Science.gov

Sample records for nerve sheath decompression

  1. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  2. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Lee, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) grow slowly and, if untreated, patients may have stable visual function for up to several years. Treatment of an ONSM may lead to vision loss (radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy). Therefore, observation is recommended for a patient with ONSM and relatively preserved visual acuity, color vision, pupils, and visual fields. Follow-up every 4 to 6 months initially is recommended extending to annual examinations if visual function and tumor size remain stable for a few years. Neuroimaging can be repeated every 12 months. An undisputed decline in visual function or any intracranial extension warrants treatment of the ONSM. The treatment of choice for a tumor confined to the orbit is stereotactic fractionated radiation. Stereotactic fractionated radiation uses multiple small doses of radiation using tight margins. A reasonable alternative, three-dimensional conformal fractionated radiation uses computed tomography-guided planning but usually requires wider margins. Conventional radiation uses much wider margins and would not be recommended for treatment of ONSM. The radiation can be administered during 5 to 6 weeks in 28 daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy/fraction to a total of 50.4 to 56 Gy. Many patients have improvement or stabilization of their visual function. Gamma knife radiosurgery does not have a role in ONSM because the required dose is toxic to the optic nerve. A tumor that extends intracranially may be treated with fractionated radiation if any vision remains. Surgical excision can be considered for significant intracranial extension but this often leads to complete vision loss in the ipsilateral eye. A blind, disfigured eye also may be treated with en bloc surgical resection of the meningioma.

  3. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  4. Intrasellar malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Krayenbühl, N; Heppner, F; Yonekawa, Y; Bernays, R L

    2007-02-01

    Intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) and intrasellar schwannomas are rare tumors. We describe a case of an intrasellar schwannoma with progression to a MPNST, a finding that, although very rare, extends the differential diagnosis of intrasellar lesions.

  5. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease.

  6. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  7. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  8. Optic Nerve Decompression through a Supraorbital Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Luigi; Evins, Alexander I.; Berra, Luigi V.; Beer-Furlan, André; Stieg, Philip E.; Bernardo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective We propose a stepwise decompression of the optic nerve (ON) through a supraorbital minicraniotomy and describe the surgical anatomy of the ON as seen through this approach. We also discuss the clinical applications of this approach. Methods Supraorbital approaches were performed on 10 preserved cadaveric heads (20 sides). First, 3.5-cm skin incisions were made along the supraciliary arch from the medial third of the orbit and extended laterally. A 2 × 3-cm bone flap was fashioned and extradural dissections were completed. A 180-degree unroofing of the ON was achieved, and the length and width of the proximal and distal portions of the optic canal (OC) were measured. Results The supraorbital minicraniotomy allowed for identification of the anterior clinoid process and other surgical landmarks and adequate drilling of the roof of the OC with a comfortable working angle. A 25-degree contralateral head rotation facilitated visualization of the ON. Conclusion The supraorbital approach is a minimally invasive and cosmetically favorable alternative to more extended approaches with longer operative times used for the management of ON decompression in posttraumatic or compressive optic neuropathy from skull base pathologies extending into the OC. The relative ease of this approach provides a relatively short learning curve for developing neurosurgeons. PMID:26225308

  9. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE PRAWN NERVE SHEATHS

    PubMed Central

    Doggenweiler, C. F.; Heuser, John E.

    1967-01-01

    The sheaths from freshly teased nerve fibers of the prawn exhibit a positive radial birefringence, consistent with their EM appearance as highly organized laminated structures composed of numerous thin cytoplasmic sheets or laminae bordered by unit membranes and arranged concentrically around the axon. The closely apposed membranes in these sheaths are fragile and often break down into rows of vesicles during fixation. Desmosome-like attachment zones occur in many regions of the sheath. The membranes within these zones resist vesiculation and thereby provide a "control" region for relating the type of vesicles formed in the fragile portions of the sheaths to the specific fixation conditions. It is proposed that during fixation the production of artifactual vesicles is governed by an interplay of three factors: (a) direct chemical action of the fixative on the polar strata of adjacent unit membranes, (b) osmotic forces applied to membranes during fixation, and (c) the pre-existing natural relations between adjacent membranes. It is found that permanganate best preserves the continuity of the membranes but will still produce vesicles if the fixative exerts severe osmotic forces. These results support other reports (19) of the importance of comparing tissues fixed by complementary procedures so that systematic artifacts will not be described as characteristic of the natural state. PMID:4166578

  10. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  11. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of penis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Madan, R; Singh, L; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Roy, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare variety of soft tissue sarcoma that originates from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of neural crest origin. They have historically been difficult tumours to diagnose and treat. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with a goal to achieve negative margins. Despite aggressive surgery and adjuvant therapy, the prognosis of patients with MPNST remains poor. MPNST arising from penis is a very rare entity; thus, it presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present a case of penile MPNST in a 38-year-old man in the absence of neurofibromatosis treated with surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions and adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and adriamycin.

