtained in our image base. In addition, the robustness of the method proposed can be seen in the high percentage of images obtained with a discrepancy delta<5 (96% and 99% in our and a different image base, respectively). The results also confirm the hypothesis that the ONH contour can be properly approached with a non-deformable ellipse. Another important aspect of the method is that it directly provides the parameters characterising the shape of the papilla: lengths of its major and minor axes, its centre of location and its orientation with regard to the horizontal position.

  4. Collagen microstructural factors influencing optic nerve head biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Albon, Julie; Jones, Hannah; Gouget, Cecile L M; Ethier, C Ross; Goh, James C H; Girard, Michaël J A

    2015-03-03

    Previous studies have suggested that the lamina cribrosa (LC) and its surrounding sclera are biomechanically important in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, but many were limited by assumptions of tissue isotropy and homogeneity. Here, we used an improved biomechanical model driven by experimental measurements of scleral and LC collagen fiber organization to more accurately evaluate optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanics. Collagen fiber organization was quantitatively mapped across human ONH cryosections (three normal and three glaucomatous) using small-angle light scattering (SALS) and fed into two-dimensional finite element models loaded under biaxial stress to simulate raised intraocular pressure. Effects of artificial variations in collagen fiber microstructure and stiffness on LC and scleral strains were also investigated. Scleral collagen fibers were circumferential and exhibited the highest alignment in a region not immediately adjacent to, but at a distance (400-500 μm) away from, the LC. In models, such a fiber arrangement yielded rings of low strain (second principal and effective) in the scleral region immediately adjacent to the LC. Further sensitivity analyses showed that scleral fiber alignment was crucial in determining LC strain levels. Moderate scleral anisotropy (as observed physiologically) was more effective than isotropy or high anisotropy in limiting LC and scleral strain magnitude. The presence of a heterogeneous collagen fiber organization in the peripapillary sclera appears effective in limiting LC strain and is able to reduce strain levels at the scleral canal boundary: a transition zone prone to LC disinsertion, focal lamina cribrosa defects, and optic disc hemorrhages in glaucoma. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. Dr. Henry Head and lessons learned from his self-experiment on radial nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Lenfest, Stephen M; Vaduva-Nemes, Andreea; Okun, Michael S

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the authors aim to review Dr. Henry Head's famous and dramatic nerve sectioning experiment. They discuss the implications of his experimental approach as well as the effect his experiment had on the field of neurology. Henry Head was a prominent British neurologist who contributed greatly to the understanding of the sensory examination through an experiment in which he had his own radial nerve transected. Head carefully documented the sensory changes following the sectioning. He hypothesized the existence of two separate sensory systems: protopathic and epicritic. Head was one of the first scientists to speculate on sensory dissociation, and his writings generated both enthusiasm and controversy. Although the ethical issue of self-experimentation was raised by his bold experiment and many aspects of his investigations and conclusions have been criticized, Head undoubtedly contributed important clinical lessons to neurology. Arguably, Henry Head's greatest contribution was the realization that the neurological portion of the sensory examination was anything but straightforward.

  6. [Blood circulation of cauda equina and nerve root].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Baba, Hisatoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Yayama, Takafumi; Takeno, Kenichi; Negoro, Kohei

    2005-03-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of radiculopathy associated with pathologic conditions of the spine, such as lumbar disc herniaton and lumbarl canal stenosis, may result from both mechanical compression and vascular problems. In this article, we have reviewed about the blood circulation of cauda equina and nerve root under normal and pathologic conditions.

  7. Optic nerve head and fibre layer imaging for diagnosing glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Michelessi, Manuele; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Oddone, Francesco; Brazzelli, Miriam; Parravano, Mariacristina; Franchi, Sara; Ng, Sueko M; Virgili, Gianni

    2015-11-30

    The diagnosis of glaucoma is traditionally based on the finding of optic nerve head (ONH) damage assessed subjectively by ophthalmoscopy or photography or by corresponding damage to the visual field assessed by automated perimetry, or both. Diagnostic assessments are usually required when ophthalmologists or primary eye care professionals find elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) or a suspect appearance of the ONH. Imaging tests such as confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP, as used by the GDx instrument), provide an objective measure of the structural changes of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and ONH parameters occurring in glaucoma. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of HRT, OCT and GDx for diagnosing manifest glaucoma by detecting ONH and RNFL damage. We searched several databases for this review. The most recent searches were on 19 February 2015. We included prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-control studies that evaluated the accuracy of OCT, HRT or the GDx for diagnosing glaucoma. We excluded population-based screening studies, since we planned to consider studies on self-referred people or participants in whom a risk factor for glaucoma had already been identified in primary care, such as elevated IOP or a family history of glaucoma. We only considered recent commercial versions of the tests: spectral domain OCT, HRT III and GDx VCC or ECC. We adopted standard Cochrane methods. We fitted a hierarchical summary ROC (HSROC) model using the METADAS macro in SAS software. After studies were selected, we decided to use 2 x 2 data at 0.95 specificity or closer in meta-analyses, since this was the most commonly-reported level. We included 106 studies in this review, which analysed 16,260 eyes (8353 cases, 7907 controls) in total. Forty studies (5574 participants) assessed GDx, 18 studies (3550 participants) HRT, and 63 (9390 participants) OCT, with 12 of

  8. Optic nerve head and fibre layer imaging for diagnosing glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Michelessi, Manuele; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Oddone, Francesco; Brazzelli, Miriam; Parravano, Mariacristina; Franchi, Sara; Ng, Sueko M; Virgili, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of glaucoma is traditionally based on the finding of optic nerve head (ONH) damage assessed subjectively by ophthalmoscopy or photography or by corresponding damage to the visual field assessed by automated perimetry, or both. Diagnostic assessments are usually required when ophthalmologists or primary eye care professionals find elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) or a suspect appearance of the ONH. Imaging tests such as confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP, as used by the GDx instrument), provide an objective measure of the structural changes of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and ONH parameters occurring in glaucoma. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of HRT, OCT and GDx for diagnosing manifest glaucoma by detecting ONH and RNFL damage. Search methods We searched several databases for this review. The most recent searches were on 19 February 2015. Selection criteria We included prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-control studies that evaluated the accuracy of OCT, HRT or the GDx for diagnosing glaucoma. We excluded population-based screening studies, since we planned to consider studies on self-referred people or participants in whom a risk factor for glaucoma had already been identified in primary care, such as elevated IOP or a family history of glaucoma. We only considered recent commercial versions of the tests: spectral domain OCT, HRT III and GDx VCC or ECC. Data collection and analysis We adopted standard Cochrane methods. We fitted a hierarchical summary ROC (HSROC) model using the METADAS macro in SAS software. After studies were selected, we decided to use 2 × 2 data at 0.95 specificity or closer in meta-analyses, since this was the most commonly-reported level. Main results We included 106 studies in this review, which analysed 16,260 eyes (8353 cases, 7907 controls) in total. Forty studies (5574

  9. Motor nerves of the head and neck that are susceptible to damage during dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Brown, S M; Oliphant, T; Langtry, J

    2014-08-01

    As the incidence of non melanoma skin cancer rises, dermatologists will increasingly be called upon to perform excisions in the head and neck region. Damage to the motor nerves of the head and neck represents an important adverse event for patients, and a source of litigation for surgeons. Understanding the anatomy of this region is key to counselling patients about the possibility of motor nerve injury associated with particular skin surgical procedures. We describe the anatomy of the motor nerves of the head and neck that are most vulnerable to injury during dermatological surgery. The consequences of injury are outlined, and the surface anatomy and anatomical landmarks that may be used to identify the relevant danger zones are described.

  10. Digitizing Stereoscopic Optic Nerve Head Photographs for Storage and Viewing Using a Personal Computer

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Ronit; Zacharopoulos, Ioannis; Assia, Ehud I.; Schuman, Joel S.

    2007-01-01

    Careful examination and monitoring of optic nerve head changes is essential in the treatment of patients with glaucoma. This often results in accumulation of numerous photographs and required appropriate storage space. A simple, inexpensive, and efficient means of storing and viewing stereoscopic optic nerve head photographs is described. Images were acquired with a fundus camera, on a color slide film. Slides were then scanned and digitized. A handheld stereoscope was used for stereoscopic viewing on a computer monitor. A scanning resolution of 300 dpi appeared optimal. At this resolution, the storage utilization was 16 kilobytes and the scanning time was 160 seconds per patient. PMID:16156151

  11. Digitizing stereoscopic optic nerve head photographs for storage and viewing using a personal computer.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Ronit; Zacharopoulos, Ioannis; Assia, Ehud I; Schuman, Joel S

    2005-01-01

    Careful examination and monitoring of optic nerve head changes is essential in the treatment of patients with glaucoma. This often results in accumulation of numerous photographs and required appropriate storage space. A simple, inexpensive, and efficient means of storing and viewing stereoscopic optic nerve head photographs is described. Images were acquired with a fundus camera, on a color slide film. Slides were then scanned and digitized. A handheld stereoscope was used for stereoscopic viewing on a computer monitor. A scanning resolution of 300 dpi appeared optimal. At this resolution, the storage utilization was 16 kilobytes and the scanning time was 160 seconds per patient.

  12. Unilateral compression neuropathy of the hypoglossal nerve due to head suspension orthosis in mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Hess, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    An 85-year-old woman with multisystem mitochondriopathy experienced tension headache, cervical pain, torque head-posture, and vertigo since 1980 for which she was continuously wearing a head-suspension-orthosis- since 1990. Since 1996 she developed severe left-sided weakness and wasting of the tongue. Needle-EMG of the left genioglossus muscle revealed abnormal spontaneous activity and reduced interference-pattern. No morphological alterations in the anatomical course of the hypoglossal nerve were found. Severe, unilateral weakness and wasting of the tongue was interpreted due to chronic compression of the hypoglossal nerve by long-standing use of a head-suspension-orthosis for cervical pain from cervical muscle weakness and resulting spinal degeneration.

  13. Natural motion of the optic nerve head revealed by high speed phase-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OHara, Keith; Schmoll, Tilman; Vass, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-03-01

    We use phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the deformation of the optic nerve head during the pulse cycle, motivated by the possibility that these deformations might be indicative of the progression of glaucoma. A spectral-domain OCT system acquired 100k A-scans per second, with measurements from a pulse-oximeter recorded simultaneously, correlating OCT data to the subject's pulse. Data acquisition lasted for 2 seconds, to cover at least two pulse cycles. A frame-rate of 200-400 B-scans per second results in a sufficient degree of correlated speckle between successive frames that the phase-differences between fames can be extracted. Bulk motion of the entire eye changes the phase by several full cycles between frames, but this does not severely hinder extracting the smaller phase-changes due to differential motion within a frame. The central cup moves about 5 μm/s relative to the retinal-pigment-epithelium edge, with tissue adjacent to blood vessels showing larger motion.

  14. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  15. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for ischemic femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, H-J; Lan, B-Sh; Cheng, B; Zhang, K-F; Yan, H-W; Wang, W-Zh; Gao, Z-Q

    2010-06-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a highly mutilating disease. There is no effective way to treat femoral head ischemia. This study was designed to show the curative effects of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to induce vascular regeneration and improve ischemic femoral head necrosis in rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent ischemic femoral head necrosis in both hindlimbs using liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. One cohort of rats was intraperitoneally injected with granulocyte-specific colony-stimulating factor (250 microg/kg/d), and control animals received equivalent saline solution. The right side was used as the transplantation group and the left as the control. After separation of peripheral blood, a stem cell suspension was poured into the right femoral artery and saline solution into the left femoral artery. At 4 weeks after peripheral stem cell transplantation, standing ability and activity of the the transplanted right hindlimb were remarkably improved, but there were no obvious changes in the control limbs. The experimental rabbits underwent arteriography of bilateral femoral heads, which indicated increased and thickened blood supply to the transplanted right hindlimb compared with the left control. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation improved ischemic femoral head necrosis.

  16. Common Peroneal Nerve Laceration in Closed Fibular Head Avulsion Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Singh, Jagdeep; Khatri, Kavin; Bither, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The common peroneal nerve (CPN) injuries are the most common among lower limb nerve injuries because of its fixed attachment in the region of the neck of the fibula. The involvement of CPN following varus displacement of the knee is commonly expected to be traction neuropraxia. The spontaneous recovery is usually expected and the not so favorable results of repair have led to a debatable consensus on its surgical management. Closed transaction/laceration of nerve following sports injury is highly uncommon. Case Report: A 27-year-old male sustained closed avulsion fracture of the fibular head with complete foot drop following a hyperadduction injury to the knee. Early operative exploration revealed peroneal nerve laceration which was repaired primarily along with anatomical reduction of the fibular head which yields good results following early repair. Conclusion: This case review emphasizes that severe damage to CPN may occur in spite of closed injuries to the knee. Patients presenting with fibular head avulsion fractures at the knee and CPN injury should be subjected to early intervention with repair or reconstruction of the avulsion injuries and exploration of CPN to achieve good clinical outcome. PMID:27299119

  17. Macular schisis and detachment associated with presumed acquired enlarged optic nerve head cups.

    PubMed

    Zumbro, David S; Jampol, Lee M; Folk, James C; Olivier, Mildred M G; Anderson-Nelson, Susan

    2007-07-01

    To describe a clinical syndrome of macular schisis and detachment in patients with acquired optic nerve head cupping resulting from glaucoma. Retrospective review of five patients. Patients were included if they had optic nerve cupping and macular schisis with or without detachment with no other identifiable cause. The patients had to have no leakage on fluorescein angiography and no vitreous traction on examination or on optic coherence tomography (OCT). These patients were followed up and visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and the findings of serial fundus and OCT examinations were noted. Five patients had schisis with or without detachment of the macula with pronounced optic nerve head cupping. One patient had resolution of the macular fluid after filtering surgery for uncontrolled glaucoma. Two patients underwent a vitrectomy with intraocular gas and had almost total resolution of macular fluid and improved vision. Macular schisis and detachment can occur in patients with presumed enlarged optic nerve head cups in the absence of obvious congenital anomalies of the disk. The authors believe the cause is leakage of fluid from the vitreous through a tiny hole in the thin tissue of the cup. This is a similar mechanism to that seen in patients with optic pits. A vitrectomy or steps to reduce the intraocular pressure may result in resolution of the fluid and improved vision.

  18. Effect of topical betaxolol on tissue circulation in the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Y; Araie, M; Tomita, K; Nagahara, M

    1999-08-01

    There have been no reports to date on long-term betaxolol instillation effects on the human optic nerve head (ONH) tissue circulation. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of topical 0.5% betaxolol on tissue blood velocity in the human ONH. Using a laser-speckle tissue blood flow analyzer, normalized blur (NB; a quantitative index of tissue blood velocity) was measured every 0.125 seconds at a temporal ONH site free of visible surface vessels. Measurements were averaged for 3 cardiac cycles (NB(ONH)). For baseline comparison (day 0), recordings of bilateral NB(ONH) and intraocular pressure (IOP), blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were recorded in healthy volunteers before, and 2, 4.5, and 7 hr after, instillation of 30 microL of betaxolol vehicle, and again on day 21; IOP was also recorded on days 7 and 14. On day 1 (the day after baseline measurements), and twice daily for 3 weeks, 30 microL of 0.5% betaxolol into one eye and 30 microL vehicle was instilled into the other in a double-blind study. Measurements as on day 0 were again recorded on day 21; IOP was also recorded on days 7 and 14. During baseline recordings, no significant changes were noted in any parameters. After administration of topical betaxolol, IOP was significantly reduced, bilaterally, with greater reduction in the betaxolol-treated eyes on day 21. Also on day 21, the NB(ONH) of the betaxolol-treated eyes was significantly higher 4.5 hr after instillation than that of the comparable baseline recording (p = 0.035 with Bonferroni's correction); BP, PR, and NB(ONH) in the eye which received only the vehicle showed little change. Tissue blood velocity in the human ONH was increased at least temporarily by instillation of topical betaxolol twice daily for 3 weeks. Although the obtained increase is small and may be clinically insignificant, the potential of betaxolol that can affect the ONH tissue circulation in humans after 21 days of instillation is thought to deserve further

  19. Relationship between Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Hemoglobin Present in the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To observe the relationship between topographic hemoglobin levels in the optic nerve head (ONH), the rim thickness (BMO-MRW), and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods 96 normal eyes and 82 glaucomas were examined using TOP strategy (Octopus 300 perimeter), SPECTRALIS OCT, and Laguna ONhE program which estimates hemoglobin from conventional color photographs (Horus Scope DEC 200 fundus camera). Results The correlation between Laguna ONhE glaucoma discriminant function (GDF) and SPECTRALIS BMO-MRW was R = 0.81 (P < 0.0001), similar to that between the BMO-MRW and BMO-RNFL thicknesses (R = 0.85, P < 0.0001) (P = 0.227 between both R values). GDF correlated well with RNFL thicknesses in the 360 degrees around the nerve, similar to mean perimetric sensitivity (MS) and BMO-MRW. The amount of hemoglobin in the nasal and temporal sectors showed low correlation with superior and inferior RNFL thicknesses. The superotemporal and inferotemporal sectors located on the vertical diameter of the disk showed good intercorrelation but without a clear RNFL topographic relationship. Conclusion GDF showed high correlation with RNFL thickness. Except in the nasal and temporal sectors, ONH hemoglobin correlated well with RNFL thickness. PMID:28660077

  20. The course of axons through the retina and optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1979-06-01

    By identifying degenerating axons in tissue specimens from 22 primate eyes, it was possible to demonstrate the normal course of axon fibers. Nerve fiber bundles from a group of retinal ganglion cells travel together with little tendency to disperse laterally. In addition, axons are stratified such that processes from more central ganglion cells are successfully added to the inner strata of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Within and behind the lamina cribrosa, areas of degeneration following retinal photocoagulation were well circumscribed and confined to a group of adjacent axon bundles. This degree of retinotopic organization of axons within the nerve head and retinal fiber layer is believed to be consistent with the premise that isolated lesions within the lamina cribrosa could cause well-organized paracentral scotomas such as those characteristic of early glaucoma.

  1. Isolation of intact astrocytes from the optic nerve head of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2015-08-01

    The astrocytes of the optic nerve head are a specialized subtype of white matter astrocytes that form the direct cellular environment of the unmyelinated ganglion cell axons. Due to their potential involvement in glaucoma, these astrocytes have become a target of research. Due to the heterogeneity of the optic nerve tissue, which also contains other cell types, in some cases it may be desirable to conduct gene expression studies on small numbers of well-characterized astrocytes or even individual cells. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate individual astrocytes. This method permits obtaining astrocytes with intact morphology from the adult mouse optic nerve and reduces contamination of the isolated astrocytes by other cell types. Individual astrocytes can be recognized by their morphology and collected under microscopic control. The whole procedure can be completed in 2-3 h. We also discuss downstream applications like multiplex single-cell PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR).

  2. Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Following Minor Head Trauma; a Case report

    PubMed Central

    GoliKhatir, Iraj; Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Motamed Motlagh, Hasan; Heidari, Seyed Farshad

    2017-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. This report describes a 61 years old female with an abrasion on the left forehead and ptosis of the left eye. Initial computed tomography did not reveal any causative cerebral and vascular lesions or orbital and cranial fractures. High-resolution and multi-axial enhanced Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be helpful in diagnosis and monitoring of patients with this rare phenomenon. PMID:28286849

  3. Optical nerve identification in head and neck surgery after Er:YAG laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Bergauer, Bastian; Rohde, Maximilian; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Facial nerve function may be hampered by iatrogenic damage during head and neck laser surgery procedures. Optical techniques can serve as a basis for feedback-controlled tissue-specific laser surgery on the jaw bone and the parotid gland. In order to preserve nerve tissue during laser surgery, the alteration of optical tissue properties through laser-tissue interactions have to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the viability of optical tissue differentiation through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy after exposure to laser light as a basis for a feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery. Spectra of diffuse reflectance (wavelength, 350-650 nm) of nerves, salivary glands, and cortical and cancellous bone of the midfacial region (ex vivo domestic pig heads) were acquired before/after Er:YAG laser (wavelength, 2.94 μm) ablation (each 16,800 spectra). Principal component analysis was computed followed by quadratic discriminant analysis. The tissue classification performance as well as area under the curve (AUC) sensitivity and specificity for tissue differentiation was assessed before and after laser-tissue exposure. A high classification performance was observed before laser ablation (total error, 7.74%). Nerve tissue was differentiated from bone and salivary glands with results greater than 0.96 in AUC, sensitivity and specificity. After laser exposure, a total classification error of 18.61% was observed. The differentiation of nerve tissue was reduced with an AUC of >0.94, sensitivity of >0.95, and specificity >0.87. Er:YAG laser ablation only slightly reduces the differentiation performance through diffuse reflectance in the investigated tissue types. The results show the general viability of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in identifying neural structures in the vicinity of salivary glands and bone as a basis for nerve preservation during feedback-controlled laser surgery.

  4. Effect of head tilt on repeatability of optic nerve head parameters using cirrus spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lilian Hui Li; Ismail, Muhammad Amir; Yap, Sae Cheong; Wong, Elizabeth Poh Ying; Yip, Leonard Wei Leon

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the repeatability of measuring optic nerve head (ONH) parameters using the Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT), as well as to assess the effect of head tilt on these measurements. METHODS Thirty healthy participants with no evidence of glaucoma were recruited for the study. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, standard automated perimetry and ocular examination were performed for each participant. One eye was then randomly selected and scanned undilated with the Cirrus OCT in 3 positions (neutral, 30° right tilt and 30° left tilt). RESULTS Data collected from 29 eyes were used for analysis. One patient was omitted due to poor scan quality. The repeatability of the ONH parameters was analyzed using analysis of variance, coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference between 3 scans in a single position. There was good agreement between measurements (ICC 0.919-0.996, COV 1.94%-5.48%). Even with the presence of head tilt, repeated scans in the 3 positions showed good agreement as well (ICC 0.888-0.996, COV 2.04%-5.39%). CONCLUSION Serial measurements of ONH parameters using the Cirrus OCT are found to have good repeatability. The ONH parameters with Cirrus OCT also maintain good repeatability despite head tilt. PMID:27585788

  5. Nerves are more abundant than blood vessels in the degenerate human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Antony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-12-21

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is the most common cause of disability worldwide. New ideas surrounding LBP are emerging that are based on interactions between mechanical, biological and chemical influences on the human IVD. The degenerate IVD is proposed to be innervated by sensory nerve fibres and vascularised by blood vessels, and it is speculated to contribute to pain sensation. However, the incidence of nerve and blood vessel ingrowth, as well as whether these features are always associated, is unknown. We investigated the presence of nerves and blood vessels in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD in a large population of human discs. Immunohistochemistry was performed with 61 human IVD samples, to identify and localise nerves (neurofilament 200 [NF200]/protein gene product 9.5) and blood vessels (CD31) within different regions of the IVD. Immunopositivity for NF200 was identified within all regions of the IVD within post-mortem tissues. Nerves were seen to protrude across lamellar ridges and through matrix towards NP cells. Nerves were identified deep within the NP and were in many cases, but not always, seen in close proximity to fissures or in areas where decreased matrix was seen. Fifteen percent of samples were degenerate and negative for nerves and blood vessels, whilst 16 % of all samples were degenerate with nerves and blood vessels. We identified 52% of samples that were degenerate with nerves but no blood vessels. Interestingly, only 4% of all samples were degenerate with no nerves but positive for blood vessels. Of the 85 samples investigated, only 6 % of samples were non-degenerate without nerves and blood vessels and 7% had nerves but no blood vessels. This study addresses the controversial topic of nerve and blood vessel ingrowth into the IVD in a large number of human samples. Our findings demonstrate that nerves are present within a large proportion of NP samples from degenerate IVDs. This study shows a possible link between nerve ingrowth and

  6. The morphology and spatial arrangement of astrocytes in the optic nerve head of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Lye-Barthel, Ming; Masland, Richard H; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the shapes, numbers, and spatial distribution of astrocytes within the glial lamina, an astrocyte-rich region at the junction of the retina and optic nerve. A primary aim was to determine how the population of astrocytes, collectively, partitions the axonal space in this region. Astrocyte processes labeled with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) compartmentalize ganglion cell axons into bundles, forming "glial tubes," and giving the glial architecture of the optic nerve head in transverse section a honeycomb appearance. The shapes of individual astrocytes were studied by using transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein in isolated astrocytes (hGFAPpr-EGFP). Within the glial lamina the astrocytes were transverse in orientation, with thick, smooth primary processes emanating from a cytoplasmic expansion of the soma. Spaces between the processes of neighboring astrocytes were spatially aligned, to form the apertures through which the bundles of optic axons pass. The processes of individual astrocytes were far-reaching-they could span most of the width of the nerve-and overlapped the anatomical domains of other near and distant astrocytes. Thus, astrocytes in the glial lamina do not tile: each astrocyte participates in ensheathing approximately one-quarter of all of the axon bundles in the nerve, and each glial tube contains the processes of about nine astrocytes. This raises the mechanistic question of how, in glaucoma or other cases of nerve damage, the glial response can be confined to a circumscribed region where damage to axons has occurred.

  7. Digital versus film stereo-photography for assessment of the optic nerve head in glaucoma and glaucoma suspect patients.

    PubMed

    Hasanreisoglu, Murat; Priel, Ethan; Naveh, Lili; Lusky, Moshe; Weinberger, Dov; Benjamini, Yoav; Gaton, Dan D

    2013-03-01

    One of the leading methods for optic nerve head assessment in glaucoma remains stereoscopic photography. This study compared conventional film and digital stereoscopy in the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the optic nerve head in glaucoma and glaucoma suspect patients. Fifty patients with glaucoma or suspected glaucoma underwent stereoscopic photography of the optic nerve head with a 35-mm color slide film and a digital camera. Photographs/images were presented in random order to 3 glaucoma specialists for independent analysis using a standardized assessment form. Findings for the following parameters were compared among assessors and between techniques: cup/disc (C/D) ratio, state of the optic rim, presence of peripapillary atrophy and appearance of the retinal nerve fiber layer, blood vessels, and lamina cribrosa. The film-based and image-based diagnoses (glaucoma yes/no) were compared as well. Despite high level of agreement across graders using the same method for the horizontal and vertical C/D ratio, (intraclass correlations 0.80 to 0.83), the agreement across graders was much lower for the other parameters using the same method. Similarly the agreement between the findings of the same grader using either method was high for horizontal and vertical C/D ratio, but low for the other parameters. The latter differences were reflected in the disagreement regarding the final diagnosis: The diagnoses differed by technique for each grader in 18% to 46% of eyes, resulting in 38.5% of eyes diagnosed with glaucoma by film photography that "lost" their diagnosis on the digital images, whereas 18.7% of eyes diagnosed as nonglaucomatous by film photography were considered to have glaucoma on the digital images. Although there is consistency between 35-mm film stereoscopy and digital stereoscopy in determining the cup/disc (C/D) ratio, in all other parameters large differences exist, leading to differences in diagnosis. Differences in capturing images between

  8. Effect of the consumption of ethanol on the microcirculation of the human optic nerve head in the acute phase

    PubMed

    Kojima; Sugiyama; Kojima; Azuma; Ito

    2000-05-01

    Purpose: The effect of the consumption of ethanol on the circulation of the optic nerve head (ONH) in the human eye in the acute phase and its mechanism were studied.Methods: Eleven volunteers drank a bottle of beer (633 mL) with or without ethanol (29.5 g). Normalized blur (NB), a quantitative index of blood flow velocity, was measured in the temporal site of the ONH. NB, blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured before, immediately after, and every 15 minutes for 90 minutes after consumption. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and plasma ethanol concentration were measured before, and 30 and 90 minutes after consumption. Genotyping of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 gene was also performed.Results: NB in the ONH increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption of ethanol and the maximum increase was 14% at 15 minutes. IOP was lowered at 90 minutes after consumption, but it was not significant. Mean BP was lowered significantly after 60 minutes. PR and ocular perfusion pressure did not change. A significant correlation was found between plasma ethanol concentration at 30 minutes and maximum NB. NB in the ALDH 2-deficient group was significantly larger from 15 to 45 minutes after consumption than in the proficient group.Conclusions: It appeared that the consumption of ethanol can increase the blood flow in the human ONH in the acute phase through decreased resistance in blood vessels induced by acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol.

  9. Integrated Model of the Eye/Optic Nerve Head Biomechanical Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2017-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Previously, it has been suggested that ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to the cephalad fluid shift that results in altered fluid pressures [1]. We are investigating the impact of changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) using a combination of numerical models, which simulate the effects of various environment conditions, including finite element (FE) models of the posterior eye. The specific interest is to understand how altered pressures due to gravitational changes affect the biomechanical environment of tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. METHODS: Additional description of the numerical modeling is provided in the IWS abstract by Nelson et al. In brief, to simulate the effects of a cephalad fluid shift on the cardiovascular and ocular systems, we utilized a lumped-parameter compartment model of these systems. The outputs of this lumped-parameter model then inform boundary conditions (pressures) for a finite element model of the optic nerve head (Figure 1). As an example, we show here a simulation of postural change from supine to 15 degree head-down tilt (HDT), with primary outcomes being the predicted change in strains at the optic nerve head (ONH) region, specifically in the lamina cribrosa (LC), retrolaminar optic nerve, and prelaminar neural tissue (PLNT). The strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as the first, second and third principal strains. We compare the peak tensile (first principal) and compressive (third principal) strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induces tissue remodeling. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our lumped-parameter model predicted an IOP increase of c. 7 mmHg after 21 minutes of 15 degree HDT, which agreed with previous reports of IOP in HDT [1]. The corresponding FEM simulations predicted a relative increase in the magnitudes of the peak tensile

  10. Volumetric Measurement of Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tsikata, Edem; Vercellin Verticchio, Alice C; Falkenstein, Iryna; Poon, Linda Yi-Chieh; Brauner, Stacey; Khoueir, Ziad; Miller, John B; Chen, Teresa C

    2017-09-01

    To describe new software tools for quantifying optic nerve head drusen volume using 3-dimensional (3D) swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) volumetric scans. SS-OCT was used to acquire raster volume scans of 8 eyes of 4 patients with bilateral optic nerve head drusen. The scans were manually segmented by 3 graders to identify the drusen borders, and thereafter total drusen volumes were calculated. Linear regression was performed to study the relationships between drusen volume, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and Humphrey visual field mean deviation. In the 8 study eyes, drusen volumes ranged between 0.24 to 1.05 mm. Visual field mean deviation decreased by ∼20 dB per cubic millimeter increase in drusen volume, and the coefficient of correlation of the linear regression was 0.92. In this small patient series, visual field defects were detected when drusen volume was larger than about 0.2 mm. Software tools have been developed to quantify the size of OHND using SS-OCT volume scans.

  11. Ligament, nerve, and blood vessel anatomy of the lateral zone of the lumbar intervertebral foramina.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Guo; Wen, You-Liang; Zhang, Pei; Li, Yi-Kai

    2015-11-01

    To provide an anatomical basis for intrusive treatment using an approach through the lateral zones of the lumbar intervertebral foramina (LIF), especially for acupotomology lysis, percutaneous transforaminal endoscopy, and lumbar nerve root block. Blood vessels, ligaments, nerves, and adjacent structures of ten cadavers were exposed through the L1-2 to L5-S1 intervertebral foramina and examined. The lateral zones of the LIF were almost filled by ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels, which were separated into compartments by superior/inferior transforaminal ligaments and corporotransverse superior/inferior ligaments. Two zones relatively lacking in blood vessels and nerves (triangular working zones) were found beside the lamina of the vertebral arch and on the root of the transverse processus. Both the ascending lumbar vein and branches of the intervetebral vein were observed in 12 Kambin's triangles, and in only seven Kambin's triangles were without any veins. Nerves and blood vessels are fixed and protected by transforaminal ligaments and/or corporotransverse ligaments. It is necessary to distinguish the ligaments from nerves using transforaminal endoscopy so that the ligaments can be cut without damaging nerves. Care needs to be taken in intrusive operations because of the veins running through Kambin's triangle. We recommend injecting into the lamina of the vertebral arch and the midpoint between the adjacent roots of the transverse processus when administering nerve root block. Blind percutaneous incision and acupotomology lysis is dangerous in the lateral zones of the LIF, as they are filled with nerves and blood vessels.

  12. Transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps to recover elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Teboul, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Restoration of elbow flexion is the first goal in brachial plexus injuries. The current procedures using nerve grafts and nerve transfers authorize more extensive repairs, with different possible targets: shoulder, elbow extension, and hand. Elbow extension is important to stabilize the elbow without the contralateral hand and allows achieving a useful grasp. The transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps may restore this function in brachial plexus palsies. Furthermore, in case of C5 to C7 palsy, this transfer spares the radial nerve and gives a chance to spontaneous triceps recovery by the reinnervation from C8 root. Moreover, in case of absence or insufficient (M0 to M2 according to Medical Research Council scoring) recovery of elbow flexion strength by nerve surgery, the reinnervated triceps can be transferred. We present the technique of intercostal nerve transfer to the long head of the triceps branch to restore elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy. Results concerning 10 patients are presented.

  13. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; GLANZMANN, CHRISTOPH; YOUSEFI, BITA; LOEWENICH, KARL; HUBER, GERHARD; SCHMID, STEPHAN; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves of interest. So far, one of the assessed 151 IMRT patients at risk exhibited symptoms of RICNP after 6 years. The mean/median FU of the entire cohort was 71/68 months (range, 27–145). The results were compared with literature reports. In conclusion, RICNP appears to be a rare complication. However, a longer FU and a larger sample size are required to draw reliable conclusions on the incidence of RICNP in the era of IMRT. PMID:26171186

  14. Tele-transmission of stereoscopic images of the optic nerve head in glaucoma via Internet.

    PubMed

    Bergua, Antonio; Mardin, Christian Y; Horn, Folkert K

    2009-06-01

    The objective was to describe an inexpensive system to visualize stereoscopic photographs of the optic nerve head on computer displays and to transmit such images via the Internet for collaborative research or remote clinical diagnosis in glaucoma. Stereoscopic images of glaucoma patients were digitized and stored in a file format (joint photographic stereoimage [jps]) containing all three-dimensional information for both eyes on an Internet Web site (www.trizax.com). The size of jps files was between 0.4 to 1.4 MB (corresponding to a diagonal stereo image size between 900 and 1400 pixels) suitable for Internet protocols. A conventional personal computer system equipped with wireless stereoscopic LCD shutter glasses and a CRT-monitor with high refresh rate (120 Hz) can be used to obtain flicker-free stereo visualization of true-color images with high resolution. Modern thin-film transistor-LCD displays in combination with inexpensive red-cyan goggles achieve stereoscopic visualization with the same resolution but reduced color quality and contrast. The primary aim of our study was met to transmit stereoscopic images via the Internet. Additionally, we found that with both stereoscopic visualization techniques, cup depth, neuroretinal rim shape, and slope of the inner wall of the optic nerve head, can be qualitatively better perceived and interpreted than with monoscopic images. This study demonstrates high-quality and low-cost Internet transmission of stereoscopic images of the optic nerve head from glaucoma patients. The technique allows exchange of stereoscopic images and can be applied to tele-diagnostic and glaucoma research.

  15. Effects of Head-down Tilt on Nerve Conduction in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Zhao-Hui; Dai, Zhong-Quan; Huang, Xu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few studies have focused on peripheral nerve conduction during exposure to microgravity. The −6° head-down tilt (HDT) comprises an experimental model used to simulate the space flight environment. This study investigated nerve conduction characteristics of rhesus monkeys before and after prolonged exposure to HDT. Methods: Six rhesus monkeys (3–4 years old) were tilted backward 6° from the horizontal. Nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were performed on the median, ulnar, tibial, and fibular motor nerves. Analysis of variance with a randomized block design was conducted to compare the differences in the NCS before and 7, 21, and 42 days after the −6° HDT. Results: The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 21 and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (4.38 ± 2.83 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 4.85, P = 0.013 and 3.30 ± 2.70 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 5.93, P = 0.004, respectively). The distal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 7, 21, and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (7.28 ± 1.27 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 4.03, P = 0.039; 5.05 ± 2.01 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 6.25, P = 0.04; and 3.95 ± 2.79 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 7.35, P = 0.01; respectively). The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the tibial nerve was significantly decreased at 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (6.14 ± 1.94 vs. 11.87 ± 3.19 mV, F = 5.02, P = 0.039). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the compound muscle action potential amplitudes of nerves are decreased under simulated microgravity in rhesus monkeys. Moreover, rhesus monkeys exposed to HDT might be served as an experimental model for the study of NCS under microgravity. PMID:28139516

  16. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kihara, Mikihiro; Schmelzer, J.D.; Poduslo, J.F.; Curran, G.L.; Nickander, K.K.; Low, P.A. )

    1991-07-15

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, the authors examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG, group II received STZ plus AG, group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. They monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. They suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  17. Detection of Glaucoma Progression with Stratus OCT Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer, Optic Nerve Head, and Macular Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Alencar, Luciana M.; Bowd, Christopher; Sample, Pamela A.; Susanna, Remo; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), optic nerve head, and macular thickness parameters to detect progressive structural damage in glaucoma. Methods This observational cohort study included 253 eyes of 253 patients. Images were obtained annually with the Stratus OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA) along with optic disc stereophotographs and standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields. The median follow-up time was 4.01 years. Progression was determined by the Guided Progression Analysis software for SAP (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.) and by masked assessment of optic disc stereophotographs performed by expert graders. Random coefficient models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the relationship between change in Stratus OCT parameters over time and progression as determined by SAP and/or stereophotographs. Results From the 253 eyes, 31 (13%) showed progression over time by stereophotographs and/or SAP. Mean rates of change in average RNFL thickness were significantly higher for progressors compared with nonprogressors (−0.72 μm/y vs. 0.14 μm/y; P = 0.004), with sensitivity of 77% for specificity of 80%. RNFL parameters performed significantly better than ONH and macular thickness measurements in discriminating progressors from nonprogressors. The parameters with the largest ROC curve areas for each scanning area were inferior RNFL thickness (0.84), cup area (0.66), and inferior inner macula thickness (0.64). Conclusions Stratus OCT RNFL parameters discriminated between eyes progressing by visual fields or optic disc photographs and eyes that remained stable by these methods and performed significantly better than ONH and macular thickness parameters in detecting change over time. PMID:19815731

  18. Detection of blood-nerve barrier permeability by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wessig, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) separates the endoneurium from the endovascular space and the epineurial connective tissue. An intact BNB is very important for integrity and functions of the nerve fibers within the endoneurial space. Disruption of the BNB which leads to functional and structural impairment of the peripheral nerve plays an important role in many disorders of the peripheral nerve like Wallerian degeneration, inflammatory nerve disorders, and demyelination. So far, this increased BNB permeability can only be assessed ex vivo. Assessing BNB disruption in vivo would be of great value for studying disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Gadofluorine M (Gf), a new amphiphilic contrast agent for MRI, accumulates in rat nerves with increased permeability of the BNB. After application of Gf, T1-weighted MR images show contrast enhancement of nerves with a disrupted BNB. This new tool of assessing BNB permeability in vivo is described.

  19. Telemedical assessment of optic nerve head and retina in patients after recent minor stroke or TIA.

    PubMed

    Wolz, Johannes; Audebert, Heinrich; Laumeier, Inga; Ahmadi, Michael; Steinicke, Maureen; Ferse, Caroline; Michelson, Georg

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to telemedically assess the prevalence of simple optic nerve atrophy and retinal arteriolar anomalies in subjects who have had a minor stroke or TIA within 14 days, and to compare these results with an age-matched control group. By using a mobile examination unit, retinal photographs were taken with a 45° non-mydriatic colour fundus camera (KOWA NM-45, non-mydriatic-alpha) in patients who had suffered from a minor stroke or TIA within 14 days of the time of the examination. Retinal photographs were focused on the optic nerve head region. Pupils were not dilated. The documented medical history and the retinal images were stored on a server using browser independent web-based software running on PCs, tablets and smartphones. After completing the upload of the medical interview and the retinal images into the electronic patient chart, all retinal images were evaluated via telemedicine by an experienced senior consultant ophthalmologist. Age-matched normotensive, non-diabetic subjects (aged 40-89 years) who reported no systemic or ocular diseases were used as the control group. Both study groups were divided into five decades of life (40-49; 50-59; 60-69; 70-79; 80-89 years). We calculated the prevalences and the ratios of prevalences of optic nerve atrophy and retinal arteriolar anomalies between the stroke and the control group per decades of life. 139 minor stroke or TIA subjects (aged 40-89 years) and 1611 age-matched control subjects were examined. In the stroke group, we found significantly increased prevalences of optic nerve atrophy and retinal arteriolar anomalies throughout the 5th-8th decade of life when compared to age-matched controls. The prevalence of optic nerve atrophy in stroke subjects outranged the prevalence in the controls depending on age-class by a factor of 3-21. Simple optic nerve atrophy is frequent in patients who have suffered from an ischemic stroke or TIA, and it seems to indicate vascular damage, indicating

  20. Elevated hydrostatic pressure activates sodium/hydrogen exchanger-1 in rat optic nerve head astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amritlal; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A; Terán, Marcos A

    2009-07-01

    Optic nerve head astrocytes become abnormal in eyes that have elevated intraocular pressure, and cultured astrocytes display altered protein expression after being subjected for > or = 1 days to elevated hydrostatic pressure. Here we show that 2-h elevated hydrostatic pressure (15 or 30 mmHg) causes phosphorylation of ERK1/2, ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p90(RSK)), and Na/H exchanger (NHE)1 in cultured rat optic nerve head astrocytes as judged by Western blot analysis. The MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 abolished phosphorylation of NHE1 and p90(RSK) as well as ERK1/2. To examine NHE1 activity, cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) was measured with BCECF and, in some experiments, cells were acidified by 5-min exposure to 20 mM ammonium chloride. Although baseline pH(i) was unaltered, the rate of pH(i) recovery from acidification was fourfold higher in pressure-treated astrocytes. In the presence of either U0126 or dimethylamiloride (DMA), an NHE inhibitor, hydrostatic pressure did not change the rate of pH(i) recovery. The findings are consistent with NHE1 activation due to phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p90(RSK), and NHE1 that occurs in response to hydrostatic pressure. These responses may precede long-term changes of protein expression known to occur in pressure-stressed astrocytes.

  1. Sigma 1 receptor regulates ERK activation and promotes survival of optic nerve head astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Mysona, Barbara A.; Wang, Jing; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Bollinger, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    The sigma 1 receptor (S1R) is a unique transmembrane protein that has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cellular survival. It is expressed within several cell types throughout the nervous system and visceral organs, including neurons and glia within the eye. S1R ligands are therapeutic targets for diseases ranging from neurodegenerative conditions to neoplastic disorders. However, effects of S1R activation and inhibition within glia cells are not well characterized. Within the eye, the astrocytes at the optic nerve head are crucial to the health and survival of the neurons that send visual information to the brain. In this study, we used the S1R-specific agonist, (+)-pentazocine, to evaluate S1R activation within optic nerve head-derived astrocytes (ONHAs). Treatment of ONHAs with (+)-pentazocine attenuated the level and duration of stress-induced ERK phosphorylation following oxidative stress exposure and promoted survival of ONHAs. These effects were specific to S1R activation because they were not observed in ONHAs that were depleted of S1R using siRNA-mediated knockdown. Collectively, our results suggest that S1R activation suppresses ERK1/2 phosphorylation and protects ONHAs from oxidative stress-induced death. PMID:28898265

  2. Differentiating Mild Papilledema and Buried Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Kaushal M.; Pasol, Joshua; Rosa, Potyra R.; Lam, Byron L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in differentiating mild papilledema from buried optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Design Comparative case series. Participants 16 eyes of 9 patients with ultrasound-proven buried ONHD, 12 eyes of 6 patients with less than or equal to Frisén grade 2 papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2 normal fellow eyes of patients with buried ONHD were included. Methods A raster scan on the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness analysis was performed on each eye using SD-OCT. Eight eyes underwent enhanced depth imaging SD-OCT. Images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively to identify differentiating features between buried ONHD and papilledema. Five clinicians trained with a tutorial and masked to the underlying diagnosis reviewed the SD-OCT images of each eye independently to determine the diagnosis. Main outcome measures Differences in RNFL thickness in each quadrant between the two groups, and diagnostic accuracy of five independent clinicians based on the SD-OCT images alone. Results We found no statistically significant difference in RNFL thickness between buried ONHD and papilledema in any of the four quadrants. Diagnostic accuracy among the readers was low and ranged from 50–64%. The kappa coefficient of agreement among the readers was 0.35 (95% Confidence interval: 0.19, 0.54). Conclusions SD-OCT is not clinically reliable in differentiating buried ONHD and mild papilledema. PMID:24321144

  3. Variability between experts in defining the edge and area of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Alayon, S; Gonzalez de la Rosa, M; Fumero, F J; Sigut Saavedra, J F; Sanchez, J L

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of the error rate in the subjective determination of the optic nerve head edge and area. 1) 169 images of optic nerve disc were evaluated by five experts for the defining of the edges in 8 positions (every 45°). 2) The estimated areas of 26 cases were compared with the measurements of the Cirrus Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT-Cirrus). 1) The mean variation of the estimated radius was ±5.2%, with no significant differences between sectors. Specific differences were found between the 5 experts (P <.001), each one compared with the others. 2) The disc area measured by the OCT-Cirros was 1.78 mm² (SD =0.27). The results corresponding to the experts who detected smaller areas were better correlated to the area detected by the OCT-Cirrus (r=0.77-0.88) than the results corresponding to larger areas (r =0.61-0.69) (P <.05 in extreme cases). There are specific patterns in each expert for defining the disc edges and involve 20% variation in the estimation of the optic nerve area. The experts who detected smaller areas have a higher agreement with the objective method used. A web tool is proposed for self-assessment and training in this task. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. The acute effect of topical beta-adrenoreceptor blocking agents on retinal and optic nerve head circulation.

    PubMed

    Arend, O; Harris, A; Arend, S; Remky, A; Martin, B J

    1998-02-01

    Topical beta-blockers are the most common treatment for ocular hypertension in glaucoma, but their ocular hemodynamic effects are not well known. We investigated the acute effects of betaxolol (beta-1 selective antagonist), levobunolol (non-selective antagonist with active polar metabolite), and timolol (non-selective antagonist) on retinal and superficial optic nerve head circulation. Intraocular pressure (IOP), heart rate, blood pressure, and retinal circulation were evaluated in 12 healthy subjects (6F/6M; mean age=24+/-2 years) before and two hours after instillation of each drug on separate occasions at least two weeks apart. Macular capillary blood velocity (MCBV), epipapillary blood velocities (EBV), arteriovenous passage (AVP) times, and arterial and venous diameters were measured by digital image analysis of scanning laser fluorescein angiograms. All drugs significantly (p<0.05) reduced IOP. There was no significant effect on blood pressure or calculated ocular perfusion pressure. Only levobunolol significantly lowered heart rate (p<0.05). Each drug produced a significant (p<0.01) decrease in AVP time of approximately 25%. MCBV was significantly (p<0.01) increased by approximately 20% in all three conditions; each drug also produced significant (p<0.01) increases in EBV. Arterial and venous diameters remained unaffected. All three drugs, despite different beta-adrenergic properties, increased blood velocities in retinal and epipapillary capillaries. These changes, occurring as they do in concert with decreased retinal arteriovenous passage time at constant retinal arterial and venous diameter, may indicate improved retinal perfusion after drug treatment. Improved circulation, if it indeed occurs, in tandem with reduced IOP, might explain in part the beneficial effect of beta-adrenoreceptor blocking agents in glaucomatous patients.

  5. Premise and Prediction – How Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics Underlies the Susceptibility and Clinical Behavior of the Aged Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2009-01-01

    We propose that age-related alterations in optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanics underlie the clinical behavior and increased susceptibility of the aged ONH to glaucomatous damage. The literature which suggests that the aged ONH is more susceptible to glaucomatous damage at all levels of intraocular pressure is reviewed. The relevant biomechanics of the aged ONH are discussed and a biomechanical explanation for why, on average, the stiffened peripapillary scleral and lamina cribrosa connective tissues of the aged eye should lead to a shallow (senile sclerotic) form of cupping is proposed. A logic for why age-related axon loss and the optic neuropathy of glaucoma in the aged eye may overlap is discussed. Finally, we argue for a need to characterize all forms of clinical cupping into prelaminar and laminar components so as to add precision to the discussion of clinical cupping which does not currently exist. Such characterization may lead to the early detection of ONH axonal and connective tissue pathology in ocular hypertension and eventually aid in the assessment of etiology in all forms of optic neuropathy including those that may be purely age-related. PMID:18552618

  6. Subtilisin-like Proprotein Convertase Expression, Localization, and Activity in the Human Retina and Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, John A.; Brun-Zinkernagel, Anne-Marie; Clark, Abbot F.; Wordinger, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs) are a family of calcium-dependent cleavage enzymes that act on dibasic sites of various peptide/protein substrates. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression, localization, and activity of SPCs in the human retina and optic nerve head. Methods mRNA expression of the SPC family in the human retina and optic nerve head tissues was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR). Double immunofluorescence staining was performed on paraffin-embedded human posterior sections to localize SPC family members. Western blot analysis was used to identify PACE4 isoform expression within the optic nerve head and retina. In addition, a fluorogenic SPC substrate-based assay was used to elucidate SPC enzyme activity within human retina and optic nerve head (ONH) tissues. Results QPCR results indicated that PC1 and PC2 were expressed 4.1- and 5.7-fold higher in retina compared to optic nerve head, whereas PACE4 was expressed 4.1-fold higher in the ONH. PC1 and PC2 were localized primarily in neuronal cells, whereas PACE4 and PC5 were limited to the glia of the retina and optic nerve head. SPC activity in ONH lysate was significantly higher than that of retinal lysate; however, when an SPC inhibitor was added, activity in ONH decreased more than that in retina. Conclusions These results indicate that the SPCs are expressed in distinct patterns throughout the human retina and ONH. PC1 and PC2 were primarily expressed in neurons, whereas PACE4 appeared to be largely restricted to glia. Thus, elevated PACE4 may modulate the bioactivity of proteins secreted in the ONH and retina. PMID:19339735

  7. Similarities and dissimilarities of the blood supplies of the human sciatic, tibial, and common peroneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Ugrenovic, Sladjana Z; Jovanovic, Ivan D; Kovacevic, Predrag; Petrović, Sladjana; Simic, Tamara

    2013-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the arterial supply of the sciatic, tibial, and common peroneal nerves. Thirty-six lower limbs of 18 human fetuses were studied. The fetuses had been fixed in buffered formalin and the blood vessels injected with barium sulfate. Fetal age ranged from 12 to 28 weeks of gestation. Microdissection of the fetal lower extremities was done under ×5 magnifying lenses. The sciatic nerves of 10 lower extremities were dissected and excised and radiographs taken. The extraneural arterial chain of the sciatic nerve was composed of 2-6 arterial branches of the inferior gluteal artery, the medial circumflex femoral artery, the perforating arteries, and the popliteal artery. The extraneural arterial chain of tibial nerve was composed of 2-5 arteries, which were branches of the popliteal, the peroneal, and the posterior tibial arteries. Radiographs showed the presence of complete intraneural arterial chains in the sciatic and tibial nerves, formed from anastomosing vessels. Dissection showed that, in 97.2% of the specimens, the common peroneal nerve was supplied only by one popliteal artery branch, the presence of which was confirmed radiologically. The sciatic and tibial nerves are supplied by numerous arterial branches of different origins, which provide for collateral circulation. In contrast, the common peroneal nerve is most frequently supplied only by one elongated longitudinal blood vessel, a branch of the popliteal artery. Such a vascular arrangement may make the common peroneal nerve less resistant to stretching and compression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Pulse waveform analysis in the optic nerve head circulation reflects systemic vascular resistance obtained via a Swan-Ganz catheter.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Mao; Hashimoto, Ryuya; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Hori, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether a pulse waveform analysis in the optic nerve head (ONH) circulation as determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) can provide systemic hemodynamic values - the systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in particular - similar to those obtained by using a Swan-Ganz catheter, which is an invasive method. Sixteen consecutive subjects were examined. Hemodynamic monitoring was obtained from right heart catheterization with a Swan-Ganz catheter and coronary angiography without an intracoronary nitroglycerin administration. Direct blood pressure was measured with a trans-radial approach. Single regression analyses were used to determine the relationship between the blowout score and blowout time, which are the items of the pulse waveform analysis in the ONH, by using LSFG and the hemodynamic parameters. The blowout time was significantly and negatively correlated with the SVR (r = -0.52, p = 0.04), the ocular perfusion pressure with the mean arterial blood pressure of the radial artery (r = -0.52, p = 0.04) and the radial artery pulse pressure (r = -0.52, p = 0.04).The pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (r  = -0.44, p = 0.09) and the mean arterial blood pressure of the radial artery (r  = -0.44, p = 0.09) tended to be correlated with the blowout time, but did not reach significance. The blowout score was significantly and negatively correlated with the radial artery blood pressure (r = -0.51, p = 0.046). A pulse waveform analysis in the ONH by LSFG may be one of the useful methods for understanding the SVR.

