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Sample records for nerve head blood

  1. Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Autoregulation during Changes in Arterial Blood Pressure in Healthy Young Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Agnes; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J.; Palkovits, Stefan; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Aim In the present study the response of optic nerve head blood flow to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during isometric exercise was studied. Based on our previous studies we hypothesized that subjects with an abnormal blood flow response, defined as a decrease in blood flow of more than 10% during or after isometric exercise, could be identified. Methods A total of 40 healthy subjects were included in this study. Three periods of isometric exercise were scheduled, each consisting of 2 minutes of handgripping. Optic nerve head blood flow was measured continuously before, during and after handgripping using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood pressure was measured non-invasively in one-minute intervals. Intraocular pressure was measured at the beginning and the end of the measurements and ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as 2/3*mean arterial pressure –intraocular pressure. Results Isometric exercise was associated with an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during all handgripping periods (p < 0.001). By contrast no change in optic nerve head blood flow was seen. However, in a subgroup of three subjects blood flow showed a consistent decrease of more than 10% during isometric exercise although their blood pressure values increased. In addition, three other subjects showed a consistent decline of blood flow of more than 10% during the recovery periods. Conclusion Our data confirm previous results indicating that optic nerve head blood flow is autoregulated during an increase in perfusion pressure. In addition, we observed a subgroup of 6 subjects (15%) that showed an abnormal response, which is in keeping with our previous data. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal response remain to be shown. PMID:24324774

  2. The Effect of Swimming Goggles on Intraocular Pressure and Blood Flow within the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kyoung Tak; Chung, Woo Suk; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Seong, Gong Je

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Goggles are frequently worn in the sport of swimming and are designed to form a seal around the periorbital tissue orbit. The resultant pressure on the eye may have the potential to affect intraocular pressure and blood flow of the optic nerve head. This study evaluates the influence of wearing swimming goggles on intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood flow of the ocular nerve head (ONH) in normal subjects. Materials and Methods Thirty healthy participants took part in this study. The IOP of each participant was measured using a Goldmann tonometer. Measurements were taken immediately before putting on swimming goggles, at 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after putting on swimming goggles, and then immediately after taking off the goggles. Blood flow of the ONH was measured using the Heidelberg retinal flowmeter. Results The average IOP before, during and after wearing the swimming goggles were 11.88 ± 2.82 mmHg, 14.20 ± 2.81mmHg and 11.78 ± 2.89 mmHg, respectively. The IOP increased immediately after putting on the goggles (p < 0.05) and then returned to normal values immediately after removal (p > 0.05). Blood flow of the ONH was 336.60 ± 89.07 Arbitrary Units (AU) before and 319.18 ± 96.02 AU after the goggles were worn (p < 0.05). Conclusion A small but significant IOP elevation was observed immediately after the swimming goggles were put on. This elevated IOP was maintained while the goggles were kept on, and then returned to normal levels as soon as they were taken off. Blood flow of the ONH did not change significantly throughout the experiment. These facts should be considered for safety concerns, especially in advanced glaucoma patients. PMID:17963338

  3. Regulation of optic nerve head blood flow during combined changes in intraocular pressure and arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René M; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    In the choroid, there is evidence that blood flow does not only depend on ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), but also on absolute mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intraocular pressure (IOP). The present study included 40 healthy subjects to investigate whether such behavior is also found in the optic nerve head (ONH). The ONH blood flow (ONHBF) was studied using laser Doppler flowmetry during a separate increase in IOP and MAP as well as during a combined elevation. Mean arterial pressure was increased by isometric exercise and IOP by the suction method. During both, the change in ONHBF was less pronounced than the change in OPP indicating autoregulation. Correlation analysis was performed for the combined experiments after pooling all data according to IOP and MAP values. A correlation between ONHBF and MAP was found at IOPs ⩽25 mm Hg (P<0.001), but not at IOPs>25 mm Hg (P=0.79). Optic nerve head blood flow and IOP were significantly correlated (P<0.001), and ONHBF was only slightly dependent on MAP. The data of the present study indicate a complex regulation of ONHBF during combined changes in MAP and IOP. Our results may be compatible with myogenic mechanisms underlying autoregulation, and indicate better ONHBF regulation during an increase in MAP than during an increase in IOP. PMID:23921903

  4. Changes in optic nerve head blood flow, visual function, and retinal histology in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Maho; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Hotchi, Junko; Okuno, Takashi; Oku, Hidehiro; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effects of hypercholesterolemia on optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow, visual function, and retinal histology in a rabbit model. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in rabbits by feeding them a high cholesterol (1%) diet for 12 weeks. Changes in blood pressure, intraocular pressure (IOP), and ONH blood flow were monitored at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. The autoregulation of ONH blood flow as detected by laser speckle flowgraphy was verified by an artificial elevation of IOP at 12 weeks. Visually evoked potentials (VEPs) were also recorded and analyzed at 6 and 12 weeks. Finally, a histological examination as well as immunohistochemistry to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed. In the hypercholesterolemic rabbits, blood pressure, IOP, and ONH blood flow did not alter significantly throughout this study. The autoregulation of ONH blood flow against IOP elevation was found to be impaired at 12 weeks. The amplitudes of the first negative peak of VEPs were diminished. Both the density of the retinal ganglion cells and the thickness of the inner nuclear layer and photoreceptor cell layer were reduced. Immunoreactivity to eNOS was reduced and that to iNOS was enhanced in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits compared to those in the normal control rabbits. The results of this study show that hypercholesterolemia induces impairment in the autoregulation of ONH blood flow and deterioration in visual function and histology. Downregulation of eNOS activity might be one of the causes for impairment of the autoregulation. Enhanced activity of iNOS might be involved in the impaired visual function and histology.

  5. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E; Sinclair, S H

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  6. Blood flow measurements within optic nerve head during on-pump cardiovascular operations. A window to the brain?

    PubMed

    Nenekidis, Ioannis; Geiser, Martial; Riva, Charles; Pournaras, Constantin; Tsironi, Evangelia; Vretzakis, Georgios; Mitilis, Vasilios; Tsilimingas, Nikolaos

    2011-05-01

    This observational study is conducted to demonstrate optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow alterations during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in routine on-pump cardiovascular operations in order to evaluate the perfusion status of important autoregulatory tissue vascular beds during moderate hypothermia. Twenty-one patients free from eye disease were prospectively enrolled in our database. Perioperative ONH blood flow measurements were performed using a hand-held portable ocular laser Doppler flowmeter just after administration of general anesthesia and during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) upon the lowest temperature point of moderate hypothermia. Important operative flow variables were correlated to optic nerve blood flow during surgical phases. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction of 32.1 ± 14.5% of mean ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P < 0.0001) compared to the reference flow values of phase 1. A negative univariate association between ECC time and ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P = 0.031) is noted. This angiokinetic approach can detect changes of flow within autoregulatory vascular tissue beds like ONH, thus creating a 'window' on cerebral microvasculature. ONH blood flow is reduced during CPB. Our data suggest that it is of paramount importance to avoid extracorporeal prolongation even in moderate hypothermic cardiovascular operations. PMID:21297131

  7. Oxidative injury to blood vessels and glia of the pre-laminar optic nerve head in human glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Feilchenfeld, Zac; Yücel, Yeni H; Gupta, Neeru

    2008-11-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible world blindness. Oxidative damage and vascular injury have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine in human primary open angle glaucoma whether oxidative injury occurs in pre-laminar optic nerve blood vessels and glial cells. Following IRB approval, sections from post-mortem primary open angle glaucoma eyes (n=5) with mean age of 77 +/- 9 yrs (+/-SD) were compared to normal control eyes (n=4) with mean age 70 +/- 9 yrs (Eye Bank of Canada). Immunostaining with nitrotyrosine, a footprint for peroxynitrite-mediated injury, was performed and sections were double-labeled with markers for vascular endothelial cells, perivascular smooth muscle cells, and astrocytes with CD34, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. Immunostaining was captured in a masked fashion using confocal microscopy, and defined regions of interest for blood vessels and glial tissue. Intensity measurements of supra-threshold area in pixels as percent of the total number of pixels were calculated using ImageJ (NIH) and compared using two-tailed Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests between glaucoma and control groups. Colocalization coefficients with cell-specific markers were determined and compared with random coefficients of correlation. Increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in pre-laminar optic nerve head blood vessels of primary open angle glaucoma eyes compared to controls and this difference was statistically significant (1.35 +/- 1.11% [+/-SD] vs. 0.01 +/- 0.01%, P=0.016). NT-immunoreactivity was also increased in the glial tissue surrounding the pre-laminar optic nerve head in the glaucoma group and compared to controls, and this difference was statistically significant (18.37 +/-12.80% vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04%, P=0.016). Colocalization studies demonstrated nitrotyrosine staining in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, in addition to

  8. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  9. [Microcirculation of optic nerve head and glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S H; Zhao, J L; Wu, C

    2016-06-11

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness world widely. The pathogenesis of glaucoma is still not fully understood. It is proposed that the microcirculation of optic nerve head (ONH) may play an important role in glaucomatous optic neuropathy, but the hypothesis is still lack of direct evidence. In this review, we summarized the technical developments in ONH blood flow examination and findings on relationship between decreased ONH microcirculation and glaucoma. These evidences implicate that damaged ONH microcirculation involves in pathogenesis of glaucoma. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 466-470). PMID:27373574

  10. Hyperemic responses of the optic nerve head blood flow to chromatic equiluminant flicker are reduced by ocular hypertension and early glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsini, Benedetto; Riva, Charles E.; Salgarello, Tommaso; Logean, Eric; Colotto, Alberto; Giudiceandrea, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated in ocular hypertension (OHT) and early glaucoma (EOAG) patients the optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow response (RF) to chromatic equiluminant flicker. This stimulus generates neural activity dominated by the parvo-cellular system. Eleven EOAG, 20 OHT patients, and 8 age-matched control subjects were examined. The blood flow (F) at the neuroretinal rim was continuously monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry before, during, and after a 60-s exposure to a 4 Hz, red-green equiluminant flicker stimulus (30 deg field). RF was expressed as percentage F-change during the last 20 s of flicker relative to baseline F. Responses were collected at a number of temporal sites. The highest RF value was used for subsequent analysis. As compared to controls, both OHT and EOAG patients showed a decrease (p<0.01) in mean RF. We conclude that RF elicited by chromatic equiluminant flicker is abnormally reduced in OHT and EOAG patients indicating an impairment of the parvo-cellular-mediated vasoactivity. This decrease of vascular response may occur independently of neural activity loss early in the disease process.

  11. Digital Photogrammetry Of The Optic Nerve Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A. Ralph

    1980-07-01

    A digital photogrammetric method capable of providing quantitative measurements from stereophotographs of the optic nerve head has been utilized in our laboratory to study the optic cup in patients with ocular hypertension and chronic glaucoma. Studies on the reproducibi-lity of the digital photogrammetric technique of optic nerve head photographs taken with various cameras has revealed that (1) reproducibility was significantly better when simultaneous stereo-photographs were analyzed and (2) the Donaldson stereofundus camera provided the best reproducibility of the majority of geometric measurements in optic cups of various sizes. In addition, it has been determined that the shallower cups encountered larger percentage errors. Improvements in parameter reproducibility have been obtained when finer sampling intervals have been used during film digitization. An additional study comparing reproducibility of cup parameters as determined by the digital photogrammetric procedure with those values obtained from analog photogrammetry and manual analysis revealed generally superior reproducibility of the digital photogrammetric analyses in the eyes studies. Preliminary observations utilizing the digital photogrammetric procedure in a modified Zeiss model eye indicated that minor shifts in camera posi-tion did not alter the reproducibility of the technique.

  12. Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Downs, J. Crawford

    2015-01-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. PMID:25819451

  13. Automated optic-nerve-head analysis using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Manish D.; Harman, Jonathan W.; Kim, Robert; Kirschbaum, Alan R.; Pedersen, Per; Everett, Matthew J.; Wei, Jay

    2002-06-01

    The early identification of glaucomatous development is extremely important for treatment of glaucoma. Analysis of optic-nerve-head features may play a crucial role for early glaucoma diagnostics. Here we propose a critical parameter, viz., nerve tissue area, which may prove to be extremely useful for detection of glaucoma in early stages. We report a novel and robust algorithm for OCT-based automatic, objective extraction of critical optic-nerve-head features such as optic disc, nerve tissue area, and optic cup for the first time.

  14. What is a typical optic nerve head?

    PubMed

    Voorhees, A P; Grimm, J L; Bilonick, R A; Kagemann, L; Ishikawa, H; Schuman, J S; Wollstein, G; Sigal, I A

    2016-08-01

    Whereas it is known that elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) increases the risk of glaucoma, it is not known why optic nerve heads (ONHs) vary so much in sensitivity to IOP and how this sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the ONH such as tissue mechanical properties and geometry. It is often assumed that ONHs with uncommon or atypical sensitivity to IOP, high sensitivity in normal tension glaucoma or high robustness in ocular hypertension, also have atypical ONH characteristics. Here we address two specific questions quantitatively: Do atypical ONH characteristics necessarily lead to atypical biomechanical responses to elevated IOP? And, do typical biomechanical responses necessarily come from ONHs with typical characteristics. We generated 100,000 ONH numerical models with randomly selected values for the characteristics, all falling within literature ranges of normal ONHs. The models were solved to predict their biomechanical response to an increase in IOP. We classified ONH characteristics and biomechanical responses into typical or atypical using a percentile-based threshold, and calculated the fraction of ONHs for which the answers to the two questions were true and/or false. We then studied the effects of varying the percentile threshold. We found that when we classified the extreme 5% of individual ONH characteristics or responses as atypical, only 28% of ONHs with an atypical characteristic had an atypical response. Further, almost 29% of typical responses came from ONHs with at least one atypical characteristic. Thus, the answer to both questions is no. This answer held irrespective of the threshold for classifying typical or atypical. Our results challenge the assumption that ONHs with atypical sensitivity to IOP must have atypical characteristics. This finding suggests that the traditional approach of identifying risk factors by comparing characteristics between patient groups (e.g. ocular hypertensive vs. primary open angle glaucoma) may not

  15. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. Methods We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Results Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT–PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1–2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6–7, TRPP1–2, and Piezo1–2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1–2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Conclusions Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury. PMID:26236150

  16. Humeral head translation after a suprascapular nerve block.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jun G; Kosek, Peter; Karduna, Andrew R

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common shoulder disorder. Abnormal superior translation of the humeral head is believed to be a major cause of this pathology. The first purpose of the study was to examine the effects of suprascapular nerve block on superior translation of the humeral head and scapular upward rotation during dynamic shoulder elevation. The secondary purpose was to assess muscle activation patterns during these motions. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the study. Using fluoroscopy and electromyography, humeral head translation and muscle activation were measured before and after a suprascapular nerve block. The humeral head was superiorly located at 60 degrees of humeral elevation, and the scapula was more upwardly rotated from 30 to 90 degrees of humeral elevation after the block. The differences were observed during midrange of motion. In addition, the deltoid muscle group demonstrated increased muscle activation after the nerve block. The study's results showed a compensatory increase in humeral head translation, scapular upward rotation, and deltoid muscle activation due to the nerve block. These outcomes suggest that increasing muscular strength and endurance of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles could prevent any increased superior humeral head translation. This may be beneficial in reducing shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tears over time. PMID:22927503

  17. Contour Photography Of The Optic Nerve Head: Stereometric Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jerrold M.

    1983-07-01

    Three dimensional analysis of the optic nerve head is important in the detection and treatment of eye diseases, particularly glaucoma. In glaucoma, the fluid pressure within the eye increases. Since there is a wide variability in people's sensitivity to elevated pressure, it is not possible to predict which eye will be damaged by a given pressure. The side effects of treatment preclude treating everyone with elevated pressure. However, those eyes susceptible to elevated pressure slowly begin to show erosion of the optic nerve head. The erosion process progresses very slowly and imperceptibly. By the time it can be detected visually, permanent visual loss has often occurred.

  18. [Blood-nerve barrier: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Kanda, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and surrounding extracellular space or blood contents, and is localized the innermost layer of multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels. Since the BNB is a key structure controlling the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma, adequate understanding of the BNB is crucial for developing treatment strategies for human peripheral nervous system disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and diabetic and various metabolic/toxic neuropathies. However, fewer studies have been conducted on the BNB, if we compare against the number of studies on the blood-brain barrier. This is because of the lack of adequate human cell lines originating from the BNB. In our laboratory, human immortal cell lines from the BNB, namely, the endothelial cell line and pericyte cell line, have recently been established and vigorous investigations of their biological and physiological properties are now underway. Pericytes constituting the BNB were found to possess robust ability of controlling BNB integrity via secretion of various cytokines and growth factors including bFGF, VEGF, GDNF, BDNF, and angiopoietin-1. Unknown soluble factors secreted by pericytes also contribute to the upregulation of claudin-5 in endothelial cells in the BNB and thus, strengthen the barrier function of the BNB. In diabetic neuropathy, pericytes were shown to regulate the vascular basement membrane, while AGEs were shown to induce basement membrane hypertrophy and disrupt the BNB by increasing the autocrine secretion of VEGF and TGF-beta from pericytes. In this review article, we discuss the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the human BNB as well as the molecular mechanisms of mononuclear cell infiltration across the BNB. PMID:21613659

  19. [Nitroxidergic nerve fibers of intracerabral blood vessels].

    PubMed

    Kotsiuba, A E; Kotsiuba, E P; Chertok, V M

    2009-01-01

    Methods of light and electron microscopic histochemistry were applied to study the structure and distribution of NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons and processes in the parietal area of rat cerebral cortex. It was found that the most of the neurons displayed close connections with the intracerebral vessels. In the cerebral cortex, the smallest distance between the axonal plasma membrane and smooth muscle cells of the intracerebral arteries was found to be no less than 0.3-0.5 microm. Neuronal cell bodies were located in the functionally important areas of the vessels (in the areas of lateral trunk branching and in arteriolar sources), while their processes accompanied the vessels, tightly embracing them with their branches. Quite often, the neurons, the dendrites of which make contacts with the bodies or processes of over- or underlying neurons, sent their nerve fibers to the arteries, veins and capillaries. Thus, nitroxidergic neurons or their groups may control the blood flow in the different areas of vascular bed, performing the functions of the local nerve center.

  20. Morphometry of the myopic optic nerve head using FDOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Young, Mei; Lebed, Evgeniy; Mackenzie, Paul J.; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present imaging and morphometric analysis of a myopic Optic Nerve Head (ONH) using an 830nm wavelength Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. The thinner prelaminar neural tissue and shallower optic cup in the myopic subject allows visualization of the tissue structures such as anterior laminar surface and lamina cribrosa that are often challenging to image due to their depth. From these structures we measured volumetric anatomical parameters and topographical tissue thickness correlated with glaucomatous structural damage in the ONH.

  1. The blood-nerve barrier: structure and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Weerasuriya, Ananda; Mizisin, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) defines the physiological space within which the axons, Schwann cells, and other associated cells of a peripheral nerve function. The BNB consists of the endoneurial microvessels within the nerve fascicle and the investing perineurium. The restricted permeability of these two barriers protects the endoneurial microenvironment from drastic concentration changes in the vascular and other extracellular spaces. It is postulated that endoneurial homeostatic mechanisms regulate the milieu intérieur of peripheral axons and associated Schwann cells. These mechanisms are discussed in relation to nerve development, Wallerian degeneration and nerve regeneration, and lead neuropathy. Finally, the putative factors responsible for the cellular and molecular control of BNB permeability are discussed. Given the dynamic nature of the regulation of the permeability of the perineurium and endoneurial capillaries, it is suggested that the term blood-nerve interface (BNI) better reflects the functional significance of these structures in the maintenance of homeostasis within the endoneurial microenvironment.

  2. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  3. Reproducibility of topographic measures of the glaucomatous optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, O; Michaeli-Cohen, A; Silver, D; Versano, D; Neudorfer, M; Dzhanov, R; Lazar, M

    1998-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Laser scanning tomography provides an assessment of three dimensional optic disc topography. For the clinical purpose of follow up of glaucoma patients, the repeatability of the various measured variables is essential. In the present study, the reproducibility of morphometric variables calculated by the topographic scanning system, TopSS (Laser Diagnostic Technology, San Diego, CA) was investigated.
METHODS—Two independent measurements (30 minutes apart) each consisting of three complete images of the optic disc were performed on 16 eyes of 16 glaucoma patients using a TopSS. The instrument calculates 14 morphometric variables for the characterisation of the optic disc.
RESULTS—From the two tailed paired tests, all variables were seen to have good reproducibility. However, correlation and regression analyses showed that only the three variables, volume below, half depth area, and average cup depth, are acceptably reproducible.
CONCLUSION—The TopSS provides three variables which describe the physiological shape of the optic disc that have high reproducibility. These three variables might be useful for following the progression of optic disc changes in glaucoma patients.

 Keywords: optic nerve head; scanning laser; glaucoma; tomography PMID:9536873

  4. Unusual delayed presentation of head trauma complicating outcome of facial nerve decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Thakur, J S; Shekar, Vidya; Saluja, Manika; Mohindroo, N K

    2013-08-20

    Late presentation of head trauma is rare. A young boy presented with a traumatic facial paralysis after head trauma. A CT scan of the head showed temporal bone fracture without intracranial insult. Facial nerve decompression was performed and paralysis started improving. However, he presented with vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss after 2 months. Clinical examination also showed cerebellar sign. We suspected iatrogenic injury to the cochlea; however, brain MRI showed haemorrhage in the area of anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient was managed conservatively and the vertigo improved. This case stresses on unusual late presentation of head trauma and cerebellar artery injury that complicated the outcome of facial nerve paralysis.

  5. Foreign body in ocular coats causing a pseudo optic nerve head shadow.

    PubMed

    Takkar, Brijesh; Kumar, Vinod; Agrawal, Renu; Ravani, Raghav; Azad, Shorya

    2015-01-01

    Small intraocular foreign body in the outer coats of the eye may be wrongly interpreted as optic nerve head on ultrasound imaging. Such errors can be avoided by performing multiple sonography scans in different axes.

  6. Compromised Optic Nerve Blood Flow and Autoregulation Secondary to Neural Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cull, Grant; Told, Reinhard; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Thompson, Simon; Fortune, Brad; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow (BF) and autoregulation compromise are consequences of optic nerve degeneration induced by surgical optic nerve transection (ONT). Methods In both eyes of five nonhuman primates, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) was measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Optic nerve head BF and dynamic autoregulation responses to a rapid manometric IOP increase (from 10–40 mm Hg) were measured by Laser Speckle Flowgraphy. The measurements were conducted every 10 to 15 days before and after unilateral ONT. Post-ONT measurements were repeated until RNFLT in the ONT eye was reduced by more than 40% of baseline value. Results After ONT, RNFLT, and ONH BF progressively declined over time (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Longitudinal changes between the two were highly correlated (P < 0.0001). When data was grouped by test session, the first significant decreases for RNFLT and BF were found 13 ± 0.8 and 24 ± 3.2 days post ONT, respectively (P < 0.05, both). At the final time point (55 ± 0.5 days post ONT), RNFLT, and BF were reduced by 44% ± 2.0% and 38 ± 5.0% from baseline, respectively. Dynamic autoregulation analysis showed marginal increased response time in post-ONT eyes (P = 0.05). Control eyes showed no longitudinal changes for any parameter. Conclusions The close association between RNFLT loss and ONH BF decrease following optic nerve degeneration demonstrated a clear cause and effect relationship. Increased BF response time appears to be a sign of dynamic autoregulation dysfunction in this ONT model. PMID:26551332

  7. Calcium regulation in frog peripheral nerve by the blood-nerve barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwani, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: (a) to investigate the characteristics of calcium transport across the perineurium and the endoneurial capillaries, and (b) to gain a better understanding of the extent of calcium homeostasis in the endoneurial space. To study the nature of calcium transport across the perineurium, the flux of radiotracer /sup 45/Ca was measured through the perineurial cylinder, isolated from the frog sciatic nerve, and through the perineurium into the nerve in situ. To study the nature of calcium transport across the endoneurial capillaries, the permeability-surface area product (PA) of /sup 45/Ca was determined as a function of the calcium concentration in the blood. To study calcium homeostasis, the calcium content of the frog sciatic nerve was determined as a function of chronic changes in plasma (Ca).

  8. Schlieren laser Doppler flowmeter for the human optical nerve head with the flicker stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiser, Martial H.; Truffer, Frederic; Evequoz, Hugo; Khayi, Hafid; Mottet, Benjamin; Chiquet, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    We describe a device to measure blood perfusion for the human optic nerve head (ONH) based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with a flicker stimuli of the fovea region. This device is self-aligned for LDF measurements and includes near-infrared pupil observation, green illumination, and observation of the ONH. The optical system of the flowmeter is based on a Schlieren arrangement which collects only photons that encounter multiple scattering and are back-scattered out of the illumination point. LDF measurements are based on heterodyne detection of Doppler shifted back-scattered light. We also describe an automated analysis of the LDF signals which rejects artifacts and false signals such as blinks. By using a Doppler simulator consisting of a lens and a rotating diffusing wheel, we demonstrate that velocity and flow vary linearly with the speed of the wheel. A cohort of 12 healthy subjects demonstrated that flicker stimulation induces an increase of 17.8% of blood flow in the ONH.

  9. Schlieren laser Doppler flowmeter for the human optical nerve head with the flicker stimuli.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Martial H; Truffer, Frederic; Evequoz, Hugo; Khayi, Hafid; Mottet, Benjamin; Chiquet, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    We describe a device to measure blood perfusion for the human optic nerve head (ONH) based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with a flicker stimuli of the fovea region. This device is self-aligned for LDF measurements and includes near-infrared pupil observation, green illumination, and observation of the ONH. The optical system of the flowmeter is based on a Schlieren arrangement which collects only photons that encounter multiple scattering and are back-scattered out of the illumination point. LDF measurements are based on heterodyne detection of Doppler shifted back-scattered light. We also describe an automated analysis of the LDF signals which rejects artifacts and false signals such as blinks. By using a Doppler simulator consisting of a lens and a rotating diffusing wheel, we demonstrate that velocity and flow vary linearly with the speed of the wheel. A cohort of 12 healthy subjects demonstrated that flicker stimulation induces an increase of 17.8% of blood flow in the ONH.

  10. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  11. Radical nerve dissection for the carcinoma of head of pancreas: report of 30 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Tan, Langping; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Quanbo; Chen, Rufu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of the radical nerve dissection (RND) for the carcinoma of head of pancreas (CHP). Methods The clinical and pathological data of 30 CHP patients who underwent RND in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed, with an attempt to explore the safety and short-term efficacy of this procedure. Results Among these 30 patients, the operative time was (351±61) min, the intra-operative blood loss was 350 (range, 300-600) mL, and the grades B and C pancreatic fistula was 23.33%. During the follow-up (range, 2-30 months; median: 17 months), the 1-year survival rate was 63.33% and the 1-year disease-free survival rate was 56.67%. Among the 23 patients (76.66%) with positive extra-pancreatic perineural invasion (PNI), the 1-year casefatality rate was 34.78%, which was not significantly different from that (28.57%) of patients with negative PNI (P=0.760). Conclusions Our results suggested potential advantages of RND in the fields of surgery-associated risk and prognosis compared with the Whipple operation in the treatment of CHP. Due to the low sample size of this study, further well-designed research of large sample size is needed. PMID:27647971

  12. Natural motion of the optic nerve head revealed by high speed phase-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OHara, Keith; Schmoll, Tilman; Vass, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-03-01

    We use phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the deformation of the optic nerve head during the pulse cycle, motivated by the possibility that these deformations might be indicative of the progression of glaucoma. A spectral-domain OCT system acquired 100k A-scans per second, with measurements from a pulse-oximeter recorded simultaneously, correlating OCT data to the subject's pulse. Data acquisition lasted for 2 seconds, to cover at least two pulse cycles. A frame-rate of 200-400 B-scans per second results in a sufficient degree of correlated speckle between successive frames that the phase-differences between fames can be extracted. Bulk motion of the entire eye changes the phase by several full cycles between frames, but this does not severely hinder extracting the smaller phase-changes due to differential motion within a frame. The central cup moves about 5 μm/s relative to the retinal-pigment-epithelium edge, with tissue adjacent to blood vessels showing larger motion.

  13. Tardy ulnar nerve palsy caused by chronic radial head dislocation after Monteggia fracture: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Itsubo, Toshiro; Horii, Emiko; Hayashi, Masanori; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Dislocation of the radial head is often encountered as a result of a pediatric Monteggia fracture. We report two rare cases of tardy ulnar nerve palsy associated with anterior radial head dislocation combined with anterior bowing of the ulna. They had cubitus valgus deformity, valgus instability, and osteoarthritis of the elbow, and had elbow injury more than 40 years back. They were diagnosed with chronic radial head dislocation long after a Bado type 1 Monteggia fracture. Anterior subcutaneous ulnar nerve transposition yielded favorable results. It is important to recognize the possibility of tardy ulnar nerve palsy caused by an improperly treated Monteggia fracture. PMID:26986030

  14. Isolation of intact astrocytes from the optic nerve head of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2015-01-01

    The astrocytes of the optic nerve head are a specialized subtype of white matter astrocytes that form the direct cellular environment of the unmyelinated ganglion cell axons. Due to their potential involvement in glaucoma, these astrocytes have become a target of research. Due to the heterogeneity of the optic nerve tissue, which also contains other cell types, in some cases it may be desirable to conduct gene expression studies on small numbers of well-characterized astrocytes or even individual cells. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate individual astrocytes. This method permits obtaining astrocytes with intact morphology from the adult mouse optic nerve and reduces contamination of the isolated astrocytes by other cell types. Individual astrocytes can be recognized by their morphology and collected under microscopic control. The whole procedure can be completed in 2-3 hours. We also discuss downstream applications like multiplex single-cell PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR). PMID:26093274

  15. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with a pit of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; Pilkerton, A R

    1988-04-01

    A 56-year-old myope developed a retinal detachment of the macular area and the temporal quadrants in his left eye that harbored a temporally-located pit of the optic nerve head. Under anesthesia a small peripheral retinal break was identified, and the retina was reattached successfully using cryotherapy and a limited scleral buckling procedure. Peripheral retinal breaks should be searched for in myopic eyes with optic pits and retinal detachments involving peripheral retinal quadrants.

  16. Bioinformatic and statistical analysis of the optic nerve head in a primate model of ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kompass, Kenneth S; Agapova, Olga A; Li, Wenjun; Kaufman, Paul L; Rasmussen, Carol A; Hernandez, M Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Background The nonhuman primate model of glaucomatous optic neuropathy most faithfully reproduces the human disease. We used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to investigate whole genome transcriptional changes occurring at the optic nerve head during primate experimental glaucoma. Results Laser scarification of the trabecular meshwork of cynomolgus macaques produced elevated intraocular pressure that was monitored over time and led to varying degrees of damage in different samples. The macaques were examined clinically before enucleation and the myelinated optic nerves were processed post-mortem to determine the degree of neuronal loss. Global gene expression was examined in dissected optic nerve heads with Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We validated a subset of differentially expressed genes using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immuno-enriched astrocytes from healthy and glaucomatous human donors. These genes have previously defined roles in axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusion Our findings show that glaucoma is associated with increased expression of genes that mediate axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and ECM remodeling. These studies also reveal that, as glaucoma progresses, retinal ganglion cell axons may make a regenerative attempt to restore lost nerve cell contact. PMID:18822132

  17. The neural signal of angular head position in primary afferent vestibular nerve axons

    PubMed Central

    Loe, P. R.; Tomko, David L.; Werner, G.

    1973-01-01

    1. The relation between discharge frequency and angular head position was determined for a population of regularly discharging single first-order vestibular neurones in the eighth nerve of the barbiturate anaesthetized cat. 2. Each axon had a characteristic head position which was maximally excitatory to it, and a diametrically opposed head position which was minimally excitatory. 3. After correction for phase shifts introduced by the orientation of preferred excitability, discharge rate in statoreceptor afferents varied as a power function of the sine of angular head position with exponents ranging from 0·9 to 1·6. 4. Experimentally determined discharge rates were compared with the predictions of a computer simulation model incorporating the idea that shearing force acting on morphologically polarized receptors is the adequate stimulus for macular receptor cells. 5. This approach permitted the identification of a population of first-order vestibular afferents whose discharge frequency varied with head position as did the magnitude of shear force computed for individual receptors, each most excited in a particular head position. 6. The majority of the spatial orientations of maximal sensitivity defined a surface which is tilted by approximately 30° with reference to the Horsley—Clarke horizontal plane, implying that most statoreceptor afferents are maximally sensitive to position changes when the cat's head is at or near its normal position. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:4702433

  18. Effect of head tilt on repeatability of optic nerve head parameters using cirrus spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lilian Hui Li; Ismail, Muhammad Amir; Yap, Sae Cheong; Wong, Elizabeth Poh Ying; Yip, Leonard Wei Leon

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the repeatability of measuring optic nerve head (ONH) parameters using the Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT), as well as to assess the effect of head tilt on these measurements. METHODS Thirty healthy participants with no evidence of glaucoma were recruited for the study. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, standard automated perimetry and ocular examination were performed for each participant. One eye was then randomly selected and scanned undilated with the Cirrus OCT in 3 positions (neutral, 30° right tilt and 30° left tilt). RESULTS Data collected from 29 eyes were used for analysis. One patient was omitted due to poor scan quality. The repeatability of the ONH parameters was analyzed using analysis of variance, coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference between 3 scans in a single position. There was good agreement between measurements (ICC 0.919-0.996, COV 1.94%-5.48%). Even with the presence of head tilt, repeated scans in the 3 positions showed good agreement as well (ICC 0.888-0.996, COV 2.04%-5.39%). CONCLUSION Serial measurements of ONH parameters using the Cirrus OCT are found to have good repeatability. The ONH parameters with Cirrus OCT also maintain good repeatability despite head tilt. PMID:27585788

  19. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; GLANZMANN, CHRISTOPH; YOUSEFI, BITA; LOEWENICH, KARL; HUBER, GERHARD; SCHMID, STEPHAN; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves of interest. So far, one of the assessed 151 IMRT patients at risk exhibited symptoms of RICNP after 6 years. The mean/median FU of the entire cohort was 71/68 months (range, 27–145). The results were compared with literature reports. In conclusion, RICNP appears to be a rare complication. However, a longer FU and a larger sample size are required to draw reliable conclusions on the incidence of RICNP in the era of IMRT. PMID:26171186

  20. Comparison of cutaneous nerve injury and vessel disruption complications following saphenous vein stripping using big or small olive heads

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Mustafa Cuneyt; Cicek, Omer Faruk; Lafci, Gokhan; Uzun, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the nerve injury and vessel disruption complicaitons in patients undergoing saphenous vein stripping using olive heads of different sizes. Methods: Big olive heads were used in group A (n=50) and small olive heads were used in group B (n=50) from the ankle to the groin; in group C (n=50), the vein was stripped in two sections; in an upward fashion by stripping the distal portion from the ankle to the level of the knee using small olive heads and by stripping the proximal portion from the knee to the level of the groin using big olive heads. Results: Six months after the operation, nerve injury symptoms were identified in 26%, 4%, 6% of patients in groups A, B, and C respectively. Vessel disruption occurred 2% in group A, 32% in group B, and 4% in group C. Both vessel disruption and nerve injury complications of group C were significantly lower than group A and B (p<0.001). Conclusion: Saphenous stripping using big olive heads for the proximal portion from the groin down to the level of the knee and using small olive heads for the distal portion from the knee to the level of the ankle is the alternative method which results in minimal nerve injury and vessel disruption. PMID:27375703

  1. Relations of blood pressure and head injury to regional cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kisser, Jason E; Allen, Allyssa J; Katzel, Leslie I; Wendell, Carrington R; Siegel, Eliot L; Lefkowitz, David; Waldstein, Shari R

    2016-06-15

    Hypertension confers increased risk for cognitive decline, dementia, and cerebrovascular disease. These associations have been attributed, in part, to cerebral hypoperfusion. Here we posit that relations of higher blood pressure to lower levels of cerebral perfusion may be potentiated by a prior head injury. Participants were 87 community-dwelling older adults - 69% men, 90% white, mean age=66.9years, 27.6% with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) defined as a loss of consciousness ≤30min resulting from an injury to the head, and free of major medical (other than hypertension), neurological or psychiatric comorbidities. All engaged in clinical assessment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Computerized coding of the SPECT images yielded relative ratios of blood flow in left and right cortical and select subcortical regions. Cerebellum served as the denominator. Sex-stratified multiple regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, race, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and depressive symptomatology, revealed significant interactions of blood pressure and head injury to cerebral blood flow in men only. Specifically, among men with a history of head injury, higher systolic blood pressure was associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left orbital (β=-3.21, p=0.024) and left dorsolateral (β=-2.61, p=0.042) prefrontal cortex, and left temporal cortex (β=-3.36, p=0.014); higher diastolic blood pressure was marginally associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (β=-2.79, p=0.051). Results indicate that men with a history of head injury may be particularly vulnerable to the impact of higher blood pressure on cerebral perfusion in left anterior cortical regions, thus potentially enhancing risk for adverse brain and neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:27206865

  2. Sequential-digital image correlation for mapping human posterior sclera and optic nerve head deformation.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Jeffrey D; Genovese, Katia; Casaletto, Luciana; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) deformations may be involved in the onset or further development of glaucoma, including in patients with relatively normal intraocular pressures (IOPs). Characterizing posterior scleral deformations over physiological pressures may provide a better understanding of how changes in IOP lead to changes in the mechanical environment of the ONH and possibly retinal ganglion cell death. Pressure inflation measurement test protocols are commonly used to measure deformation of the peripapillary sclera with full-field noncontact optical methods. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate a new sequential 3D digital image correlation (S-DIC) approach for quantification of posterior scleral pressure induced deformation that improves z (in-depth) resolution of the DIC measurement without losing in-plane sensitivity, while also being able to contour and map deformations of the complex-shaped ONH. Our approach combines two orthogonal axes of parallax with standard 3D DIC methods using a single high-resolution camera. The enhanced capabilities of S-DIC with respect to standard 3D DIC has been demonstrated by carrying out a complete benchmark for shape, deformation, and strain measurement on an object of known complex geometry. Our S-DIC method provided a reconstruction accuracy of 0.17% and an uncertainty in z-position measurement of 8 μm. The developed methodology has also been applied to a human posterior scleral shell, including the full peripapillary sclera and optic nerve. The relatively inexpensive S-DIC approach may provide new information on the biomechanical deformations of the optic nerve head and, thus, the death of retinal ganglion cells in primary open angle glaucoma. PMID:24337344

  3. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, M; Schmelzer, J D; Poduslo, J F; Curran, G L; Nickander, K K; Low, P A

    1991-01-01

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, we examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG (25 mg.kg-1.day-1), group II received STZ plus AG (50 mg.kg-1.day-1), group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. We monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to 125I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. We suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:2068089

  4. Blood-nerve barrier in IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy: a clinicopathologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Usui, S; Beppu, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamawaki, M; Oda, M

    1998-02-01

    We report the pathologic findings in a patient with sensorimotor neuropathy associated with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, particularly in relation to blood-nerve barrier defects. The monoclonal IgM was of kappa type and possessed anti-HNK-1 activity. A sural nerve biopsy specimen revealed severe loss of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and gaps between adjacent endothelial cells of small endoneurial vessels. Postmortem findings 3 years later included severe loss of myelinated nerve fibers and diffuse infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic B cells throughout the peripheral nervous system, sparing the central nervous system. Findings in this case suggest an immune attack against endoneurial endothelial cells with permeation of IgM into peripheral nerve tissue. PMID:9498055

  5. Vaginal blood flow after radical hysterectomy with and without nerve sparing. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Q D; Ter Kuile, M M; Deruiter, M C; Trimbos, J B M Z; Kenter, G G; Maas, C P

    2008-01-01

    Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHL) for cervical cancer causes damage to the autonomic nerves, which are responsible for increased vaginal blood flow during sexual arousal. The aim of the study of which we now report preliminary data was to determine whether a nerve-sparing technique leads to an objectively less disturbed vaginal blood flow response during sexual stimulation. Photoplethysmographic assessment of vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) during sexual stimulation by erotic films was performed. Subjective sexual arousal was assessed after each stimulus. Thirteen women after conventional RHL, 10 women after nerve-sparing RHL, and 14 healthy premenopausal women participated. Data were collected between January and August 2006. The main outcome measure was the logarithmically transformed mean VPA. To detect statistically significant differences in mean VPA levels between the three groups, a univariate analysis of variance was used. Mean VPA differed between the three groups (P= 0.014). The conventional group had a lower vaginal blood flow response than the control group (P= 0.016), which tended also to be lower than that of the nerve-sparing group (P= 0.097). These differences were critically dependent on baseline vaginal blood flow differences between the groups. The conventional group follows a vaginal blood flow pattern similar to postmenopausal women. Conventional RHL is associated with an overall disturbed vaginal blood flow response compared with healthy controls. Because it is not observed to the same extent after nerve-sparing RHL, it seems that the nerve-sparing technique leads to a better overall vaginal blood flow caused by less denervation of the vagina. PMID:17692083

  6. Automatic segmentation of the optic nerve head for deformation measurements in video rate optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Aguirre, Maribel; Gitelman, Julian; Lesk, Mark Richard; Costantino, Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become a standard diagnostic tool in ophthalmology, providing essential information associated with various eye diseases. In order to investigate the dynamics of the ocular fundus, we present a simple and accurate automated algorithm to segment the inner limiting membrane in video-rate optic nerve head spectral domain (SD) OCT images. The method is based on morphological operations including a two-step contrast enhancement technique, proving to be very robust when dealing with low signal-to-noise ratio images and pathological eyes. An analysis algorithm was also developed to measure neuroretinal tissue deformation from the segmented retinal profiles. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated, and deformation results are presented for healthy and glaucomatous eyes.