  12. Endoscopic decompression for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic decompression surgery for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Methods The records from seventeen consecutive patients treated with endoscopic posterior decompression without fusion for intaforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine (7 males and 10 females, mean age: 67.9 ± 10.7 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures consisted of lateral or translaminal decompression with or without discectomy. The following items were investigated: 1) the preoperative clinical findings; 2) the radiologic findings including MRI and computed tomography-discography; and 3) the surgical outcome as evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale for lower back pain (JOA score). Results All patients had neurological findings compatible with a radiculopathy, such as muscle weakness and sensory disturbance. MRI demonstrated the obliteration of the normal increased signal intensity fat in the intervertebral foramen. Ten patients out of 14 who underwent computed tomography-discography exhibited disc protrusion or herniation. Selective nerve root block was effective in all patients. During surgery, 12 patients were found to have a protruded disc or herniation that compressed the nerve root. Sixteen patients reported pain relief immediately after surgery. Conclusions Intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression is a rare but distinct pathological condition causing severe radiculopathy. Endoscopic decompression surgery is considered to be an appropriate and less invasive surgical option. PMID:21439083

  13. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  14. [Transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Nenashev, E A; Cherekaev, V A; Kadasheva, A B; Kozlov, A V; Rotin, D L; Stepanian, M A

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare entity with only 18 cases of trigeminal nerve MPNST described by now and only one report of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into MPNST published up to date. One more case of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve (1st division) tumor into MPNST is demonstrated.

  15. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  16. Decompression of inferior alveolar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago Miguel Santos; Gomes, Joana Marques

    2011-01-01

    Paresthesia as a result of mechanical trauma is one of the most frequent sensory disturbances of the inferior alveolar nerve. This case report describes surgical treatment for paresthesia caused by a compressive phenomenon within the mandibular canal. The cause of the compression, a broken instrument left in the patient's mouth during previous endodontic therapy, was identified during routine radiography and computed tomography. Once the foreign object was removed by surgery, the paresthesia resolved quickly. This case highlights the potential for an iatrogenic mechanical cause of paresthesia.

  17. Leptomeningeal metastasis of an intradural malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Stark, Andreas M; Mehdorn, H Maximilian

    2013-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are defined as any malignant tumor arising from or differentiating towards the peripheral nerve sheath. Intradural MPNST metastases are very rare. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of leptomeningeal metastasis of a MPNST to the spine and intracranial space. A 56-year-old woman with primary intradural MPNST of the S1 nerve root developed leptomeningeal metastases as well as brain metastases 19 months after diagnosis. The patient had a history of non-Hodgkins lymphoma for which she had received irradiation to the spine 15 years prior to this presentation. She had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. Patients with MPNST may also develop leptomeningeal metastases as demonstrated in this patient with intradural post-radiation MPNST.

  18. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF.

  19. Comparative Oncogenomics for Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Steven L. Carroll , MD, PhD RECIPIENT: Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC 29425 REPORT DATE: June 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven L. Carroll 5d...2014, when Dr. Carroll left UAB to assume a position as Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Medical

  20. Therapy of Experimental Nerve Sheath Tumors Using Oncolytic Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Abstract follows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Oncolytic HSV, angiogenesis, MPNST , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...reliable tumor models for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ). Several existing and novel oncolytic HSV vectors will then be tested on these...from G47A increases cytotoxicity in vitro to human endothelial cells and murine Nfl" MPNST cell lines. Inhibition of MPNST M2 tumor growth in vivo was