  9. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression. PMID:28286771

  10. Evaluation of Multiple Blood Matrices for Assessment of Human Exposure to Nerve Agents.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Nicholas D; Hamelin, Elizabeth I; Winkeljohn, W Rucks; Shaner, Rebecca L; Basden, Brian J; deCastro, B Rey; Pantazides, Brooke G; Thomas, Jerry D; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2016-04-01

    Biomedical samples may be used to determine human exposure to nerve agents through the analysis of specific biomarkers. Samples received may include serum, plasma, whole blood, lysed blood and, due to the toxicity of these compounds, postmortem blood. To quantitate metabolites resulting from exposure to sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), VX and VR, these blood matrices were evaluated individually for precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Accuracies for these metabolites ranged from 100 to 113% with coefficients of variation ranging from 2.31 to 13.5% across a reportable range of 1-100 ng/mL meeting FDA recommended guidelines for bioanalytical methods in all five matrices. Limits of detection were calculated to be 0.09-0.043 ng/mL, and no interferences were detected in unexposed matrix samples. The use of serum calibrators was also determined to be a suitable alternative to matrix-matched calibrators. Finally, to provide a comparative value between whole blood and plasma, the ratio of the five nerve agent metabolites measured in whole blood versus plasma was determined. Analysis of individual whole blood samples (n = 40), fortified with nerve agent metabolites across the reportable range, resulted in average nerve agent metabolite blood to plasma ratios ranging from 0.53 to 0.56. This study demonstrates the accurate and precise quantitation of nerve agent metabolites in serum, plasma, whole blood, lysed blood and postmortem blood. It also provides a comparative value between whole blood and plasma samples, which can assist epidemiologists and physicians with interpretation of test results from blood specimens obtained under variable conditions.

  11. Evaluation of Multiple Blood Matrices for Assessment of Human Exposure to Nerve Agents

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Nicholas D.; Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Winkeljohn, W. Rucks; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Basden, Brian J.; deCastro, B. Rey; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical samples may be used to determine human exposure to nerve agents through the analysis of specific biomarkers. Samples received may include serum, plasma, whole blood, lysed blood and, due to the toxicity of these compounds, postmortem blood. To quantitate metabolites resulting from exposure to sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), VX and VR, these blood matrices were evaluated individually for precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Accuracies for these metabolites ranged from 100 to 113% with coefficients of variation ranging from 2.31 to 13.5% across a reportable range of 1–100 ng/mL meeting FDA recommended guidelines for bioanalytical methods in all five matrices. Limits of detection were calculated to be 0.09–0.043 ng/mL, and no interferences were detected in unexposed matrix samples. The use of serum calibrators was also determined to be a suitable alternative to matrix-matched calibrators. Finally, to provide a comparative value between whole blood and plasma, the ratio of the five nerve agent metabolites measured in whole blood versus plasma was determined. Analysis of individual whole blood samples (n = 40), fortified with nerve agent metabolites across the reportable range, resulted in average nerve agent metabolite blood to plasma ratios ranging from 0.53 to 0.56. This study demonstrates the accurate and precise quantitation of nerve agent metabolites in serum, plasma, whole blood, lysed blood and postmortem blood. It also provides a comparative value between whole blood and plasma samples, which can assist epidemiologists and physicians with interpretation of test results from blood specimens obtained under variable conditions. PMID:26861671

  12. Automatic segmentation of the optic nerve head for deformation measurements in video rate optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Aguirre, Maribel; Gitelman, Julian; Lesk, Mark Richard; Costantino, Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become a standard diagnostic tool in ophthalmology, providing essential information associated with various eye diseases. In order to investigate the dynamics of the ocular fundus, we present a simple and accurate automated algorithm to segment the inner limiting membrane in video-rate optic nerve head spectral domain (SD) OCT images. The method is based on morphological operations including a two-step contrast enhancement technique, proving to be very robust when dealing with low signal-to-noise ratio images and pathological eyes. An analysis algorithm was also developed to measure neuroretinal tissue deformation from the segmented retinal profiles. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated, and deformation results are presented for healthy and glaucomatous eyes.

  13. Effects of cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation on regional coronary blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Haws, C.W.; Green, L.S.; Burgess, M.J.; Abildskov, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation on regional coronary blood flow following ..beta..-blockade. In 17 anesthetized dogs treated with propranolol (2 mg/kg iv) regional myocardial perfusion was measured (radio labelled microspheres) during control and during stimulation of the ventrolateral, ventromedial, or recurrent cardiac nerve. Ventrolateral nerve stimulation produced 25.5 +/- 3.4 and 23.5 +/- 3.1% (mean +/- SE) decreases in coronary blood flow in the posterior and lateral quadrants of the left ventricle. Ventromedial nerve stimulation produced 18.6 +/- 2.8, 15.4 +/- 2.8, and 10.1 +/- 3.2% decreases in flow in the anterior, septal, and lateral left ventricle, respectively. Recurrent cardiac nerve stimulation produced 16.4 +/- 2.1, 15.6 +/- 2.2, and 13.6 +/- 2.5% decreases in flow in the anterior and septal left ventricle and right ventricle, respectively. Ventrolateral nerve stimulation resulted in a small but significant increase in the endocardial-to-epicardial blood flow ratio in the posterolateral left ventricle. The authors conclude that the cardiac sympathetic nerves have selective regional effects on myocardial perfusion that could contribute to fine regulation of flow in the normal heart and could have beneficial or adverse effects in the setting of coronary stenosis or occlusion.

  14. The role of astrocytes in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Magdalena; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is defined as a progressive optic neuropathy and is characterized by an irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. The main risk factor to develop glaucoma is an increased intraocular pressure (IOP). During the course of glaucoma structural changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) take place which lead to the characteristic excavation or cupping of the ONH. In this review we will focus on mechanisms and processes involved in structural alterations of the extracellular matrix in the lamina cribrosa (LC) of the ONH, which are associated with astrocytes. In glaucoma, a disordered deposition of elastic and collagen fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the nerve fibers can be observed in the LC region. The remodeling process of the LC and the loss of ON axons are associated with a conversion of astrocytes from quiescent to a reactivated state. The extracellular matrix changes in the LC are thought to be due to a disturbed homeostatic balance of growth factors and the reactivated astrocytes are part of this process. Reactivated astrocytes, remodeling of the ECM within the LC and an elevated IOP are taking part in the retinal ganglion cell loss in glaucoma.

  15. Bilateral optic nerve head drusen with chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Leila; Ghanbari, Heshmatollah

    2016-01-01

    Chorioretinal coloboma is a congenital defect of the eye caused by improper closure of the embryonic fissure. Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are white calcareous deposits that are generally asymptomatic. We report a very rare association of both in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome. A 16-year-old man was referred to our clinic from suffering blurred vision. Best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 6/10 and 10/10 in the left one. External ocular and slit lamp examination were normal. Dilated ophthalmoscopy showed marked swelling in both optic nerves and chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye inferiorly. Ultrasonography showed an echodense structure with acoustic shadowing in both eyes consistent with buried ONHD. Visual field testing showed normal field in the left eye and moderate superior field depression in the right eye corresponding to inferior coloboma in funduscopy. Results of general medical and neurologic, cardiologic, and other examinations were normal. To the best our knowledge combination of bilateral ONHD and unilateral chorioretinal coloboma in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome has not been published in the literature. We reported this very rare association and recommended examine eyes and other body organs. In such cases that coloboma is associated with ONHD, we should keep in mind Noonan syndrome. The diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is clinical and confirm by the consultant pediatricians and clinical geneticists. PMID:27099847

  16. Bilateral optic nerve head drusen with chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Leila; Ghanbari, Heshmatollah

    2016-01-01

    Chorioretinal coloboma is a congenital defect of the eye caused by improper closure of the embryonic fissure. Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are white calcareous deposits that are generally asymptomatic. We report a very rare association of both in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome. A 16-year-old man was referred to our clinic from suffering blurred vision. Best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 6/10 and 10/10 in the left one. External ocular and slit lamp examination were normal. Dilated ophthalmoscopy showed marked swelling in both optic nerves and chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye inferiorly. Ultrasonography showed an echodense structure with acoustic shadowing in both eyes consistent with buried ONHD. Visual field testing showed normal field in the left eye and moderate superior field depression in the right eye corresponding to inferior coloboma in funduscopy. Results of general medical and neurologic, cardiologic, and other examinations were normal. To the best our knowledge combination of bilateral ONHD and unilateral chorioretinal coloboma in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome has not been published in the literature. We reported this very rare association and recommended examine eyes and other body organs. In such cases that coloboma is associated with ONHD, we should keep in mind Noonan syndrome. The diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is clinical and confirm by the consultant pediatricians and clinical geneticists.

  17. The Impact of Ocular Pressures, Material Properties and Geometry on Optic Nerve Head Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Myers, Jerry G.; Raykin, Julia; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier C. Ross

    2017-01-01

    Alteration in intracranial pressure (ICP) has been associated with various diseases that cause visual impairment, including glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. However, how changes in ICP lead to vision loss is unclear, although it is hypothesized to involve deformations of the tissues in the optic nerve head (ONH). Recently, understanding the effect of ICP alterations on ocular tissues has become a major concern for NASA, where 42 of astronauts that partake in long duration space missions suffer from VIIP syndrome. Astronauts with VIIP syndrome suffer from visual impairment and changes in ocular anatomy that persist after returning to earth (1). It is hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that occurs upon entering microgravity increases ICP, which leads to an altered biomechanical environment in the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath, and subsequently VIIP syndrome. Our goal was to develop a finite element (FE) model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye. Here, we simulated how inter-individual differences affect the deformation of ONH tissues. Further, we examined how several different geometries influenced deformations when exposed to elevated ICP.

  18. Assessment of Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Enhanced Depth Imaging and Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Anna L.; Tatham, Andrew J.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are calcific deposits buried or at the surface of the optic disc. Although ONHD may be associated with progressive visual field defects, the mechanism of drusen-related field loss is poorly understood. Methods for detecting and imaging disc drusen include B-scan ultrasonography, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These modalities are useful for drusen detection but are limited by low resolution or poor penetration of deep structures. This review was designed to assess the potential role of new OCT technologies in imaging ONHD. Evidence Acquisition Critical appraisal of published literature and comparison of new imaging devices to established technology. Results The new imaging modalities of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) and swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are able to provide unprecedented in vivo detail of ONHD. Using these devices it is now possible to quantify optic disc drusen dimensions and assess integrity of neighboring retinal structures, including the retinal nerve fiber layer. Conclusions EDI-OCT and SS-OCT have the potential to allow better detection of longitudinal changes in drusen and neural retina and improve our understanding of drusen-related visual field loss. PMID:24662838

  19. Estimating a structural bottle neck for eye-brain transfer of visual information from 3D-volumes of the optic nerve head from a commercial OCT device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla; Söderberg, Per G.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the possibility of using OCT optic nerve head 3D information captured with a Topcon OCT 2000 device for detection of the shortest distance between the inner limit of the retina and the central limit of the pigment epithelium around the circumference of the optic nerve head. The shortest distance between these boundaries reflects the nerve fiber layer thickness and measurement of this distance is interesting for follow-up of glaucoma.

  20. Reproducibility of topographic measurements of the normal and glaucomatous optic nerve head with the laser tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Dreher, A W; Tso, P C; Weinreb, R N

    1991-02-15

    We acquired five independent topographic images of the optic nerve head of eight normal eyes and eight eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma with a laser tomographic scanner. Each image had a field of view of 15 x 15 degrees with a resolution of 256 x 256 pixels. The pixel size was approximately 15 x 15 microns. The value of a pixel of a topographic image represented the height at this position. The mean height and the standard deviation over the five topographic images were calculated for each of the 65,536 pixel positions. The standard deviation of a single height measurement in normal eyes was 38.7 microns (range, 23.4 to 62.2 microns) for areas in the peripapillary retina and 42.6 microns (range, 24.4 to 53.7 microns) for measurements within the optic nerve head area. In glaucomatous eyes, the standard deviation was 41.2 microns (range, 23.2 to 59.6 microns) in the peripapillary retina and 49.4 microns (range, 28.1 to 72.8 microns) within the optic nerve head. There was no significant difference between the standard deviation of a single height measurement in normal and glaucomatous eyes (P = .34 within the optic nerve head area; P = .57 on peripapillary retina). No correlation was found between standard deviation of the measurements and pupil size or age of the subject.

  1. Neural control of blood pressure: focusing on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H

    2007-03-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor leading to devastating cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. Despite intensive research in this area, mechanisms underlying essential hypertension remain to be defined. Accumulating evidence indicates that neural components including both sympathetic and sensory nerves innervating the cardiovascular and renal tissues play a key role in regulating water and sodium homeostasis and blood pressure, and that abnormalities in these nervous systems contribute to increased salt sensitivity and development of hypertension. In contrast to relatively well-defined sympathetic nervous system, the role of sensory nerves in the control of cardiovascular homeostasis is largely unknown. Data from our laboratory show that degeneration of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves renders a rat salt sensitive in terms of blood pressure regulation. Evidence is also available indicating that sensory nerves, in interacting with other neurohormonal systems including the sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system, the endothelin system, and superoxide, regulate cardiovascular and renal function in such that they play a counter-balancing role in preventing salt-induced increases in blood pressure under pathophysiological conditions. Altered activity of the sensory nervous system, a condition existed in both genetic and experimental models of hypertension, contributes to the development of hypertension. This article focuses on reviewing the current knowledge regarding the possible role of sensory nerves in regulating blood pressure homeostasis as well as the function and regulation of novel molecules expressed in sensory nerves.

  2. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes, and the optic nerve blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Alemán, R; Mompeó, B; Castaño, I

    2016-04-01

    To study the features of the endoneurial micro-vessels of the optic nerve in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. Optic nerves from control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. Patency was determined by indirect immunofluorescence albumin detection. The expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules was performed by direct immunofluorescence. The endoneurial vessels were counted, and the endothelial cell, the basement membrane, and the surface of the transverse section of the nerve were measured. Vessels of diabetic rats showed vessel wall thickening, preservation of pericytes, an increase in endothelial cell transcytosis, and an increased number of perivascular macrophage cells. It may be concluded that the effects of hyperglycaemia on the inner vessels of the optic nerve are more similar to the cerebral diabetic vessels than to the retinal vessels in diabetic animals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Sciatic nerve regeneration by transplantation of menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Farzamfar, Saeed; Naseri-Nosar, Mahdi; Ghanavatinejad, Alireza; Vaez, Ahmad; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Salehi, Majid

    2017-10-04

    This is the first study demonstrating the efficacy of menstrual blood-derived stem cell (MenSC) transplantation via a neural guidance conduit, for peripheral nerve regeneration. The synthesized poly (ɛ-caprolactone)/Gelatin conduit, filled with collagen type I and seeded with 3 × 10(4) MenSCs, was implanted into a rat's 10 mm sciatic nerve defect. The results of hot plate latency, sciatic functional index and weight-loss percentage of wet gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that the MenSC transplantation had comparable nerve regeneration outcome to autograft, as the gold standard of nerve bridging. The transplantation of MenSCs via a synthetic conduit could ameliorate the functional recovery of sciatic nerve-injured rats which make them a potential candidate for cell therapy of peripheral nervous system disorders.

  4. Influence of Myopia on Size of Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seok Hyun; Kang, Shin Hee; Feng, Chi Shian; Park, Joohyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic nerve head size and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness according to refractive status and axial length. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 252 eyes of 252 healthy volunteers underwent ocular biometry measurement as well as optic nerve head and RNFL imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for all subjects. The magnification effect was adjusted by the modified axial length method. Results Disc area and spherical equivalent were positively correlated (r = 0.225, r2 = 0.051, p = 0.000). RNFL thickness showed significant correlations with spherical equivalent (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000), disc radius (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), and radius of the scan circle (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). After adjustment for the magnification effect, those relationships were reversed; RNFL thickness showed negative correlation with spherical equivalent and disc radius, and positive correlation with axial length and radius of the scan circle. The distance between the disc margin and the scan circle was closely correlated with RNFL thickness (r = -0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), which showed a negative correlation with axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). Conclusions Optic disc radius and RNFL thickness decreased in more severely myopic eyes, but they increased after adjustment for magnification effect. The error due to the magnification effect and optic nerve head size difference might be factors that should be considered when interpreting optical coherence tomography results. PMID:27729753

  5. Anterior approach to the superior mesenteric artery by using nerve plexus hanging maneuver for borderline resectable pancreatic head carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shugo; Isaji, Shuji; Tanemura, Akihiro; Kishiwada, Masashi; Murata, Yasuhiro; Azumi, Yoshinori; Kuriyama, Naohisa; Usui, Masanobu; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Tabata, Masami

    2014-06-01

    To achieve R0 resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) of the pancreatic head, complete resection of the retropancreatic nerve plexus around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is thought to be required. Twenty-five patients with borderline resectable right-sided PDAC were divided into two groups after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: those with portal vein (PV) invasion alone (n = 12), and those with invasion of both PV and SMA (n = 13). A tape for guidance was passed in a space ventral to the SMA and behind the pancreatic parenchyma, followed by resection of the pancreatic parenchyma with the splenic vein. Another tape was passed behind the nerve plexus lateral to the hepatic artery and the SMA ventral to the inferior vena cava and the nerve plexus was dissected, resulting in complete resection of the nerve plexus around the SMA. Pathological findings revealed that the rates of R0, R01 (a margin less than 1 mm) and R1 were 58.3 %, 41.7 % and 0 % in PV group, and 53.8 %, 30.8 % and 15.4 % in PV/A group, respectively. The median survival time was 23.3 and 22.8 months in PV and PV/A groups, respectively. The plexus hanging maneuver for PDAC of the pancreatic head achieved complete resection of the retropancreatic nerve plexus around the SMA, helping to secure a negative surgical margin.

  6. The usefulness of multimodal imaging for differentiating pseudopapilloedema and true swelling of the optic nerve head: a review and case series.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jaclyn; Wong, Elizabeth; Whatham, Andrew; Hennessy, Michael; Kalloniatis, Michael; Zangerl, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Ophthalmic practitioners have to make a critical differential diagnosis in cases of an elevated optic nerve head. They have to discriminate between pseudopapilloedema (benign elevation of the optic nerve head) and true swelling of the optic nerve head. This decision has significant implications for appropriate patient management. Assessment of the optic disc prior to the advanced imaging techniques that are available today (particularly spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence), has mainly used diagnostic tools, such as funduscopy and retinal photography. As these traditional methods rely on the subjective assessment by the clinician, evaluation of the elevated optic nerve head to differentiate pseudopapilloedema from true swelling of the optic nerve head can be a challenge in clinical practice with patients typically referred for further neuroimaging investigation when the diagnosis is uncertain. The use of multimodal ocular imaging tools such as spectral domain optical coherence tomography, short wavelength fundus autofluorescence and ultrasonography, can potentially aid in the differentiation of pseudopapilloedema from true swelling of the optic nerve head, in conjunction with other clinical findings. By doing so, unnecessary patient costs and anxiety in the case of pseudopapilloedema can be reduced, and appropriate urgent referral and management in the case of true swelling of the optic nerve head can be initiated.

  7. Measuring Deformation in the Mouse Optic Nerve Head and Peripapillary Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cathy; Midgett, Dan; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Jefferys, Joan L.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo explant system using multiphoton microscopy and digital volume correlation to measure the full-field deformation response to intraocular pressure (IOP) change in the peripapillary sclera (PPS) and in the optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytic structure. Methods Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-glutamate transporter-GLT1 (GLT1/GFP) mouse eyes were explanted and imaged with a laser-scanning microscope under controlled inflation. Images were analyzed for regional strains and changes in astrocytic lamina and PPS shape. Astrocyte volume fraction in seven control GLT1/GFP mice was measured. The level of fluorescence of GFP fluorescent astrocytes was compared with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) labeled astrocytes using immunohistochemistry. Results The ONH astrocytic structure remained stable during 3 hours in explants. Control strain—globally, in the central one-half or two-thirds of the astrocytic lamina—was significantly greater in the nasal-temporal direction than in the inferior-superior or anterior-posterior directions (each P ≤ 0.03, mixed models). The PPS opening (perimeter) in normal eye explants also became wider nasal-temporally than superior-inferiorly during inflation from 10 to 30 mm Hg (P = 0.0005). After 1 to 3 days of chronic IOP elevation, PPS area was larger than in control eyes (P = 0.035), perimeter elongation was 37% less than controls, and global nasal-temporal strain was significantly less than controls (P = 0.007). Astrocyte orientation was altered by chronic IOP elevation, with processes redirected toward the longitudinal axis of the optic nerve. Conclusions The explant inflation test measures the strain response of the mouse ONH to applied IOP. Initial studies indicate regional differences in response to both acute and chronic IOP elevation within the ONH region. PMID:28146237

  8. In Vivo Changes in Lamina Cribrosa Microarchitecture and Optic Nerve Head Structure in Early Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Kevin M.; Sredar, Nripun; Patel, Nimesh B.; Rajagopalan, Lakshmi; Queener, Hope M.; Twa, Michael D.; Harwerth, Ronald S.; Porter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The lamina cribrosa likely plays an important role in retinal ganglion cell axon injury in glaucoma. We sought to (1) better understand optic nerve head (ONH) structure and anterior lamina cribrosa surface (ALCS) microarchitecture between fellow eyes of living, normal non-human primates and (2) characterize the time-course of in vivo structural changes in the ONH, ALCS microarchitecture, and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in non-human primate eyes with early experimental glaucoma (EG). Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) images of the ONH were acquired cross-sectionally in six bilaterally normal rhesus monkeys, and before and approximately every two weeks after inducing unilateral EG in seven rhesus monkeys. ONH parameters and RNFLT were quantified from segmented SDOCT images. Mean ALCS pore area, elongation and nearest neighbor distance (NND) were quantified globally, in sectors and regionally from adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope images. In bilaterally normal monkeys, ONH parameters were similar between fellow eyes with few inter-eye differences in ALCS pore parameters. In EG monkeys, an increase in mean ALCS Depth (ALCSD) was the first structural change measured in 6 of 7 EG eyes. A decrease in mean minimum rim width (MRW) simultaneously accompanied this early change in 4 of 6 EG eyes and was the first structural change in the 7th EG eye. Mean ALCS pore parameters were among the first or second changes measured in 4 EG eyes. Mean ALCS pore area and NND increased in superotemporal and temporal sectors and in central and peripheral regions at the first time-point of change in ALCS pore geometry. RNFLT and/or mean ALCS radius of curvature were typically the last parameters to initially change. Survival analyses found mean ALCSD was the only parameter to significantly show an initial change prior to the first measured loss in RNFLT across EG eyes. PMID:26230993

  9. Crowded optic nerve head evaluation with optical coherence tomography in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, S; Afzali, M; Akbari, M; Ebrahimi, K B; Khodabande, A; Yazdani-Abyaneh, A R; Ghafouri, S N H; Coh, P; Okhravi, S; Fard, M A

    2017-04-07

    PurposeTo characterize the optic nerve head (ONH) structure in patients with non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) compared to healthy control subjects using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) via the enhanced depth imaging method.MethodsIn this prospective, cross-sectional, comparative study, we assessed 66 eyes of 33 patients with unilateral NAION and 31 eyes of 31 healthy normal subjects in an academic institution. The peripapillary nerve fiber layer thickness, disc area, and quantitative parameters of the ONH structures, including the Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) area, anterior laminar depth, and prelaminar thickness and depth were compared between the three groups.ResultsLinear mixed model analysis after adjusting for age, sex, and axial length showed that the BMO area was similar in eyes with NAION (1.89±0.33 mm(2)), their fellow eyes (1.85±0.35 mm(2)), and control eyes (1.88±0.37 mm(2); all P>0.99). Anterior laminar depth was also similar in the three groups. The mean prelaminar tissue thickness of the NAION eyes was 445±176 μm, which was thinner than the prelaminar tissue of their unaffected fellow eyes (mean, 539±227 μm, P=0.004), but both were thicker than the prelaminar tissue of the normal subjects (mean 243±145 μm, P=0.001 and P<0.001, respectively).ConclusionsThe thick prelaminar thickness is associated with unilateral NAION in the affected and unaffected eyes.Eye advance online publication, 7 April 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.56.

  10. Characterization of Abnormal Optic Nerve Head Morphology in Albinism Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sarim; Gottlob, Irene; Sheth, Viral; Pilat, Anastasia; Lee, Helena; Pollheimer, Ellen; Proudlock, Frank Anthony

    2015-07-01

    To characterize abnormalities in three-dimensional optic nerve head (ONH) morphology in people with albinism (PWA) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and to determine whether ONH abnormalities relate to other retinal and clinical abnormalities. Spectral-domain OCT was used to obtain three-dimensional images from 56 PWA and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. B-scans were corrected for nystagmus-associated motion artefacts. Disc, cup, and rim ONH dimensions and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (ppRNFL) thickness were calculated using Copernicus and ImageJ software. Median disc areas were similar in PWA (median = 1.65 mm2) and controls (1.71 mm2, P = 0.128), although discs were significantly elongated horizontally in PWA (P < 0.001). In contrast, median optic cup area in PWA (0.088 mm2) was 23.7% of that in controls (0.373 mm2, P < 0.001), with 39.4% of eyes in PWA not demonstrating a measurable optic cup. This led to significantly smaller cup to disc ratios in PWA (P < 0.001). Median rim volume in PWA (0.273 mm3) was 136.6% of that in controls (0.200 mm3). The ppRNFL was significantly thinner in PWA compared with controls (P < 0.001), especially in the temporal quadrant. In PWA, ppRNFL thickness was correlated to ganglion cell thickness at the central fovea (P = 0.007). Several ONH abnormalities, such as cup to disc ratio, were related to higher refractive errors in PWA. In PWA, ocular maldevelopment is not just limited to the retina but also involves the ONH. Reduced ppRNFL thickness is consistent with previous reports of reduced ganglion cell numbers in PWA. The thicker rim volumes may be a result of incomplete maturation of the ONH.

  11. A Digital Staining Algorithm for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Jean-Martial; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Strouthidis, Nicholas G.; Girard, Michaël J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To digitally stain spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the optic nerve head (ONH), and highlight either connective or neural tissues. Methods OCT volumes of the ONH were acquired from one eye of 10 healthy subjects. We processed all volumes with adaptive compensation to remove shadows and enhance deep tissue visibility. For each ONH, we identified the four most dissimilar pixel-intensity histograms, each of which was assumed to represent a tissue group. These four histograms formed a vector basis on which we ‘projected' each OCT volume in order to generate four digitally stained volumes P1 to P4. Digital staining was also verified using a digital phantom, and compared with k-means clustering for three and four clusters. Results Digital staining was able to isolate three regions of interest from the proposed phantom. For the ONH, the digitally stained images P1 highlighted mostly connective tissues, as demonstrated through an excellent contrast increase across the anterior lamina cribrosa boundary (3.6 ± 0.6 times). P2 highlighted the nerve fiber layer and the prelamina, P3 the remaining layers of the retina, and P4 the image background. Further, digital staining was able to separate ONH tissue layers that were not well separated by k-means clustering. Conclusion We have described an algorithm that can digitally stain connective and neural tissues in OCT images of the ONH. Translational Relevance Because connective and neural tissues are considerably altered in glaucoma, digital staining of the ONH tissues may be of interest in the clinical management of this pathology. PMID:28174676

  12. Gender- and Ethnicity-Related Differences in Optic Nerve Head Topography in Healthy Indian and Caucasian Participants.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Anastasia V; Gottlob, Irene; Sheth, Viral; Thomas, Mervyn G; Proudlock, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of ethnicity and gender on optic nerve head morphology in healthy subjects using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Thirty-five Indian (i.e. Indian subcontinent) females, 34 Caucasian females, 32 Indian males, and 32 Caucasian males were examined using SD-OCT (Copernicus, Optopol Technology). Disc and rim areas were larger in Caucasian males compared with females but smaller in Indians males compared with females. Indian participants had significantly larger cup areas and volumes without significant differences in retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thicknesses between groups. Gender and ethnicity differences should be considered in assessment of patients.

  13. Gender- and Ethnicity-Related Differences in Optic Nerve Head Topography in Healthy Indian and Caucasian Participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilat, Anastasia V.; Gottlob, Irene; Sheth, Viral; Thomas, Mervyn G.; Proudlock, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the effect of ethnicity and gender on optic nerve head morphology in healthy subjects using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Thirty-five Indian (i.e. Indian subcontinent) females, 34 Caucasian females, 32 Indian males, and 32 Caucasian males were examined using SD-OCT (Copernicus, Optopol Technology). Disc and rim areas were larger in Caucasian males compared with females but smaller in Indians males compared with females. Indian participants had significantly larger cup areas and volumes without significant differences in retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thicknesses between groups. Gender and ethnicity differences should be considered in assessment of patients. PMID:27928300

  14. Detecting abnormality in optic nerve head images using a feature extraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haogang; Poostchi, Ali; Vernon, Stephen A; Crabb, David P

    2014-07-01

    Imaging and evaluation of the optic nerve head (ONH) plays an essential part in the detection and clinical management of glaucoma. The morphological characteristics of ONHs vary greatly from person to person and this variability means it is difficult to quantify them in a standardized way. We developed and evaluated a feature extraction approach using shift-invariant wavelet packet and kernel principal component analysis to quantify the shape features in ONH images acquired by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph [HRT]). The methods were developed and tested on 1996 eyes from three different clinical centers. A shape abnormality score (SAS) was developed from extracted features using a Gaussian process to identify glaucomatous abnormality. SAS can be used as a diagnostic index to quantify the overall likelihood of ONH abnormality. Maps showing areas of likely abnormality within the ONH were also derived. Diagnostic performance of the technique, as estimated by ROC analysis, was significantly better than the classification tools currently used in the HRT software - the technique offers the additional advantage of working with all images and is fully automated.

  15. Aging changes of the optic nerve head in relation to open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Garway-Heath, D; Wollstein, G; Hitchings, R

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the age related changes in optic nerve head structure in a group of normal subjects and assess the significance of any changes in relation to those found in open angle glaucoma.
METHODS—A group of 88 white volunteers and friends and spouses of patients with a normal visual field and normal intraocular pressure was studied. Two different imaging and measurement devices were used (computer assisted planimetry and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy), and the results from each were compared. Measurements were made of the optic disc, optic cup, and neuroretinal rim areas, and the vertical optic disc diameter and cup/disc diameter ratio.
RESULTS—Neuroretinal rim area declined at the rate of between 0.28% and 0.39% per year. Vertical optic cup diameter and optic cup area increased with age. The mean cup/disc diameter ratio increased by about 0.1 between the ages of 30 and 70 years.
CONCLUSIONS—Age related changes are significant and measurable, and should be taken into account when assessing the glaucoma suspect, and when estimating the rate of progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in patients with established disease.

 PMID:9486023

  16. Bilateral choroidal neovascularization associated with optic nerve head drusen treated by antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delas, Barbara; Almudí, Lorena; Carreras, Anabel; Asaad, Mouafk

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report a good clinical outcome in a patient with bilateral choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injection. Methods A 12-year-old girl was referred for loss of right eye vision detected in a routine check-up. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand movements in the right eye and 0.9 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed the presence of superficial and buried bilateral ONHD, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and computed tomography, and the study was completed with perimetry. The presence of bilateral CNV, active in the right eye, was observed and subsequently confirmed using fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography. Results Treatment with two consecutive injections of intravitreal ranibizumab resulted in inactivation of the neovascular membrane with subretinal fluid reabsorption and improved right eye BCVA. After 12 months’ follow-up, this was 20/60 and stable. Conclusion Although there are no published studies of safety in children, antiangiogenic therapy for CNV secondary to ONHD may be useful and safe. A search of the literature produced only one previously reported case of ONHD-associated CNV treated with antivascular endothelial growth factor alone. PMID:22368440

  17. Scleral anisotropy and its effects on the mechanical response of the optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Boote, Craig; Quigley, Harry A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a computational modeling study of the effects of the collagen fiber structure on the mechanical response of the sclera and the adjacent optic nerve head (ONH). A specimen-specific inverse finite element method was developed to determine the material properties of two human sclera subjected to full-field inflation experiments. A distributed fiber model was applied to describe the anisotropic elastic behavior of the sclera. The model directly incorporated wide angle x-ray scattering measurements of the anisotropic collagen structure. The converged solution of the inverse method was used in micromechanical studies of the mechanical anisotropy of the sclera at different scales. The effects of the scleral collagen fiber structure on the ONH deformation were evaluated by progressively filtering out local anisotropic features. It was found that the majority of the midposterior sclera could be described as isotropic without significantly affecting the mechanical response of the tissues of the ONH. In contrast, removing local anisotropic features in the peripapillary sclera produced significant changes in scleral canal expansion, and lamina cribrosa deformation. Local variations in the collagen structure of the peripapillary sclera significantly influenced the mechanical response of the ONH. PMID:23188256

  18. Changes in quantitative 3D shape features of the optic nerve head associated with age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) structure is an important biological feature of the eye used by clinicians to diagnose and monitor progression of diseases such as glaucoma. ONH structure is commonly examined using stereo fundus imaging or optical coherence tomography. Stereo fundus imaging provides stereo views of the ONH that retain 3D information useful for characterizing structure. In order to quantify 3D ONH structure, we applied a stereo correspondence algorithm to a set of stereo fundus images. Using these quantitative 3D ONH structure measurements, eigen structures were derived using principal component analysis from stereo images of 565 subjects from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS). To evaluate the usefulness of the eigen structures, we explored associations with the demographic variables age, gender, and race. Using regression analysis, the eigen structures were found to have significant (p < 0.05) associations with both age and race after Bonferroni correction. In addition, classifiers were constructed to predict the demographic variables based solely on the eigen structures. These classifiers achieved an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.62 in predicting a binary age variable, 0.52 in predicting gender, and 0.67 in predicting race. The use of objective, quantitative features or eigen structures can reveal hidden relationships between ONH structure and demographics. The use of these features could similarly allow specific aspects of ONH structure to be isolated and associated with the diagnosis of glaucoma, disease progression and outcomes, and genetic factors.

  19. Visual loss and optic nerve head swelling in thiamine deficiency without prolonged dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Sean M; Lam, Byron L

    2014-01-01

    Visual loss due to optic neuropathy is a rare manifestation of thiamine deficiency. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 29 kg/m2 who developed visual loss and bilateral optic nerve head swelling after a short, self-limited gastrointestinal illness. She was disoriented and inattentive and had absent ankle jerk reflexes, diminished sensation in both legs below the knees, and marked truncal ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increased T2-signal in the medial thalami and mammillary bodies. The serum thiamine level was 8 nmol/L (normal 8–30). The diagnosis of thiamine deficiency was made, and the patient’s vision and neurologic symptoms improved significantly with intramuscular thiamine treatment. Thiamine deficiency can occur in the absence of an obvious predisposing factor such as alcoholism or low body weight. The clinician must be aware of the factors that govern vitamin availability and maintain a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:24899800

  20. Identification of glaucomatous optic nerve head changes in Indian donor eyes without clinical history

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumari, Srinivasan; Neethu, Mohan; Santhi, Radhakrishnan; Krishnadas, Subbiah Ramaswami; Muthukkaruppan, Veerappan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop methods to identify glaucoma by examining the optic nerve head (ONH) of donor's eyes when information on the preexisting ocular disease is unavailable. Materials and Methods: The ONH of the donor's eyes was evaluated under a stereomicroscope for the cup-disc ratio (CDR) and focal retinal rim thinning. The vertical diameter of the cup and disc was also measured using a precalibrated eyepiece micrometer. The suspect eyes were subjected to histological analysis to confirm the presence of specific glaucomatous changes. Results: A total of 202 eyes from 119 donors (68 males and 51 females, aged 42–96) were evaluated for glaucoma. Among them, 190 (94%) eyes showing vertical CDR in the of 0.0–0.6 range were considered nonglaucomatous and the remaining eyes with >0.6 as glaucoma suspect. The calculated mean CDR of the two groups (0.3 ± 0.16, 0.62 ± 0.27) was highly significant (P = 0.0003). Of 12 eyes suspected of glaucoma, 7 eyes from 5 donors showed specific glaucomatous changes by histology. The prevalence of glaucoma was 4.2% among the donors studied. Conclusions: A simple method of screening fresh donor eyes for selecting those with glaucoma features using CDR and histological analysis was reported. This method helps to obtain biologically active human ocular tissue for glaucoma research on gene expression, ultrastructural/proteome changes, and outflow mechanism. PMID:26458478

  1. Effect of two different preprocessing steps in detection of optic nerve head in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Meysam; Nazar, Mahdieh; Mehdizadeh, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Identification of optic nerve head (ONH) is necessary in retinal image analysis to locate anatomical components such as fovea and retinal vessels in fundus images. In this study, we first worked on two different methods for preprocessing of images after that our main method was proposed for ONH detection in color fundus images. In the first preprocessing method, we did color space conversion, illumination equalization, and contrast enhancement and separately in the second method we applied top-hat transformation to an image. In the next step, Radon transform is applied to each of these two preprocessed fundus image to find candidates for the location of the ONH. Then, the accurate location was found using the minimum mean square error estimation. The accuracy of this method was approved by the results. Our method detected ONH correctly in 110 out of 120 images in our local database and 38 out of 40 color images in the DRIVE database by using Illumination equalization and contrast enhancement preprocessing. Moreover, by use of top-hat transformation our approach correctly detected the ONHs in 106 out of 120 images in the local database and 36 out of 40 images in the DRIVE set. In addition, Sensitivity and specificity of pixel base analysis of this algorithm seems to be acceptable in comparison with other methods.

  2. Surgical anatomy of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and its clinical significance in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kochilas, Xenophon; Bibas, Athanasios; Xenellis, John; Anagnostopoulou, Sofia

    2008-03-01

    Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) increases the morbidity following a variety of neck procedures and can have catastrophic consequences in people who use their voice professionally. Identification and preservation of the EBSLN are thus important in thyroidectomy, parathyroidectomy, carotid endarterectomy, and anterior cervical spine procedures, where the nerve is at risk. There are large variations in the anatomical course of the EBSLN, which makes the intraoperative identification of the nerve challenging. The topographic relationship of the EBSLN to the superior thyroid artery and the upper pole of the thyroid gland are considered by many authors to be the key point for identifying the nerve during surgery of the neck. The classifications by Cernea et al. ([1992a] Head Neck 14:380-383; [1992b] Am. J. Surg. 164:634-639) and by Kierner et al. ([1998] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 124:301-303), as well as clinically important connections are discussed in detail. Along with sound anatomical knowledge, neuromonitoring is helpful in identifying the EBSLN during neck procedures. The clinical signs of EBSLN injury include hoarseness, decreased voice projection, decreased pitch range, and fatigue after extensive voice use. Videostroboscopy, electromyography, voice analysis, and electroglottography can provide crucial information on the function of the EBSLN following neck surgery.

  3. Muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic during physician and nurse blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Buzzi, Silvia; Magni, Laura; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Quarti-Trevano, Fosca; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood pressure assessment by a nurse markedly attenuates the pressor and tachicardic responses triggered by the physician blood pressure measurement. Whether and to what extent this attenuation reflects a different pattern of the neuroadrenergic responses to doctor or nurse blood pressure evaluation is unknown. In 19 lean untreated mild essential hypertensive patients (age 39.1 ± 2.4 years, mean ± SEM), we measured beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (Finapres), heart rate (ECG), and efferent postganglionic muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), respectively, by microneurography], before, during, and following a 10-min sphygmomanometric BP measurement by a doctor or by a nurse unfamiliar to the patients. Measurements were repeated at a 30-min interval to obtain, in separate periods, muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic recordings. Both the sequences (doctor vs. nurse and muscle vs. skin sympathetic nerve traffic) were randomized. A doctor visit induced sudden, marked, and prolonged blood pressure and heart rate increases, accompanied by a muscle sympathetic nerve traffic inhibition (average response: -18.1 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01) coupled with a skin sympathetic nerve traffic excitation (average response: +46.1 ± 5.5%, P < 0.01). In contrast, a nurse visit elicited blood pressure and heart rate responses markedly and significantly reduced (-72.1 ± 11 and -81.7 ± 13% respectively, P < 0.01) as compared with those seen during the doctor's visit. This was the case also for muscle and skin sympathetic neural responses (-44.3 ± 9 and -65.6 ± 13%, P < 0.01). These data provide the first evidence that the blunted pressor and tachicardic responses to nurse's blood pressure measurements are accompanied by an attenuation of the adrenergic neural responses seen during the alerting reaction accompanying

  4. Vagus nerve is involved in lack of blood reflow into sinusoids after rat hepatic ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Ueshima, S; Kazuo, H; Ito, T; Seiyama, A; Matsuda, H

    2000-05-01

    Although recovery of microcirculation is an important determinant for ischemia-reperfusion injury, little information is available about hepatic blood flow after ischemia. To examine regulatory mechanisms of postischemic hepatic microcirculation, we studied the sinusoidal blood flow after portal triad clamping of rat livers for 5, 15, or 30 min. Hepatic tissue blood flow and erythrocyte blood flow in sinusoids were measured using a laser-Doppler flowmeter and an intravital microspectroscope, respectively. There was a time of no blood flow (lag time) in sinusoids after declamping, dependent on the ischemic time. Cholinergic blockade agents eliminated the lag time, whereas nerve stimulation at the hiatus esophagus or on the hepatoduodenal ligament during reperfusion prolonged it. Chemical denervation with 10% phenol or surgical denervation on the hepatoduodenal ligament eliminated the lag time. The prolongation of lag time by nerve stimulation was completely abrogated by truncal vagotomy. These results suggest that the cholinergic vagus nerve is involved in causing the lag time of sinusoidal blood flow in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion.

  5. Optical fiber head for monitoring of heart rate and blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Kacper; Baranowska, Agata; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this article we presented possibility of heart rate and blood oxygenation measurements by classic displacement optical fiber sensor in reflection mode. Based on numerical analysis of sensor head characteristics the optimal construction was developed. Three LED diodes at the wavelengths of 530nm (green), 650nm (red) and 850nm (infrared) were used for determine heart rate and saturation of blood during "in vivo" measurements. Developed sensor head allows noninvasive and continuously monitoring of blood parameters.

  6. Optic nerve head and intraocular pressure in the guinea pig eye.

    PubMed

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-05-01

    The guinea pig is becoming an increasingly popular model for studying human myopia, which carries an increased risk of glaucoma. As a step towards understanding this association, this study sought to characterize the normal, developmental intraocular pressure (IOP) profiles, as well as the anatomy of the optic nerve head (ONH) and adjacent sclera of young guinea pigs. IOP was tracked in pigmented guinea pigs up to 3 months of age. One guinea pig was imaged in vivo with OCT and one with a fundus camera. The eyes of pigmented and albino guinea pigs (ages 2 months) were enucleated and sections from the posterior segment, including the ONH and surrounding sclera, processed for histological analyses - either hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of paraffin embedded, sectioned tissue (n = 1), or cryostat sectioned tissue, processed for immunohistochemistry (n = 3), using primary antibodies against collagen types I-V, elastin, fibronectin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM) studies of ONHs were also undertaken (n = 2 & 5 respectively). Mean IOPs ranged from 17.33 to 22.7 mmHg, increasing slightly across the age range studied, and the IOPs of individual animals also exhibited diurnal variations, peaking in the early morning (mean of 25.8, mmHg, ∼9 am), and decreasing across the day. H&E-stained sections showed retinal ganglion cell axons organized into fascicles in the prelaminar and laminar region of the ONHs, with immunostained sections revealing collagen types I, III, IV and V, as well as elastin, GFAP and fibronectin in the ONHs. SEM revealed a well-defined lamina cribrosa (LC), with radially-oriented collagen beams. TEM revealed collagen fibrils surrounding non-myelinated nerve fiber bundles in the LC region, with myelination and decreased collagen posterior to the LC. The adjacent sclera comprised mainly crimped collagen fibers in a crisscross arrangement. Both the sclera and LC were

  7. Changes in optic nerve head circulation in response to vasoactive agents: intereye comparison in monkeys with experimental unilateral glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mayama, Chihiro; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Ota, Takashi; Tomidokoro, Atsuo; Araie, Makoto

    2012-08-22

    To investigate circulatory changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) in response to vasoactive agents including calcium antagonists, a substrate of nitric oxide (NO), and an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) in monkeys with unilateral experimental glaucoma. Argon laser cautery to the trabecular meshwork was used to create experimental unilateral glaucoma in nine monkeys. The effects of systemic lomerizine or nilvadipine (calcium-antagonists), L-arginine (a substrate of NO), and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor) on the ONH tissue blood velocity (NB(ONH)) was studied by the laser speckle method. Lomerizine and nilvadipine significantly increased NB(ONH) in the untreated normal eyes (P = 0.039 and 0.008, respectively), while significant, less increases were found in the laser-treated experimental glaucomatous eyes with significant intereye differences (P = 0.036 and 0.011, respectively). L-arginine significantly increased NB(ONH) in both eyes without intereye difference (P = 0.71). L-NAME had no significant effects on NB(ONH) in the experimental glaucoma eyes; however, it produced a significant decrease in the nonlaser treated eyes (P = 0.036). In experimental glaucomatous eyes, the reactivity of ONH vessels to calcium antagonists was preserved, but was significantly reduced. The response to a NOS inhibitor was lost; however, reactivity to a substrate of NO was normal. These data indicate that in experimental glaucoma, vasodilator reactivity in the peripheral vasculature of the ONH is preserved, but functional alterations are likely to affect reactivity to the NO system.

  8. Optic nerve head perfusion in normal eyes and eyes with glaucoma using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Gupta, Divakar; Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Kono, Rei; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the differences of perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) between normal and glaucomatous eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus 5000 HD-OCT-based OMAG prototype system centered at the ONH (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA, USA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. En face OMAG images for preLC were generated using signals with highest blood flow signal intensity. ONH perfusion was quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH. Standard t-tests were performed to analyze the ONH perfusion differences between normal and glaucomatous eyes. Linear regression models were constructed to analyze the correlation between ONH perfusion and other clinical measurements. Results Twenty normal and 21 glaucoma subjects were enrolled. Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower ONH perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics compared to normal eyes (P≤0.0003). Significant correlations between ONH perfusion and disease severity as well as structural changes were detected in glaucomatous eyes (P≤0.012). Conclusions ONH perfusion detected by OMAG showed significant differences between glaucoma and normal controls and was significantly correlated with disease severity and structural defects in glaucomatous eyes. ONH perfusion measurement using OMAG may provide useful information for detection and monitoring of glaucoma. PMID:27190764

  9. A Modeling of Cerebral Blood Flow Changes due to Head Motion for fNIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nara, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Inoue, Masao; Shimizu, Shunji; Kojima, Satoru

    2013-04-01

    A method is proposed for measuring brain activity during exercises involving head motion by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which investigates cerebral hemodynamics. Obtaining measurements during exercise is difficult because cerebral blood flow changes due to the head motion component (HMC), in addition to neural activity. HMC is an undesirable artifact in the measurement of hemodynamic response caused by neural activity, and as such, it must be estimated and eliminated. In our experiments, cerebral blood flow and head motion were measured during repeated passive forward bending of the subjects. Head motion was measured by 3-D motion capture, and HMC was estimated by deriving a relation between head motion and cerebral blood flow, where the pitch angle was found to be suitable for estimating HMC. In this research, an assumption was made that cerebral blood flow caused by neural activity and that caused by postural change were additive, and thus HMC was eliminated by subtraction.

  10. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  11. The Effects of Impact Vibration on Peripheral Blood Vessels and Nerves

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine M.; WAUGH, Stacey; JOHNSON, Claud; MILLER, G. Roger; XU, Xueyan; WARREN, Christopher; DONG, Ren G.

    2013-01-01

    Research regarding the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome after exposure to impact vibration has produced conflicting results. This study used an established animal model of vibration-induced dysfunction to determine how exposure to impact vibration affects peripheral blood vessels and nerves. The tails of male rats were exposed to a single bout of impact vibration (15 min exposure, at a dominant frequency of 30 Hz and an unweighted acceleration of approximately 345 m/s2) generated by a riveting hammer. Responsiveness of the ventral tail artery to adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction and acetylcholine-mediated re-dilation was measured ex vivo. Ventral tail nerves and nerve endings in the skin were assessed using morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Impact vibration did not alter vascular responsiveness to any factors or affect trunk nerves. However, 4 days following exposure there was an increase in protein-gene product (PGP) 9.5 staining around hair follicles. A single exposure to impact vibration, with the exposure characteristics described above, affects peripheral nerves but not blood vessels. PMID:24077447

  12. The effect of 2,5-hexanedione on permeability of blood-nerve barrier in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Duan, Huawei; Dai, Yufei; Niu, Yong; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qing; Bin, Ping; Zheng, Yuxin

    2010-06-01

    To explore the effect of 2,5-hexanedione on permeability of blood-nerve barrier, adult Wistar rats were administered with 400 mg x kg(-1) x d(- 1) 2,5-hexanedione to establish animal model of 2,5-hexnedione neuropathy. Evans blue was injected through left femoral vein of the rats after the model had been established. The distribution of fluorescence in sciatic-tibial nerve was observed and assessed. For the transverse sections of sciatic-tibial nerves, the average fluorescence intensity of proximal section was stronger (p < .01) than those of intermediate and distal sections and the average fluorescence intensity of intermediate section was stronger (p < .01) than that of distal section in the intoxicated group. In the control, the weak fluorescence was shown, and average fluorescence intensity of distal section was stronger (p < .05) than that of proximal section. The average fluorescence intensity of proximal, intermediate and distal sections in the intoxicated group was stronger (p < .01) than those of the corresponding sections in the control. For the longitudinal sections of sciatic-tibial nerves, fluorescence was observed in both proximal and distal sections in the intoxicated group. The fluorescence intensity of distal section in the control was weak and almost no fluorescence was shown in the proximal section. The permeability of blood-nerve barrier could be increased by 2,5-hexanedione.

  13. Importance of rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons in determining efferent sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Hiroo; Oshima, Naoki; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Iigaya, Kamon; Imai, Masaki; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Sakata, Katsufumi; Osaka, Motohisa; Onami, Toshiko; Takimoto, Chie; Kamayachi, Tadashi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Saruta, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Accentuated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. In this review, we investigate our working hypothesis that potentiated activity of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is the primary cause of experimental and essential hypertension. Over the past decade, we have examined how RVLM neurons regulate peripheral SNA, how the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems are correlated and how the sympathetic system can be suppressed to prevent cardiovascular events in patients. Based on results of whole-cell patch-clamp studies, we report that angiotensin II (Ang II) potentiated the activity of RVLM neurons, a sympathetic nervous center, whereas Ang II receptor blocker (ARB) reduced RVLM activities. Our optical imaging demonstrated that a longitudinal rostrocaudal column, including the RVLM and the caudal end of ventrolateral medulla, acts as a sympathetic center. By organizing and analyzing these data, we hope to develop therapies for reducing SNA in our patients. Recently, 2-year depressor effects were obtained by a single procedure of renal nerve ablation in patients with essential hypertension. The ablation injured not only the efferent renal sympathetic nerves but also the afferent renal nerves and led to reduced activities of the hypothalamus, RVLM neurons and efferent systemic sympathetic nerves. These clinical results stress the importance of the RVLM neurons in blood pressure regulation. We expect renal nerve ablation to be an effective treatment for congestive heart failure and chronic kidney disease, such as diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22170390

  14. Importance of rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons in determining efferent sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Hiroo; Oshima, Naoki; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Iigaya, Kamon; Imai, Masaki; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Sakata, Katsufumi; Osaka, Motohisa; Onami, Toshiko; Takimoto, Chie; Kamayachi, Tadashi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Saruta, Takao

    2012-02-01

    Accentuated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. In this review, we investigate our working hypothesis that potentiated activity of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is the primary cause of experimental and essential hypertension. Over the past decade, we have examined how RVLM neurons regulate peripheral SNA, how the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems are correlated and how the sympathetic system can be suppressed to prevent cardiovascular events in patients. Based on results of whole-cell patch-clamp studies, we report that angiotensin II (Ang II) potentiated the activity of RVLM neurons, a sympathetic nervous center, whereas Ang II receptor blocker (ARB) reduced RVLM activities. Our optical imaging demonstrated that a longitudinal rostrocaudal column, including the RVLM and the caudal end of ventrolateral medulla, acts as a sympathetic center. By organizing and analyzing these data, we hope to develop therapies for reducing SNA in our patients. Recently, 2-year depressor effects were obtained by a single procedure of renal nerve ablation in patients with essential hypertension. The ablation injured not only the efferent renal sympathetic nerves but also the afferent renal nerves and led to reduced activities of the hypothalamus, RVLM neurons and efferent systemic sympathetic nerves. These clinical results stress the importance of the RVLM neurons in blood pressure regulation. We expect renal nerve ablation to be an effective treatment for congestive heart failure and chronic kidney disease, such as diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia via the retromolar triangle, an alternative for patients with blood dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Suazo Galdames, Iván Claudio; Cantín López, Mario Gonzalo; Zavando Matamala, Daniela Alejandra

    2008-01-01

    One of the most commonly used mandibular anesthesia techniques is the Spix technique, which is very useful in clinical practice, but is risky when the patient is a bearer of blood dyscrasias. The aim of this study was to present an alternative to the Spix technique in order to achieve troncular anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve. To this purpose, an infiltrative technique was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve via the retromolar triangle. This study included 40 patients with an average age of 23.65 years, 22 males and 18 females, who were previously evaluated with a vitalometer control, then subjected to the designed anesthetic technique. The effectiveness of the technique used to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve was evaluated by the results of tests using a vitalometer applied to a molar and a premolar on the anesthetized side after 5, 10 and 15 minutes. Moreover, the anesthesia was evaluated in mucosa innervated regions by the inferior alveolar, lingual and buccal nerves, and by having the patient relate the duration of the induced feeling of numbness. The technique proved to be effective in 72.5% of the cases, with a latency of 10 minutes and an average duration of the anesthetic effect for 141.125 minutes. Moreover, anesthesia was obtained in the mucosa innervated regions by the inferior alveolar nerve in 72.5% of the cases, by the buccal nerve in 27.5% and in the innervated areas by the lingual nerve in 55% of the cases. The proposed technique, even when it proved to be less effective than the Spix technique, can be seen as a lower risk alternative for patients carrying blood dyscrasias and being subjected to dental procedures in mandibular teeth.