  7. Automatic segmentation of the optic nerve head for deformation measurements in video rate optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Aguirre, Maribel; Gitelman, Julian; Lesk, Mark Richard; Costantino, Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become a standard diagnostic tool in ophthalmology, providing essential information associated with various eye diseases. In order to investigate the dynamics of the ocular fundus, we present a simple and accurate automated algorithm to segment the inner limiting membrane in video-rate optic nerve head spectral domain (SD) OCT images. The method is based on morphological operations including a two-step contrast enhancement technique, proving to be very robust when dealing with low signal-to-noise ratio images and pathological eyes. An analysis algorithm was also developed to measure neuroretinal tissue deformation from the segmented retinal profiles. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated, and deformation results are presented for healthy and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26598974

  8. The role of lamina cribrosa cells in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Deborah M; O'Brien, Colm J

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic progressive optic neuropathy. There are extracellular matrix (ECM) changes associated with optic disc cupping in the optic nerve head (ONH) and subsequent visual field defects. The primary risk factor for onset and progression of glaucoma is raised intraocular pressure (IOP). Elevated IOP causes deformation at the ONH specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also deposition of ECM causing the LC to initially undergo thickening and posterior migration with eventual shearing and collapse of the LC plates leading to a thin fibrotic connective tissue structure/scar. Cells that populate the LC region of the ONH are those cells that are positive for GFAP (the astrocytes) and those negative for GFAP (the LC cells). The LC cell plays an integral role in ECM remodelling producing ECM when exposed to high level mechanical stretch, TGF- β1 and a hypoxic environment. PMID:26675406

  9. The role of astrocytes in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Magdalena; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is defined as a progressive optic neuropathy and is characterized by an irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. The main risk factor to develop glaucoma is an increased intraocular pressure (IOP). During the course of glaucoma structural changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) take place which lead to the characteristic excavation or cupping of the ONH. In this review we will focus on mechanisms and processes involved in structural alterations of the extracellular matrix in the lamina cribrosa (LC) of the ONH, which are associated with astrocytes. In glaucoma, a disordered deposition of elastic and collagen fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the nerve fibers can be observed in the LC region. The remodeling process of the LC and the loss of ON axons are associated with a conversion of astrocytes from quiescent to a reactivated state. The extracellular matrix changes in the LC are thought to be due to a disturbed homeostatic balance of growth factors and the reactivated astrocytes are part of this process. Reactivated astrocytes, remodeling of the ECM within the LC and an elevated IOP are taking part in the retinal ganglion cell loss in glaucoma.

  10. Bilateral optic nerve head drusen with chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Leila; Ghanbari, Heshmatollah

    2016-01-01

    Chorioretinal coloboma is a congenital defect of the eye caused by improper closure of the embryonic fissure. Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are white calcareous deposits that are generally asymptomatic. We report a very rare association of both in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome. A 16-year-old man was referred to our clinic from suffering blurred vision. Best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 6/10 and 10/10 in the left one. External ocular and slit lamp examination were normal. Dilated ophthalmoscopy showed marked swelling in both optic nerves and chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye inferiorly. Ultrasonography showed an echodense structure with acoustic shadowing in both eyes consistent with buried ONHD. Visual field testing showed normal field in the left eye and moderate superior field depression in the right eye corresponding to inferior coloboma in funduscopy. Results of general medical and neurologic, cardiologic, and other examinations were normal. To the best our knowledge combination of bilateral ONHD and unilateral chorioretinal coloboma in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome has not been published in the literature. We reported this very rare association and recommended examine eyes and other body organs. In such cases that coloboma is associated with ONHD, we should keep in mind Noonan syndrome. The diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is clinical and confirm by the consultant pediatricians and clinical geneticists. PMID:27099847

  11. Bilateral optic nerve head drusen with chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Leila; Ghanbari, Heshmatollah

    2016-01-01

    Chorioretinal coloboma is a congenital defect of the eye caused by improper closure of the embryonic fissure. Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are white calcareous deposits that are generally asymptomatic. We report a very rare association of both in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome. A 16-year-old man was referred to our clinic from suffering blurred vision. Best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 6/10 and 10/10 in the left one. External ocular and slit lamp examination were normal. Dilated ophthalmoscopy showed marked swelling in both optic nerves and chorioretinal coloboma in the right eye inferiorly. Ultrasonography showed an echodense structure with acoustic shadowing in both eyes consistent with buried ONHD. Visual field testing showed normal field in the left eye and moderate superior field depression in the right eye corresponding to inferior coloboma in funduscopy. Results of general medical and neurologic, cardiologic, and other examinations were normal. To the best our knowledge combination of bilateral ONHD and unilateral chorioretinal coloboma in a healthy patient with no any systemic syndrome has not been published in the literature. We reported this very rare association and recommended examine eyes and other body organs. In such cases that coloboma is associated with ONHD, we should keep in mind Noonan syndrome. The diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is clinical and confirm by the consultant pediatricians and clinical geneticists. PMID:27099847

  12. The role of astrocytes in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Magdalena; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is defined as a progressive optic neuropathy and is characterized by an irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. The main risk factor to develop glaucoma is an increased intraocular pressure (IOP). During the course of glaucoma structural changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) take place which lead to the characteristic excavation or cupping of the ONH. In this review we will focus on mechanisms and processes involved in structural alterations of the extracellular matrix in the lamina cribrosa (LC) of the ONH, which are associated with astrocytes. In glaucoma, a disordered deposition of elastic and collagen fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the nerve fibers can be observed in the LC region. The remodeling process of the LC and the loss of ON axons are associated with a conversion of astrocytes from quiescent to a reactivated state. The extracellular matrix changes in the LC are thought to be due to a disturbed homeostatic balance of growth factors and the reactivated astrocytes are part of this process. Reactivated astrocytes, remodeling of the ECM within the LC and an elevated IOP are taking part in the retinal ganglion cell loss in glaucoma. PMID:26321510

  13. Estimating a structural bottle neck for eye-brain transfer of visual information from 3D-volumes of the optic nerve head from a commercial OCT device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla; Söderberg, Per G.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the possibility of using OCT optic nerve head 3D information captured with a Topcon OCT 2000 device for detection of the shortest distance between the inner limit of the retina and the central limit of the pigment epithelium around the circumference of the optic nerve head. The shortest distance between these boundaries reflects the nerve fiber layer thickness and measurement of this distance is interesting for follow-up of glaucoma.

  14. Rat Optic Nerve Head Anatomy within 3D Histomorphometric Reconstructions of Normal Control Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Cepurna, William O.; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to three-dimensionally (3D) characterize the principal macroscopic and microscopic relationships within the rat optic nerve head (ONH) and quantify them in normal control eyes. Perfusion-fixed, trephinated ONH from 8 normal control eyes of 8 Brown Norway Rats were 3D histomorphometrically reconstructed, visualized, delineated and parameterized. The rat ONH consists of 2 scleral openings, (a superior neurovascular and inferior arterial) separated by a thin connective tissue strip we have termed the “scleral sling”. Within the superior opening, the nerve abuts a prominent extension of Bruch's Membrane (BM) superiorly and is surrounded by a vascular plexus, as it passes through the sclera, that is a continuous from the choroid into and through the dural sheath and contains the central retinal vein (CRV), (inferiorly). The inferior scleral opening contains the central retinal artery and three long posterior ciliary arteries which obliquely pass through the sclera to obtain the choroid. Bruch's Membrane Opening (BMO) is irregular and vertically elongated, enclosing the nerve (superiorly) and CRV and CRA (inferiorly). Overall mean BMO Depth, BMO Area, Choroidal Thickness and peripapillary Scleral Thickness were 29 μm, 56.5 × 103 μm2, 57 μm and 104 μm respectively. Mean anterior scleral canal opening (ASCO) and posterior scleral canal opening (PSCO) radii were 201 ± 15 μm and 204 ± 16 μm, respectively. Mean optic nerve area at the ASCO and PSCO were 46.3 × 103 ± 4.4 × 103 μm2 and 44.1 × 103 ± 4.5 × 103 μm2 respectively. In conclusion, the 3D complexity of the rat ONH and the extent to which it differs from the primate have been under-appreciated within previous 2D studies. Properly understood, these anatomic differences may provide new insights into the relative susceptibilities of the rat and primate ONH to elevated intraocular pressure. PMID:26021973

  15. Influence of Myopia on Size of Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seok Hyun; Kang, Shin Hee; Feng, Chi Shian; Park, Joohyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic nerve head size and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness according to refractive status and axial length. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 252 eyes of 252 healthy volunteers underwent ocular biometry measurement as well as optic nerve head and RNFL imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for all subjects. The magnification effect was adjusted by the modified axial length method. Results Disc area and spherical equivalent were positively correlated (r = 0.225, r2 = 0.051, p = 0.000). RNFL thickness showed significant correlations with spherical equivalent (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000), disc radius (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), and radius of the scan circle (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). After adjustment for the magnification effect, those relationships were reversed; RNFL thickness showed negative correlation with spherical equivalent and disc radius, and positive correlation with axial length and radius of the scan circle. The distance between the disc margin and the scan circle was closely correlated with RNFL thickness (r = -0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), which showed a negative correlation with axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). Conclusions Optic disc radius and RNFL thickness decreased in more severely myopic eyes, but they increased after adjustment for magnification effect. The error due to the magnification effect and optic nerve head size difference might be factors that should be considered when interpreting optical coherence tomography results. PMID:27729753

  16. Onychophoran cephalic nerves and their bearing on our understanding of head segmentation and stem-group evolution of Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, B J; Budd, G E

    2000-07-01

    The extant Onychophora are basal representatives of the Arthropoda, resembling Cambrian arthropod stem-group fossils such as Aysheaia and other so-called lobopodians. They thus provide an important model system for early stages in arthropod evolution, especially those of the head. However, homologies between onychophoran and euarthropod head structures have remained uncertain, and previous descriptions of the onychophoran head are contradictory. Our investigation examines the cephalic nerves of two species of onychophoran using immunohistochemical and confocal laser scanning microscopical techniques. Our new reconstruction for the distribution of onychophoran cephalic nerves differs significantly from previous accounts. The so-called "labrum" of the Onychophora appears to be part of the pharynx, and any affinities to the various pre-oral outgrowths of crown-group arthropods referred to as hypostomata and/or labra can be ruled out. The innervation of the mouth is particularly noteworthy, as its nerves originate from three different regions of the brain, including the dorsum. This suggests that the mouth was primitively terminal/frontal, although subsequent ventral rotation of the mouth may have been parallelly achieved in Onychophora and in Euarthropoda. Our model allows the onychophoran cephalic nervous system to be interpreted as a modified circumoral nerve ring, similar to that seen in the nematodes and other cycloneuralians. We regard this as supporting the Ecdysozoa model of arthropod relationships. PMID:18088927

  17. [Selected aspects of pediatric ophthalmology for non-pediatric ophthalmologists. Part 2: The odd looking optic nerve head in infants].

    PubMed

    Käsmann-Kellner, B; Seitz, B

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the clinical presentation of the most common congenital optic disc findings: optic nerve hypoplasia, optic disc cupping and pediatric optic atrophy. Particular emphasis is placed on the often difficult question: is it a physiological variant or is it pathological? Do I need further investigations? Pragmatic clinical hints are given to enable ophthalmologists to recognize normal variants with greater certainty but also not to overlook congenital optic nerve pathologies. Congenital anomalies of the optic nerve (head) are more common than half a century ago. They can affect the visual development and thus the general infantile development to a large extent if presenting bilaterally. They can occur isolated, with other ocular pathologies and/or accompanied by systemic diseases or syndromes, such as septo-optic dysplasia, albinism, prematurity, small for gestational age birth, as well as due to toxic exposure during pregnancy (e.g. drugs, alcohol and maternal diabetes). In addition to clinical illustrations to distinguish between physiological variants and pathologies of the optic nerve head, the different diagnostic and therapeutic options depending on the age of presentation of the infant are outlined. The reader will obtain some guidelines for distinguishing congenital and acquired optic nerve pathologies. The focal point of the present paper is with infants aged 0-2 years where many diagnostic imaging and psychophysical techniques cannot be applied. Therefore, this age group is the most difficult to correctly discriminate between physiological and pathological findings and to decide whether further diagnostic and/or treatment steps are necessary. PMID:22699951

  18. Ability of Cirrus™ HD-OCT Optic Nerve Head Parameters to Discriminate Normal from Glaucomatous Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Oakley, Jonathan D; Budenz, Donald L; Anderson, Douglas R

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the ability of optic nerve head (ONH) parameters measured with spectral domain Cirrus™ HD-OCT to discriminate between normal and glaucomatous eyes and to compare them to the discriminating ability of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements performed with Cirrus™ HD-OCT. Design Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. Participants Seventy-three subjects with glaucoma and one hundred and forty-six age-matched normal subjects. Methods Peripapillary ONH parameters and RNFL thickness were measured in one randomly selected eye of each participant within a 200×200 pixel A-scan acquired with Cirrus™ HD-OCT centered on the ONH. Main Outcome Measures ONH topographic parameters, peripapillary RNFL thickness, and the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Results For distinguishing normal from glaucomatous eyes, regardless of disease stage, the six best parameters (expressed as AUC) were vertical rim thickness (VRT, 0.963), rim area (RA, 0.962), RNFL thickness at clock-hour 7 (0.957), RNFL thickness of the inferior quadrant (0.953), vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR, 0.951) and average RNFL thickness (0.950). The AUC for distinguishing between normal and eyes with mild glaucoma was greatest for RNFL thickness of clock-hour 7 (0.918), VRT (0.914), RA (0.912), RNFL thickness of inferior quadrant (0.895), average RNFL thickness (0.893) and VCDR (0.890). There were no statistically significant differences between AUCs for the best ONH parameters and RNFL thickness measurements (p > 0.05). Conclusions Cirrus™ HD-OCT ONH parameters are able to discriminate between eyes that are normal from those with glaucoma or even mild glaucoma. There is no difference in the ability of ONH parameters and RNFL thickness measurement, as measured with Cirrus™ OCT, to distinguish between normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:20920824

  19. Optical coherence tomography in papilledema and pseudopapilledema with and without optic nerve head drusen

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Shikha Talwar; Mohana, Kuppuswamy Parthasarthy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings of the optic disc and the peripapillary retina of patients with a true papilledema and pseudopapilledema with and without optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Study Design: Retrospective Case Control Study. Subjects and Methods: Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (PPRNFL) thickness as depicted by SD-OCT of 94 eyes of 66 patients with papilledema (30 eyes), pseudopapiledema (31 eyes), and normal controls (33 eyes) was analyzed. The mean RNFL thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT) at a superior and inferior edge of the disc and the quadrant wise topography of increased RNFL were compared in all three groups. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) were calculated for all the parameters. Results: The median RNFL thickness was 185.4 (129.5–349.3 μm), 122.3 (109–156.3 μm) and 91.62 ± 7 μm in papilledema, pseudopapilledema, and controls, respectively. Papilledema group had thicker PPRNFL in all quadrants except temporal quadrant. TRT was thicker in papilledema and pseudopapilledema compared to controls. ONHD could be directly visualized as high reflective clumps in the sub-retinal space or the RNFL in 30 eyes. Increased RNFL thickness in all four quadrants was noted 43.3% in papilledema and 9.7% in pseudopapilledema. Normal RNFL thickness in all four quadrants was noted in 0% in papilledema and 32.3% in pseudopapilledema. Nasal RNFL had the highest AROC (0.792) indicating high diagnostic ability to differentiate papilledema from pseudopapilledema. Conclusion: SD-OCT can be used as a tool to differentiate between papilledema and pseudopapilledema. PMID:25579359

  20. The Effects of Impact Vibration on Peripheral Blood Vessels and Nerves

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine M.; WAUGH, Stacey; JOHNSON, Claud; MILLER, G. Roger; XU, Xueyan; WARREN, Christopher; DONG, Ren G.

    2013-01-01

    Research regarding the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome after exposure to impact vibration has produced conflicting results. This study used an established animal model of vibration-induced dysfunction to determine how exposure to impact vibration affects peripheral blood vessels and nerves. The tails of male rats were exposed to a single bout of impact vibration (15 min exposure, at a dominant frequency of 30 Hz and an unweighted acceleration of approximately 345 m/s2) generated by a riveting hammer. Responsiveness of the ventral tail artery to adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction and acetylcholine-mediated re-dilation was measured ex vivo. Ventral tail nerves and nerve endings in the skin were assessed using morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Impact vibration did not alter vascular responsiveness to any factors or affect trunk nerves. However, 4 days following exposure there was an increase in protein-gene product (PGP) 9.5 staining around hair follicles. A single exposure to impact vibration, with the exposure characteristics described above, affects peripheral nerves but not blood vessels. PMID:24077447

  1. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  2. A single injection of intravitreal ranibizumab in the treatment of choroidal neovascularisation secondary to optic nerve head drusen in a child.

    PubMed

    Alkin, Zeynep; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Ihsan; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan

    2014-05-02

    Optic nerve head drusen are acellular, calcified deposits which may be found in buried or exposed drusen form. Choroidal neovascularisation secondary to optic nerve head drusen is rarely seen in childhood. This case report summarises the clinical and therapeutic outcomes of a 13-year-old girl with unilateral choroidal neovascularisation secondary to optic nerve head drusen. The patient was successfully treated with a single intravitreal ranibizumab injection. After a month from the injection the visual acuity increased dramatically and maintained at the same level during 9 months of follow-up time. There was no complication related to the injection.

  3. Nitric oxide control of lower vertebrate blood vessels by vasomotor nerves.

    PubMed

    Donald, John A; Broughton, Brad R S

    2005-10-01

    In mammals, much is understood about the endothelial and neural NO control mechanisms in the vasculature. In contrast, NO control of blood vessels in lower vertebrates is poorly understood, with the majority of research focusing on the presence of an endothelial NO system; however, its presence remains controversial. This study examined the mechanisms by which NO regulates the large blood vessels of non-mammalian vertebrates. In all species examined, the arteries and veins contained a plexus of NOS-positive perivascular nerves that included nerve bundles and fine, varicose nerve terminals. However, in the large arteries and veins of various species of fishes and amphibians, no anatomical evidence was found for endothelial NOS using both NADPH-diaphorase and eNOS immunohistochemistry. In contrast, perinuclear NOS staining was readily apparent in blue-tongue lizard, pigeon and rat, which suggested that eNOS first appeared in reptiles. Physiological analysis of NO signalling in the vascular smooth muscle of short-finned eel and cane toad could not find any evidence for endothelial NO signalling. In contrast, it appears that activation of the nitrergic vasomotor nerves is responsible for NO control of the blood vessels.

  4. Scleral anisotropy and its effects on the mechanical response of the optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Boote, Craig; Quigley, Harry A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a computational modeling study of the effects of the collagen fiber structure on the mechanical response of the sclera and the adjacent optic nerve head (ONH). A specimen-specific inverse finite element method was developed to determine the material properties of two human sclera subjected to full-field inflation experiments. A distributed fiber model was applied to describe the anisotropic elastic behavior of the sclera. The model directly incorporated wide angle x-ray scattering measurements of the anisotropic collagen structure. The converged solution of the inverse method was used in micromechanical studies of the mechanical anisotropy of the sclera at different scales. The effects of the scleral collagen fiber structure on the ONH deformation were evaluated by progressively filtering out local anisotropic features. It was found that the majority of the midposterior sclera could be described as isotropic without significantly affecting the mechanical response of the tissues of the ONH. In contrast, removing local anisotropic features in the peripapillary sclera produced significant changes in scleral canal expansion, and lamina cribrosa deformation. Local variations in the collagen structure of the peripapillary sclera significantly influenced the mechanical response of the ONH. PMID:23188256

  5. Changes in quantitative 3D shape features of the optic nerve head associated with age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) structure is an important biological feature of the eye used by clinicians to diagnose and monitor progression of diseases such as glaucoma. ONH structure is commonly examined using stereo fundus imaging or optical coherence tomography. Stereo fundus imaging provides stereo views of the ONH that retain 3D information useful for characterizing structure. In order to quantify 3D ONH structure, we applied a stereo correspondence algorithm to a set of stereo fundus images. Using these quantitative 3D ONH structure measurements, eigen structures were derived using principal component analysis from stereo images of 565 subjects from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS). To evaluate the usefulness of the eigen structures, we explored associations with the demographic variables age, gender, and race. Using regression analysis, the eigen structures were found to have significant (p < 0.05) associations with both age and race after Bonferroni correction. In addition, classifiers were constructed to predict the demographic variables based solely on the eigen structures. These classifiers achieved an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.62 in predicting a binary age variable, 0.52 in predicting gender, and 0.67 in predicting race. The use of objective, quantitative features or eigen structures can reveal hidden relationships between ONH structure and demographics. The use of these features could similarly allow specific aspects of ONH structure to be isolated and associated with the diagnosis of glaucoma, disease progression and outcomes, and genetic factors.

  6. Aging changes of the optic nerve head in relation to open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Garway-Heath, D; Wollstein, G; Hitchings, R

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the age related changes in optic nerve head structure in a group of normal subjects and assess the significance of any changes in relation to those found in open angle glaucoma.
METHODS—A group of 88 white volunteers and friends and spouses of patients with a normal visual field and normal intraocular pressure was studied. Two different imaging and measurement devices were used (computer assisted planimetry and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy), and the results from each were compared. Measurements were made of the optic disc, optic cup, and neuroretinal rim areas, and the vertical optic disc diameter and cup/disc diameter ratio.
RESULTS—Neuroretinal rim area declined at the rate of between 0.28% and 0.39% per year. Vertical optic cup diameter and optic cup area increased with age. The mean cup/disc diameter ratio increased by about 0.1 between the ages of 30 and 70 years.
CONCLUSIONS—Age related changes are significant and measurable, and should be taken into account when assessing the glaucoma suspect, and when estimating the rate of progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in patients with established disease.

 PMID:9486023

  7. Identification and localization of lamina cribrosa cells in the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Vidales, Tara; Wordinger, Robert J; Clark, Abbot F

    2016-06-01

    One of the central features of glaucoma is progressive cupping and excavation of the optic nerve head (ONH). Unmyelinated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons exit the eye through the ONH, which is supported by the lamina cribrosa (LC) consisting of plates of connective tissue with channels for bundles of RGC axons. The LC progressively remodels during glaucoma, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this remodeling are poorly understood. Two major cell types have been isolated and cultured from the human ONH, which differ in their characteristics. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive ONH astrocytes are the major cell type and are reactive in glaucoma. GFAP negative LC cells are the second major cell type isolated from the human ONH, and in contrast to ONH astrocytes, are α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive. Although a number of in vitro studies have been conducted with LC cells, to date there has been no direct evidence for these cells in situ in the human ONH. We used GFAP and α-SMA immunofluorescent staining of human eyes to clearly demonstrate the presence of not only ONH astrocytes within the human ONH, but also LC cells within the cribriform (e.g. laminar) plates/beams of the LC region. Both of these cell types likely play important roles in the homeostatic maintenance of the ONH and pathogenic changes that occur in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). PMID:27167365

  8. The Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy for Large Nerve Perineural Spread of Cancer of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Gorayski, Peter; Foote, Matthew; Porceddu, Sandro; Poulsen, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Large nerve perineural spread (LNPNS) is an uncommon but serious sequelae of cutaneous and salivary gland malignancies arising in the head and neck. This distinct clinical entity is caused by malignant cell spread along the course of larger (named) cranial nerves in a bidirectional pattern of spread toward the origins of the nerve in the brainstem and/or its most distal branches residing in the dermis. Untreated, LNPNS causes multiple cranial neuropathies that significantly impact on quality of life and ultimately is fatal. Curative treatment involves en bloc surgical resection of all known involved sites of gross disease followed by risk-adapted postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) to improve local control. We review the evidence for contemporary practice and outline the processes involved in the delivery of PORT using the zonal anatomical classification. PMID:27123394

  9. [Ethnic differences in the parameters of the head of the optic nerve: data of optical coherent tomography].

    PubMed

    Dzhumataeva, Z A

    2007-01-01

    The determination of normalcy indices by optical coherent tomography, considering the ethnicity of an examinee, is one of the conditions for data objectivization in the diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 214 persons (428 eyes) without eyes disease, including 133 (260 eyes) natives and 81 (168 eyes) newcomers, were examined. There were significant differences in the area of the ciliary zonule and in that of excavation, as well as a slight correlation between the parameters of the head of the optic nerve in the Europeans. The found age-related and ethnic features of the head of the optic nerve may be used as normalcy indices to analyze a possible pathological process and its prediction.

  10. Effect of intracapsular hyperpressure on femoral head blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vegter, J; Klopper, P J

    1991-08-01

    Intracapsular hyperpressure in the hip joint of dogs affected femoral head blood flow, especially in the juvenile animals. Graphic recording of the laser Doppler signal curve using rapid sampling time demonstrated venous hip joint tamponade in both juvenile and adult dogs. Laser Doppler flowmetry seems to be a sensitive and reproducible method to demonstrate femoral-head blood-flow changes.

  11. Optic nerve head and intraocular pressure in the guinea pig eye.

    PubMed

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-05-01

    The guinea pig is becoming an increasingly popular model for studying human myopia, which carries an increased risk of glaucoma. As a step towards understanding this association, this study sought to characterize the normal, developmental intraocular pressure (IOP) profiles, as well as the anatomy of the optic nerve head (ONH) and adjacent sclera of young guinea pigs. IOP was tracked in pigmented guinea pigs up to 3 months of age. One guinea pig was imaged in vivo with OCT and one with a fundus camera. The eyes of pigmented and albino guinea pigs (ages 2 months) were enucleated and sections from the posterior segment, including the ONH and surrounding sclera, processed for histological analyses - either hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of paraffin embedded, sectioned tissue (n = 1), or cryostat sectioned tissue, processed for immunohistochemistry (n = 3), using primary antibodies against collagen types I-V, elastin, fibronectin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM) studies of ONHs were also undertaken (n = 2 & 5 respectively). Mean IOPs ranged from 17.33 to 22.7 mmHg, increasing slightly across the age range studied, and the IOPs of individual animals also exhibited diurnal variations, peaking in the early morning (mean of 25.8, mmHg, ∼9 am), and decreasing across the day. H&E-stained sections showed retinal ganglion cell axons organized into fascicles in the prelaminar and laminar region of the ONHs, with immunostained sections revealing collagen types I, III, IV and V, as well as elastin, GFAP and fibronectin in the ONHs. SEM revealed a well-defined lamina cribrosa (LC), with radially-oriented collagen beams. TEM revealed collagen fibrils surrounding non-myelinated nerve fiber bundles in the LC region, with myelination and decreased collagen posterior to the LC. The adjacent sclera comprised mainly crimped collagen fibers in a crisscross arrangement. Both the sclera and LC were

  12. Optic nerve head perfusion in normal eyes and eyes with glaucoma using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Gupta, Divakar; Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Kono, Rei; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the differences of perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) between normal and glaucomatous eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus 5000 HD-OCT-based OMAG prototype system centered at the ONH (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA, USA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. En face OMAG images for preLC were generated using signals with highest blood flow signal intensity. ONH perfusion was quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH. Standard t-tests were performed to analyze the ONH perfusion differences between normal and glaucomatous eyes. Linear regression models were constructed to analyze the correlation between ONH perfusion and other clinical measurements. Results Twenty normal and 21 glaucoma subjects were enrolled. Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower ONH perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics compared to normal eyes (P≤0.0003). Significant correlations between ONH perfusion and disease severity as well as structural changes were detected in glaucomatous eyes (P≤0.012). Conclusions ONH perfusion detected by OMAG showed significant differences between glaucoma and normal controls and was significantly correlated with disease severity and structural defects in glaucomatous eyes. ONH perfusion measurement using OMAG may provide useful information for detection and monitoring of glaucoma. PMID:27190764

  13. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply in the gluteal region: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kanawati, Andrew James

    2014-11-01

    Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy and blood supply are complex and largely not dealt with in common anatomy texts. Variations of the sciatic nerve anatomy can be divided into the height of division of its branches, relation of the branches to the piriformis muscle, and its blood supply. These variations should be well known to any surgeon operating in this anatomical region. It is unknown whether these variations increase the risk of surgical injury and consequent morbidity. This paper will review the current knowledge regarding anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve and its blood supply.

  14. The effect of cataract surgery on imaging optic nerve head topography with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph.

    PubMed

    Falck, Aura A K; Saarela, Ville

    2012-06-14

    Purpose. To determine whether phacoemulsification cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation interferes with measuring optic nerve head (ONH) topography using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT). Methods. The study population consisted of 31 women and 12 men aged 63-81 years with no previous history of eye diseases, surgery, laser procedures, or medication. The patients underwent first eye cataract surgery for senile cataract. The HRT II with software version 1.6 was used to obtain 3-dimensional images of the ONH as a part of a comprehensive ocular examination. The quality of the HRT image was assessed using topography standard deviation (TSD). Topography measurements are considered to be unreliable if TSD is more than 50 µm. Re-examination took place 1 month after surgery. Results. Before surgery, the topography measurements were unreliable in 35% (15/43) of the eyes; in 3 of these cases, ONH topography could not be calculated at all. One month after cataract surgery, the ONH topography could be calculated in all eyes and only one displayed unreliable topography measurements. The mean TSD was 40 µm before and 22 µm after surgery when calculated for all eyes with measurable topographies. The change in TSD was statistically significant (p<0.0005). The image alignment between the HRT examinations before and after surgery was excellent in 67% (26/39). Magnification changes occurred in 21% (8/39). Conclusions. Phacoemulsification cataract surgery with IOL implantation improves the image quality of the HRT. However, because of magnification changes and image misalignment, HRT follow-up of the ONH after cataract surgery is often unreliable.

  15. An Applet to Estimate the IOP-Induced Stress and Strain within the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The ability to predict the biomechanical response of the optic nerve head (ONH) to intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation holds great promise, yet remains elusive. The objective of this work was to introduce an approach to model ONH biomechanics that combines the ease of use and speed of analytical models with the flexibility and power of numerical models. Methods. Models representing a variety of ONHs were produced, and finite element (FE) techniques used to predict the stresses (forces) and strains (relative deformations) induced on each of the models by IOP elevations (up to 10 mm Hg). Multivariate regression was used to parameterize each biomechanical response as an analytical function. These functions were encoded into a Flash-based applet. Applet utility was demonstrated by investigating hypotheses concerning ONH biomechanics posited in the literature. Results. All responses were parameterized well by polynomials (R2 values between 0.985 and 0.999), demonstrating the effectiveness of our fitting approach. Previously published univariate results were reproduced with the applet in seconds. A few minutes allowed for multivariate analysis, with which it was predicted that often, but not always, larger eyes experience higher levels of stress and strain than smaller ones, even at the same IOP. Conclusions. An applet has been presented with which it is simple to make rapid estimates of IOP-related ONH biomechanics. The applet represents a step toward bringing the power of FE modeling beyond the specialized laboratory and can thus help develop more refined biomechanics-based hypotheses. The applet is available for use at www.ocularbiomechanics.com. PMID:21527378

  16. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  17. A Modeling of Cerebral Blood Flow Changes due to Head Motion for fNIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nara, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Inoue, Masao; Shimizu, Shunji; Kojima, Satoru

    2013-04-01

    A method is proposed for measuring brain activity during exercises involving head motion by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which investigates cerebral hemodynamics. Obtaining measurements during exercise is difficult because cerebral blood flow changes due to the head motion component (HMC), in addition to neural activity. HMC is an undesirable artifact in the measurement of hemodynamic response caused by neural activity, and as such, it must be estimated and eliminated. In our experiments, cerebral blood flow and head motion were measured during repeated passive forward bending of the subjects. Head motion was measured by 3-D motion capture, and HMC was estimated by deriving a relation between head motion and cerebral blood flow, where the pitch angle was found to be suitable for estimating HMC. In this research, an assumption was made that cerebral blood flow caused by neural activity and that caused by postural change were additive, and thus HMC was eliminated by subtraction.

  18. On the vagal cardiac nerves, with special reference to the early evolution of the head-trunk interface.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Hyodo, Susumu; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve, or the tenth cranial nerve, innervates the heart in addition to other visceral organs, including the posterior visceral arches. In amniotes, the anterior and posterior cardiac branches arise from the branchial and intestinal portions of the vagus nerve to innervate the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. The evolution of this innervation pattern has yet to be elucidated, due mainly to the lack of morphological data on the vagus in basal vertebrates. To investigate this topic, we observed the vagus nerves of the lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), and mouse (Mus musculus), focusing on the embryonic patterns of the vagal branches in the venous pole. In the lamprey, no vagus branch was found in the venous pole throughout development, whereas the arterial pole was innervated by a branch from the branchial portion. In contrast, the vagus innervated the arterial and venous poles in the mouse and elephant shark. Based on the morphological patterns of these branches, the venous vagal branches of the mouse and elephant shark appear to belong to the intestinal part of the vagus, implying that the cardiac nerve pattern is conserved among crown gnathostomes. Furthermore, we found a topographical shift of the structures adjacent to the venous pole (i.e., the hypoglossal nerve and pronephros) between the extant gnathostomes and lamprey. Phylogenetically, the lamprey morphology is likely to be the ancestral condition for vertebrates, suggesting that the evolution of the venous branch occurred early in the gnathostome lineage, in parallel with the remodeling of the head-trunk interfacial domain during the acquisition of the neck. J. Morphol. 277:1146-1158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27216138

  19. Radiation treatment inhibits monocyte entry into the optic nerve head and prevents neuronal damage in a mouse model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Gareth R.; Soto, Ileana; Zhu, Xianjun; Ryan, Margaret; Macalinao, Danilo G.; Sousa, Gregory L.; Caddle, Lura B.; MacNicoll, Katharine H.; Barbay, Jessica M.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Anderson, Michael G.; Smith, Richard S.; Clark, Abbot F.; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common ocular disorder that is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. It is characterized by the dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although many studies have implicated various molecules in glaucoma, no mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the earliest detectable damage to RGCs and their axons in the optic nerve. Here, we show that the leukocyte transendothelial migration pathway is activated in the optic nerve head at the earliest stages of disease in an inherited mouse model of glaucoma. This resulted in proinflammatory monocytes entering the optic nerve prior to detectable neuronal damage. A 1-time x-ray treatment prevented monocyte entry and subsequent glaucomatous damage. A single x-ray treatment of an individual eye in young mice provided that eye with long-term protection from glaucoma but had no effect on the contralateral eye. Localized radiation treatment prevented detectable neuronal damage and dysfunction in treated eyes, despite the continued presence of other glaucomatous stresses and signaling pathways. Injection of endothelin-2, a damaging mediator produced by the monocytes, into irradiated eyes, combined with the other glaucomatous stresses, restored neural damage with a topography characteristic of glaucoma. Together, these data support a model of glaucomatous damage involving monocyte entry into the optic nerve. PMID:22426214

  20. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  1. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  2. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Nerve system and mutual interaction between bone and blood vessel].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hiroki; Takeda, Shu

    2014-07-01

    The identification that nervous system controls bone metabolism through leptin deficient mice studies opened a new field in bone biology. Notably, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve system regulate bone metabolism. In addition, sensory nerve system also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis. On the other hand, traditionally, it is well known that invasion of vessels into cartilage during the skeletal development is important for normal bone formation. And, the decrease of angiogenesis with aging leads to low bone mass and delaying of fracture healing. Although these indicate that blood vessel activity is closely related to bone remodeling, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. Most recently, the mechanism of coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis by a specific vessel subtype in bone was reported.

  3. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thicknesses in Three Different Optic Nerve Head Size Groups Measured by Cirrus Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gür Güngör, Sirel; Akman, Ahmet; Küçüködük, Ali; Çolak, Meriç

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses in three different optic nerve head (ONH) size groups measured by Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods: Between January and March 2013, 253 eyes of 253 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study (mean age: 42.7±7.4 years [28-62 years]; 121 men and 132 women). The patients were divided into 3 groups according to ONH size: 77 patients in the “small ONH” group (ONH area <1.63 mm2), 90 patients in the “medium ONH” group (ONH area 1.63-1.97 mm2), and 86 patients in the “large ONH” group (ONH area >1.97 mm2). Results: There were significant differences in superior (p=0.008), inferior (p=0.004) and average RNFL thickness (p=0.001) between the small, medium and large ONH groups. Positive correlations between ONH size and inferior/average RNFL thicknesses were significant but very weak (r=0.150, p=0.017 and r=0.157, p=0.013 respectively). Conclusion: RNFL thickness as measured by Cirrus OCT is positively correlated with ONH size and the differences in RNFL thickness were statistically significant between groups. This correlation and difference may be the result of a varying distance between the circular scan and the ONH margin. PMID:27800261

  4. Does Optic Nerve Head Size Variation Affect Circumpapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement by Optical Coherence Tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, David; Chopra, Vikas; Lu, Ake Tzu-Hui; Tan, Ou; Francis, Brian; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the relationship between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, optic disc size, and image magnification. Methods. The cohort consisted of 196 normal eyes of 101 participants in the Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study (AIGS), a multicenter, prospective, longitudinal study to develop advanced imaging technologies for glaucoma diagnosis. Scanning laser tomography was used to measure disc size. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to perform circumpapillary RNFL thickness measurements using the standard fixed 3.46-mm nominal scan diameter. A theoretical model of magnification effects was developed to relate RNFL thickness (overall average) with axial length and magnification. Results. Multivariate regression showed no significant correlation between RNFL thickness and optic disc area (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.9 to 4.1 μm/mm2, P = 0.21). Linear regression showed that RNFL thickness depended significantly on axial length (slope = −3.1 μm/mm, 95% CI = −4.9 to −1.3, P = 0.001) and age (slope = −0.3 μm/y, 95% CI = −0.5 to −0.2, P = 0.0002). The slope values agreed closely with the values predicted by the magnification model. Conclusions. There is no significant association between RNFL thickness and optic disc area. Previous publications that showed such an association may have been biased by the effect of axial length on fundus image magnification and, therefore, both measured RNFL thickness and apparent disc area. The true diameter of the circumpapillary OCT scan is larger for a longer eye (more myopic eye), leading to a thinner RNFL measurement. Adjustment of measured RNFL thickness by axial length, in addition to age, may lead to a tighter normative range and improve the detection of RNFL thinning due to glaucoma. PMID:22743319

  5. A lab-on-a-chip for detection of nerve agent sarin in blood.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2008-06-01

    Sarin (C(4)H(10)FO(2)P,O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is a colourless, odourless and highly toxic phosphonate that acts as a cholinesterase inhibitor and disrupts neuromuscular transmission. Sarin and related phosphonates are chemical warfare agents, and there is a possibility of their application in a military or terrorist attack. This paper reports a lab-on-a-chip device for detecting a trace amount of sarin in a small volume of blood. The device should allow early detection of sarin exposure during medical triage to differentiate between those requiring medical treatment from mass psychogenic illness cases. The device is based on continuous-flow microfluidics with sequential stages for lysis of whole blood, regeneration of free nerve agent from its complex with blood cholinesterase, protein precipitation, filtration, enzyme-assisted reaction and optical detection. Whole blood was first mixed with a nerve gas regeneration agent, followed by a protein precipitation step. Subsequently, the lysed product was filtered on the chip in two steps to remove particulates and fluoride ions. The filtered blood sample was then tested for trace levels of regenerated sarin using immobilised cholinesterase on the chip. Activity of immobilised cholinesterase was monitored by the enzyme-assisted reaction of a substrate and reaction of the end-product with a chromophore. Resultant changes in chromophore-induced absorbance were recorded on the chip using a Z-shaped optical window. Loss of enzyme activity obtained prior and after passage of the treated blood sample, as shown by a decrease in recorded absorbance values, indicates the presence of either free or regenerated sarin in the blood sample. The device was fabricated in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) using CO(2)-laser micromachining. This paper reports the testing results of the different stages, as well as the whole device with all stages in the required assay sequence. The results demonstrate the potential use of a

  6. Renal nerves mediate changes in contralateral renal blood flow after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Connors, Bret A; Evan, Andrew P; Willis, Lynn R; Simon, Jay R; Fineberg, Naomi S; Lifshitz, David A; Shalhav, Arieh L; Paterson, Ryan F; Kuo, Ramsay L; Lingeman, James E

    2003-01-01

    Renal blood flow falls in both kidneys following delivery of a clinical dose of shockwaves (SW) (2000 SW, 24 kV, Dornier HM3) to only one kidney. The role of renal nerves in this response was examined in a porcine model of renal denervation. Six-week-old pigs underwent unilateral renal denervation. Nerves along the renal artery of one kidney were identified, sectioned and painted with 10% phenol. Two weeks later the pigs were anesthetized and baseline renal function was determined using inulin and PAH clearances. Animals then had either sham-shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) (group 1), SWL to the innervated kidney (group 2) or SWL to the denervated kidney (group 3). Bilateral renal function was again measured 1 and 4 h after SWL. Both kidneys were then removed for analysis of norepinephrine content to validate the denervation. Renal plasma (RPF) flow was significantly reduced in shocked innervated kidneys (group 2) and shocked denervated kidneys (group 3). RPF was not reduced in the unshocked denervated kidneys of group 2. These observations suggest that renal nerves play a pivotal role in modulating the vascular response of the contralateral unshocked kidney to SWL, but only a partial role, if any, in modulating that response in the shocked kidney.

  7. Blood pressure control with selective vagal nerve stimulation and minimal side effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Cota, Oscar; Espinosa, Nayeli; Boeser, Fabian; Herrera, Taliana C.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Hypertension is the largest threat to patient health and a burden to health care systems. Despite various options, 30% of patients do not respond sufficiently to medical treatment. Mechanoreceptors in the aortic arch relay blood pressure (BP) levels through vagal nerve (VN) fibers to the brainstem and trigger the baroreflex, lowering the BP. Selective electrical stimulation of these nerve fibers reduced BP in rats. However, there is no technique described to localize and stimulate these fibers inside the VN without inadvertent stimulation of non-baroreceptive fibers causing side effects like bradycardia and bradypnea. Approach. We present a novel method for selective VN stimulation to reduce BP without the aforementioned side effects. Baroreceptor compound activity of rat VN (n = 5) was localized using a multichannel cuff electrode, true tripolar recording and a coherent averaging algorithm triggered by BP or electrocardiogram. Main results. Tripolar stimulation over electrodes near the barofibers reduced the BP without triggering significant bradycardia and bradypnea. The BP drop was adjusted to 60% of the initial value by varying the stimulation pulse width and duration, and lasted up to five times longer than the stimulation. Significance. The presented method is robust to impedance changes, independent of the electrode's relative position, does not compromise the nerve and can run on implantable, ultra-low power signal processors.