  1. Differential expression of angiogenic factors in peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Wasa, Junji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Shido, Yoji; Hosono, Kozo; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    It is difficult to differentiate some malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) from benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors (BPNST) histologically, and to predict the clinical outcome of patients with MPNST. In this study, the expression of VEGF and MVD were evaluated immunohistochemically in 22 cases of MPNST, 14 of neurofibroma and 19 of schwannoma and correlation of the staining grade of VEGF or MVD and the various clinical factors were analyzed, and statistically evaluated. Levels of VEGF mRNA expression were also determined with real-time RT-PCR. Statistically higher positive staining for VEGF was observed in MPNST compared to neurofibroma (P=0.004) and schwannoma (P<0.001). Even low grade MPNST showed higher VEGF positive staining than neurofibroma. Moreover, high VEGF expression statistically correlated with the poor prognosis of the patients with MPNST (P=0.015). Although MVD in MPNST was significantly higher than that in neurofibroma (P=0.038) and schwannoma (P<0.001), MVD could not predict the prognosis of the patients with MPNST. Although VEGF mRNA expression tended to be higher in MPNST compared to neurofibroma, the difference was not significant. Levels of VEGF protein expression serve as a novel diagnostic and prognostic tools for peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

  2. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size.

  3. [Intrathoracic giant peripheral nerve sheath tumor during Von Recklinghausen disease].

    PubMed

    Ngabou, U D; Mounguengui, D; Owono Mbouengou, J P; El Wali, A; Nguema Edzang, B; Boguikouma, J B; Tchoua, R; Aziz, N E

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a patient aged 23, admitted for bilateral intrathoracic tumor, including a giant right. Surgery was performed by right sternothoracotomy. After 7 days, she presented an irreversible cardiac arrest. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are rare and aggressive. Their incidence is 0.001% in the general population and 0.16% in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors are characterized by their risk of recurrence and poor prognosis. The treatment is the surgical resection. We analyze incidence, diagnosis and prognosis of these tumors.

  4. Characterization of the Biomechanical Behavior of the Optic Nerve Sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Wang, Roy; Forte, Taylor E.; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    A major priority in current space medicine research is to characterize the mechanisms in Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a group of ophthalmic changes that occur in some astronauts following long-duration spaceflight [1]. It is hypothesized that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts lead to increases in intracranial pressure (ICP), which drives maladaptive remodeling of the optic nerve sheath (ONS). In this study, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine ONS to better understand the mechanical response of the ONS to increased ICP.

  5. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  6. Pudendal nerve decompression in perineology : a case series

    PubMed Central

    Beco, Jacques; Climov, Daniela; Bex, Michèle

    2004-01-01

    Background Perineodynia (vulvodynia, perineal pain, proctalgia), anal and urinary incontinence are the main symptoms of the pudendal canal syndrome (PCS) or entrapment of the pudendal nerve. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral pudendal nerve decompression (PND) on the symptoms of the PCS, on three clinical signs (abnormal sensibility, painful Alcock's canal, painful "skin rolling test") and on two neurophysiological tests: electromyography (EMG) and pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies (PNTML). The second aim was to study the clinical value of the aforementioned clinical signs in the diagnosis of PCS. Methods In this retrospective analysis, the studied sample comprised 74 female patients who underwent a bilateral PND between 1995 and 2002. To accomplish the first aim, the patients sample was compared before and at least one year after surgery by means of descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. The second aim was achieved by means of a statistical comparison between the patient's group before the operation and a control group of 82 women without any of the following signs: prolapse, anal incontinence, perineodynia, dyschesia and history of pelvi-perineal surgery. Results When bilateral PND was the only procedure done to treat the symptoms, the cure rates of perineodynia, anal incontinence and urinary incontinence were 8/14, 4/5 and 3/5, respectively. The frequency of the three clinical signs was significantly reduced. There was a significant reduction of anal and perineal PNTML and a significant increase of anal richness on EMG. The Odd Ratio of the three clinical signs in the diagnosis of PCS was 16,97 (95% CI = 4,68 – 61,51). Conclusion This study suggests that bilateral PND can treat perineodynia, anal and urinary incontinence. The three clinical signs of PCS seem to be efficient to suspect this diagnosis. There is a need for further studies to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:15516268

  7. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  8. Study of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Hu, XiaoPeng; Feng, ChunGuo

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are very rare soft tissue sarcomas, usually arising from somatic soft tissues or peripheral nerves. Primary MPNST of the cerebellopontine angle is extremely rare, with only a single case reported so far. Here, we report an unusual case of MPNST in cerebellopontine angle in a 25-year-old man presented with dizziness, left facial numbness, and tinnitus. After hospitalization, the tumor was treated with complete surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Histologically, the tumor showed malignant spindle cells, which were with focal S-100 positivity on immunohistochemistry, and a diagnosis of the MPNST was made. This case is being reported for its rarity and presence in cerebellopontine and illustrated the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of MPNST, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been described before in the soft tissue sarcomas.