  16. The effect of blood pressure on compression-induced facial nerve neuropraxia in the cat.

    PubMed

    Roffman, G D; Babin, R W; Ryu, J H

    1981-01-01

    The facial nerves of 21 adult anesthetized cats were exposed from the parotid gland to the orbicularis oculi muscle. The summated action potential (SAP) of the orbicularis oculi muscle was recorded. A calibrated pressure block was applied to the intact facial nerve between the stimulating electrode and the muscle. Pressures of between 150 and 200 mm Hg caused a rapid stable neuropraxia. In ten animals the blood pressure was elevated by a constant levarterenol infusion. In 11 animals the blood pressure was elevated by coarcting the abdominal aorta and volume overloading the rostral vascular system. In both groups, in all animals, when the systolic blood pressure exceeded the pressure applied to the nerve, a substantial increase in SAP amplitude was noted. If the systolic pressure was allowed to fall below the pressure on the nerve, the neuropraxia rapidly returned. This data suggest that within a physiologic pressure range of 150 to 200 mm Hg there is a reversible ischemic phase of compression neuropraxia and it is in complete accord with the earlier work of Devriese.

  17. The effect of cataract surgery on imaging optic nerve head topography with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph.

    PubMed

    Falck, Aura A K; Saarela, Ville

    2012-06-14

    Purpose. To determine whether phacoemulsification cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation interferes with measuring optic nerve head (ONH) topography using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT). Methods. The study population consisted of 31 women and 12 men aged 63-81 years with no previous history of eye diseases, surgery, laser procedures, or medication. The patients underwent first eye cataract surgery for senile cataract. The HRT II with software version 1.6 was used to obtain 3-dimensional images of the ONH as a part of a comprehensive ocular examination. The quality of the HRT image was assessed using topography standard deviation (TSD). Topography measurements are considered to be unreliable if TSD is more than 50 µm. Re-examination took place 1 month after surgery. Results. Before surgery, the topography measurements were unreliable in 35% (15/43) of the eyes; in 3 of these cases, ONH topography could not be calculated at all. One month after cataract surgery, the ONH topography could be calculated in all eyes and only one displayed unreliable topography measurements. The mean TSD was 40 µm before and 22 µm after surgery when calculated for all eyes with measurable topographies. The change in TSD was statistically significant (p<0.0005). The image alignment between the HRT examinations before and after surgery was excellent in 67% (26/39). Magnification changes occurred in 21% (8/39). Conclusions. Phacoemulsification cataract surgery with IOL implantation improves the image quality of the HRT. However, because of magnification changes and image misalignment, HRT follow-up of the ONH after cataract surgery is often unreliable.

  18. Mapping in-vivo optic nerve head strains caused by intraocular and intracranial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Grimm, J.; Wang, B.; Smith, M. A.; Gogola, A.; Nelson, S.; Tyler-Kabara, E.; Schuman, J.; Wollstein, G.; Sigal, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Although it is well documented that abnormal levels of either intraocular (IOP) or intracranial pressure (ICP) can lead to potentially blinding conditions, such as glaucoma and papilledema, little is known about how the pressures actually affect the eye. Even less is known about potential interplay between their effects, namely how the level of one pressure might alter the effects of the other. Our goal was to measure in-vivo the pressure-induced stretch and compression of the lamina cribrosa due to acute changes of IOP and ICP. The lamina cribrosa is a structure within the optic nerve head, in the back of the eye. It is important because it is in the lamina cribrosa that the pressure-induced deformations are believed to initiate damage to neural tissues leading to blindness. An eye of a rhesus macaque monkey was imaged in-vivo with optical coherence tomography while IOP and ICP were controlled through cannulas in the anterior chamber and lateral ventricle, respectively. The image volumes were analyzed with a newly developed digital image correlation technique. The effects of both pressures were highly localized, nonlinear and non-monotonic, with strong interactions. Pressure variations from the baseline normal levels caused substantial stretch and compression of the neural tissues in the posterior pole, sometimes exceeding 20%. Chronic exposure to such high levels of biomechanical insult would likely lead to neural tissue damage and loss of vision. Our results demonstrate the power of digital image correlation technique based on non-invasive imaging technologies to help understand how pressures induce biomechanical insults and lead to vision problems.

  19. An Applet to Estimate the IOP-Induced Stress and Strain within the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The ability to predict the biomechanical response of the optic nerve head (ONH) to intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation holds great promise, yet remains elusive. The objective of this work was to introduce an approach to model ONH biomechanics that combines the ease of use and speed of analytical models with the flexibility and power of numerical models. Methods. Models representing a variety of ONHs were produced, and finite element (FE) techniques used to predict the stresses (forces) and strains (relative deformations) induced on each of the models by IOP elevations (up to 10 mm Hg). Multivariate regression was used to parameterize each biomechanical response as an analytical function. These functions were encoded into a Flash-based applet. Applet utility was demonstrated by investigating hypotheses concerning ONH biomechanics posited in the literature. Results. All responses were parameterized well by polynomials (R2 values between 0.985 and 0.999), demonstrating the effectiveness of our fitting approach. Previously published univariate results were reproduced with the applet in seconds. A few minutes allowed for multivariate analysis, with which it was predicted that often, but not always, larger eyes experience higher levels of stress and strain than smaller ones, even at the same IOP. Conclusions. An applet has been presented with which it is simple to make rapid estimates of IOP-related ONH biomechanics. The applet represents a step toward bringing the power of FE modeling beyond the specialized laboratory and can thus help develop more refined biomechanics-based hypotheses. The applet is available for use at www.ocularbiomechanics.com. PMID:21527378

  20. Increased mitochondrial fission and volume density by blocking glutamate excitotoxicity protect glaucomatous optic nerve head astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Won-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Lukas, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Perkins, Guy A

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal structure and function of astrocytes have been observed within the lamina cribrosa region of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Glutamate excitotoxicity-mediated mitochondrial alteration has been implicated in experimental glaucoma. However, the relationships among glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alteration and ONH astrocytes in the pathogenesis of glaucoma remain unknown. We found that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NRs) are present in human ONH astrocytes and that glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes have increased expression levels of NRs and the glutamate aspartate transporter. Glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes exhibit mitochondrial fission that is linked to increased expression of dynamin-related protein 1 and its phosphorylation at Serine 616. In BAC ALDH1L1 eGFP or Thy1-CFP transgenic mice, NMDA treatment induced axon loss as well as hypertrophic morphology and mitochondrial fission in astrocytes of the glial lamina. In human ONH astrocytes, NMDA treatment in vitro triggered mitochondrial fission by decreasing mitochondrial length and number, thereby reducing mitochondrial volume density. However, blocking excitotoxicity by memantine (MEM) prevented these alterations by increasing mitochondrial length, number and volume density. In glaucomatous DBA/2J (D2) mice, blocking excitotoxicity by MEM inhibited the morphological alteration as well as increased mitochondrial number and volume density in astrocytes of the glial lamina. However, blocking excitotoxicity decreased autophagosome/autolysosome volume density in both astrocytes and axons in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings provide evidence that blocking excitotoxicity prevents ONH astrocyte dysfunction in glaucomatous neurodegeneration by increasing mitochondrial fission, increasing mitochondrial volume density and length, and decreasing autophagosome/autolysosome formation. GLIA 2015;63:736-753.

  1. Increased Mitochondrial Fission and Volume Density by Blocking Glutamate Excitotoxicity Protect Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Head Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Won-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Lukas, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Perkins, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal structure and function of astrocytes have been observed within the lamina cribrosa region of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Glutamate excitotoxicity-mediated mitochondrial alteration has been implicated in experimental glaucoma. However, the relationships among glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alteration and ONH astrocytes in the pathogenesis of glaucoma remain unknown. We found that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NRs) are present in human ONH astrocytes and that glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes have increased expression levels of NRs and the glutamate aspartate transporter. Glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes exhibit mitochondrial fission that is linked to increased expression of dynamin-related protein 1 and its phosphorylation at Serine 616. In BAC ALDH1L1 eGFP or Thy1-CFP transgenic mice, NMDA treatment induced axon loss as well as hypertrophic morphology and mitochondrial fission in astrocytes of the glial lamina. In human ONH astrocytes, NMDA treatment in vitro triggered mitochondrial fission by decreasing mitochondrial length and number, thereby reducing mitochondrial volume density. However, blocking excitotoxicity by memantine (MEM) prevented these alterations by increasing mitochondrial length, number and volume density. In glaucomatous DBA/2J (D2) mice, blocking excitotoxicity by MEM inhibited the morphological alteration as well as increased mitochondrial number and volume density in astrocytes of the glial lamina. However, blocking excitotoxicity decreased autophagosome/autolysosome volume density in both astrocytes and axons in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings provide evidence that blocking excitotoxicity prevents ONH astrocyte dysfunction in glaucomatous neurodegeneration by increasing mitochondrial fission, increasing mitochondrial volume density and length, and decreasing autophagosome/autolysosome formation. PMID:25557093

  2. The innervation of the chromaffin cells in the head kidney of the carp, Cyprinus carpio; regional differences of the connections between nerve endings and chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Imagawa, T; Kitagawa, H; Uehara, M

    1996-02-01

    Nerve fibres and their connections with chromaffin cells in the carp head kidney were studied by light and electron microscopy. Some nerve bundles entered the head kidney from the dorsal aspect along veins. Many unmyelinated axons emerged from the nerve bundles to invade the clusters of chromaffin cells, the distribution of which was restricted to the neighbourhood of the venous trunks and their tributaries. Most of the nerve endings were attached to a chromaffin cell by synaptic junctions and were generally invaginated into the cell. Some nerve endings were flattened in shape and connected with two chromaffin cells. Occasional exocytotic figures of synaptic vesicles opening into the intercellular space, or synaptic junctions along the course of the nerve fibre were observed. The percentage of the chromaffin cells supplied by nerve endings in the head kidney as a whole was similar to that in primitive amphibians. The distribution of the chromaffin cells and the frequency of their innervation suggest that carp chromaffin cells are phylogenetically similar to those of amphibians. The frequencies of synaptic connections in the carp head kidney showed regional differences. The number in dorsal portion was significantly higher than that in two ventral portions. It is suggested that chromaffin cells in the head kidney are separable into two populations: one (in the dorsal portion) shows closer and the other (in the ventral portions) less contact with nerve fibres. The fine structure of the nerve endings indicates that catecholamine secretion of carp chromaffin cells is partially modulated by nerve fibres (probably preganglionic cholinergic fibres). However, the low frequency of synaptic connections on the chromaffin cells and their distribution suggest that carp chromaffin cells are mainly modulated by the endocrine system via the bloodstream.

  3. Independent effects of heart-head distance and caudal blood pooling on blood pressure regulation in aquatic and terrestrial snakes.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Arndt, Joachim O

    2004-03-01

    Changes in orientation in a gravitational field markedly alter the patterns of blood pressure and flow in animals, especially tall or long ones such as giraffes or snakes. Vertical orientation tends to reduce blood flow and pressure in the head for two major reasons. First, the increased vertical blood column above the heart creates a gravitational hydrostatic pressure against which the heart must work. Second, expansion of dependent vessels in the lower extremities causes blood pooling and reduces return of venous blood to the heart, thereby lowering flow and pressure. For most animals, it is difficult to separate these two effects, but snakes offer the possibility of bending the animal in the region of the heart and manipulating the two ends of the body independently. We studied baroregulatory responses in terrestrial pythons (Liasis fuscus) and aquatic file snakes (Acrochordus arafurae) by tilting only the front or rear parts and then the whole animal. Changes in head blood pressure during partial tilts added up to the change during full tilt. The vertical distance to the head had twice as much influence on head blood pressure than did blood pooling in the pythons and four times as much in file snakes. This accounts for the cephalad location of the heart in terrestrial species compared with aquatic ones.

  4. Investigations into Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress at the Optic Nerve Head in a Rat Model of Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chidlow, Glyn; Wood, John P M; Casson, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    The vascular hypothesis of glaucoma proposes that retinal ganglion cell axons traversing the optic nerve head (ONH) undergo oxygen and nutrient insufficiency as a result of compromised local blood flow, ultimately leading to their degeneration. To date, evidence for the hypothesis is largely circumstantial. Herein, we made use of an induced rat model of glaucoma that features reproducible and widespread axonal transport disruption at the ONH following chronic elevation of intraocular pressure. If vascular insufficiency plays a role in the observed axonal transport failure, there should exist a physical signature at this time point. Using a range of immunohistochemical and molecular tools, we looked for cellular events indicative of vascular insufficiency, including the presence of hypoxia, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible, or antioxidant-response genes, alterations to antioxidant enzymes, increased formation of superoxide, and the presence of oxidative stress. Our data show that ocular hypertension caused selective hypoxia within the laminar ONH in 11/13 eyes graded as either medium or high for axonal transport disruption. Hypoxia was always present in areas featuring injured axons, and, the greater the abundance of axonal transport disruption, the greater the likelihood of a larger hypoxic region. Nevertheless, hypoxic regions were typically focal and were not necessarily evident in sections taken deeper within the same ONH, while disrupted axonal transport was frequently encountered without any discernible hypoxia. Ocular hypertension caused upregulation of heme oxygenase-1-an hypoxia-inducible and redox-sensitive enzyme-in ONH astrocytes. The distribution and abundance of heme oxygenase-1 closely matched that of axonal transport disruption, and encompassed hypoxic regions and their immediate penumbra. Ocular hypertension also caused upregulations in the iron-regulating protein ceruloplasmin, the anaerobic glycolytic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and the

  5. Blood-nerve barrier dysfunction contributes to the generation of neuropathic pain and allows targeting of injured nerves for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tony K Y; Shi, Xiang Qun; Martin, Hiliary Claire; Huang, Hao; Luheshi, Giamal; Rivest, Serge; Zhang, Ji

    2014-05-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a selectively permeable barrier that creates an immunologically and biochemically privileged space for peripheral axons and supporting cells. The breakdown of the BNB allows access of blood-borne (hematogenous) cells and molecules to the endoneurium to engage in the local inflammatory cascade. This process was examined in a mouse model of trauma-associated neuropathic pain. The impact of nerve injury-triggered opening of the BNB in the development of chronic pain behavior was investigated. Partial ligation of the sciatic nerve led to a long-lasting disruption of the BNB distal to the site of injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed by resident macrophages after nerve injury. Intraneural injection of VEGF decreased mechanical thresholds while opening the BNB. Serum from nerve-injured or lipopolysaccharide-treated animals elicited mechanical allodynia in naive animals, when allowed to bypass the BNB by intraneural injection. Intraneural injection of fibrinogen, a clotting protein in plasma that was found to deposit in the nerve after nerve injury, also produced a decrease in mechanical thresholds when introduced into naive nerves. These results demonstrate that blood-borne molecules may play a role in the generation of neuropathic pain, suggesting that pain may be driven from infection or injury, at a distance from the nervous system. Furthermore, the breakdown of the BNB in neuropathic conditions was exploited to permit the entry of analgesic molecules that typically cannot pass the BNB, such as ProToxin-II, a BNB-impermeable Nav1.7 inhibitor. Therapeutics utilizing this mechanism could have selective access to injured nerves over healthy tissues.

  6. On the vagal cardiac nerves, with special reference to the early evolution of the head-trunk interface.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Hyodo, Susumu; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve, or the tenth cranial nerve, innervates the heart in addition to other visceral organs, including the posterior visceral arches. In amniotes, the anterior and posterior cardiac branches arise from the branchial and intestinal portions of the vagus nerve to innervate the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. The evolution of this innervation pattern has yet to be elucidated, due mainly to the lack of morphological data on the vagus in basal vertebrates. To investigate this topic, we observed the vagus nerves of the lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), and mouse (Mus musculus), focusing on the embryonic patterns of the vagal branches in the venous pole. In the lamprey, no vagus branch was found in the venous pole throughout development, whereas the arterial pole was innervated by a branch from the branchial portion. In contrast, the vagus innervated the arterial and venous poles in the mouse and elephant shark. Based on the morphological patterns of these branches, the venous vagal branches of the mouse and elephant shark appear to belong to the intestinal part of the vagus, implying that the cardiac nerve pattern is conserved among crown gnathostomes. Furthermore, we found a topographical shift of the structures adjacent to the venous pole (i.e., the hypoglossal nerve and pronephros) between the extant gnathostomes and lamprey. Phylogenetically, the lamprey morphology is likely to be the ancestral condition for vertebrates, suggesting that the evolution of the venous branch occurred early in the gnathostome lineage, in parallel with the remodeling of the head-trunk interfacial domain during the acquisition of the neck. J. Morphol. 277:1146-1158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Blood nerve barrier in rat and cellular mechanisms of lead-induced segmental demyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Dyck, P.J.; Windebank, A.J.; Low, P.A.; Baumann, W.J.

    1980-11-01

    Feeding of lead carbonate to rats causes widespread and reproducible segmental de- and remyelination of myelinated fibers (MFs) of peripheral nerve. Such segmental demyelination might be explained by increased permeability of endoneurial capillaries to serum containing protein-bound lead. The perineurium of control and lead nerves was impermeable to fluorescein-labeled bovine albumin (FBA) and to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Epineurial capillaries in both conditions allowed HRP to pass freely between and, to a lesser extent, through endothelial cells. Contrary to expectation, flooding of the endoneurium with HRP was seen in only 1 of 36 tissue blocks of lead nerves from rats fed 4% lead carbonate for 7 1/2 and 12 weeks. Abundant HRP reaction product was seen in the epineurium in more than half of these tissue blocks. HRP was not generally found in endoneurial fluid, even in lead nerves with marked edema and widespread segmental de- and remyelination. These findings are against a massive breakdown of the blood nerve barrier. These studies suggest that there may be an increased transfer of HRP through endoneurial cells in lead neuropathy.

  8. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply in the gluteal region: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kanawati, Andrew James

    2014-11-01

    Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply are complex and largely not dealt with in common anatomy texts. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy can be divided into the height of division of its branches, relation of the branches to the piriformis muscle, and its blood supply. These variations should be well known to any surgeon operating in this anatomical region. It is unknown whether these variations increase the risk of surgical injury and consequent morbidity. This paper will review the current knowledge regarding anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve and its blood supply.

  9. A lab-on-a-chip for detection of nerve agent sarin in blood.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2008-06-01

    Sarin (C(4)H(10)FO(2)P,O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is a colourless, odourless and highly toxic phosphonate that acts as a cholinesterase inhibitor and disrupts neuromuscular transmission. Sarin and related phosphonates are chemical warfare agents, and there is a possibility of their application in a military or terrorist attack. This paper reports a lab-on-a-chip device for detecting a trace amount of sarin in a small volume of blood. The device should allow early detection of sarin exposure during medical triage to differentiate between those requiring medical treatment from mass psychogenic illness cases. The device is based on continuous-flow microfluidics with sequential stages for lysis of whole blood, regeneration of free nerve agent from its complex with blood cholinesterase, protein precipitation, filtration, enzyme-assisted reaction and optical detection. Whole blood was first mixed with a nerve gas regeneration agent, followed by a protein precipitation step. Subsequently, the lysed product was filtered on the chip in two steps to remove particulates and fluoride ions. The filtered blood sample was then tested for trace levels of regenerated sarin using immobilised cholinesterase on the chip. Activity of immobilised cholinesterase was monitored by the enzyme-assisted reaction of a substrate and reaction of the end-product with a chromophore. Resultant changes in chromophore-induced absorbance were recorded on the chip using a Z-shaped optical window. Loss of enzyme activity obtained prior and after passage of the treated blood sample, as shown by a decrease in recorded absorbance values, indicates the presence of either free or regenerated sarin in the blood sample. The device was fabricated in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) using CO(2)-laser micromachining. This paper reports the testing results of the different stages, as well as the whole device with all stages in the required assay sequence. The results demonstrate the potential use of a

  10. Radiation treatment inhibits monocyte entry into the optic nerve head and prevents neuronal damage in a mouse model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Gareth R.; Soto, Ileana; Zhu, Xianjun; Ryan, Margaret; Macalinao, Danilo G.; Sousa, Gregory L.; Caddle, Lura B.; MacNicoll, Katharine H.; Barbay, Jessica M.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Anderson, Michael G.; Smith, Richard S.; Clark, Abbot F.; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common ocular disorder that is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. It is characterized by the dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although many studies have implicated various molecules in glaucoma, no mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the earliest detectable damage to RGCs and their axons in the optic nerve. Here, we show that the leukocyte transendothelial migration pathway is activated in the optic nerve head at the earliest stages of disease in an inherited mouse model of glaucoma. This resulted in proinflammatory monocytes entering the optic nerve prior to detectable neuronal damage. A 1-time x-ray treatment prevented monocyte entry and subsequent glaucomatous damage. A single x-ray treatment of an individual eye in young mice provided that eye with long-term protection from glaucoma but had no effect on the contralateral eye. Localized radiation treatment prevented detectable neuronal damage and dysfunction in treated eyes, despite the continued presence of other glaucomatous stresses and signaling pathways. Injection of endothelin-2, a damaging mediator produced by the monocytes, into irradiated eyes, combined with the other glaucomatous stresses, restored neural damage with a topography characteristic of glaucoma. Together, these data support a model of glaucomatous damage involving monocyte entry into the optic nerve. PMID:22426214

  11. Radiation treatment inhibits monocyte entry into the optic nerve head and prevents neuronal damage in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Howell, Gareth R; Soto, Ileana; Zhu, Xianjun; Ryan, Margaret; Macalinao, Danilo G; Sousa, Gregory L; Caddle, Lura B; MacNicoll, Katharine H; Barbay, Jessica M; Porciatti, Vittorio; Anderson, Michael G; Smith, Richard S; Clark, Abbot F; Libby, Richard T; John, Simon W M

    2012-04-01

    Glaucoma is a common ocular disorder that is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. It is characterized by the dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although many studies have implicated various molecules in glaucoma, no mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the earliest detectable damage to RGCs and their axons in the optic nerve. Here, we show that the leukocyte transendothelial migration pathway is activated in the optic nerve head at the earliest stages of disease in an inherited mouse model of glaucoma. This resulted in proinflammatory monocytes entering the optic nerve prior to detectable neuronal damage. A 1-time x-ray treatment prevented monocyte entry and subsequent glaucomatous damage. A single x-ray treatment of an individual eye in young mice provided that eye with long-term protection from glaucoma but had no effect on the contralateral eye. Localized radiation treatment prevented detectable neuronal damage and dysfunction in treated eyes, despite the continued presence of other glaucomatous stresses and signaling pathways. Injection of endothelin-2, a damaging mediator produced by the monocytes, into irradiated eyes, combined with the other glaucomatous stresses, restored neural damage with a topography characteristic of glaucoma. Together, these data support a model of glaucomatous damage involving monocyte entry into the optic nerve.

  12. Transfer of 45Ca and 36Cl at the blood-nerve barrier of the sciatic nerve in rats fed low or high calcium diets

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwani, K.C.; Murphy, V.A.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Unidirectional fluxes of 45Ca, 36Cl, and of (3H)mannitol from blood into the sciatic nerve and cerebral cortex were determined from 5- and 15-min uptakes of these tracers after an intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection in awake rats. Rats were fed diets for 8 wk, that had either a low (0.01% wt/wt), normal (0.67%), or high (3%) Ca content. Plasma (Ca) was 32% less and 11% more in rats fed low (LOCA) and high Ca diets (HICA), respectively, than in rats fed a normal Ca diet (CONT). The mean permeability-surface area product (PA) of 45Ca at the blood-nerve barrier was about eightfold higher than at the blood-brain barrier in the same animals and did not differ significantly between groups (greater than 0.05). Mean PA ratios of 45Ca/36Cl for the blood-nerve and blood-brain barriers in CONT rats, 0.52 {plus minus} 0.04 and 0.40 {plus minus} 0.02, respectively, were not significantly different from corresponding ratios in LOCA and HICA groups, and corresponded to the aqueous limiting diffusion ratio (0.45). The authors results show no evidence for concentration-dependent transport of Ca over a plasma (Ca) range of 0.8-1.4 mmol/liter at the blood-nerve barrier of the rat peripheral nerve, and suggest that Ca and Cl exchange slowly between nerve and blood via paracellular pathways.

  13. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensory stimulation for lowering intraocular pressure, improving blood flow to the optic nerve and neuroprotection in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rom, Edith

    2013-12-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a group of optic neuropathies that can lead to irreversible blindness. Sensory stimulation in the form of acupuncture or ear acupressure may contribute to protecting patients from blindness when used as a complementary method to orthodox treatment in the form of drops, laser or surgery. The objective of this article is to provide a narrative overview of the available literature up to July 2012. It summarises reported evidence on the potential beneficial effects of sensory stimulation for glaucoma. Sensory stimulation appears to significantly enhance the pressure-lowering effect of orthodox treatments. Studies suggest that it may also improve blood flow to the eye and optic nerve head. Furthermore, it may play a role in neuroprotection through regulating nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors, thereby encouraging the survival pathway in contrast to the pathway to apoptosis. Blood flow and neuroprotection are areas that are not directly influenced by orthodox treatment modalities. Numerous different treatment protocols were used to investigate the effect of sensory stimulation on intraocular pressure, blood flow or neuroprotection of the retina and optic nerve in the animal model and human pilot studies. Objective outcomes were reported to have been evaluated with Goldmann tonometry, Doppler ultrasound techniques and electrophysiology (pattern electroretinography, visually evoked potentials), and supported with histological studies in the animal model. Taken together, reported evidence from these studies strongly suggests that sensory stimulation is worthy of further research.

  15. Comparing optic nerve head analysis between confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Roberti, Gloria; Centofanti, Marco; Oddone, Francesco; Tanga, Lucia; Michelessi, Manuele; Manni, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, HRT3, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), RTVue-100, are able to give 3-dimensional (3D) topography images of optic nerve head (ONH) and to derive stereometric parameters and sectorial analysis. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the agreement of these two devices and their diagnostic accuracy to discriminate eyes with glaucoma from those without. Glaucoma patients and healthy control subjects were included. All of them underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including slit lamp evaluation and visual field (VF) test. After pupil dilatation, HRT3 and RTVue-100 were performed. The following stereometric parameters were recorded: disc area, rim area, rim volume, cup volume, cup area, cup/disk ratio, and the following sectors, superotemporal, superonasal, inferotemporal, inferonasal. Forty-six eyes of 46 glaucoma patients and 58 eyes of 58 healthy subjects were included in the study. In both groups, HRT3 rim area and rim volume were statistically higher than RTVue-100 (glaucomas: 0.95 ± 0.38 versus 0.44 ± 0.33 and 0.19 ± 0.13 versus 0.02 ± 0.03, p < 0.01. controls: 1.41 ± 0.30 versus 1.08 ± 0.37 and 0.37 ± 0.13 versus 0.14 ± 0.11, p < 0.01), while cup area was statistically higher by RTVue-100 (glaucomas: 1.42 ± 0.57 versus 1.14 ± 0.58, p < 0.01. controls: 1.05 ± 1.35 versus 0.65 ± 0.48). Bland and Altman plots confirmed the presence of a fixed bias. The parameters with largest AUROC were rim volume, rim area and cup/disk ratio for both instruments. HRT3 inferotemporal sector had the highest sensitivity (80.43%, at 75.9% specificity), while for RTVue-100, the superotemporal sector had the highest sensitivity (76.1%, at 81% specificity). The agreement was moderate for inferotemporal sector and fair for the others. HRT3 and RTVue-100 are not interchangeable for ONH analysis. They both have good diagnostic accuracy, but RTVue

  16. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  17. Accelerated Aging in Glaucoma: Immunohistochemical Assessment of Advanced Glycation End Products in the Human Retina and Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Tezel, Gülgün; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Xiangjun

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to determine the association between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and glaucoma based on the known synergism between oxidative stress with AGEs and the evidence of oxidative stress during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. METHODS The extent and cellular localization of immunolabeling for AGEs and their receptor, RAGE, were determined in histologic sections of the retina and optic nerve head obtained from 38 donor eyes with glaucoma and 30 eyes from age-matched donors without glaucoma. RESULTS The extent of AGE and RAGE immunolabeling was greater in older than in younger donor eyes. However, compared with age-matched controls, an enhanced accumulation of AGEs and an up-regulation of RAGE were detectable in the glaucomatous retina and optic nerve head. Although some retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and glia exhibited intracellular immunolabeling for AGEs, increased AGE immunolabeling in glaucomatous eyes was predominantly extracellular and included laminar cribriform plates in the optic nerve head. Some RAGE immunolabeling was detectable on RGCs; however, increased RAGE immunolabeling in glaucomatous eyes was predominant on glial cells, primarily Müller cells. CONCLUSIONS Given that the generation of AGEs is an age-dependent event, increased AGE accumulation in glaucomatous tissues supports that an accelerated aging process accompanies neurodegeneration in glaucomatous eyes. One of the potential consequences of AGE accumulation in glaucomatous eyes appears to be its contribution to increased rigidity of the lamina cribrosa. The presence of RAGE on RGCs and glia also makes them susceptible to AGE-mediated events through receptor-mediated signaling, which may promote cell death or dysfunction during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. PMID:17325164

  18. Macrophage-Induced Blood Vessels Guide Schwann Cell-Mediated Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Burden, Jemima J.; Van Emmenis, Lucie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Hoving, Julian J.A.; Garcia Calavia, Noelia; Guo, Yanping; McLaughlin, Maeve; Rosenberg, Laura H.; Quereda, Victor; Jamecna, Denisa; Napoli, Ilaria; Parrinello, Simona; Enver, Tariq; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Lloyd, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The peripheral nervous system has remarkable regenerative capacities in that it can repair a fully cut nerve. This requires Schwann cells to migrate collectively to guide regrowing axons across a ‘bridge’ of new tissue, which forms to reconnect a severed nerve. Here we show that blood vessels direct the migrating cords of Schwann cells. This multicellular process is initiated by hypoxia, selectively sensed by macrophages within the bridge, which via VEGF-A secretion induce a polarized vasculature that relieves the hypoxia. Schwann cells then use the blood vessels as “tracks” to cross the bridge taking regrowing axons with them. Importantly, disrupting the organization of the newly formed blood vessels in vivo, either by inhibiting the angiogenic signal or by re-orienting them, compromises Schwann cell directionality resulting in defective nerve repair. This study provides important insights into how the choreography of multiple cell-types is required for the regeneration of an adult tissue. PMID:26279190

  19. Macrophage-Induced Blood Vessels Guide Schwann Cell-Mediated Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Burden, Jemima J; Van Emmenis, Lucie; Mackenzie, Francesca E; Hoving, Julian J A; Garcia Calavia, Noelia; Guo, Yanping; McLaughlin, Maeve; Rosenberg, Laura H; Quereda, Victor; Jamecna, Denisa; Napoli, Ilaria; Parrinello, Simona; Enver, Tariq; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Lloyd, Alison C

    2015-08-27

    The peripheral nervous system has remarkable regenerative capacities in that it can repair a fully cut nerve. This requires Schwann cells to migrate collectively to guide regrowing axons across a 'bridge' of new tissue, which forms to reconnect a severed nerve. Here we show that blood vessels direct the migrating cords of Schwann cells. This multicellular process is initiated by hypoxia, selectively sensed by macrophages within the bridge, which via VEGF-A secretion induce a polarized vasculature that relieves the hypoxia. Schwann cells then use the blood vessels as "tracks" to cross the bridge taking regrowing axons with them. Importantly, disrupting the organization of the newly formed blood vessels in vivo, either by inhibiting the angiogenic signal or by re-orienting them, compromises Schwann cell directionality resulting in defective nerve repair. This study provides important insights into how the choreography of multiple cell-types is required for the regeneration of an adult tissue. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Oxidative modification of rat blood proteins after destruction capsaicin-sensitive nerve and change of nitric oxide level].

    PubMed

    Tolochko, Z S; Spiridonov, V K

    2010-01-01

    Content of blood protein carbonyl derivates in rats are determined to assess oxidative modification of protein after destruction of capsaicin-sensitive nerve and change of nitric oxide (NO) level. Deafferentation of these nerves produces increase of the protein carbonyl derivates content. The increase of NO by L-arginine does not affect protein oxidative destruction produced by ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve. Selective inhibitor of neuronal synthase NO (n-NOS) 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) results in similar effect. L-NAME increased oxidative destruction of proteins. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve induces oxidative destruction of proteins. NO has party to mediating oxidative modification of proteins.

  1. [Artificial control of blood-nerve barrier: a novel therapeutic approach to peripheral neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Kanda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a "Janus-faced" structure for the peripheral nerve parenchyma. Healthy BNB may contribute to stabilize the internal milleu of peripheral nervous system (PNS) and to stop the entrance of toxic substances and harmful leukocytes into nerve parenchyma. On the other hand, healthy BNB may sometimes be a drawback because the peripheral nerve parenchyma cannot receive enough amount of nutrients and growth factors and cannot excrete toxic substances into systemic circulation because of its presence. Here we present a future therapeutic strategy to control BNB function, based on the basic knowledge acquired from recently developed human immortalized cell lines of BNB origin. If we can artificially regulate the BNB permeability and the expression of adhesion molecules on the surface of BNB-forming endothelial cells, and stop the entrance of toxic substances as well as pathogenic leukocytes into PNS parenchyma, the treatment of inflammatory neuropathies may make great progresses. For hereditary, metabolic and ischemic neuropathies, the promotion of the entrance of growth factors into PNS parenchyma and of the excretion of toxic substances should powerfully encourage the regeneration of axons.

  2. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xue-man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  3. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery.

  4. Transfer of a motor fascicle from the ulnar nerve to the branch of the radial nerve destined to the long head of the triceps for restoration of elbow extension in brachial plexus surgery: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-02-01

    Restoration of elbow extension has not been considered of much importance regarding functional outcomes in brachial plexus surgery; however, the flexion of the elbow joint is only fully effective if the motion can be stabilized, what can be achieved solely if the triceps brachii is coactivated. To present a novel nerve transfer of a healthy motor fascicle from the ulnar nerve to the nerve of the long head of the triceps to restore the elbow extension function in brachial plexus injuries involving the upper and middle trunks. Case 1 is a 32-year-old man sustaining a right brachial extended upper plexus injury in a motorcycle accident 5 months before admission. The computed tomography myelogram demonstrated avulsion of the C5 and C6 roots. Case 2 is a 24-year-old man who sustained a C5-C7 injury to the left brachial plexus in a traffic accident 4 months before admission. Computed tomography myelogram demonstrated signs of C6 and C7 root avulsion. The technique included an incision at the medial border of the biceps, in the proximal third of the involved arm, followed by identification of the ulnar nerve, the radial nerve, and the branch to the long head of the triceps. The proximal stump of a motor fascicle from the ulnar nerve was sutured directly to the distal stump of the nerve of the long head of the triceps. Techniques to restore elbow flexion and shoulder abduction were applied in both cases. Triceps strength Medical Research Council M4 grade was obtained in both cases. The attempted nerve transfer was effective for restoration of elbow extension in primary brachial plexus surgery; however, it should be selected only for cases in which other reliable donor nerves were used to restore elbow flexion.

  5. Relation with preoperative fructosamine and autonomic nerve function and blood pressure during anesthesia in diabetics: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Goto, Y; Sugiura, Y; Yanagimoto, M; Yasuda, Y; Suzuki, H; Hasegawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Many diabetics may have a high risk involving the cardiovascular system. In an attempt to predict the intraoperative risks of diabetics during anesthesia, we evaluated retrospectively the relationship among the biochemical assay or autonomic nerve function obtained as parts of the preoperative examination, and the blood pressure changes relating to the stimulation of intubation and extubation for anesthesia. In 40 diabetic surgical patients examined the biochemical assay (HbA1c, fructosamine level and blood glucose level) beforehand, the autonomic nerve function was quantified preoperatively by analysis of ECG R-R variability recorded in supine and subsequent standing position using an HRV analyzer, and some parameters of autonomic nerve function especially responsive sympathetic nerve activities were obtained. We assessed the correlation with systolic blood pressure changes in these cases at intubation for general anesthesia comparing to similar conditioned 40 non-diabetics. A diabetics with low vagal activity became larger systolic blood pressure afterdrop at tracheal intubation for anesthesia (r=0.513, p<0.001). Otherwise the blood pressure afterdrop at extubation became larger in a non-diabetics with high sympathetic activity (r=0.502, p<0.001). The preoperative fructosamine concentration in diabetics correlated positively with the responsive sympathetic nerve irritability index; "mRR(sup)-RRmin(std)" (r=0.432, p<0.05) and the responsive sympathetic nerve excitability index; "mRR(sup-std)" (r=0.448, p<0.05). However HbA1c had no correlation with these parameters of autonomic nerve function and blood pressure rise at tracheal intubation. Because of above correlation with blood pressure rise at intubation for anesthesia induction, the preoperative fructosamine examination and the responsive sympathetic nerve function test must be useful preoperative examination for detection of the unexpected heart events of diabetic patients during operation.

  6. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  7. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Nerve system and mutual interaction between bone and blood vessel].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hiroki; Takeda, Shu

    2014-07-01

    The identification that nervous system controls bone metabolism through leptin deficient mice studies opened a new field in bone biology. Notably, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve system regulate bone metabolism. In addition, sensory nerve system also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis. On the other hand, traditionally, it is well known that invasion of vessels into cartilage during the skeletal development is important for normal bone formation. And, the decrease of angiogenesis with aging leads to low bone mass and delaying of fracture healing. Although these indicate that blood vessel activity is closely related to bone remodeling, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. Most recently, the mechanism of coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis by a specific vessel subtype in bone was reported.

  8. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Hubbard, S.L.; Reger, S.I.; Miller, E.D.; Stamp, W.G.

    1983-12-01

    Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings.

  9. A novel method for measuring hydraulic conductivity at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helton, E Scott; Palladino, Steven; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular barrier permeability to water is an essential biophysical property required for the homeostatic maintenance of unique tissue microenvironments. This is of particular importance in peripheral nerves where strict control of ionic concentrations is needed for axonal signal transduction. Previous studies have associated inflammation, trauma, toxin exposure and metabolic disease with increases in water influx and hydrostatic pressure in peripheral nerves with resultant endoneurial edema that may impair axonal function. The regulation of water permeability across endoneurial microvessels that form the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is poorly understood. Variations exist in apparatus and methods used to measure hydraulic conductivity. The objective of the study was to develop a simplified hydraulic conductivity system using commercially available components to evaluate the BNB. We determined the mean hydraulic conductivity of cultured confluent primary and immortalized human endoneurial endothelial cell layers as 2.00×10(-7) and 2.17×10(-7)cm/s/cm H₂O respectively, consistent with restrictive microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. We also determined the mean hydraulic conductivity of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell layers, a commonly used blood-brain barrier (BBB) cell line, as 0.20×10(-7)cm/s/cm H₂O, implying a mean 10-fold higher resistance to transendothelial water flux in the brain compared to peripheral nerves. To our knowledge, this is the first reported measurement of human BNB and BBB hydraulic conductivities. This model represents an important tool to further characterize the human BNB and deduce the molecular determinants and signaling mechanisms responsible for BNB hydraulic conductivity in normal and disease states in vitro.

  10. The role of blood vessels in high-resolution volume conductor head modeling of EEG.

    PubMed

    Fiederer, L D J; Vorwerk, J; Lucka, F; Dannhauer, M; Yang, S; Dümpelmann, M; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Aertsen, A; Speck, O; Wolters, C H; Ball, T

    2016-03-01

    Reconstruction of the electrical sources of human EEG activity at high spatio-temporal accuracy is an important aim in neuroscience and neurological diagnostics. Over the last decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that realistic modeling of head anatomy improves the accuracy of source reconstruction of EEG signals. For example, including a cerebro-spinal fluid compartment and the anisotropy of white matter electrical conductivity were both shown to significantly reduce modeling errors. Here, we for the first time quantify the role of detailed reconstructions of the cerebral blood vessels in volume conductor head modeling for EEG. To study the role of the highly arborized cerebral blood vessels, we created a submillimeter head model based on ultra-high-field-strength (7T) structural MRI datasets. Blood vessels (arteries and emissary/intraosseous veins) were segmented using Frangi multi-scale vesselness filtering. The final head model consisted of a geometry-adapted cubic mesh with over 17×10(6) nodes. We solved the forward model using a finite-element-method (FEM) transfer matrix approach, which allowed reducing computation times substantially and quantified the importance of the blood vessel compartment by computing forward and inverse errors resulting from ignoring the blood vessels. Our results show that ignoring emissary veins piercing the skull leads to focal localization errors of approx. 5 to 15mm. Large errors (>2cm) were observed due to the carotid arteries and the dense arterial vasculature in areas such as in the insula or in the medial temporal lobe. Thus, in such predisposed areas, errors caused by neglecting blood vessels can reach similar magnitudes as those previously reported for neglecting white matter anisotropy, the CSF or the dura - structures which are generally considered important components of realistic EEG head models. Our findings thus imply that including a realistic blood vessel compartment in EEG head models will be helpful to

  11. The role of blood vessels in high-resolution volume conductor head modeling of EEG

    PubMed Central

    Fiederer, L.D.J.; Vorwerk, J.; Lucka, F.; Dannhauer, M.; Yang, S.; Dümpelmann, M.; Schulze-Bonhage, A.; Aertsen, A.; Speck, O.; Wolters, C.H.; Ball, T.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of the electrical sources of human EEG activity at high spatiotemporal accuracy is an important aim in neuroscience and neurological diagnostics. Over the last decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that realistic modeling of head anatomy improves the accuracy of source reconstruction of EEG signals. For example, including a cerebrospinal fluid compartment and the anisotropy of white matter electrical conductivity were both shown to significantly reduce modeling errors. Here, we for the first time quantify the role of detailed reconstructions of the cerebral blood vessels in volume conductor head modeling for EEG. To study the role of the highly arborized cerebral blood vessels, we created a submillimeter head model based on ultra-high-field-strength (7 T) structural MRI datasets. Blood vessels (arteries and emissary/intraosseous veins) were segmented using Frangi multi-scale vesselness filtering. The final head model consisted of a geometry-adapted cubic mesh with over 17 × 106 nodes. We solved the forward model using a finite-element-method (FEM) transfer matrix approach, which allowed reducing computation times substantially and quantified the importance of the blood vessel compartment by computing forward and inverse errors resulting from ignoring the blood vessels. Our results show that ignoring emissary veins piercing the skull leads to focal localization errors of approx. 5 to 15 mm. Large errors (>2 cm) were observed due to the carotid arteries and the dense arterial vasculature in areas such as in the insula or in the medial temporal lobe. Thus, in such predisposed areas, errors caused by neglecting blood vessels can reach similar magnitudes as those previously reported for neglecting white matter anisotropy, the CSF or the dura — structures which are generally considered important components of realistic EEG head models. Our findings thus imply that including a realistic blood vessel compartment in EEG head models will be helpful to

  12. Comparison of CCD-equipped laser speckle flowgraphy with hydrogen gas clearance method in the measurement of optic nerve head microcirculation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Tokushige, Hideki; Maeno, Takatoshi; Nakazawa, Toru; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Araie, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the correlation between mean blur rate (MBR) obtained with CCD-equipped laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) and capillary blood flow (CBF) obtained by the hydrogen gas clearance method in rabbit optic nerve head (ONH). Using Japanese white rabbits under systemic anesthesia, a hydrogen electrode was inserted an area of the ONH free from superficial capillaries. MBR was measured with LSFG near the hydrogen electrode. CBF and MBR were measured in the range of 32.4-83.5 mL/min/100 g and 3.5-6.0, respectively. MBR and CBF were significantly correlated (r = 0.73, P < 0.01, n = 14). After inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) or intravenous administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), MBR and CBF were changed in the relative range of 0.74-1.27 and 0.76-1.35, respectively. The relative changes in MBR and CBF induced by CO(2) and ET-1 were also significantly correlated (r = 0.67, P < 0.01). The current results suggest that MBR may correlate with CBF and also change with CBF, as an index of blood flow in the ONH, linearly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biology of the blood-nerve barrier and its alteration in immune mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic and competent interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and the surrounding extracellular space or blood. It is localised at the innermost layer of the multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels, and is the key structure that controls the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma. Since the endoneurial BNB is the point of entry for pathogenic T cells and various soluble factors, including cytokines, chemokines and immunoglobulins, understanding this structure is important to prevent and treat human immune mediated neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein and skin changes) syndrome and a subset of diabetic neuropathy. However, compared with the blood-brain barrier, only limited knowledge has been accumulated regarding the function, cell biology and clinical significance of the BNB. This review describes the basic structure and functions of the endoneurial BNB, provides an update of the biology of the cells comprising the BNB, and highlights the pathology and pathomechanisms of BNB breakdown in immune mediated neuropathies. The human immortalised cell lines of BNB origin established in our laboratory will facilitate the future development of BNB research. Potential therapeutic strategies for immune mediated neuropathies manipulating the BNB are also discussed.

  14. Annulus fissures are mechanically and chemically conducive to the ingrowth of nerves and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Stefanakis, Manos; Al-Abbasi, Maan; Harding, Ian; Pollintine, Phillip; Dolan, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Adams, Michael A

    2012-10-15

    Mechanical and biochemical analyses of cadaveric and surgically removed discs. To test the hypothesis that fissures in the annulus of degenerated human discs are mechanically and chemically conducive to the ingrowth of nerves and blood vessels. Discogenic back pain is closely associated with fissures in the annulus fibrosus, and with the ingrowth of nerves and blood vessels. Three complementary studies were performed. First, 15 cadaveric discs that contained a major annulus fissure were subjected to 1 kN compression, while a miniature pressure transducer was pulled through the disc to obtain distributions of matrix compressive stress perpendicular to the fissure axis. Second, Safranin O staining was used to evaluate focal loss of proteoglycans from within annulus fissures in 25 surgically removed disc samples. Third, in 21 cadaveric discs, proteoglycans (sulfated glycosaminoglycans [sGAGs]) and water concentration were measured biochemically in disrupted regions of annulus containing 1 or more fissures, and in adjacent intact regions. Reductions in compressive stress within annulus fissures averaged 36% to 46%, and could have been greater at the fissure axis. Stress reductions were greater in degenerated discs, and were inversely related to nucleus pressure (R(2) = 47%; P = 0.005). Safranin O stain intensity indicated that proteoglycan concentration was typically reduced by 40% at a distance of 600 μm from the fissure axis, and the width of the proteoglycan-depleted zone increased with age (P < 0.006; R(2) = 0.29) and with general proteoglycan loss (P < 0.001; R(2) = 0.32). Disrupted regions of annulus contained 36% to 54% less proteoglycans than adjacent intact regions from the same discs, although water content was reduced only slightly. Annulus fissures provide a low-pressure microenvironment that allows focal proteoglycan loss, leaving a matrix that is conducive to nerve and blood vessel ingrowth.

  15. Automatic, operator-adjusted, and manual disc-definition for optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer measurements with the RTVue-100 optical coherence tomograph.

    PubMed

    Garas, Anita; Vargha, Pèter; Holló, Gábor

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the repeatability and between-methods differences of optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements as made with the automatic, operator-adjusted, and manual disc-definition functions of the RTVue-100 Fourier-domain optical coherence tomograph. One eye of each of 126 persons (72 glaucomatous, 10 ocular hypertensive, 44 healthy control eyes) was analyzed with all 3 disc-definition functions. Thirty-three eyes were imaged 5 times for the determination of measurement repeatability. For several parameters, repeatability with automatic disc definition was significantly poorer than the other options. In contrast, for all but 1 parameter repeatability did not differ between the manual and operator-adjusted methods. Refractive error, disease category or peripapillary atrophy had no influence on repeatability. However, the measured values differed significantly between the methods, for all but 3 parameters. Similar between-method differences were seen for eyes irrespective of glaucoma, refractive error, or parapapillary atrophy. High intraclass correlation (93.5% to 99.9%) was seen for all parameters measured with manual and operator-adjusted methods, but in the other comparisons only for RNFLT parameters. Agreement of the classifications was better for RNFLT parameters than disc parameters, and the κ-values were highest (0.881 to 0.968) in comparing the manual and operator-adjusted methods. Measurement repeatability with manual and operator-adjusted disc-definition functions is similar and is not influenced by refractive error, glaucoma, or parapapillary atrophy. The high intraclass correlation and the agreement of diagnostic classifications suggest that operator-adjusted disc-definition can be useful for glaucoma detection with the RTVue-100 Fourier-domain optical coherence tomograph.

  16. Effect of Photorefractive Keratectomy on Optic Nerve Head Topography and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measured by Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3

    PubMed Central

    Nilforushan, Naveed; Azadi, Pejvak; Soudi, Reza; Shaheen, Yahya; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) has a significant effect on optic nerve head (ONH) parameters and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured by the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (Heidelberg Engineering GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany) in eyes with low to moderate myopia. Methods: This prospective, interventional case series, includes 43 consecutive myopic eyes which were assessed on the day of PRK and 3 months postoperatively using the HRT3. Among the stereometric parameters, we compared disc area, linear cup disc ratio, cup shape measure, global rim area, global rim volume, RNFL height variation contour and mean RNFL thickness; out of the Glaucoma Probability Score (GPS) we assessed changes in global value, rim steepness temporal/superior, and temporal/inferior, as well as cup size and cup depth before and after PRK. Results: Mean refractive error before and after PRK were −3.24 ± 1.31 and −0.20 ± 0.42 diopters, respectively. No significant change occurred in disc area, linear cup disc ratio, cup shape measure, rim area and rim volume among the stereometric parameters; and in rim steepness temporal/superior and rim steepness temporal/inferior in the GPS before and after PRK using the default average keratometry. However, RNFL height variation contour, mean RNFL thickness, and cup size and depth were significantly altered after PRK (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PRK can affect some HRT3 parameters. Although the most important stereometric parameters for differentiating normal, suspect or glaucomatous patients such as rim and cup measurements in stereometric parameters were not changed. PMID:27413492

  17. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of the Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Teresa C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that video-rate spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) can qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) glaucomatous structural changes. To correlate quantitative SDOCT parameters with disc photography and visual fields. Methods: SDOCT images from 4 glaucoma eyes (4 patients) with varying stages of open-angle glaucoma (ie, early, moderate, late) were qualitatively contrasted with 2 age-matched normal eyes (2 patients). Of 61 other consecutive patients recruited in an institutional setting, 53 eyes (33 patients) met inclusion/exclusion criteria for quantitative studies. Images were obtained using two experimental SDOCT systems, one utilizing a superluminescent diode and the other a titanium:sapphire laser source, with axial resolutions of about 6 μm and 3 μm, respectively. Results: Classic glaucomatous ONH and RNFL structural changes were seen in SDOCT images. An SDOCT reference plane 139 μm above the retinal pigment epithelium yielded cup-disc ratios that best correlated with masked physician disc photography cup-disc ratio assessments. The minimum distance band, a novel SDOCT neuroretinal rim parameter, showed good correlation with physician cup-disc ratio assessments, visual field mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation (P values range, .0003–.024). RNFL and retinal thickness maps correlated well with disc photography and visual field testing. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this thesis presents the first comprehensive qualitative and quantitative evaluation of SDOCT images of the ONH and RNFL in glaucoma. This pilot study provides basis for developing more automated quantitative SDOCT-specific glaucoma algorithms needed for future prospective multicenter national trials. PMID:20126502

  18. Blood pressure control with selective vagal nerve stimulation and minimal side effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Cota, Oscar; Espinosa, Nayeli; Boeser, Fabian; Herrera, Taliana C.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Hypertension is the largest threat to patient health and a burden to health care systems. Despite various options, 30% of patients do not respond sufficiently to medical treatment. Mechanoreceptors in the aortic arch relay blood pressure (BP) levels through vagal nerve (VN) fibers to the brainstem and trigger the baroreflex, lowering the BP. Selective electrical stimulation of these nerve fibers reduced BP in rats. However, there is no technique described to localize and stimulate these fibers inside the VN without inadvertent stimulation of non-baroreceptive fibers causing side effects like bradycardia and bradypnea. Approach. We present a novel method for selective VN stimulation to reduce BP without the aforementioned side effects. Baroreceptor compound activity of rat VN (n = 5) was localized using a multichannel cuff electrode, true tripolar recording and a coherent averaging algorithm triggered by BP or electrocardiogram. Main results. Tripolar stimulation over electrodes near the barofibers reduced the BP without triggering significant bradycardia and bradypnea. The BP drop was adjusted to 60% of the initial value by varying the stimulation pulse width and duration, and lasted up to five times longer than the stimulation. Significance. The presented method is robust to impedance changes, independent of the electrode's relative position, does not compromise the nerve and can run on implantable, ultra-low power signal processors.