  8. Leptin into the rostral ventral lateral medulla (RVLM) augments renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Maria J.; McDougal, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone released from adipose tissue. While this hormone normally acts to reduce feeding behavior and increase energy expenditure, in obesity, resistance to these effects occurs even though the hormone is released in large amounts. Although leptin no longer works to suppress feeding in the obese, leptin retains its potent effects on other autonomic functions such as blood pressure regulation. Leptin has been associated with hypertension and increased sympathetic autonomic activity. Therefore, leptin is emerging as a major contributor to the hypertensive state observed in obesity. Sympathetic control of blood pressure is maintained principally by autonomic reflex control circuits in the caudal brainstem. The rostral ventral-lateral medulla (RVLM) is the primary regulator of the sympathetic nervous system, sending excitatory fibers to sympathetic preganglionic neurons to regulate sympathetic control over resistance vessels and blood pressure. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that neurons in the ventral lateral medulla express leptin receptors (ObRb). Our present study using pseudo-rabies multi-synaptic retrograde tract tracing and immunohistochemical methods revealed that neurons within the RVLM that send sympathetic projections to the kidney express leptin receptors. Acute microinjection of leptin (1 and 3 μg; 40 nL) into the RVLM evoked a significant increase in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). When the 3 μg dose of leptin was preceded with a leptin antagonist, (SLAN-4; 1 ng), it attenuated the cardiovascular response of leptin. Taken together, these data suggest that leptin's actions within the RVLM may influence blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:25152707

  9. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of the Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Teresa C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that video-rate spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) can qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) glaucomatous structural changes. To correlate quantitative SDOCT parameters with disc photography and visual fields. Methods: SDOCT images from 4 glaucoma eyes (4 patients) with varying stages of open-angle glaucoma (ie, early, moderate, late) were qualitatively contrasted with 2 age-matched normal eyes (2 patients). Of 61 other consecutive patients recruited in an institutional setting, 53 eyes (33 patients) met inclusion/exclusion criteria for quantitative studies. Images were obtained using two experimental SDOCT systems, one utilizing a superluminescent diode and the other a titanium:sapphire laser source, with axial resolutions of about 6 μm and 3 μm, respectively. Results: Classic glaucomatous ONH and RNFL structural changes were seen in SDOCT images. An SDOCT reference plane 139 μm above the retinal pigment epithelium yielded cup-disc ratios that best correlated with masked physician disc photography cup-disc ratio assessments. The minimum distance band, a novel SDOCT neuroretinal rim parameter, showed good correlation with physician cup-disc ratio assessments, visual field mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation (P values range, .0003–.024). RNFL and retinal thickness maps correlated well with disc photography and visual field testing. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this thesis presents the first comprehensive qualitative and quantitative evaluation of SDOCT images of the ONH and RNFL in glaucoma. This pilot study provides basis for developing more automated quantitative SDOCT-specific glaucoma algorithms needed for future prospective multicenter national trials. PMID:20126502

  10. Design and Validation of a Method to Determine the Position of the Fovea by Using the Nerve-Head to Fovea Distance of the Fellow Eye

    PubMed Central

    van de Put, Mathijs A. J.; Nayebi, Fara; Croonen, Danna; Nolte, Ilja M.; Japing, Wouter J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure the nerve-head to fovea distance (NFD) on fundus photographs in fellow eyes, and to compare the NFD between fellow eyes. Methods Diabetic patients without retinopathy, (n = 183) who were screened by fundus photography at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands from January 1st 2005 until January 1st 2006 were included. The NFD was measured in left and right eyes both from the center and from the rim of the nerve-head. To determine inter- and intra-observer agreement, repeated measurements by one observer (n = 3) were performed on all photographs and by two observers on 60 photographs (30 paired eyes). The effect of age, gender, and refractive error on NFD was analysed. Results The correlation of NFDs between the left and the right eye was 0.958 when measured from the center of the nerve head (mean difference 0.0078 mm. ±SD 0.079 (95% limits of agreement −0.147–0.163)) and 0.963 when measured from the rim (mean difference 0.0056±SD 0.073 (95% limits of agreement −0.137–0.149)). Using the NFD between fellow eyes interchangeably, resulted in a standard error of 0.153 mm. Intra- and inter-observer variability was small. We found a significant effect of age (center of the nerve-head (P = 0.006) and rim of the nerve head (P = 0.003)) and refractive error (center of nerve-head (P<0.001) and rim of nerve head (P<0.001)) on NFD. Conclusions The NFD in one eye provides a confident, reproducible, and valid method to address the position of the fovea in the fellow eye. We recommend using the NFD measured from the center of the nerve-head since the standard error by this method was smallest. Age and refractive error have an effect on NFD. PMID:23667483

  11. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  12. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  13. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits.

  14. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability.

  15. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  16. The Connective Tissue Components of Optic Nerve Head Cupping in Monkey Experimental Glaucoma Part 1: Global Change

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Ren, Ruojin; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, Crawford; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue change within 21 monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) eyes, so as to identify its principal components. Methods Animals were imaged three to five times at baseline then every 2 weeks following chronic unilateral IOP elevation, and euthanized early through end-stage confocal scanning laser tomographic change. Optic nerve heads were serial-sectioned, three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall EG versus control eye differences were assessed by general estimating equations (GEE). Significant, animal-specific, EG eye change was required to exceed the maximum physiologic intereye differences in six healthy animals. Results Overall EG eye change was significant (P < 0.0026) and animal-specific EG eye change most frequent, for five phenomena (number of EG eyes and range of animal-specific change): posterior laminar deformation (21, −29 to −437 μm), laminar thickening (11, 20–73 μm) and thinning (3, −23 to −31 μm), scleral canal expansion (17, 20–139 μm), outward anterior (16, −16 to −124 μm) and posterior (17, −22 to −279 μm) laminar insertion migration, and peripapillary scleral bowing (11, 21–77 μm). Experimental glaucoma versus control eye laminar thickness differences were bimodal in behavior, being thickened in most EG eyes demonstrating the least deformation and less thickened or thinned in most EG eyes demonstrating the greatest deformation. Conclusions Our postmortem studies retrospectively identify five connective tissue components of ONH “cupping” in monkey EG which serve as targets for longitudinally staging and phenotyping ONH connective tissue alteration within all forms of monkey and human optic neuropathy. PMID:26641545

  17. Species differences in the reflex effects of lingual afferent nerve stimulation on lip blood flow and arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Koeda, S; Yasuda, M; Izumi, H

    2003-11-01

    We evoked changes in lower lip blood flow and systemic arterial blood pressure by electrically stimulating the central cut end of the lingual nerve in artificially ventilated, urethane-anesthetized, cervically vago-sympathectomized cats, rats, rabbits, and guinea pig. The systemic arterial blood pressure changes were species-dependent: increases in rat, consistent decreases in rabbit and guinea pig, and variable among individuals in cat. In cat and rabbit, lip blood flow increases, which occurred only ipsilaterally to the stimulated nerve and showed no statistically significant correlation with the systemic arterial blood pressure changes. In rat, the ipsilateral lip blood flow increase was markedly greater than the contralateral one, and although there was a significant correlation between each of them and the systemic arterial blood pressure changes, the ipsilateral increase presumably included an active vasodilatation. In guinea pig, lip blood flow decreased on both sides in proportion to the systemic arterial blood pressure reductions. Thus, species variability exists in the sympathetic-mediated systemic arterial blood pressure changes and parasympathetic-mediated lip blood flow responses themselves, and in the relationship between them. PMID:12920546

  18. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  19. Determination of cyanide in blood by reaction head-space gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Felby, Søren

    2009-01-01

    A method describing determination of cyanide in blood by head-space gas chromatography with electron capture detector was reported. The method involves transformation of cyanide into cyanogen chloride by reacting hydrogen cyanide with chloramine-T on a stick of filter paper in the space above the blood in the head-space vial. The recovery was 84-96% and the coefficient of variation was 3.3-7.2%. The limit of quantitation was about 0.01 mg cyanide/l.

  20. Blood-Sparing Techniques in Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Mindy R; Cognetti, David M; Nyquist, Gurston G

    2016-06-01

    Given the risks and potential complications of allogenic blood transfusion (ABT), as well as the expanding population of patients for whom ABT may not be an option, it is important for the treating physician, anesthesiologist, and surgeon to be well-versed in various alternatives. A good grasp of the concepts discussed in this article will help to customize a treatment plan that is specific to each patient's underlying disease and personal preferences without compromising appropriate medical care. PMID:27267010

  1. Blood-Sparing Techniques in Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Mindy R; Cognetti, David M; Nyquist, Gurston G

    2016-06-01

    Given the risks and potential complications of allogenic blood transfusion (ABT), as well as the expanding population of patients for whom ABT may not be an option, it is important for the treating physician, anesthesiologist, and surgeon to be well-versed in various alternatives. A good grasp of the concepts discussed in this article will help to customize a treatment plan that is specific to each patient's underlying disease and personal preferences without compromising appropriate medical care.

  2. Experimental Glaucoma Causes Optic Nerve Head Neural Rim Tissue Compression: A Potentially Important Mechanism of Axon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Reynaud, Juan; Hardin, Christy; Wang, Lin; Sigal, Ian A.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that experimental glaucoma (EG) results in greater thinning of the optic nerve head (ONH) neural rim tissue than the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) tissue. Methods Longitudinal spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging of the ONH and peripapillary RNFL was performed every other week under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 nonhuman primates (NHP) during baseline and after induction of unilateral EG. The ONH parameter minimum rim area (MRA) was derived from 80 radial B-scans centered on the ONH; RNFL cross-sectional area (RNFLA) from a peripapillary circular B-scan with 12° diameter. Results In control eyes, MRA was 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline and 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at the final session (P = 0.77), while RNFLA was 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.95 ± 0.10 mm2, respectively (P = 0.96). In EG eyes, MRA decreased from 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline to 0.63 ± 0.21 mm2 at the final session (P < 0.0001), while RNFLA decreased from 0.95 ± 0.09 to 0.74 ± 0.19 mm2, respectively (P < 0.0001). Thus, MRA decreased by 36.4 ± 20.6% in EG eyes, significantly more than the decrease in RNFLA (21.7 ± 19.4%, P < 0.0001). Other significant changes in EG eyes included increased Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) nonplanarity (P < 0.05), decreased BMO aspect ratio (P < 0.0001), and decreased MRA angle (P < 0.001). Bruch's membrane opening area did not change from baseline in either control or EG eyes (P = 0.27, P = 0.15, respectively). Conclusions Optic nerve head neural rim tissue thinning exceeded peripapillary RNFL thinning in NHP EG. These results support the hypothesis that axon bundles are compressed transversely within the ONH rim along with glaucomatous deformation of connective tissues. PMID:27564522

  3. Imaging blood vessels of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, R J

    1995-01-01

    ATHEROSCLEROTIC DISEASE: Patients with transient ischaemic attacks or a non-disabling stroke who are surgical candidates should be screened with Doppler ultrasound, or MRA/CT, or both. The choice will depend on local expertise and availability. If DUS is used it is recommended that the equipment is regularly calibrated and a prospective audit of results, particularly of those patients that go on to angiography, is maintained locally. Those patients found to have the DUS equivalent of a 50% stenosis should have angiography only if surgical or balloon angioplasty treatment is contemplated. Angiography should be performed with meticulous technique to minimise risks. ANEURYSM AND ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS: Angiography remains the investigation of choice for patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography and CT can demonstrate the larger aneurysm but because even small aneurysms can rupture with devastating effects, these techniques are not the examination of first choice. Angiography is also the only technique that adequately defines the neck of an aneurysm. This information is becoming increasingly important in management decisions-for instance, whether to clip or use a coil. Likewise angiography is the only technique to fully define the vascular anatomy of arteriovenous malformations although the size of the nidus can be monitored by MRA and this is a useful method of follow up after stereotactic radiosurgery, embolisation, or surgery. There are specific uses for MRA such as in patients presenting with a painful 3rd nerve palsy and as a screening test for those patients with a strong family history of aneurysms. VASCULITIS, FIBROMUSCULAR HYPERPLASIA, AND DISSECTION: These rare arterial diseases are best detected by angiography, although there are increasing reports of successful diagnosis by MRA. There are traps for the many unwary and MRA does not give an anatomical depiction of the arteries but a flow map. Slow flow may lead to signal loss

  4. Analysis of H2 clearance curves used to measure blood flow in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Day, T J; Lagerlund, T D; Low, P A

    1989-01-01

    1. By use of the H2 clearance technique, blood flow was measured in the sciatic nerve of healthy, anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at rest, during inferior vena cava occlusion and during 5-hydroxytryptamine infusion. The purpose was to clarify the mechanisms underlying the biexponential curves which are commonly obtained using this technique. 2. An analysis of the frequency distribution of rate constants of 270 nerve and thirty-three arterial samples indicated that H2 clearance rates cluster below 20 ml min-1 100 g-1 and between 70 and 100 ml min-1 100 g-1. This suggests that at least two compartments are present. 3. The contribution of diffusion was studied by recording H2 clearance immediately following circulatory arrest. Slow clearance rates (median = 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1) were observed, indicating that diffusion is not likely to contribute significantly to nutritive flow under most situations. 4. The contribution of arteriovenous shunts to H2 clearance was assessed by determining H2 clearance during inferior vena cava occlusion and the infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Both manoeuvres caused abolition of, or a significant reduction in the weight of, the fast component which indicates that this compartment is closely related to arteriovenous shunts in nerve. 5. By use of a multi-compartmental model, it was shown that H2 clearance should follow a multi-exponential course, where the weights of the components reflect the relative volumes of each compartment and the exponents represent the relative flow (i.e. flow per unit volume) in each compartment. 6. By use of other mathematical models, estimates were made for the clearance rates attributable to polarographic oxidation of H2 at the tip of the microelectrode (0.2 ml min-1 100 g-1) and to diffusion to air (2 ml min-1 100 g-1). The latter estimate is very close to the measured value of 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1. 7. These findings indicate that it is possible to separately assess nutritive and non-nutritive flow by

  5. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  6. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  7. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe.

    PubMed

    Brøndum, E; Hasenkam, J M; Secher, N H; Bertelsen, M F; Grøndahl, C; Petersen, K K; Buhl, R; Aalkjaer, C; Baandrup, U; Nygaard, H; Smerup, M; Stegmann, F; Sloth, E; Ostergaard, K H; Nissen, P; Runge, M; Pitsillides, K; Wang, T

    2009-10-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow remained unchanged. Cardiac output was reduced by 30%, CVP decreased to -1 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.01), and jugular flow ceased as the jugular cross-sectional area increased to 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (P < 0.01), corresponding to accumulation of approximately 1.2 l of blood in the veins. When the head was raised, the jugular veins collapsed and blood was returned to the central circulation, and CVP and cardiac output were restored. The results demonstrate that in the upright-positioned, anesthetized giraffe cerebral blood flow is governed by arterial pressure without support of a siphon mechanism and that when the head is lowered, blood accumulates in the vein, affecting MAP.

  8. Cerebral blood velocity and other cardiovascular responses to 2 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary A. B.; Mader, Thomas H.; Bagian, James P.; Charles, John B.; Meehan, Richard T.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body, and space motion sickness, which is a problem during the first few days of space flight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system. To evaluate possible changes in cerebral blood flow during simulated weightlessness, we measured blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) along with retinal vascular diameters, intraocular pressure, impedance cardiography, and sphygmomanometry on nine men (26.2 +/- 6.6 yr) morning and evening for 2 days during continuous 10 deg head-down tilt (HDT). When subjects went from seated to head-down bed rest, their heart rate and retinal diameters decreased, and intraocular pressures increased. After 48 h of HDT, blood flow velocity in the MCA was decreased and thoracic impedance was increased, indicating less fluid in the thorax. Percent changes in blood flow velocities in the MCA after 48 h of HDT were inversely correlated with percent changes in retinal vascular diameters. Blood flow velocities in the MCA were inversely correlated (intersubject) with arterial pressures and retinal vascular diameters. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic arterial pressure, and at times pulse pressure and blood flow velocities in the MCA were greater in the evening. Total peripheral resistance was higher in the morning. Although cerebral blood velocity is reduced after subjects are head down for 2 days, the inverse relationship with retinal vessel diameters, which have control analogous to that of cerebral vessels, indicates cerebral blood flow is not reduced.

  9. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications.

  10. Optic nerve head characteristics in eyes with papillomacular bundle defects in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aparna; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the pattern of retinal nerve fibre layer defects (RNFLD) with regard to involvement of papillomacular bundle (PMB) in glaucoma. This observational study included patients attending glaucoma imaging services at our centre from 2011 to 2012. All images were exported to Image J software for analysis and rescaled to a unified scale for measurement of degree of RNFLD defined by its angular width, pattern of involvement with regard to involvement or sparing of PMB in particular and horizontal and vertical distance of central vessel trunk (CVT) from the disc margin. Association of clinical data with pattern of defects with regard to PMB involvement was analysed. Sixty-two fundus photographs with discernible nerve fibre layer defects on red free images were selected, including 48 normal tension glaucoma, two primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) and 12 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) eyes. Discernible PMB involvement was seen in 35 eyes which included 31 defects in inferior quadrant while CVT exit was placed in the quadrant opposite to the quadrant of RNFLD in that eye. The mean vertical distance from the nearest disc margin was greater in eyes without PMB involvement, 0.4 ± 0.02 mm, than eyes with PMB defects, 0.3 ± 0.01 mm, p < 0.001. On multivariate logistic regression, PMB involvement was significantly associated with decreased linear horizontal of the CVT from the disc margin, p = 0.003. Selective involvement of superior and inferior PMB suggests different retinotopic representation within the optic disc. Exit of the CVT towards the disc margin may be a predisposing factor for RNFLD and involvement of the PMB.

  11. Effect of Head Rotation on Cerebral Blood Velocity in the Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    Højlund, Jakob; Sandmand, Marie; Sonne, Morten; Mantoni, Teit; Jørgensen, Henrik L.; Belhage, Bo; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Pott, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prone position is applied to facilitate surgery of the back and to improve oxygenation in the respirator-treated patient. In particular, with positive pressure ventilation the prone position reduces venous return to the heart and in turn cardiac output (CO) with consequences for cerebral blood flow. We tested in healthy subjects the hypothesis that rotating the head in the prone position reduces cerebral blood flow. Methods. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined, together with the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) and jugular vein diameters bilaterally in 22 healthy subjects in the prone position with the head centered, respectively, rotated sideways, with and without positive pressure breathing (10 cmH2O). Results. The prone position reduced SV (by 5.4 ± 1.5%; P < 0.05) and CO (by 2.3 ± 1.9 %), and slightly increased MAP (from 78 ± 3 to 80 ± 2 mmHg) as well as bilateral jugular vein diameters, leaving MCA Vmean unchanged. Positive pressure breathing in the prone position increased MAP (by 3.6 ± 0.8 mmHg) but further reduced SV and CO (by 9.3 ± 1.3 % and 7.2 ± 2.4 % below baseline) while MCA Vmean was maintained. The head-rotated prone position with positive pressure breathing augmented MAP further (87 ± 2 mmHg) but not CO, narrowed both jugular vein diameters, and reduced MCA Vmean (by 8.6 ± 3.2 %). Conclusion. During positive pressure breathing the prone position with sideways rotated head reduces MCA Vmean ~10% in spite of an elevated MAP. Prone positioning with rotated head affects both CBF and cerebrovenous drainage indicating that optimal brain perfusion requires head centering. PMID:22988456

  12. Intraoperative radiation of canine carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Therapeutic applications in the management of advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.B.; Pelzer, H.; Tsao, C.S.; Ward, W.F.; Johnson, P.; Friedman, C.; Sisson, G.A. Sr.; Kies, M. )

    1990-12-01

    As a step in the application of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for treating advanced head and neck cancers, preliminary information was obtained on the radiation tolerance of the canine common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve to a single, high-dose electron beam. Both sides of the neck of eight mongrel dogs were operated on to expose an 8-cm segment of common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. One side of the neck was irradiated, using escalating doses of 2500, 3500, 4500, and 5500 cGy. The contralateral side of the neck served as the unirradiated control. At 3 and 6 months after IORT, one dog at each dose level was killed. None of the dogs developed carotid bleeding at any time after IORT. Light microscopic investigations using hematoxylin-eosin staining on the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein showed no consistent changes that suggested radiation damage; however, the Masson trichrome stain and hydroxyproline concentration of irradiated common carotid artery indicated an increase in the collagen content of the tunica media. Marked changes in the irradiated vagus nerve were seen, indicating severe demyelination and loss of nerve fibers, which appeared to be radiation-dose dependent. Four patients with advanced recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with surgical resection and IORT without any acute or subacute complications. The role of IORT as a supplement to surgery, external beam irradiation, and chemotherapy in selected patients with advanced head and neck cancer needs further exploration.

  13. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  14. Effects of lower body positive pressure on muscle sympathetic nerve activity response [correction of respopnse] to head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Fu, Q; Iwase, S; Niimi, Y; Kamiya, A; Kawanokuchi, J; Cui, J; Mano, T

    2001-07-01

    The benefits of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are generally accepted for clinical treatment in medical emergencies caused by massive bleeding to maintain the systemic blood pressure. They are also used by NASA post spaceflight for preventing orthostatic hypotension in the astronauts. However, controversy still exists concerning the mechanisms underlying LBPP benefits. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the baroreflex-mediated enhancement in sympathetic activity would be attenuated by LBPP during an orthostatic challenge in humans. Specifically, we studied 1) the sympathetic activity responses by the microneurographic technique, using direct intraneural measurement of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA); and 2) the contributions of preload and afterload to the chances in MSNA response during orthostasis on application of LBPP. To accomplish these issues, MSNA was recorded microneurographically along with noninvasive measurement of the cardiovascular variables in all the subjects during exposure to a 70 degrees HUT with 30-mm Hg LBPP.

  15. Ultrahigh-Speed Optical Coherence Tomography for Three-Dimensional and En Face Imaging of the Retina and Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Adler, Desmond C.; Chen, Yueli; Gorczynska, Iwona; Huber, Robert; Duker, Jay S.; Schuman, Joel S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second and a wavelength of 1060 nm. To investigate methods for visualization of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve using high-density sampling enabled by improved imaging speed. Methods A swept-source OCT retinal imaging system operating at a speed of 249,000 axial scans per second was developed. Imaging of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve were performed. Display methods such as speckle reduction, slicing along arbitrary planes, en face visualization of reflectance from specific retinal layers, and image compounding were investigated. Results High-definition and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the normal retina and optic nerve head were performed. Increased light penetration at 1060 nm enabled improved visualization of the choroid, lamina cribrosa, and sclera. OCT fundus images and 3D visualizations were generated with higher pixel density and less motion artifacts than standard spectral/Fourier domain OCT. En face images enabled visualization of the porous structure of the lamina cribrosa, nerve fiber layer, choroid, photoreceptors, RPE, and capillaries of the inner retina. Conclusions Ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second is possible. The improvement of ∼5 to 10× in imaging speed over commercial spectral/Fourier domain OCT technology enables higher density raster scan protocols and improved performance of en face visualization methods. The combination of the longer wavelength and ultrahigh imaging speed enables excellent visualization of the choroid, sclera, and lamina cribrosa. PMID:18658089

  16. Influence of long-term head-down body position on innervation density in extremity blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorant, M.; Raffai, G.; Nadasy, G.; Feher, E.; Monos, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitate and compare the density of nerve terminals (NTD), as well as of their synaptic vesicle population (SyVD) in saphenous and brachial vein and artery, obtained from rats maintained in the horizontal or head-down tilted (HDT) position for two weeks. The same technique was applied as that for the head-up tilt study.

  17. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation.

  18. Automated discovery of structural features of the optic nerve head on the basis of image and genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of optic nerve head (ONH) structure is a commonly used clinical technique for both diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma. Glaucoma is associated with characteristic changes in the structure of the ONH. We present a method for computationally identifying ONH structural features using both imaging and genetic data from a large cohort of participants at risk for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Using 1054 participants from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study, ONH structure was measured by application of a stereo correspondence algorithm to stereo fundus images. In addition, the genotypes of several known POAG genetic risk factors were considered for each participant. ONH structural features were discovered using both a principal component analysis approach to identify the major modes of variance within structural measurements and a linear discriminant analysis approach to capture the relationship between genetic risk factors and ONH structure. The identified ONH structural features were evaluated based on the strength of their associations with genotype and development of POAG by the end of the OHTS study. ONH structural features with strong associations with genotype were identified for each of the genetic loci considered. Several identified ONH structural features were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with the development of POAG after Bonferroni correction. Further, incorporation of genetic risk status was found to substantially increase performance of early POAG prediction. These results suggest incorporating both imaging and genetic data into ONH structural modeling significantly improves the ability to explain POAG-related changes to ONH structure.

  19. Electrical Stimulation of the Ear, Head, Cranial Nerve, or Cortex for the Treatment of Tinnitus: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Adjamian, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is often associated with hearing loss and is thought to result from abnormal neural activity at some point or points in the auditory pathway, which is incorrectly interpreted by the brain as an actual sound. Neurostimulation therapies therefore, which interfere on some level with that abnormal activity, are a logical approach to treatment. For tinnitus, where the pathological neuronal activity might be associated with auditory and other areas of the brain, interventions using electromagnetic, electrical, or acoustic stimuli separately, or paired electrical and acoustic stimuli, have been proposed as treatments. Neurostimulation therapies should modulate neural activity to deliver a permanent reduction in tinnitus percept by driving the neuroplastic changes necessary to interrupt abnormal levels of oscillatory cortical activity and restore typical levels of activity. This change in activity should alter or interrupt the tinnitus percept (reduction or extinction) making it less bothersome. Here we review developments in therapies involving electrical stimulation of the ear, head, cranial nerve, or cortex in the treatment of tinnitus which demonstrably, or are hypothesised to, interrupt pathological neuronal activity in the cortex associated with tinnitus. PMID:27403346

  20. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves.

  1. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  2. Effect of inferior alveolar nerve axotomy on periodontal and pulpal blood flow subsequent to experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, V; Kvinnsland, I H; Kvinnsland, S

    1998-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) axotomy on periodontal (PDL) and pulpal blood flow incident to experimental tooth movement and to investigate whether nerve fiber regeneration coincides with blood flow changes. The first right mandibular molar was moved mesially for 3, 7, and 14 days after ipsilateral IAN axotomy in 29 rats. Four rats served as unoperated controls. At the end of each experimental period fluorescent microspheres (FM) were injected into the left ventricle and thereafter counted in serial sections in the PDL and pulp of the right and left first mandibular molars. The number of FM per tissue volume was taken as a measure of blood flow. Re-innervation of nerve fibers was mapped immunohistochemically 7, 14, and 21 days after IAN axotomy in 9 rats that had no orthodontic appliance. The statistical analysis showed no significant differences in the number of FM/mm3 PDL between the denervated and the contralateral side at 3 and 7 days. At 14 days the PDL on the denervated side showed a significant increase in the number of FM/mm3, coinciding with the initial periodontal nerve fiber re-innervation. In the pulp no significant differences were found between the denervated and the contralateral, innervated side in any experimental period. It can be concluded that IAN axotomy postpones an increase in periodontal blood flow until a sensory tissue re-innervation is established, thus indicating that neurogenic mechanisms play an important role in the development of the inflammatory reaction induced by experimental tooth movement.

  3. Differential effects of hyperinsulinemia and carbohydrate metabolism on sympathetic nerve activity and muscle blood flow in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Vollenweider, P; Tappy, L; Randin, D; Schneiter, P; Jéquier, E; Nicod, P; Scherrer, U

    1993-01-01

    Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia evokes both sympathetic activation and vasodilation in skeletal muscle, but the mechanism remains unknown. To determine whether insulin per se or insulin-induced stimulation of carbohydrate metabolism is the main excitatory stimulus, we performed, in six healthy lean subjects, simultaneous microneurographic recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, plethysmographic measurements of calf blood flow, and calorimetric determinations of carbohydrate oxidation rate. Measurements were made during 2 h of: (a) insulin/glucose infusion (hyperinsulinemic [6 pmol/kg per min] euglycemic clamp), (b) exogenous glucose infusion at a rate matched to that attained during protocol a, and (c) exogenous fructose infusion at the same rate as for glucose infusion in protocol b. For a comparable rise in carbohydrate oxidation, insulin/glucose infusion that resulted in twofold greater increases in plasma insulin concentrations than did glucose infusion alone, evoked twofold greater increases in both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf blood flow. Fructose infusion, which increased carbohydrate oxidation comparably, but had only a minor effect on insulinemia, did not stimulate either muscle sympathetic nerve activity or calf blood flow. These observations suggest that in humans hyperinsulinemia per se, rather than insulin-induced stimulation of carbohydrate metabolism, is the main mechanism that triggers both sympathetic activation and vasodilation in skeletal muscle. PMID:8325979

  4. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  5. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) of keratinocytes, blood vessels and nerves in hairless mouse skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    BUSSAU, L. J.; VO, L. T.; DELANEY, P. M.; PAPWORTH, G. D.; BARKLA, D. H.; KING, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) enabled subsurface fluorescence microscopy of the skin of hairless mice in vivo. Application of acridine orange enabled imaging of the layers of the epidermis. The corneocytes of the stratum corneum, the keratinocytes in the basal layers and redundant hair follicles were visualised at depths greater than 100 μm. Cellular and nuclear membranes of keratinocytes of the skin were visualised by the use of acridine orange and DIOC5(3). Imaging of the skin after injection of FITC-dextran revealed an extensive network of blood vessels with a size range up to 20 μm. Blood cells could be seen moving through dermal vessels and the blood circulation through the dermal vascular bed was video-taped. The fluorescent dye 4-di-2-ASP showed the presence of nerves fibres around the hair follicles and subsurface blood vessels. Comparison was made between images obtained in vivo using FOCI and in vitro scanning electron microscopy and conventional histology. FOCI offers the potential to study dynamic events in vivo, such as blood flow, skin growth, nerve regeneration and many pathological processes, in ways which have not previously been possible. PMID:9643419

  6. Optic nerve head parameters of high-definition optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retina tomogram in perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Viquar Unnisa; Addepalli, Uday Kumar; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra Sekhar; Rao, Harsha Laxmana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heidelberg retina tomogram (HRT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two widely used imaging modalities to evaluate the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma. Purpose: To compare the ONH parameters of HRT3 and high-definition OCT (HD-OCT) and evaluate their diagnostic abilities in perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Methods: 35 control eyes (24 subjects), 21 preperimetric glaucoma eyes (15 patients), and 64 perimetric glaucoma eyes (44 patients) from the Longitudinal Glaucoma Evaluation Study underwent HRT3 and HD-OCT examinations. Statistical Analysis: Agreement between the ONH parameters of HRT and HD-OCT were assessed using Bland-Altman plots. Diagnostic abilities of ONH parameters were evaluated using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs), sensitivity at fixed specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR). Results: Optic disc area, vertical cup to disc ratio, and cup volume with HD-OCT were larger than with HRT, while the rim area was smaller with HD-OCT (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). AUCs of all HD-OCT ONH parameters (0.90-0.97 in perimetric and 0.62-0.71 in preperimetric glaucoma) were comparable (P > 0.10) to the corresponding HRT ONH parameters (0.81-0.95 in perimetric and 0.55-0.72 in preperimetric glaucoma). LRs associated with diagnostic categorization of ONH parameters of both HD-OCT and HRT were associated with larger effects on posttest probability of perimetric compared to preperimetric glaucoma. Conclusions: ONH measurements of HD-OCT and HRT3 cannot be used interchangeably. Though the diagnostic abilities of ONH parameters of HD-OCT and HRT in glaucoma were comparable, the same were significantly lower in preperimetric compared to perimetric glaucoma. PMID:27221679

  7. From Clinical Examination of the Optic Disc to Clinical Assessment of the Optic Nerve Head: A Paradigm Change

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Balwantray C.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To review and interpret optic nerve head (ONH) anatomy detected with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) pertaining to the clinical examination of the optic disc and propose that a paradigm change for clinical assessment of the ONH is necessary. Design Perspective. Methods Presently, the clinician evaluates neuroretinal rim health according to the appearance of the optic disc, the clinically visible surface of the ONH. Recent anatomic findings with SD-OCT have challenged the basis and accuracy of current rim evaluation. We demonstrate why incorporation of SD-OCT imaging of the ONH into the clinical examination of the disc is required. Results Disc margin based rim evaluation lacks a solid anatomic basis and results in variably inaccurate measurements for two reasons. First, the clinically visible disc margin is an unreliable outer border of rim tissue due to clinically and photographically invisible extensions of Bruch’s membrane. Second, rim tissue orientation is not considered in width measurements. We propose alternative anatomically and geometrically accurate SD-OCT based approaches for rim assessment that have enhanced detection of glaucoma. We also argue for new data acquisition and analysis strategies with SD-OCT that account for the large inter-individual variability in the angle between the fovea and ONH. Conclusions We propose a 4-point paradigm change for clinical assessment of the ONH that is anchored to the eye-specific anatomy and geometry of the ONH and fovea. Our approach is designed to enhance the accuracy and consistency of rim width, as well as peripapillary and macular intraretinal thickness measurements. PMID:23768651

  8. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  9. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C; Lasker, David M

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background discharge rates have a larger phase lead re-head velocity than those that fire more regularly. The goal of this study was to investigate the cause of the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents at high-frequency head rotations. Under the assumption that externally applied galvanic currents act directly on the nerve, we derived a transfer function describing the dynamics of a semicircular canal and its hair cells through comparison of responses to sinusoidally modulated head velocity and currents. Responses of all afferents were fit well with a transfer function with one zero (lead term). Best-fit lead terms describing responses to current for each group of afferents were similar to the lead term describing responses to head velocity for regular afferents (0.006 s + 1). This finding indicated that the pre-synaptic and synaptic inputs to regular afferents were likely to be pure velocity transducers. However, the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents could not be explained solely by the ratio of type I to II hair cells (Baird et al 1988), suggesting that the variation was caused by a combination of pre- (type of hair cell) and post-synaptic properties.

  10. Increasing Intracranial Pressure After Head Injury: Impact on Respiratory Oscillations in Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Christina; Diehl, Rolf R; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Diedler, Jennifer; Sorrentino, Enrico; Smielewski, Piotr; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have shown that closed-box conditions alter the transmission of respiratory oscillations (R waves) to organ blood flow already at a marginal pressure increase. How does the increasing intracranial pressure (ICP) interact with R waves in cerebral blood flow after head injury (HI)?Twenty-two head-injured patients requiring sedation and mechanical ventilation were monitored for ICP, Doppler flow velocity (FV) in the middle cerebral arteries, and arterial blood pressure (ABP). The analysis included transfer function gains of R waves (9-20 cpm) from ABP to FV, and indices of pressure-volume reserve (RAP) and autoregulation (Mx). Increasing ICP has dampened R-wave gains from day 1 to day 4 after HI in all patients. A large impact (ΔGain /ΔICP right: 0.14 ± 0.06; left: 0.18 ± 0.08) was associated with exhausted reserves (RAP ≥0.85). When RAP was <0.85, rising ICP had a lower impact on R-wave gains (ΔGain /ΔICP right: 0.05 ± 0.02; left: 0.06 ± 0.04; p < 0.05), but increased the pulsatility indices (right: 1.35 ± 0.55; left: 1.25 ± 0.52) and Mx indices (right: 0.30 ± 0.12; left: 0.28 ± 0.08, p < 0.05). Monitoring of R waves in blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity has suggested that rising ICP after HI might have an impact on cerebral blood flow directly, even before autoregulation is impaired. PMID:27165901

  11. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous micro-circulation vasodilates during acute 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. We expected that relative magnitudes of and differences between upper and lower body cutaneous blood flow elevation would be sustained during initial acclimation to simulated microgravity. We measured cutaneous micro-vascular blood flow with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean + SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline throughout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg, baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or humoral effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  12. A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a simple-structured disposable pump head.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Li, Lichuan; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) has been developed for use in a disposable extracorporeal system. The design of the pump is intended to eliminate mechanical contact with the impeller, to facilitate a simple disposable mechanism, and to reduce the blood-heating effects that are caused by motors and magnetic bearings. The bearing rotor attached to the impeller is suspended by a two degrees-of-freedom controlled radial magnetic bearing stator, which is situated outside the rotor. In the space inside the ringlike rotor, a magnetic coupling disk is placed to rotate the rotor and to ensure that the pump head is thermally isolated from the motor. In this system, the rotor can exhibit high passive stiffness due to the novel design of the closed magnetic circuits. The disposable pump head, which has a priming volume of 23 mL, consists of top and bottom housings, an impeller, and a rotor with a diameter of 50 mm. The pump can provide a head pressure of more than 300 mm Hg against a flow of 5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis of the MedTech Dispo is 0.0025 +/- 0.0005 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 250 mm Hg. This is one-seventh of the equivalent figure for a Bio Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), which has a value of 0.0170 +/- 0.0096 g/100 L. These results show that the MedTech Dispo offers high pumping performance and low blood trauma.

  13. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  14. Simultaneous determination of benzene and toluene in the blood using head-space gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pekari, K; Riekkola, M L; Aitio, A

    1989-07-21

    A head-space method for the simultaneous determination of benzene and toluene in blood using a gas chromatograph equipped with a photoionization detector was developed. Internal standards for benzene and toluene were fluorobenzene and o-xylene, respectively, and the detection limit was 5 nmol/l for both solvents. This method is sensitive enough for needs of biological monitoring of benzene and toluene in exposed workers. With automation it offers a possibility for routine measurements. An application of the method in monitoring exposed workers in the industry is presented.

  15. Increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, heart rate, respiration, and skin blood flow during passive viewing of exercise.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachael; Kemp, Ursula; Macefield, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exercise have been widely studied, as have the autonomic effects of imagined and observed exercise. However, the effects of observed exercise in the first person have not been documented, nor have direct recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) been obtained during observed or imagined exercise. The aim of the current study was to measure blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, skin blood flow, sweat release, and MSNA (via microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve), during observation of exercise from the first person point of view. It was hypothesized that the moving stimuli would produce robust compensatory increases in the above-mentioned parameters as effectively as those generated by mental imagery and-to a lesser extent-actual exercise. Nine subjects watched a first-person running video, allowing them to view the action from the perspective of the runner rather than viewing someone else perform the exercise. On average, statistically significant increases from baseline during the running phase were seen in heart rate, respiratory rate, skin blood flow, and burst amplitude of MSNA. These results suggest that observation of exercise in the first person is a strong enough stimulus to evoke "physiologically appropriate" autonomic responses that have a purely psychogenic origin.

  16. Inhibition of oxidative stress by coenzyme Q10 increases mitochondrial mass and improves bioenergetic function in optic nerve head astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Y H; Kim, K-Y; Shim, M S; Choi, S-H; Choi, S; Ellisman, M H; Weinreb, R N; Perkins, G A; Ju, W-K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to dysfunction of glial cells in the optic nerve head (ONH). However, the biological basis of the precise functional role of mitochondria in this dysfunction is not fully understood. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain and a potent antioxidant, acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) for protecting neuronal cells against oxidative stress in many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we tested whether hydrogen peroxide (100 μM H2O2)-induced oxidative stress alters the mitochondrial network, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex (Cx) expression and bioenergetics, as well as whether CoQ10 can ameliorate oxidative stress-mediated alterations in mitochondria of the ONH astrocytes in vitro. Oxidative stress triggered the activation of ONH astrocytes and the upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression in the ONH astrocytes. In contrast, CoQ10 not only prevented activation of ONH astrocytes but also significantly decreased SOD2 and HO-1 protein expression in the ONH astrocytes against oxidative stress. Further, CoQ10 prevented a significant loss of mitochondrial mass by increasing mitochondrial number and volume density and by preserving mitochondrial cristae structure, as well as promoted mitofilin and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 protein expression in the ONH astrocyte, suggesting an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, oxidative stress triggered the upregulation of OXPHOS Cx protein expression, as well as reduction of cellular adeonsine triphosphate (ATP) production and increase of ROS generation in the ONH astocytes. However, CoQ10 preserved OXPHOS protein expression and cellular ATP production, as well as decreased ROS generation in the ONH astrocytes. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction or alteration may be an important

  17. Effect of selective vagal nerve stimulation on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in rats under metoprolol medication.

    PubMed

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Plachta, Dennis T T

    2016-02-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been shown to reduce blood pressure without major side effects in rats. This technology might be the key to non-medical antihypertensive treatment in patients with therapy-resistant hypertension. β-blockers are the first-line therapy of hypertension and have in general a bradycardic effect. As VNS itself can also promote bradycardia, it was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the β1-selective blocker Metoprolol on the effect of sVNS especially with respect to the heart rate. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide multichannel-cuff electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibers. The stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of individual animals and were in the following ranges: frequency 30-50 Hz, amplitude 0.3-1.8 mA and pulse width 0.3-1.3 ms. Blood pressure responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with s.c. chest electrodes. After IV administration of Metoprolol (2 mg kg(-1) body weight), the animals' mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) decreased significantly. Although the selective electrical stimulation of the baroreceptive fibers reduced MAP and HR, both effects were significantly alleviated by Metoprolol. As a side effect, the rate of stimulation-induced apnea significantly increased after Metoprolol administration. sVNS can lower the MAP under Metoprolol without causing severe bradycardia.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  19. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  20. Microscopy and Microanalysis of Blood in a Snake Head Fish, Channa gachua Exposed to Environmental Pollution.

    PubMed

    Pala, Eva M; Dey, Sudip

    2016-02-01

    Conventional and highly sophisticated analytical methods (Cyria et al., 1989; Massar et al., 2012a) were used to analyze micro-structural and micro-analytical aspects of the blood of snake head fish, Channa gachua, exposed to municipal wastes and city garbage. Red (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts and hemhemoglobin content were found to be higher in pollution affected fish as compared with control. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the occurrence of abnormal erythrocytes such as crenated cells, echinocytes, lobopodial projections, membrane internalization, spherocytes, ruptured cells, contracted cells, depression, and uneven elongation of erythrocyte membranes in fish inhabiting the polluted sites. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed the presence of silicon and lead in the RBCs of pollution affected fish. Significance of the study includes the highly sophisticated analytical approach, which revealed the aforementioned micro-structural abnormalities.

  1. Microscopy and Microanalysis of Blood in a Snake Head Fish, Channa gachua Exposed to Environmental Pollution.

    PubMed

    Pala, Eva M; Dey, Sudip

    2016-02-01

    Conventional and highly sophisticated analytical methods (Cyria et al., 1989; Massar et al., 2012a) were used to analyze micro-structural and micro-analytical aspects of the blood of snake head fish, Channa gachua, exposed to municipal wastes and city garbage. Red (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts and hemhemoglobin content were found to be higher in pollution affected fish as compared with control. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the occurrence of abnormal erythrocytes such as crenated cells, echinocytes, lobopodial projections, membrane internalization, spherocytes, ruptured cells, contracted cells, depression, and uneven elongation of erythrocyte membranes in fish inhabiting the polluted sites. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed the presence of silicon and lead in the RBCs of pollution affected fish. Significance of the study includes the highly sophisticated analytical approach, which revealed the aforementioned micro-structural abnormalities. PMID:26914995

  2. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous microcirculation vasodilates during acute 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. Cutaneous microvascular blood flow was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean +/- SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline througout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or hurmonal effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  3. Noninvasive diffuse optical monitoring of head and neck tumor blood flow and oxygenation during radiation delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study explored using a novel diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter to noninvasively monitor blood flow and oxygenation changes in head and neck tumors during radiation delivery. A fiber-optic probe connected to the DCS flow-oximeter was placed on the surface of the radiologically/clinically involved cervical lymph node. The DCS flow-oximeter in the treatment room was remotely operated by a computer in the control room. From the early measurements, abnormal signals were observed when the optical device was placed in close proximity to the radiation beams. Through phantom tests, the artifacts were shown to be caused by scattered x rays and consequentially avoided by moving the optical device away from the x-ray beams. Eleven patients with head and neck tumors were continually measured once a week over a treatment period of seven weeks, although there were some missing data due to the patient related events. Large inter-patient variations in tumor hemodynamic responses were observed during radiation delivery. A significant increase in tumor blood flow was observed at the first week of treatment, which may be a physiologic response to hypoxia created by radiation oxygen consumption. Only small and insignificant changes were found in tumor blood oxygenation, suggesting that oxygen utilizations in tumors during the short period of fractional radiation deliveries were either minimal or balanced by other effects such as blood flow regulation. Further investigations in a large patient population are needed to correlate the individual hemodynamic responses with the clinical outcomes for determining the prognostic value of optical measurements. PMID:22312579

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning: correlation of sensory and motor nerve conduction, neurologic symptoms, and blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, quaterphenyls, and dibenzofurans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.C.; Tang, S.Y.; Miyata, H.; Kashimoto, T.; Chang, Y.C.; Chang, K.J.; Tung, T.C.