  9. Light and electron microscopic alterations in spinal cord myelin sheaths after decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J J; Yaffe, L J

    1985-09-01

    Pathological examination of spinal cords from animals subjected to experimental decompression sickness (DCS) was undertaken in an attempt to explain the disparate response to treatment observed. Eight experimental animals, four undived control animals, and two dived but untreated animals were perfusion fixed, and the spinal cords were removed. Light microscopy of toluidine blue stained, ultrathin sections from dived animals demonstrated a distinctive widened myelin sheath showing a banded pattern of myelin disruption. This pattern was confirmed by electron microscopy and showed the separation to be between abutting double layers of myelin. Artifactual changes were also present in dived and undived animals. These previously unreported changes may be caused by DCS. They are compatible with the major mechanisms proposed in the pathophysiology of spinal cord DCS and may also account for the response to treatment seen in our experimental animals. It is suggested that these findings may also explain the response to treatment seen in patients, together with the formation of late lesions described in the spinal cords of long-term survivors of DCS.

  10. Feline cutaneous nerve sheath tumours: histological features and immunohistochemical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mandara, M T; Fabriani, E; Pavone, S; Pumarola, M

    2013-10-01

    Feline cutaneous nerve sheath tumours (CNSTs) are uncommonly reported in the skin, since they are underestimated relative to the more common spindle cell tumours of soft tissue. In this study, 26 nerve sheath tumours selected from 337 skin neoplasms of cats were examined. Histologically, they were classified into malignant (MPNSTs) and benign tumours (BPNSTs) based on degree of cellular atypia and polymorphism as well as mitotic rate and diffuse necrosis. CPNSTs were tipically characterised by Antoni A pattern, in some cases associated with Antoni B pattern. In the malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs) the polymorphism was marked, while it was mild to moderate in the benign forms (BPNSTs). In the MPNSTs the mitotic activity was generally higher than in the BPNSTs. In five cases, including three MPNSTs and two BPNSTs, there were multinucleated giant cells. Necrotic foci occurred in a BPNST and in two MPNSTs, while osseous/chondroid metaplasia was found in two cases. Immunohistochemically, all the tumours showed a marked diffuse vimentin expression. S-100 protein was expressed in 17 cases, including 81.8% of BPNSTs and 57.14% of MPNSTs. Twenty-five tumours expressed NSE and twenty-four cases showed immunoreaction for laminin. Thirteen tumours were positive for GFAP, while five tumours were positive for SMA. PGP 9.5 expression was detected in all cases, except for two MPNSTs. NGFR was expressed in eleven cases, including four MPNSTs and seven BPNSTs. Ki67 was expressed in twenty tumours without any relationship with morphologic malignancy of the neoplasm. In this case series we confirmed neoplastic spindloid cells with wavy cytoplasm arranged in compact areas, with occasional nuclear palisading or whirls, and interchanged with loosely arranged areas, as the morphological features supporting a diagnosis of CPNST. A constant concurrent expression of vimentin, NSE, and laminin might confirm the diagnosis of PNST in the absence of clear S-100 protein

  11. Sarcoma of possible nerve sheath origin in a captive muskrat.

    PubMed

    Borucinska, J D; Trettel, J; Knibbs, D

    2000-07-01

    A captive adult female muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) was found dead without previous signs of disease. At necropsy, abdominal organs were infiltrated with a poorly demarcated, soft, tan tissue. Microscopically this tissue was composed of neoplastic cells assuming two distinct growth characteristics consistent with Antoni A and B patterns. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were pleomorphic, lacked junctional devices, had abundant mitochondria and ergastoplasm, and frequently were closely associated with extracellular collagen. Immunocytochemical examination of tumor cells demonstrated sporadic expression of neuron specific enolase. Microscopic tumor metastases to the myocardium, ascending aorta, lungs and visceral pleura were present. This is the first report of a sarcoma compatible with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a muskrat.