  19. Human muscle nerve sympathetic activity at rest. Relationship to blood pressure and age

    PubMed Central

    Sundlöf, G.; Wallin, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    1. Recordings of multi-unit sympathetic activity were made from median or peroneal muscle nerve fascicles in thirty-three healthy subjects, resting in recumbent position. Simultaneous recordings of intra-arterial blood pressure were made in seventeen subjects. The neural activity, quantified by counting the number of pulse synchronous sympathetic bursts in the mean voltage neurogram (burst incidence), was plotted against the arterial blood pressure level and the age of the subjects. The effects of spontaneous temporary blood pressure fluctuations were studied by correlating different pressure parameters of individual heart beats to the probability of occurrence of a sympathetic burst and to the amplitude of the occurring burst. 2. Between different subjects there were marked differences in burst incidence, from less than 10 to more than 90 bursts/100 heart beats. No correlation was found to interindividual differences in the arterial blood pressure level but there was a slight tendency for increasing burst incidence with increasing age. 3. Irrespective of the magnitude of the burst incidence, the bursts always occurred more frequently during spontaneous transient blood pressure reductions than during transient increases in blood pressure. When, for each heart cycle, the occurrence of a sympathetic burst was correlated with different blood pressure parameters there was regularly a close negative correlation to diastolic pressure, a low correlation to systolic and an intermediary negative correlation to mean blood pressure. There was a positive correlation to pulse pressure and to pulse interval. 4. When measured for individual heart beats, not only the occurrence but also the mean voltage amplitude of the sympathetic bursts tended to increase with decreasing diastolic pressure. 5. In a given subject when comparing heart beats with the same diastolic pressure, the occurrence as well as the amplitude of the sympathetic bursts was higher for heart beats occurring

  20. Blood-Sparing Techniques in Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Mindy R; Cognetti, David M; Nyquist, Gurston G

    2016-06-01

    Given the risks and potential complications of allogenic blood transfusion (ABT), as well as the expanding population of patients for whom ABT may not be an option, it is important for the treating physician, anesthesiologist, and surgeon to be well-versed in various alternatives. A good grasp of the concepts discussed in this article will help to customize a treatment plan that is specific to each patient's underlying disease and personal preferences without compromising appropriate medical care.

  1. Steep head-down tilt has persisting effects on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A Cortney; Levin, David L; Hopkins, Susan R; Olfert, I Mark; Buxton, Richard B; Prisk, G Kim

    2006-08-01

    Head-down tilt has been shown to increase lung water content in animals and alter the distribution of ventilation in humans; however, its effects on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow in humans are unknown. We hypothesized that head-down tilt would increase the heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in humans, an effect analogous to the changes seen in the distribution of ventilation, by increasing capillary hydrostatic pressure and fluid efflux in the lung. To test this, we evaluated changes in the distribution of pulmonary blood flow in seven normal subjects before and after 1 h of 30 degrees head-down tilt using the magnetic resonance imaging technique of arterial spin labeling. Data were acquired in triplicate before tilt and at 10-min intervals for 1 h after tilt. Pulmonary blood flow heterogeneity was quantified by the relative dispersion (standard deviation/mean) of signal intensity for all voxels within the right lung. Relative dispersion was significantly increased by 29% after tilt and remained elevated during the 1 h of measurements after tilt (0.84 +/- 0.06 pretilt, 1.09 +/- 0.09 calculated for all time points posttilt, P < 0.05). We speculate that the mechanism most likely responsible for our findings is that increased pulmonary capillary pressures and fluid efflux in the lung resulting from head-down tilt alters regional blood flow distribution.

  2. Imaging blood vessels of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, R J

    1995-01-01

    ATHEROSCLEROTIC DISEASE: Patients with transient ischaemic attacks or a non-disabling stroke who are surgical candidates should be screened with Doppler ultrasound, or MRA/CT, or both. The choice will depend on local expertise and availability. If DUS is used it is recommended that the equipment is regularly calibrated and a prospective audit of results, particularly of those patients that go on to angiography, is maintained locally. Those patients found to have the DUS equivalent of a 50% stenosis should have angiography only if surgical or balloon angioplasty treatment is contemplated. Angiography should be performed with meticulous technique to minimise risks. ANEURYSM AND ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS: Angiography remains the investigation of choice for patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography and CT can demonstrate the larger aneurysm but because even small aneurysms can rupture with devastating effects, these techniques are not the examination of first choice. Angiography is also the only technique that adequately defines the neck of an aneurysm. This information is becoming increasingly important in management decisions-for instance, whether to clip or use a coil. Likewise angiography is the only technique to fully define the vascular anatomy of arteriovenous malformations although the size of the nidus can be monitored by MRA and this is a useful method of follow up after stereotactic radiosurgery, embolisation, or surgery. There are specific uses for MRA such as in patients presenting with a painful 3rd nerve palsy and as a screening test for those patients with a strong family history of aneurysms. VASCULITIS, FIBROMUSCULAR HYPERPLASIA, AND DISSECTION: These rare arterial diseases are best detected by angiography, although there are increasing reports of successful diagnosis by MRA. There are traps for the many unwary and MRA does not give an anatomical depiction of the arteries but a flow map. Slow flow may lead to signal loss

  3. Visualization of the 3-D topography of the optic nerve head through a passive stereo vision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Juan M.; Mitra, Sunanda; Morales, Jose

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a system for surface recovery and visualization of the 3D topography of the optic nerve head, as support of early diagnosis and follow up to glaucoma. In stereo vision, depth information is obtained from triangulation of corresponding points in a pair of stereo images. In this paper, the use of the cepstrum transformation as a disparity measurement technique between corresponding windows of different block sizes is described. This measurement process is embedded within a coarse-to-fine depth-from-stereo algorithm, providing an initial range map with the depth information encoded as gray levels. These sparse depth data are processed through a cubic B-spline interpolation technique in order to obtain a smoother representation. This methodology is being especially refined to be used with medical images for clinical evaluation of some eye diseases such as open angle glaucoma, and is currently under testing for clinical evaluation and analysis of reproducibility and accuracy.

  4. The Connective Tissue Components of Optic Nerve Head Cupping in Monkey Experimental Glaucoma Part 1: Global Change

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Ren, Ruojin; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, Crawford; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue change within 21 monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) eyes, so as to identify its principal components. Methods Animals were imaged three to five times at baseline then every 2 weeks following chronic unilateral IOP elevation, and euthanized early through end-stage confocal scanning laser tomographic change. Optic nerve heads were serial-sectioned, three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall EG versus control eye differences were assessed by general estimating equations (GEE). Significant, animal-specific, EG eye change was required to exceed the maximum physiologic intereye differences in six healthy animals. Results Overall EG eye change was significant (P < 0.0026) and animal-specific EG eye change most frequent, for five phenomena (number of EG eyes and range of animal-specific change): posterior laminar deformation (21, −29 to −437 μm), laminar thickening (11, 20–73 μm) and thinning (3, −23 to −31 μm), scleral canal expansion (17, 20–139 μm), outward anterior (16, −16 to −124 μm) and posterior (17, −22 to −279 μm) laminar insertion migration, and peripapillary scleral bowing (11, 21–77 μm). Experimental glaucoma versus control eye laminar thickness differences were bimodal in behavior, being thickened in most EG eyes demonstrating the least deformation and less thickened or thinned in most EG eyes demonstrating the greatest deformation. Conclusions Our postmortem studies retrospectively identify five connective tissue components of ONH “cupping” in monkey EG which serve as targets for longitudinally staging and phenotyping ONH connective tissue alteration within all forms of monkey and human optic neuropathy. PMID:26641545

  5. The acute morphologic changes that occur at the optic nerve head induced by medical reduction of intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Sarah P; Swift, Louise; Eke, Tom; Broadway, David C

    2007-09-01

    The mechanical theory of glaucoma postulates that raised intraocular pressure (IOP) causes laminar distortion resulting in damage to axons at the optic nerve head. There is some evidence that the change in morphology may occur over a short time course. The aim of this paper was to detail the acute morphologic changes at the optic nerve head when IOP was lowered with medical therapy in a clinical population. Subjects referred to the glaucoma clinic that had a documented IOP of over 28 mm Hg, on no treatment, in one or both eyes were included. Tonometry, pachymetry, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy were performed before and after lowering IOP with topical apraclonidine and oral acetazolamide. The significance of change in outcome variables was assessed using a paired t test allowing for dependence within subjects and, for sensitivity, with a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Data were obtained from 38 eyes of 19 patients with a mean age of 67 years. After lowering IOP for only 1 hour, there was a significant decrease in mean cup volume (mean change in volume below surface 26.8 microm3, P< or =0.001) and mean cup depth (13.8 microm, P<0.01), there being a corresponding increase in mean rim area (37.3 microm2, P<0.034). There was no statistically significant change in central corneal thickness after administration of the IOP lowering medications. In the present study, it was shown that acute and statistically significant alterations in optic disc morphology occur when IOP is lowered medically with a combination of topical apraclonidine and systemic acetazolamide. The technique, therefore, may be useful to further investigate subgroups of glaucomatous eyes and test etiologic hypotheses.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography of the Swollen Optic Nerve Head: Deformation of the Peripapillary Retinal Pigment Epithelium Layer in Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick; Mandel, Gary; Durbin, Mary; Kardon, Randy H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the biomechanical deformation of load bearing structures of the optic nerve head (ONH) resulting from raised intracranial pressure, using high definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT). The authors postulate that elevated intracranial pressure induces forces in the retrolaminar subarachnoid space that can deform ONH structures, particularly the peripapillary Bruch's membrane (BM) and RPE layers. Methods. The authors compared HD-OCT optic nerve and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) findings in eyes with papilledema caused by raised intracranial pressure to findings in eyes with optic disc swelling caused by optic neuritis and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), conditions without intracranial hypertension. The authors measured average thickness of the RNFL and the angle of the RPE/BM at the temporal and nasal borders of the neural canal opening. The angle was measured as positive with inward (toward the vitreous) angulation and as negative with outward angulation. Results. Of 30 eyes with papilledema, 20 eyes (67%) had positive RPE/BM rim angles. One of eight optic neuritis (12%) eyes and 1 of 12 NAION (8%) eyes had positive angulation. In five eyes with papilledema, RNFL thickening increased, three of which developed positive RPE/BM angles. On follow-up, 22 papilledema eyes had a reduction of RNFL swelling, and 17 of these eyes had less positive RPE/BM angulation. Conclusions. In papilledema, the RPE/BM is commonly deflected inward, in contrast to eyes with NAION or optic neuritis. The RPE/BM angulation is presumed to be caused by elevated pressure in the subarachnoid space, does not correlate with the amount of RNFL swelling, and resolves as papilledema subsides. PMID:21705690

  7. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  8. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images.

    PubMed

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N; Zangwill, Linda M

    2014-03-18

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  9. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the “non-progressing” and “progressing” glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection. PMID:25606299

  10. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  11. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe.

    PubMed

    Brøndum, E; Hasenkam, J M; Secher, N H; Bertelsen, M F; Grøndahl, C; Petersen, K K; Buhl, R; Aalkjaer, C; Baandrup, U; Nygaard, H; Smerup, M; Stegmann, F; Sloth, E; Ostergaard, K H; Nissen, P; Runge, M; Pitsillides, K; Wang, T

    2009-10-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow remained unchanged. Cardiac output was reduced by 30%, CVP decreased to -1 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.01), and jugular flow ceased as the jugular cross-sectional area increased to 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (P < 0.01), corresponding to accumulation of approximately 1.2 l of blood in the veins. When the head was raised, the jugular veins collapsed and blood was returned to the central circulation, and CVP and cardiac output were restored. The results demonstrate that in the upright-positioned, anesthetized giraffe cerebral blood flow is governed by arterial pressure without support of a siphon mechanism and that when the head is lowered, blood accumulates in the vein, affecting MAP.

  12. Movement of retinal vessels toward the optic nerve head after increasing intraocular pressure in monkey eyes with experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Atsumi; Enomoto, Nobuko; Ishida, Kyoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Horai, Naoto; Onoe, Hirotaka; Hara, Hideaki; Tomita, Goji

    2017-09-01

    A shift or displacement of the retinal blood vessels (RBVs) with neuroretinal rim thinning indicates the progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In chronic open angle glaucoma, individuals with RBV positional shifts exhibit more rapid visual field loss than those without RBV shifts. The retinal vessels reportedly move onto the optic nerve head (ONH) in response to glaucoma damage, suggesting that RBVs are pulled toward the ONH in response to increased cupping. Whether this phenomenon only applies to RVBs located in the vicinity or inside the ONH or, more generally, to RBVs also located far from the ONH, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the movement of RBVs located relatively far from the ONH edge after increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) in an experimental monkey model of glaucoma. Fundus photographs were obtained in 17 monkeys. High IOP was induced in the monkeys by laser photocoagulation burns applied uniformly with 360° irradiation around the trabecular meshwork of the left eye. The right eye was left intact and used as a non-treated control. Considering the circadian rhythm of IOP, it was measured in both eyes of each animal at around the same time-points. Then, fundus photographs were obtained. Using Image J image analysis software, an examiner (N.E.) measured the fundus photographs at two time-points, i.e. before laser treatment (time 1) and the last fundus photography after IOP elevation (time 2). The following parameters were measured (in pixels): 1) vertical diameter of the ONH (DD), 2) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the superior branch of the central retinal vein (UV), 3) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the inferior branch of the central retinal vein (LV), 4) ONH area, and 5) surface area of the cup of the ONH. We calculated the ratios of UV to DD (UV/DD), LV to DD (LV/DD), and the cup area to disc area ratio (C/D). The mean UV/DD at time 1 (0.656 ± 0.233) was

  13. Cerebral blood velocity and other cardiovascular responses to 2 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary A. B.; Mader, Thomas H.; Bagian, James P.; Charles, John B.; Meehan, Richard T.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body, and space motion sickness, which is a problem during the first few days of space flight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system. To evaluate possible changes in cerebral blood flow during simulated weightlessness, we measured blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) along with retinal vascular diameters, intraocular pressure, impedance cardiography, and sphygmomanometry on nine men (26.2 +/- 6.6 yr) morning and evening for 2 days during continuous 10 deg head-down tilt (HDT). When subjects went from seated to head-down bed rest, their heart rate and retinal diameters decreased, and intraocular pressures increased. After 48 h of HDT, blood flow velocity in the MCA was decreased and thoracic impedance was increased, indicating less fluid in the thorax. Percent changes in blood flow velocities in the MCA after 48 h of HDT were inversely correlated with percent changes in retinal vascular diameters. Blood flow velocities in the MCA were inversely correlated (intersubject) with arterial pressures and retinal vascular diameters. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic arterial pressure, and at times pulse pressure and blood flow velocities in the MCA were greater in the evening. Total peripheral resistance was higher in the morning. Although cerebral blood velocity is reduced after subjects are head down for 2 days, the inverse relationship with retinal vessel diameters, which have control analogous to that of cerebral vessels, indicates cerebral blood flow is not reduced.

  14. Cerebral blood velocity and other cardiovascular responses to 2 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary A. B.; Mader, Thomas H.; Bagian, James P.; Charles, John B.; Meehan, Richard T.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body, and space motion sickness, which is a problem during the first few days of space flight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system. To evaluate possible changes in cerebral blood flow during simulated weightlessness, we measured blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) along with retinal vascular diameters, intraocular pressure, impedance cardiography, and sphygmomanometry on nine men (26.2 +/- 6.6 yr) morning and evening for 2 days during continuous 10 deg head-down tilt (HDT). When subjects went from seated to head-down bed rest, their heart rate and retinal diameters decreased, and intraocular pressures increased. After 48 h of HDT, blood flow velocity in the MCA was decreased and thoracic impedance was increased, indicating less fluid in the thorax. Percent changes in blood flow velocities in the MCA after 48 h of HDT were inversely correlated with percent changes in retinal vascular diameters. Blood flow velocities in the MCA were inversely correlated (intersubject) with arterial pressures and retinal vascular diameters. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic arterial pressure, and at times pulse pressure and blood flow velocities in the MCA were greater in the evening. Total peripheral resistance was higher in the morning. Although cerebral blood velocity is reduced after subjects are head down for 2 days, the inverse relationship with retinal vessel diameters, which have control analogous to that of cerebral vessels, indicates cerebral blood flow is not reduced.

  15. Anatomical attributes of the optic nerve head in eyes with parafoveal scotoma in normal tension glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aparna; Mukherjee, Sujoy

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate optic nerve characteristics independent of systemic factors predisposing to parafoveal scotoma in normal tension glaucoma. We included 40 patients with bilateral normal tension glaucoma with parafoveal scotoma (visual field defect in one hemifield within 10° of fixation with at least one point at p<1% lying at the two innermost paracentral points) in only one eye (Parafoveal group, PF, n = 40) identified from the hospital database in this observational cross sectional study. The other eye with no parafoveal scotoma constituted the control group (n = 32). Red free fundus photographs were evaluated using Image J software analyzing parameters including vertical and horizontal disc diameter, disc haemorrhage, location and angular width of the retinal nerve fibre layer depth and displacement of the central vessel trunk, CVT (vertical and horizontal). Clinical characteristics and disc parameters were compared in the two groups. The PF group had lower mean deviation(MD) and visual field index (VFI) and higher pattern standard deviation (PSD) than control group (p≤0.001) for similar untreated IOP, (p = 0.9). Disc haemorrhages were more frequent in the PF group, p = 0.01. The PF group had greater width of nerve fibre layer defects, p = 0.05 and greater vertical displacement of the central vessel trunk, p = 0.001. On multivariate logistic regression, parafoveal scotoma was significantly associated with increased vertical distance of the CVT, p = 0.0001. Increased vertical displacement of the CVT is associated with parafoveal scotoma in normal tension glaucoma. Localising the vessel trunk may help clinicians in identifying patients at risk for parafoveal involvement.

  16. Experimental Glaucoma Causes Optic Nerve Head Neural Rim Tissue Compression: A Potentially Important Mechanism of Axon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Reynaud, Juan; Hardin, Christy; Wang, Lin; Sigal, Ian A.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that experimental glaucoma (EG) results in greater thinning of the optic nerve head (ONH) neural rim tissue than the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) tissue. Methods Longitudinal spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging of the ONH and peripapillary RNFL was performed every other week under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 nonhuman primates (NHP) during baseline and after induction of unilateral EG. The ONH parameter minimum rim area (MRA) was derived from 80 radial B-scans centered on the ONH; RNFL cross-sectional area (RNFLA) from a peripapillary circular B-scan with 12° diameter. Results In control eyes, MRA was 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline and 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at the final session (P = 0.77), while RNFLA was 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.95 ± 0.10 mm2, respectively (P = 0.96). In EG eyes, MRA decreased from 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline to 0.63 ± 0.21 mm2 at the final session (P < 0.0001), while RNFLA decreased from 0.95 ± 0.09 to 0.74 ± 0.19 mm2, respectively (P < 0.0001). Thus, MRA decreased by 36.4 ± 20.6% in EG eyes, significantly more than the decrease in RNFLA (21.7 ± 19.4%, P < 0.0001). Other significant changes in EG eyes included increased Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) nonplanarity (P < 0.05), decreased BMO aspect ratio (P < 0.0001), and decreased MRA angle (P < 0.001). Bruch's membrane opening area did not change from baseline in either control or EG eyes (P = 0.27, P = 0.15, respectively). Conclusions Optic nerve head neural rim tissue thinning exceeded peripapillary RNFL thinning in NHP EG. These results support the hypothesis that axon bundles are compressed transversely within the ONH rim along with glaucomatous deformation of connective tissues. PMID:27564522

  17. The efficacy of forward head correction on nerve root function and pain in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Diab, Aliaa A; Moustafa, Ibrahim M

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the effect of forward head posture correction on pain and nerve root function in cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. A randomized controlled study with six months follow-up. University research laboratory. Ninety-six patients with unilateral lower cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (C5-C6 and C6-C7) and craniovertebral angle measured less than or equal to 50° were randomly assigned to an exercise or a control group. The control group (n = 48) received ultrasound and infrared radiation, whereas the exercise group (n = 48) received a posture corrective exercise programme in addition to ultrasound and infrared radiation. The peak-to-peak amplitude of dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials, craniovertebral angle, visual analogue scale were measured for all patients at three intervals (before treatment, after 10 weeks of treatment, and at follow-up of six months). There was a significant difference between groups adjusted to baseline value of outcome at 10 weeks post-treatment for craniovertebral angle, pain, C6 and C7 peak-to-peak amplitude of dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials P = 0.000, 0.01, 0.000, 0.001 respectively and at follow-up for all previous variables (P = 0.000). Forward head posture correction using a posture corrective exercise programme in addition to ultrasound and infrared radiation decreased pain and craniovertebral angle and increased the peak-to-peak amplitude of dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials for C6 and C7 in cases of lower cervical spondylotic radiculopathy.

  18. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  19. Investigation of multiple optical and biometric properties of optic nerve head (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Young-Joo; Chan, Aaron C.; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases which results in optic nerve damage and vision loss. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely used to investigate geometric risk factor of glaucoma. However, material properties of ONH are also important to understand intra-ocular pressure related stress. We developed Jones-matrix based multifunctional posterior eye OCT (JM-OCT), which uses 1-μm band swept-source with a 100-kHz A-line rate. It provides three different optical properties, attenuation coefficient (AC), local birefringence (LB), and optical coherence angiography (OCA). We investigated the utility those properties for the investigation of normal ONH cases. 3 mm x 3 mm area around ONH was scanned for each eye, and biometric parameters were measured in hospital. Statistical analyses were performed with the mean values of above parameters at the regions of prelamina, lamina cribrosa, peripapillary sclera, and peripapillary nerve fiber layer, and biometric parameters of age, axial eye length, refractive error, and intraocular pressure. In qualitative observation, the lamina cribrosa generally shows more hyper signals in AC, LB, and OCA than prelamina. In t-test, AC, LB, and OCA showed significant difference (p < 0.05) between prelamina and lamina cribrosa, while conventional OCT did not. In correlation test, axial eye length is positively correlated with LB and AC in lamina cribrosa. And these LB and AC are also negatively correlated with the refractive error. Age was found to be negatively correlated with OCA in lamina cribrosa.

  20. A head-to-head comparison between CT- and IVUS-derived coronary blood flow models.

    PubMed

    Bulant, C A; Blanco, P J; Maso Talou, G D; Bezerra, C Guedes; Lemos, P A; Feijóo, R A

    2017-01-25

    The goal of this work is to compare coronary hemodynamics as predicted by computational blood flow models derived from two imaging modalities: coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and intravascular ultrasound integrated with angiography (IVUS). Criteria to define boundary conditions are proposed to overcome the dissimilar anatomical definition delivered by both modalities. The strategy to define boundary conditions is novel in the present context, and naturally accounts for the flow redistribution induced by the resistance of coronary vessels. Hyperemic conditions are assumed to assess model predictions under stressed hemodynamic environments similar to those encountered in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) calculations. As results, it was found that CCTA models predict larger pressure drops, higher average blood velocity and smaller FFR. Concerning the flow rate at distal locations in the major vessels of interest, it was found that CCTA predicted smaller flow than IVUS, which is a consequence of a larger sensitivity of CCTA models to coronary steal phenomena. Comparisons to in-vivo measurements of FFR are shown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of long-term head-down body position on innervation density in extremity blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorant, M.; Raffai, G.; Nadasy, G.; Feher, E.; Monos, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitate and compare the density of nerve terminals (NTD), as well as of their synaptic vesicle population (SyVD) in saphenous and brachial vein and artery, obtained from rats maintained in the horizontal or head-down tilted (HDT) position for two weeks. The same technique was applied as that for the head-up tilt study.

  2. Influence of long-term head-down body position on innervation density in extremity blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorant, M.; Raffai, G.; Nadasy, G.; Feher, E.; Monos, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitate and compare the density of nerve terminals (NTD), as well as of their synaptic vesicle population (SyVD) in saphenous and brachial vein and artery, obtained from rats maintained in the horizontal or head-down tilted (HDT) position for two weeks. The same technique was applied as that for the head-up tilt study.

  3. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  4. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes.

  5. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Shoulder posture and median nerve sliding

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Andrea; Lees, Rebecca; Dilley, Andrew; Lynn, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Background Patients with upper limb pain often have a slumped sitting position and poor shoulder posture. Pain could be due to poor posture causing mechanical changes (stretch; local pressure) that in turn affect the function of major limb nerves (e.g. median nerve). This study examines (1) whether the individual components of slumped sitting (forward head position, trunk flexion and shoulder protraction) cause median nerve stretch and (2) whether shoulder protraction restricts normal nerve movements. Methods Longitudinal nerve movement was measured using frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis from high frequency ultrasound images during individual components of slumped sitting. The effects of protraction on nerve movement through the shoulder region were investigated by examining nerve movement in the arm in response to contralateral neck side flexion. Results Neither moving the head forward or trunk flexion caused significant movement of the median nerve. In contrast, 4.3 mm of movement, adding 0.7% strain, occurred in the forearm during shoulder protraction. A delay in movement at the start of protraction and straightening of the nerve trunk provided evidence of unloading with the shoulder flexed and elbow extended and the scapulothoracic joint in neutral. There was a 60% reduction in nerve movement in the arm during contralateral neck side flexion when the shoulder was protracted compared to scapulothoracic neutral. Conclusion Slumped sitting is unlikely to increase nerve strain sufficient to cause changes to nerve function. However, shoulder protraction may place the median nerve at risk of injury, since nerve movement is reduced through the shoulder region when the shoulder is protracted and other joints are moved. Both altered nerve dynamics in response to moving other joints and local changes to blood supply may adversely affect nerve function and increase the risk of developing upper quadrant pain. PMID:15282032

  7. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  8. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits.

  9. The crosstalk between the kidney and the central nervous system: the role of renal nerves in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Erika E; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? This review describes the role of renal nerves as the key carrier of signals from the kidneys to the CNS and vice versa; the brain and kidneys communicate through this carrier to maintain homeostasis in the body. What advances does it highlight? Whether renal or autonomic dysfunction is the predominant contributor to systemic hypertension is still debated. In this review, we focus on the role of the renal nerves in a model of renovascular hypertension. The sympathetic nervous system influences the renal regulation of arterial pressure and body fluid composition. Anatomical and physiological evidence has shown that sympathetic nerves mediate changes in urinary sodium and water excretion by regulating the renal tubular water and sodium reabsorption throughout the nephron, changes in the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate by regulating the constriction of renal vasculature, and changes in the activity of the renin-angiotensin system by regulating the renin release from juxtaglomerular cells. Additionally, renal sensory afferent fibres project to the autonomic central nuclei that regulate blood pressure. Hence, renal nerves play a key role in the crosstalk between the kidneys and the CNS to maintain homeostasis in the body. Therefore, the increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and the renal afferent nerve activity to the CNS may contribute to the outcome of diseases, such as hypertension. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Tissue engineering with peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promotes the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mengjie; Wang, Xianghai; Chen, Yijing; Cao, Shangtao; Wen, Jinkun; Wu, Guofeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Lixia; Qian, Changhui; Qin, Zhenqi; Li, Zhenlin; Tan, Dandan; Fan, Zhihao; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair can be enhanced by Schwann cell (SC) transplantation, but clinical applications are limited by the lack of a cell source. Thus, alternative systems for generating SCs are desired. Herein, we found the peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PBMSCs) could be induced into SC like cells with expressing SC-specific markers (S100, P75NTR and CNPase) and functional factors (NGF, NT-3, c-Fos, and Krox20). When the induced PBMSCs (iPBMSCs) were transplanted into crushed rat sciatic nerves, they functioned as SCs by wrapping the injured axons and expressing myelin specific marker of MBP. Furthermore, iPBMSCs seeded in an artificial nerve conduit to bridge a 10-mm defect in a sciatic nerve achieved significant nerve regeneration outcomes, including axonal regeneration and remyelination, nerve conduction recovery, and restoration of motor function, and attenuated myoatrophy and neuromuscular junction degeneration in the target muscle. Overall, the data from this study indicated that PBMSCs can transdifferentiate towards SC-like cells and have potential as grafting cells for nerve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Pseudocatalytic scavenging of the nerve agent VX with human blood components and the oximes obidoxime and HI-6.

    PubMed

    Wille, Timo; von der Wellen, Jens; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Despite six decades of extensive research in medical countermeasures against nerve agent poisoning, a broad spectrum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivator is not yet available. One current approach is directed toward synthesizing oximes with high affinity and reactivatability toward butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma to generate an effective pseudocatalytic scavenger. An interim solution could be the administration of external AChE or BChE from blood products to augment pseudocatalytic scavenging with slower but clinically approved oximes to decrease nerve agent concentrations in the body. We here semiquantitatively investigate the ability of obidoxime and HI-6 to decrease the inhibitory activity of VX with human AChE and BChE from whole blood, erythrocyte membranes, erythrocytes, plasma, clinically available fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cells. The main findings are that whole blood showed a VX concentration-dependent decrease in inhibitory activity with HI-6 being more potent than obidoxime. Using erythrocytes and erythrocyte membranes again, HI-6 was more potent compared to obidoxime. With freshly prepared plasma, obidoxime and HI-6 showed comparable results for the decrease in VX. The use of the clinically available blood products revealed that packed red blood cells showed similar kinetics as fresh erythrocytes. Fresh frozen plasma resulted in a slower and incomplete decrease in inhibitory plasma compared to freshly prepared plasma. In conclusion, the administration of blood products in combination with available oximes augments pseudocatalytic scavenging and might be useful to decrease the body load of persistent, highly toxic nerve agents.

  13. Symmetry of optic nerve head parameters measured by the heidelberg retina tomograph 3 in healthy eyes: the Blue Mountains Eye study.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Healey, Paul R; Tariq, Yasser M; Teber, Erdahl; Mitchell, Paul

    2013-03-01

    To assess the symmetry of optic nerve head parameters measured by the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT 3) between fellow eyes in a normal elderly population. Cross-sectional population-based study. Participants of the Blue Mountains Eye Study 10-year follow-up who did not have optic disc disease, including glaucoma, were included. Optic nerve head parameters measured by HRT 3 were compared between fellow eyes. The normal range of interocular asymmetry (larger disc minus smaller disc) was determined by the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. A total of 1276 eligible participants had HRT scans of both eyes. HRT measurements in right eyes differed slightly in rim steepness and rim volume from those in left eyes (P < .05). The 2.5th and 97.5th percentile of interocular asymmetry limits were -0.41 and 0.45 for cup-to-disc ratio and -0.19 and 0.22 for cup-to-disc area ratio, respectively. The highest interocular correlation was found in disc area and cup area (r ranged from 0.74-0.76), whereas mean cup depth, cup volume, and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness had the poorest correlation (r ≤ 0.07). Greater optic disc area asymmetry was associated with a larger interocular difference in the other optic nerve head parameters. There was minimal interocular difference and substantial interocular correlation in optic nerve head parameters measured by HRT 3. Interocular asymmetry greater than 0.2 for cup-to-disc area ratio was considered outside the normal range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography for three-dimensional and en face imaging of the retina and optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Adler, Desmond C; Chen, Yueli; Gorczynska, Iwona; Huber, Robert; Duker, Jay S; Schuman, Joel S; Fujimoto, James G

    2008-11-01

    To demonstrate ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second and a wavelength of 1060 nm. To investigate methods for visualization of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve using high-density sampling enabled by improved imaging speed. A swept-source OCT retinal imaging system operating at a speed of 249,000 axial scans per second was developed. Imaging of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve were performed. Display methods such as speckle reduction, slicing along arbitrary planes, en face visualization of reflectance from specific retinal layers, and image compounding were investigated. High-definition and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the normal retina and optic nerve head were performed. Increased light penetration at 1060 nm enabled improved visualization of the choroid, lamina cribrosa, and sclera. OCT fundus images and 3D visualizations were generated with higher pixel density and less motion artifacts than standard spectral/Fourier domain OCT. En face images enabled visualization of the porous structure of the lamina cribrosa, nerve fiber layer, choroid, photoreceptors, RPE, and capillaries of the inner retina. Ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second is possible. The improvement of approximately 5 to 10x in imaging speed over commercial spectral/Fourier domain OCT technology enables higher density raster scan protocols and improved performance of en face visualization methods. The combination of the longer wavelength and ultrahigh imaging speed enables excellent visualization of the choroid, sclera, and lamina cribrosa.

  15. Zinc transferrin stimulates red blood cell formation in the head kidney of common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Fang, Szu-Wei; Jeng, Sen-Shyong

    2013-09-01

    The common carp is one of the few fish able to tolerate extremely low oxygen levels. These fish store zinc in their digestive tract tissue and head kidney at concentrations of 300-500μg/g of fresh tissue, which is 5-10 times higher than in other fish. Previous studies have indicated a link between the high zinc levels in the common carp and stress erythropoiesis. In this report, using suspension-cultured common carp head kidney cells with or without ZnCl2 supplementation, we found that zinc stimulated the proliferation of immature red blood cells; however, this effect was only observed when the culture was supplemented with carp serum. We identified the active component of carp serum to be transferrin. The zinc-transferrin complex interacts with the transferrin receptor and stimulates the proliferation of immature red blood cells. In addition, the growth rate of the immature red blood cells was regulated by the supplied ZnCl2 concentration. Under stress, the zinc in the common carp digestive tract tissue was released and used as a signal to induce red blood cell formation in the head kidney. This cell culture system might provide a means for exploring the regulatory role of zinc in hematopoietic cell growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Scanning laser polarimetry reveals status of RNFL integrity in eyes with optic nerve head swelling by OCT.

    PubMed

    Kupersmith, Mark J; Kardon, Randy; Durbin, Mary; Horne, Melissa; Shulman, Julia

    2012-04-18

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening in optic nerve head (ONH) swelling, but does not provide information on acute axonal disruption. It was hypothesized that scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) compared with OCT might reveal the status of axon integrity and visual prognosis in acute RNFL swelling. Threshold perimetry, OCT, and SLP were used to prospectively study eyes with papilledema (24), optic neuritis (14), nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) (21), and ONH swelling (average RNFL value by OCT was above the 95th percentile of controls at presentation). Regional RNFL was judged reduced if the quadrant measurement was below the fifth percentile of controls. At presentation, average RNFL by OCT was similar for eyes with papilledema and NAION (P = 0.97), and reduced for optic neuritis. Average RNFL by SLP was slightly increased for papilledema and optic neuritis, and reduced for NAION (P = 0.02) eyes. The RNFL by SLP was reduced in at least one quadrant in 1 eye with papilledema, 1 eye with optic neuritis, and in 13 eyes with NAION. In NAION eyes, quadrants with reduced SLP had corresponding visual field loss that did not recover. By one month, eyes with NAION showed RNFL thinning by OCT (7/17 eyes) and by SLP (14/16 eyes) in contrast to optic neuritis (by OCT, 0/12, P = 0.006; and by SLP, 1/12, P = 0.0004). OCT and SLP revealed different aspects of RNFL changes associated with ONH swelling. OCT revealed thickening due to edema. SLP revealed a decrease in retardance in eyes with axonal injury associated with visual field loss, which is unlikely to recover.

  17. Confocal scanning laser tomography of the optic nerve head on the patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to glaucoma and control.

    PubMed

    Kurna, Sevda Aydin; Akar, Gokcen; Altun, Ahmet; Agirman, Yasemin; Gozke, Eren; Sengor, Tomris

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate optic nerve head (ONH) differences of the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) measured by confocal scanning laser tomography [Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) III] and compare with glaucoma and control subjects. Eighty-four patients were enrolled into the study: 44 eyes of 24 patients with mild to moderate AD (Group 1), 68 eyes of 35 patients with glaucoma (Group 2), and 49 eyes of 25 heathy volunteers as a control (Group 3). A complete ophthalmologic examination as well as a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopic assessment with HRT III were performed on all patients. Mean values of the ONH topographic parameters such as rim area (RA), rim volume (RV), height variation contour, linear cup/disc ratio, cup shape measure, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were recorded. Mean values of RNFL thickness was 0.23 ± 0.07 in AD, 0.22 ± 0.09 in glaucoma and 0.24 ± 0.07 in the control group (p = 0.323). RA and RV were significantly lower, and linear C/D ratio was significantly higher in the glaucoma group when compared to AD and control (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between AD and control for the optic disc parameters tested (p > 0.05). We observed a negative correlation of the age with RNFL in all of the groups (p < 0.005). Age was the most important parameter affecting RNFL. Our results suggest that HRT does not demonstrate ONH differences between AD and control group, while it successfully differentiates glaucoma from AD and control cases of older age.

  18. Tumor blood flow and systemic shunting in patients receiving intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, R.H.; Ziessman, H.A.; Medvec, B.R.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W.; Pitt, S.R.; Baker, S.R.

    1986-08-01

    Radionuclide techniques have been used to estimate the systemic shunt and to quantitate blood flow to the tumor and a reference normal tissue in nine patients undergoing intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The systemic shunt was calculated as the percentage of pulmonary trapping of intraarterially injected /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean systemic shunt in the 12 separate arteries studied was 23 +/- 13% (SE) (range 8-43%). Quantitative blood flow was determined from the slope of the washout curve of intraarterially injected /sup 133/Xe. The mean tumor blood flow was 13.6 +/- 6.7 ml/100 g/min, while the mean blood flow to the scalp was 4.2 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min providing a mean tumor/normal tissue ratio of 3.9 +/- 2.7. An estimate of blood flow distribution was obtained by calculating the ratio of counts/pixel in the tumor mass versus the remainder of the head as determined by single photon emission computed tomography following an intraarterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean ratio of tumor to normal tissue perfusion by this technique was 5.6 +/- 3.7. These techniques have allowed noninvasive determination of the blood flow parameters associated with intraarterial chemotherapy. At least part of the therapeutic advantage of regional chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer is due to a tumor/normal tissue blood flow ratio that favors drug delivery to the tumor contained within the infused volume.

  19. CT, MRI, and (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Youn; Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yi Kyung; Cha, Jihoon; Park, Gyeong Min; Kim, Sung Tae

    2017-10-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a highly malignant tumor and rarely occurs in the head and neck. Purpose To describe the imaging features of MPNST of the head and neck. Material and Methods We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography (CT; n = 14), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n = 16), and (18)F-FDG PET/CT (n = 5) imaging features of 18 MPNSTs of the head and neck in 17 patients. Special attention was paid to determine the nerve of origin from which the tumor might have arisen. Results All lesions were well-defined (n = 3) or ill-defined (n = 15) masses (mean, 6.1 cm). Lesions were at various locations but most commonly the neck (n = 8), followed by the intracranial cavity (n = 3), paranasal sinus (n = 2), and orbit (n = 2). The nerve of origin was inferred for 11 lesions: seven in the neck, two in the orbit, one in the cerebellopontine angle, and one on the parietal scalp. Attenuation, signal intensity, and enhancement pattern of the lesions on CT and MRI were non-specific. Necrosis/hemorrhage/cystic change within the lesion was considered to be present on images in 13 and bone change in nine. On (18)F-FDG PET/CT images, all five lesions demonstrated various hypermetabolic foci with maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) from 3.2 to 14.6 (mean, 7.16 ± 4.57). Conclusion MPNSTs can arise from various locations in the head and neck. Though non-specific, a mass with an ill-defined margin along the presumed course of the cranial nerves may aid the diagnosis of MPSNT in the head and neck.

  20. Optic nerve head changes after short-term intraocular pressure elevation in acute primary angle-closure suspects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ran; Xu, Liang; Liu, Xue; Chen, Jian Dong; Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ya Xing

    2015-04-01

    To investigate changes in the optic nerve head morphology after acute intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation during a dark room prone provocative test (DRPPT). Prospective cohort study. Acute primary angle-closure (APAC) suspects underwent DRPPT. Study participants stayed in a dark room for 2 hours with the forehead placed on a desk. At baseline and within 5 minutes after DRPPT, tonometry and enhanced depth imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) were performed. Changes in 3-dimensional optic nerve head topography. The study included 114 eyes of 65 participants with a mean age of 58.3±8.7 years and a mean IOP elevation of 10.1±10.9 mmHg during DRPPT. When all eyes were included, the mean value of most optic disc parameters did not change significantly, except for a decrease in the temporal minimal rim width (P = 0.005). By including only eyes with an IOP increase greater than 15 mmHg, the mean value of cup width (P = 0.001) and cup depth (P = 0.002) increased, whereas the lamina cribrosa (LC) thickness (P = 0.035), temporal minimal rim width (P = 0.001), and nasal minimal rim width (P < 0.001) decreased. The LC depth and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) did not differ between the baseline and the end of DRPPT. An IOP increase was significantly associated with widening (P < 0.001; r = 0.46) and deepening (P < 0.001; r = 0.52) of the optic cup, thinning of the LC (P = 0.003; r = -0.35), temporal minimal rim width (P < 0.001; r = -0.34), and nasal minimal rim width (P < 0.001; r = -0.35). Angle-closure suspect eyes showed a widening and deepening of the optic cup, decrease in neuroretinal rim width, and thinning of the LC after a darkness-induced IOP increase of >15 mmHg. The diameter of the BMO and position of the anterior LC surface remained unchanged. This suggests that a short-term IOP increase leads to a condensation of neuroretinal rim, prelaminar tissue, and LC, without major changes in the optic disc size and position of the anterior LC

  1. Does the motor branch of the long head of the triceps brachii arise from the radial nerve? An anatomic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    de Sèze, M P; Rezzouk, J; de Sèze, M; Uzel, M; Lavignolle, B; Midy, D; Durandeau, A

    2004-12-01

    Anatomy textbooks say that the motor branch of the long head of the triceps brachii (LHT) arises from the radial nerve. Some clinical observations of traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve with associated paralysis of the LHT have suggested that the motor branch of the LHT may arise from the axillary nerve. This anatomic study was performed, using both cadaver anatomical dissections and a surgical study, to determine the exact origin of the motor branch of the LHT. From the adult cadaver specimens (group I), 20 posterior cords were dissected from 10 subjects (eight embalmed, two fresh) using 3.5x magnification. The axillary nerve was followed from its onset to the posteromedial part of the surgical neck of the humerus and the radial nerve. We looked for the origin of the proximal branch of the LHT by a meticulous double anterior and posterior dissection. From the surgical group (group II), 15 posterior cords were dissected from 15 patients suffering from a C5-C6 injured paralysis, without paralysis of the LHT. During the surgical procedure, we looked for the origins of the motor branch of the LHT with a nerve stimulator. In group I, the motor branch of the LHT arose in 13 cases from the axillary nerve near its origin, in five cases from the terminal division of the posterior cord itself, and in two cases from the posterior cord 10 mm before its terminal division into the radial and axillary nerves. In no case did we find the motor branch of the LHT arising from the radial nerve. In eight cases, we found some accessory branches that arose near the principal branch. In group II, the motor branch of the LHT arose in 11 cases from the axillary nerve near its origin and in four cases from the terminal division of the posterior cord itself. The motor branch of the LHT never originated from the radial nerve. In four cases, we found some accessory branches that arose near the principal branch of the LHT. These results reveal that the motor branch of the LHT seems to

  2. Anterior Interosseous Nerve Neuropraxia Secondary to Shoulder Arthroscopy and Open Subpectoral Long Head Biceps Tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Steed, Jeremiah T; Drexler, Kathlyn; Wooldridge, Adam N; Ferguson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff tendon repair is a common elective procedure performed by trained orthopaedic surgeons with a relatively low complication rate. Specifically, isolated neuropraxia of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) is a very rare complication of shoulder arthroscopy. An analysis of peer-reviewed published literature revealed only three articles reporting a total of seven cases that describe this specific complication following standard shoulder arthroscopic procedures. This article reports on three patients diagnosed with AIN neuropraxia following routine shoulder arthroscopy done by a single surgeon within a three-year period. All three patients also underwent open biceps tenodesis immediately following completion of the arthroscopic procedures. The exact causal mechanism of AIN neuropraxia following shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis is not known. This case report reviews possible mechanisms with emphasis on specific factors that make a traction injury the most likely etiology in these cases. We critically analyze our operating room setup and patient positioning practices in light of the existing biomechanical and cadaveric research to propose changes to our standard practices that may help to reduce the incidence of this specific postoperative complication in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis.

  3. Anterior Interosseous Nerve Neuropraxia Secondary to Shoulder Arthroscopy and Open Subpectoral Long Head Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Adam N.

    2017-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff tendon repair is a common elective procedure performed by trained orthopaedic surgeons with a relatively low complication rate. Specifically, isolated neuropraxia of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) is a very rare complication of shoulder arthroscopy. An analysis of peer-reviewed published literature revealed only three articles reporting a total of seven cases that describe this specific complication following standard shoulder arthroscopic procedures. This article reports on three patients diagnosed with AIN neuropraxia following routine shoulder arthroscopy done by a single surgeon within a three-year period. All three patients also underwent open biceps tenodesis immediately following completion of the arthroscopic procedures. The exact causal mechanism of AIN neuropraxia following shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis is not known. This case report reviews possible mechanisms with emphasis on specific factors that make a traction injury the most likely etiology in these cases. We critically analyze our operating room setup and patient positioning practices in light of the existing biomechanical and cadaveric research to propose changes to our standard practices that may help to reduce the incidence of this specific postoperative complication in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis. PMID:28567319

  4. Optic Nerve Head Parameters in a Turkish Population Over Forty Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Niyaz, Leyla; Yıldırım, Nilgün; Musmul, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the optic disc area and cup area in a normal population over 40 years of age. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed in Eskişehir. Fundus photographs were obtained using a nonmydriatic fundus camera. Planimetric measurements of the optic disc and cup area were performed with VK-2 digital imaging software. Optic nerve parameters were then compared between sex and age groups. Results: A total of 3,038 subjects were evaluated. Mean age was 56.6±10.4 years (range 40-91 years). The median disc area of the subjects was 2.87 (2.53-3.23) mm2 in the right eyes and 2.89 (2.55-3.25) mm2 in the left eyes (p<0.001). The median cup area of the subjects was 0.46 mm2 (0.33-0.64 mm2) in the right eyes and 0.44 mm2 (0.33-0.61 mm2) in the left eyes (p<0.001). The differences in disc and cup area between male and female subjects were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: We report the normal distribution of disc area and cup area measurements and their association with age and sex. PMID:28058153

  5. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Regulates Organ Blood Flow and Apoptosis during Controlled Hypotension in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lele; Shao, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chuanlong; Guo, Xiaoqing; Jin, Ling; Lian, Linli; Yu, Xiaojing; Dong, Zhenhua; Mo, Yadi; Fang, Jianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used in clinical practice for alleviating pains and physiological disorders. It has been reported that TENS could counteract the ischemic injury happened in some vital organs. To determine the protective effect of TENS on internal organs during CH in dogs, target hypotension was maintained for 60 min at 50% of the baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP). The perfusion to the brain, liver, stomach, and kidney was recorded and apoptosis within these organs was observed. Results showed that when arriving at the target MAP, and during the maintaining stage for 10 min, perfusion to the stomach and liver in the CH+TENS group was much higher than in the CH group (P<0.05). Perfusion to the cerebral cortex greatly declined in both the controlled pressure groups when compared with the general anesthesia (GA) group (P<0.05). After withdrawing CH, the hepatic blood flow in both the CH and CH+TENS groups, and the gastric and cerebral cortical blood flow in the CH+TENS group, were rapidly increased. By the end of MAP restoration, gastric blood flow in the CH group was still low. At 72 h after applying CH, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in stomach and kidney tissue from the CH group were significantly increased compared with those in the GA group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in TUNEL-positive cells in the liver and hippocampus among the three groups. Our results demonstrated that CH with a 50% MAP level could cause lower perfusion to the liver, stomach, cerebral cortex, and kidney, with apoptosis subsequently occurring in the stomach and kidney. TENS combined GA is able to improve the blood flow to the liver, stomach, and reduce the apoptosis in the stomach and kidney. PMID:24732970

  6. Correlation between optic nerve head circulation and visual function before and after anti-VEGF therapy for central retinal vein occlusion: prospective, interventional case series.

    PubMed

    Nagasato, Daisuke; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Semba, Kentaro; Akaiwa, Kei; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Yoshizumi, Yuki; Tabuchi, Hitoshi; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-04-05

    To determine the correlation between the optic nerve head (ONH) circulation determined by laser speckle flowgraphy and the best-corrected visual acuity or retinal sensitivity before and after intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab for central retinal vein occlusion. Thirty-one eyes of 31 patients were treated with intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab for macular edema due to a central retinal vein occlusion. The blood flow in the large vessels on the ONH, the best-corrected visual acuity, and retinal sensitivity were measured at the baseline, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The arteriovenous passage time on fluorescein angiography was determined. The venous tortuosity index was calculated on color fundus photograph by dividing the length of the tortuous retinal vein by the chord length of the same segment. The blood flow was represented by the mean blur rate (MBR) determined by laser speckle flowgraphy. To exclude the influence of systemic circulation and blood flow in the ONH tissue, the corrected MBR was calculated as MBR of ONH vessel area - MBR of ONH tissue area in the affected eye divided by the vascular MBR - tissue MBR in the unaffected eye. Pearson's correlation tests were used to determine the significance of correlations between the MBR and the best-corrected visual acuity, retinal sensitivity, arteriovenous passage time, or venous tortuosity index. At the baseline, the corrected MBR was significantly correlated with the arteriovenous passage time and venous tortuosity index (r = -0.807, P < 0.001; r = -0.716, P < 0.001; respectively). The corrected MBR was significantly correlated with the best-corrected visual acuity and retinal sensitivity at the baseline, and at 1, 3, and 6 months (all P < 0.050). The corrected MBR at the baseline was significantly correlated with the best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months (r = -0.651, P < 0.001) and retinal sensitivity at 6 months (r = 0.485, P = 0.005). The pre

  7. Uterine artery blood flow and renal sympathetic nerve activity during exercise in rabbit pregnancy.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Kathleen P; Alberts, Jennifer A

    2003-11-01

    The uterine artery blood flow (UtBF) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) responses to treadmill exercise were evaluated in 12 nonpregnant (NP) and 17 term pregnant (P) rabbits. UtBF was monitored continuously with a Transonic flowprobe. Rabbits underwent three exercise trials (5-min duration) that varied in absolute workload. The rise in renal SNA with exercise was intensity related. Pregnancy did not affect the average steady-state renal SNA response expressed relative to maximum activity (P 24 +/- 1% vs. NP 23 +/- 2% of maximum smoke-elicited activity) and increased the average renal SNA response expressed relative to resting activity (P +155 +/- 19% vs. NP +84 +/- 23% from rest, P = 0.03) At rest, UtBF (P 13 +/- 3 vs. NP 1.9 +/- 0.3 ml/min) and uterine artery conductance (UtC; P 22 +/- 5 vs. NP 2.8 +/- 0.5 ml. min-1.mmHg-1 x 10-2) were elevated in the P rabbits. The average exercise-related decreases in UtBF (P -16 +/- 4% vs. NP -48 +/- 4%) and UtC (P -27 +/- 4% vs. NP -54 +/- 4%) were attenuated in the P rabbits. Pregnancy does not impair the ability to raise renal SNA but attenuates the uterine artery constrictor response to moderate to heavy dynamic exercise in rabbits. Under normal conditions, the pregnant uterine circulatory bed may be relatively protected from exercise-related redistribution of blood flow.