    1985-08-01

    In 1979 in Taiwan, more than 2000 people were poisoned with rice cooking oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). One hundred ten patients were studied within one year of the exposure. The blood PCB levels were 39.3 +/- 16.6 ppb. The blood levels of the PCB derivatives, polychlorinated quaterphenyls (PCQ) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), were 8.6 +/- 4.8 and 0.076 +/- 0.038 ppb, respectively. Both the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) of the patients were significantly lower than the control. Abnormal slowing of sensory NCV was found in 43.6% and abnormal slowing of motor NCV was seen in 21.8%. Patients who had higher PCQ blood levels has significantly slower median nerve sensory NCV than those with lower PCQ levels. Patients with higher PCB blood levels had significantly slower peroneal nerve motor NCV than those with lower PCB levels.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood brain/nerve barrier dysfunction and leukocyte infiltration: closely related or discordant?

    PubMed

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Blood Brain/Nerve Barrier Dysfunction and Leukocyte Infiltration: Closely Related or Discordant?

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients. PMID:23267343

  7. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26732309

  8. High thermal sensitivity of blood enhances oxygen delivery in the high-flying bar-headed goose.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Milsom, William K

    2013-06-15

    The bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) crosses the Himalaya twice a year at altitudes where oxygen (O2) levels are less than half those at sea level and temperatures are below -20°C. Although it has been known for over three decades that the major hemoglobin (Hb) component of bar-headed geese has an increased affinity for O2, enhancing O2 uptake, the effects of temperature and interactions between temperature and pH on bar-headed goose Hb-O2 affinity have not previously been determined. An increase in breathing of the hypoxic and extremely cold air experienced by a bar-headed goose at altitude (due to the enhanced hypoxic ventilatory response in this species) could result in both reduced temperature and reduced levels of CO2 at the blood-gas interface in the lungs, enhancing O2 loading. In addition, given the strenuous nature of flapping flight, particularly in thin air, blood leaving the exercising muscle should be warm and acidotic, facilitating O2 unloading. To explore the possibility that features of blood biochemistry in this species could further enhance O2 delivery, we determined the P50 (the partial pressure of O2 at which Hb is 50% saturated) of whole blood from bar-headed geese under conditions of varying temperature and [CO2]. We found that blood-O2 affinity was highly temperature sensitive in bar-headed geese compared with other birds and mammals. Based on our analysis, temperature and pH effects acting on blood-O2 affinity (cold alkalotic lungs and warm acidotic muscle) could increase O2 delivery by twofold during sustained flapping flight at high altitudes compared with what would be delivered by blood at constant temperature and pH.

  9. BMI, HOMA-IR, and Fasting Blood Glucose Are Significant Predictors of Peripheral Nerve Dysfunction in Adult Overweight and Obese Nondiabetic Nepalese Individuals: A Study from Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Lekhjung; Rana, P V S

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Nondiabetic obese individuals have subclinical involvement of peripheral nerves. We report the factors predicting peripheral nerve function in overweight and obese nondiabetic Nepalese individuals. Methodology. In this cross-sectional study, we included 50 adult overweight and obese nondiabetic volunteers without features of peripheral neuropathy and 50 healthy volunteers to determine the normative nerve conduction data. In cases of abnormal function, the study population was classified on the basis of the number of nerves involved, namely, "<2" or "≥2." Multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out to predict outcomes. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was the significant predictor of motor nerve dysfunction (P = 0.039, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.003-1.127). Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was the significant predictor (P = 0.019, 96% CI = 1.420-49.322) of sensory nerve dysfunction. Body mass index (BMI) was the significant predictor (P = 0.034, 95% CI = 1.018-1.577) in case of ≥2 mixed nerves' involvement. Conclusion. FBG, HOMA-IR, and BMI were significant predictors of peripheral nerve dysfunction in overweight and obese Nepalese individuals. PMID:27200189

  10. Nerve growth factor-like activity detected in equine peripheral blood after running exercise.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Koyama, H; Oikawa, M; Yoshihara, T; Kaneko, M

    1991-08-01

    Addition of sera, collected from Thoroughbred horses after sprint exercise, induced significant neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia after a 24-hour culture. The nerve growth factor (NGF)-like activity was detected in sera collected immediately, or 1 hour or more, after the exercise. These findings suggest a possible role of serum NGF-like activity under stress conditions (running exercise) of horses.

  11. Blood supply of the olfactory nerve. Meningeal relationships and surgical relevance.

    PubMed

    Favre, J J; Chaffanjon, P; Passagia, J G; Chirossel, J P

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of dissections and anatomic sections of the fronto-basal region of the brain and of the anterior cranial fossa in human cadavers. The constant presence of an arachnoidal cistern above the olfactory nerve was verified. The arachnoid separates from the pial membrane and forms a bridge with the ventral part of the olfactory bulb and tract, from the lateral edge of the olfactory sulcus to the medial edge of the gyrus rectus. The cistern is wide in its anterior portion, between the gyrus rectus and the olfactory bulb, and is reduced to a virtual slit in its posterior portion where the tract is lodged in the olfactory sulcus. The olfactory nerve can be separated without damaging fronto-basal arachnoidial adhesions over several centimeters. Dissection of this region after intravascular injection of colored media shows the constant presence of an artery destined to the olfactory bulb and tract. It originates either from the lateral surface of the anterior cerebral a. (segment A2), or from the medial fronto-basal a., and consistently provides terminal branches in front of the olfactory trigone in the medial olfactory sulcus. At their ventral extremity, the olfactory structures are therefore vascularised independently for several centimeters, from the lower face of the frontal lobe. The independent vascularisation of the olfactory nerve, the tenuous and easily detachable adhesions, and the actual presence of a true arachnoidal cistern all contribute to enabling surgical techniques which conserve olfactory function during anterior approaches. PMID:7482150

  12. [ROLE OF CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE NERVES IN THE REGULATION OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE BLOOD CONTENT UNDER NORMAL AND FRUCTOSE-INDUCED METABOLIC SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Ovcjukova, M V; Kostina, N E; Obut, T A

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves (capsaicin, 1 mg/kg, s/c) and their eafferentation (capsaicin, 150 mg/kg, s/c) on the blood content of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) was investigated in normal rats and rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome (12.5% fructose solution, 10 weeks). An increase in blood of tryglyceride, lipid peroxidation, glucose (fasting and after loading glucose, 2 mg/kg, i/p) was considered as symptoms of metabolic syndrome. It was shown that in normal rats drinking tap water the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves resulted in the increase of DHEAS content while their deafferentation reduced the concentration of this hormone in the blood. The fructose diet caused the decrease in content of DHEAS, triglyceridemia, lipid peroxidation, impaired tolerance glucose. In rats with the metabolic syndrome the stimulation capsaicin-sensitive nerves prevented the fructose-induced decrease of DHEAS content as well as decreased the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In fructose fed rats the stimulation-induced effects were prevented by the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves. It is suggested that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute both to the regulation of blood content of DHEAS under normal and fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

  13. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  14. Spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood volume changes in different microvascular compartments evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shanbin; Cheng, Haiying; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2003-07-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of changes in cerebral blood volume associated with neuronal activity were investigated in the hindlimb somatosensory cortex of α-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats (n=10) with optical imaging at 570nm through a thinned skull. Activation of cortex was carried out by electrical stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve with 5Hz, 0.3V pulses (0.5ms) for duration of 2s. The stimulation evoked a monophasic optical reflectance decrease at cortical parenchyma and arteries sites rapidly after the onset of stimulation, whereas no similar response was observed at vein compartments. The optical signal changes reached 10% of the peak response 0.70+/-0.32s after stimulation onset and no significant time lag in this 10% start latency time was observed between the response at cortical parenchyma and arteries compartments. The evoked optical reflectance decrease reached the peak (0.25%+/-0.047%) 2.66+/-0.61s after the stimulus onset at parenchyma site, 0.40+/-0.20s earlier (P<0.05) than that at arteries site (0.50+/-0.068% 3.06+/-0.70s). Variable location within the cortical parenchyma and arteries compartment themselves didn"t affect the temporal characteristics of the evoked signal significantly. These results suggest that the sciatic nerve stimulation evokes a local blood volume increase at both capillaries (cortical parenchyma) and arterioles rapidly after the stimulus onset but the evoked blood volume increase in capillaries could not be entirely accounted for by the dilation of arterioles.

  15. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  16. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Robert H.; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-American (AA) males with CKD, we conducted a randomized, crossover study in which participants underwent 14 min of MM or 14 min of BP education (control intervention) during two separate random-order study visits. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), beat-to-beat arterial BP, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were continuously measured at baseline and during each intervention. A subset had a third study visit to undergo controlled breathing (CB) to determine whether a reduction in RR alone was sufficient in exacting hemodynamic changes. We observed a significantly greater reduction in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and HR, as well as a significantly greater reduction in MSNA, during MM compared with the control intervention. Participants had a significantly lower RR during MM; however, in contrast to MM, CB alone did not reduce BP, HR, or MSNA. MM acutely lowers BP and HR in AA males with hypertensive CKD, and these hemodynamic effects may be mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. RR is significantly lower during MM, but CB alone without concomitant meditation does not acutely alter hemodynamics or sympathetic activity in CKD. PMID:24829497

  17. Optic nerve head topography and retinal structural changes in eyes with macrodisks: a comparative study with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Öztürker, Zeynep Kayaarası; Eltutar, Kadir; Karini, Belma; Erkul, Sezin Özdogan; Osmanbaşoğlu, Özen Ayrancı; Sultan, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare optic nerve head parameters, the thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL), the macular retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL), the ganglion cell complex (GCC), and the ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) in macrodisks and normal-sized healthy disks using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients and methods A total of 88 healthy eyes (42 macrodisks and 46 normal-sized disks) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Optic nerve head parameters as well as pRNFL, mRNFL, GCC, and GCIPL thicknesses were measured in all subjects. Optic disk areas (ODAs) >2.70 mm2 were defined as macrodisks. All spectral domain optical coherence tomography parameters were compared between normal-sized disks and macrodisks. Results The mean age of the participants was 49.4±5.7 years in the normal size group and 51.55±6.3 years in the macrodisk group (P=0.65). The average ODAs were 2.23±0.29 mm2 and 3.30±0.59 mm2 in the normal size and the macrodisk groups, respectively. ODA (P<0.001), cup area (P<0.001), cup disk area ratio (P<0.001), horizontal cup disk ratio (P<0.001), vertical cup disk ratio (P<0.001), horizontal disk diameter (P<0.001), vertical disk diameter (P<0.001), and cup volume (P<0.001) were significantly higher in the macrodisk group. The inferior mRNFL thickness was significantly lower (P=0.042), and the GCC inferior and GCIPL inferior thicknesses were found to be lower with low significance (P=0.052, P=0.059, respectively) in the macrodisk group. Rim volume (P=0.622), total pRNFL (P=0.201), superior pRNFL (P=0.123), inferior pRNFL (P=0.168), average macular thickness (P=0.162), total mRNFL (P=0.171), superior mRNFL (P=0.356), total GCC (P=0.080), superior GCC (P=0.261), total GCIPL (P=0.214), and superior GCIPL (P=0.515) thicknesses were similar in both groups. Conclusion Optic disk topography and retinal structures show different characteristics in healthy eyes with macrodisks. These disk size

  18. Optic nerve head topography and retinal structural changes in eyes with macrodisks: a comparative study with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Öztürker, Zeynep Kayaarası; Eltutar, Kadir; Karini, Belma; Erkul, Sezin Özdogan; Osmanbaşoğlu, Özen Ayrancı; Sultan, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare optic nerve head parameters, the thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL), the macular retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL), the ganglion cell complex (GCC), and the ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) in macrodisks and normal-sized healthy disks using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Patients and methods A total of 88 healthy eyes (42 macrodisks and 46 normal-sized disks) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Optic nerve head parameters as well as pRNFL, mRNFL, GCC, and GCIPL thicknesses were measured in all subjects. Optic disk areas (ODAs) >2.70 mm2 were defined as macrodisks. All spectral domain optical coherence tomography parameters were compared between normal-sized disks and macrodisks. Results The mean age of the participants was 49.4±5.7 years in the normal size group and 51.55±6.3 years in the macrodisk group (P=0.65). The average ODAs were 2.23±0.29 mm2 and 3.30±0.59 mm2 in the normal size and the macrodisk groups, respectively. ODA (P<0.001), cup area (P<0.001), cup disk area ratio (P<0.001), horizontal cup disk ratio (P<0.001), vertical cup disk ratio (P<0.001), horizontal disk diameter (P<0.001), vertical disk diameter (P<0.001), and cup volume (P<0.001) were significantly higher in the macrodisk group. The inferior mRNFL thickness was significantly lower (P=0.042), and the GCC inferior and GCIPL inferior thicknesses were found to be lower with low significance (P=0.052, P=0.059, respectively) in the macrodisk group. Rim volume (P=0.622), total pRNFL (P=0.201), superior pRNFL (P=0.123), inferior pRNFL (P=0.168), average macular thickness (P=0.162), total mRNFL (P=0.171), superior mRNFL (P=0.356), total GCC (P=0.080), superior GCC (P=0.261), total GCIPL (P=0.214), and superior GCIPL (P=0.515) thicknesses were similar in both groups. Conclusion Optic disk topography and retinal structures show different characteristics in healthy eyes with macrodisks. These disk size

  19. Auditory stimulation affects renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takuo; Tanida, Mamoru; Niijima, Akira; Hibino, Hiroshi; Shen, Jiao; Nagai, Katsuya

    2007-04-12

    Here, we examined the effects of auditory stimulation at 50 dB with white noise (WN) or music (Traeumerei [TM] by Schumann or Etude by Chopin) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP in urethane-anesthetized rats. Auditory stimulation with TM, but not with WN or the Etude, significantly decreased RSNA and BP. Complete bilateral destruction of the cochleae and bilateral lesions of the auditory cortex (AuC) eliminated the effects of TM stimulation on RSNA and BP, but bilateral lesions of primary somatosensory cortex (S1C) had no effect. Bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or intracerebral administration of thioperamide, a histaminergic H3 receptor antagonist, also abolished TM-induced decreases in RSNA and BP. These findings suggest that exposure to music can decrease RSNA and BP through the auditory pathway, histaminergic neurons, and the SCN.

  20. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Fadel, Paul J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory‐related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube–Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age‐related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory–sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube–Hering waves in both young and older humans. Healthy ageing and alterations in respiratory–sympathetic coupling have been independently linked with heightened sympathetic neural vasoconstrictor activity. We investigated how age influences the respiratory‐related modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure that occur with respiration (Traube–Hering waves; THW). Ten young (22 ± 2 years; mean ± SD) and 10 older healthy men (58 ± 6 years) were studied while resting supine and breathing spontaneously. MSNA, blood pressure and respiration were recorded simultaneously. Resting values were ascertained and respiratory cycle‐triggered averaging of MSNA and blood pressure measurements performed. The MSNA burst incidence was higher in older individuals [22.7 ± 9.2 versus 42.2 ± 13.7 bursts (100 heart beats)−1, P < 0.05], and was reduced to a similar extent in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in young and older subjects (by ∼25% compared with mid‐ to late expiration). A similar attenuation of MSNA burst frequency (in bursts per minute), amplitude and total activity (burst frequency × mean burst amplitude) was also observed in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in both groups. A significant positive correlation between respiratory‐related MSNA and the magnitude of

  1. Difference in intraosseous blood vessel volume and number in osteoporotic model mice induced by spinal cord injury and sciatic nerve resection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wen-Ge; Yan, Wei-hong; Wei, Zhao-Xiang; Liu, Jin-Bo

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, we examined intraosseous blood vessel parameters of the tibial metaphysis in mice using microcomputed tomography (µCT) to investigate the relationship between post-nerve-injury osteoporosis and local intraosseous blood vessel volume and number. Mice were randomly divided into groups receiving spinal cord injury (SCI), sciatic nerve resection group (NX), or intact controls (30 mice/group). Four weeks after surgery, mice were perfused with silicone and the distribution of intraosseous blood vessels analyzed by μCT. The bone density, μCT microstructure, biomechanical properties, and the immunohistochemical and biochemical indicators of angiogenesis were also measured. The SCI group showed significantly reduced tibial metaphysis bone density, μCT bone microstructure, tibial biomechanical properties, indicators of angiogenesis, and intraosseous blood vessel parameters compared to the NX group. Furthermore, the spinal cord-injured mice exhibited significantly decreased intraosseous blood vessel volume and number during the development of osteoporosis. In conclusion, these data suggest that decreased intraosseous blood vessel volume and number may play an important role in the development of post-nerve-injury osteoporosis.

  2. Rapid analysis of malathion in blood using head space-solid phase microextraction and selected ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Namera, A; Yashiki, M; Nagasawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Kojima, T

    1997-08-01

    A simple and rapid method for analysis of malathion in blood was developed using head space-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry/ electron impact ionization-selected ion monitoring (GC-MS/EI-SIM). A vial containing a blood sample, ammonium sulphate, sulphuric acid and fenitrothion as an internal standard, was heated at 90 degrees C for 15 min. The extraction fiber of the SPME was exposed for 5 min in the head space of the vial. The compounds absorbed on the fiber were detached by exposing the fibre in the injection port of GC-MS. A straight calibration curve was obtained between malathion concentrations of 2.5 to 50.0 micrograms g-1 in blood. No interfering substances were found, and the time for analysis was 40 min for one sample.

  3. Study on the Dynamic Compound Structure Composed of Mast Cells, Blood Vessels, and Nerves in Rat Acupoint

    PubMed Central

    Mingfu, Luo; Xiaotong, Dong; Xiaojing, Song; Jin, Jiang; Jinling, Zhann; Ying, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background. Circulation system, immunity system, and nervous system have a close relationship with meridian phenomen. However, there is still lack of the results of dynamic changes of these structures in acupoint. The aim of this study is to explore the interrelationship by composite staining techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings. Twenty rats were separated into electroacupuncture group (EA) and control group (Con) randomly. In EA group, the Zusanli and Weishu were stimulated with the 0.1 mA for 25 min. The tissue of these acupoints was double-stained with acetylcholinesterase and Toluidine blue. The compound structure of mast cells, nervous fibers, and mast cells in the acupoint was observed. Conclusions/Significance. The blood vessels, mast cells and acetylcholinesterase responded nerves were clearly observed in acupoint tissues. EA can result in the mast cell recruitment and migration along the blood vessels and nervous bundle, which conformed the dynamic compound structure and played important roles in acupuncture. PMID:23878591

  4. Altered Blood Biomarker Profiles in Athletes with a History of Repetitive Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The long-term health effects of concussion and sub-concussive impacts in sport are unknown. Growing evidence suggests both inflammation and neurodegeneration are pivotal to secondary injury processes and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we characterized circulating brain injury and inflammatory mediators in healthy male and female athletes according to concussion history and collision sport participation. Eighty-seven university level athletes (male, n = 60; female, n = 27) were recruited before the start of the competitive season. Athletes were healthy at the time of the study (no medications, illness, concussion or musculoskeletal injuries). Dependent variables included 29 inflammatory and 10 neurological injury analytes assessed in the peripheral blood by immunoassay. Biomarkers were statistically evaluated using partial least squares multivariate analysis to identify possible relationships to self-reported previous concussion history, number of previous concussions and collision sport participation in male and female athletes. Multiple concussions were associated with increases in peripheral MCP-1 in females, and MCP-4 in males. Collision sport participation was associated with increases in tau levels in males. These results are consistent with previous experimental and clinical findings that suggest ongoing inflammatory and cerebral injury processes after repetitive mild head trauma. However, further validation is needed to correlate systemic biomarkers to repetitive brain impacts, as opposed to the extracranial effects common to an athletic population such as exercise and muscle damage. PMID:27458972

  5. Altered Blood Biomarker Profiles in Athletes with a History of Repetitive Head Impacts.

    PubMed

    Di Battista, Alex P; Rhind, Shawn G; Richards, Doug; Churchill, Nathan; Baker, Andrew J; Hutchison, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The long-term health effects of concussion and sub-concussive impacts in sport are unknown. Growing evidence suggests both inflammation and neurodegeneration are pivotal to secondary injury processes and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we characterized circulating brain injury and inflammatory mediators in healthy male and female athletes according to concussion history and collision sport participation. Eighty-seven university level athletes (male, n = 60; female, n = 27) were recruited before the start of the competitive season. Athletes were healthy at the time of the study (no medications, illness, concussion or musculoskeletal injuries). Dependent variables included 29 inflammatory and 10 neurological injury analytes assessed in the peripheral blood by immunoassay. Biomarkers were statistically evaluated using partial least squares multivariate analysis to identify possible relationships to self-reported previous concussion history, number of previous concussions and collision sport participation in male and female athletes. Multiple concussions were associated with increases in peripheral MCP-1 in females, and MCP-4 in males. Collision sport participation was associated with increases in tau levels in males. These results are consistent with previous experimental and clinical findings that suggest ongoing inflammatory and cerebral injury processes after repetitive mild head trauma. However, further validation is needed to correlate systemic biomarkers to repetitive brain impacts, as opposed to the extracranial effects common to an athletic population such as exercise and muscle damage. PMID:27458972

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  7. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  8. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  9. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Thang, Loc V; Demel, Stacie L; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E; Swain, Greg M; Van Rooijen, Nico; Galligan, James J

    2015-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2 (-) release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3-5, 10-13, and 18-21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22(phox) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2 (-) was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18-21. O2 (-) and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22(phox) were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2 (-) while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2 (-), which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves.

  10. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  11. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  12. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  13. Cost-effective instrumentation for quantitative depth measurement of optic nerve head using stereo fundus image pair and image cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Luis Alberto V.; Carvalho, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    One of the main problems with glaucoma throughout the world is that there are typically no symptoms in the early stages. Many people who have the disease do not know they have it and by the time one finds out, the disease is usually in an advanced stage. Most retinal cameras available in the market today use sophisticated optics and have several other features/capabilities (wide-angle optics, red-free and angiography filters, etc) that make them expensive for the general practice or for screening purposes. Therefore, it is important to develop instrumentation that is fast, effective and economic, in order to reach the mass public in the general eye-care centers. In this work, we have constructed the hardware and software of a cost-effective and non-mydriatic prototype device that allows fast capturing and plotting of high-resolution quantitative 3D images and videos of the optical disc head and neighboring region (30° of field of view). The main application of this device is for glaucoma screening, although it may also be useful for the diagnosis of other pathologies related to the optic nerve.

  14. Heart rate and blood pressure response to short-term head-down bed rest: a nonlinear approach.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Di Garbo, A; Michelassi, C; Chillemi, S; Varanini, M; Barbi, M; Legramante, J M; Raimondi, G; Zbilut, J P

    2000-06-01

    Although it is well-known that prolonged exposure to microgravity environment such as in space travel results in derangements of orthostasis, recent evidence suggests that even short-term exposure may have similar effects and parallels such common examples as prolonged bed rest. Whereas spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic blood pressure have been unable to detect changes, we hypothesized that nonlinear indexes may be better able to uncover such perturbations. Eighteen healthy subjects were exposed to 4-hour head-down tilt, and of these, 4 exhibited fainting. Two nonlinear indexes, mutual information and recurrence quantification were used to analyze the data. Only recurrence quantification was able to detect a "decoupling" of heart rate and systolic blood pressure at rest using discriminant analysis (p < 0.05). These results suggest that orthostatic intolerance may be due to a decoupling of heart rate from systolic blood pressure reflexive activity occurring at rest.

  15. Analysis of the variation in OCT measurements of a structural bottle neck for eye-brain transfer of visual information from 3D-volumes of the optic nerve head, PIMD-Average [02π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the clinical usefulness of the thinnest cross section of the nerve fibers in the optic nerve head averaged over the circumference of the optic nerve head. 3D volumes of the optic nerve head of the same eye was captured at two different visits spaced in time by 1-4 weeks, in 13 subjects diagnosed with early to moderate glaucoma. At each visit 3 volumes containing the optic nerve head were captured independently with a Topcon OCT- 2000 system. In each volume, the average shortest distance between the inner surface of the retina and the central limit of the pigment epithelium around the optic nerve head circumference, PIMD-Average [02π], was determined semiautomatically. The measurements were analyzed with an analysis of variance for estimation of the variance components for subjects, visits, volumes and semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [0;2π]. It was found that the variance for subjects was on the order of five times the variance for visits, and the variance for visits was on the order of 5 times higher than the variance for volumes. The variance for semi-automatic measurements of PIMD-Average [02π] was 3 orders of magnitude lower than the variance for volumes. A 95 % confidence interval for mean PIMD-Average [02π] was estimated to 1.00 +/-0.13 mm (D.f. = 12). The variance estimates indicate that PIMD-Average [02π] is not suitable for comparison between a onetime estimate in a subject and a population reference interval. Cross-sectional independent group comparisons of PIMD-Average [02π] averaged over subjects will require inconveniently large sample sizes. However, cross-sectional independent group comparison of averages of within subject difference between baseline and follow-up can be made with reasonable sample sizes. Assuming a loss rate of 0.1 PIMD-Average [02π] per year and 4 visits per year it was found that approximately 18 months follow up is required before a significant change of PIMDAverage [02π] can

  16. The Effect of Ergotamine on Tissue Blood Flow and the Arteriovenous Shunting of Radioactive Microspheres in the Head

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Barbara M.; Saxena, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    1 The radioactive microsphere method was used to study the effects of ergotamine (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg, i.v.) on systemic and regional haemodynamic variables in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. The influence of the drug was also studied on the number of 15 μm microspheres escaping entrapment in the head to emerge in the left external jugular vein. 2 Ergotamine decreased the heart rate and cardiac output. Since arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, calculated total peripheral resistance increased. 3 The regional distribution of cardiac output obtained with 15 μm microspheres agreed well with previous studies in cats where 25 μm spheres were used. The most pronounced difference was that in the present investigation more microspheres, apparently escaping through arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), were detected in the lungs than when larger spheres had been used. 4 Coronary blood flow decreased, while uterine blood flow was increased by the drug. The microsphere content of the lungs, which receive the spheres not only via bronchial arteries but also via AVAs, was greatly reduced by all doses of ergotamine. Ergotamine did not influence tissue blood flow to other major organs such as the brain, kidneys, skin, liver, skeletal muscle or the gastrointestinal tract. 5 In the 16 experiments, 0.46 ± 0.05 (s.e. mean)% of the total microspheres injected (equivalent to 11.7 ± 1.4% of microspheres detected in the left-side of the head) appeared within 2 min of microsphere injection into the left external jugular vein. The highest dose of ergotamine significantly reduced the shunting of the microspheres in the head. 6 Since 15 μm microspheres are only likely to reach the lungs by passing into the venous circulation through large glomus-type AVAs, we conclude that ergotamine reduces the fraction of microspheres appearing in the lungs by causing strong vasoconstriction in the AVAs in the head. 7 In conformity with the closure of head AVAs is the finding that

  17. Longitudinal tracking of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and its relationship with blood pressure in subjects with prehypertension.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Kara, Tomas; Kucharska, Wiesława; Somers, Virend K; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Prehypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular events. While the "tracking phenomenon" is an important longitudinal characteristic of blood pressure (BP), changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) over time remain unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that MSNA tracking contributes to BP trends in prehypertension. BP and MSNA were assessed in 13 prehypertensive males at rest, during hand grip and mental stressors at baseline and after 8 years. Baseline office BP averaged 127 ± 2/81 ± 2 mmHg and MSNA 24 ± 4 bursts/min. BP increased by 7 ± 2/5 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.01) and MSNA by 11 ± 2 bursts/min (P < 0.001) at follow-up. SBP and DBP were interrelated at baseline (r = 0.65, P = 0.02) and at follow-up (r = 0.78, P = 0.002). MSNA tracking (r = 0.82; P < 0.001) was similar to BP. MSNA was strongly related to DBP at baseline (r = 0.73; P < 0.01) and follow-up (r = 0.64; P = 0.01), more so than SBP. BMI increased (P < 0.001) at follow-up but was unrelated to BP or MSNA. Despite comparable pressor and cardiac increases to handgrip and mental stressors, sympathetic responses were blunted, more pronounced to isometric test (P < 0.006) at follow-up. In conclusion, the trend in MSNA corresponds with BP changes over time suggesting that tonic sympathetic activation may contribute to time-related increase in resting BP and the development of sustained hypertension in prehypertension. PMID:26654200

  18. Morphometric Optic Nerve Head Analysis in Glaucoma Patients: A Comparison between the Simultaneous Nonmydriatic Stereoscopic Fundus Camera (Kowa Nonmyd WX3D) and the Heidelberg Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (HRT III).

    PubMed

    Mariacher, Siegfried; Hipp, Stephanie; Wirthky, Robert; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Ziemssen, Focke; Schiefer, Ulrich; Voykov, Bogomil; Januschowski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the agreement between morphometric optic nerve head parameters assessed with the confocal laser ophthalmoscope HRT III and the stereoscopic fundus camera Kowa nonmyd WX3D retrospectively. Methods. Morphometric optic nerve head parameters of 40 eyes of 40 patients with primary open angle glaucoma were analyzed regarding their vertical cup-to-disc-ratio (CDR). Vertical CDR, disc area, cup volume, rim volume, and maximum cup depth were assessed with both devices by one examiner. Mean bias and limits of agreement (95% CI) were obtained using scatter plots and Bland-Altman analysis. Results. Overall vertical CDR comparison between HRT III and Kowa nonmyd WX3D measurements showed a mean difference (limits of agreement) of -0.06 (-0.36 to 0.24). For the CDR < 0.5 group (n = 24) mean difference in vertical CDR was -0.14 (-0.34 to 0.06) and for the CDR ≥ 0.5 group (n = 16) 0.06 (-0.21 to 0.34). Conclusion. This study showed a good agreement between Kowa nonmyd WX3D and HRT III with regard to widely used optic nerve head parameters in patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy. However, data from Kowa nonmyd WX3D exhibited the tendency to measure larger CDR values than HRT III in the group with CDR < 0.5 group and lower CDR values in the group with CDR ≥ 0.5.

  19. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways. PMID:26790027

  20. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways.

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways. PMID:26790027

  2. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Demizu, Yusuke; Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue; Akagi, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Terashima, Kazuki; Suga, Daisaku; Kamae, Isao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  3. Corneal Segmentation Analysis Increases Glaucoma Diagnostic Ability of Optic Nerve Head Examination, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph's Moorfield's Regression Analysis, and Glaucoma Probability Score.

    PubMed

    Saenz-Frances, F; Jañez, L; Berrozpe-Villabona, C; Borrego-Sanz, L; Morales-Fernández, L; Acebal-Montero, A; Mendez-Hernandez, C D; Martinez-de-la-Casa, J M; Santos-Bueso, E; Garcia-Sanchez, J; Garcia-Feijoo, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study whether a corneal thickness segmentation model, consisting in a central circular zone of 1 mm radius centered at the corneal apex (zone I) and five concentric rings of 1 mm width (moving outwards: zones II to VI), could boost the diagnostic accuracy of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph's (HRT's) MRA and GPS. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. 121 healthy volunteers and 125 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Six binary multivariate logistic regression models were constructed (MOD-A1, MOD-A2, MOD-B1, MOD-B2, MOD-C1, and MOD-C2). The dependent variable was the presence of glaucoma. In MOD-A1, the predictor was the result (presence of glaucoma) of the analysis of the stereophotography of the optic nerve head (ONH). In MOD-B1 and MOD-C1, the predictor was the result of the MRA and GPS, respectively. In MOD-B2 and MOD-C2, the predictors were the same along with corneal variables: central, overall, and zones I to VI thicknesses. This scheme was reproduced for model MOD-A2 (stereophotography along with corneal variables). Models were compared using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Results. MOD-A1-AUC: 0.771; MOD-A2-AUC: 0.88; MOD-B1-AUC: 0.736; MOD-B2-AUC: 0.845; MOD-C1-AUC: 0.712; MOD-C2-AUC: 0.838. Conclusion. Corneal thickness variables enhance ONH assessment and HRT's MRA and GPS diagnostic capacity.

  4. Optic nerve head analyser and Heidelberg retina tomograph: accuracy and reproducibility of topographic measurements in a model eye and in volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Janknecht, P; Funk, J

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of the optic nerve head analyser (ONHA) and the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) were compared and the performance of the HRT in measuring fundus elevations was evaluated. The coefficient of variation of three repeated measurements in a model eye and in volunteers and the relative error in a model eye was calculated. With ONHA measurements the pooled coefficient of variation in volunteers was 9.3% in measuring cup areas and 8.4% in measuring the cup volume. In a model eye the pooled coefficient of variation was 7.6% for the parameter 'cup area' and 9.9% for the parameter 'cup volume'. The pooled relative error in the model eye was 6.6% for the parameter 'cup area' and 5.1% for the parameter 'cup volume'. With HRT measurements in volunteers the pooled coefficient of variation of both the parameters 'volume below contour' and 'volume below surface' was 6.9%. In the model eye the pooled coefficient of variation was 2.4% for the 'volume below contour' and 4.1% for the parameter 'volume below surface'. The pooled relative error in the model eye was 11.3% for the 'volume below contour' and 11% for the 'volume below surface'. The pooled relative error in measuring retinal elevations in the model eye was 3.8%. The coefficient of variation was 3.5%. The accuracies of the HRT and ONHA were similar. However, as the ONHA 'cup volume' is unreliable in patients because of the design of the ONHA whereas the HRT volume parameters are reliable it seems reasonable to assume that the HRT is superior to the ONHA. Only the HRT is capable of quantifying retinal elevations. Images PMID:7803352

  5. Calibrated variability of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during graded head-up tilt in humans and its link with noradrenaline data and cardiovascular rhythms.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias; Porta, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) variability is traditionally computed through a low-pass filtering procedure that requires normalization. We proposed a new beat-to-beat MSNA variability computation that preserves dimensionality typical of an integrated neural discharge (i.e., bursts per unit of time). The calibrated MSNA (cMSNA) variability technique is contrasted with the traditional uncalibrated MSNA (ucMSNA) version. The powers of cMSNA and ucMSNA variabilities in the low-frequency (LF, from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz) band were computed with those of the heart period (HP) of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure (SAP and DAP, respectively) in seven healthy subjects (age, 20-28 years; median, 22 years; 5 women) during a graded head-up tilt. Subjects were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 60° table inclinations. The LF powers of ucMSNA and HP variabilities were expressed in normalized units (LFnu), whereas all remaining spectral markers were expressed in absolute units. We found that 1) the LF power of cMSNA variability was positively correlated with tilt angle, whereas the LFnu power of the ucMSNA series was uncorrelated; 2) the LF power of cMSNA variability was correlated with LF powers of SAP and DAP, LFnu power of HP and noradrenaline concentration, whereas the relationship of the LFnu power of ucMSNA variability to LF powers of SAP and DAP was weaker and that to LFnu power of HP was absent; and 3) the stronger relationship of cMSNA variability to SAP and DAP spectral markers compared with the ucMSNA series was confirmed individually. The cMSNA variability appears to be more suitable in describing sympathetic control in humans than traditional ucMSNA variability. PMID:27009053

  6. 3D Histomorphometry of the Normal and Early Glaucomatous Monkey Optic Nerve Head: Lamina Cribrosa and Peripapillary Scleral Position and Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Downs, J. Crawford; Girkin, Christopher; Sakata, Lisandro; Bellezza, Anthony; Thompson, Hilary; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To three-dimensionally delineate the anterior and posterior surface of the lamina cribrosa, scleral flange and peripapillary sclera so as to determine the position and thickness of these structures within digital three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the monkey optic nerve head (ONH). Methods The trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of three early glaucoma (EG) monkeys (one eye Normal, one eye given laser-induced EG) were serial-sectioned at 3-μm thickness, with the embedded tissue block face stained and imaged after each cut. Images were aligned and stacked to create 3D reconstructions, within which Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) and the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lamina cribrosa and peripapillary sclera were delineated in 40 serial, radial (4.5° interval), digital, sagittal sections. For each eye, a BMO zero reference plane was fit to the 80 BMO points, which served as the reference from which all position measurements were made. Regional laminar, scleral flange, and peripapillary scleral position and thickness were compared between the Normal and EG eyes of each monkey and between treatment groups by analysis of variance. Results Laminar thickness varies substantially within the Normal eyes and is profoundly thicker within the three EG eyes. Laminar position is permanently posteriorly deformed in all three EG eyes, with substantial differences in the magnitude and extent of deformation among them. Scleral flange and peripapillary scleral thickness vary regionally within each Normal ONH with the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera thinnest nasally. Overall, the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera immediately surrounding the ONH are posteriorly displaced relative to the more peripheral sclera. Conclusion Profound fixed posterior deformation and thickening of the lamina is accompanied by mild posterior deformation and thinning of the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera at the onset of confocal scanning laser

  7. Cross-matched blood for major head and neck surgery: an analysis of requirements.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, A M; Telfer, M R; Stassen, L F

    1998-04-01

    We retrospectively analysed our blood ordering practice; the number of units of cross-matched blood requested was compared with the number transfused, in 70 patients undergoing a total of 82 ablative operations for malignant disease. Patients undergoing neck dissection alone, or excision of tumour with free revascularized flap reconstruction without neck dissection, are unlikely to require blood transfusion. Operations that include excision of tumour with primary closure and neck dissection, excision of tumour with pedicled flap reconstruction and excision of tumour with any form of flap reconstruction and neck dissection in continuity, will probably require transfusion. If atypical antibodies are present in the patient's serum on screening, cross-matched blood should always be available preoperatively. Provided that atypical antibodies are not present and that blood is available within 40 minutes from the blood bank, our results show that it is safe to adopt a policy of blood grouping and saving serum, for patients undergoing neck dissection alone, but cross-matching two or more units of blood for patients who are to have more extensive operations. PMID:9643594

  8. Preclinical Study of Cell Therapy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head with Allogenic Peripheral Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ning-Ning; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yi; Peng, Jia-Chen; Fang, Ning; Yu, Li-Mei; Liu, Jin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the value of transplanting peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells from allogenic rabbits (rPBMSCs) to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Materials and Methods rPBMSCs were separated/cultured from peripheral blood after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization. Afterwards, mobilized rPBMSCs from a second passage labeled with PKH26 were transplanted into rabbit ONFH models, which were established by liquid nitrogen freezing, to observe the effect of rPBMSCs on ONFH repair. Then, the mRNA expressions of BMP-2 and PPAR-γ in the femoral head were assessed by RT-PCR. Results After mobilization, the cultured rPBMSCs expressed mesenchymal markers of CD90, CD44, CD29, and CD105, but failed to express CD45, CD14, and CD34. The colony forming efficiency of mobilized rPBMSCs ranged from 2.8 to 10.8 per million peripheral mononuclear cells. After local transplantation, survival of the engrafted cells reached at least 8 weeks. Therein, BMP-2 was up-regulated, while PPAR-γ mRNA was down-regulated. Additionally, bone density and bone trabeculae tended to increase gradually. Conclusion We confirmed that local transplantation of rPBMSCs benefits ONFH treatment and that the beneficial effects are related to the up-regulation of BMP-2 expression and the down-regulation of PPAR-γ expression. PMID:27189298

  9. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary vasa recta diameter via pericyte cells: a role for regulating medullary blood flow?

    PubMed

    Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Kelly, M C; Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta (DVR), and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF). Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial, and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesize that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine) evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is important

  10. Evaluation of management techniques to conserve water in a mechanical head wash blood removal system.

    PubMed

    Galloway, H O; Deotte, R E; Lawrence, T E

    2013-11-01

    This research objectively evaluated methods to conserve water in a mechanical beef head wash system. Digital images of pre-wash and post-wash beef heads were analyzed to quantify the percentage change in red saturation of the image, which was used as an objective measure of cleanliness. Three types of nozzles (fan, three-hole, venturi) and three water pressures (344, 516, 689kPa) were evaluated in a two-way treatment structure. An interaction (P=0.07) was observed between water pressure and nozzle type; the change in red saturation increased as pressure decreased for fan and three-hole nozzles which contrasted with venturi nozzles. The fan nozzle×516kPa pressure treatment used 25L of water per head washed and was used to evaluate the effect of three water temperatures (15, 38, 57°C). Water temperature did not impact (P=0.21) change in red saturation. Reducing water wastage and minimizing the use of heated water could have positive economic benefits to the beef processor. PMID:23793094

  11. Evaluation of management techniques to conserve water in a mechanical head wash blood removal system.

    PubMed

    Galloway, H O; Deotte, R E; Lawrence, T E

    2013-11-01

    This research objectively evaluated methods to conserve water in a mechanical beef head wash system. Digital images of pre-wash and post-wash beef heads were analyzed to quantify the percentage change in red saturation of the image, which was used as an objective measure of cleanliness. Three types of nozzles (fan, three-hole, venturi) and three water pressures (344, 516, 689kPa) were evaluated in a two-way treatment structure. An interaction (P=0.07) was observed between water pressure and nozzle type; the change in red saturation increased as pressure decreased for fan and three-hole nozzles which contrasted with venturi nozzles. The fan nozzle×516kPa pressure treatment used 25L of water per head washed and was used to evaluate the effect of three water temperatures (15, 38, 57°C). Water temperature did not impact (P=0.21) change in red saturation. Reducing water wastage and minimizing the use of heated water could have positive economic benefits to the beef processor.

  12. Bupivacaine Mandibular Nerve Block Affects Intraoperative Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in a Yucatan Miniature Swine Mandibular Condylectomy Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bova, Jonathan F.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Stout, Rhett W.; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Alfi, David M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Lopez, Mandi J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim The primary objective was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine mandibular nerve block on intraoperative blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in response to surgical stimulation and the need for systemic analgesics postoperatively. We hypothesized that a mandibular nerve block would decrease the need for systemic analgesics both intraoperatively and postoperatively. Materials and Methods Fourteen adult male Yucatan pigs were purchased. Pigs were chemically restrained with ketamine, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane inhalant anesthesia. Pigs were randomized to receive a mandibular block with either bupivacaine (bupivacaine group) or saline (control group). A nerve stimulator was used for administration of the block with observation of masseter muscle twitch to indicate the injection site. Invasive BP and HR were measured with the aid of an arterial catheter in eight pigs. A rescue analgesic protocol consisting of fentanyl and lidocaine was administered if HR or BP values increased 20% from baseline. Postoperative pain was quantified with a customized ethogram. HR and BP were evaluated at base line, pre-rescue, 10 and 20 min post-rescue. Results Pre-rescue mean BP was significantly increased (p = .001) for the bupivacaine group. Mean intraoperative HR was significantly lower (p = .044) in the bupivacaine versus saline group. All other parameters were not significant. Conclusion Addition of a mandibular nerve block to the anesthetic regimen in the miniature pig condylectomy model may improve variations in intraoperative BP and HR. This study establishes the foundation for future studies with larger animal numbers to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:25394295

  13. Effects of Mild Hypercapnia During Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, aud Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Taibbi, G.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Zanello, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Hu, X.; Stenger, M. B.; Vizzeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to cause an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, as experienced by some astronauts during long-duration space flight. Elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on ISS may also raise ICP and contribute to VIIP development. We seek to determine if the combination of mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the International Space Station, with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt, will induce ophthalmic and cerebral blood flow changes similar to those described in the VIIP syndrome. We hypothesize that mild hypercapnia in the head-down tilt position will increase choroidal blood volume and cerebral blood flow, raise intraocular pressure (IOP), and transiently reduce visual acuity as compared to the seated or the head-down tilt position without elevated CO2, respectively.