  8. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional fibrillar collagen microstructure within the normal, aged and glaucomatous human optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Jones, H. J.; Girard, M. J.; White, N.; Fautsch, M. P.; Morgan, J. E.; Ethier, C. R.; Albon, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify connective tissue fibre orientation and alignment in young, old and glaucomatous human optic nerve heads (ONH) to understand ONH microstructure and predisposition to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Transverse (seven healthy, three glaucomatous) and longitudinal (14 healthy) human ONH cryosections were imaged by both second harmonic generation microscopy and small angle light scattering (SALS) in order to quantify preferred fibre orientation (PFO) and degree of fibre alignment (DOFA). DOFA was highest within the peripapillary sclera (ppsclera), with relatively low values in the lamina cribrosa (LC). Elderly ppsclera DOFA was higher than that in young ppsclera (p < 0.00007), and generally higher than in glaucoma ppsclera. In all LCs, a majority of fibres had preferential orientation horizontally across the nasal–temporal axis. In all glaucomatous LCs, PFO was significantly different from controls in a minimum of seven out of 12 LC regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, higher fibre alignment was observed in the glaucomatous inferior–temporal LC (p < 0.017). The differences between young and elderly ONH fibre alignment within regions suggest that age-related microstructural changes occur within the structure. The additional differences in fibre alignment observed within the glaucomatous LC may reflect an inherent susceptibility to glaucomatous optic neuropathy, or may be a consequence of ONH remodelling and/or collapse. PMID:25808336

  9. Automated discovery of structural features of the optic nerve head on the basis of image and genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of optic nerve head (ONH) structure is a commonly used clinical technique for both diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma. Glaucoma is associated with characteristic changes in the structure of the ONH. We present a method for computationally identifying ONH structural features using both imaging and genetic data from a large cohort of participants at risk for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Using 1054 participants from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study, ONH structure was measured by application of a stereo correspondence algorithm to stereo fundus images. In addition, the genotypes of several known POAG genetic risk factors were considered for each participant. ONH structural features were discovered using both a principal component analysis approach to identify the major modes of variance within structural measurements and a linear discriminant analysis approach to capture the relationship between genetic risk factors and ONH structure. The identified ONH structural features were evaluated based on the strength of their associations with genotype and development of POAG by the end of the OHTS study. ONH structural features with strong associations with genotype were identified for each of the genetic loci considered. Several identified ONH structural features were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with the development of POAG after Bonferroni correction. Further, incorporation of genetic risk status was found to substantially increase performance of early POAG prediction. These results suggest incorporating both imaging and genetic data into ONH structural modeling significantly improves the ability to explain POAG-related changes to ONH structure.

  10. Electrical Stimulation of the Ear, Head, Cranial Nerve, or Cortex for the Treatment of Tinnitus: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Adjamian, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is often associated with hearing loss and is thought to result from abnormal neural activity at some point or points in the auditory pathway, which is incorrectly interpreted by the brain as an actual sound. Neurostimulation therapies therefore, which interfere on some level with that abnormal activity, are a logical approach to treatment. For tinnitus, where the pathological neuronal activity might be associated with auditory and other areas of the brain, interventions using electromagnetic, electrical, or acoustic stimuli separately, or paired electrical and acoustic stimuli, have been proposed as treatments. Neurostimulation therapies should modulate neural activity to deliver a permanent reduction in tinnitus percept by driving the neuroplastic changes necessary to interrupt abnormal levels of oscillatory cortical activity and restore typical levels of activity. This change in activity should alter or interrupt the tinnitus percept (reduction or extinction) making it less bothersome. Here we review developments in therapies involving electrical stimulation of the ear, head, cranial nerve, or cortex in the treatment of tinnitus which demonstrably, or are hypothesised to, interrupt pathological neuronal activity in the cortex associated with tinnitus. PMID:27403346

  11. Optic nerve head slope-based quantitative parameters for identifying open-angle glaucoma on SPECTRALIS OCT images.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinnawi, Abdel-Razzak M; Al-Naami, Bassam O; Al-Latayfeh, Motasem M

    2017-08-01

    To investigate monitoring slope-based features of the optic nerve head (ONH) cup as open-angle glaucoma (OAG) occurs. A dataset of 46 retrospective OCT cases was acquired from the SPECTRALIS Heidelberg Engineering OCT device. A set of five parameters, which are based on the ONH cup-incline, are measured on the OAG and normal subjects in the dataset. Then, three new ONH cup-shape indices were deduced. The ONH cup-incline parameters and ONH cup-shape indices are analyzed to estimate their clinical value. The statistical difference between measurements on normal and glaucoma eyes was remarkably significant for all of the analyzed parameters and indices (p value < 0.001). The geometric shape of the ONH cup can be transferred to numerical parameters and indices. The proposed ONH cup-incline parameters and ONH cup-shape indices have shown suggestive clinical value to identify the development of OAG. As OAG appears, the top ONH cup-incline parameters decrease while the bottom ONH cup-incline parameters increase. The ONH cup-shape indices suggest capability to discriminate OAG from normal eyes.

  12. Gene Expression and Functional Studies of the Optic Nerve Head Astrocyte Transcriptome from Normal African Americans and Caucasian Americans Donors

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Haixi; Chen, Lin; Riordan, Sean M.; Li, Wenjun; Juarez, Santiago; Crabb, Andrea M.; Lukas, Thomas J.; Du, Pan; Lin, Simon M.; Wise, Alexandria; Agapova, Olga A.; Yang, Ping; Gu, Charles C.; Hernandez, M. Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes, a key cellular component of glaucomatous neuropathy, exhibit differential gene expression in primary cultures of astrocytes from normal African American (AA) donors compared to astrocytes from normal Caucasian American (CA) donors. Methods We used oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray (HG U133A & HG U133A 2.0 chips) to compare gene expression levels in cultured ONH astrocytes from twelve CA and twelve AA normal age matched donor eyes. Chips were normalized with Robust Microarray Analysis (RMA) in R using Bioconductor. Significant differential gene expression levels were detected using mixed effects modeling and Statistical Analysis of Microarray (SAM). Functional analysis and Gene Ontology were used to classify differentially expressed genes. Differential gene expression was validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR. Protein levels were detected by Western blots and ELISA. Cell adhesion and migration assays tested physiological responses. Glutathione (GSH) assay detected levels of intracellular GSH. Results Multiple analyses selected 87 genes differentially expressed between normal AA and CA (P<0.01). The most relevant genes expressed in AA were categorized by function, including: signal transduction, response to stress, ECM genes, migration and cell adhesion. Conclusions These data show that normal astrocytes from AA and CA normal donors display distinct expression profiles that impact astrocyte functions in the ONH. Our data suggests that differences in gene expression in ONH astrocytes may be specific to the development and/or progression of glaucoma in AA. PMID:18716680

  13. Complex conjugate artifact-free adaptive optics optical coherence tomography of in vivo human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Yu; Werner, John S; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    We acquired in vivo images of the human optic nerve head (ONH) using an adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) system. In order to improve imaging of the lamina cribrosa in the ONH with high lateral resolution and sensitivity, we implemented a complex conjugate artifact-free Fourier domain OCT (Fd-OCT) acquisition scheme with a reference arm-based phase shifting method. This allowed positioning of the lamina cribrosa structures near the zero path length difference where AO-OCT imaging achieves highest sensitivity. Implementation of our complex conjugate artifact removal (CCR) method required constant phase shifts between consecutive axial scans (A-scans), generated by continuous beam path-length changes from offsetting the pivot point of the scanning mirror placed in the reference arm. Fourier transform along the transverse axis and a filtering algorithm allowed reconstruction of CCR AO-OCT images. The suppression ratio of the mirror artifact was approximately 22 dB (at 18,000 A-scans per second acquisition speed) with a paperboard test target and an optimum phase-shift value. Finally, we reconstructed the three-dimensional structure of human ONH with enhanced depth range and sensitivity using CCR AO-OCT.

  14. Optic Nerve Head (ONH) Topographic Analysis by Stratus OCT in Normal Subjects: Correlation to Disc Size, Age, and Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Barbara C.; Cantor, Louis B.; WuDunn, Darrell; Hoop, Joni; Lipyanik, Jennifer; Patella, Vincent Michael; Budenz, Donald L.; Greenfield, David S.; Savell, Jonathan; Schuman, Joel S.; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study optic nerve head (ONH) topography parameters measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) in normal subjects and to analyze ONH data for differences in relation to disc size, ethnicity, and age. Methods Three hundred sixty-seven normal subjects underwent Stratus optical coherence tomography ONH measurement using the fast optic disc scan protocol software package 3.0. Only ONH scans meeting specific qualification criteria were included for data analysis ensuring appropriate scan quality and reliability. ONH topographic parameters of qualified scans were analyzed for differences in regards to optic disc size, age, and ethnicity. Results Two hundred and twelve qualified ONH scans were included for data analysis. Mean disc area was 2.27±0.41 mm2 and optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width increased with disc size, whereas vertical integrated rim area did not. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, and rim area decreased and cup area increased with age. Mean optic disc area was larger in African-Americans as compared with Hispanics or Whites and this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions Optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width correlated to disc size. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, rim area, and cup area, changed with age. African-American optic discs had larger disc area measurements as compared with Whites optic discs and this difference was statistically significant. PMID:19855299

  15. Graph search: active appearance model based automated segmentation of retinal layers for optic nerve head centered OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Enting; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Jin, Chao; Sun, Min; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach combining the active appearance model (AAM) and graph search is proposed to segment retinal layers for optic nerve head(ONH) centered optical coherence tomography(OCT) images. The method includes two parts: preprocessing and layer segmentation. During the preprocessing phase, images is first filtered for denoising, then the B-scans are flattened. During layer segmentation, the AAM is first used to obtain the coarse segmentation results. Then a multi-resolution GS-AAM algorithm is applied to further refine the results, in which AAM is efficiently integrated into the graph search segmentation process. The proposed method was tested on a dataset which contained113-D SD-OCT images, and compared to the manual tracings of two observers on all the volumetric scans. The overall mean border positioning error for layer segmentation was found to be 7.09 +/- 6.18μm for normal subjects. It was comparable to the results of traditional graph search method (8.03+/-10.47μm) and mean inter-observer variability (6.35+/-6.93μm).The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Topographic anatomy of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. Its importance in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kambic, V; Zargi, M; Radsel, Z

    1984-11-01

    The authors have studied the anatomy of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve in its entirety on 40 fresh cadavers, and they have drawn the following conclusions: the nerve ramifies from the vagus immediately below the nodose ganglion or in the ganglion itself. The nerve splits into two branches approximately 1.5 cm below the ganglion nodosum. In four cases, both branches originated from the vagus itself. In one case, anastomosis of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve with the recurrent nerve was found. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve is not usually severed at supraglottic laryngectomy but the nerve is at risk during neck dissections, resection of Zenker's diverticula and thyroidectomy. An accurate knowledge of its course should reduce the incidence of injury to the branches of the superior laryngeal nerve during surgery.

  17. Autofluorescence spectroscopy for nerve-sparing laser surgery of the head and neck-the influence of laser-tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Riemann, Max; Oetter, Nicolai; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Knipfer, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The use of remote optical feedback systems represents a promising approach for minimally invasive, nerve-sparing laser surgery. Autofluorescence properties can be exploited for a fast, robust identification of nervous tissue. With regard to the crucial step towards clinical application, the impact of laser ablation on optical properties in the vicinity of structures of the head and neck has not been investigated up to now. We acquired 24,298 autofluorescence spectra from 135 tissue samples (nine ex vivo tissue types from 15 bisected pig heads) both before and after ER:YAG laser ablation. Sensitivities, specificities, and area under curve(AUC) values for each tissue pair as well as the confusion matrix were statistically calculated for pre-ablation and post-ablation autofluorescence spectra using principal component analysis (PCA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC). The confusion matrix indicated a highly successful tissue discrimination rate before laser exposure, with an average classification error of 5.2%. The clinically relevant tissue pairs nerve/cancellous bone and nerve/salivary gland yielded an AUC of 100% each. After laser ablation, tissue discrimination was feasible with an average classification accuracy of 92.1% (average classification error 7.9%). The identification of nerve versus cancellous bone and salivary gland performed very well with an AUC of 100 and 99%, respectively. Nerve-sparing laser surgery in the area of the head and neck by means of an autofluorescence-based feedback system is feasible even after ER-YAG laser-tissue interactions. These results represent a crucial step for the development of a clinically applicable feedback tool for laser surgery interventions in the oral and maxillofacial region.

  18. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  19. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Influence of two anesthetic techniques on blood sugar level in head injury patients: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, Manoj; Malviya, Deepak; Malviya, P. S.; Kumar, Virendra; Tyagi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head injury presents a major worldwide social, economic, and health problem. Hyperglycemia is a significant indicator of the severity of injury and predictor of outcome, which can easily be prevented. There has been a long-standing controversy regarding the use of inhalational or intravenous (i.v.) anesthetic agents for surgery of head injury cases and impact of these agents on blood sugar level. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to find out anesthetic drugs and technique having minimal or no effect on the blood sugar, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of patients with a head injury by comparing two types of anesthetic techniques in surgery of head injury patients. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, and comparative study, conducted on 60 adult head injury patients. The patients were divided into two groups of 30 each. Group I patients received induction with sevoflurane and then had O2 + air + sevoflurane for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Group II patients received induction with i.v. propofol and then had O2 + air + propofol for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Injection fentanyl was used in both the groups at the time of induction and in intermittent boluses in maintenance. In observation, blood sugar level and mean arterial pressure were assessed at different time periods perioperatively in both groups while GCS was analyzed pre- and post-operatively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Microsoft Excel 2010 using t-test for comparison between the two groups and Z-test for comparison of proportions. Results and Conclusion: Blood sugar level was found significantly higher in patients of sevoflurane group at 30 min after induction, at the end of surgery, and 1 h after the end of anesthesia than propofol group patients. This increase of blood sugar level did not have any significant alteration in the GCS profile of the patients in sevoflurane group as compared to propofol group

  2. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve neuropathies or retinal diseases displaying photoreceptors degeneration.

  3. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gai-yun; Al-wesabi, Samer abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study. Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis’ RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters. No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = −0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively). MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH

  4. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Gai-Yun; Al-Wesabi, Samer Abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study.Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis' RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters.No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = -0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively).MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH. This is a

  5. Renal blood-flow changes during renal nerve stimulation in rats treated with alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic blockers.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, B J; Horn, N M; Robertson, M J

    1982-01-01

    1. Blood flow through the inner cortex and outer medulla of the rat kidney was measured by the hydrogen wash-out technique. 2. Renal nerve stimulation caused vasoconstriction in both cortex and medulla. This constriction was abolished or reduced by phenoxybenzamine (9 mumole/kg I.V.), phentolamine (100 n-mole/kg) or prazosin (1.5 mumole/kg). 3. After prazosin (6 mumole/kg I.V.), renal nerve stimulation caused small but significant renal cortical vasodilatation. This vasodilatation was reversed by sulpiride (0.7 mumole kg-1 min-1), but was unaffected by propranolol (10 mumole/kg) or atropine (4.3 mumole/kg). 4. These results indicate the existence of dopaminergic vasodilator nerves to the renal cortex of the rat. PMID:6125590

  6. Eppur Si Muove: The dynamic nature of physiological control of renal blood flow by the renal sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter Ricci; Zucker, Irving H

    2017-05-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response are widely appreciated as important regulators of renal blood flow, but the role of the sympathetic nervous system in physiological renal blood flow control remains controversial. Where classic studies using static measures of renal blood flow failed, dynamic approaches have succeeded in demonstrating sympathetic control of renal blood flow under normal physiological conditions. This review focuses on transfer function analysis of renal pressure-flow, which leverages the physical relationship between blood pressure and flow to assess the underlying vascular control mechanisms. Studies using this approach indicate that the renal nerves are important in the rapid regulation of the renal vasculature. Animals with intact renal innervation show a sympathetic signature in the frequency range associated with sympathetic vasomotion that is eliminated by renal denervation. In conscious rabbits, this sympathetic signature exerts vasoconstrictive, baroreflex control of renal vascular conductance, matching well with the rhythmic, baroreflex-influenced control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and complementing findings from other studies employing dynamic approaches to study renal sympathetic vascular control. In this light, classic studies reporting that nerve stimulation and renal denervation do not affect static measures of renal blood flow provide evidence for the strength of renal autoregulation rather than evidence against physiological renal sympathetic control of renal blood flow. Thus, alongside tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response, renal sympathetic outflow should be considered an important physiological regulator of renal blood flow. Clinically, renal sympathetic vasomotion may be important for solving the problems facing the field of therapeutic renal denervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The promotion of endothelial progenitor cells recruitment by nerve growth factors in tissue-engineered blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Yuan, Wei; Li, Li; Mi, Jianhong; Xu, Shangcheng; Wen, Can; Zhou, Zhenhua; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Sun, Jiansen; Ying, Dajun; Yang, Mingcan; Li, Xiaosong; Zhu, Chuhong

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) mobilization and homing are critical to the development of an anti-thrombosis and anti-stenosis tissue-engineered blood vessel. The growth and activation of blood vessels are supported by nerves. We investigated whether nerve growth factors (NGF) can promote EPCs mobilization and endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels. In vitro, NGF promoted EPCs to form more colonies, stimulated human EPCs to differentiate into endothelial cells, and significantly enhanced EPCs migration. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that NGF treatment increased the number of EPCs in the peripheral circulation of C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, the treatment of human EPCs with NGF facilitated their homing into wire-injured carotid arteries after injection into mice. Decellularized rat blood vessel matrix was incubated with EDC cross-linked collagen and bound to NGF protein using the bifunctional coupling agent N-succinmidyl3-(2-pyridyldit-hio) propionate (SPDP). The NGF-bound tissue-engineered blood vessel was implanted into rat carotid artery for 1 week and 1 month. NGF-bound blood vessels possessed significantly higher levels of endothelialization and patency than controls did. These results demonstrated that NGF can markedly increase EPCs mobilization and homing to vascular grafts. Neurotrophic factors such as NGF have a therapeutic potential for the construction of tissue-engineered blood vessels in vivo.

  8. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation.

  9. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Simon; Liu, Xue Jun; Kwan, Chun; Salter, Michael W

    2010-11-02

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS) to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) remains an open question. Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C-fibers each cause an increase in the permeability of

  10. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  11. [The effect of destruction of rat capsaicin-sensitive nerves on blood pressure in rats with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Kostina, N E

    2013-09-01

    The effect of destruction of capsaicin-sensitive nerve (capsaicin 150 mg/kg, s/c) on blood pre- ssure was investigated in rats with metabolic syndrome induced by fructose (12.5% in drinking water for 10 weeks). The blood plasma concentrations of glucose, triglyceride (TG) and products of lipid perioxidation were defined in these rats. The systolic blood pressure was measured by non-invasive method using the Coda system (Coda, Kent Scientific, USA). The fructose diet caused impaired tolerance glucose, arterial hypertension, increased the contents of TG and products of lipid peroxidation. In capsaicin--pretreated rats (deafferentiation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve) the fructose intake did not evoke impairment tolerance glucose, the increase of systolic blood pressure and the plasma content of triglyceride. The increase of lipid perioxidation in fructose fed rats was not prevented by capsaicin pretreatment. The authors suggest that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute to the development of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension in the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Intragastric capsaicin enhances rat gastric acid elimination and mucosal blood flow by afferent nerve stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lippe, I. T.; Pabst, M. A.; Holzer, P.

    1989-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of intragastric capsaicin on acid output, clearance of aniline, potential difference, and morphology of the mucosa in the rat stomach. The experiments were carried out on rats anaesthetized with urethane in which the stomachs were continuously perfused with saline. 2. When the stomach was perfused with normal saline (pH approximately 6), intragastric capsaicin (32-640 microM) had no effect on the output of titratable acid. In contrast, when acid output was stimulated by pentagastrin or when the stomach was perfused with acid saline (pH 3), capsaicin reduced acid output. Acid loss which occurred during perfusion with saline of pH 2 was not significantly increased by capsaicin. This suggests that capsaicin does not enhance acid back-diffusion but facilitates acid elimination by other means. 3. The gastric clearance of [14C]-aniline, which is an indirect index of gastric mucosal blood flow, was estimated while the stomach was perfused with saline of pH 3. The clearance of aniline rose by 50-60% following intragastric administration of capsaicin (160 microM) whereas the mean arterial blood pressure was increased by about 2.5 mmHg only. Combined pretreatment of the rats with atropine, phentolamine, and propranolol did not alter the effect of capsaicin on the gastric clearance of aniline. 4. The gastric potential difference was not altered by capsaicin (160 microM) administered together with saline of pH 3. This and the finding that there were no signs of mucosal damage by light and scanning electron microscopy indicate that intragastric capsaicin does not irritate the gastric mucosa. 5. The effects of intragastric capsaicin on gastric acid output and aniline clearance and on blood pressure were absent in rats in which capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones had been ablated by neonatal treatment with a neurotoxic dose of capsaicin, which indicates that they result from stimulation of afferent nerve endings in the stomach. It is

  13. Severity and Patterns of Blood-Nerve Barrier Breakdown in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: Correlations with Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Sawai, Setsu; Sano, Yasuteru; Beppu, Minako; Misawa, Sonoko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Koga, Michiaki; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM) and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS)). The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) in each CIDP subtype. Methods We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs). Results The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. Conclusions Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes. PMID:25105500

  14. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  15. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves.

  16. In vivo analysis of glaucoma-related features within the optic nerve head using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Prata, Tiago S; Lopes, Flavio S; Prado, Vitor G; Almeida, Izabela; Matsubara, Igor; Dorairaj, Syril; Furlanetto, Rafael L; Vessani, Roberto M; Paranhos, Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Structural differences between optic nerve head (ONH) parameters in glaucomatous and non-glaucomatous eyes has been documented, however the association between such parameters in patients with different disease stages is yet to be elucidated. We investigated the relationship between different laminar and prelaminar ONH structures using enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT) in a population with and without glaucoma. In this observational case-control study, we prospectively enrolled healthy individuals and glaucomatous patients with different disease stages. All participants underwent EDI OCT imaging (Heidelberg Engineering). Following ONH parameters were measured on serial vertical B-scans by two examiners masked to patient's clinical data: lamina cribrosa (LC) and prelaminar neural tissue (PLNT) thicknesses, Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) and cup depth. Associations between cup depth, and laminar and prelaminar parameters were evaluated controlling for possible confounding factors such as axial length and disc size. Sixty-four eyes of 64 patients were included (30 with glaucoma and 34 controls). Eyes with glaucoma had significantly lower mean LC and PLNT thickness, and greater mean cup depth than controls (p<0.01). There was a significant negative association between PLNT thickness and cup depth in glaucomatous eyes (R2 = 0.158, p = 0.029). In addition, LC thickness correlated significantly with cup depth (R2 = 0.135, p = 0.045). Eyes with thinner LCs presented deeper cups. Overall, cup depth and BMO had the best and LC thickness had the worst intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility grading. In conclusion, significant associations were seen between cup depth, LC and PLNT thickness. Eyes with deeper cups not only had less neural tissue, but also thinner LCs, independent of disc size and axial length. Best reproducibility was found for prelaminar parameters compared to deeper ONH structures.

  17. Early detection of glaucoma using fully automated disparity analysis of the optic nerve head (ONH) from stereo fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Archie; Corona, Enrique; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian S.

    2006-03-01

    Early detection of structural damage to the optic nerve head (ONH) is critical in diagnosis of glaucoma, because such glaucomatous damage precedes clinically identifiable visual loss. Early detection of glaucoma can prevent progression of the disease and consequent loss of vision. Traditional early detection techniques involve observing changes in the ONH through an ophthalmoscope. Stereo fundus photography is also routinely used to detect subtle changes in the ONH. However, clinical evaluation of stereo fundus photographs suffers from inter- and intra-subject variability. Even the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) has not been found to be sufficiently sensitive for early detection. A semi-automated algorithm for quantitative representation of the optic disc and cup contours by computing accumulated disparities in the disc and cup regions from stereo fundus image pairs has already been developed using advanced digital image analysis methodologies. A 3-D visualization of the disc and cup is achieved assuming camera geometry. High correlation among computer-generated and manually segmented cup to disc ratios in a longitudinal study involving 159 stereo fundus image pairs has already been demonstrated. However, clinical usefulness of the proposed technique can only be tested by a fully automated algorithm. In this paper, we present a fully automated algorithm for segmentation of optic cup and disc contours from corresponding stereo disparity information. Because this technique does not involve human intervention, it eliminates subjective variability encountered in currently used clinical methods and provides ophthalmologists with a cost-effective and quantitative method for detection of ONH structural damage for early detection of glaucoma.

  18. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy of the optic nerve head in exfoliation glaucoma and ocular hypertension with exfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harju, M.; Vesti, E.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To study the relation between optic nerve head topography (Heidelberg retina tomograph, HRT) and disc area, visual field index mean defect (MD), and intraocular pressure (IOP), and to see whether change in HRT parameters is associated with change in MD in a prospective follow up.
METHODS—80 consecutive patients (69 patients with exfoliation glaucoma and 11 with ocular hypertension combined with exfoliation syndrome) were examined before IOP reducing intervention and prospectively followed every 6 months for 2 years.
RESULTS—At the entry point, multiple regression analysis showed significant linear association between MD and all HRT parameters, when controlling for disc area. Disc area showed significant association with cup area, cup/disc area ratio, rim area, cup volume, and mean RNFL thickness. Six months after intervention IOP had decreased significantly. Reversible changes in cup area, cup/disc area ratio, rim area, cup volume, rim volume, mean cup depth, and maximum cup depth were associated with decrease in IOP. During the follow up period from 6 month to 2 years, IOP did not change significantly, and MD was used as a measure of progression of glaucoma. During this period, only cup shape measure among HRT parameters showed significant association with subsequent change in MD.
CONCLUSION—Disc area should be taken into account when using HRT to compare patients. Any effect of change in IOP should be also taken into account when using HRT in follow up. Cup shape measure is a promising indicator of progression of glaucomatous damage.

 PMID:11222334

  19. Comparison of Optic Nerve Head Assessment with a Digital Stereoscopic Camera (Discam), Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy, and Stereophotography

    PubMed Central

    Correnti, Anthony J.; Wollstein, Gadi; Price, Lori Lyn; Schuman, Joel S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare computer-assisted planimetry using the Discam system (Marcher Enterprises Ltd., Hereford, UK), confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO), and stereoscopic disc photography with respect to optic nerve head (ONH) measurements and glaucoma status. Design Comparative, observational case series and interobserver variability study. Methods Three hundred eighty-six eyes of 233 consecutive subjects were imaged with the Discam, and a subset underwent ONH evaluation with CSLO (n = 297), stereoscopic photography (n = 233), or both. Subjects were classified into normal, glaucoma suspect, and glaucoma groups based on clinical findings of slit-lamp disc examination and visual field testing. Agreement of cup-to-disc ratio measurements among the three technologies was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and areas under the receiver operator characteristic (AROC) curves. Main Outcome Measures Cup-to-disc ratio as measured by Discam, CSLO, and stereography. Results Intraclass correlation coefficients calculated using the two-way random effects model for comparing Discam, CSLO, and stereography among cup-to-disc area ratio, vertical cup-to-disc ratio, and horizontal cup-to-disc ratio were 0.46 to 0.53. The ICC was higher for eyes with larger optic discs (0.51) than those with smaller ones (0.32). The ICC calculated using the fixed effects model for the Discam and CSLO comparison was 0.72. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.67 to 0.80 among the three technologies comparing normal with glaucomatous eyes. In general, there was no statistically significant difference between techniques with respect to sensitivity and specificity of glaucoma detection. Conclusions There is good agreement between ONH measurements obtained by Discam, CSLO, and stereography; however, the results are not interchangeable. Similar AROC curve values among all three techniques imply that the Discam, CSLO, and stereography perform equally for

  20. Osteopontin Is Induced by TGF-β2 and Regulates Metabolic Cell Activity in Cultured Human Optic Nerve Head Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Friedrich; Hammer, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    The aqueous humor (AH) component transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 is strongly correlated to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and was shown to up-regulate glaucoma-associated extracellular matrix (ECM) components, members of the ECM degradation system and heat shock proteins (HSP) in primary ocular cells. Here we present osteopontin (OPN) as a new TGF-β2 responsive factor in cultured human optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes. Activation was initially demonstrated by Oligo GEArray microarray and confirmed by semiquantitative (sq) RT-PCR, realtime RT-PCR and western blot. Expressions of most prevalent OPN receptors CD44 and integrin receptor subunits αV, α4, α 5, α6, α9, β1, β3 and β5 by ONH astrocytes were shown by sqRT-PCR and immunofluorescence labeling. TGF-β2 treatment did not affect their expression levels. OPN did not regulate gene expression of described TGF-β2 targets shown by sqRT-PCR. In MTS-assays, OPN had a time- and dose-dependent stimulating effect on the metabolic activity of ONH astrocytes, whereas TGF-β2 significantly reduced metabolism. OPN signaling via CD44 mediated a repressive outcome on metabolic activity, whereas signaling via integrin receptors resulted in a pro-metabolic effect. In summary, our findings characterize OPN as a TGF-β2 responsive factor that is not involved in TGF-β2 mediated ECM and HSP modulation, but affects the metabolic activity of astrocytes. A potential involvement in a protective response to TGF-β2 triggered damage is indicated, but requires further investigation. PMID:24718314

  1. Linear discriminant functions to improve the glaucoma probability score analysis to detect glaucomatous optic nerve heads: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Iester, Michele; Oddone, Francesco; Prato, Mirko; Centofanti, Marco; Fogagnolo, Paolo; Rossetti, Luca; Vaccarezza, Valeria; Manni, Gianluca; Ferreras, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to create a linear discriminant function (LDF) formula by using the new Glaucoma Probability Score (GPS) global and sectorial optic nerve head parameters measured by Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph 3 to improve the GPS diagnostic capacity to discriminate between healthy and glaucomatous eyes. This is a multicenter cross-sectional study. To calculate the LDF formula, 137 normal individuals and 96 glaucomatous patients were selected. Another independent sample of 60 healthy and 69 glaucomatous eyes was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the LDF formulas. All patients underwent a full eye examination, standard achromatic perimetry by using Humphrey Field Analyzer, and imaging with Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph 3. Glaucoma was defined on the basis of SITA-24-2 visual field loss (pattern standard deviation P<5% and glaucoma Hemifield test outside normal limits). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curves and sensitivity and specificity for different LDFs were analyzed as measures of diagnostic accuracy. The analysis was repeated after stratification for optic disc size and glaucoma stage. Two LDF formulas improved GPS algorithm results. At fixed specificities of 85% and 95%, the sensitivity values were 79.7% and 71%, respectively, for the GPS-only LDF, which used only the so-called GPS parameters, whereas the values were 85.5% and 79.7%, respectively, for the GPS-RA LDF, which used sectorial rim area parameters as well. When the so-called GPS parameters were used in an LDF formula, its diagnostic capacity slightly improved; however, the diagnostic performances of the GPS LDF, which used sectorial rim area parameters as well, were better.

  2. Optic Nerve Head Measurements With Optical Coherence Tomography: A Phantom-Based Study Reveals Differences Among Clinical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anant; Baxi, Jigesh; Calhoun, William; Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can monitor for glaucoma by measuring dimensions of the optic nerve head (ONH) cup and disc. Multiple clinical studies have shown that different OCT devices yield different estimates of retinal dimensions. We developed phantoms mimicking ONH morphology as a new way to compare ONH measurements from different clinical OCT devices. Methods Three phantoms were fabricated to model the ONH: One normal and two with glaucomatous anatomies. Phantoms were scanned with Stratus, RTVue, and Cirrus clinical devices, and with a laboratory OCT system as a reference. We analyzed device-reported ONH measurements of cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and cup volume and compared them with offline measurements done manually and with a custom software algorithm, respectively. Results The mean absolute difference between clinical devices with device-reported measurements versus offline measurements was 0.082 vs. 0.013 for CDR and 0.044 mm3 vs. 0.019 mm3 for cup volume. Statistically significant differences between devices were present for 16 of 18 comparisons of device-reported measurements from the phantoms. Offline Cirrus measurements tended to be significantly different from those from Stratus and RTVue. Conclusions The interdevice differences in CDR and cup volume are primarily caused by the devices' proprietary ONH analysis algorithms. The three devices yield more similar ONH measurements when a consistent offline analysis technique is applied. Scan pattern on the ONH also may be a factor in the measurement differences. This phantom-based study has provided unique insights into characteristics of OCT measurements of the ONH. PMID:27409500

  3. Deformation of the Normal Monkey Optic Nerve Head Connective Tissue Following Acute IOP Elevation within 3-D Histomorphometric Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Downs, J. Crawford; Sigal, Ian A.; Roberts, Michael D.; Thompson, Hillary; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue deformation following acute (15 or 30 minutes) intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation within six adult normal monkeys using 3-D histomorphometry. Methods Trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of six monkeys, each perfusion fixed with one eye at IOP 10 mmHg and the other at IOP 30 or 45 mmHg by anterior chamber manometer were serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, 3-D delineated and quantified using standard parameters. For each monkey, inter-eye differences (high IOP eye minus IOP 10 eye) for each parameter were calculated and compared by ANOVA and EPIDmax both overall and regionally. EPIDmax deformations for each parameter were defined to be those statistically significant differences that exceeded the maximum physiologic inter-eye difference within six bilaterally normal monkeys of a previous report. Results Regional EPIDmax laminar thinning, posterior bowing of the peripapillary sclera, thinning and expansion of the scleral canal were present in most high IOP eyes and were colocalized in those demonstrating the most deformation. Laminar deformation was minimal and not only posterior but in some cases anterior in the high IOP eyes. No increase in deformation was seen in the IOP-45 versus the IOP-30 eyes. Conclusion ONH connective tissue alterations following acute IOP elevation involve regional thinning, stretching and deformation of the lamina cribrosa and peripapillary sclera which are minimal to modest in magnitude. The time-dependent character of these alterations, as well as their compressive, expansile, and shear effects on the contained axons, astrocytes, laminar and posterior ciliary circulations remain to be determined. PMID:19628739

  4. Detection of the optic nerve head in fundus images of the retina using the Hough transform for circles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ells, Anna L

    2010-06-01

    Detection of the optic nerve head (ONH) is a key preprocessing component in algorithms for the automatic extraction of the anatomical structures of the retina. We propose a method to automatically locate the ONH in fundus images of the retina. The method includes edge detection using the Sobel operators and detection of circles using the Hough transform. The Hough transform assists in the detection of the center and radius of a circle that approximates the margin of the ONH. Forty images of the retina from the Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction (DRIVE) dataset were used to test the performance of the proposed method. The center and boundary of the ONH were independently marked by an ophthalmologist for evaluation. Free-response receiver operating characteristics (FROC) analysis as well as measures of distance and overlap were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The centers of the ONH were detected with an average distance of 0.36 mm to the corresponding centers marked by the ophthalmologist; the detected circles had an average overlap of 0.73 with the boundaries of the ONH drawn by the ophthalmologist. FROC analysis indicated a sensitivity of detection of 92.5% at 8.9 false-positives per image. With an intensity-based criterion for the selection of the circle and a limit of 40 pixels (0.8 mm) on the distance between the center of the detected circle and the manually identified center of the ONH, a successful detection rate of 90% was obtained with the DRIVE dataset.

  5. A Framework for Detecting Glaucomatous Progression in the Optic Nerve Head of an Eye using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Žabić, Stanislav; Bowd, Christopher; Thompson, Hilary W.; Wolenski, Peter; Iyengar, S. Sitharama; Karki, Bijaya B.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Often the optic nerve head (ONH) glaucomatous damage and ONH changes occur prior to visual field loss and are observable in vivo. Thus, digital image analysis is a promising choice for detecting the onset and/or progression of glaucoma. In this work, we present a new framework for detecting glaucomatous changes in the ONH of an eye using the method of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). A baseline topograph subspace was constructed for each eye to describe the structure of the ONH of the eye at a reference/baseline condition using POD. Any glaucomatous changes in the ONH of the eye present during a follow-up exam were estimated by comparing the follow-up ONH topography with its baseline topograph subspace representation. Image correspondence measures of L1 and L2 norms, correlation, and image Euclidean distance (IMED) were used to quantify the ONH changes. An ONH topographic library built from the Louisiana State University Experimental Glaucoma study was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were used to compare the diagnostic performance of the POD induced parameters with the parameters of Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) method. The IMED and L2 norm parameters in the POD framework provided the highest AUC of 0.94 at 10° field of imaging and 0.91 at 15° field of imaging compared to the TCA parameters with an AUC of 0.86 and 0.88 respectively. The proposed POD framework captures the instrument measurement variability and inherent structure variability and shows promise for improving our ability to detect glaucomatous change over time in glaucoma management. PMID:19369163

  6. Optic Nerve Head Measurements With Optical Coherence Tomography: A Phantom-Based Study Reveals Differences Among Clinical Devices.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anant; Baxi, Jigesh; Calhoun, William; Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Schuman, Joel S; Wollstein, Gadi; Hammer, Daniel X

    2016-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can monitor for glaucoma by measuring dimensions of the optic nerve head (ONH) cup and disc. Multiple clinical studies have shown that different OCT devices yield different estimates of retinal dimensions. We developed phantoms mimicking ONH morphology as a new way to compare ONH measurements from different clinical OCT devices. Three phantoms were fabricated to model the ONH: One normal and two with glaucomatous anatomies. Phantoms were scanned with Stratus, RTVue, and Cirrus clinical devices, and with a laboratory OCT system as a reference. We analyzed device-reported ONH measurements of cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and cup volume and compared them with offline measurements done manually and with a custom software algorithm, respectively. The mean absolute difference between clinical devices with device-reported measurements versus offline measurements was 0.082 vs. 0.013 for CDR and 0.044 mm3 vs. 0.019 mm3 for cup volume. Statistically significant differences between devices were present for 16 of 18 comparisons of device-reported measurements from the phantoms. Offline Cirrus measurements tended to be significantly different from those from Stratus and RTVue. The interdevice differences in CDR and cup volume are primarily caused by the devices' proprietary ONH analysis algorithms. The three devices yield more similar ONH measurements when a consistent offline analysis technique is applied. Scan pattern on the ONH also may be a factor in the measurement differences. This phantom-based study has provided unique insights into characteristics of OCT measurements of the ONH.

  7. Optic nerve head parameters of high-definition optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retina tomogram in perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Viquar Unnisa; Addepalli, Uday Kumar; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra Sekhar; Rao, Harsha Laxmana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heidelberg retina tomogram (HRT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two widely used imaging modalities to evaluate the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma. Purpose: To compare the ONH parameters of HRT3 and high-definition OCT (HD-OCT) and evaluate their diagnostic abilities in perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Methods: 35 control eyes (24 subjects), 21 preperimetric glaucoma eyes (15 patients), and 64 perimetric glaucoma eyes (44 patients) from the Longitudinal Glaucoma Evaluation Study underwent HRT3 and HD-OCT examinations. Statistical Analysis: Agreement between the ONH parameters of HRT and HD-OCT were assessed using Bland-Altman plots. Diagnostic abilities of ONH parameters were evaluated using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs), sensitivity at fixed specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR). Results: Optic disc area, vertical cup to disc ratio, and cup volume with HD-OCT were larger than with HRT, while the rim area was smaller with HD-OCT (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). AUCs of all HD-OCT ONH parameters (0.90-0.97 in perimetric and 0.62-0.71 in preperimetric glaucoma) were comparable (P > 0.10) to the corresponding HRT ONH parameters (0.81-0.95 in perimetric and 0.55-0.72 in preperimetric glaucoma). LRs associated with diagnostic categorization of ONH parameters of both HD-OCT and HRT were associated with larger effects on posttest probability of perimetric compared to preperimetric glaucoma. Conclusions: ONH measurements of HD-OCT and HRT3 cannot be used interchangeably. Though the diagnostic abilities of ONH parameters of HD-OCT and HRT in glaucoma were comparable, the same were significantly lower in preperimetric compared to perimetric glaucoma. PMID:27221679

  8. Correlations between corneal and optic nerve head variables in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Jañez, Luis; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Berrozpe-Villabona, Clara; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Garcia-Sanchez, Julian; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To correlate corneal variables (determined using the Pentacam) with optic nerve head (ONH) variables determined using the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Measurements were made in 75 healthy eyes and 73 eyes with POAG and correlations examined through Pearson correlation coefficients between the two sets of variables in the two subject groups. The corneal variables determined were corneal volume (CVol), central corneal thickness (CCT), overall corneal thickness (OvCT), the mean thickness of a circular zone centered at the corneal apex of 1 mm radius (zone I) and the mean thickness of several concentric rings, also centered at the apex until the limbus, each of 1 mm width (zones II to VI respectively). The ONH variables were determined using the HRT. RESULTS The following pairs of variables were correlated in the control group: CCT-disc area (DAr) (-0.48; P<0.0001), Zone I-DAr (-0.503; P<0.0001) and Zone II-DAr (-0.443; P<0.0001); and in the POAG group: CCT-cup-to-disc area ratio (CDRa) (-0.402; P<0.0001), Zone I-CDRa (-0.418; P<0.0001), Zone II-CDRa (-0.405; P=0.006), Zone I-cup shape measure (CSM) (-0.415; P=0.002), Zone II-CSM (-0.405; P=0.001), Zone IV-height variation contour (HVC) (0.378; P=0.002); Zone V-HVC (0.388, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In the healthy subjects, significant negative correlation was detected between central and paracentral corneal thickness and optic disc area. In contrast, the POAG patients showed significant negative correlation between central and paracentral corneal thickness and the cup-disc ratio and CSM, and positive correlation between peripheral corneal thickness and HVC. PMID:26682165

  9. Role of endothelin-A receptors in optic nerve head red cell flux regulation during isometric exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René M; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Frantal, Sophie; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is an important regulator of vascular tone in the eye. It appears to play a role in ocular disease because of its strong vasoconstrictor action, its role in intraocular pressure homeostasis, and its neurotoxic potential. We have previously shown that ET-1 is involved in choroidal red cell flux (RCF) regulation during isometric exercise in healthy humans. In the present study we hypothesized that ET-1 also plays a role in optic nerve head (ONH) RCF regulation during isometric exercise. To test this hypothesis, we performed a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study in 15 healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized to receive intravenous infusions of the specific endothelin type A receptor antagonist BQ-123 and placebo on two different study days. During these infusion periods, subjects performed squatting for 6 min to increase ocular perfusion pressure (OPP). ONH RCF was assessed with laser-Doppler flowmetry, and OPP was calculated from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure. BQ-123 did not change OPP or ONH RCF at baseline. The relative increase in OPP during isometric exercise was comparable between both groups (between 84 and 88%, P = 0.76 between groups; P < 0.001 vs. baseline). Isometric exercise increased ONH RCF during placebo and BQ-123, but the increase was more pronounced when the endothelin type-A receptor antagonist was administered (placebo, 27.3 ± 5.4%; and BQ-123, 39.2 ± 4.4%; P = 0.007 between groups). The present data indicate that ET-1 regulates red cell flux in the ONH beyond the autoregulatory range.

  10. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C; Lasker, David M

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background discharge rates have a larger phase lead re-head velocity than those that fire more regularly. The goal of this study was to investigate the cause of the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents at high-frequency head rotations. Under the assumption that externally applied galvanic currents act directly on the nerve, we derived a transfer function describing the dynamics of a semicircular canal and its hair cells through comparison of responses to sinusoidally modulated head velocity and currents. Responses of all afferents were fit well with a transfer function with one zero (lead term). Best-fit lead terms describing responses to current for each group of afferents were similar to the lead term describing responses to head velocity for regular afferents (0.006 s + 1). This finding indicated that the pre-synaptic and synaptic inputs to regular afferents were likely to be pure velocity transducers. However, the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents could not be explained solely by the ratio of type I to II hair cells (Baird et al 1988), suggesting that the variation was caused by a combination of pre- (type of hair cell) and post-synaptic properties.

  11. Peripheral blood DNA methylation profiles are indicative of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Scott M.; Koestler, Devin C; Christensen, Brock C; Butler, Rondi A; Wiencke, John K; Nelson, Heather H; Houseman, E Andres; Marsit, Carmen J

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for an estimated 47,560 new cases and 11,480 deaths annually in the United States, the majority of which are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). The overall 5 year survival is approximately 60% and declines with increasing stage at diagnosis, indicating a need for non-invasive tests that facilitate the detection of early disease. DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification that is amenable to measurement and readily available in peripheral blood. We used a semi-supervised recursively partitioned mixture model (SS-RPMM) approach to identify novel blood DNA methylation markers of HNSCC using genome-wide methylation array data for peripheral blood samples from 92 HNSCC cases and 92 cancer-free control subjects. To assess the performance of the resultant markers, we constructed receiver operating characteristic (RJC) curves and calculated the corresponding area under the curve (AUC). Cases and controls were best differentiated by a methylation profile of six CpG loci (associated with FGD4, SERPINF1, WDR39, IL27, HYAL2 and PLEKHA6), with an AUC of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.62–0.82). After adjustment for subject age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption and HPV16 serostatus, the AUC increased to 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76–0.92). We have identified a novel blood-based methylation profile that is indicative of HNSCC with a high degree of accuracy. This profile demonstrates the potential of DNA methylation measured in blood for development of non-invasive applications for detection of head and neck cancer. PMID:22430805

  12. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous micro-circulation vasodilates during acute 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. We expected that relative magnitudes of and differences between upper and lower body cutaneous blood flow elevation would be sustained during initial acclimation to simulated microgravity. We measured cutaneous micro-vascular blood flow with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean + SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline throughout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg, baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or humoral effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  13. A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a simple-structured disposable pump head.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Li, Lichuan; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) has been developed for use in a disposable extracorporeal system. The design of the pump is intended to eliminate mechanical contact with the impeller, to facilitate a simple disposable mechanism, and to reduce the blood-heating effects that are caused by motors and magnetic bearings. The bearing rotor attached to the impeller is suspended by a two degrees-of-freedom controlled radial magnetic bearing stator, which is situated outside the rotor. In the space inside the ringlike rotor, a magnetic coupling disk is placed to rotate the rotor and to ensure that the pump head is thermally isolated from the motor. In this system, the rotor can exhibit high passive stiffness due to the novel design of the closed magnetic circuits. The disposable pump head, which has a priming volume of 23 mL, consists of top and bottom housings, an impeller, and a rotor with a diameter of 50 mm. The pump can provide a head pressure of more than 300 mm Hg against a flow of 5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis of the MedTech Dispo is 0.0025 +/- 0.0005 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 250 mm Hg. This is one-seventh of the equivalent figure for a Bio Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), which has a value of 0.0170 +/- 0.0096 g/100 L. These results show that the MedTech Dispo offers high pumping performance and low blood trauma.

  14. The influence of gravity on regional lung blood flow in humans: SPECT in the upright and head-down posture.

    PubMed

    Ax, M; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Lindahl, S G E; Mure, M; Petersson, J

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that gravity has little influence on the distribution of lung blood flow while changing posture from supine to prone. This study aimed to evaluate the maximal influence of posture by comparison of regional lung blood flow in the upright and head-down posture in 8 healthy volunteers, using a tilt table. Regional lung blood flow was marked by intravenous injection of macroaggregates of human albumin labeled with (99m)Tc or (113m)In, in the upright and head-down posture, respectively, during tidal breathing. Both radiotracers remain fixed in the lung after administration. The distribution of radioactivity was mapped using quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) corrected for attenuation and scatter. All images were obtained supine during tidal breathing. A shift from upright to the head-down posture caused a clear redistribution of blood flow from basal to apical regions. We conclude that posture plays a role for the distribution of lung blood flow in upright humans, and that the influence of posture, and thereby gravity, is much greater in the upright and head-down posture than in horizontal postures. However, the results of the study demonstrate that lung structure is the main determinant of regional blood flow and gravity is a secondary contributor to the distribution of lung blood flow in the upright and head-down positions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using a dual-isotope quantitative SPECT method, we demonstrated that although a shift in posture redistributes blood flow in the direction of gravity, the results are also consistent with lung structure being a greater determinant of regional blood flow than gravity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use modern imaging methods to quantify the shift in regional lung blood flow in humans at a change between the upright and head-down postures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The relationship between lingual and hypoglossal nerve function and quality of life in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfring, T; Boliek, C A; Winget, M; Paulsen, C; Seikaly, H; Rieger, J M

    2014-02-01

    Sensorimotor impairment of the tongue has the potential to affect speech and swallowing. The purpose of this study was to critically examine the effects of nerve preservation and reinnervation after reconstruction of the base of tongue on patient-perceived outcomes of quality of life (QoL) related to speech and swallowing through completion of the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 standardised questionnaire. Thirty participants with a diagnosis of base of tongue cancer underwent primary resection and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap, which may or may not have included nerve repair to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve or both. Eight QoL domains sensitive to changes in motor and sensory nerve function were included in the analysis. Transected lingual and hypoglossal nerves were associated with difficulty in swallowing, social eating, dry mouth and social contact. There were fewer problems reported when these nerves were either repaired or left intact. There were no significant differences between patient nerve status and QoL outcomes for speech, sticky saliva and use of feeding tubes. This study was the first to examine the impact of sensory or motor nerve transection and reconstruction on health-related QoL outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pharmacological control of head motion during cerebral blood flow imaging with CT or MRI.

    PubMed

    Sesay, M; Jeannin, A; Moonen, C T W; Dousset, V; Maurette, P

    2009-06-01

    Uncontrolled head motion during CT/MRI cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging has been estimated between 3 and 15% of the cases. We present a pharmacological approach which permitted us to maintain the incident at 0.06% with few side effects. The protocol involves the systematic use of general anesthesia (sevoflurane) in children below five years and those with mental retardation. In anxious, claustrophobic or agitated adults, mild sedation with propofol, midazolam or hydroxyzine was used with mild effects on CBF. We strongly recommend the availability of basic cardiorespiratory resuscitation equipment and a recovery room before any sedation or general anesthesia is undertaken.

  17. Multiple stimulations for muscle-nerve-blood vessel unit in compensatory hypertrophied skeletal muscle of rat surgical ablation model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Tono, Kayoko; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Tissue inflammation and multiple cellular responses in the compensatory enlarged plantaris (OP Plt) muscle induced by surgical ablation of synergistic muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were followed over 10 weeks after surgery. Contralateral surgery was performed in adult Wistar male rats. Cellular responses in muscle fibers, blood vessels and nerve fibers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Severe muscle fiber damage and disappearance of capillaries associated with apparent tissue edema were observed in the peripheral portion of OP Plt muscles during the first week, whereas central portions were relatively preserved. Marked cell activation/proliferation was also mainly observed in peripheral portions. Similarly, activated myogenic cells were seen not only inside but also outside of muscle fibers. The former were likely satellite cells and the latter may be interstitial myogenic cells. One week after surgery, small muscle fibers, small arteries and capillaries and several branched-muscle fibers were evident in the periphery, thus indicating new muscle fiber and blood vessel formation. Proliferating cells were also detected in the nerve bundles in the Schwann cell position. These results indicate that the compensatory stimulated/enlarged muscle is a suitable model for analyzing multiple physiological cellular responses in muscle-nerve-blood vessel units under continuous stretch stimulation.

  18. [Evaluation of the injured range of vestibular superior and inferior nerves in sudden deafness patients with vertigo using video head impulse test].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lingxiao; Chen, Taisheng; Xu, Kaixu; Wang, Wei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Chao; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Yuanxu; Lin, Peng

    2015-09-01

    To discuss the video head impulse tests (vHIT) application values in assessment of the vestibular nerves, function in sudden deafness patients with vertigo. There were 60 cases (120 ears) of healthy volunteers as control group, and 182 cases (182 ears) of sudden deafness with vertigo patients as study group. The study group received vHIT and caloric test, and the control group received vHIT. Functions of vestibular superior and inferior nerves were analyzed by the gains of vHIT and the nystagmus, s unilateral weakness of caloric test, with SPSS17.0 software. The values of vHIT-G of the six semicircular canals in the control group were normal distribution and no statistical significance among them (F = 0.005, P = 1.000). The vHIT-G averages of both sides of anterior, horizontal and posterior semicircular canals were (15.20 ± 11.00) %, (15.30 ± 13.30) %, and (15.15 ± 14.72) % respectively. In the study group, the vHIT-G of the affected side were (21.73 ± 14.84) %, (21.20 ± 28.24) %, and (19.22 ± 23.50) %, with normal distribution, and in which statistical significance was detected comparing with those in the control group (P < 0.05). The positive rates were 26.9% (49/182) in vHIT, 70.3% (128/182) in caloric test. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between vHIT and caloric test examined by chi-square test. According to the results of vHIT, there were 15 cases (8.2%) damaged vestibular superior and inferior nerves areas, 19 cases (10.4%) damaged the superior vestibular nerve area, and 15 cases (8.2%) damaged the inferior vestibular nerve area. In combination with caloric test results, it was shown that there were 29 cases (15.9%) damaged vestibular superior and inferior nerves areas, 101 cases (55.5%) damaged the superior vestibular nerve area, and 1 case (0.5%) damaged the inferior vestibular nerve area. vHIT can assess the function of six semicircular canals and illustrate high frequency of vestibular nerves. Caloric test combined with vHIT have

  19. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  20. An anatomical study of the full-length phrenic nerve and its blood supply: clinical implications for endoscopic dissection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Su; Xu, Wen-Dong; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2011-12-01

    For surgeries aimed at the dissection of full-length phrenic nerve, a full appreciation of its trajectory, blood supply and correlation with adjacent anatomical structures is necessary, especially for endoscopic manipulations. A fresh cadaver study was conducted with the purpose of avoiding surgical complications and ensuring further efficacy and efficiency of endoscopic manipulations. Ten fresh adult cadavers were dissected. Special attention was paid to the topography of the origin, the trajectory of the phrenic nerve, and its anatomic communication with the surrounding vessels and organs. In the second side of the cadavers, thoracic endoscopic manipulations and observations were also performed. The full length of the phrenic nerve was 24.6 ± 1.7 and 30.6 ± 1.8 cm on the right and left side, respectively; the blood supply of the phrenic nerve in the thoracic cavity came exclusively from the pericardiacophrenic artery; the distance between the origin of the pericardiacophrenic artery and that of the internal thoracic artery ranged from 0.5 to 5.2 cm on the right side, and from 1.4 to 5.6 cm on the left; most of the pericardiacophrenic veins intermingled with small vessels of pericardium and pleura, forming a venous network and joining the innominate vein. Endoscopic dissection of the thoracic phrenic nerve together with the accompanying pericardiacophrenic artery can be performed. Extreme attention should be paid during surgery to a section of about 6 cm in length of the artery originating from the internal thoracic artery, while the accompanying veins do not require to be spared.

  1. Microscopy and Microanalysis of Blood in a Snake Head Fish, Channa gachua Exposed to Environmental Pollution.

    PubMed

    Pala, Eva M; Dey, Sudip

    2016-02-01

    Conventional and highly sophisticated analytical methods (Cyria et al., 1989; Massar et al., 2012a) were used to analyze micro-structural and micro-analytical aspects of the blood of snake head fish, Channa gachua, exposed to municipal wastes and city garbage. Red (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts and hemhemoglobin content were found to be higher in pollution affected fish as compared with control. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the occurrence of abnormal erythrocytes such as crenated cells, echinocytes, lobopodial projections, membrane internalization, spherocytes, ruptured cells, contracted cells, depression, and uneven elongation of erythrocyte membranes in fish inhabiting the polluted sites. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed the presence of silicon and lead in the RBCs of pollution affected fish. Significance of the study includes the highly sophisticated analytical approach, which revealed the aforementioned micro-structural abnormalities.

  2. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) of keratinocytes, blood vessels and nerves in hairless mouse skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    BUSSAU, L. J.; VO, L. T.; DELANEY, P. M.; PAPWORTH, G. D.; BARKLA, D. H.; KING, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) enabled subsurface fluorescence microscopy of the skin of hairless mice in vivo. Application of acridine orange enabled imaging of the layers of the epidermis. The corneocytes of the stratum corneum, the keratinocytes in the basal layers and redundant hair follicles were visualised at depths greater than 100 μm. Cellular and nuclear membranes of keratinocytes of the skin were visualised by the use of acridine orange and DIOC5(3). Imaging of the skin after injection of FITC-dextran revealed an extensive network of blood vessels with a size range up to 20 μm. Blood cells could be seen moving through dermal vessels and the blood circulation through the dermal vascular bed was video-taped. The fluorescent dye 4-di-2-ASP showed the presence of nerves fibres around the hair follicles and subsurface blood vessels. Comparison was made between images obtained in vivo using FOCI and in vitro scanning electron microscopy and conventional histology. FOCI offers the potential to study dynamic events in vivo, such as blood flow, skin growth, nerve regeneration and many pathological processes, in ways which have not previously been possible. PMID:9643419

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  4. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous microcirculation vasodilates during acute 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. Cutaneous microvascular blood flow was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean +/- SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline througout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or hurmonal effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  5. Comparing Optic Nerve Head Rim Width, Rim Area, and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness to Axon Count in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Hardin, Christy; Reynaud, Juan; Cull, Grant; Yang, Hongli; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compare spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) measurements of minimum rim width (MRW), minimum rim area (MRA), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) to complete orbital optic nerve axon counts in nonhuman primates (NHP) with unilateral experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods Biweekly SDOCT measurements of MRW, MRA, and RNFLT were acquired under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 NHP during baseline (mean ± SD, 5.0 ± 1.6 sessions) and after laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of one eye to induce chronic IOP elevation. At the study endpoint (predefined for each NHP), 100% axon counts were obtained from each optic nerve. Results For SDOCT parameters at baseline, the correlation between the two eyes of each animal was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.97) and MRW (R = 0.97), but lower for MRA (R = 0.85). At the final time point, average values in EG eyes relative to control eyes were: −22% for RNFLT, −38% for MRW, −36% for MRA, and −36% for optic nerve axons. The correlation with axon counts was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.81), compared to MRW (R = 0.72, P = 0.001) or MRA (R = 0.70, P = 0.001). Diagnostic sensitivity was 75% for RNFLT, 90% for MRW, and 88% for MRA; all had 100% specificity. Conclusions Peripapillary RNFLT was correlated more closely with total orbital optic nerve axon count than were the ONH parameters MRW or MRA. This is likely because glaucomatous deformation (beyond axon loss alone) has a greater influence on the ONH parameters MRW and MRA than on RNFLT. PMID:27409499

  6. CSF Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Sean D.; Lang, Susan M.; Simmonds, Sarah S.; Wenner, Megan M.; Farquhar, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or poly-synaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to CSF hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15M, 0.6M, and 1.0M NaCl (5µL/10 min) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure (ABP) despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the GABAA agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to ICV infusion of 1M NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and ABP. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally-projecting RVLM neurons revealed three distinct populations based on discharge responses to ICV infusion of 1M NaCl: Type I excited (46%, 11/24), Type II inhibited (37%, 9/24), and Type III no change (17%, 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were Type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in CSF NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and ABP. PMID:26416846

  7. Detection of blood aspiration in deadly head gunshots comparing postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and autopsy.

    PubMed

    Scaparra, E; Peschel, O; Kirchhoff, C; Reiser, M; Kirchhoff, S M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the reliability of postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) versus autopsy in detecting signs of blood aspiration in a distinct group of patients following deadly head, mouth or floor of mouth gunshot injuries. In this study, in 41 cases PMCT was compared to autopsy reports, the gold standard of postmortem exams, regarding detection of blood aspiration. PMCT was evaluated for the presence and level of typical signs of blood aspiration in the major airways and lung using a semi-quantitative scale ranging from level 0 (no aspiration) to 3 (significant aspiration) also taking density values of the described potential aspiratory changes into account. Overall, in 29 (70.7%) of 41 enrolled cases PMCT and autopsy revealed the same level of aspiration. A difference of one level between PMCT and autopsy resulted for 5 (12.2%) of the remaining 12 cases. More than one level difference between both methods resulted for 7 cases (17.2%). Autopsy described no signs of aspiration in 10 cases, compared to 31 cases with reported blood aspiration. In contrast, PMCT revealed no signs of blood aspiration in 15 cases whereas 26 cases were rated as positive for signs of aspiration in the major airways. In 18 of these 26 cases considered positive for blood aspiration by autopsy and PMCT, clear signs of aspiration signs were also described bilaterally by both methods. The presented study provides evidence for the assumption that PMCT seems to be helpful in the detection of blood aspiration in cases of deadly head gunshots. In conclusion, it seems reasonable to suggest performing PMCT additionally to traditional postmortem exams in cases of suspected aspiration to rule out false-negative cases and to possibly allow for a more detailed and rather evidence based examination reconnoitering the cause of death. However, the adequate use of PMCT in this context needs further evaluation and the definition of an objective scale for aspiration detection on PMCT needs

  8. Augmentation of venous, arterial and microvascular blood supply in the leg by isometric neuromuscular stimulation via the peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, AT; Maass, A; Bain, DS; Chen, L-H; Azzam, M; Dawson, H; Johnston, A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot within the deep veins. During periods of sitting, blood flow is decreased and this contributes to an increased risk of DVT. Trials have shown that 5% to 10% of passengers undertaking long-haul flights develop asymptomatic calf DVT. AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of a novel neuromuscular device that augments peripheral blood flow. METHODS: Thirty healthy volunteers were assessed while seated. Each subject had one leg connected to the stimulator and the other leg immobile acting as control. Fifteen sequential electrical stimulations were applied for 5 min each followed by a 10 min recovery phase. The following noninvasive measurements were performed before, during and after the stimulation programs: photoplethysmography, strain gauge plethysmography, laser Doppler fluxmetry, transcutaneous oxygen tension, pulse oximetry, superficial femoral vein blood flow and vessel diameter (ultrasound); discomfort questionnaires were also administered. RESULTS: During neuromuscular stimulation, significant increases in blood volume flow and velocity and skin capillary blood flow were found; transdermal skin oxygen levels were maintained. No changes were observed in heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation or femoral vein vessel diameter. CONCLUSIONS: Using a newly developed device, electrical nerve stimulation of the lower leg significantly increased blood flow; the device in the present study is, therefore, a promising tool for the development of a novel DVT prevention device. Because this method of electrical nerve stimulation is virtually pain free, the present study has significant implications for the prevention of DVT in hospitals, outpatient settings and community care settings, as well as in preventing travel-related thrombosis. PMID:22477572

  9. Neurovascular decompression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla decreases blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Susumu; Tanda, Shuji; Hatta, Tsuguru; Morimoto, Satoshi; Takeda, Kazuo; Kizu, Osamu; Tamaki, Shinji; Saito, Mitsuru; Tamura, Yoji; Kondo, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the authors experienced four patients who had refractory hypertension and neurovascular compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). One of them, a 49-year-old woman, had undergone continuous intravenous drip injections of calcium channel blockers and β-blockers for more than 3 years because of severe and refractory hypertension. The patients had undergone microvascular decompression (MVD) of the RVLM, and the changes in blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve activities were recorded. In these patients, BP decreased to the normal range without any antihypertensive drugs 2 to 3 months after MVD. The tibial sympathetic nerve activities under resting and stress conditions significantly decreased, and plasma levels of norepinephrine, urinary levels of adrenaline, and plasma renin activity were also significantly decreased after MVD of RVLM. In some patients with refractory hypertension, arterial compression of the RVLM enhances sympathetic nerve activity and renin-angiotensin system to thereby increase BP. In these patients, the operative decompression of the RVLM could lower BP via restoration of sympathetic nerve activities and the renin-angiotensin system.

  10. The prevalence of accessory heads of the flexor pollicis longus and the flexor digitorum profundus muscles in Egyptians and their relations to median and anterior interosseous nerves.

    PubMed

    El Domiaty, M A; Zoair, M M; Sheta, A A

    2008-02-01

    Entrapment neuropathy in the forearm is not uncommon. Surgical interference for nerve decompression should be preceded by accurate diagnosis of the exact cause and site of the nerve entrapment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of accessory heads of the flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles (FPLah) and (FDPah) in Egyptians and their topographical relationship with both the median nerve and its anterior interosseous branch. A total of 42 upper limbs of embalmed cadavers, 36 from males and 6 from females, were examined to elucidate the prevalence of both the FPLah and the FDPah muscles, their origin, insertion, nerve supply and morphology. The distribution of these two muscles in the right and left male and female upper limbs and their relationship to the anterior interosseous and median nerves were recorded. The total lengths of both accessory muscles and the lengths of their fleshy bellies and tendons were also measured. The FPLah was found to be present more frequently (61.9%) than it was absent, whereas the FDPah was observed in only 14.24% of the specimens examined. The combination of the accessory muscles in the same forearm was noticed in 9.52% of cases. As regards side, the FPLah appeared in 77.7% of the right forearms and in 50% of the left, while the FDPah was found in only 25% of the left forearms. The accessory muscles showed no single morphology, as the FPLah appeared fusiform in 53.8%, slender in 30.8% and voluminous fusiform in 15.4%, while the FDPah was slender in 66.6% and triangular in 33.3% of specimens. The FPLah arose mainly from the under surface of flexor digitorum superficialis, while the FDPah took its origin from the under surface of flexor digitorum superficialis or from the medial epicondyle. The insertion of the FPLah was mainly into the upper third of the FPL tendon, while the FDPah tendon joined the tendons of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle to the index or middle and ring

  11. Comparison of optic area measurement using fundus photography and optical coherence tomography between optic nerve head drusen and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gili, Pablo; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores; Grifol-Clar, Eulalia

    2013-03-01

    To compare optic disc area measurement between optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and control subjects using fundus photography, time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We also made a comparison between each of the three techniques. We performed our study on 66 eyes (66 patients) with ONHD and 70 healthy control subjects (70 controls) with colour ocular fundus photography at 20º (Zeiss FF 450 IR plus), TD-OCT (Stratus OCT) with the Fast Optic Disc protocol and SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT) with the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol for measurement of the optic disc area. The measurements were made by two observers and in each measurement a correction of the image magnification factor was performed. Measurement comparison using the Student's t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson/Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot was performed in the statistical analysis. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of the optic disc area in ONHD and in controls was 2.38 (0.54) mm(2) and 2.54 (0.42) mm(2), respectively with fundus photography; 2.01 (0.56) mm(2) and 1.66 (0.37) mm(2), respectively with TD-OCT, and 2.03 (0.49) mm(2) and 1.75 (0.38) mm(2), respectively with SD-OCT. In ONHD and controls, repeatability of optic disc area measurement was excellent with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT and SD-OCT), but with a low degree of agreement between both techniques. Optic disc area measurement is smaller in ONHD compared to healthy subjects with fundus photography, unlike time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in which the reverse is true. Both techniques offer good repeatability, but a low degree of correlation and agreement, which means that optic disc area measurement is not interchangeable or comparable between techniques. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  12. Inhibition of oxidative stress by coenzyme Q10 increases mitochondrial mass and improves bioenergetic function in optic nerve head astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Y H; Kim, K-Y; Shim, M S; Choi, S-H; Choi, S; Ellisman, M H; Weinreb, R N; Perkins, G A; Ju, W-K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to dysfunction of glial cells in the optic nerve head (ONH). However, the biological basis of the precise functional role of mitochondria in this dysfunction is not fully understood. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain and a potent antioxidant, acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) for protecting neuronal cells against oxidative stress in many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we tested whether hydrogen peroxide (100 μM H2O2)-induced oxidative stress alters the mitochondrial network, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex (Cx) expression and bioenergetics, as well as whether CoQ10 can ameliorate oxidative stress-mediated alterations in mitochondria of the ONH astrocytes in vitro. Oxidative stress triggered the activation of ONH astrocytes and the upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression in the ONH astrocytes. In contrast, CoQ10 not only prevented activation of ONH astrocytes but also significantly decreased SOD2 and HO-1 protein expression in the ONH astrocytes against oxidative stress. Further, CoQ10 prevented a significant loss of mitochondrial mass by increasing mitochondrial number and volume density and by preserving mitochondrial cristae structure, as well as promoted mitofilin and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 protein expression in the ONH astrocyte, suggesting an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, oxidative stress triggered the upregulation of OXPHOS Cx protein expression, as well as reduction of cellular adeonsine triphosphate (ATP) production and increase of ROS generation in the ONH astocytes. However, CoQ10 preserved OXPHOS protein expression and cellular ATP production, as well as decreased ROS generation in the ONH astrocytes. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction or alteration may be an important

  13. Mechanosensitive release of adenosine 5'-triphosphate through pannexin channels and mechanosensitive upregulation of pannexin channels in optic nerve head astrocytes: a mechanism for purinergic involvement in chronic strain.

    PubMed

    Beckel, Jonathan M; Argall, Arthur J; Lim, Jason C; Xia, Jingsheng; Lu, Wennan; Coffey, Erin E; Macarak, Edward J; Shahidullah, Mohammed; Delamere, Nicholas A; Zode, Gulab S; Sheffield, Val C; Shestopalov, Valery I; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire H

    2014-09-01

    As adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) released from astrocytes can modulate many neural signaling systems, the triggers and pathways for this ATP release are important. Here, the ability of mechanical strain to trigger ATP release through pannexin channels and the effects of sustained strain on pannexin expression were examined in rat optic nerve head astrocytes. Astrocytes released ATP when subjected to 5% of equibiaxial strain or to hypotonic swelling. Although astrocytes expressed mRNA for pannexins 1-3, connexin 43, and VNUT, pharmacological analysis suggested a predominant role for pannexins in mechanosensitive ATP release, with Rho kinase contribution. Astrocytes from panx1(-/-) mice had reduced baseline and stimulated levels of extracellular ATP, confirming the role for pannexins. Swelling astrocytes triggered a regulatory volume decrease that was inhibited by apyrase or probenecid. The swelling-induced rise in calcium was inhibited by P2X7 receptor antagonists A438079 and AZ10606120, in addition to apyrase and carbenoxolone. Extended stretch of astrocytes in vitro upregulated expression of panx1 and panx2 mRNA. A similar upregulation was observed in vivo in optic nerve head tissue from the Tg-MYOC(Y437H) mouse model of chronic glaucoma; genes for panx1, panx2, and panx3 were increased, whereas immunohistochemistry confirmed increased expression of pannexin 1 protein. In summary, astrocytes released ATP in response to mechanical strain, with pannexin 1 the predominant efflux pathway. Sustained strain upregulated pannexins in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings provide a mechanism by which extracellular ATP remains elevated under chronic mechanical strain, as found in the optic nerve head of patients with glaucoma.

  14. Do optic nerve head and visual field parameters in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome differ from those in control individuals?

    PubMed

    Salzgeber, R; Iliev, M E; Mathis, J

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that sleep apnea syndrome may play a role in normal-tension glaucoma contributing to optic nerve damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if optic nerve and visual field parameters in individuals with sleep apnea syndrome differ from those in controls. From the records of the sleep laboratory at the University Hospital in Bern, Switzerland, we recruited consecutive patients with severe sleep apnea syndrome proven by polysomnography, apnea-hypopnea index >20, as well as no sleep apnea controls with apnea-hypopnea index <10. Participants had to be unknown to the ophtalmology department and had to have no recent eye examination in the medical history. All participants underwent a comprehensive eye examination, scanning laser polarimetry (GDx VCC, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, California), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II, HRT II), and automated perimetry (Octopus 101 Programm G2, Haag-Streit Diagnostics, Koeniz, Switzerland). Mean values of the parameters of the two groups were compared by t-test. The sleep apnea group consisted of 69 eyes of 35 patients; age 52.7 ± 9.7 years, apnea-hypopnea index 46.1 ± 24.8. As controls served 38 eyes of 19 patients; age 45.8 ± 11.2 years, apnea-hypopnea index 4.8 ± 1.9. A difference was found in mean intraocular pressure, although in a fully overlapping range, sleep apnea group: 15.2 ± 3.1, range 8-22 mmHg, controls: 13.6 ± 2.3, range 9-18 mmHg; p<0.01. None of the extended visual field, optic nerve head (HRT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (GDx VCC) parameters showed a significant difference between the groups. Visual field, optic nerve head, and retinal nerve fiber layer parameters in patients with sleep apnea did not differ from those in the control group. Our results do not support a pathogenic relationship between sleep apnea syndrome and glaucoma. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. High thermal sensitivity of blood enhances oxygen delivery in the high-flying bar-headed goose.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Milsom, William K

    2013-06-15

    The bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) crosses the Himalaya twice a year at altitudes where oxygen (O2) levels are less than half those at sea level and temperatures are below -20°C. Although it has been known for over three decades that the major hemoglobin (Hb) component of bar-headed geese has an increased affinity for O2, enhancing O2 uptake, the effects of temperature and interactions between temperature and pH on bar-headed goose Hb-O2 affinity have not previously been determined. An increase in breathing of the hypoxic and extremely cold air experienced by a bar-headed goose at altitude (due to the enhanced hypoxic ventilatory response in this species) could result in both reduced temperature and reduced levels of CO2 at the blood-gas interface in the lungs, enhancing O2 loading. In addition, given the strenuous nature of flapping flight, particularly in thin air, blood leaving the exercising muscle should be warm and acidotic, facilitating O2 unloading. To explore the possibility that features of blood biochemistry in this species could further enhance O2 delivery, we determined the P50 (the partial pressure of O2 at which Hb is 50% saturated) of whole blood from bar-headed geese under conditions of varying temperature and [CO2]. We found that blood-O2 affinity was highly temperature sensitive in bar-headed geese compared with other birds and mammals. Based on our analysis, temperature and pH effects acting on blood-O2 affinity (cold alkalotic lungs and warm acidotic muscle) could increase O2 delivery by twofold during sustained flapping flight at high altitudes compared with what would be delivered by blood at constant temperature and pH.

  16. The Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation of Sympathetic Ganglions and Acupuncture Points on Distal Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Fahimeh; Mirkhani, Hossein; Nematollahi, Ahmadreza; Heidari, Saeed; Moosavi, Elahesadat; Mohamadi, Marzieh

    2017-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a widely-practiced method to increase blood flow in clinical practice. The best location for stimulation to achieve optimal blood flow has not yet been determined. We compared the effect of TENS application at sympathetic ganglions and acupuncture points on blood flow in the foot of healthy individuals. Seventy-five healthy individuals were randomly assigned to three groups. The first group received cutaneous electrical stimulation at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions. The second group received stimulation at acupuncture points. The third group received stimulation in the mid-calf area as a control group. Blood flow was recorded at time zero as baseline and every 3 minutes after baseline during stimulation, with a laser Doppler flow-meter. Individuals who received sympathetic ganglion stimulation showed significantly greater blood flow than those receiving acupuncture point stimulation or those in the control group (p<0.001). Data analysis revealed that blood flow at different times during stimulation increased significantly from time zero in each group. Therefore, the application of low-frequency TENS at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions was more effective in increasing peripheral blood circulation than stimulation at acupuncture points. Copyright © 2017 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry applied to quantitation of the organophosphorus nerve agent VX in microdialysates from blood probes.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, S J; Read, R W

    2010-05-15

    VX (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate) is a low volatility organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent and therefore the most likely route of exposure is via percutaneous absorption. Microdialysis has been used as a tool to study percutaneous poisoning by VX in the anesthetised guinea pig. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method using positive electrospray ionisation (ESI) was used to quantitate VX in microdialysate samples collected from microdialysis probes, implanted into a blood vessel of anesthetised guinea pigs. The method resulted from modification of a LC-MS-MS method previously developed for the analysis of dermal microdialysates. Modification increased the sensitivity of the method, allowing quantitation of the trace levels of VX in blood microdialysates, over the range 0.002-1 ng/ml, with linear calibration. Quantitative results have been used to determine the time course of VX concentrations in the blood of guinea pigs following percutaneous poisoning.

  18. T cell abundance in blood predicts acute organ toxicity in chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Sybille D.; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Schirmer, Markus A.; Stadelmann, Christine; Canis, Martin; Wolff, Hendrik A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) often results in high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT). As these adverse effects impair the patients' quality of life and the feasibility of the planned therapy, we sought to analyze immunological parameters in tumor material and blood samples obtained from 48 HNSCC patients in order to assess the potential to predict the individual acute organ toxicity. T cells in the tumor stroma were enriched in patients developing HGAOT whereas levels of soluble factors in the plasma and gene expression in whole blood did not coincide with the occurrence of acute organ toxicity. In contrast, the frequency and absolute numbers of selected leukocyte subpopulations measured in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) directly before the beginning of CRT were significantly different in patients with HGAOT as compared to those without. When we validated several potential markers including the abundance of T cells in a small prospective study with 16 HNSCC patients, we were able to correctly predict acute organ toxicity in up to 81% of the patients. We conclude that analysis of PBMCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) might be a convenient strategy to identify patients at risk of developing HGAOT caused by CRT, which might allow to adapt the treatment regimen and possibly improve disease outcome. PMID:27589568

  19. Three-dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Treatment of Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Head Defects Associated with Schisis-like Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Öztaş, Zafer; Menteş, Jale; Ateş, Halil; Nalçacı, Serhad

    2017-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional (3D) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings of schisis-like maculopathy associated with structural changes of the optic nerve (ON) head as well as the treatment outcomes of a case of advanced glaucoma. In addition to ophthalmological examination, B-scan and 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head, peripapillary retina, and the macula were obtained. The B-scan images only detected typical retinoschisis findings. However, the 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head revealed defects of various sizes, shapes, and depths at the outer wall of the prelaminar and laminar regions of the ON canal. The 3D images were able to establish that these defects were both adjacent to and interconnected with the retinal layers. The patient successfully received 3D-SD-OCT-guided thermal laser treatment that is used in congenital optic disc pits complicated with macular schisis. In brief, 3D-SD-OCT is very useful for demonstrating the ON head defects that can lead to schisis-like maculopathy in cases of advanced glaucoma. PMID:28405489

  20. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-10-25

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents.

  1. Emotional stress induced by parachute jumping enhances blood nerve growth factor levels and the distribution of nerve growth factor receptors in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, L; Bracci-Laudiero, L; Alleva, E; Lambiase, A; Micera, A; Tirassa, P

    1994-01-01

    We examined the plasma nerve growth factor (NGF) level and the distribution of NGF receptors in peripheral lymphocytes of young soldiers (mean age, 20-24 yr) experiencing the thrill of a novice about to make their first parachute jumps. Blood was collected from soldiers who knew they were selected to jump (n = 26), as well as from soldiers who knew they were not selected (n = 17, controls). The former group was sampled the evening before the jump and 20 min after landing. Compared with controls, NGF levels increased 84% in prejump and 107% in postjump sampling. Our studies also showed that the increase of NGF levels preceded the increase of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. No changes in the baseline levels of circulating interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor were found, suggesting that the increased levels of NGF were not correlated with change in these cytokines. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that parachuting stress enhances the distribution of low-affinity p75LNGFR and high-affinity p140trkA NGF receptors in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the release of NGF might be involved in the activation of cells of the immune system and is most probably associated with homeostatic adaptive mechanisms, as previously shown for stressed rodents. Images PMID:7937971

  2. [The red blood system in men during long-term head-down bed rest].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S M; Morukov, B V; Iarlykova, Iu V; Labetskaia, O I; Levina, A A; Kozinets, G I

    2005-01-01

    Red blood was analyzed in six 25 to 40 yr. old male volunteers in a 120-d head-down bedrest (HDBR) study. The hematological investigation included morphological analyses (erythrocyte count and hemoglobin), and determination of iron turnover, erythrocyte IgA, IgG and IgM, metabolism, lipids and phospholipids, and lipid peroxidation rate (LPO). At the beginning of HDBR (day 7), the erythrocyte count and hemoglobin content were found increased w/o any visible changes in the other parameters. Further exposure to HDBR (days 50-100) resulted in modification of intracellular metabolism in erythrocytes, increases in serum iron, and serum and erythrocyte ferritin. On HDBR days 50 and 100, and post-HDBR day 9, cholesterol was increased, LPO intensified and antioxidant activities inhibited, which suggested destabilization of the cell membrane. Hematological shifts in the bedrested volunteers were of the type and pattern similar to those in cosmonauts who fulfilled extended space missions.

  3. Effects of evening primrose oil treatment on sciatic nerve blood flow and endoneurial oxygen tension in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1994-12-01

    Evening primrose oil (EPO) is rich in the omega-6 essential fatty acid component, gamma-linolenic acid. The aim of the investigation was to determine whether EPO treatment prevented a reduction in sciatic nerve perfusion and oxygenation in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Rats were treated from diabetes induction with 10 g EPO kg-1 day-1. Sciatic blood flow was measured by microelectrode polarography and hydrogen clearance. Diabetes caused 47.7% +/- 3.4% (P < 0.001) and 58.8% +/- 4.8% (P < 0.001) reduction in the nutritive (capillary) and the non-nutritive (large vessel) components of endoneurial blood flow, respectively, which were prevented by EPO. Treatment had no significant effect on nutritive flow in non-diabetic rats; however, the rate of non-nutritive flow increased by 97.7% +/- 38.9% (P < 0.01). Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tension was measured by microelectrode polarography. Diabetes resulted in a 44.7% +/- 3.4% reduction in mean oxygen tension (P < 0.001), which was largely (82.3% +/- 10.2%) prevented by EPO treatment (P < 0.001). Thus, EPO prevents impairment of blood flow and endoneurial oxygenation in experimental diabetes. It is likely that this neurovascular action accounts for the beneficial effects of treatment on nerve function in diabetic rats and patients.

  4. Increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, heart rate, respiration, and skin blood flow during passive viewing of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rachael; Kemp, Ursula; Macefield, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exercise have been widely studied, as have the autonomic effects of imagined and observed exercise. However, the effects of observed exercise in the first person have not been documented, nor have direct recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) been obtained during observed or imagined exercise. The aim of the current study was to measure blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, skin blood flow, sweat release, and MSNA (via microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve), during observation of exercise from the first person point of view. It was hypothesized that the moving stimuli would produce robust compensatory increases in the above-mentioned parameters as effectively as those generated by mental imagery and—to a lesser extent—actual exercise. Nine subjects watched a first-person running video, allowing them to view the action from the perspective of the runner rather than viewing someone else perform the exercise. On average, statistically significant increases from baseline during the running phase were seen in heart rate, respiratory rate, skin blood flow, and burst amplitude of MSNA. These results suggest that observation of exercise in the first person is a strong enough stimulus to evoke “physiologically appropriate” autonomic responses that have a purely psychogenic origin. PMID:23781170

  5. Time-Dependent Impact of Irreversible Electroporation on Pancreas, Liver, Blood Vessels and Nerves: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Agnass, P.; Crezee, J.; Dijk, F.; Verheij, J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Meijerink, M. R.; Vroomen, L. G.; van Lienden, K. P.; Besselink, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel ablation technique in the treatment of unresectable cancer. The non-thermal mechanism is thought to cause mostly apoptosis compared to necrosis in thermal techniques. Both in experimental and clinical studies, a waiting time between ablation and tissue or imaging analysis to allow for cell death through apoptosis, is often reported. However, the dynamics of the IRE effect over time remain unknown. Therefore, this study aims to summarize these effects in relation to the time between treatment and evaluation. Methods A systematic search was performed in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for original articles using IRE on pancreas, liver or surrounding structures in animal or human studies. Data on pathology and time between IRE and evaluation were extracted. Results Of 2602 screened studies, 36 could be included, regarding IRE in liver (n = 24), pancreas (n = 4), blood vessels (n = 4) and nerves (n = 4) in over 440 animals (pig, rat, goat and rabbit). No eligible human studies were found. In liver and pancreas, the first signs of apoptosis and haemorrhage were observed 1–2 hours after treatment, and remained visible until 24 hours in liver and 7 days in pancreas after which the damaged tissue was replaced by fibrosis. In solitary blood vessels, the tunica media, intima and lumen remained unchanged for 24 hours. After 7 days, inflammation, fibrosis and loss of smooth muscle cells were demonstrated, which persisted until 35 days. In nerves, the median time until demonstrable histological changes was 7 days. Conclusions Tissue damage after IRE is a dynamic process with remarkable time differences between tissues in animals. Whereas pancreas and liver showed the first damages after 1–2 hours, this took 24 hours in blood vessels and 7 days in nerves. PMID:27870918

  6. Effect of selective vagal nerve stimulation on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in rats under metoprolol medication.

    PubMed

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Plachta, Dennis T T

    2016-02-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been shown to reduce blood pressure without major side effects in rats. This technology might be the key to non-medical antihypertensive treatment in patients with therapy-resistant hypertension. β-blockers are the first-line therapy of hypertension and have in general a bradycardic effect. As VNS itself can also promote bradycardia, it was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the β1-selective blocker Metoprolol on the effect of sVNS especially with respect to the heart rate. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide multichannel-cuff electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibers. The stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of individual animals and were in the following ranges: frequency 30-50 Hz, amplitude 0.3-1.8 mA and pulse width 0.3-1.3 ms. Blood pressure responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with s.c. chest electrodes. After IV administration of Metoprolol (2 mg kg(-1) body weight), the animals' mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) decreased significantly. Although the selective electrical stimulation of the baroreceptive fibers reduced MAP and HR, both effects were significantly alleviated by Metoprolol. As a side effect, the rate of stimulation-induced apnea significantly increased after Metoprolol administration. sVNS can lower the MAP under Metoprolol without causing severe bradycardia.

  7. Time-Dependent Impact of Irreversible Electroporation on Pancreas, Liver, Blood Vessels and Nerves: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J A; van Veldhuisen, E; Agnass, P; Crezee, J; Dijk, F; Verheij, J; van Gulik, T M; Meijerink, M R; Vroomen, L G; van Lienden, K P; Besselink, M G

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel ablation technique in the treatment of unresectable cancer. The non-thermal mechanism is thought to cause mostly apoptosis compared to necrosis in thermal techniques. Both in experimental and clinical studies, a waiting time between ablation and tissue or imaging analysis to allow for cell death through apoptosis, is often reported. However, the dynamics of the IRE effect over time remain unknown. Therefore, this study aims to summarize these effects in relation to the time between treatment and evaluation. A systematic search was performed in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for original articles using IRE on pancreas, liver or surrounding structures in animal or human studies. Data on pathology and time between IRE and evaluation were extracted. Of 2602 screened studies, 36 could be included, regarding IRE in liver (n = 24), pancreas (n = 4), blood vessels (n = 4) and nerves (n = 4) in over 440 animals (pig, rat, goat and rabbit). No eligible human studies were found. In liver and pancreas, the first signs of apoptosis and haemorrhage were observed 1-2 hours after treatment, and remained visible until 24 hours in liver and 7 days in pancreas after which the damaged tissue was replaced by fibrosis. In solitary blood vessels, the tunica media, intima and lumen remained unchanged for 24 hours. After 7 days, inflammation, fibrosis and loss of smooth muscle cells were demonstrated, which persisted until 35 days. In nerves, the median time until demonstrable histological changes was 7 days. Tissue damage after IRE is a dynamic process with remarkable time differences between tissues in animals. Whereas pancreas and liver showed the first damages after 1-2 hours, this took 24 hours in blood vessels and 7 days in nerves.

  8. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  9. Polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning: correlation of sensory and motor nerve conduction, neurologic symptoms, and blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, quaterphenyls, and dibenzofurans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.C.; Tang, S.Y.; Miyata, H.; Kashimoto, T.; Chang, Y.C.; Chang, K.J.; Tung, T.C.

    1985-08-01

    In 1979 in Taiwan, more than 2000 people were poisoned with rice cooking oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). One hundred ten patients were studied within one year of the exposure. The blood PCB levels were 39.3 +/- 16.6 ppb. The blood levels of the PCB derivatives, polychlorinated quaterphenyls (PCQ) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), were 8.6 +/- 4.8 and 0.076 +/- 0.038 ppb, respectively. Both the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) of the patients were significantly lower than the control. Abnormal slowing of sensory NCV was found in 43.6% and abnormal slowing of motor NCV was seen in 21.8%. Patients who had higher PCQ blood levels has significantly slower median nerve sensory NCV than those with lower PCQ levels. Patients with higher PCB blood levels had significantly slower peroneal nerve motor NCV than those with lower PCB levels.

  10. Acupuncture therapy to the head and face to treat post-trauma paralysis of peripheral fascial nerve dextra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihardja, H.; Meuratana, PA; Ibrahim, A.

    2017-08-01

    Damage to the facial nerve due to trauma from traffic accidents is the second most common cause of paralysis of the facial nerve. The treatments include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy. Acupuncture is a method of treatment that applies evidence-based medical principles and uses anatomy, physiology, and pathology to place needles atcertain acupuncture points. This paper describes a 26-year-old female patient with right-side facial palsy following a traffic accident who had animproved Brackmann’s score after 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture points were chosen based on Liu Yan’sbrain-clearing needling technique. Acupuncture can shorten healing time and improve the effect of treatment for facial-nerve paralysis.

  11. Expression of Glucose Transporters in the Prelaminar Region of the Optic-Nerve Head of the Pig as Determined by Immunolabeling and Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, F. Javier; Aranda, Carlos J.; Porcel, David; Rodriguez-Hurtado, Francisco; Martínez-Agustin, Olga; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop the use of cultured tissue of the prelaminar optic nerve of the pig to explore possible alterations of the astrocyte-axon metabolic pathways in glaucoma, we map the distribution of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3 in fresh and cultured tissue. Methods We monitor cell survival in cultures of the prelaminar optic-nerve tissue, measuring necrosis and apoptosis markers biochemically as well as morphologically, and establish the presence of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. We map the distribution of these transporters with immunolabeling in histological sections of the optic nerve using confocal and electronic transmission microscopy. Results We find that the main death type in prelaminar culture is apoptosis. Caspase 7 staining reveals an increment in apoptosis from day 1 to day 4 and a reduction from day 4 to day 8. Western blotting for GLUT1 shows stability with increased culture time. CLSM micrographs locate GLUT1 in the columnar astrocytes and in the area of axonal bundles. Anti-GLUT3 predominantly labels axonal bundles. TEM immunolabeling with colloidal gold displays a very specific distribution of GLUT-1 in the membranes of vascular endothelial cells and in periaxonal astrocyte expansions. The GLUT-3 isoform is observed with TEM only in axons in the axonal bundles. Conclusions Tissue culture is suitable for apoptosis-induction experiments. The results suggest that glucose is transported to the axonal cleft intracytoplasmically and delivered to the cleft by GLUT1 transporters. As monocarboxylate transporters have been reported in the prelaminar region of the optic-nerve head, this area is likely to use both lactate and glucose as energy sources. PMID:26030125

  12. Clinical validation and applications for CT-based atlas for contouring the lower cranial nerves for head and neck cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Waleed F; Young, Brett M; Young, Rebekah; Blakaj, Dukagjin M; Ohri, Nitin; Shourbaji, Rania A; Manolidis, Spiros; Gámez, Mauricio; Kumar, Mahesh; Khorsandi, Azita; Khan, Majid A; Shasha, Daniel; Blakaj, Adriana; Glanzman, Jonathan; Garg, Madhur K; Hu, Kenneth S; Kalnicki, Shalom; Harrison, Louis B

    2013-09-01

    Radiation induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) involving the lower cranial nerves (CNs) is a serious complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Recommendations for delineating the lower CNs on RT planning studies do not exist. The aim of the current study is to develop a standardized methodology for contouring CNs IX-XII, which would help in establishing RT limiting doses for organs at risk (OAR). Using anatomic texts, radiologic data, and guidance from experts in head and neck anatomy, we developed step-by-step instructions for delineating CNs IX-XII on computed tomography (CT) imaging. These structures were then contoured on five consecutive patients who underwent definitive RT for locally-advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). RT doses delivered to the lower CNs were calculated. We successfully developed a contouring atlas for CNs IX-XII. The median total dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70Gy (range: 66-70Gy). The median CN (IX-XI) and (XII) volumes were 10c.c (range: 8-12c.c) and 8c.c (range: 7-10c.c), respectively. The median V50, V60, V66, and V70 of the CN (IX-XI) and (XII) volumes were (85, 77, 71, 65) and (88, 80, 74, 64) respectively. The median maximal dose to the CN (IX-XI) and (XII) were 72Gy (range: 66-77) and 71Gy (range: 64-78), respectively. We have generated simple instructions for delineating the lower CNs on RT planning imaging. Further analyses to explore the relationship between lower CN dosing and the risk of RICNP are recommended in order to establish limiting doses for these OARs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Position of retinal blood vessels correlates with retinal nerve fibre layer thickness profiles as measured with GDx VCC and ECC.

    PubMed

    Resch, Hemma; Brela, Barbara; Resch-Wolfslehner, Christa; Vass, Clemens

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the correlation of the retinal blood vessel position and the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness profile. RNFL thickness of 81 healthy subjects was measured using scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). To quantify the retinal blood vessel position, the angle (superior and inferior) between a horizontal line and a line from the optic disc centre to the intersection of the most temporal major retinal blood vessel and the outer margin of the measurement ellipse was measured on the SLP printout. A negative correlation was found between both the superior and inferior angle and the superotemporal and inferotemporal RNFL thickness, and a positive correlation between both angles and the superonasal and inferonasal RFNL thickness. The steepest slope of the regression line was located in the superotemporal and inferotemporal regions (-0.7 to -1.0 μm/°). Using this slope, the difference in RNFL thickness for the interquartile range of the superior angle was 13 μm. RNFL thickness profiles correlate with the location of the main temporal superior and inferior blood vessels. The application of a normative database, taking into account the position of major blood vessels, might improve the diagnostic power of RNFL measurement.

  14. Sex differences in blood pressure control during 6° head-down tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Platts, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced orthostatic intolerance has been studied for decades. Although ∼22% of the astronaut corps are women, most mechanistic studies use mostly male subjects, despite known sex differences in autonomic control and postflight orthostatic intolerance. We studied adrenergic, baroreflex, and autonomic indexes during continuous infusions of vasoactive drugs in men and women during a 60-day head-down bed rest. Volunteers were tested before bed rest (20 men and 10 women) and around day 30 (20 men and 10 women) and day 60 (16 men and 8 women) of bed rest. Three increasing doses of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside were infused for 10 min after an infusion of normal saline. A 20-min rest period separated the phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside infusions. Autonomic activity was approximated by spectral indexes of heart rate and blood pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity was measured by the spontaneous baroreflex slope. Parasympathetic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity decreased with bed rest, with women experiencing a larger decrease in baroreflex sensitivity by day 30 than men. The sympathetic activation of men and parasympathetic responsiveness of women in blood pressure control during physiological stress were preserved throughout bed rest. During PE infusions, women experienced saturation of the R-R interval at high frequency, whereas men did not, revealing a sex difference in the parabolic relationship between high-frequency R-R interval, a measurement of respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and R-R interval. These sex differences in blood pressure control during simulated microgravity reveal the need to study sex differences in long-duration spaceflight to ensure the health and safety of the entire astronaut corps. PMID:23396455

  15. Influence of Mitochondrial Genetics on the Mitochondrial Toxicity of Linezolid in Blood Cells and Skin Nerve Fibers.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, G; Soriano, À; Pinós, T; Casanova-Mollà, J; Pacheu-Grau, D; Morén, C; García-Arumí, E; Morales, M; Ruiz-Pesini, E; Catalán-Garcia, M; Milisenda, J C; Lozano, E; Andreu, A L; Montoya, J; Mensa, J; Cardellach, F

    2017-09-01

    The antibiotic linezolid is a ribosomal inhibitor with excellent efficacy. Although the administration period has been reduced to 28 days, side effects, usually of hematologic or neuropathic origin, are still reported due to secondary inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Susceptibility to linezolid toxicity remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to gain an understanding of clinical heterogeneity in response to identical linezolid exposures through exhaustive examination of the molecular basis of tissue-dependent mitotoxicity, consequent cell dysfunction, and the association of mitochondrial genetics with adverse effects of linezolid administered for the recommended period. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and skin nerve fibers from 19 and 6 patients, respectively, were evaluated before and after a 28-day linezolid treatment in order to assess toxic effects on mitochondria and cells. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ribosomal sequences where linezolid binds to mitochondrial ribosomes were also analyzed to investigate their genetic contributions. We found that linezolid reduced mitochondrial protein levels, complex IV activity, and mitochondrial mass in PBMC and was associated with a trend toward an increase in the rate of apoptosis. In skin tissue, mitochondrial mass increased within nerve fibers, accompanied by subclinical axonal swelling. Mitochondrial haplogroup U, mutations in 12S rRNA, and the m.2706A→G, m.3197T→C, and m.3010G→A polymorphisms in 16S rRNA showed a trend toward an association with increased mitochondrial and clinical adverse effects. We conclude that even when linezolid is administered for a shorter time than formerly, adverse effects are reported by 63% of patients. Linezolid exerts tissue-dependent mitotoxicity that is responsible for downstream cellular consequences (blood cell death and nerve fiber swelling), leading to adverse hematologic and peripheral

  16. Estimation of the neuromotor system functional state after sciatic nerve neurorrhaphy in experimental conditions of intravenous laser irradiation of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, N. I.; Tanin, Leonid V.; Antonov, Ignatii P.; Vasilevskaya, Lyudmila A.; Vlasyuk, P. A.

    1996-12-01

    The speckle-optical methods and the methods of electroneuromyography were used to study the myotonus, the contractional activity of leg muscles and the neuromotor system functional state in intact rabbits and 3 months after the sciatic nerve (SN) neurorrhaphy in conditions of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). The blood of animals was exposed to laser radiation with the help of a quartz-polymeric light guide, which has been inserted into the earvein the next day after SN stitching. The radiation power at the light guide output was 2-2.5 mW. Two courses of treatment with a two-week interval have been conducted. It has been established from the speckle-optical study data that ILIB increases the contractional activity of skeletal muscles in animals. The ILIB-therapy after the SN neurorrhaphy normalizes the latent period of M-response and neural cation potential. A tendancy has been revealed to an increase in impulse conduction velocity in motor nerve fibers and in maximal amplitude of the neural action potential. Thus, the ILIB-therapy after SN trauma improves the neuromotor system functional state in experimental animals in the early reinnervation period.

  17. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-06

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain.

  18. Optic nerve head topography and retinal structural changes in eyes with macrodisks: a comparative study with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Öztürker, Zeynep Kayaarası; Eltutar, Kadir; Karini, Belma; Erkul, Sezin Özdogan; Osmanbaşoğlu, Özen Ayrancı; Sultan, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare optic nerve head parameters, the thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL), the macular retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL), the ganglion cell complex (GCC), and the ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) in macrodisks and normal-sized healthy disks using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients and methods A total of 88 healthy eyes (42 macrodisks and 46 normal-sized disks) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Optic nerve head parameters as well as pRNFL, mRNFL, GCC, and GCIPL thicknesses were measured in all subjects. Optic disk areas (ODAs) >2.70 mm2 were defined as macrodisks. All spectral domain optical coherence tomography parameters were compared between normal-sized disks and macrodisks. Results The mean age of the participants was 49.4±5.7 years in the normal size group and 51.55±6.3 years in the macrodisk group (P=0.65). The average ODAs were 2.23±0.29 mm2 and 3.30±0.59 mm2 in the normal size and the macrodisk groups, respectively. ODA (P<0.001), cup area (P<0.001), cup disk area ratio (P<0.001), horizontal cup disk ratio (P<0.001), vertical cup disk ratio (P<0.001), horizontal disk diameter (P<0.001), vertical disk diameter (P<0.001), and cup volume (P<0.001) were significantly higher in the macrodisk group. The inferior mRNFL thickness was significantly lower (P=0.042), and the GCC inferior and GCIPL inferior thicknesses were found to be lower with low significance (P=0.052, P=0.059, respectively) in the macrodisk group. Rim volume (P=0.622), total pRNFL (P=0.201), superior pRNFL (P=0.123), inferior pRNFL (P=0.168), average macular thickness (P=0.162), total mRNFL (P=0.171), superior mRNFL (P=0.356), total GCC (P=0.080), superior GCC (P=0.261), total GCIPL (P=0.214), and superior GCIPL (P=0.515) thicknesses were similar in both groups. Conclusion Optic disk topography and retinal structures show different characteristics in healthy eyes with macrodisks. These disk size

  19. Size of the Optic Nerve Head and Its Relationship with the Thickness of the Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Nobuko; Anraku, Ayako; Ishida, Kyoko; Takeyama, Asuka; Yagi, Fumihiko; Tomita, Goji

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationships among the optic nerve head (ONH) area, macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC) thickness, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness, and visual field defects in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This retrospective study included 90 eyes of 90 patients with POAG. The ONH area, rim area, mGCC thickness, and cpRNFL thickness were measured using optical coherence tomography. Mean deviation (MD) was measured using standard automated perimetry. The relationships among clinical factors including age, refraction, the ONH area, the rim area, the mGCC thickness, the cpRNFL thickness, and MD were evaluated using correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results. The significant correlation of the ONH area with refraction (r = 0.362, P < 0.001), the mGCC thickness (r = 0.225, P = 0.033), and the cpRNFL thickness (r = 0.253, P = 0.016) was found. Multiple regression analysis showed that the ONH area, rim area, and MD were selected as significant contributing factors to explain the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness. No factor was selected to explain MD. Conclusions. The ONH area, in other words, the disc size itself may affect the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness in POAG patients. PMID:26339503

  20. Blood cleansing cells in head kidney and spleen in Buenos Aires tetra, Hyphessobrycon anisitsi (Eigenmann), (Characidae: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Leknes, I L

    2012-06-01

    The general structure and cell types in kidney and spleen in Buenos Aires tetra, Hyphessobrycon anisitsi, family Characidae, are described. The capability and capacity of these organs to clean foreign ferritin from the blood stream are analysed and compared. Head kidney was mainly composed of neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes and other white blood cells, whereas unmatured and matured red blood cells were few in number. Spleen often contained much red pulp, that is mainly matured red blood cells between splenic cords, often with some macrophages and neutrophils in the latter. Occasionally, this pulp contained large volumes of unmatured red blood cells, particularly in the periphery of the spleen. The splenic white pulp consisted of ellipsoids composed of an inner endothelial layer covered by a thick sheet of white blood cells, which in the periphery consisted mainly of macrophages. Erythrocytes occupied nearly the entire splenic volume in some specimens, whereas up to half of this volume was filled by ellipsoid macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes and other white blood cells in other specimens. The macrophages and sinusoidal endothelial cells in kidney and spleen from ferritin-injected specimens were tightly packed by yellow-brown granules or Prussian blue precipitations, in tissue treated with Mallory stain or acid ferrocyanide, respectively, suggesting a large uptake of foreign ferritin. In the present tetra large amounts of white blood cells are developed in head kidney, where macrophages and sinusoidal endothelial cells play important roles in the cleansing of scavenger and foreign molecules and particles from the blood stream. The spleen seems primarily to be a site for iron recycling and production and storage of red blood cells. Sometimes, however, it was rich in macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes and other white blood cells, suggesting functions like blood cleansing and non-specific and specific defence in such specimens. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing

  1. [ROLE OF CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE NERVES IN THE REGULATION OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE BLOOD CONTENT UNDER NORMAL AND FRUCTOSE-INDUCED METABOLIC SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Ovcjukova, M V; Kostina, N E; Obut, T A

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves (capsaicin, 1 mg/kg, s/c) and their eafferentation (capsaicin, 150 mg/kg, s/c) on the blood content of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) was investigated in normal rats and rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome (12.5% fructose solution, 10 weeks). An increase in blood of tryglyceride, lipid peroxidation, glucose (fasting and after loading glucose, 2 mg/kg, i/p) was considered as symptoms of metabolic syndrome. It was shown that in normal rats drinking tap water the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves resulted in the increase of DHEAS content while their deafferentation reduced the concentration of this hormone in the blood. The fructose diet caused the decrease in content of DHEAS, triglyceridemia, lipid peroxidation, impaired tolerance glucose. In rats with the metabolic syndrome the stimulation capsaicin-sensitive nerves prevented the fructose-induced decrease of DHEAS content as well as decreased the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In fructose fed rats the stimulation-induced effects were prevented by the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves. It is suggested that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute both to the regulation of blood content of DHEAS under normal and fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

  2. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  3. Spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood volume changes in different microvascular compartments evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shanbin; Cheng, Haiying; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2003-07-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of changes in cerebral blood volume associated with neuronal activity were investigated in the hindlimb somatosensory cortex of α-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats (n=10) with optical imaging at 570nm through a thinned skull. Activation of cortex was carried out by electrical stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve with 5Hz, 0.3V pulses (0.5ms) for duration of 2s. The stimulation evoked a monophasic optical reflectance decrease at cortical parenchyma and arteries sites rapidly after the onset of stimulation, whereas no similar response was observed at vein compartments. The optical signal changes reached 10% of the peak response 0.70+/-0.32s after stimulation onset and no significant time lag in this 10% start latency time was observed between the response at cortical parenchyma and arteries compartments. The evoked optical reflectance decrease reached the peak (0.25%+/-0.047%) 2.66+/-0.61s after the stimulus onset at parenchyma site, 0.40+/-0.20s earlier (P<0.05) than that at arteries site (0.50+/-0.068% 3.06+/-0.70s). Variable location within the cortical parenchyma and arteries compartment themselves didn"t affect the temporal characteristics of the evoked signal significantly. These results suggest that the sciatic nerve stimulation evokes a local blood volume increase at both capillaries (cortical parenchyma) and arterioles rapidly after the stimulus onset but the evoked blood volume increase in capillaries could not be entirely accounted for by the dilation of arterioles.