  14. Roles for the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and CNS melanocortin-4 receptor in the elevated blood pressure in hyperandrogenemic female rats

    PubMed Central

    Maranon, Rodrigo; Lima, Roberta; Spradley, Frank T.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Zhang, Howei; Smith, Andrew D.; Bui, Elizabeth; Thomas, R. Lucas; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Hall, John E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have hyperandrogenemia and increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated blood pressure. We recently characterized a hyperandrogenemic female rat (HAF) model of PCOS [chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) beginning at 4 wk of age] that exhibits similar characteristics as women with PCOS. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that the elevated blood pressure in HAF rats is mediated in part by sympathetic activation, renal nerves, and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activation. Adrenergic blockade with terazosin and propranolol or renal denervation reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP by telemetry) in HAF rats but not controls. Hypothalamic MC4R expression was higher in HAF rats than controls, and central nervous system MC4R antagonism with SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h icv) reduced MAP in HAF rats. Taking a genetic approach, MC4R null and wild-type (WT) female rats were treated with DHT or placebo from 5 to 16 wk of age. MC4R null rats were obese and had higher MAP than WT control rats, and while DHT increased MAP in WT controls, DHT failed to further increase MAP in MC4R null rats. These data suggest that increases in MAP with chronic hyperandrogenemia in female rats are due, in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and MC4R and may provide novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for hypertension in women with hyperandrogenemia such as PCOS. PMID:25695289

  15. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for 3 to 5% of all cancers in the United States. Primary or salvage surgeries are extensive and often lead to major head and neck defects that require complex reconstructions with local, regional, or free tissue transfer flaps. Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning '1') for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89 +/- 0.15, 2.26 +/- 0.13, and 2.43 +/- 0.13 (mean +/- standard error) respectively on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p < 0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flap were 1.14 and 1.34 respectively on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating a less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  16. Genetic comparison of the head of Henri IV and the presumptive blood from Louis XVI (both Kings of France).

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Olalde, Iñigo; Solé, Neus; Ramírez, Oscar; Babelon, Jean-Pierre; Galland, Bruno; Calafell, Francesc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-03-10

    A mummified head was identified in 2010 as belonging to Henri IV, King of France. A putative blood sample from the King Louis XVI preserved into a pyrographically decorated gourd was analyzed in 2011. Both kings are in a direct male-line descent, separated by seven generations. We have retrieved the hypervariable region 1 of the mitochondrial DNA as well as a partial Y-chromosome profile from Henri IV. Five STR loci match the alleles found in Louis XVI, while another locus shows an allele that is just one mutation step apart. Taking into consideration that the partial Y-chromosome profile is extremely rare in modern human databases, we concluded that both males could be paternally related. The likelihood ratio of the two samples belonging to males separated by seven generations (as opposed to unrelated males) was estimated as 246.3, with a 95% confidence interval between 44.2 and 9729. Historically speaking, this forensic DNA data would confirm the identity of the previous Louis XVI sample, and give another positive argument for the authenticity of the head of Henri IV.

  17. Genetic comparison of the head of Henri IV and the presumptive blood from Louis XVI (both Kings of France).

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Olalde, Iñigo; Solé, Neus; Ramírez, Oscar; Babelon, Jean-Pierre; Galland, Bruno; Calafell, Francesc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-03-10

    A mummified head was identified in 2010 as belonging to Henri IV, King of France. A putative blood sample from the King Louis XVI preserved into a pyrographically decorated gourd was analyzed in 2011. Both kings are in a direct male-line descent, separated by seven generations. We have retrieved the hypervariable region 1 of the mitochondrial DNA as well as a partial Y-chromosome profile from Henri IV. Five STR loci match the alleles found in Louis XVI, while another locus shows an allele that is just one mutation step apart. Taking into consideration that the partial Y-chromosome profile is extremely rare in modern human databases, we concluded that both males could be paternally related. The likelihood ratio of the two samples belonging to males separated by seven generations (as opposed to unrelated males) was estimated as 246.3, with a 95% confidence interval between 44.2 and 9729. Historically speaking, this forensic DNA data would confirm the identity of the previous Louis XVI sample, and give another positive argument for the authenticity of the head of Henri IV. PMID:23283403

  18. Anemia During Sequential Induction Chemotherapy and Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer: The Impact of Blood Transfusion on Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Ahmed, Merina; Rengarajan, Vijayan; Powell, Ceri; Miah, Aisha; Newbold, Kate; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Sequential treatment (chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation; CCRT) is increasingly being used for radical treatment of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), which results in increased myelosuppression. In this study, we review the incidence of anemia and the effect of a policy of hemoglobin (Hb) maintenance by blood transfusion on disease outcomes in these patients. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of the records of patients with SCCHN treated with sequential CCRT formed the basis of this study. The incidence of anemia and statistics on blood transfusion were documented. For the purpose of outcome analyses, patients were divided into four categories by (1) transfusion status, (2) nadir Hb concentration, (3) number of transfusion episodes, and (4) number of units of blood transfused (NOUT). Data on 3-year locoregional control (LRC), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were identified. The median follow-up was 23.6 months. The RFS (52% vs. 41%, p = 0.03), DSS (71% vs. 66%, p = 0.02), and OS (58% vs. 42% p = 0.005) were significantly better for patients who did not have a transfusion vs. those who did. The LRC, RFS, DSS, and OS were also significantly better for patients with nadir Hb level >12 vs. <12 g/dL and NOUT 1-4 vs. >4. Conclusion: Our study seems to suggest that blood transfusion during radical treatment for SCCHN might be detrimental. Further research should be undertaken into the complex interactions among tumor hypoxia, anemia, and the treatment of anemia before making treatment recommendations.

  19. Spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood volume changes in different microvascular compartments evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shangbin; Chen, Haiying; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2003-10-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of changes in cerebral blood volume associated with neuronal activity were investigated in the hindlimb somatosensory cortex of α-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats (n=10) with optical imaging at 570nm through a thinned skull. Activation of cortex was carried out by electrical stimulation of the contralateral sciatic nerve with 5Hz, 0.3V pulses (0.5ms) for duration of 2s. The stimulation evoked a monophasic optical reflectance decrease at cortical parenchyma and arteries sites rapidly after the onset of stimulation, whereas no similar response was observed at vein compartments. The optical signal changes reached 10% of the peak response 0.70+/-0.32s after stimulation onset and no significant time lag in this 10% start latency time was observed between the response at cortical parenchyma and arteries compartments. The evoked optical reflectance decrease reached the peak (0.25%+/-0.047%)2.66+/-0.61s after the stimulus onset at parenchyma site, 0.40+/-0.20s earlier (P<0.05) than that at arteries site (0.50%+/-0.068% 3.06+/-0.70s). Variable location within the cortical parenchyma and arteries compartment themselves didn"t affect the temporal characteristics of the evoked signal significantly. These results suggest that the sciatic nerve stimulation evokes a local blood volume increase at both capillaries (cortical parenchyma) and arterioles rapidly after the stimulus onset but the evoked blood volume increase in capillaries could not be entirely accounted for by the dilation of arterioles.

  20. The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival

    PubMed Central

    Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Månsson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis. PMID:23251433

  1. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  2. Effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on blood vessels area and expression of the angiogenic factors VEGF and TGFbeta1 in the rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Pieper, Marcela; Lara, Hernán E; Bravo, Javier A; Romero, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is a crucial process in follicular development and luteogenesis. The nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenesis in various tissues. An impaired production of this neurotrophin has been associated with delayed wound healing. A variety of ovarian functions are regulated by NGF, but its effects on ovarian angiogenesis remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate if NGF modulates 1) the amount of follicular blood vessels and 2) ovarian expression of two angiogenic factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFbeta1), in the rat ovary. Results In cultured neonatal rat ovaries, NGF increased VEGF mRNA and protein levels, whereas TGFbeta1 expression did not change. Sectioning of the superior ovarian nerve, which increases ovarian NGF protein content, augmented VEGF immunoreactivity and the area of capillary vessels in ovaries of prepubertal rats compared to control ovaries. Conclusion Results indicate that NGF may be important in the maintenance of the follicular and luteal vasculature in adult rodents, either indirectly, by increasing the expression of VEGF in the ovary, or directly via promoting the proliferation of vascular cells. This data suggests that a disruption on NGF regulation could be a component in ovarian disorders related with impaired angiogenesis. PMID:17096853

  3. The Location of The Inferior and Superior Temporal Blood Vessels and Inter-Individual Variability of The Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Salant, Jennifer A.; Arthur, Stella N.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if adjusting for blood vessel location can decrease the inter-subject variability of retinal nerve fiber (RNFL) thickness measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects and Methods One eye of 50 individuals with normal vision was tested with OCT and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). The SLP and OCT RNFL thickness profiles were determined for a peripapillary circle 3.4 mm in diameter. The midpoints between the superior temporal vein and artery (STva) and the inferior temporal vein and artery (ITva) were determined at the location where the vessels cross the 3.4 mm circle. The average OCT and SLP RNFL thicknesses for quadrants and arcuate sectors of the lower and upper optic disc were obtained before and after adjusting for blood vessel location. This adjustment was done by shifting the RNFL profiles based upon the locations of the STva and ITva relative to the mean locations of all 50 individuals. Results Blood vessel locations ranged over 39° (STva) and 33° (ITva) for the 50 eyes. The location of the leading edge of the OCT and SLP profiles was correlated with the location of the blood vessels for both the superior [r=0.72 (OCT) and 0.72(SLP)] and inferior [r=0.34 and 0.43] temporal vessels. However, the variability in the OCT and SLP thickness measurements showed little change due to shifting. After shifting, the difference in the coefficient of variation ranged from −2.1% (shifted less variable) to +1.7% (unshifted less variable). Conclusion The shape of the OCT and SLP RNFL profiles varied systematically with the location of the superior and inferior superior veins and arteries. However, adjusting for the location of these major temporal blood vessels did not decrease the variability for measures of OCT or SLP RNFL thickness. PMID:19661824

  4. A comparison of blood loss during the Halal slaughter of lambs following Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning, Electric Head-Only Stunning and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Rizvan; Knowles, Toby G; Wotton, Steve B

    2015-12-01

    Blood lost at exsanguination during the Halal slaughter of lambs was compared between the slaughter methods of Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning (TRS), Electric Head-Only Stunning (EHOS) and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning (PCEHOS). Two protocols were examined, Experimental (80 lambs) and Commercial (360 lambs), assessing varying periods of animal orientation during the 4 min bleeding process (upright orientation before vertical hanging). Live-weight, blood weight (Experimental only), carcass weights and by-product weights were recorded. The Experimental protocol highlighted an increase in blood loss at 60s in EHOS and PCEHOS compared to TRS (P<0.001) but by 90 s there was no significant difference. A post-slaughter change in animal orientation from an upright to a vertical hanging position aided the amount of blood loss. The bleeding of lambs is largely completed by 2 min. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in final blood loss between treatments. This research was undertaken to inform discussion on the merits of different slaughter methods compatible with Halal requirements.

  5. Intracranial blood flow measured with single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) during transient -6 degrees head-down tilt.

    PubMed

    Satake, H; Konishi, T; Kawashima, T; Matsunami, K; Uno, T; Imai, S; Yamada, H; Hirakawa, C

    1994-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during a transient head-down tilt of -6 degrees (-6 degrees HDT) was measured with single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT). CBF was measured and averaged for both sides of the brain areas; e.g., the bilateral anterior cerebral artery (bACA) area, the middle cerebral artery (bMCA) area, the posterior cerebral artery (bPCA) area, bilateral basal ganglia, and the cerebellum. Among these areas, a significant increase in CBF was observed in the basal ganglia and the cerebellum during -6 degrees HDT compared to pre-HDT. When CBF was measured separately in the left or right brain area, these significances disappeared, although a trend of increase or decrease was still observable. A trend of increase was observed in the left anterior cerebral artery (IACA) area, the right middle cerebral artery (rMCA) area, the right posterior cerebral artery (rPCA) area, the left and right basal ganglia, and the cerebellum. In rACA, IMCA and IPCA areas, a slight decrease in CBF was observed. At the same time, cardiac parameters were measured. Heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) did not change significantly, although SV slightly increased and HR slightly decreased during -6 degrees HDT.

  6. Validation of the i-STAT and HemoCue systems for the analysis of blood parameters in the bar-headed goose, Anser indicus

    PubMed Central

    Harter, T. S.; Reichert, M.; Brauner, C. J.; Milsom, W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Every year, bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) perform some of the most remarkable trans-Himalayan migrations, and researchers are increasingly interested in understanding the physiology underlying their high-altitude flight performance. A major challenge is generating reliable measurements of blood parameters on wild birds in the field, where established analytical techniques are often not available. Therefore, we validated two commonly used portable clinical analysers (PCAs), the i-STAT and the HemoCue systems, for the analysis of blood parameters in bar-headed geese. The pH, partial pressures of O2 and CO2 (PO2 and PCO2), haemoglobin O2 saturation (sO2), haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin concentration [Hb] were simultaneously measured with the two PCA systems (i-STAT for all parameters; HemoCue for [Hb]) and with conventional laboratory techniques over a physiological range of PO2, PCO2 and Hct. Our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate reliable values on bar-headed goose whole blood pH, PO2, PCO2 and Hct, but we recommend correcting the obtained values using the linear equations determined here for higher accuracy. The i-STAT is probably not able to produce meaningful measurements of sO2 and [Hb] over a range of physiologically relevant environmental conditions. However, we can recommend the use of the HemoCue to measure [Hb] in the bar-headed goose, if results are corrected. We emphasize that the equations that we provide to correct PCA results are applicable only to bar-headed goose whole blood under the conditions that we tested. We encourage researchers to validate i-STAT or HemoCue results thoroughly for their specific study conditions and species in order to yield accurate results. PMID:27293706

  7. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  8. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  9. Determining degree of optic nerve edema from color fundus photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agne, Jason; Wang, Jui-Kai; Kardon, Randy H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-03-01

    Swelling of the optic nerve head (ONH) is subjectively assessed by clinicians using the Frisén scale. It is believed that a direct measurement of the ONH volume would serve as a better representation of the swelling. However, a direct measurement requires optic nerve imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and 3D segmentation of the resulting images, which is not always available during clinical evaluation. Furthermore, telemedical imaging of the eye at remote locations is more feasible with non-mydriatic fundus cameras which are less costly than OCT imagers. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop a more quantitative analysis of optic nerve swelling on a continuous scale, similar to SD-OCT. Here, we select features from more commonly available 2D fundus images and use them to predict ONH volume. Twenty-six features were extracted from each of 48 color fundus images. The features include attributes of the blood vessels, optic nerve head, and peripapillary retina areas. These features were used in a regression analysis to predict ONH volume, as computed by a segmentation of the SD-OCT image. The results of the regression analysis yielded a mean square error of 2.43 mm3 and a correlation coefficient between computed and predicted volumes of R = 0:771, which suggests that ONH volume may be predicted from fundus features alone.

  10. Intermittent electrical stimulation of the right cervical vagus nerve in salt-sensitive hypertensive rats: effects on blood pressure, arrhythmias, and ventricular electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Elizabeth M; Xie, Xueyi; Lee, Steven W; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Osborn, John W; Tolkacheva, Elena G

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is the single greatest risk factor for potentially fatal cardiovascular diseases. One cause of HTN is inappropriately increased sympathetic nervous system activity, suggesting that restoring the autonomic nervous balance may be an effective means of HTN treatment. Here, we studied the potential of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to treat chronic HTN and cardiac arrhythmias through stimulation of the right cervical vagus nerve in hypertensive rats. Dahl salt-sensitive rats (n = 12) were given a high salt diet to induce HTN. After 6 weeks, rats were randomized into two groups: HTN-Sham and HTN-VNS, in which VNS was provided to HTN-VNS group for 4 weeks. In vivo blood pressure and electrocardiogram activities were monitored continuously by an implantable telemetry system. After 10 weeks, rats were euthanized and their hearts were extracted for ex vivo electrophysiological studies using high-resolution optical mapping. Six weeks of high salt diet significantly increased both mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure, demonstrating successful induction of HTN in all rats. After 4 weeks of VNS treatment, the increase in MAP and the number of arrhythmia episodes in HTN-VNS rats was significantly attenuated when compared to those observed in HTN-Sham rats. VNS treatment also induced changes in electrophysiological properties of the heart, such as reduction in action potential duration (APD) during rapid drive pacing, slope of APD restitution, spatial dispersion of APD, and increase in conduction velocity of impulse propagation. Overall, these results provide further evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of VNS in HTN and HTN-related heart diseases. PMID:26265746

  11. Bone, blood vessels, and muscle detection algorithm and creating database based on dynamic and non-dynamic multi-slice CT image of head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir Ahamed, Mohammed; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Iwasaki, Hirokazu

    2007-03-01

    Nowadays, dental CT images play more and more important roles in oral clinical applications. Our research is important particularly in the field of dentistry. We are using non-dynamic and dynamic CT image for our research. We are creating our database of bone, blood vessels and muscles of head and neck. This database contains easy case and difficult case of head and neck's bone, blood vessels and muscle. There are lots of difficult cases in our database. Teeth separation and condylar process separation is difficult case. External carotid artery has many branches and they are attached with vain so it is difficult to separate. All muscle threshold value is same and they are attaching with each other so muscle separation is very difficult. These databases also contain different age's patients. For this reason our database becomes an important tool for dental students and also important assets for diagnosis. After completion our database we can link it with other dental application.

  12. Murder or Not? Cold Temperature Makes Criminals Appear to Be Cold-Blooded and Warm Temperature to Be Hot-Headed

    PubMed Central

    Gockel, Christine; Kolb, Peter M.; Werth, Lioba

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-related words such as cold-blooded and hot-headed can be used to describe criminal behavior. Words associated with coldness describe premeditated behavior and words associated with heat describe impulsive behavior. Building on recent research about the close interplay between physical and interpersonal coldness and warmth, we examined in a lab experiment how ambient temperature within a comfort zone influences judgments of criminals. Participants in rooms with low temperature regarded criminals to be more cold-blooded than participants in rooms with high temperature. Specifically, they were more likely to attribute premeditated crimes, ascribed crimes resulting in higher degrees of penalty, and attributed more murders to criminals. Likewise, participants in rooms with high temperature regarded criminals to be more hot-headed than participants in rooms with low temperature: They were more likely to attribute impulsive crimes. Results imply that cognitive representations of temperature are closely related to representations of criminal behavior and attributions of intent. PMID:24788725

  13. Murder or not? Cold temperature makes criminals appear to be cold-blooded and warm temperature to be hot-headed.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Christine; Kolb, Peter M; Werth, Lioba

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-related words such as cold-blooded and hot-headed can be used to describe criminal behavior. Words associated with coldness describe premeditated behavior and words associated with heat describe impulsive behavior. Building on recent research about the close interplay between physical and interpersonal coldness and warmth, we examined in a lab experiment how ambient temperature within a comfort zone influences judgments of criminals. Participants in rooms with low temperature regarded criminals to be more cold-blooded than participants in rooms with high temperature. Specifically, they were more likely to attribute premeditated crimes, ascribed crimes resulting in higher degrees of penalty, and attributed more murders to criminals. Likewise, participants in rooms with high temperature regarded criminals to be more hot-headed than participants in rooms with low temperature: They were more likely to attribute impulsive crimes. Results imply that cognitive representations of temperature are closely related to representations of criminal behavior and attributions of intent. PMID:24788725

  14. Murder or not? Cold temperature makes criminals appear to be cold-blooded and warm temperature to be hot-headed.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Christine; Kolb, Peter M; Werth, Lioba

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-related words such as cold-blooded and hot-headed can be used to describe criminal behavior. Words associated with coldness describe premeditated behavior and words associated with heat describe impulsive behavior. Building on recent research about the close interplay between physical and interpersonal coldness and warmth, we examined in a lab experiment how ambient temperature within a comfort zone influences judgments of criminals. Participants in rooms with low temperature regarded criminals to be more cold-blooded than participants in rooms with high temperature. Specifically, they were more likely to attribute premeditated crimes, ascribed crimes resulting in higher degrees of penalty, and attributed more murders to criminals. Likewise, participants in rooms with high temperature regarded criminals to be more hot-headed than participants in rooms with low temperature: They were more likely to attribute impulsive crimes. Results imply that cognitive representations of temperature are closely related to representations of criminal behavior and attributions of intent.

  15. Does the preoperative administration of tranexamic acid reduce perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements after head neck cancer surgery? A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anjan; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Debabrata; Chhaule, Subinay; Mitra, Tapobrata; Mukherjee, Anindya; Mandal, Subrata Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery is associated with high intraoperative blood loss which may require urgent blood transfusion. Many strategies have been recommended to decrease the need for allogenic transfusion. Use of perioperative tranexamic acid (TA) has a promising role. Aims: This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single preoperative bolus dose of TA on blood loss prevention and red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing HNC surgery. Study Design: A prospective, double-blind, and randomized controlled study. Materials and Methods: From 2007 July to 2010 January; 80 patients, aged (35–55), of American Society of Anesthesiologists II-III scheduled for unilateral HNC surgeries were randomly received either TA (Group T) in a dose of 20 mg/kg diluted to 25 cc with normal saline or an equivalent volume of normal saline (Group C) in a tertiary care hospital. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, platelet count, packed cell volume, fibrinogen level, D-dimer level were measured pre- and post-operatively. Results: Saline (C) Group required more blood, colloid, crystalloid for blood loss. In Group T, 32 patients did not require transfusion of any blood products compared to five patients in Group C (P < 0.0001) and only eight units of blood was transfused in Group T, whereas a total of 42 units of blood was transfused in Group C. Even after numerous transfusions, Hb% after 6 h and 24 h in Group C were significantly low in comparison with Group T (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Thus, TA significantly reduces blood loss and chances of colloid, blood, and crystalloid transfusion caused by HNC surgery. PMID:26712979

  16. Blood volume regulating hormones response during two space related simulation protocols: Four-week confinement and head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, A.; Gauquelin, G.; Gunga, H. C.; Fortrat, J. O.; Kirsch, K.; Guell, A.; Bizollon, Ch. A.; Gharib, C.

    1995-04-01

    The volume of regulating hormones (renin, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin and atrial natriuretic factor), electrolytes and creatinine concentrations, and blood pressure were measured in two different four-week experimental protocols: respectively -6 ° head-down bed-rest (5 subjects) and confinement (6 subjects). We observed a significant increase ( P < 0.01 at D2 vs D-5) of systolic blood pressure during confinement and a different level of response for some hormones, especially for arginine vasopressin (300% increase during confinement instead of 50% during bed-rest). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was enhanced during confinement and head-down bed-rest. In both conditions, we obtained a similar pattern of response for blood volume regulating hormones. During confinement, two main factors were inactivity and stress activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In the bed-rest study the response is principally due to the fluid shift and blood volume adaptation but it is not possible to exclude the role of inactivity and stress.

  17. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery: a national study of patients treated at Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality. PMID:24132654

  18. Highly sensitive and selective immuno-capture/electrochemical assay of acetylcholinesterase activity in red blood cells: a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold (MWCNTs-Au) nanocomposites modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is used for the immobilization of AChE specific antibody. Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentrations of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to OP concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposure to OPs.

  19. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  20. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  1. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and lead content in sciatic nerve of lead-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, N.; Uchino, E.; Terayama, K.; Ohno, H.; Yamamura, K.

    1986-07-01

    There have been many pathological and electrophysiological studies of peripheral nerves in inorganic lead intoxication. Peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) has been used as an objective measure of the effects of lead on the peripheral nerve function and has been examined with blood lead content. There have been few reports on the changes in NCV related to lead content in the peripheral nerve tissue under lead poisoning. In the present study, the authors have examined motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) of the tail by a non-invasive method and lead content of the peripheral nerve in lead-exposed rats. Furthermore, they have attempted to assess the relationship between these two parameters.

  2. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  3. Prediction of clinical toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients by radio-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is treated mainly by surgery and radiotherapy. Normal tissue toxicity due to x-ray exposure is a limiting factor for treatment success. Many efforts have been employed to develop predictive tests applied to clinical practice. Determination of lymphocyte radio-sensitivity by radio-induced apoptosis arises as a possible method to predict tissue toxicity due to radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze radio-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in head and neck cancer patients and to explore their role in predicting radiation induced toxicity. Seventy nine consecutive patients suffering from head and neck cancer, diagnosed and treated in our institution, were included in the study. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and irradiated at 0, 1, 2 and 8 Gy during 24 hours. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Lymphocytes were marked with CD45 APC-conjugated monoclonal antibody. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and fitted to a semi logarithmic model defined by two constants: α and β. α, as the origin of the curve in the Y axis determining the percentage of spontaneous cell death, and β, as the slope of the curve determining the percentage of cell death induced at a determined radiation dose, were obtained. β value was statistically associated to normal tissue toxicity in terms of severe xerostomia, as higher levels of apoptosis were observed in patients with low toxicity (p = 0.035; Exp(B) 0.224, I.C.95% (0.060-0.904)). These data agree with our previous results and suggest that it is possible to estimate the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients determining the radiation induced apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide staining. β values observed define an individual radiosensitivity profile that could predict late toxicity due to radiotherapy

  4. Clinical implications of the surgical anatomy of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Coert, J H; Dellon, A L

    1994-11-01

    The exact anatomy of the sural nerve remains important for many clinical situations. To better understand this anatomy, 25 embalmed and 10 fresh cadaver pairs were studied. The origin of the common sural nerve in relation to the fibular head and its medial and lateral sural components were investigated. The lateral sural nerve was absent in 4 percent of the embalmed cadavers. The lateral and medial sural nerves united in the popliteal fossa in 12 percent and in the lower third of the leg in 84 percent of the cadavers. A site was identified where the lateral sural and lateral cutaneous nerve of the calf pierced the deep fascia. This site was centered about the fibular head and may be viewed as a potential site of nerve compression. There is application of these findings to nerve grafting, neuroma prevention and treatment, and sural nerve biopsy.

  5. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  6. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  7. Dynamic changes in the distribution and time course of blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides in the mouse head with EPR imaging: visualization of blood flow in a mouse model of ischemia.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Miho C; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2014-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxides as redox-sensitive probes is a powerful, noninvasive method that can be used under various physiological conditions to visualize changes in redox status that result from oxidative damage. Two blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides, 3-hydroxymethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (HMP) and 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy (MCP), have been widely used as redox-sensitive probes in the brains of small animals, but their in vivo distribution and properties have not yet been analyzed in detail. In this study, a custom-made continuous-wave three-dimensional (3D) EPR imager was used to obtain 3D EPR images of mouse heads using MCP or HMP. This EPR imager made it possible to take 3D EPR images reconstructed from data from 181 projections acquired every 60s. Using this improved EPR imager and magnetic resonance imaging, the distribution and reduction time courses of HMP and MCP were examined in mouse heads. EPR images of living mice revealed that HMP and MCP have different distributions and different time courses for entering the brain. Based on the pharmacokinetics of the reduction reactions of HMP and MCP in the mouse head, the half-lives of HMP and MCP were clearly and accurately mapped pixel by pixel. An ischemic mouse model was prepared, and the half-life of MCP was mapped in the mouse head. Compared to the half-life in control mice, the half-life of MCP in the ischemic model mouse brain was significantly increased, suggesting a shift in the redox balance. This in vivo EPR imaging method using BBB-permeative MCP is a useful noninvasive method for assessing changes in the redox status in mouse brains under oxidative stress.

  8. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  9. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  10. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  11. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high. PMID:27022734

  12. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  13. Behavioural and psychosocial sequelae of severe closed head injury and regional cerebral blood flow: a SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Oder, W; Goldenberg, G; Spatt, J; Podreka, I; Binder, H; Deecke, L

    1992-01-01

    Thirty six patients (31 male, 5 female) who had suffered severe closed head injury were re-examined at an average of 39.3 (SD 12.8, range 7-66) months after the injury. Behavioural symptoms were measured using the Giessen test. The relatives' reports were used for data analysis to ensure that results were valid. The neurophysical impairment subscale of the Glasgow assessment schedule was completed by two neurologists, and the number connection test was completed by each patient. The adjective mood scale was completed by each relative. All patients were investigated by single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT). Exploratory factor analysis using the principal components method was carried out separately for SPECT results and psychological measures and correlations were sought between the resulting factors. Factor analysis of the data from the Giessen test identified social isolation, disinhibition, and aggressive behaviour as major components of post-traumatic personality changes; it indicates that these behavioural features are independent of the level of neurological and neuropsychological impairment, which loaded on a single independent factor. Relatives' psychic health seemed to be relatively resistant to physical and cognitive disability and was mainly affected by disinhibitive behaviour. The highest correlation was between frontal flow indices and disinhibitive behaviour (p less than 0.01): the severity of disinhibition increased with lower frontal flow rates. There was a significant but somewhat weaker correlation (p less than 0.05) between flow indices of the left cerebral hemisphere and social isolation. Low flow values of the right brain regions were related to aggressive behaviour (p less than 0.05). Neurological and cognitive impairment correlated negatively with the thalamus; worse neurological and cognitive performance indicate by raised scores on the neurophysical scale and on the number connection test was associated with low thalamic

  14. Vestibular modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during sinusoidal linear acceleration in supine humans

    PubMed Central

    Hammam, Elie; Bolton, Philip S.; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2014-01-01

    The utricle and saccular components of the vestibular apparatus preferentially detect linear displacements of the head in the horizontal and vertical planes, respectively. We previously showed that sinusoidal linear acceleration in the horizontal plane of seated humans causes a pronounced modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), supporting a significant role for the utricular component of the otolithic organs in the control of blood pressure. Here we tested the hypothesis that the saccule can also play a role in blood pressure regulation by modulating lower limb MSNA. Oligounitary MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve in 12 subjects, laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal linear accelerations-decelerations (peak acceleration ±4 mG) were applied in the rostrocaudal axis (which predominantly stimulates the saccule) and in the mediolateral axis (which also engages the utricle) at 0.08 Hz. The modulation of MSNA in the rostrocaudal axis (29.4 ± 3.4%) was similar to that in the mediolateral axis (32.0 ± 3.9%), and comparable to that obtained by stimulation of the utricle alone in seated subjects with the head vertical. We conclude that both the saccular and utricular components of the otolithic organs play a role in the control of arterial pressure during postural challenges. PMID:25346657

  15. Physical and Psychological Effects of Head Treatment in the Supine Position Using Specialized Ayurveda-Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Iwawaki, Yoko; Uebaba, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Yoko; Takishita, Yukie; Harada, Kiyomi; Shibata, Akemi; Narumoto, Jin; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To clarify the physical and psychological effects of head massage performed in the supine position using Ayurveda-based techniques (head treatment). Design: Twenty-four healthy female students were included in the study. Using a crossover study design, the same participants were enrolled in both the head treatment intervention group and control group. There was an interval of 1 week or more between measurements. Outcome measures: The physiologic indices measured included blood pressure and heart rate fluctuations (high frequency and low frequency/high frequency). The psychological markers measured included liveliness, depression, and boredom using the visual analogue scale method. State anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory method. Results: The parasympathetic nerve activity increased immediately after head treatment. Upon completion of head treatment, the parasympathetic nerve predominance tended to gradually ease. Head treatment boosted freshness and relieved anxiety. Conclusions: The results suggest that head treatment has a relaxing and refreshing effect and may be used to provide comfort. PMID:27163344

  16. Influence of myelinated retinal nerve fibers on scanning laser polarimetry using variable and enhanced corneal compensation methods.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Márta; Holló, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Five eyes with myelinated retinal nerve fibers were imaged using a scanning laser polarimeter with variable corneal compensation and with enhanced corneal compensation (a new research software). Using variable corneal compensation, areas of myelinated retinal nerve fibers uniformly appeared as areas of increased retardation. Using enhanced corneal compensation software, the same myelinated retinal nerve fiber areas adjacent to the optic nerve head appeared as areas of clinically significant thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer in the superior and inferior quadrants, and as areas of increased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness nasally and temporally. Wedge-shaped myelinated retinal nerve fibers along a retinal nerve fiber bundle and discontinuous to the optic nerve head caused increased retardation with both compensation methods. The results show that influence of myelinated retinal nerve fibers on scanning laser polarimetric results varies according to the compensation method and the retinal location of the myelinated retinal nerve fibers. PMID:16898400

  17. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  18. Vitamin K2 Ameliorates Damage of Blood Vessels by Glucocorticoid: a Potential Mechanism for Its Protective Effects in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuelei; Yin, Junhui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Changqing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has been reported to decrease blood vessel number and harm the blood supply in the femoral head, which is recognized to be an important mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). To prevent glucocorticoid-induced ONFH, medication that promotes both bone formation and angiogenesis would be ideal. Vitamin K2 has been revealed to play an important role in bone metabolism; however, few studies have focused on the effect of Vitamin K2 on new vascular formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether Vitamin K2 promoted new blood vessel formation in the presence of glucocorticoids, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Vitamin K2 on viability, migration, in vitro tube formation, and VEGF, vWF, CD31, KDR, Flt and PDGFB in EAhy926 incubated with or without dexamethasone were elucidated. VEGF, TGF-β and BMP-2, angiogenesis-related proteins secreted by osteoblasts, were also detected in the osteoblast-like cell line of MG63. In addition, blood vessels of the femoral head in rats administered with or without methylprednisolone and Vitamin K2 were evaluated using angiography and CD31 staining. In vitro studies showed that Vitamin K2 significantly protected endothelial cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, promoted endothelial cell migration and in vitro tube formation. Angiogenesis-related proteins both in EAhy926 and MG63 were also upregulated by Vitamin K2 when cotreated with dexamethasone. In vivo studies showed enhanced blood vessel volume and CD31-positive staining cells in rats cotreated with VK2 and methylprednisolone compared to rats treated with methylprednisolone only. Collectively, Vitamin K2 has the ability to promote angiogenesis in vitro and to ameliorate vessels of the femoral head in glucocorticoid-treated rats in vivo, indicating that Vitamin K2 is a promising drug that may be used to prevent steroid-induced ONFH. PMID:27313492

  19. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  20. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction.

  1. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  2. Paediatric Extracranial Spinal Accessory Nerve Schwannoma: An Extremely Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Arunabha; Garg, Sunil; Bhargava, Rahul

    2016-07-01

    Schwannoma in head and neck region are quiet common and generally arise from last four cranial nerves. Spinal accessory nerve involvement is very rare. We are hereby presenting an extremely rare case of paediatric XI nerve schwannoma hitherto unreported in English medical literature till date. PMID:27630872

  3. Paediatric Extracranial Spinal Accessory Nerve Schwannoma: An Extremely Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sunil; Bhargava, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma in head and neck region are quiet common and generally arise from last four cranial nerves. Spinal accessory nerve involvement is very rare. We are hereby presenting an extremely rare case of paediatric XI nerve schwannoma hitherto unreported in English medical literature till date. PMID:27630872

  4. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  5. Radiochemotherapy-induced changes of tumour vascularity and blood supply estimated by dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and fractal analysis in malignant head and neck tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hietschold, V; Appold, S; von Kummer, R; Abolmaali, N

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate radiochemotherapy (RChT)-induced changes of transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and relative tumour blood volume (rTBV) estimated by dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and fractal analysis in head and neck tumours (HNTs). Methods: DCE-CT was performed in 15 patients with inoperable HNTs before RChT, and after 2 and 5 weeks. The dynamics of Ktrans and rTBV as well as lacunarity, slope of log(lacunarity) vs log(box size), and fractal dimension were compared with tumour behaviour during RChT and in the 24-month follow-up. Results: In 11 patients, an increase of Ktrans and/or rTBV after 20 Gy followed by a decrease of both parameters after 50 Gy was noted. Except for one local recurrence, no tumour residue was found during the follow-up. In three patients with partial tumour reduction during RChT, a decrease of Ktrans accompanied by an increase in rTBV between 20 and 50 Gy was detected. In one patient with continuous elevation of both parameters, tumour progressed after RChT. Pre-treatment difference in intratumoral heterogeneity with its decline under RChT for the responders vs non-responders was observed. Conclusion: Initial growth of Ktrans and/or rTBV followed by further reduction of both parameters along with the decline of the slope of log(lacunarity) vs log(box size) was associated with positive radiochemotherapeutic response. Increase of Ktrans and/or rTBV under RChT indicated a poor outcome. Advances in knowledge: The modification of Ktrans and rTBV as measured by DCE-CT may be applied for the assessment of tumour sensitivity to chose RChT regimen and, consequently, to reveal clinical impact allowing individualization of RChT strategy in patients with HNT. PMID:25412001

  6. 24-h blood pressure monitoring in normal tension glaucoma: night-time blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Plange, N; Kaup, M; Daneljan, L; Predel, H G; Remky, A; Arend, O

    2006-02-01

    Systemic arterial hypotension, hypertension and altered ocular blood flow are known risk factors in glaucoma. In this study, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) and controls to evaluate blood pressure variability. In all, 51 patients with NTG and 28 age-matched controls were included in this prospective study. A 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (SpaceLabs Medical Inc., Redmond, USA) was performed and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures were measured every 30 min during daytime (0800-2000) and night time (0000-0600). To evaluate blood pressure variability a variability index was defined as the s.d. of blood pressure measurements. Night-time blood pressure depression ('dip') was calculated (in percent of the daytime blood pressures). Patients with NTG exhibited higher night-time diastolic (P = 0.01) and mean arterial blood pressure values (P = 0.02) compared to controls, whereas systolic blood pressure data were not significantly different. The variability indices of night-time systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure measurements were significantly increased in patients with NTG compared to controls (P < 0.05). The night-time blood pressure depression of systolic (P = 0.47), diastolic (P = 0.11) and mean arterial blood pressures (P = 0.28) was not significantly different between patients with NTG and controls. In conclusion, patients with NTG showed increased variability of night-time blood pressure measurements compared to controls. Increased fluctuation of blood pressure may lead to ocular perfusion pressure fluctuation and may cause ischaemic episodes at the optic nerve head. PMID:16239898

  7. [Experimental study on the effect of ultrasonic surgical aspiration on blood flow and nerve function by use of ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter and auditory brainstem evoked response].

    PubMed

    Konishi, T; Moritake, K; Takebe, Y; Suwa, H; Handa, H

    1984-08-01

    The effect of intracranial use of an ultrasonic surgical aspirator on major cerebral vessels and nervous tissue was studied in anesthetised adult cats. Experiments were performed without suction in order to investigate only the effect of ultrasonic emulsification. The flow rate of irrigation saline over the tip of the ultrasonic aspirator was set at either slow (4 ml/min) or fast (24 ml/min). Flow in the common carotid artery and superior sagittal sinus was studied by ultrasonic Doppler flowmetry during direct or indirect (intermediated by muscle fragment) application to the vessels of ultrasonic vibration for periods of 5 min. each in increments of 20% from 20% of maximal intensity. Flow in both the carotid artery and the superior sagittal sinus changed only with direct application on vascular surface of ultrasonic vibration of at least 80% of maximal intensity; otherwise flow in these vessels was not changed. The temperature rise caused by ultrasonic vibration was studied by use of a thermister buried in the brain parenchyma of animals 2 mm from the ultrasonic vibratory probe tip. A rise above the physiological range could be prevented by sufficient irrigation. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the brainstem was studied by using auditory brainstem evoked response (ABR) to monitor brainstem function. An ultrasonic vibratory probe was applied to the ventral surface of the brainstem exposed by transclival approach. ABR changed noticeably only when ultrasonic vibration of 60% or more of maximal intensity was applied directly; otherwise ABR was not changed. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the intracranial acoustic nerve was also studied by ABR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Adrenergic vasoconstriction in peripheral nerves of the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, D.; Mansson, L.G.; Karlsson, L.; Svanvik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The blood flow in the sciatic nerve of the rabbit was estimated from the wash out of intraneurally injected /sup 133/Xe. To avoid diffusion of the tracer into the surrounding muscular tissue, the nerve was covered by a gas-tight plastic film. Using this technique, the basal blood flow in the sciatic nerve was estimated to 35 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. It was found that intraarterial norepinephrine and electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain strongly reduced the wash out of /sup 133/Xe, which only can be explained by a pronounced reduction of the blood flow in the nerve itself. The blood flow again increased within 4 min of stopping the infusion of norepinephrine or the sympathetic stimulation. The prolonged effect and higher neurotoxicity of local anesthetics containing adrenaline may be explained by an alpha receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of the microvessels of peripheral nerves.

  9. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  10. Teeth and tooth nerves.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Fried, K; Tuisku, F; Johansson, C S

    1995-02-01

    (1) Although our knowledge on teeth and tooth nerves has increased substantially during the past 25 years, several important issues remain to be fully elucidated. As a result of the work now going on at many laboratories over the world, we can expect exciting new findings and major break-throughs in these and other areas in a near future. (2) Dentin-like and enamel-like hard tissues evolved as components of the exoskeletal bony armor of early vertebrates, 500 million years ago, long before the first appearance of teeth. It is possible that teeth developed from tubercles (odontodes) in the bony armor. The presence of a canal system in the bony plates, of tubular dentin, of external pores in the enamel layer and of a link to the lateral line system promoted hypotheses that the bony plates and tooth precursors may have had a sensory function. The evolution of an efficient brain, of a head with paired sense organs and of toothed jaws concurred with a shift from a sessile filter-feeding life to active prey hunting. (3) The wide spectrum of feeding behaviors exhibited by modern vertebrates is reflected by a variety of dentition types. While the teeth are continuously renewed in toothed non-mammalian vertebrates, tooth turnover is highly restricted in mammals. As a rule, one set of primary teeth is replaced by one set of permanent teeth. Since teeth are richly innervated, the turnover necessitates a local neural plasticity. Another factor calling for a local plasticity is the relatively frequent occurrence of age-related and pathological dental changes. (4) Tooth development is initiated through interactions between the oral epithelium and underlying neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. The interactions are mediated by cell surface molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and soluble molecules. The possibility that the initiating events might involve a neural component has been much discussed. With respect to mammals, the experimental evidence available does not

  11. Evaluating optic nerve damage: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Paul J; Mikelberg, Frederick S

    2009-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy involving loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons at the level of the optic nerve head. This change manifests as thinning and excavation of the neural tissues and nerve fiber layer. Therefore, it has long been known that the structural appearance of the optic nerve head is paramount to both glaucoma diagnosis and to the detection of progression [1-4]. Quantitative imaging methods such as Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT) and Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT) show great promise for the diagnosis and management of glaucoma and as these technologies continue to improve, they will become more important in the care of glaucoma. However, these tests cannot replace good clinical examination and indeed they depend upon clinical correlation for correct interpretation. Thus, careful and systematic clinical examination of the optic nerve remains a cornerstone of glaucoma management. In this paper, we outline a few pearls for the examination of the optic nerve and some of the pitfalls to be avoided in optic disc examination. PMID:19834565

  12. Measurement of the absolute optical properties and cerebral blood volume of the adult human head with hybrid differential and spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Terence S.; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Smith, Martin; Delpy, David T.; Elwell, Clare E.