  4. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  5. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  6. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning “1”) for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps. PMID:26187444

  7. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  8. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  9. Altered Blood Biomarker Profiles in Athletes with a History of Repetitive Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The long-term health effects of concussion and sub-concussive impacts in sport are unknown. Growing evidence suggests both inflammation and neurodegeneration are pivotal to secondary injury processes and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we characterized circulating brain injury and inflammatory mediators in healthy male and female athletes according to concussion history and collision sport participation. Eighty-seven university level athletes (male, n = 60; female, n = 27) were recruited before the start of the competitive season. Athletes were healthy at the time of the study (no medications, illness, concussion or musculoskeletal injuries). Dependent variables included 29 inflammatory and 10 neurological injury analytes assessed in the peripheral blood by immunoassay. Biomarkers were statistically evaluated using partial least squares multivariate analysis to identify possible relationships to self-reported previous concussion history, number of previous concussions and collision sport participation in male and female athletes. Multiple concussions were associated with increases in peripheral MCP-1 in females, and MCP-4 in males. Collision sport participation was associated with increases in tau levels in males. These results are consistent with previous experimental and clinical findings that suggest ongoing inflammatory and cerebral injury processes after repetitive mild head trauma. However, further validation is needed to correlate systemic biomarkers to repetitive brain impacts, as opposed to the extracranial effects common to an athletic population such as exercise and muscle damage. PMID:27458972

  10. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P; Aouad, Rony K; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J; Patel, Amit B; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89 ± 0.15, 2.26 ± 0.13, and 2.43 ± 0.13 (mean ± standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  11. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  12. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeanie; Lyles, Robert H; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-07-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-American (AA) males with CKD, we conducted a randomized, crossover study in which participants underwent 14 min of MM or 14 min of BP education (control intervention) during two separate random-order study visits. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), beat-to-beat arterial BP, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were continuously measured at baseline and during each intervention. A subset had a third study visit to undergo controlled breathing (CB) to determine whether a reduction in RR alone was sufficient in exacting hemodynamic changes. We observed a significantly greater reduction in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and HR, as well as a significantly greater reduction in MSNA, during MM compared with the control intervention. Participants had a significantly lower RR during MM; however, in contrast to MM, CB alone did not reduce BP, HR, or MSNA. MM acutely lowers BP and HR in AA males with hypertensive CKD, and these hemodynamic effects may be mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. RR is significantly lower during MM, but CB alone without concomitant meditation does not acutely alter hemodynamics or sympathetic activity in CKD.

  13. Detecting a disruption of blood flow to the femoral head after ischemic injury using 4 different techniques: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Standefer, Karen Divita; Pierce, William A; Sucato, Daniel J; Kim, Harry K W

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of blood flow to the femoral head can have a detrimental effect on the clinical outcome after a closed or open reduction for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip and after a treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Availability of a clinically reliable and easy-to-use technique to monitor the blood flow before, during, and after a therapeutic intervention may allow early detection and more effective management of this complication. An experimental investigation was performed to evaluate 4 different sensors/techniques for their ability to detect an acute disruption of blood flow to the immature femoral head. Under general anesthesia, the femoral heads of 10 immature pigs were exposed and total head ischemia was induced by ligating the femoral neck and transecting the ligamentum teres. Blood flow was assessed before and after the induction of ischemia using 1 of 4 techniques. The following sensors/techniques were evaluated: fiber optic pressure (FOP), piezoelectric pressure, partial pressure of oxygen, and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). The time taken to observe a 50% reduction of the preischemia level was determined and the sensor outputs were monitored until each reached a steady level. All techniques demonstrated a reduction in their respective measurements after a disruption of blood flow to the femoral head. However, the response time differed, even between the 2 pressure sensors (FOP and piezoelectric pressure at 3 and 15 min, respectively). The fastest response time for a 50% reduction was observed with the LDF (2 min) and the FOP (3 min) sensors. The partial pressure of oxygen was the slowest to change, taking over 30 minutes. Technique-dependent advantages and disadvantages were seen. The FOP sensor was fragile and susceptible to the positioning of the sensor tip. The LDF sensor was susceptible to motion artifact. The LDF and the FOP sensors demonstrated a rapid decline in their respective measurements after the induction of

  14. A 10-minute point-of-care assay for detection of blood protein adducts resulting from low level exposure to organophosphate nerve agents.

    PubMed

    VanDine, Robert; Babu, Uma Mahesh; Condon, Peter; Mendez, Arlene; Sambursky, Robert

    2013-03-25

    The OrganoTox test is a rapid, point-of-care assay capable of detecting clinically relevant organophosphate (OP) poisoning after low-level exposure to sarin, soman, tabun, or VX chemical nerve agents. The test utilizes either a finger stick peripheral blood sample or plasma specimen. While high-level nerve agent exposure can quickly lead to death, low-level exposure produces vague, nondescript signs and symptoms that are not easily clinically differentiated from other conditions. In initial testing, the OrganoTox test was used to detect the presence of blood protein-nerve agent adducts in exposed blood samples. In order to mimic the in vivo exposure as closely as possible, nerve agents stored in organic solvents were spiked in minute quantities into whole blood samples. For performance testing, 40 plasma samples were spiked with sarin, soman, tabun, or VX and 10 normal plasma samples were used as the negative control. The 40 nerve agent-spiked plasma samples included 10 replicates of each agent. At the clinically relevant low-level exposure of 10 ng/ml, the OrganoTox test demonstrated 100% sensitivity for soman, tabun, and VX and 80% sensitivity for sarin. The OrganoTox test demonstrated greater than 97% specificity with 150 blood samples obtained from healthy adults. No cross-reactivity or interference from pesticide precursor compounds was found. A rapid test for nerve agent exposure will help identify affected patients earlier in the clinical course and trigger more appropriate medical management in a more timely manner.

  15. Combining retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with individual retinal blood vessel locations allows modeling of central vision loss in glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Mengyu; Baniasadi, Neda; Jin, Qingying; Elze, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To assess whether modeling of central vision loss (CVL) due to glaucoma by optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal nerve fiber (RNF) layer thickness (RNFLT) can be improved by including the location of the major inferior temporal retinal artery (ITA), a known correlate of individual RNF geometry. Methods: Pat- tern deviations of the two locations of the Humphrey 24-2 visual field (VF) known to be specifically vulnerable to glaucomatous CVL and OCT RNFLT on the corresponding circumpapillary sector around the optic nerve head within the radius of 1.73mm were retrospectively selected from 428 eyes of 428 patients of a large clinical glaucoma service. ITA was marked on the 1.73mm circle by a trained observer. Linear regression models were fitted with CVL as dependent variable and VF mean deviation (MD) plus either of (1) RNFLT, (2) ITA, and (3) their combination, respectively, as regressors. To assess CVL over all levels of glaucoma severity, the three models were compared to a null model containing only MD. A Baysian model comparison was performed with the Bayes Factor (BF) as measure of strength of evidence (BF<3: no evidence, 3-20: positive evidence, >20: strong evidence over null model). Results: Neither RNFLT (BF=0.9) nor ITA (BF=1.4) alone provided positive evidence over the null model, but their combination resulted in a model with strong evidence (BF=21.4). Conclusion: While the established circumpapillary RNFLT sector, based on population statistics, could not satisfactorily model CVL, the inclusion of a retinal parameter related to individual eye anatomy yielded a strong structure-function model.

  16. Heterogeneous blood flow distribution within single skeletal muscles in the rabbit: role of vasomotion, sympathetic nerve activity and effect of vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Iversen, P O; Nicolaysen, G

    1989-09-01

    A major heterogeneous distribution of blood flow has been described on a non-microvascular level within single skeletal muscles at rest and during exercise hyperaemia both in the dog and in the rabbit. The heterogeneity in blood flow distribution could be composed of both a steady-state region-to-region variability (spatial) and a time-dependent variability (temporal) in blood flow to each region. In the present study we estimated their relative contributions to the variations in blood flow within the muscles. Furthermore, we determined whether sympathetic nerve activity contributed to and whether pharmacologically induced vasodilation affected the heterogeneous blood flow pattern. Regional blood flow measurements were based on microsphere infusions into anaesthetized rabbits. Blood flow was determined under both resting conditions and during exercise hyperaemia in regions weighing 0.25 g each within hind leg muscles. The coefficient of variation for the spatial variability was twice that of the temporal one: 0.32 and 0.16 (mean) respectively. Neither stimulation of the sympathetic nerves, sympathectomy nor vasodilation affected the heterogeneity in blood flow. When exercise hyperaemia was induced, blood flow increased in all regions so that a positive (P less than 0.05) correlation was present between resting and exercising blood flow values in the individual regions. Although regional variation in vascularization could explain the observations during exercise hyperaemia, we have at present no fully satisfying explanation for the observed regional heterogeneity in blood flow.

  17. Fiber-optic immuno-biosensor for rapid and accurate detection of nerve growth factor in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Cha, Yong-Mei; Li, Hongmei; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-01-01

    An accurate and rapid assay of cardiac nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in blood can provide physicians with critical information regarding myocardial injury and neural remodeling in cardiac tissues to identify patients at risk of impending heart attack, thereby enabling them to receive appropriate lifesaving treatment more quickly. Currently used assay methods, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are usually time-consuming (hours to days), expensive and technically complicated. In this paper, we described the development and clinical study of a rapid and sensitive method for detection and quantification of NGF in human blood plasma. This method utilizes a fiber-optic, immuno-biosensing system which performs a fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay on the surface of an optical fiber. Physiological concentrations of NGF could be quantified in both buffer and human blood plasma samples within 5 minutes. The NGF concentrations determined by the fiberoptic sensor were comparable to those by the gold standard, ELISA. Preliminary study of NGF assay in cardiac patient plasma samples showed a great potential of the fiber-optic sensor as a rapid diagnostic and prognostic tool in clinical applications.

  18. Detection of time window of cerebral blood flow response induced by sciatic nerve stimulation using temporal clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Luo, Qingming; Cheng, Haiying; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2003-07-01

    In many studies on functional neuroimaging, change in local cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by sensory stimulation is used as a substitutive marker for change in cortical neuronal activity by Roy and Sherrington"s postulation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the close temporal relationship between evoked local CBF and neuronal activity through utilizing temporal clustering analysis (TCA) method to analyze the dataset obtained by high-resolution laser speckle imaging (LSI). We mapped a relatively large somatosensory area of cerebral cortex in successively and followed variations of cerebral blood flow under sciatic nerve stimulation in anesthetized rats using LSI technique. Then we illustrated TCA method on the optical imaging signals and investigated the temporal characteristics of CBF activation. Contralateral somatosensory cortical microflow was activated to increase promptly in less than 1 second after the onset of 2 seconds electrical stimulation (pulse parameters: 0.5ms, 5Hz, 350mV). The data of the present study may possibly shed light on the development question of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) whether the ultimate spatial resolution attainable by fMRI is limited by the physiology of the cerebral blood flow response to activation or by the hardware and signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Alternative exon 3 splicing of the human major protein zero gene in white blood cells and peripheral nerve tissue.

    PubMed

    Besançon, R; Prost, A L; Konecny, L; Latour, P; Petiot, P; Boutrand, L; Kopp, N; Mularoni, A; Chamba, G; Vandenberghe, A

    1999-09-03

    The major protein zero (MPZ) is involved in peripheral myelin folding. Using nested reverse transcription-PCR, we amplified several fragments of MPZ mRNAs in white blood cells and in peripheral nerve tissue. Cloning of PCR products revealed the existence of three alternative splicing patterns: one resulted in the complete loss of exon 3 and two others induced partial skipping of the exon 3 sequence. All three alternative splicing mechanisms produced a frame-shift and created an identical premature stop codon in exon 4. We conclude that the existence of these MPZ RNA transcript variants may be the result of deliberate splicing decisions and may have functional implications in the cell.

  20. Brain blood-flow change with acute vagus nerve stimulation in treatment-refractory major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Conway, Charles R; Sheline, Yvette I; Chibnall, John T; Bucholz, Richard D; Price, Joseph L; Gangwani, Sunil; Mintun, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Existing neuroimaging studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in treatment resistant major depression (TRMD) suggest that many brain regions (eg, prefrontal cortex, thalamus, cingulate cortex, insular cortex) associated with mood disorders undergo alterations in blood flow/metabolism. Positron emission tomography (PET oxygen-15 labeled water or PET [(15)O] H(2)O) was used to identify changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in response to immediate VNS in 13 subjects with TRMD. We hypothesized rCBF changes along the afferent pathway of the vagus and in regions associated with depression (eg, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, insular cortex). Six 90-second PET [(15)O] H(2)O scans were performed on 13 subjects in a VNS off-on sequence. After normalization for global uptake and realignment to standard atlas space, statistical t images (P < .005) were used to evaluate rCBF change. VNS induced significant rCBF decreases in the left and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex and left inferior temporal lobe. Significant increases were found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate, left posterior limb of the internal capsule/medial putamen, the right superior temporal gyrus, and the left cerebellar body. Post hoc analysis found small-to-moderate correlations between baseline acute change in rCBF and antidepressant response after 12 months of VNS. Regions undergoing rCBF change in response to acute VNS are consistent with the known afferent pathway of the vagus nerve and models of brain network in depression. Larger studies assessing the correlation between acute stimulation patterns and antidepressant outcomes with VNS are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of cerebral blood flow response to sciatic nerve stimulation using laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Luo, Qingming; Cheng, Haiying; Lu, Qiang

    2003-12-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) through a thinned skull over the somatosensory cortex was utilized to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of local cerebral flood flow (CBF) in anesthetized rats during sciatic nerve stimulation. Region-of-interest selection and Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) method was illustrated on the dataset from high-resolution optical imaging to detect the timing and location of CBF activation. Contralateral hindlimb sensory cortical microflow was activated to increase promptly in less than 1 s after the onset of 2 s electrical stimulation then evolved in different discrete regions. Individual arteries, veins and capillaries in different diameters were activated with the time going. This pattern is similar but slightly elaborated to the results obtained from laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We presented this combination to characterize the behaviors of CBF response to neuronal activity, which might possibly lead to a better understanding of neurovascular coupling and fMRI signals.

  2. Peripheral nerve stimulation characteristics of an asymmetric head-only gradient coil compatible with a high-channel-count receiver array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Graziani, Dominic; Piel, Joseph; Budesheim, Eric; Fiveland, Eric; Hardy, Christopher J; Tan, Ek Tsoon; Amm, Bruce; Foo, Thomas K-F; Bernstein, Matt A; Huston, John; Shu, Yunhong; Schenck, John F

    2016-12-01

    To characterize peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of an asymmetric head-only gradient coil that is compatible with a commercial high-channel-count receive-only array. Two prototypes of an asymmetric head-only gradient coil set with a 42-cm inner diameter were constructed for brain imaging at 3T with maximum performance specifications of up to 85 mT/m and 708 T/m/s. Tests were performed in 24 volunteers to measure PNS thresholds with the transverse (x = left-right; y = anterior-posterior [A/P]) gradient coils of both prototypes. Fourteen of these 24 volunteers were also tested for the z-gradient PNS in the second prototype and were scanned with high-slew-rate echo planar imaging (EPI) immediately after the PNS tests. For both prototypes, the y-gradient PNS threshold was markedly higher than the x-gradient threshold. The z-gradient threshold was intermediate between those for the x- and y-coils. Of the 24 volunteers, only two experienced y-gradient PNS at 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s. All volunteers underwent the EPI scan without PNS when the readout direction was set to A/P. Measured PNS characteristics of asymmetric head-only gradient coil prototypes indicate that such coils, especially in the A/P direction, can be used for fast EPI readout in high-performance neuroimaging scans with substantially reduced PNS concerns compared with conventional whole body gradient coils. Magn Reson Med 76:1939-1950, 2016. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans.

    PubMed

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B; Lip, Gregory Y H; Fadel, Paul J; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E; Fisher, James P

    2015-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory-related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube-Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age-related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory-sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube-Hering waves in both young and older humans. Healthy ageing and alterations in respiratory-sympathetic coupling have been independently linked with heightened sympathetic neural vasoconstrictor activity. We investigated how age influences the respiratory-related modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure that occur with respiration (Traube-Hering waves; THW). Ten young (22 ± 2 years; mean ± SD) and 10 older healthy men (58 ± 6 years) were studied while resting supine and breathing spontaneously. MSNA, blood pressure and respiration were recorded simultaneously. Resting values were ascertained and respiratory cycle-triggered averaging of MSNA and blood pressure measurements performed. The MSNA burst incidence was higher in older individuals [22.7 ± 9.2 versus 42.2 ± 13.7 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P < 0.05], and was reduced to a similar extent in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in young and older subjects (by ∼ 25% compared with mid- to late expiration). A similar attenuation of MSNA burst frequency (in bursts per minute), amplitude and total activity (burst frequency × mean burst amplitude) was also observed in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in both groups. A significant positive correlation between respiratory-related MSNA and the magnitude of Traube-Hering waves was observed in all young (100

  4. Effects of selective head cooling on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in newborn piglets after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guoqiang; Sun, Jinqiao; Wang, Laishuan; Shao, Xiaomei; Zhou, Wenhao

    2011-02-01

    the effect of selective head cooling on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolism rate (CMR) was investigated in newborn piglets. seven days old newborn piglets were randomly assigned to one of the following three groups: Selective head cooling in normal piglets (n=4), selective head cooling after HI (n=6) and normal temperature after HI (n=6). CBF was measured with color microspheres. Cerebral oxygenation metabolism rate (CMRO(2)), Cerebral glucose consumption (CMR(Glu)) and Cerebral lactate production (CMR(lac)) were calculated. in normal piglets, CBF, CMRO(2) and CMR(glu) were significantly decreased at both 35°C (P<0.05) and 32°C (P<0.01), while CMR(lac) did not change. Compared to baseline, CBF and CMRO(2) were significantly reduced (P<0.05), while CMR(glu) and CMR(lac) were significantly increased (P<0.01), AVDO(2) was decreased (P<0.05), while AVD(glu) and AVD(lac) were significantly increased (P<0.01 respectively) in HI piglets with normal temperature respectively. Compared to normal temperature after HI, selective head cooling after HI significantly reduced CMR(glu) and CMR(lac), and AVDO(2), AVD(glu), AVD(lac) were improved at 35°C. selective head cooling not only reduced energy consumption, but also improve brain oxygen metabolism in newborn after HI. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Difference in intraosseous blood vessel volume and number in osteoporotic model mice induced by spinal cord injury and sciatic nerve resection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wen-Ge; Yan, Wei-hong; Wei, Zhao-Xiang; Liu, Jin-Bo

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, we examined intraosseous blood vessel parameters of the tibial metaphysis in mice using microcomputed tomography (µCT) to investigate the relationship between post-nerve-injury osteoporosis and local intraosseous blood vessel volume and number. Mice were randomly divided into groups receiving spinal cord injury (SCI), sciatic nerve resection group (NX), or intact controls (30 mice/group). Four weeks after surgery, mice were perfused with silicone and the distribution of intraosseous blood vessels analyzed by μCT. The bone density, μCT microstructure, biomechanical properties, and the immunohistochemical and biochemical indicators of angiogenesis were also measured. The SCI group showed significantly reduced tibial metaphysis bone density, μCT bone microstructure, tibial biomechanical properties, indicators of angiogenesis, and intraosseous blood vessel parameters compared to the NX group. Furthermore, the spinal cord-injured mice exhibited significantly decreased intraosseous blood vessel volume and number during the development of osteoporosis. In conclusion, these data suggest that decreased intraosseous blood vessel volume and number may play an important role in the development of post-nerve-injury osteoporosis.

  6. UK-414,495, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in female genital blood flow in the anaesthetized rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Wayman, CP; Baxter, D; Turner, L; Van Der Graaf, PH; Naylor, AM

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Female sexual arousal consists of a number of physiological responses resulting from increased genital blood. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y and to a lesser extent nitric oxide are neurotransmitters found in the vasculature of the genitalia. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) modulates the activity of neuropeptides including VIP. The aim of this study was to investigate the control of genital blood flow by VIP and endogenous neuropeptides using a selective NEP inhibitor [UK-414,495, ((R)-2-({1-[(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl) carbamoyl]cyclopentyl}methyl) valeric acid)]. Experimental approach: Vaginal and clitoral blood flow (VBF and CBF) were monitored using laser Doppler in terminally anaesthetized New Zealand rabbits. Increases in VBF and CBF were induced by either electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve or by i.v. infusion of VIP. Key results: Stimulation of the pelvic nerve increased VBF and CBF, compared with basal flow. Increases were mimicked by infusion of exogenous VIP. UK-414,495 dose-dependently potentiated pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in VBF (EC50= 37 ± 9 nM; 3.6 × IC50 rabbit NEP). Nerve-stimulated increases in VBF and CBF were both enhanced after UK-414,495. UK-414,495 increased the amplitude and duration of VIP-induced increases in VBF. UK-414,495 had no effect on basal VBF or cardiovascular parameters. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of NEP potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in genital blood flow. This suggests that the endogenous neurotransmitter mediating genital blood flow is a substrate for NEP (most likely VIP). NEP inhibitors may restore sexual arousal in women adversely affected by female sexual arousal disorder. This article is commented on by Angulo, pp. 48–50 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00693.x PMID:20412068

  7. Study on the Dynamic Compound Structure Composed of Mast Cells, Blood Vessels, and Nerves in Rat Acupoint

    PubMed Central

    Mingfu, Luo; Xiaotong, Dong; Xiaojing, Song; Jin, Jiang; Jinling, Zhann; Ying, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background. Circulation system, immunity system, and nervous system have a close relationship with meridian phenomen. However, there is still lack of the results of dynamic changes of these structures in acupoint. The aim of this study is to explore the interrelationship by composite staining techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings. Twenty rats were separated into electroacupuncture group (EA) and control group (Con) randomly. In EA group, the Zusanli and Weishu were stimulated with the 0.1 mA for 25 min. The tissue of these acupoints was double-stained with acetylcholinesterase and Toluidine blue. The compound structure of mast cells, nervous fibers, and mast cells in the acupoint was observed. Conclusions/Significance. The blood vessels, mast cells and acetylcholinesterase responded nerves were clearly observed in acupoint tissues. EA can result in the mast cell recruitment and migration along the blood vessels and nervous bundle, which conformed the dynamic compound structure and played important roles in acupuncture. PMID:23878591

  8. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant depression increases regional cerebral blood flow in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Brockmann, Holger; Frick, Caroline; Zobel, Astrid; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2011-03-31

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in depressed patients. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed by [(99m)Tc]-HMPAO-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after 10weeks of VNS in patients participating in an open, uncontrolled European multi-center study investigating efficacy and safety of VNS. Patients suffered from major depression, with a baseline score of≥20 on the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and had been unsuccessfully treated with at least two adequately prescribed antidepressant drugs. Data of 15 patients could be analyzed using SPM 2. After 10weeks of VNS (20Hz, 500μs pulse width, stimulation during 30s every 5min at the maximal comfortable level) rCBF was increased in the left dorsolateral/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 47) and decreased in the right posterior cingulate area, the lingual gyrus and the left insula. Our findings are in line with earlier results which showed that VNS increases rCBF in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The modulation of the activity in this region could be associated with the antidepressant efficacy of VNS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. VEGF-A165 potently induces human blood-nerve barrier endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Chetan Lakshmana; Yosef, Nejla; Ubogu, Eroboghene E.

    2013-01-01

    Several mitogens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been implicated in mammalian vascular proliferation and repair. However, the molecular mediators of human blood-nerve barrier (BNB) development and specialization are unknown. Primary human endoneurial endothelial cells (pHEndECs) were expanded in vitro and specific mitogen receptors detected by western blot. pHEndECs were cultured with basal medium containing different mitogen concentrations with or without heparin. Non-radioactive cell proliferation, Matrigel™-induced angiogenesis and sterile micropipette injury wound healing assays were performed. Proliferation rates, number and total length of induced microvessels and rate of endothelial cell monolayer wound healing were determined and compared to basal conditions. VEGF-A165 in the presence of heparin, was the most potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro. 1.31 nM VEGF-A165 induced ~110% increase in cell proliferation relative to basal conditions (~51% without heparin). 2.62 pM VEGF-A165 induced a 3-fold increase in mean number of microvessels and 3.9-fold increase in total capillary length/field relative to basal conditions. In addition, 0.26 nM VEGF-A165 induced ~1.3-fold increased average rate of endothelial wound healing 4–18 hours after endothelial monolayer injury, mediated by increased cell migration. VEGF-A165 was the only mitogen capable of complete wound closure, occurring within 30 hours following injury via increased cell proliferation. This study demonstrates that VEGF-A165, in the presence of heparin, is a potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis and wound healing in vitro. VEGF-A165 may be an important mitogen necessary for human BNB development and recovery in response to peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23712256

  10. Comparison of the effects of evening primrose oil and triglycerides containing gamma-linolenic acid on nerve conduction and blood flow in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dines, K C; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1995-04-01

    The aim was to ascertain whether the ability of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment to correct peripheral nerve dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats depends on a gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)-containing triglyceride constituent, di-linolein mono-gamma-linolenate (DLMG). A second objective was to investigate whether the triglyceride conformation of GLA affects efficacy, using tri-gamma-linolenate (TGLA), which is not present in EPO. Third, we examined the actions of these omega-6 essential fatty acid-containing oils on sciatic nerve blood flow to establish a common mechanism. After 6 weeks of diabetes, sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was 21% reduced. EPO treatment caused dose-dependent increases in NCV that reached asymptote within 7 days. DLMG and TGLA, at doses matched for GLA content, had effects indistinguishable from those of EPO. Sciatic blood flow, 47.2% reduced by diabetes, was partially normalized by EPO, DLMG and TGLA. In contrast, sunflower oil (which does not contain GLA) did not alter NCV or blood flow. The data therefore provide strong evidence that DLMG is the active component of EPO and suggest that correction of nerve dysfunction involves a vascular action. The precise triglyceride configuration of GLA does not appear crucial to its effects in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Countercurrent transfer of dopamine from venous blood in the cavernous sinus to the arterial blood supplying the brain - the perfused rabbit head as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Muszak, J; Krzymowski, T; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to check whether countercurrent transfer of dopamine occurs in the cavernous sinus of the rabbit and whether the rabbit can be used as an animal model to study cavernous sinus function. After exsanguination of the animal, oxygenated and warmed (37°C) Hanseneleit-Krebs buffer with autologous or homologous blood (in a 3:1 or 1:1 ratio) was pumped through both common carotid arteries into the head (60 ml/min; 80-100 mm Hg) and radiolabeled dopamine (3(H)-DA, 10 μCi) was infused into the cavernous sinus through the angular oculi vein. Cerebral blood from the basilar artery was collected from the cannulated vertebral artery during 3(H)-DA infusion and for 10 minutes after completion of infusion. Selected brain tissue samples were collected after completion of the head perfusion. It was demonstrated that dopamine can penetrate from the rabbit's cavernous sinus to the internal carotid artery supplying the brain. Dopamine permeation was greater when the rabbit head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio than with 1:1 (P<0.01). When the head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio, significant radioactivity was found in samples collected from the brain basilar artery during and after 3(H)-DA infusion (P<0.001). The radioactivity was identified as 34.13 ± 2.7% unmetabolized 3(H)-DA and 65.9 ± 2.7% its metabolites. Significant radioactivity was also found in some brain tissue samples in both groups (P<0.05). The concentration of free radiolabeled dopamine particles in the dialysate of blood plasma and plasma diluted with buffer did not differ significantly. Because the structures of the cavernous sinus and cavernous fragment of the internal carotid artery of the rabbit are similar to those in humans, it suggests that rabbits can serve as a model for experimental physiological studies of cavernous sinus function and retrograde dopamine transfer in the cavernous sinus should be considered as an important link in

  12. Heart rate and blood pressure response to short-term head-down bed rest: a nonlinear approach.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Di Garbo, A; Michelassi, C; Chillemi, S; Varanini, M; Barbi, M; Legramante, J M; Raimondi, G; Zbilut, J P

    2000-06-01

    Although it is well-known that prolonged exposure to microgravity environment such as in space travel results in derangements of orthostasis, recent evidence suggests that even short-term exposure may have similar effects and parallels such common examples as prolonged bed rest. Whereas spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic blood pressure have been unable to detect changes, we hypothesized that nonlinear indexes may be better able to uncover such perturbations. Eighteen healthy subjects were exposed to 4-hour head-down tilt, and of these, 4 exhibited fainting. Two nonlinear indexes, mutual information and recurrence quantification were used to analyze the data. Only recurrence quantification was able to detect a "decoupling" of heart rate and systolic blood pressure at rest using discriminant analysis (p < 0.05). These results suggest that orthostatic intolerance may be due to a decoupling of heart rate from systolic blood pressure reflexive activity occurring at rest.

  13. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Thang, Loc V.; Demel, Stacie L.; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Swain, Greg M.; Van Rooijen, Nico

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2− release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3–5, 10–13, and 18–21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22phox were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2− was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18–21. O2− and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22phox were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2− while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2−, which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves. PMID:26320034

  14. The Effect of Ergotamine on Tissue Blood Flow and the Arteriovenous Shunting of Radioactive Microspheres in the Head

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Barbara M.; Saxena, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    1 The radioactive microsphere method was used to study the effects of ergotamine (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg, i.v.) on systemic and regional haemodynamic variables in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. The influence of the drug was also studied on the number of 15 μm microspheres escaping entrapment in the head to emerge in the left external jugular vein. 2 Ergotamine decreased the heart rate and cardiac output. Since arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, calculated total peripheral resistance increased. 3 The regional distribution of cardiac output obtained with 15 μm microspheres agreed well with previous studies in cats where 25 μm spheres were used. The most pronounced difference was that in the present investigation more microspheres, apparently escaping through arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), were detected in the lungs than when larger spheres had been used. 4 Coronary blood flow decreased, while uterine blood flow was increased by the drug. The microsphere content of the lungs, which receive the spheres not only via bronchial arteries but also via AVAs, was greatly reduced by all doses of ergotamine. Ergotamine did not influence tissue blood flow to other major organs such as the brain, kidneys, skin, liver, skeletal muscle or the gastrointestinal tract. 5 In the 16 experiments, 0.46 ± 0.05 (s.e. mean)% of the total microspheres injected (equivalent to 11.7 ± 1.4% of microspheres detected in the left-side of the head) appeared within 2 min of microsphere injection into the left external jugular vein. The highest dose of ergotamine significantly reduced the shunting of the microspheres in the head. 6 Since 15 μm microspheres are only likely to reach the lungs by passing into the venous circulation through large glomus-type AVAs, we conclude that ergotamine reduces the fraction of microspheres appearing in the lungs by causing strong vasoconstriction in the AVAs in the head. 7 In conformity with the closure of head AVAs is the finding that

  15. The impact of blood ethanol concentration on the classification of head injury severity in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rønning, Pål; Gunstad, Per Ole; Skaga, Nils-Oddvar; Langmoen, Iver Arne; Stavem, Knut; Helseth, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is classified into mild, moderate and severe, based on the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). However, TBI patients are often influenced by ethanol, which in itself can attenuate the level of consciousness. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on the GCS group classification in TBI patients. The Oslo University Hospital trauma database was searched for all patients admitted with a head injury where the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) had been measured (n = 1004). The effect of BEC on GCS groups was analysed using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. This study identified 546, 142 and 316 patients in the mild, moderate and severe groups, respectively. Increasing BEC by 1 g kg(-1) and pre-hospital intubation had OR = 1.34 and 16.34 for being in a more severe GCS group, respectively. Increasing head abbreviated injury scale (head-AIS) was significantly associated with being in a more severe GCS group. The modelled probability of detecting a head-AIS of 4 or 5 in a patient with BEC of 2.0 g kg(-1) was 20%, 38% and 65% in the mild, moderate and severe groups, respectively. Increasing BEC was associated with increasing odds of being in a more severe GCS group. However, because the modelled probability of significant brain injury was high in patients with high levels of BEC, a reduced level of consciousness in intoxicated patients mandates further radiological investigations.

  16. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  17. Influences of neck afferents on sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Kerman, I A; Woodring, S F; Yates, B J

    1998-11-15

    It is well established that the vestibular system influences the sympathetic nervous system and the respiratory system; presumably, vestibulosympathetic and vestibulorespiratory responses participate in maintaining stable blood pressure and blood oxygenation during movement and changes in posture. Many brainstem neurons that generate vestibulospinal reflexes integrate signals from the labyrinth and neck muscles to distinguish between head movements on a stable body and whole body movements. In the present study, responses were recorded from the splanchnic (sympathetic), hypoglossal (inspiratory) and abdominal (expiratory) nerves during stimulation of the C2 dorsal root ganglion or C2 or C3 nerve branches innervating dorsal neck muscles. Stimulation of neck afferents using low current intensities, in many cases less than twice the threshold for producing an afferent volley recordable from the cord dorsum, elicited changes in sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity. These data suggest that head rotation on a stable body would elicit both cervical and vestibular inputs to respiratory motoneurons and sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The effects of cervical afferent stimulation on abdominal, splanchnic and hypoglossal nerve activity were not abolished by transection of the brainstem caudal to the vestibular nuclei; thus, pathways in addition to those involving the vestibular nuclei are involved in relaying cervical inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons and respiratory motoneurons. Transection of the C1-3 dorsal roots enhanced responses of the splanchnic and abdominal nerves to pitch head rotations on a fixed body but diminished responses of the hypoglossal nerve. Thus, neck and vestibular afferent influences on activity of respiratory pump muscles and sympathetic outflow appear to be antagonistic, so that responses will occur during whole body movements but not head movements on a stationary trunk. In contrast, neck and vestibular influences on tongue

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of monochromatic photography of the ocular fundus in differentiating optic nerve head drusen and optic disc oedema: optic disc drusen and oedema.

    PubMed

    Gili, Pablo; Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Yangüela, Julio; Orduña-Azcona, Javier; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of monochromatic photography of the ocular fundus in differentiating optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and optic disc oedema (ODE). Sixty-six patients with ONHD, 31 patients with ODE and 70 healthy subjects were studied. Colour and monochromatic fundus photography with different filters (green, red and autofluorescence) were performed. The results were analysed blindly by two observers. The sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement (k) of each test were assessed. Colour photography offers 65.5 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for the diagnosis of ONHD. Monochromatic photography improves sensitivity and specificity and provides similar results: green filter (71.20 % sensitivity, 96.70 % specificity), red filter (80.30 % sensitivity, 96.80 % specificity), and autofluorescence technique (87.8 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity). The interobserver agreement was good with all techniques used: autofluorescence (k = 0.957), green filter (k = 0.897), red filter (k = 0.818) and colour (k = 0.809). Monochromatic fundus photography permits ONHD and ODE to be differentiated, with good sensitivity and very high specificity. The best results were obtained with autofluorescence and red filter study.

  19. Determination of cup-to-disc ratio of optical nerve head for diagnosis of glaucoma on stereo retinal fundus image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    A large cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio, which is the ratio of the diameter of the depression (cup) to that of the optical nerve head (ONH, disc), can be one of the important signs for diagnosis of glaucoma. Eighty eyes, including 25 eyes with the signs of glaucoma, were imaged by a stereo retinal fundus camera. An ophthalmologist provided the outlines of cup and disc on a regular monitor and on the stereo display. The depth image of the ONH was created by determining the corresponding pixels in a pair of images based on the correlation coefficient in localized regions. The areas of the disc and cup were determined by use of the red component in one of the color images and by use of the depth image, respectively. The C/D ratio was determined based on the largest vertical lengths in the cup and disc areas, which was then compared with that by the ophthalmologist. The disc areas determined by the computerized method agreed relatively well with those determined by the ophthalmologist, whereas the agreement for the cup areas was somewhat lower. When C/D ratios were employed for distinction between the glaucomatous and non-glaucomatous eyes, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.83. The computerized analysis of ONH can be useful for diagnosis of glaucoma.

  20. Cost-effective instrumentation for quantitative depth measurement of optic nerve head using stereo fundus image pair and image cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Luis Alberto V.; Carvalho, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    One of the main problems with glaucoma throughout the world is that there are typically no symptoms in the early stages. Many people who have the disease do not know they have it and by the time one finds out, the disease is usually in an advanced stage. Most retinal cameras available in the market today use sophisticated optics and have several other features/capabilities (wide-angle optics, red-free and angiography filters, etc) that make them expensive for the general practice or for screening purposes. Therefore, it is important to develop instrumentation that is fast, effective and economic, in order to reach the mass public in the general eye-care centers. In this work, we have constructed the hardware and software of a cost-effective and non-mydriatic prototype device that allows fast capturing and plotting of high-resolution quantitative 3D images and videos of the optical disc head and neighboring region (30° of field of view). The main application of this device is for glaucoma screening, although it may also be useful for the diagnosis of other pathologies related to the optic nerve.

  1. Analysis of the variation in OCT measurements of a structural bottle neck for eye-brain transfer of visual information from 3D-volumes of the optic nerve head, PIMD-Average [02π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the clinical usefulness of the thinnest cross section of the nerve fibers in the optic nerve head averaged over the circumference of the optic nerve head. 3D volumes of the optic nerve head of the same eye was captured at two different visits spaced in time by 1-4 weeks, in 13 subjects diagnosed with early to moderate glaucoma. At each visit 3 volumes containing the optic nerve head were captured independently with a Topcon OCT- 2000 system. In each volume, the average shortest distance between the inner surface of the retina and the central limit of the pigment epithelium around the optic nerve head circumference, PIMD-Average [02π], was determined semiautomatically. The measurements were analyzed with an analysis of variance for estimation of the variance components for subjects, visits, volumes and semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [0;2π]. It was found that the variance for subjects was on the order of five times the variance for visits, and the variance for visits was on the order of 5 times higher than the variance for volumes. The variance for semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [02π] was 3 orders of magnitude lower than the variance for volumes. A 95 % confidence interval for mean PIMD-Average [02π] was estimated to 1.00 +/-0.13 mm (D.f. = 12). The variance estimates indicate that PIMD-Average [02π] is not suitable for comparison between a onetime estimate in a subject and a population reference interval. Cross-sectional independent group comparisons of PIMD-Average [02π] averaged over subjects will require inconveniently large sample sizes. However, cross-sectional independent group comparison of averages of within subject difference between baseline and follow-up can be made with reasonable sample sizes. Assuming a loss rate of 0.1 PIMD-Average [02π] per year and 4 visits per year it was found that approximately 18 months follow up is required before a significant change of PIMDAverage [02π] can

  2. Sarcoidosis with optic nerve and retinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Gass, J D; Olson, C L

    1976-06-01

    A patient with the typical funduscopic changes of sarcoidosis died following an accident. The histopathological findings in one eye were correlated with the ophthalmoscopic observations made several days prior to death. Gross and histopathological examination revealed that the characteristic whitish-yellow focal retinal exudates, the perivascular exudates with an appearance like candle wax drippings, the preretinal and intravitreal nodules, and the localized tumefactions on the inner surface of the retina and optic nerve head noted ophthalmoscopically were a result of the nodular proliferation of epithelioid cells. These cells appeared to be derived primarily from blood vessels in the retina and optic nerve head. Although subpigment epithelial granulomas were found, there were no granulomas present within the choroid or elsewhere within the uvea.

  3. Peripheral blood DNA methylation profiles are indicative of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: an epigenome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Scott M; Koestler, Devin C; Christensen, Brock C; Butler, Rondi A; Wiencke, John K; Nelson, Heather H; Houseman, E Andres; Marsit, Carmen J; Kelsey, Karl T

    2012-03-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for an estimated 47,560 new cases and 11,480 deaths annually in the United States, the majority of which are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). The overall 5 year survival is approximately 60% and declines with increasing stage at diagnosis, indicating a need for non-invasive tests that facilitate the detection of early disease. DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification that is amenable to measurement and readily available in peripheral blood. We used a semi-supervised recursively partitioned mixture model (SS-RPMM) approach to identify novel blood DNA methylation markers of HNSCC using genome-wide methylation array data for peripheral blood samples from 92 HNSCC cases and 92 cancer-free control subjects. To assess the performance of the resultant markers, we constructed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calculated the corresponding area under the curve (AUC). Cases and controls were best differentiated by a methylation profile of six CpG loci (associated with FGD4, SERPINF1, WDR39, IL27, HYAL2 and PLEKHA6), with an AUC of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.62-0.82). After adjustment for subject age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption and HPV16 serostatus, the AUC increased to 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76-0.92). We have identified a novel blood-based methylation profile that is indicative of HNSCC with a high degree of accuracy. This profile demonstrates the potential of DNA methylation measured in blood for development of non-invasive applications for detection of head and neck cancer.

  4. Age and sex differences in muscle sympathetic nerve activity in relation to haemodynamics, blood volume and left ventricular size.

    PubMed

    Best, Stuart A; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Galbreath, M Melyn; Jarvis, Sara S; Bivens, Tiffany B; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Fu, Qi

    2014-06-01

    We compared the effect of age- and sex-related differences in haemodynamics, blood volume (BV) and left ventricular (LV) size and mass on resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in healthy, normotensive adults. Twenty young men (19-47 years old) and 20 young women (21-46 years old) as well as 15 older men (62-80 years old) and 15 older women (60-82 years old) were studied. Cardiac output (acetylene rebreathing), total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular resistance (FVR; venous occlusion plethysmography) and MSNA were measured during supine rest. Blood volume was calculated (CO rebreathing), and LV mass, end-diastolic (LVEDV) and end-systolic volumes (LVESV) were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac index (P < 0.001 and P = 0.016), BV (both P < 0.001), LV mass (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002), LVEDV (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002) and LVESV (both P < 0.001) were lower in the older and female groups, respectively. Total peripheral resistance was significantly higher in the older (P < 0.001) and female groups (P = 0.014), but FVR was increased in the female groups (P = 0.048) only (age, P = 0.089). The MSNA was greater in the older groups (P < 0.001) only (sex, P = 0.228). Increased MSNA was shown to correlate with a decrease in BV (P = 0.004) in men only when adjusted for age (women, P = 0.133). There was a positive relation between MSNA and FVR (P = 0.020) in men but not women (P = 0.422). There were no significant relations between MSNA and LV mass, LVEDV or LVESV. The findings suggest that the increase in resting MSNA with age may be related to the decline in BV in men only, but it is unknown whether sex differences in sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstriction occur independently of these changes.

  5. Sympathetic ganglion transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after coronary artery bypass graft surgery improves femoral blood flow and exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Gerson; Neder, J Alberto; Umpierre, Daniel; Arena, Ross; Vieira, Paulo J C; Chiappa, Adriana M Güntzel; Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R

    2014-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) over the stellate ganglion region would reduce sympathetic overstimulation and improve femoral blood flow (FBF) after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Thirty-eight patients (20 men, 24 New York Heart Association class III-IV) were randomized to 5-day postoperative TENS (n = 20; 4 times/day; 30 min/session) or sham TENS (n = 18) applied to the posterior cervical region (C7-T4). Sympathetic nervous system was stimulated by the cold pressor test, with FBF being measured by ultrasound Doppler. Femoral vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated as FBF/mean arterial pressure (MAP). Six-min walking distance established patients' functional capacity. Before and after the intervention periods, pain scores, opiate requirements, and circulating β-endorphin levels were determined. As expected, preoperative MAP increased and FBF and FVC decreased during the cold pressor test. Sham TENS had no significant effect on these variables (P > 0.05). In contrast, MAP decreased in the TENS group (125 ± 12 vs. 112 ± 10 mmHg). This finding, in association with a consistent increase in FBF (95 ± 5 vs. 145 ± 14 ml/min), led to significant improvements in FVC (P < 0.01). Moreover, 6-min walking distance improved only with TENS (postsurgery-presurgery = 35 ± 12 vs. 6 ± 10 m; P < 0.01). TENS was associated with lesser postoperative pain and opiate requirements but greater circulating β-endorphin levels (P < 0.05). In conclusion, stellate ganglion TENS after coronary artery bypass graft surgery positively impacted on limb blood flow during a sympathetic stimulation maneuver, a beneficial effect associated with improved clinical and functional outcomes.

  6. Impact of gender on benefits of exercise training on sympathetic nerve activity and muscle blood flow in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.; Melo, Ruth C.; Nobre, Thais S.; Ueno, Linda M.; Franco, Fabio G.M.; Braga, Ana M.W.; Rondon, Maria U.P.B.; Brum, Patricia C.; Barretto, Antonio C.P.; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Negrao, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    Aims We compared the effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in men and women with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods and results Forty consecutive HF outpatients from the Heart Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil were divided into the following four groups matched by age: men exercise-trained (n = 12), men untrained (n = 10), women exercise-trained (n = 9), women untrained (n = 9). Maximal exercise capacity was determined from a maximal progressive exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded directly using the technique of microneurography. There were no differences between groups in any baseline parameters. Exercise training produced a similar reduction in resting MSNA (P = 0.000002) and forearm vascular resistance (P = 0.0003), in men and women with HF. Peak VO2 was similarly increased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0003) and VE/VCO2 slope was significantly decreased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0007). There were no significant changes in left-ventricular ejection fraction in men and women with HF. Conclusion The benefits of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in patients with HF are independent of gender. PMID:20023046

  7. Impact of gender on benefits of exercise training on sympathetic nerve activity and muscle blood flow in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Melo, Ruth C; Nobre, Thais S; Ueno, Linda M; Franco, Fabio G M; Braga, Ana M W; Rondon, Maria U P B; Brum, Patricia C; Barretto, Antonio C P; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrao, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in men and women with chronic heart failure (HF). Forty consecutive HF outpatients from the Heart Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil were divided into the following four groups matched by age: men exercise-trained (n = 12), men untrained (n = 10), women exercise-trained (n = 9), women untrained (n = 9). Maximal exercise capacity was determined from a maximal progressive exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded directly using the technique of microneurography. There were no differences between groups in any baseline parameters. Exercise training produced a similar reduction in resting MSNA (P = 0.000002) and forearm vascular resistance (P = 0.0003), in men and women with HF. Peak VO(2) was similarly increased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0003) and VE/VCO(2) slope was significantly decreased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0007). There were no significant changes in left-ventricular ejection fraction in men and women with HF. The benefits of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in patients with HF are independent of gender.

  8. Transcorneal stimulation of trigeminal nerve afferents to increase cerebral blood flow in rats with cerebral vasospasm: a noninvasive method to activate the trigeminovascular reflex.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Basar; Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Dalkara, Turgay; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Oge, Kamil; Ozcan, Osman Ekin

    2002-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether stimulation of trigeminal afferents in the cornea could enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) in rats after they have been subjected to experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral vasospasm following SAH may compromise CBF and increase the risks of morbidity and mortality. Currently, there is no effective treatment for SAH-induced vasospasm. Direct stimulation of the trigeminal nerve has been shown to dilate constricted cerebral arteries after SAH; however, a noninvasive method to activate this nerve would be preferable for human applications. The authors hypothesized that stimulation of free nerve endings of trigeminal sensory fibers in the face might be as effective as direct stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. Autologous blood obtained from the tail artery was injected into the cisterna magna of 10 rats. Forty-eight and 96 hours later (five rats each) trigeminal afferents were stimulated selectively by applying transcorneal biphasic pulses (1 msec, 3 mA, and 30 Hz), and CBF enhancements were detected using laser Doppler flowmetry in the territory of the middle cerebral artery. Stimulation-induced changes in cerebrovascular parameters were compared with similar parameters in sham-operated controls (six rats). Development of vasospasm was histologically verified in every rat with SAH. Corneal stimulation caused an increase in CBF and blood pressure and a net decrease in cerebrovascular resistance. There were no significant differences between groups for these changes. Data from the present study demonstrate that transcorneal stimulation of trigeminal nerve endings induces vasodilation and a robust increase in CBF. The vasodilatory response of cerebral vessels to trigeminal activation is retained after SAH-induced vasospasm.

  9. Effects of intraduodenal injection of Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 on renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamano, Toshihiko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Nobuaki; Fukushima, Yoichi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2005-12-02

    Previously, it was shown that milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria lowers blood pressure, suggesting that metabolites or components of the bacteria have hypotensive action. To examine whether one of lactobacilli, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 (LJLa1), a probiotic strain adhesive onto intestinal epithelial cells, or its metabolite has hypotensive action, and if so the mechanism of action, we determined the effects of intraduodenal injection of LJLa1 on blood pressure (BP) and the activity of autonomic nerves in urethane-anesthetized rats. Intraduodenal injection of LJLa1 reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP and enhanced gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA). Pre-treatment with thioperamide, a histaminergic H3-receptor antagonist, eliminated the effects of LJLa1 on RSNA, GVNA, and BP. Furthermore, bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian oscillator, abolished the suppression of RSNA and BP and the elevation of GVNA caused by LJLa1. These findings suggest that LJLa1 or its metabolites might lower BP by changing autonomic neurotransmission via the central histaminergic nerves and the suprachiasmatic nucleus in rats.

  10. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  11. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  12. Blood levels of cobalt and chromium are inversely correlated to head size after metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parry, Michael C; Eastaugh-Waring, Steve; Bannister, Gordon C; Learmonth, Ian D; Case, Charles Patrick; Blom, Ashley W

    2013-01-01

    Resurfacing arthroplasty has fallen out of favour in recent years due to unfavourable survivorship in joint registries and alarming reports of soft tissue reactions around metal on metal prostheses. Our aim was to assess the effect of head size, implant design and component positioning on metal production by resurfacing arthroplasties. We measured whole blood cobalt and chromium and component position in matched populations implanted with two designs of resurfacing arthroplasty over a two-year period. Both implants resulted in a significant increase in blood metal levels (p<0.001) though the ASR design generated significantly higher metal levels (p = 0.041). A significant inverse correlation was seen between component size and blood cobalt levels (p = 0.032) and blood chromium levels (p<0.001). No correlation was identified between component position and blood metal levels. Small diameter metal resurfacing components result in increased metal generation compared with larger components. As increased metal generation has been correlated to wear and therefore failure, caution must be used on implantation of smaller components and indeed, in those who require smaller components, alternative bearing materials should be considered. These results contrast with recent findings which have demonstrated early failure for larger diameter stemmed metal-on-metal prostheses.

  13. Neuroretinal rim in non-glaucomatous large optic nerve heads: a comparison of confocal scanning laser tomography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Enders, Philip; Schaub, Friederike; Hermann, Manuel M; Cursiefen, Claus; Heindl, Ludwig M

    2017-02-01

    To compare margin-based rim area measurements from confocal scanning laser tomography (CSLT) with Bruch's membrane opening (BMO)-based measurements from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) by analysis of a group of non-glaucomatous eyes with large optic discs, so-called macrodiscs (disc size >2.45 mm(2) in CSLT). Objective is to create a reference base for large optic nerve heads in SD-OCT diagnostics. 102 eyes received CSLT and SD-OCT measurements and clinical examination on the same day. Visual field testing confirmed absence of glaucomatous defects. Statistical and correlation analysis was performed for rim area by CSLT as well as retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) and BMO minimal rim width (BMO-MRW) by SD-OCT. Mean disc size in CSLT was 2.98±0.4 mm(2) (range 2.45-4.23), mean rim area of 1.55±0.4 mm(2). BMO area was 2.51±0.33 mm(2) (range 1.61-3.51), mean global RNFLT was 79.55±17.2 μm, mean global BMO-MRW was 234.84±48.3 μm. Correlation of BMO-MRW to global RNFLT was stronger (r=0.60, p<10(-5)) than correlation of CSLT rim area to global RNFLT (r=0.26, p=0.24). BMO-MRW and CSLT rim area correlated with r=0.59 (p<10(-5)). BMO-MRW and RNFLT significantly decreased with increasing age (p<0.001). Annual loss of BMO-MRW was 0.8 μm/year (R(2)=0.14, p<0.001), loss of RNFLT was 0.27 μm/year (R(2)=0.17, p=0.001). In large optic discs, BMO-MRW is thinner compared with normal-sized discs and correlates better than CSLT parameters with the RNFLT. An age-depended loss of BMO-MRW needs to be taken into account in evaluation of the neuroretinal rim. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. The use of Bruch's membrane opening-based optical coherence tomography of the optic nerve head for glaucoma detection in microdiscs.