    2006-02-01

    A hybrid differential and spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) technique has been developed to measure absolute absorption coefficient (μa), reduced scattering coefficient (μ's) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the adult human head. A spectrometer with both differential and SRS capabilities has been used to carry out measurements in 12 subjects. Two versions of the calculation have been considered using the hybrid technique, with one considering water as a chromophore as well as oxy- and deoxy-haemoglobin, and one ignoring water. The CBV has also been measured using a previously described technique based on changing the arterial saturation (SaO2) measured separately by a pulse oximeter, resulting in mean ± SD CBVa (intra-individual coefficient of variation) = 2.22 ± 1.06 ml/100 g (29.9%). (The superscript on CBV indicates the different calculation basis.) Using the hybrid technique with water ignored, CBV0 = 3.18 ± 0.73 ml/100 g (10.0%), μ0a(813 nm) = 0.010 ± 0.003 mm-1 and μ'0s(813 nm) = 1.19 ± 0.55 mm-1 (data quoted at 813 nm). With water considered, CBVw = 3.05 ± 0.77 ml/100 g (10.5%), μwa(813 nm) = 0.010 ± 0.003 mm-1 and μ'ws(813 nm) = 1.28 ± 0.56 mm-1. The mean biases between CBV0/CBVw, CBV0/CBVa and CBVw/CBVa are 0.14 ± 0.09, 0.79 ± 1.22 and 0.65 ± 1.24 ml/100 g. The mean biases between μ0a(813 nm)/μwa(813 nm) and μ'0s(813 nm)/μ'ws(813 nm) are (5.9 ± 10.0) × 10-4 mm-1 and -0.084 ± 0.266 mm-1, respectively. The method we describe extends the functionality of the current SRS instrumentation.

  13. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  14. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  15. [Hypoglossal nerve neuropraxia after shoulder hemiarthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Pariente, L; Camarena, P; Koo, M; Sabaté, A; Armengol, J

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of hypoglossal nerve damage after shoulder hemiarthroplasty with the patient in "beach chair" position, performed with general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, and without complications. An ultrasound-guided interscalene block was previously performed in an alert patient. After the intervention, the patient showed clinical symptomatology compatible with paralysis of the right hypoglossal nerve that completely disappeared after 4 weeks. Mechanisms such as hyperextension of the neck during intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, excessive hyperextension, or head lateralization during surgery have been described as causes of this neurological damage. We discuss the causes, the associated factors and suggest preventive measures.

  16. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  17. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  18. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  19. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  20. [Measurement of external pressure of peroneal nerve tract coming in contact with lithotomy leg holders using pressure distribution measurement system BIG-MAT®].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Namba, Chikara; Takahashi, Toru

    2014-10-01

    We investigated external pressure on peroneal nerve tract coming in contact with two kinds of leg holders using pressure distribution measurement system BIG- MAT® (Nitta Corp., Osaka) in the lithotomy position Peak contact (active) pressure at the left fibular head region coming in contact with knee-crutch-type leg holder M® (Takara Belmont Corp., Osaka), which supports the left popliteal fossa, was 78.0 ± 26.4 mmHg. On the other hand, peak contact pressure at the left lateral lower leg region coming in contact with boot-support-type leg holder Bel Flex® (Takara Belmont Corp., Osaka), which supports the left lower leg and foot was 26.3±7.9 mmHg. These results suggest that use of knee-crutch-type leg holder is more likely to induce common peroneal nerve palsy at the fibular head region, but use of boot-support-type leg holder dose not easily induce superficial peroneal nerve palsy at the lateral lower leg region, because capillary blood pressure is known to be 32 mmHg. Safer holders for positioning will be developed to prevent nerve palsy based on the analysis of chronological change in external pressure using BIG-MAT® system during anesthesia.

  1. Morphological characteristics of the cranial root of the accessory nerve.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Fu; Won, Hyung-Sun; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, In-Beom; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-11-01

    There has been the controversy surrounding the cranial root (CR) of the accessory nerve. This study was performed to clarify the morphological characteristics of the CR in the cranial cavity. Fifty sides of 25 adult cadaver heads were used. The accessory nerve was easily distinguished from the vagus nerve by the dura mater in the jugular foramen in 80% of 50 specimens. The trunk of the accessory nerve from the spinal cord penetrated the dura mater at various distances before entering the jugular foramen. In 20% of the specimens there was no dural boundary. In these cases, the uppermost cranial rootlet of the accessory nerve could be identified by removing the dura mater around the jugular foramen where it joined to the trunk of the accessory nerve at the superior vagal ganglion. The cranial rootlet was formed by union of two to four short filaments emerging from the medulla oblongata (66%) and emerged single, without filament (34%), and usually joined the trunk of the accessory nerve directly before the jugular foramen. The mean number of rootlets of the CR was 4.9 (range 2-9) above the cervicomedullary junction. The CR of the accessory nerve was composed of two to nine rootlets, which were formed by the union of two to four short filaments and joined the spinal root of the accessory nerve. The CR is morphologically distinct from the vagus nerve, confirming its existence.

  2. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  3. Ganglioneuromas involving the hypoglossal nerve and the vagus nerve in a child: Surgical difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Lele, Saudamini; Nada, Ritambra

    2016-02-01

    Ganglioneuromas are benign tumors that arise from the Schwann cells of the autonomic nervous system. They are usually seen in the posterior mediastinum and the paraspinal retroperitoneum in relation to the sympathetic chain. In the head and neck, they are usually related to the cervical sympathetic ganglia or to the ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve or the hypoglossal nerve. We describe what we believe is the first reported case of multiple ganglioneuromas of the parapharyngeal space in which two separate cranial nerves were involved. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a 2-year history of a painless and slowly progressive swelling on the left side of her neck and a 1-year history hoarseness. She had no history of relevant trauma or surgery. Intraoperatively, we found two tumors in the left parapharyngeal space-one that had arisen from the hypoglossal nerve and the other from the vagus nerve. Both ganglioneuromas were surgically removed, but the affected nerves had to be sacrificed. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited hypoglossal nerve and vocal fold palsy, but she was asymptomatic. In addition to the case description, we discuss the difficulties we faced during surgical excision. PMID:26930339

  4. Ganglioneuromas involving the hypoglossal nerve and the vagus nerve in a child: Surgical difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Lele, Saudamini; Nada, Ritambra

    2016-02-01

    Ganglioneuromas are benign tumors that arise from the Schwann cells of the autonomic nervous system. They are usually seen in the posterior mediastinum and the paraspinal retroperitoneum in relation to the sympathetic chain. In the head and neck, they are usually related to the cervical sympathetic ganglia or to the ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve or the hypoglossal nerve. We describe what we believe is the first reported case of multiple ganglioneuromas of the parapharyngeal space in which two separate cranial nerves were involved. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a 2-year history of a painless and slowly progressive swelling on the left side of her neck and a 1-year history hoarseness. She had no history of relevant trauma or surgery. Intraoperatively, we found two tumors in the left parapharyngeal space-one that had arisen from the hypoglossal nerve and the other from the vagus nerve. Both ganglioneuromas were surgically removed, but the affected nerves had to be sacrificed. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited hypoglossal nerve and vocal fold palsy, but she was asymptomatic. In addition to the case description, we discuss the difficulties we faced during surgical excision.

  5. Reviewing and Reconsidering Invasion Assays in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inglehart, Ronald C.; Scanlon, Christina S.; D’Silva, Nisha J.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are malignant tumors that arise from the surface epithelium of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, primarily due to exposure to chemical carcinogens or the human papilloma virus. Due to their location, dental practitioners are well-positioned to detect the lesions. Deadlier than lymphoma or melanoma, HNSCC is incompletely understood. For these reasons, dental practitioners and researchers are focused on understanding HNSCC and the processes driving it. One of these critical processes is invasion, the degradation of the basement membrane by HNSCC cells with subsequent movement into the underlying connective tissue, blood vessels or nerves. Cancer cells metastasize to distant sites via the blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves. Metastasis is associated with poor survival. Since invasion is essential for development and metastasis of HNSCC, it is essential to understand the mechanism(s) driving this process. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved will facilitate the development of targeted treatment, thereby accelerating development of precision/ personalized medicine to treat HNSCC. Robust in vitro and in vivo assays are required to investigate the mechanistic basis of invasion. This review will focus on in vitro and in vivo assays used to study invasion in HNSCC, with special emphasis on some of the latest assays to study HNSCC. PMID:25448226

  6. Isolated unilateral idiopathic transient hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Viqar; Akram, Muhammad Saqub

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with sudden onset of difficulty in moving his tongue to the left with preceding left-sided headache with no neck pain. Earlier, he had self-limiting chest infection without rashes or tonsillar enlargement. His medical and surgical history was unremarkable with no recent trauma. Oral examination revealed difficulty in protruding his tongue to the left with muscle bulk loss and fasciculation on the same side, suggesting left hypoglossal nerve palsy. Examination of the rest of the cranial nerves and nervous system was normal. The patient's oropharyngeal and laryngeal examination was unremarkable with no cervical lymphadenopathy. He had normal laboratory investigations and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Extensive imaging of the head, neck and chest failed to reveal any pathology. Further review by an otorhinologist and rheumatologist ruled out any other underlying pathology. He made a good recovery without treatment. English literature search revealed very few cases of idiopathic, transient, unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:24969070

  7. Perineural tumor spread - Interconnection between spinal and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Kozić, Duško; Njagulj, Vesna; Gaćeša, Jelena Popadić; Semnic, Robert; Prvulović, Nataša

    2012-12-15

    The secondary neoplastic involvement of the cervical plexus in patients with head and neck malignancies is extremely rare. MR examination of the neck revealed the diffuse neoplastic infiltration of the right C2 root, in a 57-year-old patient with several months long pain in the right ear region and a history of the tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Associated perineural tumor spread and consequent distal involvement of great auricular nerve and vagus nerve were evident. Best of our knowledge, this is the first reported involvement of the cervical plexus in patients with head and neck cancers, associated with the clearly documented interconnection between the cervical plexus and cranial nerves via great auricular nerve.

  8. Response of choroidal blood flow to carbogen breathing in smokers and non-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wimpissinger, B; Resch, H; Berisha, F; Weigert, G; Schmetterer, L; Polak, K

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a potential difference in ocular vascular reactivity during carbogen breathing in optic nerve head, choroid, and retina between healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods: 25 (13 smokers and 12 non-smokers) healthy male volunteers participated in this observer masked, two cohort study. During inhalation of carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) over 10 minutes measurements were taken using laser Doppler flowmetry to assess submacular choroidal and optic nerve head blood flow, laser interferometry to assess fundus pulsation amplitudes, and retinal vessel analyser (RVA) to assess retinal vessel diameters. Results: At baseline choroidal blood flow was higher (p = 0.018, ANOVA) in smokers than in non-smokers. During administration of carbogen the response in choroidal blood flow was significantly different between the two groups: there was an increase in non-smokers after carbogen breathing (p = 0.048) compared with relatively stable blood flow in smokers (p = 0.049 between groups, ANOVA). A similar response pattern was seen for fundus pulsation amplitude, which increased notably after carbogen breathing in non-smokers but not in smokers (p<0.001 between groups, ANOVA). Optic nerve head blood flow and retinal vessel diameters were reduced in both groups to a comparable degree during carbogen breathing. Conclusion: The study indicated abnormal choroidal vascular reactivity in chronic smokers. These early haemodynamic changes may be related to the increased risk to smokers of developing ocular vascular diseases. The specific mechanisms underlying abnormal choroidal vascular reactivity in chronic smokers remain to be characterised. PMID:15148211

  9. Imaging of the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer: an essential part of glaucoma diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kotowski, Jacek; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Schuman, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    Because glaucomatous damage is irreversible early detection of structural changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer is imperative for timely diagnosis of glaucoma and monitoring of its progression. Significant improvements in ocular imaging have been made in recent years. Imaging techniques such as optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy rely on different properties of light to provide objective structural assessment of the optic nerve head, retinal nerve fiber layer and macula. In this review, we discuss the capabilities of these imaging modalities pertinent for diagnosis of glaucoma and detection of progressive glaucomatous damage and provide a review of the current knowledge on the clinical performance of these technologies. PMID:24388709

  10. Effects of intranasal cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, T N; Grayburn, P A; Snyder, R W; Hansen, J; Chavoshan, B; Landau, C; Lange, R A; Hillis, L D; Victor, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular emergencies are mediated by excessive adrenergic stimulation. Animal studies suggest that cocaine not only blocks norepinephrine reuptake peripherally but also inhibits the baroreceptors, thereby reflexively increasing sympathetic nerve discharge. However, the effect of cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans is unknown. In 12 healthy volunteers, we recorded blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle vasculature using intraneural microelectrodes (peroneal nerve) during intranasal cocaine (2 mg/kg, n = 8) or lidocaine (2%, n = 4), an internal local anesthetic control, or intravenous phenylephrine (0.5-2.0 microg/kg, n = 4), an internal sympathomimetic control. Experiments were repeated while minimizing the cocaine-induced rise in blood pressure with intravenous nitroprusside to negate sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation. After lidocaine, blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge were unchanged. After cocaine, blood pressure increased abruptly and remained elevated for 60 min while sympathetic nerve discharge initially was unchanged and then decreased progressively over 60 min to a nadir that was only 2+/-1% of baseline (P < 0.05); however, plasma venous norepinephrine concentrations (n = 5) were unchanged up to 60 min after cocaine. Sympathetic nerve discharge fell more rapidly but to the same nadir when blood pressure was increased similarly with phenylephrine. When the cocaine-induced increase in blood pressure was minimized (nitroprusside), sympathetic nerve discharge did not decrease but rather increased by 2.9 times over baseline (P < 0.05). Baroreflex gain was comparable before and after cocaine. We conclude that in conscious humans the primary effect of intranasal cocaine is to increase sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle bed. Furthermore, sinoaortic baroreflexes play a pivotal role in modulating the cocaine-induced sympathetic excitation. The interplay between these

  11. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  12. Nerve growth factor facilitates perivascular innervation in neovasculatures of mice.

    PubMed

    Goda, Mitsuhiro; Takatori, Shingo; Atagi, Saori; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that blood vessels including arterioles have a perivascular innervation. It is also widely accepted that perivascular nerves maintain vascular tone and regulate blood flow. Although there are currently prevailing opinions, unified views on the innervation of microcirculation in any organs have not been established. The present study was designed to investigate whether there are perivascular nerves innervated in microvessels and neovessels. Furthermore, we examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF) can exert a promotional effect on perivascular nerve innervation in neovessels of Matrigel plugs. A Matrigel was subcutaneously implanted in mouse. The presence of perivascular nerves in Matrigel on Day 7-21 after the implantation was immunohistochemically studied. NGF or saline was subcutaneously administered by an osmotic mini-pump for a period of 3-14 days. The immunostaining of neovasculatures in Matrigel showed the presence of perivascular nerves on Day 21 after Matrigel injection. Perivascular nerve innervation of neovessels within Matrigel implanted in NGF-treated mice was observed in Day 17 after Matrigel implantation. However, NGF treatment did not increase numbers of neovessels in Matrigel. These results suggest that perivascular nerves innervate neovessels as neovasculatures mature and that NGF accelerates the innervation of perivascular nerves in neovessels. PMID:27493098

  13. Head exposure system for a human provocation study to assess the possible influence of UMTS-like electromagnetic fields on cerebral blood circulation using near-infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hugo; Pollara, Laurent; Spichtig, Sonja; Kühn, Sven; Wolf, Martin

    2012-02-01

    A head exposure setup for efficient and precisely defined exposure of human subjects equipped with a near-infrared imaging (NIRI) sensor is presented. In a partially shielded anechoic chamber the subjects were exposed to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)-like electromagnetic fields (EMF) by using a patch antenna at a distance of 4 cm from the head. The non-contact design of the exposure setup enabled NIRI sensors to easily attach to the head. Moreover, different regions of the head were chosen for localised exposure and simultaneous NIRI investigation. The control software enabled the simple adaptation of the test parameters during exploratory testing as well as the performance of controlled, randomised, crossover and double-blind provocation studies. Four different signals with a carrier frequency of 1900 MHz were chosen for the exposure: a simple continuous wave signal and three different UMTS signals. Furthermore, three exposure doses were available: sham, low (spatial peak specific absorption rate (SAR) = 0.18 W/kg averaged over 10 g) and high (spatial peak SAR = 1.8 W/kg averaged over 10 g). The SAR assessment was performed by measurement and simulation. Direct comparison of measurement and numerical results showed good agreement in terms of spatial peak SAR and SAR distribution. The variability analysis of the spatial peak SAR over 10 g was assessed by numerical simulations. Maximal deviations of -22% and +32% from the nominal situation were observed. Compared to other exposure setups, the present setup allows for low exposure uncertainty, combined with high SAR efficiency, easy access for the NIRI sensor and minimal impairment of test subjects. PMID:21842517

  14. Head exposure system for a human provocation study to assess the possible influence of UMTS-like electromagnetic fields on cerebral blood circulation using near-infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hugo; Pollara, Laurent; Spichtig, Sonja; Kühn, Sven; Wolf, Martin

    2012-02-01

    A head exposure setup for efficient and precisely defined exposure of human subjects equipped with a near-infrared imaging (NIRI) sensor is presented. In a partially shielded anechoic chamber the subjects were exposed to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)-like electromagnetic fields (EMF) by using a patch antenna at a distance of 4 cm from the head. The non-contact design of the exposure setup enabled NIRI sensors to easily attach to the head. Moreover, different regions of the head were chosen for localised exposure and simultaneous NIRI investigation. The control software enabled the simple adaptation of the test parameters during exploratory testing as well as the performance of controlled, randomised, crossover and double-blind provocation studies. Four different signals with a carrier frequency of 1900 MHz were chosen for the exposure: a simple continuous wave signal and three different UMTS signals. Furthermore, three exposure doses were available: sham, low (spatial peak specific absorption rate (SAR) = 0.18 W/kg averaged over 10 g) and high (spatial peak SAR = 1.8 W/kg averaged over 10 g). The SAR assessment was performed by measurement and simulation. Direct comparison of measurement and numerical results showed good agreement in terms of spatial peak SAR and SAR distribution. The variability analysis of the spatial peak SAR over 10 g was assessed by numerical simulations. Maximal deviations of -22% and +32% from the nominal situation were observed. Compared to other exposure setups, the present setup allows for low exposure uncertainty, combined with high SAR efficiency, easy access for the NIRI sensor and minimal impairment of test subjects.

  15. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  16. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  17. Paresis of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI: clinical manifestation and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carlow, T J

    1989-01-01

    Successful identification of the cranial nerve and ocular muscle responsible for a subjective complaint of diplopia requires an evaluation of the type and character of the double vision and not infrequently the use of a red glass or Maddox rod, especially in incomplete and subtle cases. An isolated third nerve lesion is most commonly seen with a supraclinoid aneurysm (pupil dilated and fixed), vascular disease (pupil spared), and trauma. Mild frontal head trauma and vascular disease are the most common etiologies associated with an isolated fourth nerve paresis. Tumor, vascular disease and trauma should be prime considerations when a patient presents with an isolated sixth nerve paresis. A child's diagnostic possibilities will differ from the adult: third nerve (congenital), fourth nerve (congenital), and sixth nerve (brainstem glioma, postviral or inflammatory). Finally, myasthenia gravis can readily mask or mimic an isolated or mixed cranial nerve palsy. A Tensilon test is always indicated in unexplained diplopia with ophthalmoplegia and normal pupils.

  18. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from surgery to abstention or therapeutic radiation with curative-like outcomes. Parathyroid tissue and parathyroid adenoma can also be found in close association with the vagus nerve in intra or paravagal situations. Vagal parathyroid adenoma can be identified with preoperative imaging or suspected intraoperatively by experienced surgeons. Vagal parathyroid adenomas located in the neck or superior mediastinum can be removed via initial cervicotomy, while those located in the aortopulmonary window require a thoracic approach. This review particularly emphasizes the embryology, molecular genetics, and modern imaging of these tumors. PMID:27406876

  19. [Functional anatomy of the trigeminal nerve].

    PubMed

    Leston, J M

    2009-04-01

    The cranial nerve (CN) V is a mixed nerve that consists primarily of sensory neurons. It exits the brain on the lateral surface of the pons, entering the trigeminal ganglion within a few millimeters. Three major branches emerge from the trigeminal ganglion. The first division (V1, the ophthalmic nerve) exits the cranium through the superior orbital fissure, entering the orbit to innervate the globe and skin in the area above the eye and forehead. The second division (V2, the maxillary nerve) exits through a round hole, the foramen rotundum, into a space posterior to the orbit, the pterygopalatine fossa. It then re-enters a canal running inferior to the orbit, the infraorbital canal, and exits through a small hole, the infraorbital foramen, to innervate the skin below the eye and above the mouth. The third division (V3, the mandibular nerve) exits the cranium through an oval hole, the foramen ovale. The third division also has an additional motor component, which may run in a separate fascial compartment. Most fibers travel directly to their target tissues. Sensory axons innervate skin on the lateral side of the head, the tongue, and the mucosal wall of the oral cavity. Motor fibers innervate the muscles that are attached to the mandible. Some sensory axons enter in the mandible to innervate the teeth and emerge from the mental foramen to innervate the skin of the lower jaw.

  20. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Remains Constant during Robot Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Verdonck, Philip; Kalmar, Alain F.; Suy, Koen; Geeraerts, Thomas; Vercauteren, Marcel; Mottrie, Alex; De Wolf, Andre M.; Hendrickx, Jan F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP), a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP) is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurement, may warn us that the mechanism of protective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shifts becomes exhausted. Methods After obtaining IRB approval and written informed consent, ONSD was measured by ocular ultrasound in 20 ASA I–II patients at various stages of the RALRP procedure: baseline awake, after induction, after applying the CO2PP, during head-down position, after resuming the supine position, in the postoperative anaesthesia care unit, and on day one postoperatively. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated as the mean arterial (MAP) minus central venous pressure (CVP). Results The ONSD did not change during head-down position, although the CVP increased from 4.2(2.5) mm Hg to 27.6(3.8) mm Hg. The CPP was decreased 70 min after assuming the head-down position until 15 min after resuming the supine position, but remained above 60 mm Hg at all times. Conclusion Even though ICP has been documented to increase during CO2PP and head-down positioning, we did not find any changes in ONSD during head-down position. These results indicate that intracranial blood volume does not increase up to a point that CSF migration as a compensation mechanism becomes exhausted, suggesting any increases in ICP are likely to be small. PMID:25369152

  1. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Tyler, D. J.; Anderson, J. S.; Triolo, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  2. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  3. Sword-Like Trauma to the Shoulder with Open Head-Splitting Fracture of the Head

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Konstantinos; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Seferlis, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Zinon

    2016-01-01

    Head-splitting fractures occur as a result of violent compression of the head against the glenoid; the head splits and the tuberosities may remain attached to the fragments or split and separate. Isolated humeral head-splitting fractures are rare injuries. Favorable results with osteosynthesis can be difficult to achieve because of the very proximal location of the head fracture and associated poor vascularity. We present a case of a 67-year-old man who sustained a severe, sword-like trauma to his left shoulder after a road traffic accident with associated isolated open Gustilo-Anderson IIIA humeral head-splitting fracture. Bony union was achieved with minimal internal fixation but the clinical outcome deteriorated due to accompanying axillary nerve apraxia. To our knowledge, this type of sword-like injury with associated humeral head-split fracture has not previously been reported. PMID:27478665

  4. Sword-Like Trauma to the Shoulder with Open Head-Splitting Fracture of the Head.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Pantazis, Konstantinos; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Seferlis, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Zinon

    2016-01-01

    Head-splitting fractures occur as a result of violent compression of the head against the glenoid; the head splits and the tuberosities may remain attached to the fragments or split and separate. Isolated humeral head-splitting fractures are rare injuries. Favorable results with osteosynthesis can be difficult to achieve because of the very proximal location of the head fracture and associated poor vascularity. We present a case of a 67-year-old man who sustained a severe, sword-like trauma to his left shoulder after a road traffic accident with associated isolated open Gustilo-Anderson IIIA humeral head-splitting fracture. Bony union was achieved with minimal internal fixation but the clinical outcome deteriorated due to accompanying axillary nerve apraxia. To our knowledge, this type of sword-like injury with associated humeral head-split fracture has not previously been reported. PMID:27478665

  5. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  6. Effect of 1% Inspired CO2 During Head-Down Tilt on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, and Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Hu, X.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Phillips, T. R.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Taibbi, G.; Zwart, S. R.; Vizzeri, G.

    2016-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome experienced by many astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. In addition, elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has also been hypothesized to contribute to the development of VIIP. We seek to determine if an acute, mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the ISS, combined with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt will induce ophthalmic and ICP changes consistent with the VIIP syndrome.

  7. Retinal blood flow measurement by circumpapillary Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Bower, Bradley A; Izatt, Joseph A; Tan, Ou; Huang, David

    2008-01-01

    We present in vivo human total retinal blood flow measurements using Doppler Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The scan pattern consisted of two concentric circles around the optic nerve head, transecting all retinal branch arteries and veins. The relative positions of each blood vessel in the two OCT conic cross sections were measured and used to determine the angle between the OCT beam and the vessel. The measured angle and the Doppler shift profile were used to compute blood flow in the blood vessel. The flows in the branch veins was summed to give the total retinal blood flow at one time point. Each measurement of total retinal blood flow was completed within 2 s and averaged. The total retinal venous flow was measured in one eye each of two volunteers. The results were 52.90+/-2.75 and 45.23+/-3.18 microlmin, respectively. Volumetric flow rate positively correlated with vessel diameter. This new technique may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases that are associated with poor blood flow, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Extracranial Head and Neck Schwannomas: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shrikrishna, B H; Jyothi, A C; Kulkarni, N H; Mazhar, Md Shafiuddin

    2016-06-01

    Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nerves originating in the Schwann cells. They are rare and usually solitary, with clearly delimited capsules. They occur in the head and neck region in only 25 % of the cases, and may be associated with Von Recklinghausen's disease. Schwannomas are always a diagnostic dilemma as they are asymptomatic for long time and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. The present study retrospectively analysed data of 4 patients with schwannomas and reviewed the literature on the subject. Retrospective study at ENT & Head and Neck Surgery Department of Navodaya Medical College, Raichur. Data of 4 patients between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The sites of cervical schwannomas and the intraoperative, histopathological and postoperative clinical status of these cases were studied. Diagnostic methods, type of surgery and associated nerve of origin (NOO) were evaluated. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 50 years. None of them had type I neurofibromatosis or Von Recklinghausen's disease. The nerves affected included the brachial plexus, vagus nerve, sympathetic chain and lingual nerve. The nerve of origin was identified based on intra-operative findings and post-operative neurological deficits. Tumour was removed by debulk operation with the preservation of NOO method. Schwannomas are generally benign, and rarely recur. An accurate preoperative workup with the identification of NOO is very important not only for a correct diagnosis, but also for surgical planning and informing the patient about the possible complications. PMID:27340644

  9. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  10. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.

  11. Imaging the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew T; Volk, Holger A

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the normal course of the cranial nerves (CN) is essential when interpreting images of patients with cranial neuropathies. CN foramina are depicted best using computed X-ray tomography, but the nerves are depicted best using magnetic resonance imaging. The function and anatomy of the CN in the dog are reviewed and selected examples of lesions affecting the CN are illustrated.

  12. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  13. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  14. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  15. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  16. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  17. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  18. What are Head Cavities? - A History of Studies on Vertebrate Head Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the discovery of segmental epithelial coeloms, or "head cavities," in elasmobranch embryos toward the end of the 19th century, the debate over the presence of mesodermal segments in the vertebrate head became a central problem in comparative embryology. The classical segmental view assumed only one type of metamerism in the vertebrate head, in which each metamere was thought to contain one head somite and one pharyngeal arch, innervated by a set of cranial nerves serially homologous to dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The non-segmental view, on the other hand, rejected the somite-like properties of head cavities. A series of small mesodermal cysts in early Torpedo embryos, which were thought to represent true somite homologs, provided a third possible view on the nature of the vertebrate head. Recent molecular developmental data have shed new light on the vertebrate head problem, explaining that head mesoderm evolved, not by the modification of rostral somites of an amphioxus-like ancestor, but through the polarization of unspecified paraxial mesoderm into head mesoderm anteriorly and trunk somites posteriorly. PMID:27268975

  19. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  20. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  1. Recent advances in research on nitrergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral vascular resistance and blood flow were widely considered to be regulated solely by tonic innervation of vasoconstrictor adrenergic nerves. However, pieces of evidence suggesting that parasympathetic nitrergic nerve activation elicits vasodilatation in dog and monkey cerebral arteries were found in 1990. Nitric oxide (NO) as a neurotransmitter liberated from parasympathetic postganglionic neurons decreases cerebral vascular tone and resistance and increases cerebral blood flow, which overcome vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine liberated from adrenergic nerves. Functional roles of nitrergic vasodilator nerves are found also in peripheral vasculature, including pulmonary, renal, mesenteric, hepatic, ocular, uterine, nasal, skeletal muscle, and cutaneous arteries and veins; however, adrenergic nerve-induced vasoconstriction is evidently greater than nitrergic vasodilatation in these vasculatures. In coronary arteries, neurogenic NO-mediated vasodilatation is not clearly noted; however, vasodilatation is induced by norepinephrine released from adrenergic nerves that activates β1-adrenoceptors. Impaired actions of NO liberated from the endothelium and nitrergic neurons are suggested to participate in cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to brain dysfunction, like that in Alzheimer's disease. Nitrergic neural dysfunction participates in impaired circulation in peripheral organs and tissues and also in systemic blood pressure increase. NO and vasodilator peptides, as sensory neuromediators, are involved in neurogenic vasodilatation in the skin. Functioning of nitrergic vasodilator nerves is evidenced not only in a variety of mammals, including humans and monkeys, but also in non-mammals. The present review article includes recent advances in research on the functional importance of nitrergic nerves concerning the control of cerebral blood flow, as well as other regions, and vascular resistance. Although information is still insufficient, the nitrergic nerve

  2. High-pitch spiral CT with 3D reformation: an alternative choice for imaging vascular anomalies with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Li, H-O; Huo, R; Xu, G-Q; Duan, Y-H; Nie, P; Ji, X-P; Cheng, Z-P; Xu, Z-D

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of high-pitch spiral CT in imaging vascular anomalies (VAs) with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children. Methods: For patients with suspected VAs and affluent blood flow pre-detected by ultrasound, CT was performed with high-pitch mode, individualized low-dose scan protocol and three-dimensional (3D) reformation. A five-point scale was used for image quality evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated with clinical diagnosis with/without pathological results as the reference standard. Radiation exposure and single-phase scan time were recorded. Treatment strategies were formulated based on CT images and results and were monitored through follow-up results. Results: 20 lesions were identified in 15 patients (median age of 11 months). The mean score of image quality was 4.13 ± 0.74. 7 patients (7/15, 46.67%) were diagnosed with haemangiomas, 6 patients (6/15, 40%) were diagnosed with venous malformations and 2 patients (2/15, 13.33%) were diagnosed with arteriovenous malformations. The average effective radiation doses of a single phase and of the total procedure were 0.27 ± 0.08 and 0.86 ± 0.21 mSv. The average scanning time of a single phase was 0.46 ± 0.09 s. After treatment, 13 patients (13/15, 86.67%) achieved excellent results, and 2 patients (2/15, 13.33%) showed good results in follow-up visits. Conclusion: High-pitch spiral CT with an individualized low-dose scan protocol and 3D reformation is an effective modality for imaging VAs with affluent blood flow in the head and neck of infants and children when vascular details are needed and ultrasound and MRI could not provide the complete information. Advances in knowledge: This study proposes an alternative modality for imaging VAs with affluent blood flow. PMID:26055504

  3. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  4. Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Babyak, J W; Kartush, J M

    1987-02-01

    Neurogenic neoplasms of the intraparotid facial nerve are uncommon and are usually diagnosed intraoperatively by tissue biopsy. Fifty-six cases of primary neurogenic neoplasms involving the facial nerve have been reported. The majority of these have been schwannomas. A case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the main trunk of the facial nerve is presented. Schwannomas and neurofibromas have distinct histological features which must be considered prior to the management of these tumors. The management of neurogenic tumors associated with normal facial function is a particularly difficult problem. A new approach for the diagnosis and management of neurogenic neoplasms is described utilizing electroneurography. PMID:3807626

  5. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  6. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  7. Ganglion cyst at the fibular head causing common peroneal neuropathy diagnosed with ultrasound and electrodiagnostic examination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lawrence P; Chen, Boqing; Kumar, Suneil; Desai, Raj; Mendoza, Justin; Foye, Patrick M; Stitik, Todd P

    2014-09-01

    The common peroneal nerve is a major source of innervation to the lower limb, but it is sometimes compressed or entrapped at the fibular head. The authors present what they believe is the first reported case where peroneal nerve impingement caused by ganglion cyst compression of the nerve at the fibular head was diagnosed using a combination of ultrasound imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. The authors described the history, physical examination, electrodiagnostic findings, and musculoskeletal ultrasound findings of a patient with a left foot drop caused by a ganglion cyst compressing the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. The increasing role of ultrasound imaging to evaluate musculoskeletal pathology is discussed. PMID:24919081

  8. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  9. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Peter C.; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other facial reconstructive options were considered. These three cases illustrate some of the major controversies in facial nerve neuroma management. We discuss our decision-making plan and report our results. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171043

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  11. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  12. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  13. Damaged axillary nerve (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Conditions associated with axillary nerve dysfunction include fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone), pressure from casts or splints, and improper use of crutches. Other causes include systemic disorders that cause neuritis (inflammation of ...

  14. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  15. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  16. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  17. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  18. Altered Expression Levels of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, TIMP1, and IL-1β as a Risk Factor for the Elevated IOP and Optic Nerve Head Damage in the Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Lukasz; Pytel, Dariusz; Mucha, Bartosz; Szymanek, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of presented work was to analyze the impact of particular polymorphic changes in the promoter regions of the -1607 1G/2G MMP1, -1562 C/T MMP9, -82 A/G MMP12, -511 C/T IL-1β, and 372 T/C TIMP1 genes on their expression level in POAG patients. Blood and aqueous humor samples acquired from 50 patients with POAG and 50 control subjects were used for QPCR and protein levels analysis by ELISA. In vivo promoter activity assays were carried on HTM cells using dual luciferase assay. All studied subjects underwent ophthalmic examination, including BCVA, intraocular pressure, slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, HRT, and OCT scans. Patients with POAG are characterized by an increased mRNA expression of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, and IL-1β genes as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Aqueous humor acquired from patients with POAG displayed increased protein expression of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, and IL-1β compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Allele -1607 1G of MMP1 gene possesses only 42,91% of the -1607 2G allele transcriptional activity and allele -1562 C of MMP9 gene possesses only 21,86% of the -1562 T allele. Increased expression levels of metalloproteinases can be considered as a risk factor for the development of POAG.

  19. Altered Expression Levels of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, TIMP1, and IL-1β as a Risk Factor for the Elevated IOP and Optic Nerve Head Damage in the Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Lukasz; Pytel, Dariusz; Mucha, Bartosz; Szymanek, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of presented work was to analyze the impact of particular polymorphic changes in the promoter regions of the -1607 1G/2G MMP1, -1562 C/T MMP9, -82 A/G MMP12, -511 C/T IL-1β, and 372 T/C TIMP1 genes on their expression level in POAG patients. Blood and aqueous humor samples acquired from 50 patients with POAG and 50 control subjects were used for QPCR and protein levels analysis by ELISA. In vivo promoter activity assays were carried on HTM cells using dual luciferase assay. All studied subjects underwent ophthalmic examination, including BCVA, intraocular pressure, slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, HRT, and OCT scans. Patients with POAG are characterized by an increased mRNA expression of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, and IL-1β genes as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Aqueous humor acquired from patients with POAG displayed increased protein expression of MMP1, MMP9, MMP12, and IL-1β compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Allele -1607 1G of MMP1 gene possesses only 42,91% of the -1607 2G allele transcriptional activity and allele -1562 C of MMP9 gene possesses only 21,86% of the -1562 T allele. Increased expression levels of metalloproteinases can be considered as a risk factor for the development of POAG. PMID:26120586

  20. [Therapeutic failures in indirect injuries to the optic nerve].

    PubMed

    Segal, N; Spineanu, L; Drăgan, I; Coroiu, M

    1993-01-01

    Making an analysis during five years, the authors find a great number of atrophies of optic nerve after indirect trauma on the orbital area or an the head, questioning if the treatment applied had been correct. Studying the literature they find the same feeble results and controversial opinions regarding the therapy of these cases. On tried treatments with macrodoses of dexamethazone i.v., the opening of optic nerve's health or of the optic nerve's duct, the vacating of the retrobulbar haematomas, but the results remained unsatisfying. The problem is if we must console ourselves that the others have the same feeble results or we must try to add to the conservatory treatment applied till now the neurosurgical investigations of the optic duct and heaths of the optic nerve, especially when the vision is lowering progressively and especially when the other eye is also implied.

  1. [A case of retroperitoneal schwannoma of the vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byoung Kwan; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Park, Chul Sung; Lee, Jung Wha; Yoo, Ji Youn; Moon, Joon Ho; Jung, Jae One; Kim, Jong Pyo; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Park, Cheol Hee; Hahn, Tae Ho; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Min, Soo Kee; Yang, Dae Hyun; Park, Choong Kee

    2005-10-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that originate from any anatomical site. Most schwannomas occur in the head, neck or limbs, but rarely occur in the retroperitoneal space. Furthermore, the schwannoma originating from the vagus nerve of retroperitoneal space is much rare. We experienced a case of retroperitoneal schwannoma of the vagus nerve. A 34-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of abdominal mass on ultrasonography. Endoscopic examination revealed submucosal tumor-like lesion on high body of the stomach. Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the stomach was compressed by a solid tumor in the retroperitoneum. On exploratory laparotomy, this mass turned out to be a baseball sized mass in the retroperitoneal space. The mass was excised in an encapsulated state. Histological examination with immunohistochemical stains revealed a schwannoma of the vagus nerve.

  2. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng-hu; Zhen, Ping; Li, Shen-song; Liang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Ming-xuan; Tian, Qi; Li, Xu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C) nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy). The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation. PMID:25788934

  3. Bilateral Abducent Nerve Palsy After Neck Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Shafiee, Sajad; Sazegar, Mohammad; Nosrati, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The abducent nucleus is located in the upper part of the rhomboid fossa beneath the fourth ventricle in the caudal portion of the pons. The abducent nerve courses from its nucleus, to innervate the lateral rectus muscle. This nerve has the longest subarachnoid course of all the cranial nerves, it is the cranial nerve most vulnerable to trauma. It has been reported that 1% to 2.7% of all head injuries are followed by unilateral abducent palsy, but bilateral abducent nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Presentation A 65-year-old woman presented to the emergency department following a motor vehicle accident. A neurological assessment showed the patient’s Glascow coma scale (GCS) to be 15. She complained of double vision, and we found lateral gaze palsy in both eyes. A hangman fracture type IIA (C2 fracture with posterior ligamentous C1 - C2 distraction) was found on the cervical CT scan. A three-month follow-up of the patient showed complete recovery of the abducent nerve. Conclusions Conservative treatment is usually recommended for traumatic bilateral abducent nerve palsy. Our patient recovered from this condition after three months without any remaining neurological deficit, a very rare outcome in a rare case. PMID:27218062

  4. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  5. Regeneration of the Nerves in the Aerial Cavity with an Artificial Nerve Conduit -Reconstruction of Chorda Tympani Nerve Gaps-

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Murai, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takehiko; Inada, Yuji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Due to its anatomical features, the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) is sometimes sacrificed during middle ear surgery, resulting in taste dysfunction. We examined the effect of placing an artificial nerve conduit, a polyglycolic acid (PGA)-collagen tube, across the gap in the section of the resected chorda tympani nerve (CTN) running through the tympanic cavity. Methods The CTN was reconstructed with a PGA-collagen tube in three patients with taste disturbance who underwent CTN resection. To evaluate the effect of the reconstruction procedure on the patients' gustatory function, we measured the patients' electrogustometry (EGM) thresholds. The patients were followed-up for at least two years. Results Gustatory function was completely restored in all of the patients after the reconstruction. The patients' EGM thresholds exhibited early improvements within one to two weeks and had returned to their normal ranges within three months. They subsequently remained stable throughout the two-year follow-up period. In a patient who underwent a second surgical procedure, it was found that the PGA-collagen tube used in the first surgical procedure had been absorbed and replaced by new CTN fibers with blood vessels on their surfaces. Conclusion These results suggest that reconstruction of the CTN with an artificial nerve conduit, a PGA-collagen tube, allows functional and morphological regeneration of the nerve and facilitates the recovery of taste function. PGA-collagen tubes might be useful for repairing CTNs that are resected during middle ear surgery. Further research is required to confirm these preliminary results although this is the first report to describe the successful regeneration of a nerve running through an aerial space. PMID:24691095

  6. Agmatine treatment and vein graft reconstruction enhance recovery after experimental facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Berenholz, Leonard; Segal, Shmuel; Gilad, Varda H; Klein, Collen; Yehezkeli, Eyal; Eviatar, Ephraim; Kessler, Alex; Gilad, Gad M

    2005-09-01

    The rate of nerve regeneration is a critical determinant of the degree of functional recovery after injury. Here, we sought to determine whether treatment with the neuroprotective compound, agmatine, with or without nerve reconstruction utilizing a regional autogenous vein graft would accelerate the rate of facial nerve regeneration. Experiments compared the following seven groups of adult male rats: (A) Intact untreated controls. (B) Sham operation with interruption of the nerve blood supply (controls). (C) Transection of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve (generating a gap of 3 mm) followed by saline treatment. (D) Nerve transection with unsutured autogenous vein (external jugular) graft reconstruction plus saline treatment. (E) Nerve transection with sutured vein graft approximation (coaptation of the proximal and distal nerve stumps) plus saline. (F) Nerve transection with sutured vein graft followed by agmatine treatment (four daily intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg agmatine sulfate). (G) Nerve transection with unsutured vein graft followed by agmatine treatment. Functional recovery, as assessed by grading vibrissae movements and by recording nerve conduction velocity and numbers of regenerated axons, indicated that either vein reconstruction or agmatine treatment resulted in accelerated and more complete recovery as compared with controls. But best results were observed in animals that underwent combined treatment, i.e., vein reconstruction plus agmatine injection. We conclude that agmatine treatment can accelerate facial nerve regeneration and that agmatine treatment together with autogenous vein graft offers an advantageous alternative to other facial nerve reconstruction procedures.

  7. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures.

  8. Myocardial blood flow measurement with a conventional dual-head SPECT/CT with spatiotemporal iterative reconstructions - a clinical feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Alhassen, Fares; Nguyen, Nhan; Bains, Sukhkarn; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho; Bacharach, Stephen L; Song, Xiyun; Shao, Lingxiong; Gullberg, Grant T; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras typically rotate too slowly around a patient to capture changes in the blood pool activity distribution and provide accurate kinetic parameters. A spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method to overcome these limitations was investigated. Dynamic rest/stress 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) SPECT/CT was performed along with reference standard rest/stress dynamic positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 13N-NH3 in five patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using conventional and spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction methods. The spatiotemporal reconstruction yielded improved image quality, defined here as a statistically significant (p<0.01) 50% contrast enhancement. We did not observe a statistically significant difference between the correlations of the conventional and spatiotemporal SPECT myocardial uptake K 1 values with PET K 1 values (r=0.25, 0.88, respectively) (p<0.17). These results indicate the clinical feasibility of quantitative, dynamic SPECT/CT using 99mTc-MIBI and warrant further investigation. Spatiotemporal reconstruction clearly provides an advantage over a conventional reconstruction in computing K 1. PMID:24380045

  9. Pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat epiglottis and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Yujiro; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ishida, Hiroko; Oikawa, Miho; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2011-12-20

    The distribution of pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive (PACAP-IR) nerve fibers was studied in the rat epiglottis and pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant on the laryngeal side of the epiglottis and in the dorsal and lateral border region between naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were also detected in taste buds within the epiglottis and pharynx. In addition, many PACAP-IR nerve fibers were found around acinar cells and blood vessels. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that distribution of PACAP-IR nerve fibers was similar to that in CGRP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud. However, distributions of PACAP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibers innervating mucous glands and blood vessels were different. The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that PACAP and CGRP were co-expressed by vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons innervating the pharynx. These findings suggest that PACAP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud of the epiglottis and pharynx which originate from the vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory ganglia include nociceptors and chemoreceptors. The origin of PACAP-IR nerve fibers which innervate mucous glands and blood vessels may be the autonomic ganglion.

  10. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  11. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  12. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  13. Corneal Nerves in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Brittany; Bakir, May; Jain, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Corneal nerves are responsible for the sensations of touch, pain, and temperature and play an important role in the blink reflex, wound healing, and tear production and secretion. Corneal nerve dysfunction is a frequent feature of diseases that cause opacities and result in corneal blindness. Corneal opacities rank as the second most frequent cause of blindness. Technological advances in in vivo corneal nerve imaging, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning, have generated new knowledge regarding the phenomenological events that occur during reinnervation of the cornea following disease, injury, or surgery. The recent availability of transgenic neurofluorescent murine models has stimulated the search for molecular modulators of corneal nerve regeneration. New evidence suggests that neuro-regenerative and inflammatory pathways in the cornea are intertwined. Evidence-based treatment of neurotrophic corneal diseases includes using neuro-regenerative (blood component-based and neurotrophic factors), neuroprotective, and ensconcing (bandage contact lens and amniotic membrane) strategies and avoiding anti-inflammatory therapies, such as cyclosporine and corticosteroids. PMID:24461367

  14. Comparison of safety and efficiency of microendoscopic discectomy with automatic nerve retractor and with nerve hook

    PubMed Central

    Yin, He-Ping; Wang, Yu-Peng; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Du, Zhi-Cai; Wu, Yi-Min; Li, Shu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the safety and efficiency of two techniques in microendoscopic discectomy (MED) for lumbar disc herniation. The two techniques are MED with automatic nerve retractor and MED with nerve hook which had been widely used for many years. The former involves a newly developed MED device which contains three parts to protect nerve roots during operation. Four hundred and twenty-eight patients underwent MED treatments between October 2010 and September 2015 were recruited and randomized to either intraoperative utilization of automatic nerve retractor (n = 315, group A) or application of nerve hook during surgery (n = 113, group B). Operation time and intraoperative bleeding volume were evaluated. Simultaneously, Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and muscle strength grading were performed preoperatively, and 1, 2, 3 days, 1, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. No dramatic difference of pain intensity was observed between the two groups before surgery and 6 months after surgery (P > 0.05). The operation time was shorter in group A (30.30 ± 1.89 min) than that in group B (59.41 ± 3.25 min). Group A (67.83 ± 13.14 ml) experienced a significant decrease in the amount of blood loss volume when compared with group B (100.04 ± 15.10 ml). There were remarkable differences of VAS score and muscle strength grading after postoperative 1, 2, 3 days, 1, 2 weeks and 3 months between both groups (P ≤ 0.05). MED with automatic nerve retractor effectively shortened operation time, decreased the amount of bleeding, down-regulated the incidence of nerve traction injury. PMID:27699062

  15. Comparison of safety and efficiency of microendoscopic discectomy with automatic nerve retractor and with nerve hook

    PubMed Central

    Yin, He-Ping; Wang, Yu-Peng; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Du, Zhi-Cai; Wu, Yi-Min; Li, Shu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the safety and efficiency of two techniques in microendoscopic discectomy (MED) for lumbar disc herniation. The two techniques are MED with automatic nerve retractor and MED with nerve hook which had been widely used for many years. The former involves a newly developed MED device which contains three parts to protect nerve roots during operation. Four hundred and twenty-eight patients underwent MED treatments between October 2010 and September 2015 were recruited and randomized to either intraoperative utilization of automatic nerve retractor (n = 315, group A) or application of nerve hook during surgery (n = 113, group B). Operation time and intraoperative bleeding volume were evaluated. Simultaneously, Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and muscle strength grading were performed preoperatively, and 1, 2, 3 days, 1, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. No dramatic difference of pain intensity was observed between the two groups before surgery and 6 months after surgery (P > 0.05). The operation time was shorter in group A (30.30 ± 1.89 min) than that in group B (59.41 ± 3.25 min). Group A (67.83 ± 13.14 ml) experienced a significant decrease in the amount of blood loss volume when compared with group B (100.04 ± 15.10 ml). There were remarkable differences of VAS score and muscle strength grading after postoperative 1, 2, 3 days, 1, 2 weeks and 3 months between both groups (P ≤ 0.05). MED with automatic nerve retractor effectively shortened operation time, decreased the amount of bleeding, down-regulated the incidence of nerve traction injury.

  16. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin.

  17. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  18. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  19. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site. PMID:27635205

  20. Peripheral nerve response to injury.

    PubMed

    Steed, Martin B

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons caring for patients who have sustained a nerve injury to a branch of the peripheral trigeminal nerve must possess a basic understanding of the response of the peripheral nerves to trauma. The series of events that subsequently take place are largely dependent on the injury type and severity. Regeneration of the peripheral nerve is possible in many instances and future manipulation of the regenerative microenvironment will lead to advances in the management of these difficult injuries.

  1. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  2. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  3. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  4. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CRANIAL NERVE EMERGENCE AND SKULL FORAMINA IN THE HORSE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Malalana, Fernando; McConnell, James Fraser; Maddox, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For accurate interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the equine brain, knowledge of the normal cross-sectional anatomy of the brain and associated structures (such as the cranial nerves) is essential. The purpose of this prospective cadaver study was to describe and compare MRI and computed tomography (CT) anatomy of cranial nerves' origins and associated skull foramina in a sample of five horses. All horses were presented for euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the head. Heads were collected posteuthanasia and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in the transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes. Thin-slice MR sequences were also acquired using transverse 3D-CISS sequences that allowed mutliplanar reformatting. Transverse thin-slice CT images were acquired and multiplanar reformatting was used to create comparative images. Magnetic resonance imaging consistently allowed visualization of cranial nerves II, V, VII, VIII, and XII in all horses. The cranial nerves III, IV, and VI were identifiable as a group despite difficulties in identification of individual nerves. The group of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were identified in 4/5 horses although the region where they exited the skull was identified in all cases. The course of nerves II and V could be followed on several slices and the main divisions of cranial nerve V could be distinguished in all cases. In conclusion, CT allowed clear visualization of the skull foramina and occasionally the nerves themselves, facilitating identification of the nerves for comparison with MRI images.

  5. Multiple Heads of Gastrocnemius with Bipennate Fiber Arrangement- A Clinically Significant Variation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vincent; Rao, Mohandas Kg; Nayak, Shivananda

    2016-08-01

    It is common to have additional muscles or muscle slips in the extremities. Some of them may compress the nerves and vessels or restrict the movements, while others may enhance the muscular activity. However, a small number of them may go unnoticed. Knowledge of such variant muscles becomes important for plastic surgeons while performing various reconstructive surgeries and for clinicians while managing the pain. A case of multiple heads of gastrocnemius muscle was observed during routine dissection of the right lower limb of about 70-year-old male cadaver. It was observed that the medial head of gastrocnemius was attached to the femur with 3 thick heads and lateral head was arising from the lateral condyle of femur by 3 thick heads. All the heads of the muscles remained separate till they formed tendocalcaneus. Some of these heads showed bipinnate fiber arrangement. All the heads were innervated by the branches of tibial nerve. As the muscle heads passed down from their origin, they entrapped the sural nerve and sural nerve was seen emerging at the beginning of tendocalcaneus. Further, detailed literature and the clinical and surgical importance of the case are discussed. PMID:27656426

  6. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  7. [Case of primary central nervous system lymphoma after open head injury].

    PubMed

    Honma, Mari; Ota, Mamoru; Sato, Naoki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sugino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old man had suffered contusion of the left frontal lobe of the brain with a skull base fracture, pneumocephalus, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. He was treated with ceftriaxone 4 g/day for 14 days, but after 1 month he developed multiple cranial nerve palsies (bilateral III-X). CSF contained increased levels of protein (96 mg/dl) and mononuclear cells (72 cells/mm³), and low glucose levels (40 mg/dl, blood sugar 120 mg/dl), but no malignant cells were detected. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed swelling in multiple cranial nerves with Gd enhancement. Anti-biotic and antifungal therapy remitted the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerve palsies and reduced the Gd-enhancement lesion, as detected by MRI. However, the eyes were bilaterally dilated and medially fixed, and hearing impairments persisted. After 3 months, follow-up MRIs revealed the presence of Gd-enhanced small masses at the ventral pontine base, medulla, and cervicomedullary junctions despite a lack of change in neurological symptoms. Those lesions subsided favorably upon treatment with intravenous and oral corticosteroids. After 1 year and 9 months, Gd-enhanced small cystic masses appeared on the medulla and cerebellum. An open biopsy of the cerebellar tonsillar lesions revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Although the development of primary central nervous system lymphoma after open head injury and infection has not been reported to date, central nervous system lymphomas may mimic diverse neurological diseases. Brain biopsy remains the only definitive diagnosis, and thus should be pursued if blood and CSF markers appear normal. PMID:22688112

  8. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  9. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident

  10. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil İbrahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  12. Surgical Outcomes of Inferior Oblique Myectomy in Unilateral Congenital Superior Oblique Palsy with or without Trochlear Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the surgical outcomes of inferior oblique (IO) myectomy in congenital superior oblique palsy (SOP) according to the presence of the trochlear nerve identified with high-resolution MRI. Data Extraction Forty-one congenital SOP patients without a trochlear nerve (absent group) and 23 patients with a trochlear nerve (present group) who underwent IO myectomy as the primary surgical treatment were retrospectively reviewed. “Motor success” was defined as postoperative ipsilateral hypertropia ≤ 4 prism diopter (PD). “Head tilt improvement” was regarded as postoperative angle of head tilt < 5 degrees (°). Success rates for motor alignment and head tilt improvement, cumulative probabilities of success, and factors influencing surgical responses were evaluated. Results The cumulative probabilities of motor success at 2 years after IO myectomy were 92% in patients with a trochlear nerve and 86% in patients without a trochlear nerve (P = 0.138). The cumulative probabilities of undercorrection and recurrence of hypertropia after 2 years were 0% in the present group versus 21% in the absent group (P = 0.014). The cumulative probabilities of persistent head tilt after 2 years were 14% in the present group and 20% in the absent group (P = 0.486). A younger age at operation was associated with reduced probabilities of motor success and head tilt improvement (P = 0.009, P = 0.022 respectively). A greater preoperative angle of head tilt was associated with persistent head tilt after surgery (P = 0.038). Conclusions Congenital SOP without a trochlear nerve had a higher risk of hypertropia undercorrection after IO myectomy compared to patients with a trochlear nerve. A younger age at operation and larger preoperative head tilt was related to poor outcomes. PMID:27391445

  13. Detailed Relationship Between the Pattern of Blood Pressure Change During the Valsalva Maneuver and the Degree of Orthostatic Hypotension During the Head-Up Tilt Test in Patients With Orthostatic Intolerance: A Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Hyung

    2016-05-01

    Although the head-up tilt (HUT) test and Valsalva maneuver (VM) have been widely used to identify sympathetic adrenergic impairment, the detailed relationship between the degree of orthostatic hypotension (OH) during the HUT test and the pattern of blood pressure (BP) change during the VM remains unknown. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the degree of OH during the HUT test and the pattern of BP change during the VM. During a 4-year period, a total of 132 consecutive patients with neurogenic OH and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. The degree of OH was defined as mild (associated with a fall in systolic BP [SBP] ≥ 20 < 30 on tilting, n = 49), moderate (associated with a fall in SBP ≥ 30 < 40 on tilting, n = 43), and severe (associated with a fall in SBP ≥ 40 on tilting, n = 40). A standardized battery of autonomic tests, including the HUT test and VM using Finometer devices for recording beat-to-beat BP and heart rate response, and a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test, was performed. Sympathetic indexes (SIs 1-6) were calculated from the VM. A composite autonomic severity score (CASS) was also obtained to evaluate the severity and distribution of autonomic dysfunction. The degree of OH was compared with the BP decline and recovery during the VM. All indexes exhibited overall significant differences among tested groups (P < 0.001). Only SI 3 differentiated all subject groups. Compared with other SIs, SI 3 was best correlated with the amount of decrease in the mean SBP (R = 0.473, P < 0.001) on tilting. The decrease in mean SBP on tilting was best correlated with CASS adrenergic subscore. SI 3 can differentiate between groups with different degrees of OH. The SI 3 obtained during VM can improve the diagnostic accuracy of autonomic dysfunction in patients with different degree of OH. PMID:27175668

  14. In Vitro-Stimulated IL-6 Monocyte Secretion and In Vivo Peripheral Blood T Lymphocyte Activation Uniquely Predicted 15-Year Survival in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aarstad, Helene Hersvik; Vintermyr, Olav Karsten; Ulvestad, Elling; Kross, Kenneth; Heimdal, John Helge; Aarstad, Hans Jorgen

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed in order to determine whether peripheral blood monocyte in vitro function, and lymphocyte in vivo activation at diagnosis, was associated with HPV tumor infection status and 15-year survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Sixty-five patients from a consecutive cohort of newly diagnosed HNSCCs, together with 18 control patients, were included in the study. Monocyte responsiveness was assessed by measuring monocyte in vitro interleukin (IL)-6 secretions after 24 hours of LPS stimulation in cultures with a serum-free medium. T lymphocyte activation was determined as the fraction of CD71-positive cells on CD3-positive cells by flow cytometry, whereas HPV infection was determined by PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue. Disease-specific survivals and overall survivals were determined 15 years following inclusion. HPV-positive HNSCC patients had a lower monocyte LPS-stimulated IL-6 response. A high LPS-stimulated monocyte IL-6 response predicted a decreased survival rate (P=0.019). A high percentage of CD71-positive T lymphocytes also predicted an impaired prognosis (P=0.021). The predictive power of IL-6 monocyte LPS-stimulated responses was retained when adjusted for age, gender and TNM stage of the patients. The monocyte and T lymphocyte survival predictions were independent of each other. The survival was particularly low with a combined high activated monocyte and T lymphocyte status. In a multivariate analysis, IL-6 secretion and the percentage of CD71-positive T lymphocytes both uniquely predicted survival independent of HPV infection status. It is postulated that the natural and adaptive immune systems are separately and additionally linked to the clinical aggressiveness of HNSCCs. PMID:26079381

  15. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  16. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  17. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable. PMID:76410

  18. Distribution of sensory nerve endings around the human sinus tarsi: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Rein, Susanne; Manthey, Suzanne; Zwipp, Hans; Witt, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the pattern of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels around the sinus tarsi. The superficial and deep parts of the fat pads at the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) as well as the subtalar joint capsule inside the sinus tarsi from 13 cadaver feet were dissected. The distribution of the sensory nerve endings and blood vessels were analysed in the resected specimens as the number per cm(2) after staining with haematoxylin-eosin, S100 protein, low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75, and protein gene product 9.5 using the classification of Freeman and Wyke. Free nerve endings were the predominant sensory ending (P < 0.001). Ruffini and Golgi-like endings were rarely found and no Pacini corpuscles were seen. Significantly more free nerve endings (P < 0.001) and blood vessels (P = 0.01) were observed in the subtalar joint capsule than in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER. The deep part of the fat pad at the IER had significantly more blood vessels than the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.012). Significantly more blood vessels than free nerve endings were seen in all three groups (P < 0.001). No significant differences in distribution were seen in terms of right or left side, except for free nerve endings in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.003). A greater number of free nerve endings correlated with a greater number of blood vessels. The presence of sensory nerve endings between individual fat cells supports the hypothesis that the fat pad has a proprioceptive role monitoring changes and that it is a source of pain in sinus tarsi syndrome due to the abundance of free nerve endings.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  20. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  1. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell’s palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell’s palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell’s palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell’s palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae. PMID:18368417

  2. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  3. Resistance reflex that maintains upright head posture in the flesh fly neobellieria bullata (Sarcophagidae)

    PubMed

    Gilbert; Bauer

    1998-10-01

    In flesh flies Neobellieria bullata, we investigated a resistance reflex that maintains upright head posture around the roll axis relative to the thorax. The gain of the reflex depends upon the fly's behavioral state: moving flies immediately correct 90 % of the amplitude of experimentally imposed roll perturbations, returning the head almost to the fully upright position; motionless flies allow perturbations to persist for minutes before correcting only 70 % of perturbation amplitude. To investigate the role of various neural pathways, we examined the control of head posture after sectioning relevant propriosensory or motor nerves. Excision of the prosternal chordotonal organ causes no decrements in the control of head posture. Unilateral deafferentation of a cervical propriosensory organ, the prosternal organ, induces roll towards the cut side. Unilateral section of the frontal nerve, a mixed motor nerve that supplies the neck depressors and levators, leads to unilateral deficits in correcting perturbations towards the contralateral side. After bilateral propriosensory or frontal motor nerve section, approximately 40 % of perturbation amplitude is still corrected. To determine the contributions of the passive elastic properties of the neck skeleto-muscular system, flies were tested under reversible nitrogen anesthesia. They immediately corrected 40 % of perturbation amplitude. Taken together, the results demonstrate that passive elasticity plus active prosternal nerve afference to contralateral depressors innervated by the frontal nerve in combination constitute a sufficient and necessary reflex loop to control head roll posture.

  4. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  5. Immunohistochemical Localization of Nerve Fibers in the Pseudocapsule of Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.; Zhu, L.; Huang, X.; Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    The pseudocapsule surrounding fibroids consists of compressed myometrium containing nerves and blood vessels that continue into adjacent myometrium. Oxytocin (OXT) is thought to affect wound healing after myomectomy. We determined the presence of OXT and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) immunoreactive nerve fibers in pseudocapsule compared to adjacent myometrium. Samples (N=106) of pseudocapsule and adjacent myometrium were collected from 57 women with uterine fibroids undergoing myomectomy, and stained with anti-OXT and PGP 9.5 antibodies to demonstrate the presence of nerve fibers. Nerve fibers in the pseudocapsule stained positively with OXT (89/106, 84.0%) and PGP 9.5 (94/106, 88.7%). The densities of nerve fibers staining with PGP 9.5 and OXT in the pseudocapsule were highest in the isthmus (23.68±22.45/mm2 and 43.35±40.74/mm2, respectively). There were no significant differences in the density of nerve fibers, stained with either OXT or PGP 9.5, between the pseudocapsule, and adjacent normal myometrium regardless of the fibroid location in the uterus (P>0.05). These results suggest that the pseudocapsule should avoid to be damaged during the myomectomy procedure. PMID:24998917

  6. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing. PMID:19903499

  7. Unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial presentation of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Hironaka, Yasuo; Kawai, Hisashi; Park, Young-Su; Taoka, Toshiaki; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is well known as a symptom of microvascular infarction and intracranial aneurysm, but unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare clinical condition. We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman with bilateral CSDH who presented with unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as the initial symptom. The patient, who had a medical history of minor head injury 3 weeks prior, presented with left ptosis, diplopia, and vomiting. She had taken an antiplatelet drug for lacunar cerebral infarction. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed bilateral CSDH with a slight midline shift to the left side. She underwent an urgent evacuation through bilateral frontal burr holes. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after evacuation revealed no intracranial aneurysms, but constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the left posterior cerebral artery (PCA) ran much more anteriorly and inferiorly compared with the right PCA and the left oculomotor nerve passed very closely between the left PCA and the left superior cerebellar artery (SCA). There is the possibility that the strong compression to the left uncus, the left PCA, and the left SCA due to the bilateral CSDH resulted in left oculomotor nerve palsy with an initial manifestation without unconsciousness. Unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial presentation caused by bilateral CSDH without unconsciousness is a rare clinical condition, but this situation is very important as a differential diagnosis of unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy.

  8. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  9. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  10. Retinal hyperaemia-related blood vessel artifacts are relevant to automated OCT layer segmentation.

    PubMed

    Balk, L J; Mayer, M; Uitdehaag, B M J; Petzold, A

    2014-03-01

    A frequently observed local measurement artifact with spectral domain OCT is caused by the void signal of the retinal vasculature. This study investigated the effect of suppression of blood vessel artifacts with and without retinal hyperaemia. Spectral domain OCT scans, centred on the optic nerve head, were performed in 46 healthy subjects (92 eyes). Baseline scans were made during rest, while for the follow-up scan, 23 subjects (50 %) performed strenuous physical exercise. Systemic and retinal hyperaemia were quantified. Quantification of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness was performed with and without suppression of retinal blood vessel artifacts. The potential systematic effect on RNFL thickness measurements was analysed using Bland-Altman plots. At baseline (no retinal hyperaemia), there was a systematic difference in RNFL thickness (3.4 μm, limits of agreement -0.9 to 7.7) with higher values if blood vessel artifacts were not suppressed. There was significant retinal hyperaemia in the exercise group (p < 0.0001). Baseline thickness increased from 93.18 to 93.83 μm (p < 0.05) in the exercise group using the algorithm with blood vessel artifact suppression, but no significant changes were observed using the algorithm without blood vessel artifact suppression. Retinal hyperaemia leads to blood vessel artifacts which are relevant to the precision of OCT layer segmentation algorithms. The two algorithms investigated in this study can not be used interchangeably. The algorithm with blood vessel artifact suppression was more sensitive in detecting small changes in RNFL thickness. This may be relevant for the use of OCT in a range of neurodegenerative diseases were only a small degree of retinal layer atrophy have been found so far.

  11. Main trajectories of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    WEIJNEN, J. A. W. M.; SURINK, S.; VERSTRALEN, M. J. M.; MOERKERKEN, A.; DE BREE, G. J.; BLEYS, R. L. A. W.

    2000-01-01

    To guide surgery of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat, anatomical illustrations are required that are topographically correct. In this study, maps of this area are presented, extending from the superior cervical ganglion to the otic ganglion. They were derived from observations that were made during dissections using a ventral approach. Major blood vessels, bones, transected muscles of the tongue and neck and supra and infrahyoid muscles serve as landmarks in the illustrations. The course of the mandibular, facial, glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves with their branches, and components of the sympathetic system, are shown and discussed with reference to data available in the literature. Discrepancies in this literature can be clarified and new data are presented on the trajectories of several nerves. The course of the tympanic nerve was established. This nerve originates from the glossopharyngeal nerve, enters the tympanic cavity, crosses the promontory, passes the tensor tympani muscle dorsally, and continues its route intracranially to the otic ganglion as the lesser petrosal nerve after intersecting with the greater petrosal nerve. Auricular branches of the glossopharyngeal and of the vagus nerve were noted. We also observed a pterygopalatine branch of the internal carotid nerve, that penetrates the tympanic cavity and courses across the promontory. PMID:11005717

  12. The distribution of galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat pharynx.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Sato, Tadasu; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Galanin (GAL) consists of a chain of 29/30 amino acids which is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, the distribution of GAL-immunoreactive (-IR) nerve fibers was examined in the rat pharynx and its adjacent regions. GAL-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the epithelium and taste bud-like structure of the pharynx, epiglottis, soft palate and larynx. These nerve fibers were abundant in the laryngeal part of the pharynx, and were rare in other regions. Mucous glands were mostly devoid of GAL-IR nerve fibers. In the musculature of pharyngeal constrictor muscles, many GAL-IR nerve fibers were also located around small blood vessels. However, intrinsic laryngeal muscles contained only a few GAL-IR nerve fibers. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that the distribution pattern of GAL-IR nerve fibers was partly similar to that of calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR nerve fibers in the pharyngeal mucosa and muscles. The present findings suggest that the pharynx is one of main targets of GAL-containing nerves in the upper digestive and respiratory systems. These nerves may have sensory and autonomic origins.

  13. Cranial Nerve Schwannomas: Diagnostic Imaging Approach.

    PubMed

    Skolnik, Aaron D; Loevner, Laurie A; Sampathu, Deepak M; Newman, Jason G; Lee, John Y; Bagley, Linda J; Learned, Kim O

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that may arise along the complex course of the cranial nerves (CNs), anywhere in the head and neck. Sound knowledge of the CN anatomy and imaging features of schwannomas is paramount for making the correct diagnosis. In this article, we review approaches to diagnosing CN schwannomas by describing their imaging characteristics and the associated clinical presentations. Relevant anatomic considerations are highlighted by using illustrative examples and key differential diagnoses categorized according to regions, which include the anterior skull base, orbit, cavernous sinus, basal cisterns, and neck. The clinical presentations associated with CN schwannomas vary and range from no symptoms to symptoms caused by mass effect or CN deficits. Individuals with the inherited disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 are predisposed to multiple schwannomas. When a lesion follows the course of a CN, the radiologist's roles are to confirm the imaging features of schwannoma and exclude appropriate differential considerations. The characteristic imaging features of CN schwannomas reflect their slow growth as benign neoplasms and include circumscribed margins, displacement of local structures, and smooth expansion of osseous foramina. These neoplasms exhibit various degrees of solid enhancement, often with internal cystic spaces on magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) images and heterogeneous high signal intensity specifically on T2-weighted MR images. Clinical and/or imaging evidence of end-organ compromise of the involved CN may exist and aid in the identification of the nerve of origin. With a detailed understanding of the course of the CNs, the diagnostic features of CN schwannomas, and the correlation between these data and the associated clinical presentations of these tumors, the radiologist can have a key role in the diagnosis of CN schwannomas and the treatment planning for affected patients. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID

  14. SU-E-J-241: Wavelet-Based Temporal Feature Extraction From DCE-MRI to Identify Sub-Volumes of Low Blood Volume in Head-And-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    You, D; Aryal, M; Samuels, S; Eisbruch, A; Cao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A previous study showed that large sub-volumes of tumor with low blood volume (BV) (poorly perfused) in head-and-neck (HN) cancers are significantly associated with local-regional failure (LRF) after chemoradiation therapy, and could be targeted with intensified radiation doses. This study aimed to develop an automated and scalable model to extract voxel-wise contrast-enhanced temporal features of dynamic contrastenhanced (DCE) MRI in HN cancers for predicting LRF. Methods: Our model development consists of training and testing stages. The training stage includes preprocessing of individual-voxel DCE curves from tumors for intensity normalization and temporal alignment, temporal feature extraction from the curves, feature selection, and training classifiers. For feature extraction, multiresolution Haar discrete wavelet transformation is applied to each DCE curve to capture temporal contrast-enhanced features. The wavelet coefficients as feature vectors are selected. Support vector machine classifiers are trained to classify tumor voxels having either low or high BV, for which a BV threshold of 7.6% is previously established and used as ground truth. The model is tested by a new dataset. The voxel-wise DCE curves for training and testing were from 14 and 8 patients, respectively. A posterior probability map of the low BV class was created to examine the tumor sub-volume classification. Voxel-wise classification accuracy was computed to evaluate performance of the model. Results: Average classification accuracies were 87.2% for training (10-fold crossvalidation) and 82.5% for testing. The lowest and highest accuracies (patient-wise) were 68.7% and 96.4%, respectively. Posterior probability maps of the low BV class showed the sub-volumes extracted by our model similar to ones defined by the BV maps with most misclassifications occurred near the sub-volume boundaries. Conclusion: This model could be valuable to support adaptive clinical trials with further

  15. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  16. Detailed Relationship Between the Pattern of Blood Pressure Change During the Valsalva Maneuver and the Degree of Orthostatic Hypotension During the Head-Up Tilt Test in Patients With Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the head-up tilt (HUT) test and Valsalva maneuver (VM) have been widely used to identify sympathetic adrenergic impairment, the detailed relationship between the degree of orthostatic hypotension (OH) during the HUT test and the pattern of blood pressure (BP) change during the VM remains unknown. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the degree of OH during the HUT test and the pattern of BP change during the VM. During a 4-year period, a total of 132 consecutive patients with neurogenic OH and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. The degree of OH was defined as mild (associated with a fall in systolic BP [SBP] ≥ 20 < 30 on tilting, n = 49), moderate (associated with a fall in SBP ≥ 30 < 40 on tilting, n = 43), and severe (associated with a fall in SBP ≥ 40 on tilting, n = 40). A standardized battery of autonomic tests, including the HUT test and VM using Finometer devices for recording beat-to-beat BP and heart rate response, and a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test, was performed. Sympathetic indexes (SIs 1–6) were calculated from the VM. A composite autonomic severity score (CASS) was also obtained to evaluate the severity and distribution of autonomic dysfunction. The degree of OH was compared with the BP decline and recovery during the VM. All indexes exhibited overall significant differences among tested groups (P < 0.001). Only SI 3 differentiated all subject groups. Compared with other SIs, SI 3 was best correlated with the amount of decrease in the mean SBP (R2 = 0.473, P < 0.001) on tilting. The decrease in mean SBP on tilting was best correlated with CASS adrenergic subscore. SI 3 can differentiate between groups with different degrees of OH. The SI 3 obtained during VM can improve the diagnostic accuracy of autonomic dysfunction in patients with different degree of OH. PMID:27175668

  17. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  18. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required.

  19. Spectral and spatial dependence of
diffuse optical signals in response to
peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Debbie K.; Erb, M. Kelley; Tong, Yunjie; Yu, Yang; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Using non-invasive, near-infrared spectroscopy we have previously reported optical signals measured at or around peripheral nerves in response to their stimulation. Such optical signals featured amplitudes on the order of 0.1% and peaked about 100 ms after peripheral nerve stimulation in human subjects. Here, we report a study of the spatial and spectral dependence of the optical signals induced by stimulation of the human median and sural nerves, and observe that these optical signals are: (1) unlikely due to either dilation or constriction of blood vessels, (2) not associated with capillary bed hemoglobin, (3) likely due to blood vessel(s) displacement, and (4) unlikely due to fiber-skin optical coupling effects. We conclude that the most probable origin of the optical response to peripheral nerve stimulation is from displacement of blood vessels within the optically probed volume, as a result of muscle twitch in adjacent areas. PMID:21258519

  20. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  1. Sports and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Y; Sakakida, K

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is one of the serious complications of athletic injuries; however, they have rarely been reported. According to the report by Takazawa et al., there were only 28 cases of peripheral nerve injury among 9,550 cases of sports injuries which had been treated in the previous 5 years at the clinic of the Japanese Athletic Association. The authors have encountered 1,167 cases of peripheral nerve injury during the past 18 years. Sixty-six of these cases were related to sports (5.7%). The nerves most frequently involved were: brachial plexus, radial nerve, ulnar, peroneal, and axillary nerves (in their order of frequency). The most common causes of such injuries were mountain climbing, gymnastics, and baseball. More often, peripheral nerve injury seemed to be caused by continuous compression and repeated trauma to the involved nerve. Usually it appeared as an entrapment neuropathy and the symptoms could be improved by conservative treatment. Some of the cases were complicated by fractures and surgical exploration became necessary. Results of treatment produced excellent to good improvement in 87.9% of the cases. With regard to compartment syndrome, the authors stress the importance of early and precise diagnosis and a fasciotomy.

  2. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  3. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zarina S; Pisapia, Jared M; Ma, Tracy S; Zager, Eric L; Heuer, Gregory G; Khoury, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging modalities for evaluation of peripheral nerves. Of these, ultrasonography (US) is often underused. There are several advantages of this imaging modality, including its cost-effectiveness, time-efficient assessment of long segments of peripheral nerves, ability to perform dynamic maneuvers, lack of contraindications, portability, and noninvasiveness. It can provide diagnostic information that cannot be obtained by electrophysiologic or, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging studies. Ideally, the neurosurgeon can use US as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative assessment of a patient with traumatic, neoplastic, infective, or compressive nerve injury. Perhaps its most unique use is in intraoperative surgical planning. In this article, a brief description of normal US nerve anatomy is presented followed by a description of the US appearance of peripheral nerve disease caused by trauma, tumor, infection, and entrapment.

  4. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  5. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  6. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain.

  7. Animal Models of Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are used to elucidate primary and secondary sequelae underlying human head injury in an effort to identify potential neuroprotective therapies for developing and adult brains. The choice of experimental model depends upon both the research goal and underlying objectives. The intrinsic ability to study injury-induced changes in behavior, physiology, metabolism, the blood/tissue interface, the blood brain barrier, and/or inflammatory- and immune-mediated responses, makes in vivo TBI models essential for neurotrauma research. Whereas human TBI is a highly complex multifactorial disorder, animal trauma models tend to replicate only single factors involved in the pathobiology of head injury using genetically well-defined inbred animals of a single sex. Although such an experimental approach is helpful to delineate key injury mechanisms, the simplicity and hence inability of animal models to reflect the complexity of clinical head injury may underlie the discrepancy between preclinical and clinical trials of neuroprotective therapeutics. Thus, a search continues for new animal models, which would more closely mimic the highly heterogeneous nature of human TBI, and address key factors in treatment optimization. PMID:16389305

  8. Optic Nerve Decompression through a Supraorbital Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Luigi; Evins, Alexander I.; Berra, Luigi V.; Beer-Furlan, André; Stieg, Philip E.; Bernardo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective We propose a stepwise decompression of the optic nerve (ON) through a supraorbital minicraniotomy and describe the surgical anatomy of the ON as seen through this approach. We also discuss the clinical applications of this approach. Methods Supraorbital approaches were performed on 10 preserved cadaveric heads (20 sides). First, 3.5-cm skin incisions were made along the supraciliary arch from the medial third of the orbit and extended laterally. A 2 × 3-cm bone flap was fashioned and extradural dissections were completed. A 180-degree unroofing of the ON was achieved, and the length and width of the proximal and distal portions of the optic canal (OC) were measured. Results The supraorbital minicraniotomy allowed for identification of the anterior clinoid process and other surgical landmarks and adequate drilling of the roof of the OC with a comfortable working angle. A 25-degree contralateral head rotation facilitated visualization of the ON. Conclusion The supraorbital approach is a minimally invasive and cosmetically favorable alternative to more extended approaches with longer operative times used for the management of ON decompression in posttraumatic or compressive optic neuropathy from skull base pathologies extending into the OC. The relative ease of this approach provides a relatively short learning curve for developing neurosurgeons. PMID:26225308

  9. Recent advances in nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Quigley, Anita F; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Kapsa, Robert M I; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-04-01

    Nerve injury secondary to trauma, neurological disease or tumor excision presents a challenge for surgical reconstruction. Current practice for nerve repair involves autologous nerve transplantation, which is associated with significant donor-site morbidity and other complications. Previously artificial nerve conduits made from polycaprolactone, polyglycolic acid and collagen were approved by the FDA (USA) for nerve repair. More recently, there have been significant advances in nerve conduit design that better address the requirements of nerve regrowth. Innovations in materials science, nanotechnology, and biology open the way for the synthesis of new generation nerve repair conduits that address issues currently faced in nerve repair and regeneration. This review discusses recent innovations in this area, including the use of nanotechnology to improve the design of nerve conduits and to enhance nerve regeneration.

  10. Improved peripheral nerve regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral lumbrokinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chung; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic effects of lumbrokinase, a group of enzymes extracted from the earthworm, on peripheral-nerve regeneration using well-defined sciatic nerve lesion paradigms in diabetic rats induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ). We found that lumbrokinase therapy could improve the rats' circulatory blood flow and promote the regeneration of axons in a silicone rubber conduit after nerve transection. Lumbrokinase treatment could also improve the neuromuscular functions with better nerve conductive performances. Immunohistochemical staining showed that lumbrokinase could dramatically promote calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and cause a marked increase in the number of macrophages recruited within the distal nerve stumps. In addition, the lumbrokinase could stimulate the secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1), nerve growth factor (NGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dissected diabetic sciatic nerve segments. In conclusion, the administration of lumbrokinase after nerve repair surgery in diabetic rats was found to have remarkable effects on promoting peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25787300

  11. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. PMID:27144951

  12. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer.

  13. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  14. Post-traumatic headache: don't forget to test the supraorbital nerve!

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael; Boyce, Samantha; McGlone, Ray

    2012-08-21

    We present a series of four patients with neurological symptoms following head injury. In each case neuroimaging was normal, but careful examination demonstrated altered sensation over the distribution of the supraorbital nerve. We discuss traumatic supraorbital neuralgia and how it differs from the more commonly reported idiopathic form.

  15. Intraoperative I-125 seed implantation for extensive recurrent head and neck carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J.; Liberman, F.Z.; Park, R.I.; Zinreich, E.S. )

    1991-03-01

    From 1978 to 1988, 41 patients with extensive recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were treated with surgical resection plus intraoperative iodine-125 seed implantation. Surgery was performed to resect the tumors and to expose the tumor beds for implantation. I-125 seeds were implanted intraoperatively, with a spacing of 0.75-1 cm between adjacent seeds, either into the soft tissue in the tumor bed or onto small patches of gelatin sponges to cover the bone, nerve, or blood vessel involved with disease. Reconstructive flaps were used in 18 patients. The average I-125 dose delivered by the implanted seeds was 8,263 cGy. The determinate 5-year actuarial survival rate for the entire group was 40%. The 5-year local disease control rate was 44%. Major complications were transient wound infection (32%), flap necrosis (24%), fistula formation (10%), and carotid blowout (5%). These results indicate that surgical resection plus I-125 seed implantation provides a potentially curative treatment for patients with extensive recurrent head and neck carcinomas that would be considered traditionally unresectable and that would be treated only with palliative therapy.

  16. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers following catheter-based renal nerve ablation

    PubMed Central

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M.; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates following renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition following renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult to control arterial hypertension (age 45–74 years) before, 6 (n=11), and 12 months (n=8) following renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA raw MSNA signal were analyzed. We detected MSNA action potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: −2±3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2±9 mmHg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: −1±3 mmHg, ΔSBP: −1±9 mmHg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34±3 bursts per minute and 8±1 spikes per sec. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (−1.4±3.6 bursts/minute; −0.6±1.4 spikes per sec) or at 12 months (−2.5±4.0 bursts/minute; −2.0±1.6 spikes per sec) following renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 out of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope=−0.06; p=0.369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding following renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  17. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  18. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  19. Management of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Greywoode, Jewel D; Ho, Hao H; Artz, Gregory J; Heffelfinger, Ryan N

    2010-12-01

    Management of facial nerve injuries requires knowledge and skills that should be in every facial plastic surgeon's armamentarium. This article will briefly review the anatomy of the facial nerve, discuss the assessment of facial nerve injury, and describe the management of facial nerve injury after soft tissue trauma. PMID:21086238

  20. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  1. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  2. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  3. [Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tada, M; Nakano, A; Konno, T

    1988-04-01

    The neuroanatomy of the pelvic space was studied in order to clarify the course of cavernous nerves responsible for erectile function. The cavernous nerves travel along the dorsolateral portion at the base toward the apex of the prostate, then penetrate urogenital diaphragm at the lateral aspect of the membranous urethra. According to the anatomical findings, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy was performed through the antegrade approach in 28 patients with prostate cancer. No significant surgical complications were encountered in the present series. Of the 28, evaluable cases were limited to 22 in terms of erection. Fifteen patients (68%) recovered their erectile function after nerve-sparing surgery. Therefore, the present surgical technique seems to be effective for the preservation of male sexual function following radical pelvic surgery.

  4. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  5. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  6. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  7. [Clinical application of skin sympathetic nerve activity].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) is microneurographically recorded from the skin nerve fascicle in the peripheral nerves. It is characterized by the following features: 1) irregular, pulse asynchronous, burst activity with respiratory variation, 2) burst activity followed by vasoconstriction and/or sweating, 3) elicited by mental stress and arousal stimuli, e.g., sound, pain, electric stimulation, 4) burst with longer duration as compared with sympathetic outflow to muscles, and 5) burst activity following sudden inspiratory action. It comprises vasoconstrictor (VC) and sudomotor(SM) activity, as well as vasodilator (VD) activity. VC and SM discharge independently, whereas VD is the same activity with different neurotransmission. The VC and SM are differentiated by effector response, e.g., laser Doppler flowmetry and skin potential changes. SSNA function in thermoregulation in the human body; however it is also elicited by mental stress. SSNA is the lowest at thermoneutral ambient temperature (approximately 27 degrees C), and is enhanced in the pressence of ambient warm and cool air. The burst amplitude is well-correlated to both skin blood flow reduction rate or sweat rate change. The clinical application of SSNA comprises the following: 1) clarification of sweating phenomenon, 2) clarification and diagnosis of anhidrosis, 3) clarification and diagnosis of hyperhidrosis, 4) clarification of thermoregulatory function and diagnosis of thermoregulatory disorder, 5) clarification of pathophysiology and diagnosis of vascular diseases, e.g., Raynaud and Buerger diseases. 6) clarification of the relation between cognitive function and SSNA and 7) determination of pharmacological effect attributable to change in neuroeffector responses. PMID:19301594

  8. Vomiting blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... first part of the small intestine, or esophagus Blood clotting disorders Defects in the blood vessels of the ... as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing ...