    PubMed

    Enders, Philip; Schaub, Friederike; Adler, Werner; Nikoluk, Roman; Hermann, Manuel M; Heindl, Ludwig M

    2017-04-01

    To assess the performance of Bruch's membrane opening (BMO)-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of the optic nerve head for glaucoma detection in microdiscs in comparison with confocal scanning laser tomography (CSLT). Retrospective cohort study. 82 eyes of 82 patients with disc size <1.63 mm(2) underwent SD-OCT and CSLT measurements, visual field testing and clinical examination. BMO-based minimal rim width (BMO-MRW), retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) in SD-OCT and rim area measured in CSLT were compared and correlated with visual field defects. 51 patients with glaucoma, 11 patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and 20 healthy controls had a mean disc area of 1.36±0.19 mm(2) in CSLT, and BMO area was 1.45±0.22 mm(2) (r=0.17; p=0.12). In patients with glaucoma, visual field mean defect was -7.5±6.7 dB. Global BMO-MRW correlated better with visual field function (Spearman's r=0.65; p<0.001) than RNFLT (r=0.58; p≤0.001) and CSLT rim area (r=0.47; p=0.004). BMO-MRW significantly deteriorated with progressive visual field loss (p<0.001). In receiver operating characteristic analysis, sensitivity of BMO-MRW was 68.6% at 95% specificity (area under curve (AUC)=0.87), similar to sensitivity of RNFLT (66.4%; AUC=0.81). Performance of CSLT rim area was significantly worse (AUC=0.70, p=0.008). In healthy controls, mean BMO-MRW was 344.3±64.1 µm, mean RNFLT 78.0±11.3 µm and CSLT mean rim area 1.07±0.18 mm(2). In small optic discs, BMO-MRW and peripapillary RNFLT (OCT) have similar sensitivity to discriminate patients with glaucoma from normal controls; both exceed CSLT rim area in diagnostic power. In glaucomatous patients, BMO-MRW correlates strongest with visual field function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Blood nickel and chromium levels in association with smoking and occupational exposure among head and neck cancer patients in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Feki-Tounsi, Molka; Chakroun, Amine; Rebai, Ahmed; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer (HNC) incidence among exposed human populations. This study represents the first biomonitoring of Cr and Ni exposure in Tunisia and focuses on a possible association with HNC risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of Cr and Ni in the blood of HNC patients and controls. Metals blood levels of 169 HNC patients and 351 controls were determined using a Perkin-Elmer Analyst 800 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Mean blood levels of Cr and Ni in HNC cases (52.15 and 111.60 μg/L, respectively) were significantly higher than those of controls (37.04 and 30.50 μg/L, respectively). Cases' blood levels of Cr and Ni were significantly higher than those of controls after controlling for the other risk factors of HNC, including smoking, shisha consumption, occupational exposure, and nearby environment (P<0.05). Among these risk factors, smoking and occupational exposure presented the most significant association with HNC (odds ratio (OR)=6.54 and 7.66, respectively, P<0.001). Cr and Ni levels in blood sample of cases and controls that are smoker/occupationally exposed were higher than that of non-smoker/non-occupationally exposed (P<0.05). Smokers who are occupationally exposed present the most significant association with HNC (OR=25.08, P<0.0001). High levels of blood Cr (OR=2.09) and high levels of blood Ni (OR=8.87) were strongly associated with HNC after other potential confounders were controlled (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). This study suggested a potential role of Cr and Ni in the mechanism of HNC development.

  16. Flat-head positioning increases cerebral blood flow in anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke. A cluster randomized phase IIb trial.

    PubMed

    Olavarría, Verónica V; Lavados, Pablo M; Muñoz-Venturelli, Paula; González, Francisca; Gaete, Javier; Martins, Sheila; Arima, Hisatomi; Anderson, Craig S; Brunser, Alejandro M

    2017-01-01

    Background Whether lying-flat improves blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke is unknown. Our aim was to investigate if lying-flat "changes" cerebral blood flow velocities assessed by transcranial Doppler in acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods In a multicenter cluster clinical trial, we randomly assigned patients within 12 h from onset of a neurological deficit due to cerebral ischemia of the anterior circulation to lying-flat or upright head positioning. The primary outcome was a change of 8 cm/s or more in mean cerebral blood flow velocities on transcranial Doppler to the middle cerebral artery at 1 and 24 h post-randomization, adjusted for imbalance in baseline variables. Secondary outcomes included serious adverse events and physical functioning at 90 days. Results Ninety-four of 304 patients screened were recruited. The primary outcome occurred in 11 (26%) of 43 patients in the lying-flat group and in 6 (12%) of 51 in the upright group at 1 h (adjusted odds ratio, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.07 to 13.54), and in 23 (53%) and 18 (36%) patients in these respective groups at 24 h (adjusted odds ratio, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.08 to 8.53). There were no between-group differences in serious adverse events, including pneumonia, heart failure or mortality, nor in functional outcome at 3 months (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.38; 95% CI 0.64 to 3.00). Conclusion The lying-flat head position was associated with a significant increase in cerebral blood flow velocities at one and 24 h within the ipsilateral hemisphere of anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke, without serious safety concerns. Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01706094.

  17. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sokjoong; Rho, Seungsoo; Kim, Gijin; Kim, So-Ra; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Kang, Myungseo; Lew, Helen

    2016-05-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP‑MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB‑MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP‑43) were increased after the injection of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP‑MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP‑43 and HIF‑1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell

  18. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  19. Preclinical Study of Cell Therapy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head with Allogenic Peripheral Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ning-Ning; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yi; Peng, Jia-Chen; Fang, Ning; Yu, Li-Mei; Liu, Jin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the value of transplanting peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells from allogenic rabbits (rPBMSCs) to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Materials and Methods rPBMSCs were separated/cultured from peripheral blood after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization. Afterwards, mobilized rPBMSCs from a second passage labeled with PKH26 were transplanted into rabbit ONFH models, which were established by liquid nitrogen freezing, to observe the effect of rPBMSCs on ONFH repair. Then, the mRNA expressions of BMP-2 and PPAR-γ in the femoral head were assessed by RT-PCR. Results After mobilization, the cultured rPBMSCs expressed mesenchymal markers of CD90, CD44, CD29, and CD105, but failed to express CD45, CD14, and CD34. The colony forming efficiency of mobilized rPBMSCs ranged from 2.8 to 10.8 per million peripheral mononuclear cells. After local transplantation, survival of the engrafted cells reached at least 8 weeks. Therein, BMP-2 was up-regulated, while PPAR-γ mRNA was down-regulated. Additionally, bone density and bone trabeculae tended to increase gradually. Conclusion We confirmed that local transplantation of rPBMSCs benefits ONFH treatment and that the beneficial effects are related to the up-regulation of BMP-2 expression and the down-regulation of PPAR-γ expression. PMID:27189298

  20. Evaluation of nine oximes on in vivo reactivation of blood, brain, and tissue cholinesterase activity inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agents at lethal dose.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tsung-Ming; Skovira, Jacob W; O'Donnell, John C; McDonough, John H

    2009-09-01

    The capability of several oximes (HI-6, HLö7, MMB-4, TMB-4, carboxime, ICD 585, ICD 692, ICD 3805, and 2-PAM) to reactivate in vivo AChE inhibited by the nerve agents sarin, cyclosarin, VX, or VR in blood, brain regions, and peripheral tissues in guinea pigs was examined and compared. Animals were injected subcutaneously with 1.0 LD(50) of sarin, cyclosarin, VR, or VX, and treated intramuscularly 5 min later with one of these compounds. Toxic signs and lethality were monitored, and tissue AChE activities were determined at 60 min after nerve agent. The animals exposed to sarin or cyclosarin, alone or with non-oxime treatment, some died within 60 min; however, when treated with an oxime, no animal died. For VR or VX, all animals survived for 60 min after exposure, with or without non-oxime or oxime therapy. These nerve agents caused differential degrees of inhibition: in whole blood sarin = cyclosarin > VR = VX; in brain regions sarin > cyclosarin > VX > VR; and in peripheral tissues sarin > VX > cyclosarin > VR. These oximes exhibited differential potency in reactivating nerve agent-inhibited AChE in various peripheral tissues, but not AChE activity in the brain regions. There was no difference in the AChE reactivating potency between the dichloride and dimethanesulfonate salts of HI-6. AChE inhibited by sarin was the most and cyclosarin the least susceptible to oxime reactivation. Overall, MMB-4 appeared to be, among all oximes tested, the most effective in vivo AChE reactivator against the broadest spectrum of nerve agents.

  1. Evaluation of management techniques to conserve water in a mechanical head wash blood removal system.

    PubMed

    Galloway, H O; Deotte, R E; Lawrence, T E

    2013-11-01

    This research objectively evaluated methods to conserve water in a mechanical beef head wash system. Digital images of pre-wash and post-wash beef heads were analyzed to quantify the percentage change in red saturation of the image, which was used as an objective measure of cleanliness. Three types of nozzles (fan, three-hole, venturi) and three water pressures (344, 516, 689kPa) were evaluated in a two-way treatment structure. An interaction (P=0.07) was observed between water pressure and nozzle type; the change in red saturation increased as pressure decreased for fan and three-hole nozzles which contrasted with venturi nozzles. The fan nozzle×516kPa pressure treatment used 25L of water per head washed and was used to evaluate the effect of three water temperatures (15, 38, 57°C). Water temperature did not impact (P=0.21) change in red saturation. Reducing water wastage and minimizing the use of heated water could have positive economic benefits to the beef processor.

  2. A porohyperelastic finite element model of the eye: the influence of stiffness and permeability on intraocular pressure and optic nerve head biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ayyalasomayajula, Avinash; Park, Robert I.; Simon, Bruce R.; Geest, Jonathan P. Vande

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Progressively deteriorating visual field is a characteristic feature of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and the biomechanics of optic nerve head (ONH) is believed to be important in its onset. We used porohyperelasticity to model the complex porous behavior of ocular tissues to better understand the effect variations in ocular material properties can have on ONH biomechanics. Methods An axisymmetric model of the human eye was constructed to parametrically study how changes in the permeabilities of retina-Bruch's-choroid complex (kRBC), sclera (ksclera), uveoscleral pathway (kUVSC), and trabecular meshwork (kTM) as well as how changes in the stiffness of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and sclera affect IOP, LC strains, and translaminar interstitial pressure gradients (TLIPG). Results Decreasing kRBC from 5×10−12m/s to 5×10−13m/s increased IOP and LC strains by 17%, and TLIPG by 21%. LC strains increased by 13% and 9% when the scleral and LC moduli were decreased by 48% and 50%, respectively. Conclusions In addition to the trabecular meshwork and uveoscleral pathway, the retina-Bruch's-choroid complex had an important effect on IOP, LC strains, and TLIPG. Changes in kRBC and scleral modulus resulted in nonlinear changes in the IOP, and LC strains especially at the lowest kTM and kUVSC. This study demonstrates that porohyperelastic modeling provides a novel method for computationally studying the biomechanical environment of the ONH. Porohyperelastic simulations of ocular tissues may help provide further insight into the complex biomechanical environment of posterior ocular tissues in POAG. PMID:26195024

  3. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Demizu, Yusuke; Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue; Akagi, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Terashima, Kazuki; Suga, Daisaku; Kamae, Isao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  4. Androgen receptor and NFkB expression in human normal and glaucomatous optic nerve head astrocytes in vitro and in experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Olga A; Kaufman, Paul L; Hernandez, M Rosario

    2006-06-01

    For several decades, clinical and experimental observations suggested a relationship between steroids and glaucoma; however, the possibility that androgens are also involved in the glaucomatous changes in the optic nerve heads (ONH) has not been explored. Our previous findings that glaucomatous ONH astrocytes synthesize androgen-metabolising enzymes and overproduce a neuroactive androgen, 5alpha-androstane-3alpha, 17beta-diol (3alpha-diol) led us to propose that ONH astrocytes are androgen target cells. Androgens modulate different cellular processes through androgen receptor (AR). NFkB is a transcription factor that positively regulates AR transcription. Here, we analysed AR and NFkB expression in normal and glaucomatous ONH astrocytes in vitro, and in vivo in a monkey model of experimental glaucoma (ExpG) by quantitative real time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We demonstrated that in vitro human glaucomatous ONH astrocytes express AR mRNA and protein at higher levels than normal astrocytes and that in vivo ONH astrocytes from eyes with ExpG showed increased nuclear and cytoplasmic AR immunostaining compared to control eyes. In the retina, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) demonstrated cytoplasmic staining both in control and in ExpG eyes. NFkB mRNA expression was higher in glaucomatous ONH astrocytes than in normal and more nuclear NFkB protein was detected in glaucomatous ONH astrocytes. In vivo immunopositive NFkB nuclear staining of ONH astrocytes in ONH and in RGC in retina was detected both in control and in ExpG eyes. We conclude that in addition to our published data, increase of AR and NFkB expression in glaucomatous ONH astrocytes provides strong evidence that androgens play a significant role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma.

  5. Optic Nerve Head Biomechanic and IOP Changes Before and After the Injection of Aflibercept for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rebolleda, Gema; Puerto, Beatriz; de Juan, Victoria; Gómez-Mariscal, Marta; Muñoz-Negrete, Francisco José; Casado, Alfonso

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the early effects of intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI) on optic nerve head (ONH) morphology. All of the participants underwent applanation tonometry and enhanced depth imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography immediately before injection, and within 5 and 30 minutes after IAI. Changes in the anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth, prelaminar tissue thickness (PTT), optic cup width, optic cup depth, and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) were assessed. The study included 30 eyes of 30 subjects with a mean age of 77.4 ± 6.8 years (range, 65-89 years) following IAI (2 mg in 0.05 ml). Within 5 minutes after injection, the mean cup depth, mean cup width, and BMO were significantly increased (P = 0.013, P = 0.000, and P = 0.004, respectively), whereas the mean PTT was thinned (P = 0.009). These morphologic changes returned to near baseline values 30 minutes after injection. Cup widening and BMO expansion (P = 0.000; r, 0.668), as well as cup deepening and prelaminar thinning (P = 0.000; r, -0.838), were significantly correlated. The magnitude of cup deepening and prelaminar tissue thinning correlated with the IOP change in the opposite direction than expected (P = 0.039; r, -0.379 and P = 0.377; r, 0.040). A significant widening and deepening of the optic cup, BMO expansion, and prelaminar tissue thinning occurred following IAI for neovascular AMD. Eyes having greater optic disc cup deepening and prelaminar tissue condensation after IAI, associated with a lower IOP increase after injection, suggesting that ONH compliance might buffer the effect of additional intravitreal fluid injection on IOP values.

  6. Astrocyte Structural and Molecular Response to Elevated Intraocular Pressure Occurs Rapidly and Precedes Axonal Tubulin Rearrangement within the Optic Nerve Head in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Shandiz; Davis, Lauren; Cepurna, William O.; Choe, Tiffany E.; Lozano, Diana C.; Monfared, Ashley; Cooper, Lauren; Cheng, Joshua; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucomatous axon injury occurs at the level of the optic nerve head (ONH) in response to uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP). The temporal response of ONH astrocytes (glial cells responsible for axonal support) to elevated IOP remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the response of actin-based astrocyte extensions and integrin-based signaling within the ONH to 8 hours of IOP elevation in a rat model. IOP elevation of 60 mm Hg was achieved under isoflurane anesthesia using anterior chamber cannulation connected to a saline reservoir. ONH astrocytic extension orientation was significantly and regionally rearranged immediately after IOP elevation (inferior ONH, 43.2° ± 13.3° with respect to the anterior-posterior axis versus 84.1° ± 1.3° in controls, p<0.05), and re-orientated back to baseline orientation 1 day post IOP normalization. ONH axonal microtubule filament label intensity was significantly reduced 1 and 3 days post IOP normalization, and returned to control levels on day 5. Phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) levels steadily decreased after IOP normalization, while levels of phosphorylated paxillin (a downstream target of FAK involved in focal adhesion dynamics) were significantly elevated 5 days post IOP normalization. The levels of phosphorylated cortactin (a downstream target of Src kinase involved in actin polymerization) were significantly elevated 1 and 3 days post IOP normalization and returned to control levels by day 5. No significant axon degeneration was noted by morphologic assessment up to 5 days post IOP normalization. Actin-based astrocyte structure and signaling within the ONH are significantly altered within hours after IOP elevation and prior to axonal cytoskeletal rearrangement, producing some responses that recover rapidly and others that persist for days despite IOP normalization. PMID:27893827

  7. A porohyperelastic finite element model of the eye: the influence of stiffness and permeability on intraocular pressure and optic nerve head biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ayyalasomayajula, Avinash; Park, Robert I; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Progressively deteriorating visual field is a characteristic feature of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and the biomechanics of optic nerve head (ONH) is believed to be important in its onset. We used porohyperelasticity to model the complex porous behavior of ocular tissues to better understand the effect variations in ocular material properties can have on ONH biomechanics. An axisymmetric model of the human eye was constructed to parametrically study how changes in the permeabilities of retina-Bruch's-choroid complex (k(RBC)), sclera k(sclera), uveoscleral pathway (k(UVSC)) and trabecular meshwork k(TM) as well as how changes in the stiffness of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and sclera affect IOP, LC strains, and translaminar interstitial pressure gradients (TLIPG). Decreasing k(RBC) from 5 × 10(- 12) to 5 × 10(- 13) m/s increased IOP and LC strains by 17%, and TLIPG by 21%. LC strains increased by 13% and 9% when the scleral and LC moduli were decreased by 48% and 50%, respectively. In addition to the trabecular meshwork and uveoscleral pathway, the retina-Bruch's-choroid complex had an important effect on IOP, LC strains, and TLIPG. Changes in k(RBC) and scleral modulus resulted in nonlinear changes in the IOP, and LC strains especially at the lowest k(TM) and k(UVSC). This study demonstrates that porohyperelastic modeling provides a novel method for computationally studying the biomechanical environment of the ONH. Porohyperelastic simulations of ocular tissues may help provide further insight into the complex biomechanical environment of posterior ocular tissues in POAG.

  8. Corneal Segmentation Analysis Increases Glaucoma Diagnostic Ability of Optic Nerve Head Examination, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph's Moorfield's Regression Analysis, and Glaucoma Probability Score.

    PubMed

    Saenz-Frances, F; Jañez, L; Berrozpe-Villabona, C; Borrego-Sanz, L; Morales-Fernández, L; Acebal-Montero, A; Mendez-Hernandez, C D; Martinez-de-la-Casa, J M; Santos-Bueso, E; Garcia-Sanchez, J; Garcia-Feijoo, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study whether a corneal thickness segmentation model, consisting in a central circular zone of 1 mm radius centered at the corneal apex (zone I) and five concentric rings of 1 mm width (moving outwards: zones II to VI), could boost the diagnostic accuracy of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph's (HRT's) MRA and GPS. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. 121 healthy volunteers and 125 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Six binary multivariate logistic regression models were constructed (MOD-A1, MOD-A2, MOD-B1, MOD-B2, MOD-C1, and MOD-C2). The dependent variable was the presence of glaucoma. In MOD-A1, the predictor was the result (presence of glaucoma) of the analysis of the stereophotography of the optic nerve head (ONH). In MOD-B1 and MOD-C1, the predictor was the result of the MRA and GPS, respectively. In MOD-B2 and MOD-C2, the predictors were the same along with corneal variables: central, overall, and zones I to VI thicknesses. This scheme was reproduced for model MOD-A2 (stereophotography along with corneal variables). Models were compared using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Results. MOD-A1-AUC: 0.771; MOD-A2-AUC: 0.88; MOD-B1-AUC: 0.736; MOD-B2-AUC: 0.845; MOD-C1-AUC: 0.712; MOD-C2-AUC: 0.838. Conclusion. Corneal thickness variables enhance ONH assessment and HRT's MRA and GPS diagnostic capacity.

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 inhibits TGF-beta2 stimulation of extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells: role of gremlin in ECM modulation.

    PubMed

    Zode, Gulab S; Clark, Abbot F; Wordinger, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The characteristic cupping of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma is associated with elevated TGF-beta2 and increased synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In addition to TGF-beta2, the human ONH also expresses bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and BMP receptors, which are members of the TGF-beta superfamily. We examined the potential effects of BMP4 and the BMP antagonist gremlin on TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. BMP-4 dose dependently inhibited TGF-beta2-induced fibronectin (FN) and PAI-1 expression in ONH astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells and also reduced TGF-beta2 stimulation of collagen I, collagen VI, and elastin. Addition of gremlin blocked this BMP-4 response, increasing cellular and secreted FN as well as PAI-1 levels in both cell types. Gremlin was expressed in ONH tissues and ONH cells, and gremlin protein levels were significantly increased in the LC region of human glaucomatous ONH tissues. Interestingly, recombinant gremlin dose dependently increased ECM protein expression in cultured ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Gremlin stimulation of ECM required activation of TGF-beta receptor and R-Smad3. TGF-beta2 increased gremlin mRNA expression and protein levels in ONH cells. Inhibition of either the type I TGF-beta receptor or Smad3 phosphorylation blocked TGF-beta2-induced gremlin expression. In conclusion, BMP4 blocked the TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. The BMP antagonist gremlin reversed this inhibition, allowing TGF-beta2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Increased expression of gremlin in the glaucomatous ONH may further exacerbate TGF-beta2 effects on ONH ECM metabolism by inhibiting BMP-4 antagonism of TGF-beta2 signaling. Modulation of the ECM via gremlin provides a novel therapeutic target for glaucoma.

  10. Modelling of the dynamic relationship between arterial pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity and renal blood flow in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed

    Berger, C S; Malpas, S C

    1998-12-01

    A linear autoregressive/moving-average model was developed to describe the dynamic relationship between mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and renal blood flow (RBF) in conscious rabbits. The RBF and SNA to the same kidney were measured under resting conditions in a group of eight rabbits. Spectral analysis of the data sampled at 0.4 Hz showed that the low-pass bandwidth of the signal power for RBF was approximately 0. 05 Hz. An autoregressive/moving-average model with an exogenous input (ARMAX) was then derived (using the iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm provided by the MATLAB identification Toolbox), with MAP and SNA as inputs and RBF as output, to model the low-frequency fluctuations. The model step responses of RBF to changes in SNA and arterial pressure indicated an overdamped response with a settling time that was usually less than 2 s. Calculated residuals from the model indicated that 79 5 % (mean s.d., averaged over eight independent experiments) of the variation in RBF could be accounted for by the variations in arterial pressure and SNA. Two additional single-input models for each of the inputs were similarly obtained and showed conclusively that changes in RBF, in the conscious resting rabbit, are a function of both SNA and MAP and that the SNA signal has the predominant effect. These results indicate a strong reliance on SNA for the dynamic regulation of RBF. Such information is likely to be important in understanding the diminished renal function that occurs in a variety of disease conditions in which overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system occurs.

  11. Gastrointestinal Intervention Ameliorates High Blood Pressure Through Antagonizing Overdrive of the Sympathetic Nerve in Hypertensive Patients and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hexuan; Pu, Yunfei; Chen, Jing; Tong, Weidong; Cui, Yuanting; Sun, Fang; Zheng, Zhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Tao; Meng, Changyuan; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the hypothesis that the favorable effects of gastrointestinal (GI) intervention on hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular (CV) disturbances are mediated by antagonizing overdrive of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Methods and Results Hypertensive patients with metabolic disturbances underwent laparoscopic Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass surgery, and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) underwent RYGB or sham surgery. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), endothelium‐dependent flow‐mediated dilation, and anthropometric as well as laboratory parameters were measured at baseline and during follow‐up. Changes of BP and HR in response to cold stress, renal sympathetic nervous activity (RSNA), vasoconstriction induced by electrical field stimulation, microinjection of nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and CV function and structure were examined in SHRs with or without surgery. Compared with baseline, BP and HR were significantly reduced in both hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and rats. Impaired endothelial‐dependent vasodilatation and metabolic disturbances in hypertensive patients were also ameliorated after surgery. CV disturbances were reversed by surgery in SHRs. Under acute cold exposure, the variations in BP and HR were smaller in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHRs. RSNA and vasoconstriction induced by perivascular nerve stimulation as well as NTS‐mediated changes of BP were decreased in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHR. Weight loss did not affect BP and RSNA in sham SHRs. Conclusions GI intervention ameliorates HTN in both hypertensive patients and rats by inhibiting overdrive of the SNS. Therefore, targeting gastrointestine could be a novel strategy to treat HTN with metabolic disturbances. PMID:25240055

  12. Physical and Psychological Effects of Head Treatment in the Supine Position Using Specialized Ayurveda-Based Techniques.

    PubMed

    Murota, Masako; Iwawaki, Yoko; Uebaba, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Yoko; Takishita, Yukie; Harada, Kiyomi; Shibata, Akemi; Narumoto, Jin; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the physical and psychological effects of head massage performed in the supine position using Ayurveda-based techniques (head treatment). Twenty-four healthy female students were included in the study. Using a crossover study design, the same participants were enrolled in both the head treatment intervention group and control group. There was an interval of 1 week or more between measurements. The physiologic indices measured included blood pressure and heart rate fluctuations (high frequency and low frequency/high frequency). The psychological markers measured included liveliness, depression, and boredom using the visual analogue scale method. State anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory method. The parasympathetic nerve activity increased immediately after head treatment. Upon completion of head treatment, the parasympathetic nerve predominance tended to gradually ease. Head treatment boosted freshness and relieved anxiety. The results suggest that head treatment has a relaxing and refreshing effect and may be used to provide comfort.

  13. Biosignal-based relaxation evaluation of head-care robot.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takeshi; Takeda, Maki; Maruyama, Tomomi; Susuki, Yuto; Hirose, Toshinori; Fujioka, Soichiro; Mizuno, Osamu; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Yukio, Honda

    2013-01-01

    Such popular head care procedures as shampooing and scalp massages provide physical and mental relaxation. However, they place a big burden such as chapped hands on beauticians and other practitioners. Based on our robot hand technology, we have been developing a head care robot. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluated its relaxation effect using the following biosignals: accelerated plethymography (SDNN, HF/TP, LF/HF), heart rate (HR), blood pressure, salivary amylase (sAA) and peripheral skin temperature (PST). We compared the relaxation of our developed head care robot with the head care provided by nurses. In our experimental result with 54 subjects, the activity of the autonomic nerve system changed before and after head care procedures performed by both a human nurse and our proposed robot. Especially, in the proposed robot, we confirmed significant differences with the procedure performed by our proposed head care robot in five indexes: HF/TP, LF/HF, HR, sAA, and PST. The activity of the sympathetic nerve system decreased, because the values of its indexes significantly decreased: LF/HF, HR, and sAA. On the other hand, the activity of the parasympathetic nerve system increased, because of the increase of its indexes value: HF/TP and PST. Our developed head care robot provided satisfactory relaxation in just five minutes of use.

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways.

  15. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.05). Peripheral venous blood flow and BBT score significantly increased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.01). High-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation.

  16. Hemodynamic responses to simulated weightlessness of 24-h head-down bed rest and KAATSU blood flow restriction.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Iida, Haruko; Kurano, Miwa; Takano, Haruhito; Morita, Toshihiro; Meguro, Kentaro; Sato, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Yoshihisa; Kawashima, Sino; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Shouichi; Ishii, Naokata; Abe, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    The KAATSU training is a unique method of muscle training with restricting venous blood flow, which might be applied to prevent muscle atrophy during space flight, but the effects of KAATSU in microgravity remain unknown. We investigated the hemodynamic responses to KAATSU during actually simulated weightlessness (6 degrees head-down tilt for 24 h, n = 8), and compared those to KAATSU in the seated position before bed rest. KAATSU was applied to the proximal ends of both the thighs. In the seated position before bed rest, sequential incrementing of KAATSU cuff pressure and altering the level of blood flow restriction resulted in a decrease in stroke volume (SV) with an increase in heart rate (HR). KAATSU (150-200 mmHg) decreased SV comparable to standing. Following 24-h bed rest, body mass, blood volume (BV), plasma volume (PV), and diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) were significantly reduced. Norepinephrine (NOR), vasopressin (ADH), and plasma renin activity (PRA) tend to be reduced. A decrease in SV and CO induced by KAATSU during the simulated weightlessness was larger than that in the seated position before bed rest, and one of eight subjects developed presyncope due to hypotension during 100 mmHg KAATSU. High-frequency power (HF(RR)) decreased during KAATSU and standing, while low-frequency/high-frequency power (LF(RR)/HF(RR)) increased significantly. NOR, ADH and PRA also increased during KAATSU. These results indicate that KAATSU blood flow restriction reproduces the effects of standing on HR, SV, NOR, ADH, PRA, etc., thus stimulating a gravity-like stress during simulated weightlessness. However, syncope due to lower extremity blood pooling and subsequent reduction of venous return may be induced during KAATSU in microgravity as reported in cases of lower-body negative pressure.

  17. Effects of Mild Hypercapnia During Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, aud Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Taibbi, G.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Zanello, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Hu, X.; Stenger, M. B.; Vizzeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to cause an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, as experienced by some astronauts during long-duration space flight. Elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on ISS may also raise ICP and contribute to VIIP development. We seek to determine if the combination of mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the International Space Station, with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt, will induce ophthalmic and cerebral blood flow changes similar to those described in the VIIP syndrome. We hypothesize that mild hypercapnia in the head-down tilt position will increase choroidal blood volume and cerebral blood flow, raise intraocular pressure (IOP), and transiently reduce visual acuity as compared to the seated or the head-down tilt position without elevated CO2, respectively.

  18. Vascular patterns in the heads of crocodilians: blood vessels and sites of thermal exchange.

    PubMed

    Porter, William Ruger; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Extant crocodilians are a highly apomorphic archosaur clade that is ectothermic, yet often achieve large body sizes that can be subject to higher heat loads. Therefore, the anatomical and physiological roles that blood vessels play in crocodilian thermoregulation need further investigation to better understand how crocodilians establish and maintain cephalic temperatures and regulate neurosensory tissue temperatures during basking and normal activities. The cephalic vascular anatomy of extant crocodilians, particularly American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection technique and high resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally isolated to create representations of vascular pathways. The specimens were then dissected to confirm CT results. Sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in evaporative cooling and cephalic thermoregulation in other diapsids. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were studied to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to neurosensory tissues. Within the orbital region, both the arteries and veins demonstrated consistent branching patterns, with the supraorbital, infraorbital, and ophthalmotemporal vessels supplying and draining the orbit. The venous drainage of the orbital region showed connections to the dural sinuses via the orbital veins and cavernous sinus. The palatal region demonstrated a vast plexus that comprised both arteries and veins. The most direct route of venous drainage of the palatal plexus was through the palatomaxillary veins, essentially bypassing neurosensory tissues. Anastomotic connections with the nasal region, however, may provide an alternative route for palatal venous blood to reach neurosensory tissues. The nasal region in crocodilians is probably the most

  19. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for 3 to 5% of all cancers in the United States. Primary or salvage surgeries are extensive and often lead to major head and neck defects that require complex reconstructions with local, regional, or free tissue transfer flaps. Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning '1') for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89 +/- 0.15, 2.26 +/- 0.13, and 2.43 +/- 0.13 (mean +/- standard error) respectively on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p < 0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flap were 1.14 and 1.34 respectively on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating a less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  20. Genetic comparison of the head of Henri IV and the presumptive blood from Louis XVI (both Kings of France).

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Olalde, Iñigo; Solé, Neus; Ramírez, Oscar; Babelon, Jean-Pierre; Galland, Bruno; Calafell, Francesc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-03-10

    A mummified head was identified in 2010 as belonging to Henri IV, King of France. A putative blood sample from the King Louis XVI preserved into a pyrographically decorated gourd was analyzed in 2011. Both kings are in a direct male-line descent, separated by seven generations. We have retrieved the hypervariable region 1 of the mitochondrial DNA as well as a partial Y-chromosome profile from Henri IV. Five STR loci match the alleles found in Louis XVI, while another locus shows an allele that is just one mutation step apart. Taking into consideration that the partial Y-chromosome profile is extremely rare in modern human databases, we concluded that both males could be paternally related. The likelihood ratio of the two samples belonging to males separated by seven generations (as opposed to unrelated males) was estimated as 246.3, with a 95% confidence interval between 44.2 and 9729. Historically speaking, this forensic DNA data would confirm the identity of the previous Louis XVI sample, and give another positive argument for the authenticity of the head of Henri IV.

  1. Altered hormonal regulation and blood flow distribution with cardiovascular deconditioning after short-duration head down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; Arbeille, P; Shoemaker, J K; O'Leary, D D; Hughson, R L

    2007-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would be altered by 4-h head down bed rest (HDBR) in 11 healthy young men. In post-HDBR testing, three subjects failed to finish the protocol due to presyncopal symptoms, heart rate was increased during LBNP compared with pre-HDBR, mean arterial blood pressure was elevated at 0, -10, and -20 mmHg and reduced at -40 mmHg, central venous pressure (CVP) and cardiac stroke volume were reduced at all levels of LBNP. Plasma concentrations of renin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were significantly lower after HDBR. Renin and angiotensin II increased in response to LBNP only post-HDBR. There was no effect of HDBR or LBNP on norepinephrine while epinephrine tended to increase at -40 mmHg post-HDBR (P = 0.07). Total blood volume was not significantly reduced. Splanchnic blood flow taken from ultrasound measurement of the portal vein was higher at each level of LBNP post-compared with pre-HDBR. The gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex relating changes in total peripheral resistance to CVP was increased after HDBR, but splanchnic vascular resistance was actually reduced. These results are consistent with our hypothesis and suggest that cardiovascular instability following only 4-h HDBR might be related to altered hormonal and/or neural control of regional vascular resistance. Impaired ability to distribute blood away from the splanchnic region was associated with reduced stroke volume, elevated heart rate, and the inability to protect mean arterial pressure.

  2. Anemia During Sequential Induction Chemotherapy and Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer: The Impact of Blood Transfusion on Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Ahmed, Merina; Rengarajan, Vijayan; Powell, Ceri; Miah, Aisha; Newbold, Kate; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Sequential treatment (chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation; CCRT) is increasingly being used for radical treatment of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), which results in increased myelosuppression. In this study, we review the incidence of anemia and the effect of a policy of hemoglobin (Hb) maintenance by blood transfusion on disease outcomes in these patients. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of the records of patients with SCCHN treated with sequential CCRT formed the basis of this study. The incidence of anemia and statistics on blood transfusion were documented. For the purpose of outcome analyses, patients were divided into four categories by (1) transfusion status, (2) nadir Hb concentration, (3) number of transfusion episodes, and (4) number of units of blood transfused (NOUT). Data on 3-year locoregional control (LRC), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were identified. The median follow-up was 23.6 months. The RFS (52% vs. 41%, p = 0.03), DSS (71% vs. 66%, p = 0.02), and OS (58% vs. 42% p = 0.005) were significantly better for patients who did not have a transfusion vs. those who did. The LRC, RFS, DSS, and OS were also significantly better for patients with nadir Hb level >12 vs. <12 g/dL and NOUT 1-4 vs. >4. Conclusion: Our study seems to suggest that blood transfusion during radical treatment for SCCHN might be detrimental. Further research should be undertaken into the complex interactions among tumor hypoxia, anemia, and the treatment of anemia before making treatment recommendations.

  3. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in children with severe head injury. Part 1: Relation to age, Glasgow coma score, outcome, intracranial pressure, and time after injury.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Stuart, A G; Matthews, D S; Aynsley-Green, A; Eyre, J A

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiology of paediatric head trauma is essential for rational acute management. It has been proposed that the response to severe head injury in children differs from that in adults, with increased cerebral blood flow (cerebral hyperaemia) representing the most common cause of raised intracranial pressure, but this has recently been disputed. The relation between the pathophysiological response and time after injury has not been defined in children. This paper describes 151 serial measurements of cerebral blood flow, arteriojugular venous oxygen difference (AJVDO2), and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) that were performed in 21 children with severe head injury, mean age 8 (range 2-16) years, Glasgow coma score < or = 8. Absolute cerebral hyperaemia was uncommon, only 10 (7%) of the 151 cerebral blood flow values being at or above the upper limit of the range published in normal children. There was an inverse correlation between cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure. (r = -0.24, p = 0.009). Contrary to the widespread assumption that cerebral metabolic rate in patients with head injury is always low, CMRO2 was initially within the normal range in 17/21 (81%) children. Both CMRO2 and AJVDO2 fell significantly between the first and third days after injury. There was a non-significant rise in cerebral blood flow over time. These data represent the first evidence that the temporal change in cerebral metabolic rate reported in experimental models of traumatic brain injury also occurs in patients with head injury. The changes in the pathophysiological response over time suggest that the management may need to be modified accordingly. If cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral oxygen extraction are maximal shortly after injury in children with severe head injury then the children are most likely to sustain secondary damage during this period. Images PMID:7876842

  4. Optical bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke patients during head-of-bed manipulation.

    PubMed

    Favilla, Christopher G; Mesquita, Rickson C; Mullen, Michael; Durduran, Turgut; Lu, Xiangping; Kim, Meeri N; Minkoff, David L; Kasner, Scott E; Greenberg, Joel H; Yodh, Arjun G; Detre, John A

    2014-05-01

    A primary goal of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) management is to maximize perfusion in the affected region and surrounding ischemic penumbra. However, interventions to maximize perfusion, such as flat head-of-bed (HOB) positioning, are currently prescribed empirically. Bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) allows the effects of interventions such as flat HOB to be monitored and may ultimately be used to guide clinical management. Cerebral perfusion was measured during HOB manipulations in 17 patients with unilateral AIS affecting large cortical territories in the anterior circulation. Simultaneous measurements of frontal CBF and arterial flow velocity were performed with diffuse correlation spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Results were analyzed in the context of available clinical data and a previous study. Frontal CBF, averaged over the patient cohort, decreased by 17% (P=0.034) and 15% (P=0.011) in the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres, respectively, when HOB was changed from flat to 30°. Significant (cohort-averaged) changes in blood velocity were not observed. Individually, varying responses to HOB manipulation were observed, including paradoxical increases in CBF with increasing HOB angle. Clinical features, stroke volume, and distance to the optical probe could not explain this paradoxical response. A lower HOB angle results in an increase in cortical CBF without a significant change in arterial flow velocity in AIS, but there is variability across patients in this response. Bedside CBF monitoring with diffuse correlation spectroscopy provides a potential means to individualize interventions designed to optimize CBF in AIS.

  5. The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival

    PubMed Central

    Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Månsson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis. PMID:23251433

  6. Bupivacaine Mandibular Nerve Block Affects Intraoperative Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in a Yucatan Miniature Swine Mandibular Condylectomy Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bova, Jonathan F.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Stout, Rhett W.; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Alfi, David M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Lopez, Mandi J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim The primary objective was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine mandibular nerve block on intraoperative blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in response to surgical stimulation and the need for systemic analgesics postoperatively. We hypothesized that a mandibular nerve block would decrease the need for systemic analgesics both intraoperatively and postoperatively. Materials and Methods Fourteen adult male Yucatan pigs were purchased. Pigs were chemically restrained with ketamine, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane inhalant anesthesia. Pigs were randomized to receive a mandibular block with either bupivacaine (bupivacaine group) or saline (control group). A nerve stimulator was used for administration of the block with observation of masseter muscle twitch to indicate the injection site. Invasive BP and HR were measured with the aid of an arterial catheter in eight pigs. A rescue analgesic protocol consisting of fentanyl and lidocaine was administered if HR or BP values increased 20% from baseline. Postoperative pain was quantified with a customized ethogram. HR and BP were evaluated at base line, pre-rescue, 10 and 20 min post-rescue. Results Pre-rescue mean BP was significantly increased (p = .001) for the bupivacaine group. Mean intraoperative HR was significantly lower (p = .044) in the bupivacaine versus saline group. All other parameters were not significant. Conclusion Addition of a mandibular nerve block to the anesthetic regimen in the miniature pig condylectomy model may improve variations in intraoperative BP and HR. This study establishes the foundation for future studies with larger animal numbers to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:25394295

  7. Roles for the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and CNS melanocortin-4 receptor in the elevated blood pressure in hyperandrogenemic female rats

    PubMed Central

    Maranon, Rodrigo; Lima, Roberta; Spradley, Frank T.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Zhang, Howei; Smith, Andrew D.; Bui, Elizabeth; Thomas, R. Lucas; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Hall, John E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have hyperandrogenemia and increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated blood pressure. We recently characterized a hyperandrogenemic female rat (HAF) model of PCOS [chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) beginning at 4 wk of age] that exhibits similar characteristics as women with PCOS. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that the elevated blood pressure in HAF rats is mediated in part by sympathetic activation, renal nerves, and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activation. Adrenergic blockade with terazosin and propranolol or renal denervation reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP by telemetry) in HAF rats but not controls. Hypothalamic MC4R expression was higher in HAF rats than controls, and central nervous system MC4R antagonism with SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h icv) reduced MAP in HAF rats. Taking a genetic approach, MC4R null and wild-type (WT) female rats were treated with DHT or placebo from 5 to 16 wk of age. MC4R null rats were obese and had higher MAP than WT control rats, and while DHT increased MAP in WT controls, DHT failed to further increase MAP in MC4R null rats. These data suggest that increases in MAP with chronic hyperandrogenemia in female rats are due, in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and MC4R and may provide novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for hypertension in women with hyperandrogenemia such as PCOS. PMID:25695289

  8. Roles for the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and CNS melanocortin-4 receptor in the elevated blood pressure in hyperandrogenemic female rats.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo; Lima, Roberta; Spradley, Frank T; do Carmo, Jussara M; Zhang, Howei; Smith, Andrew D; Bui, Elizabeth; Thomas, R Lucas; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2015-04-15

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have hyperandrogenemia and increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated blood pressure. We recently characterized a hyperandrogenemic female rat (HAF) model of PCOS [chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) beginning at 4 wk of age] that exhibits similar characteristics as women with PCOS. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that the elevated blood pressure in HAF rats is mediated in part by sympathetic activation, renal nerves, and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activation. Adrenergic blockade with terazosin and propranolol or renal denervation reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP by telemetry) in HAF rats but not controls. Hypothalamic MC4R expression was higher in HAF rats than controls, and central nervous system MC4R antagonism with SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h icv) reduced MAP in HAF rats. Taking a genetic approach, MC4R null and wild-type (WT) female rats were treated with DHT or placebo from 5 to 16 wk of age. MC4R null rats were obese and had higher MAP than WT control rats, and while DHT increased MAP in WT controls, DHT failed to further increase MAP in MC4R null rats. These data suggest that increases in MAP with chronic hyperandrogenemia in female rats are due, in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and MC4R and may provide novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for hypertension in women with hyperandrogenemia such as PCOS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Harmonic Scalpel and Electrothermal Bipolar Vessel Sealing System in Head and Neck Surgery: A Prospective Study on Tissue Heating and Histological Damage on Nerves.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Camilot, Debora; Bonini, Pierluigi; Del Piero, Giulia Carolina; Biasotto, Matteo; Quatela, Eliana

    2015-11-01

    Define and compare the thermal nerve injury caused by 3 different vessel sealing and dissection devices: the harmonic scalpel (HS), the electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing system (EBVS), and the bipolar electrosurgery unit (BE). First we recorded the heating variations in pig tissue caused by a BE unit, HS, and EBVS after an activation for 5, 10, and 15 seconds at minimum and at maximum power. In the second part, we evaluated the histological damage caused by HS and EBVS on 20 in vivo human nerves, 10 per device. The 2 scalpels were placed and activated at 3 different distances from the nerve (1, 3, and 5 mm). The extension and the degree of the nerve lesion was then calculated. The instrument determining the highest rise in temperature was the BE unit, followed by HS and then EBVS. Comparison between the extension and degree of nerve injury caused by the 2 scalpels showed no statistically significant differences. Based on these evaluations, we established a relative safety limit at 3 mm and an absolute safety limit at 5 mm for both scalpels. Our data suggest EBVS and HS can be considered valid and safe devices for ENT surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Retrograde arterial leg blood flow during tilt-back from a head-up posture: importance of capacitive flows when arterial pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Don D; Nådland, Inger Helene; Toska, Karin

    2010-03-01

    The windkessel function of the arterial system converts the intermittent action of the heart into more continuous microcirculatory blood flow during diastole via the return of elastic energy stored in the walls of the arteries during systole. Might the same phenomenon occur regionally within the arterial system during tilting owing to regional differences in local arterial pressure imposed by gravity? We sought to test the hypothesis that during tilt-back from a head-up posture, the return of stored elastic energy in leg arteries would work to slow, or perhaps transiently reverse, the flow of blood in the femoral artery. Femoral artery blood flow and arterial pressure were recorded during tilt back from a 30 degrees head-up posture to supine (approximately 0.5 G) in young, healthy subjects (n = 7 males and 3 females) before and during clonidine infusion. During control (no drug) conditions femoral artery blood flow ceased for an entire heart beat during tilt-back. During clonidine infusion femoral artery blood flow reversed for at least one entire heart beat during tilt-back, i.e., blood flow in the retrograde direction in the femoral artery from the leg into the abdomen. Thus substantial capacitive effects of tilting on leg blood flow occur in humans during mild changes in posture.

  11. A comparison of blood loss during the Halal slaughter of lambs following Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning, Electric Head-Only Stunning and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Rizvan; Knowles, Toby G; Wotton, Steve B

    2015-12-01

    Blood lost at exsanguination during the Halal slaughter of lambs was compared between the slaughter methods of Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning (TRS), Electric Head-Only Stunning (EHOS) and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning (PCEHOS). Two protocols were examined, Experimental (80 lambs) and Commercial (360 lambs), assessing varying periods of animal orientation during the 4 min bleeding process (upright orientation before vertical hanging). Live-weight, blood weight (Experimental only), carcass weights and by-product weights were recorded. The Experimental protocol highlighted an increase in blood loss at 60s in EHOS and PCEHOS compared to TRS (P<0.001) but by 90 s there was no significant difference. A post-slaughter change in animal orientation from an upright to a vertical hanging position aided the amount of blood loss. The bleeding of lambs is largely completed by 2 min. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in final blood loss between treatments. This research was undertaken to inform discussion on the merits of different slaughter methods compatible with Halal requirements. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Validation of the i-STAT and HemoCue systems for the analysis of blood parameters in the bar-headed goose, Anser indicus

    PubMed Central

    Harter, T. S.; Reichert, M.; Brauner, C. J.; Milsom, W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Every year, bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) perform some of the most remarkable trans-Himalayan migrations, and researchers are increasingly interested in understanding the physiology underlying their high-altitude flight performance. A major challenge is generating reliable measurements of blood parameters on wild birds in the field, where established analytical techniques are often not available. Therefore, we validated two commonly used portable clinical analysers (PCAs), the i-STAT and the HemoCue systems, for the analysis of blood parameters in bar-headed geese. The pH, partial pressures of O2 and CO2 (PO2 and PCO2), haemoglobin O2 saturation (sO2), haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin concentration [Hb] were simultaneously measured with the two PCA systems (i-STAT for all parameters; HemoCue for [Hb]) and with conventional laboratory techniques over a physiological range of PO2, PCO2 and Hct. Our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate reliable values on bar-headed goose whole blood pH, PO2, PCO2 and Hct, but we recommend correcting the obtained values using the linear equations determined here for higher accuracy. The i-STAT is probably not able to produce meaningful measurements of sO2 and [Hb] over a range of physiologically relevant environmental conditions. However, we can recommend the use of the HemoCue to measure [Hb] in the bar-headed goose, if results are corrected. We emphasize that the equations that we provide to correct PCA results are applicable only to bar-headed goose whole blood under the conditions that we tested. We encourage researchers to validate i-STAT or HemoCue results thoroughly for their specific study conditions and species in order to yield accurate results. PMID:27293706

  13. [Effects of promoting blood circulation to remove meridian obstruction combined with medicinal guides on related osteogenesis factors in rabbits with femoral head necrosis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-tian; Kong, Xiang-ying; Tian, Neng; Lin, Na; Chen, Wei-heng

    2013-07-01

    To observe effects of blood circulation promoting compounds combined with medicinal guides on content of bone glaprotein (BGP), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BPM-2) and expression of BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with femoral head necrosis, and explore its mechanism. Ninety-eight healthy Spragur-Dawley male rabbits were collected and weighted 2.2 to 2.8 kg. Eighty-four rabbits were built femoral head necrosis model by freezing left femoral head in liquid nitrogen, then randomly divided into 6 groups, 14 in each group. The 6 groups included model group,promoting blood circulation to remove meridian obstruction group,promoting blood circulation to remove meridian obstruction combined with achyranthes bidentata group,radix angelicae pubescentis, asarum group, and platycodon grandiflorum group,other 14 rabbits were sham operation group. While drug groups were administrated corresponding Chinese herb after molding,model group and shamp operation group were given saline. Recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ( 30 microg x kg(-1) x d(-1))were injected into all rabbits for 7 days. Samples were taken on the second and fourth week,the content of BGP and BMP-2 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELSA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA), histopathological changes of left femoral head were observed by Hematoxylin and Eeosin staining (HE), and expression of BMP-2 mRNA were tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Compared with sham operation group, the rate of empty lacunae femoral head were obviously increased in model group, and the content of BGP were increased on the second week, and BMP-2 and BMP-2 mRNA were decreased on the fourth week. Compared with model group, the content of BGP, BMP-2 and BMP-2 mRNA were higher both of the second and fourth week in promoting blood circulation to remove meridian obstruction group. The rate of empty la- cunae femoral head were lower in achyranthes bidentata group, BGP, BMP-2 and BMP-2 mRNA were higher on the fourth

  14. Spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood volume changes in different microvascular compartments evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shangbin; Chen, Haiying; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2003-10-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of changes in cerebral blood volume associated with neuronal activity were investigated in the hindlimb somatosensory cortex of α-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats (n=10) with optical imaging at 570nm through a thinned skull. Activation of cortex was carried out by electrical stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve with 5Hz, 0.3V pulses (0.5ms) for duration of 2s. The stimulation evoked a monophasic optical reflectance decrease at cortical parenchyma and arteries sites rapidly after the onset of stimulation, whereas no similar response was observed at vein compartments. The optical signal changes reached 10% of the peak response 0.70+/-0.32s after stimulation onset and no significant time lag in this 10% start latency time was observed between the response at cortical parenchyma and arteries compartments. The evoked optical reflectance decrease reached the peak (0.25%+/-0.047%)2.66+/-0.61s after the stimulus onset at parenchyma site, 0.40+/-0.20s earlier (P<0.05) than that at arteries site (0.50%+/-0.068% 3.06+/-0.70s). Variable location within the cortical parenchyma and arteries compartment themselves didn"t affect the temporal characteristics of the evoked signal significantly. These results suggest that the sciatic nerve stimulation evokes a local blood volume increase at both capillaries (cortical parenchyma) and arterioles rapidly after the stimulus onset but the evoked blood volume increase in capillaries could not be entirely accounted for by the dilation of arterioles.

  15. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  16. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  17. Head Transplantation in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Shen, Zi-Long; Han, Ke-Cheng; Song, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The mouse model of allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR) has recently been established to further the clinical development of this strategy for patients who are suffering from mortal bodily trauma or disease, yet whose mind remains healthy. Animal model studies are indispensable for developing such novel surgical practices. The goal of this work was to establish head transplant mouse model, then the next step through the feasible biological model to investigate immune rejection and brain function in next step, thereby promoting the goal of translation of AHBR to the clinic in the future. Our approach involves retaining adequate blood perfusion in the transplanted head throughout the surgical procedure by establishing donor-to-recipient cross-circulation by cannulating and anastomosing the carotid artery on one side of the body and the jugular vein on the other side. Neurological function was preserved by this strategy as indicated by electroencephalogram and intact cranial nerve reflexes. The results of this study support the feasibility of this method for avoiding brain ischemia during transplantation, thereby allowing for the possibility of long-term studies of head transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

  19. Effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on blood vessels area and expression of the angiogenic factors VEGF and TGFbeta1 in the rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Pieper, Marcela; Lara, Hernán E; Bravo, Javier A; Romero, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is a crucial process in follicular development and luteogenesis. The nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenesis in various tissues. An impaired production of this neurotrophin has been associated with delayed wound healing. A variety of ovarian functions are regulated by NGF, but its effects on ovarian angiogenesis remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate if NGF modulates 1) the amount of follicular blood vessels and 2) ovarian expression of two angiogenic factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFbeta1), in the rat ovary. Results In cultured neonatal rat ovaries, NGF increased VEGF mRNA and protein levels, whereas TGFbeta1 expression did not change. Sectioning of the superior ovarian nerve, which increases ovarian NGF protein content, augmented VEGF immunoreactivity and the area of capillary vessels in ovaries of prepubertal rats compared to control ovaries. Conclusion Results indicate that NGF may be important in the maintenance of the follicular and luteal vasculature in adult rodents, either indirectly, by increasing the expression of VEGF in the ovary, or directly via promoting the proliferation of vascular cells. This data suggests that a disruption on NGF regulation could be a component in ovarian disorders related with impaired angiogenesis. PMID:17096853

  20. Murder or not? Cold temperature makes criminals appear to be cold-blooded and warm temperature to be hot-headed.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Christine; Kolb, Peter M; Werth, Lioba

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-related words such as cold-blooded and hot-headed can be used to describe criminal behavior. Words associated with coldness describe premeditated behavior and words associated with heat describe impulsive behavior. Building on recent research about the close interplay between physical and interpersonal coldness and warmth, we examined in a lab experiment how ambient temperature within a comfort zone influences judgments of criminals. Participants in rooms with low temperature regarded criminals to be more cold-blooded than participants in rooms with high temperature. Specifically, they were more likely to attribute premeditated crimes, ascribed crimes resulting in higher degrees of penalty, and attributed more murders to criminals. Likewise, participants in rooms with high temperature regarded criminals to be more hot-headed than participants in rooms with low temperature: They were more likely to attribute impulsive crimes. Results imply that cognitive representations of temperature are closely related to representations of criminal behavior and attributions of intent.