  9. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect ...

  10. Mechanisms of trigeminal nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, V B; Assael, L A

    2001-09-01

    Injuries to the trigeminal nerve branches are a known and accepted risk in oral and maxillofacial surgery. It is prudent for the practitioner to explain the risks to patients as part of the informed consent process and to recognize and document the presence of nerve injury postoperatively. Patients should be referred to a surgeon experienced in microsurgical techniques in a timely fashion for evaluation and possible surgical intervention if an injury is not resolving.

  11. Gross anatomical study of the sympathetic cardiac nerves in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ai; Tanaka, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Kensaku; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Nakatani, Toshio

    2007-05-01

    The sympathetic cardiac nerves originating from the cervical and upper thoracic sympathetic ganglia in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus) were examined using macroscopic and whole-mount immunohistochemical methods. Based on the results, the nerves were macroscopically classified into the following three groups: nerves innervating the cervical sympathetic ganglia mainly to the arterial porta of the heart; nerves supplying the stellate and thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T2-T5 or T6 for both the arterial and venous portae of the heart; and nerves innervating the thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T4-T9 to the esophagus and lung and then the heart via the blood vessels within the mediastinal pleura. These findings in the house musk shrew suggest a possible primitive morphological pattern of the cervical and thoracic sympathetic nervous system that may be related to those in other mammals, including humans. PMID:17393537

  12. Controversies related to electromagnetic field exposure on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Say, Ferhat; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Coşkun, Sina; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Yıldız, Çağrı; Altun, Gamze; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Kaya, Sefa Ersan; Pişkin, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a pervasive environmental presence in modern society. In recent years, mobile phone usage has increased rapidly throughout the world. As mobile phones are generally held close to the head while talking, studies have mostly focused on the central and peripheral nervous system. There is a need for further research to ascertain the real effect of EMF exposure on the nervous system. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that EMF emitted by cell phones could affect the systems of the body as well as functions. However, the adverse effects of EMF emitted by mobile phones on the peripheral nerves are still controversial. Therefore, this review summarizes current knowledge on the possible positive or negative effects of electromagnetic field on peripheral nerves.

  13. Controversies related to electromagnetic field exposure on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Say, Ferhat; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Coşkun, Sina; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Yıldız, Çağrı; Altun, Gamze; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Kaya, Sefa Ersan; Pişkin, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a pervasive environmental presence in modern society. In recent years, mobile phone usage has increased rapidly throughout the world. As mobile phones are generally held close to the head while talking, studies have mostly focused on the central and peripheral nervous system. There is a need for further research to ascertain the real effect of EMF exposure on the nervous system. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that EMF emitted by cell phones could affect the systems of the body as well as functions. However, the adverse effects of EMF emitted by mobile phones on the peripheral nerves are still controversial. Therefore, this review summarizes current knowledge on the possible positive or negative effects of electromagnetic field on peripheral nerves. PMID:26718608

  14. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  15. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  16. In Vivo MR Microneurography of the Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Felisaz, Paolo F.; Chang, Eric Y.; Montagna, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia

    2014-01-01

    MR microneurography is a noninvasive technique that provides visualization of the microanatomy of peripheral nerves, otherwise available only with histopathology. The objective of this study was to present a protocol to visualize the microstructure of peripheral nerves in vivo, using a 3T MRI scanner with a clinical set of coils and sequences. The tibial and the common peroneal nerves of healthy volunteers were imaged above the medial malleolus and at the level of the fibular head, respectively. The acquired images provided details about the internal structure of peripheral nerves, with visualization of the fascicles, the interfascicular fat, the epineurium, and the perineurium. MR microneurography can be performed in a clinical setting with acceptable imaging times and can be a potentially powerful tool that complements standard MR neurography. PMID:25548670

  17. In Vivo MR Microneurography of the Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerves.

    PubMed

    Felisaz, Paolo F; Chang, Eric Y; Carne, Irene; Montagna, Stefano; Balducci, Francesco; Maugeri, Giulia; Pichiecchio, Anna; Calliada, Fabrizio; Baldi, Maurizia; Bastianello, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    MR microneurography is a noninvasive technique that provides visualization of the microanatomy of peripheral nerves, otherwise available only with histopathology. The objective of this study was to present a protocol to visualize the microstructure of peripheral nerves in vivo, using a 3T MRI scanner with a clinical set of coils and sequences. The tibial and the common peroneal nerves of healthy volunteers were imaged above the medial malleolus and at the level of the fibular head, respectively. The acquired images provided details about the internal structure of peripheral nerves, with visualization of the fascicles, the interfascicular fat, the epineurium, and the perineurium. MR microneurography can be performed in a clinical setting with acceptable imaging times and can be a potentially powerful tool that complements standard MR neurography. PMID:25548670

  18. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  19. Noninvasive imaging of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rangavajla, Gautam; Mokarram, Nassir; Masoodzadehgan, Nazanin; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of peripheral nerve imaging extend the capabilities of imaging modalities to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peripheral nerve maladies. Methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its derivative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), ultrasound (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of assessing nerve structure and function following injury and relating the state of the nerve to electrophysiological and histological analysis. Of the imaging methods surveyed here, each offered unique and interesting advantages related to the field. MRI offered the opportunity to visualize immune activity on the injured nerve throughout the course of the regeneration process, and DTI offered numerical characterization of the injury and the ability to develop statistical bases for diagnosing injury. US extends imaging to the treatment phase by enabling more precise analgesic applications following surgery, and PET represents a novel method of assessing nerve injury through analysis of relative metabolism rates in injured and healthy tissue. Exciting new possibilities to enhance and extend the abilities of imaging methods are also discussed, including innovative contrast agents, some of which enable multimodal imaging approaches and present opportunities for treatment application. PMID:25766202

  20. Neural control of blood glucose level.

    PubMed

    Niijima, A

    1986-01-01

    All of the experimental results described above can be categorized as follows: the relationship between glucose levels and pancreatic and adrenal nerve activities; innervations of the liver and their role in the regulation of blood glucose level; central integration of blood glucose level; glucose-sensitive afferent nerve fibers in the liver and regulation of blood glucose; oral and intestinal inputs involved in reflex control of blood glucose level. We showed that an increase in blood glucose content produced an increase in the activity of the pancreatic branch of the vagus nerve, whereas it induced a decrease in the activity of the adrenal nerve. It was also shown that a decrease in blood glucose activated the sympatho-adrenal system and suppressed the vago-pancreatic system. It seems rational that these responses are involved in the maintenance of blood glucose level. Studies on the innervation of the liver led us to a conclusion that sympathetic innervation of the liver might play a role in eliciting a prompt hyperglycemic response through liberation of norepinephrine from the nerve terminals, and that the vagal innervation synergically worked with the humoral factor (insulin) for glycogen synthesis in the hyperglycemic condition. The glucose-sensitive afferents from the liver seem to initiate a reflex control of blood glucose level. The gustatory information on EIR response, reported by STEFFENS, is supported by the electrophysiological observations. MEI's reports also indicated the importance of information from the intestinal glucoreceptors in the reflex control of insulin secretion. The role of integrative functions of the hypothalamus and brainstem through neuronal networks on neural control of blood glucose levels is also evident. A schematic diagram of the nervous networks involved in the regulation of the blood glucose levels is shown in Fig. 3. PMID:3550186

  1. Development of a model for nerve agent inhalation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Benjamin; Perkins, Michael W; Santos, Mariton D; Rodriguez, Ashley M; Murphy, Gleeson; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2013-09-01

    This study characterizes the development of a head-out inhalation exposure system for assessing respiratory toxicity of vaporized chemical agents in untreated, non-anesthetized rats. The organophosphate diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) induces classical cholinergic toxicity following inhalation exposure and was utilized to validate the effectiveness of this newly designed inhalation exposure system. A saturator cell apparatus was used to generate DFP vapor at 9750, 10,950, 12,200, 14,625 and 19,500 mg × min/m³ which was carried by filtered nitrogen into a glass mixing tube, where it combined with ambient air before being introduced to the custom-made glass exposure chamber. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were restrained in individual head-out plethysmography chambers, which acquired respiratory parameters before, during and after agent exposure. All animals were acclimated to the exposure system prior to exposure to reduce novel environment-induced stress. The LCt₅₀, as determined by probit analysis, was 12,014 mg × min/m³. Weight loss in exposed animals was dose-dependent and ranged from 8 to 28% of their body weight 24 h after exposure. Increased salivation, lacrimation, urination, defecation (SLUD) and mild muscular fasciculation were observed in all DFP-exposed animals during and immediately following exposure. In all exposed animals, DFP vapor produced significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in cardiac blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), whole brain and lung tissue as well as alterations in tidal volume and minute volume. These studies have provided valuable information leading to the initiation of studies evaluating inhalational toxicity and treatments following exposure to the more lethal and potent chemical warfare nerve agents. PMID:23581557

  2. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-04-01

    The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne. Slightly more distally the ulnar nerve courses between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris. An accessory muscle, the anconeus epitrochlearis can cover the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel, and is easily identified on ultrasound. The radial nerve divides in a superficial sensory branch and a deep motor branch. The motor branch, the posterior interosseous nerve, courses under the arcade of Frohse where it enters the supinator muscle. At the level of the dorsal wrist the posterior interosseous nerve is located at the deep aspect of the extensor

  3. Ultrastructural studies on the barrier properties of the paraganglia in the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chien, C L; Chau, Y P; Lu, K S

    1991-01-01

    The permeability of blood capillaries in the paraganglia of the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) was investigated by employing the ionic lanthanum tracer at ultrastructural level. Two types of blood capillaries, namely, fenestrated and nonfenestrated types, were observed in the rat RLN and its associated paraganglia (RLN paraganglia). A preferential distribution of fenestrated capillaries in the RLN paraganglia was noted. Nonfenestrated capillaries were distributed in the area of RLN devoid of paraganglia. Minute aberrant ganglia consisting of 4-8 neurons were frequently encountered in the rat RLN near the paraganglia. The capillaries in these neuronal areas were also nonfenestrated. The lanthanum tracer was limited within the vascular lumen, but not in the extravascular space, in the RLN proper and in the area of RLN paraganglia where the neurons were identified. In the RLN paraganglia, the tracer was located in the vascular lumen, extravascular space, periaxonal space of nerve fibers, and the intercellular space of the RLN paraganglionic cells. We concluded that (1) a blood-nerve barrier and a blood-ganglion (or blood-neuron) barrier exist in the area of RLN devoid of paraganglia, and (2) blood-paraganglion barrier and blood-nerve barrier were lacking in the rat RLN paraganglia.

  4. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension.

  5. Cranial nerve development requires co-ordinated Shh and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1(Wig/ Wig) mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  6. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1Wig/ Wig mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  7. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  8. Protective mechanisms of the common fibular nerve in and around the fibular tunnel: a new concept.

    PubMed

    El Gharbawy, Ramadan M; Skandalakis, Lee J; Skandalakis, John E

    2009-09-01

    The most frequent site at which the common fibular nerve is affected by compression, trauma, traction, masses, and surgery is within and around the fibular tunnel. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were protective mechanisms at this site that guard against compression of the nerve. Twenty-six lower limbs of 13 preserved adult cadavers (11 males and two females) were used. Proximal to the entrance of the tunnel, three anatomical configurations seemed to afford the required protection for the nerve: reinforcement of the deep fascia; tethering of the common fibular nerve to both the tendon of the biceps femoris and the reinforced fascia; and the particular arrangement of the deep fascia, fibular head, and soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. At the entrance of the tunnel, contraction of the first segment of fibularis longus muscle could afford the required protection. In the tunnel, contraction of the second and third segments of fibularis longus muscle could guard against compression of the nerve. The tough fascia on the surface of fibularis longus muscle and the fascial band within it, which have long been accused of compression of the nerve, may actually be elements of the protective mechanisms. We conclude that there are innate, anatomical protective mechanisms which should be taken into consideration when decompressing the common fibular nerve. To preserve these mechanisms whenever possible, the technique should be planned and varied according to the underlying etiology.

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  10. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  11. Innervation of vasculature and microvasculature of the human vagina by NOS and neuropeptide-containing nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, C H; Stones, R W; Robson, T; Whitley, K; Burnstock, G

    1996-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine whether nerves that contain nitric oxide synthase (NOS), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or substance P (SP) are present in the human vagina and, if so, to determine the pattern of innervation relative to that of other neurotransmitters, particularly vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Surgical specimens of vaginal tissue (n = 10) from pre- and postmenopausal women were fixed and processed for immunohistochemistry of peptides and NOS and for histochemistry of NADPH-diaphorase. SP-immunoreactive nerves were very sparse, being absent from 9 of the 10 tissue samples. For other peptides and NOS, the innervation of the deep arteries and veins was greater than that of blood vessels in the propria. Capillaries in the epithelial papillae also appeared to be innervated by nerves containing NOS, CGRP, NPY and VIP. Beneath the epithelium nerve fibres formed a subepithelial plexus; no nerve cell bodies were seen. The relative density of innervation by immunoreactive fibres was PGP-9.5 > NPY > VIP >> NOS > CGRP > SP. These results imply that nerves that utilise nitric oxide or NPY, VIP or CGRP as a neurotransmitter may play a role in controlling blood flow and capillary permeability in the human vagina. The origin and function of all these nerves is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763480

  12. Sixth cranial nerve palsy caused by compression from a dolichoectatic vertebral artery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Thulborn, Keith; Curnyn, Kimberlee; Goodwin, James

    2005-06-01

    A 68-year-old man had an unremitting left sixth cranial nerve palsy immediately after completing a long bicycle trip. High-resolution (3 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a dolichoectatic vertebral artery that compressed the left sixth cranial nerve against the belly of the pons at its root exit zone. It was postulated that increased blood flow in the vessel during the unusually prolonged aerobic exercise precipitated the palsy. Compressive palsies of cranial nerves caused by a dolichoectatic basilar artery have often been documented; compressive palsy caused by a dolichoectatic vertebral artery is less well-recognized.

  13. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, D. M.; Goossens, J.; van den Berg, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. (1) Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit. We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow's rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals. (2) Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semi-circular canals (SCC)? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those Blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes. (3) We investigated if subject's sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is

  14. Effects of culture supernatant from Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on autonomic nerve activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Yoshinori; Izumo, Takayuki; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Nagai, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal administration of various lactobacilli has been reported to affect autonomic neurotransmission, blood pressure, blood glucose, and body weight in rats, however, the mechanisms of action of the lactobacilli remain to be clarified. Therefore, the effect of the culture supernatant of Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on the autonomic nerve activity in urethane-anesthetized rats was investigated. Intraduodenal injection of the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fraction (molecules less than 10,000 Da) of the S-PT84 culture supernatant elevated the brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity and reduced the gastric vagal nerve activity. Moreover, intraoral administration of this LMW fraction increased the body temperature of rats above the interscapular brown adipose tissue. These results suggest that the LMW fraction of the S-PT84 culture supernatant affects the autonomic nerve activity and thermogenesis, and that the change in thermogenesis may be caused by the change in the sympathetic nerve activity of brown adipose tissue.

  15. Effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhidong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important pathological model of migraine and is related to other neural disorders, such as cerebral ischemia and epilepsy. It has been reported that brain stimulation is a quite effective way to treat neural diseases. However, direct stimulation could cause harm to brain. If peripheral nerve stimulation could have the same treatment, it would be essential to investigate the mechanisms of peripheral nerve and the study of sciatic nerve stimulation would have profound clinical meaning. In this paper, we used optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) and extracellular electrophysiologic recording techniques to study the effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of CSD. We found that: (1) continuous sciatic nerve stimulation on rats caused a decrease in light intensity on the whole cortex, which meant an increase in cerebral blood volume(CBV); (2) the spreading velocity of CSD declined from 3.63+/- 0.272 mm/min to 3.06+/-0.260 mm/min during sciatic nerve stimulation, compared with that without sciatic nerve stimulation. In summary, data suggests that sciatic nerve stimulation elicits a response of cortex and causes a slowdown in the propagation of CSD.

  16. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  17. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  18. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Paraskevas, George; Tzika, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An unusual combination of median nerve's variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve's medial root. The latter (fourth) root was united with the lateral (fifth) root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications. PMID:27131354

  19. Motor neuronal control of tail-directed and head-directed siphon responses in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Hickie, C; Walters, E T

    1995-07-01

    1. Cutaneous stimulation of opposite ends of the body causes qualitatively different siphon responses: tail stimulation causes flaring and backward bending (the siphon T response), whereas head stimulation causes constriction and slight anterior bending (the siphon H response). This paper characterizes the motor neuronal control of siphon T and siphon H responses. 2. The siphon response to tail nerve (p9) shock in a semi-intact preparation was indistinguishable from the siphon T response in intact or parapodectomized animals. Similarly, the siphon response to head nerve (c2) shock in this preparation was indistinguishable from the siphon H response in intact or parapodectomized animals. 3. Central siphon motor neurons (SMNs) were found to cause a wider variety of movements than previously reported. The movements produced by the LFSB cells strongly resemble the flaring response of the siphon to tail or tail nerve stimulation. The movements produced by RDS and LDS1 resemble components of the constricting response of the siphon to head or head nerve stimulation. 4. Among central SMNs, the LFSB cells show the strongest activation by posterior stimulation, whereas RDS and LDS1 show the strongest activation by anterior stimulation. The LFSA cells, which produce much weaker siphon constriction, are only activated slightly by posterior stimulation and are inhibited by anterior stimulation. Peripheral SMNs are inhibited by stimulation of head and tail nerves, and thus their activity does not directly contribute to siphon T and H responses. 5. Artificially activating central SMNs with the pattern of activity previously exhibited after tail or head nerve stimulation indicated the sufficiency of the LFSB cells for the siphon T response, and of RDS and LDS1 for the siphon H response. 6. Dramatic behavioral deficits produced by hyperpolarizing the LFSB cells during tail nerve stimulation, or by hyperpolarizing RDS and LDS1 during head nerve stimulation, indicated the necessity

  20. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  1. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  2. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  3. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length.

  4. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the external bleeding stops. Clotting factors in the blood cause strands of blood-borne material, called fibrin, to stick together and ... the inside of the wound. Eventually, the cut blood vessel heals, and the blood clot dissolves after ...

  5. Meteoric Head Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajduk, A.; Galád, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 3261 radar meteor head echoes observed during the Orionid and Lyrid periods by the high-power radar of the Springhill Meteor Observatory are given. Dependence of the occurence of head echoes on the geometrical factors and physical properties of the meteoroids has been studied. Increas of the head echo rates with the elevation of the shower radiant and with the velocity of meteoroids has been observed.

  6. Rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Shannon, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves pose complex challenges to both military and civilian physicians. Treatment of nerve injuries must consider all aspects of the inherent disability. Pain control is of paramount importance. Little will be accomplished until pain is brought down to tolerable levels. Rehabilitation needs to be instituted as first-line treatment. Focus must be first placed on protection of the affected area from complications stemming from disuse and immobility and then on enhancement of strength, flexibility, sensory discrimination, and dexterity. Early intervention sets the stage for optimal physiologic and functional recovery. PMID:11878078

  7. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  8. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  9. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  10. Nerve-highlighting fluorescent contrast agents for image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L; Nasr, Khaled A; Fish, Kenneth M; Khullar, Onkar; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Siclovan, Tiberiu M; Johnson, Bruce F; Barnhardt, Nicole E; Tan Hehir, Cristina A; Frangioni, John V

    2011-04-01

    Nerve damage is the major morbidity of many surgeries, resulting in chronic pain, loss of function, or both. The sparing of nerves during surgical procedures is a vexing problem because surrounding tissue often obscures them. To date, systemically administered nerve-highlighting contrast agents that can be used for nerve-sparing image-guided surgery have not been reported. In the current study, physicochemical and optical properties of 4,4'-[(2-methoxy-1,4-phenylene)di-(1E)-2,1-ethenediyl]bis-benzenamine (BMB) and a newly synthesized, red-shifted derivative 4-[(1E)-2-[4-[(1E)-2-[4-aminophenyl]ethenyl]-3-methoxyphenyl]ethenyl]-benzonitrile (GE3082) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both agents crossed the blood-nerve barrier and blood-brain barrier and rendered myelinated nerves fluorescent after a single systemic injection. Although both BMB and GE3082 also exhibited significant uptake in white adipose tissue, GE3082 underwent a hypsochromic shift in adipose tissue that provided a means to eliminate the unwanted signal using hyperspectral deconvolution. Dose and kinetic studies were performed in mice to determine the optimal dose and drug-imaging interval. The results were confirmed in rat and pig, with the latter used to demonstrate, for the first time, simultaneous fluorescence imaging of blood vessels and nerves during surgery using the FLARE™ (Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration) imaging system. These results lay the foundation for the development of ideal nerve-highlighting fluorophores for image-guided surgery.

  11. Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Era of Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gurleyik, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (non-RLN) is an anatomical variation increasing the risk of vocal cord palsy. Prediction and early identification of non-RLN may minimize such a risk of injury. This study assessed the effect of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) on the detection of non-RLN. A total of 462 (236 right) nerves in 272 patients were identified and totally exposed, and all intraoperative steps of IONM were sequentially applied on the vagus nerve (VN) and RLN. Right predissection VN stimulation at a distal point did not create a sound signal in three cases (3/236; 1.27%). Proximal dissection of the right VN under IONM guidance established a proximal point, creating a positive signal. The separation point of non-RLN from VN was discovered in all three patients. Non-RLNs were exposed from separation to laryngeal entry. Positive IONM signals were obtained after resection of thyroid lobes, and postoperative period was uneventful in patients with non-RLN. Absence of distal VN signal is a precise predictor of the non-RLN. IONM-guided proximal dissection of the right VN leads to identification of the non-RLN. The prediction of non-RLN by the absence of the VN signal at an early stage of surgery may prevent or minimize the risk of nerve injury.

  12. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  13. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  14. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  15. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Krasteva, Vessela TZ; Papazov, Sava P; Daskalov, Ivan K

    2003-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium. PMID:14693034

  16. Neurovascularized free short head of the biceps femoris muscle transfer for one-stage reanimation of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akiteru; Maruyama, Yu

    2005-02-01

    The single-stage technique for cross-face reanimation of the paralyzed face without nerve graft is an improvement over the two-stage procedure because it results in early reinnervation of the transferred muscle and shortens the period of rehabilitation. On the basis of an anatomic investigation, the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with attached lateral intermuscular septum of the thigh was identified as a new candidate for microneurovascular free muscle transfer. The authors performed one-stage transfer of the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with a long motor nerve for reanimation of established facial paralysis in seven patients. The dominant nutrient vessels of the short head were the profunda perforators (second or third) in six patients and the direct branches from the popliteal vessels in one patient. The recipient vessels were the facial vessels in all cases. The length of the motor nerve of the short head ranged from 10 to 16 cm, and it was sutured directly to several zygomatic and buccal branches of the contralateral facial nerve in six patients. One patient required an interpositional nerve graft of 3 cm to reach the suitable facial nerve branches on the intact side. The period required for initial voluntary movement of the transferred muscles ranged from 4 to 10 months after the procedures. The period of postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 42 months. Transfer of the vascularized innervated short head of the biceps femoris muscle is thought to be an alternative for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face because of the reliable vascular anatomy of the muscle and because it allows two teams to operate together without the need to reposition the patient. The nerve to the short head of the biceps femoris enters the side opposite the vascular pedicle of the muscle belly, and this unique relationship between the vascular pedicle and the motor nerve is anatomically suitable for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face. As much

  17. Renal artery nerve distribution and density in the porcine model: biologic implications for the development of radiofrequency ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Armando; Rousselle, Serge; Palmieri, Taylor; Rate, William R; Wicks, Joan; Degrange, Ashley; Hyon, Chelsea M; Gongora, Carlos A; Hart, Randy; Grundy, Will; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F

    2013-12-01

    Catheter-based renal artery denervation has demonstrated to be effective in decreasing blood pressure among patients with refractory hypertension. The anatomic distribution of renal artery nerves may influence the safety and efficacy profile of this procedure. We aimed to describe the anatomic distribution and density of periarterial renal nerves in the porcine model. Thirty arterial renal sections were included in the analysis by harvesting a tissue block containing the renal arteries and perirenal tissue from each animal. Each artery was divided into 3 segments (proximal, mid, and distal) and assessed for total number, size, and depth of the nerves according to the location. Nerve counts were greatest proximally (45.62% of the total nerves) and decreased gradually distally (mid, 24.58%; distal, 29.79%). The distribution in nerve size was similar across all 3 sections (∼40% of the nerves, 50-100 μm; ∼30%, 0-50 μm; ∼20%, 100-200 μm; and ∼10%, 200-500 μm). In the arterial segments ∼45% of the nerves were located within 2 mm from the arterial wall whereas ∼52% of all nerves were located within 2.5 mm from the arterial wall. Sympathetic efferent fibers outnumbered sensory afferent fibers overwhelmingly, intermixed within the nerve bundle. In the porcine model, renal artery nerves are seen more frequently in the proximal segment of the artery. Nerve size distribution appears to be homogeneous throughout the artery length. Nerve bundles progress closer to the arterial wall in the distal segments of the artery. This anatomic distribution may have implications for the future development of renal denervation therapies.

  18. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a) early extratemporal reconstruction, b) early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c) late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies. PMID:21040532

  19. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  20. Neura, nerves, nerve fibers, neurofibrils, microtubules: multidimensional routes of pain, pleasure, and voluntary action in images across the ages.

    PubMed

    Frixione, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Available records indicate that the human body has always been conceived, in different periods and cultures, as spanned by multiple channels for internal communication and coherent functioning as a unit-"meridians" in treatises of Chinese medicine, metu in Egyptian papyri, srotas in Ayurvedic Indian texts, and neura in the Western scientific heritage from ancient Greece. Unfortunately, the earliest extant figurative depictions of such pathways of general control, complementary to the blood vessels, are late medieval copies of old crude sketches that attempted to show the main anatomico-physiological systems. The scarcity of adequate illustrations was more than compensated in the Renaissance, when the efforts of both artists and anatomists for the first time produced basically correct renditions of the human nervous system and many other bodily structures. As attention was next focused on microscopic structure as a requisite to understand physiological mechanisms, during the Enlightenment the nerves were revealed to consist of numerous thin tubes or fibers aligned in parallel. Improved microscopy techniques in the nineteenth century led to discovering and delineating still finer fibrils coursing along the cores of the nerve fibers themselves. Electron microscopy, developed throughout the twentieth century, recognized some of these fibrils within nerve fibers as being also tubular. All the progressive stages in understanding nerve construction, at increasingly more detailed scales, have been accompanied by technological advances and by debate about the structure and function relationship. And every step has been a source of amazing imagery. PMID:24041279

  1. Neura, nerves, nerve fibers, neurofibrils, microtubules: multidimensional routes of pain, pleasure, and voluntary action in images across the ages.

    PubMed

    Frixione, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Available records indicate that the human body has always been conceived, in different periods and cultures, as spanned by multiple channels for internal communication and coherent functioning as a unit-"meridians" in treatises of Chinese medicine, metu in Egyptian papyri, srotas in Ayurvedic Indian texts, and neura in the Western scientific heritage from ancient Greece. Unfortunately, the earliest extant figurative depictions of such pathways of general control, complementary to the blood vessels, are late medieval copies of old crude sketches that attempted to show the main anatomico-physiological systems. The scarcity of adequate illustrations was more than compensated in the Renaissance, when the efforts of both artists and anatomists for the first time produced basically correct renditions of the human nervous system and many other bodily structures. As attention was next focused on microscopic structure as a requisite to understand physiological mechanisms, during the Enlightenment the nerves were revealed to consist of numerous thin tubes or fibers aligned in parallel. Improved microscopy techniques in the nineteenth century led to discovering and delineating still finer fibrils coursing along the cores of the nerve fibers themselves. Electron microscopy, developed throughout the twentieth century, recognized some of these fibrils within nerve fibers as being also tubular. All the progressive stages in understanding nerve construction, at increasingly more detailed scales, have been accompanied by technological advances and by debate about the structure and function relationship. And every step has been a source of amazing imagery.

  2. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  3. Tissue Engineering the Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Fiber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Montero, Ramon B.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N.; Valenzuela, Daniel A.; Uddin, Mohammed S.; Lavik, Erin B.; Muller, Kenneth J.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  4. Spared nerve injury model to study orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença; Avelino, António

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There are many difficulties in generating and testing orofacial pain in animal models. Thus, only a few and limited models that mimic the human condition are available. The aim of the present research was to develop a new model of trigeminal pain by using a spared nerve injury (SNI) surgical approach in the rat face (SNI-face). Methods: Under anaesthesia, a small incision was made in the infraorbital region of adult male Wistar rats. Three of the main infraorbital nerve branches were tightly ligated and a 2 mm segment distal to the ligation was resected. Control rats were sham-operated by exposing the nerves. Chemical hyperalgesia was evaluated 15 days after the surgery by analyzing the time spent in face grooming activity and the number of head withdrawals in response to the orofacial formalin test. Results: SNI-face rats presented a significant increase of the formalin-induced pain-related behaviours evaluated both in the acute and tonic phases (expected biphasic pattern), in comparison to sham controls. Interpretation & conclusions: The SNI-face model in the rat appears to be a valid approach to evaluate experimental trigeminal pain. Ongoing studies will test the usefulness of this model to evaluate therapeutic strategies for the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27241642

  5. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  6. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  7. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  8. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  9. Comparison of Whole-Blood Metal Ion Levels Among Four Types of Large-Head, Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Implants: A Concise Follow-up, at Five Years, of a Previous Report.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Lungu, Eugen; Belzile, Etienne; Morin, François; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-02-17

    Few studies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants with a large-diameter femoral head and metal-on-metal design have directly compared the progression of metal ion levels over time and the relationship to complications. As we previously reported, 144 patients received one of four types of large-diameter-head, metal-on-metal THA designs (Durom, Birmingham, ASR XL, or Magnum implants). Cobalt, chromium, and titanium ion levels were measured over five years. We compared ion levels and clinical results over time. The Durom group showed the highest levels of cobalt (p ≤ 0.002) and titanium ions (p ≤ 0.03). Both the Durom and Birmingham groups demonstrated significant ongoing cobalt increases up to five years. Eight patients (seven with a Durom implant and one with a Birmingham implant) developed adverse local tissue reaction. Six Durom implants and one Birmingham implant required revision, with one pseudotumor under surveillance at the time of the most recent follow-up. We found that ion generation and related complications varied among designs. More concerning was that, for some designs, ion levels continued to increase. Coupling a cobalt-chromium adapter sleeve to an unmodified titanium femoral trunnion along with a large metal-on-metal bearing may explain the poor performances of two of the designs in the current study. PMID:26888673

  10. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... pathways to the brain results in loss of vision. At a structure in the brain called the optic chiasm, each optic nerve splits, ... both eyes, and the left side of the brain receives information from the right visual field of both eyes. ... occurs. Resources ...

  11. Cryoanalgesia for painful peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, J K

    1985-06-01

    Twelve patients with chronically painful peripheral nerve lesions were treated with cryoanalgesia. The pain was relieved in 6 patients for 1-12 months. Although the pain eventually recurred, the patients resumed normal activities during remission. It is necessary to improve the techniques of nerve localization and to determine the proper mode of nerve freezing. PMID:2995903

  12. Altered peripheral nerve function resulting from haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E; Brown, J C; Pryor, J S

    1977-01-01

    The amplitudes of muscle and nerve action potentials evoked median nerve stimulation were recorded just before and immediately after haemodialysis. These revealed a growht of action potential amplitude during dialysis. It is suggested that some component of the defective peripheral nerve function that inevitably accompanies uraemia is temporarily improved during dialysis. PMID:845605

  13. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  14. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  15. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing.

  16. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  17. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas. PMID:27774363

  18. [Aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve. Comparison of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, C; Dolci, A; Pessagno, A; Padua, G L; Dassio, D A; De Negri, M

    1996-10-01

    Hypoplasia and aplasia of the optic nerve are congenital anomalies characterized respectively by a marked volume reduction (very small papilla, often identifiable only as a rosy-yellowish area from which the retinal vessels emerge) and by the absence of the optic disk (absence of the nerve and mainly of its vessels) and of the visual functions. These anomalies are often associated with malformations of the central nervous system and of the ocular structures. The defects originate in the embryonal period due to the arrested development of the mesodermal component towards the head of the optic nerve. The aim of this study is to try to interpret the different clinical manifestations of the disease by observing two cases (a female and a male) with a clinical picture of aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve respectively. Both cases presented the following clinical characteristics: developmental defects of the optic nerve, severe microcephaly, positive IgG antibodies against CMV. The association of the optic nerve defect with microcephaly is due to the embryogenic origin of the optic vescicle by prosencephalon. The resulting clinical picture is probably the outcome of an interfering process that the authors have presumed in CMV intrauterine infection, after having excluded the most frequent teratogenic agents (maternal diabetes, tabagism, intake of alcohol ad drugs). Moreover, the different degree of ocular involvement and the different time of onset of the intrauterine pathogenic insult in the two cases could account for the different clinical pictures. PMID:9053727

  19. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M.

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30° and 60°), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 ± 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea.

  20. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30 degrees and 60 degrees), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 +/- 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:16317230

  1. Pyridostigmine used as a nerve agent pretreatment under wartime conditions. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Keeler, J.R.; Hurst, C.G.; Dunn, M.A.

    1991-08-07

    During Operation Desert Storm there was a credible threat of chemical warfare even though there was never actual use of chemical agents. Intelligence reports indicated that the Iraqi chemical arsenal contained nerve, vesicant, and blood agents. Nerve agents are organophosphorus inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, such as sarin and tabun. The vesicants are skin blistering compounds, such as mustards and arsenicals, while blood agents are the cyanides, inhibitors of cytochrome oxidase. The US Armed Force`s approach to the medical management of actual or anticipated nerve agent injuries employs a regimen that consists of pretreatment with pyridostigmine bromide tablets prior to nerve agent exposure followed by atropine citrate and pralidoxime chloride by autoinjector intramuscularly on actual exposure. Proper administration of this drug combination provides significantly increased survival after lethal exposures to nerve agents above that provided by atropine and pralidoxime therapy alone. The recent addition of pyridostigmine to the US therapeutic regimen for nerve agent poisoning was based on efficacy data in animals and safety studies in humans.

  2. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  3. Polymeric Micelles as Carriers for Nerve-Highlighting Fluorescent Probe Delivery.

    PubMed

    Hackman, Kayla M; Doddapaneni, Bhuvana Shyam; Barth, Connor W; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Alani, Adam W G; Gibbs, Summer L

    2015-12-01

    Nerve damage during surgery is a common morbidity experienced by patients that leaves them with chronic pain and/or loss of function. Currently, no clinically approved imaging technique exists to enhance nerve visualization in the operating room. Fluorescence image-guided surgery has gained in popularity and clinical acceptance over the past decade with a handful of imaging systems approved for clinical use. However, contrast agent development to complement these fluorescence-imaging systems has lagged behind with all currently approved fluorescent agents providing untargeted blood pool information. Nerve-specific fluorophores are known, however translations of these agents to the clinic has been complicated by their lipophilic nature, which necessitates specialized formulation strategies for successful systemic administration. To date the known nerve-specific fluorophores have only been demonstrated preclinically due to the necessity of a dimethyl sulfoxide containing formulation for solubilization. In the current study, a polymeric micellar (PM) formulation strategy was developed for a representative nerve-specific fluorophore from the distyrylbenzene family, BMB. The PM formulation strategy was able to solubilize BMB and demonstrated improved nerve-specific accumulation and fluorescence intensity when the same fluorophore dose was administered to mice utilizing the previous formulation strategy. The success of the PM formulation strategy will be important for moving toward clinical translation of these novel nerve-specific probes as it is nontoxic and biodegradable and has the potential to decrease the necessary dose for imaging while also improving the safety profile.

  4. The effects of inorganic particles of lunar soil simulant on brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    The health effects from lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). We revealed that brain nerve terminals were not indifferent to the exposure to LSS inorganic particles. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the synaptosomal size before and after the addition of LSS was measured and the binding of LSS inorganic particles to nerve terminals was demonstrated. Using potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G, we showed that LSS inorganic particles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals did not change in the presence of LSS inorganic particles that was revealed with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange. However, LSS inorganic particles influenced accumulation of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, by nerve terminals. Thus, we report that inorganic particles of LSS influence accumulation of glutamate in brain nerve terminals and this fact may have harmful consequences to human physiology, in particular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  5. Lack of effectiveness of laser therapy applied to the nerve course and the correspondent medullary roots

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fausto Fernandes de Almeida; Ribeiro, Thaís Lopes; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli; Barbieri, Claudio Henrique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of low intensity laser irradiation on the regeneration of the fibular nerve of rats after crush injury. METHODS: Twenty-five rats were used, divided into three groups: 1) intact nerve, no treatment; 2) crushed nerve, no treatment; 3) crush injury, laser irradiation applied on the medullary region corresponding to the roots of the sciatic nerve and subsequently on the course of the damaged nerve. Laser irradiation was carried out for 14 consecutive days. RESULTS: Animals were evaluated by functional gait analysis with the peroneal functional index and by histomorphometric analysis using the total number of myelinated nerve fibers and their density, total number of Schwann cells, total number of blood vessels and the occupied area, minimum diameter of the fiber diameter and G-quotient. CONCLUSION: According to the statistical analysis there was no significant difference among groups and the authors conclude that low intensity laser irradiation has little or no influence on nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Laboratory investigation. PMID:24453650

  6. Polymeric Micelles as Carriers for Nerve-Highlighting Fluorescent Probe Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nerve damage during surgery is a common morbidity experienced by patients that leaves them with chronic pain and/or loss of function. Currently, no clinically approved imaging technique exists to enhance nerve visualization in the operating room. Fluorescence image-guided surgery has gained in popularity and clinical acceptance over the past decade with a handful of imaging systems approved for clinical use. However, contrast agent development to complement these fluorescence-imaging systems has lagged behind with all currently approved fluorescent agents providing untargeted blood pool information. Nerve-specific fluorophores are known, however translations of these agents to the clinic has been complicated by their lipophilic nature, which necessitates specialized formulation strategies for successful systemic administration. To date the known nerve-specific fluorophores have only been demonstrated preclinically due to the necessity of a dimethyl sulfoxide containing formulation for solubilization. In the current study, a polymeric micellar (PM) formulation strategy was developed for a representative nerve-specific fluorophore from the distyrylbenzene family, BMB. The PM formulation strategy was able to solubilize BMB and demonstrated improved nerve-specific accumulation and fluorescence intensity when the same fluorophore dose was administered to mice utilizing the previous formulation strategy. The success of the PM formulation strategy will be important for moving toward clinical translation of these novel nerve-specific probes as it is nontoxic and biodegradable and has the potential to decrease the necessary dose for imaging while also improving the safety profile. PMID:26485440

  7. Development of a surgical navigation system based on augmented reality using an optical see-through head-mounted display.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lu; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huixiang; Wang, Fang; Zeng, Xiangsen; Wang, Qiugen; Egger, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The surgical navigation system has experienced tremendous development over the past decades for minimizing the risks and improving the precision of the surgery. Nowadays, Augmented Reality (AR)-based surgical navigation is a promising technology for clinical applications. In the AR system, virtual and actual reality are mixed, offering real-time, high-quality visualization of an extensive variety of information to the users (Moussa et al., 2012) [1]. For example, virtual anatomical structures such as soft tissues, blood vessels and nerves can be integrated with the real-world scenario in real time. In this study, an AR-based surgical navigation system (AR-SNS) is developed using an optical see-through HMD (head-mounted display), aiming at improving the safety and reliability of the surgery. With the use of this system, including the calibration of instruments, registration, and the calibration of HMD, the 3D virtual critical anatomical structures in the head-mounted display are aligned with the actual structures of patient in real-world scenario during the intra-operative motion tracking process. The accuracy verification experiment demonstrated that the mean distance and angular errors were respectively 0.809±0.05mm and 1.038°±0.05°, which was sufficient to meet the clinical requirements.

  8. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells display neurovascular tropism and aid in the recovery of injured peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Li, YongNan; Guo, Longzhe; Ahn, Hyun Sook; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we reported that human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs) possess great angiogenic potential. In this study, we determined whether local injection of AMMs ameliorates peripheral neuropathy. AMMs were transplanted into injured sciatic nerves. AMM injection promoted significant recovery of motor nerve conduction velocity and voltage amplitude compared to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. AMM implantation also augmented blood perfusion and increased intraneural vascularity. Whole-mount fluorescent imaging analysis demonstrated that AMMs exhibited higher engraftment and endothelial incorporation abilities in the sciatic nerve. In addition, the higher expression of pro-angiogenic factors was detected in AMMs injected into the peripheral nerve. Therefore, these data provide novel therapeutic and mechanistic insights into stem cell biology, and AMM transplantation may represent an alternative therapeutic option for treating peripheral neuropathy.

  9. Endoscopic Sciatic Nerve Decompression in the Prone Position-An Ischial-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome is described as sciatic nerve entrapment in the region deep to the gluteus maximus muscle. The entrapment can occur from the piriformis muscle, fibrous bands, blood vessels, and hamstrings. Good clinical outcomes have been shown in patients treated by open and endoscopic means. Sciatic nerve decompression with or without piriformis release provides a surgical solution to a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Previous techniques have used open methods that can now performed endoscopically. The technique of an endoscopic approach to sciatic nerve decompression in the prone position is described as well as its advantages and common findings. Through this ischial-based approach, a familiar anatomy is seen and areas of sciatic nerve entrapment can be readily identified and safely decompressed. PMID:27656390

  10. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration. PMID:23060343

  11. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  12. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  13. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  14. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell's palsy, Ramsay-Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell's palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell's phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell's palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration with

  15. Head Circumference and Neurocognitive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Universities of Glasgow and Bristol, UK, determined the value of head circumference (HC) as a screening measure, the incidence of head centile shifting, and the relationship between extremes of head size and later neurodevelopmental problems. PMID:26933592

  16. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  17. Designing ideal conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve tubes, guides, or conduits are a promising alternative for autologous nerve graft repair. The first biodegradable empty single lumen or hollow nerve tubes are currently available for clinical use and are being used mostly in the repair of small-diameter nerves with nerve defects of < 3 cm. These nerve tubes are made of different biomaterials using various fabrication techniques. As a result these tubes also differ in physical properties. In addition, several modifications to the common hollow nerve tube (for example, the addition of Schwann cells, growth factors, and internal frameworks) are being investigated that may increase the gap that can be bridged. This combination of chemical, physical, and biological factors has made the design of a nerve conduit into a complex process that demands close collaboration of bioengineers, neuroscientists, and peripheral nerve surgeons. In this article the authors discuss the different steps that are involved in the process of the design of an ideal nerve conduit for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:19435445

  18. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  19. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  20. Blood Sugar

    MedlinePlus

    Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main sugar found in your blood. It comes from the food you eat, and is your body's main source of energy. Your blood carries glucose to all of your body's cells to use ...