  12. Cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor, triton tumor variant: case report.

    PubMed

    Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Peralta-Olvera, Fabiola; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Jurado, Rodolfo; De Leon-Bojorge, Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    A case of a cerebral malignant triton tumor in a 3-year-old boy with a 2-month history of frontal headache and no clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis is reported. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large, irregular tumor in the right parietooccipital lobe. A partial surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was highly cellular and consisted of spindle cells with hyperchromatic and pleomorphic nuclei. Focally, neoplastic cells with rhabdomyoblastic features were found. The immunohistochemical study showed that tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and CD57, and the rhabdomyoblasts expressed desmin, Myo-D1, and myoglobin. During the postoperative period, a massive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was identified and surgical drainage was performed. The patient worsened and died 10 days after the first surgery. Postmortem study was not authorized. Six cases of cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor have been described; however, primary intraparenchymal malignant triton tumor has not been previously described.

  13. Nerve sheath myxoma of the dorsal paravertebral space

    PubMed Central

    Malkoc, Melih; Ormeci, Tugrul; Keskinbora, Mert; Yılmaz, Adem; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Tanik, Canan Besleyici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nerve sheath myxomas (NSM) are rare benign soft tissue tumors. The dorsal paravertebral placed NMS diagnosis can be difficult. PRESENTATION OF CASE This article presents clinical, radiological findings and treatment of the NSM of the dorsal paravertebral space in a 32-year-old man presented with a right shoulder and back pain for 4 years. DISCUSSION NSM is a rare and benign tumor and that most often occurs in the skin of the head, neck or upper limbs of younger patients. Rare locations such as intracranial, spinal canal, trunk, lower limb and oral cavity were also reported. The appropriate treatment of NSM is surgical excision. Diagnosis is difficult in an uncommon presentation. CONCLUSION Although the most presented case of NMS are dermal tumors, it may also be found extremely rare locations. We conclude that, the definitive treatment of NSM is surgical excision with safe margins even when it is possible. PMID:25462051

  14. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in a sow.

    PubMed

    Resende, Talita P; Pereira, Carlos E R; Vannucci, Fabio A; Araujo, Fernando S; dos Santos, José Lúcio; Cassali, Geovanni D; Damasceno, Karine A; Guedes, Roberto M C

    2015-09-25

    Nodular lung lesions in swine are frequently due to abscesses or granulomatous pneumonia. Although tumours are rarely reported in modern pig farming, they should be considered as a differential diagnosis when nodular lung lesions are found. A first-parity sow exhibiting respiratory signs was euthanized. Several whitish firm nodules, not encapsulated, ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 5 cm were present in all lung lobes. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of dense neoplastic cells, mainly in Antoni types A and B patterns, infiltrative and with development of emboli. All neoplastic cells stained positively by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100 protein, with variable immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and stained negative for cytokeratin. Based on the gross, histological and immunohistochemical features, the tumor was diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  15. Endoscopic Sciatic Nerve Decompression in the Prone Position-An Ischial-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome is described as sciatic nerve entrapment in the region deep to the gluteus maximus muscle. The entrapment can occur from the piriformis muscle, fibrous bands, blood vessels, and hamstrings. Good clinical outcomes have been shown in patients treated by open and endoscopic means. Sciatic nerve decompression with or without piriformis release provides a surgical solution to a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Previous techniques have used open methods that can now performed endoscopically. The technique of an endoscopic approach to sciatic nerve decompression in the prone position is described as well as its advantages and common findings. Through this ischial-based approach, a familiar anatomy is seen and areas of sciatic nerve entrapment can be readily identified and safely decompressed.

  16. Reconstruction of nerve root sheaths for sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhendong; Wu, Haibo; Yen, Ruyu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Liu, Isabelle Yisha

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers treated by reconstruction of the nerve root sheaths. The relationships between the cysts and spinal nerve root fibers were examined microscopically, the cysts were partially excised, and the defects were oversewn to reconstruct the nerve root sheaths. The Improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function. Thirty-eight patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 41.4 ± 15.57 years. The mean IJOA score was 18.8 ± 1.32 preoperatively and 19.6 ± 0.65 postoperatively, which was a significant difference (t=-3.77, P=0.001). These results indicate a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. The most significant improvement in neurological function was sensation (z=-2.86, P=0.004), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.31, P=0.02).

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  18. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  19. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases as Targets for Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in NF 1 Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    by interphase cytogenetics (FISH) in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms . J...Chronic myeloproliferative disorders with rearrangement of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor: a new clinical target for STI571/Glivec...malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms . J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2002;61:702–709. 8

  20. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases.

  1. Palliative Epineurotomy for Focal Radial Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Andrew David; Davies, Emma; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Lafuente, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the deep branch of the radial nerve distal to the elbow in a dog. The lesion was identified using computed tomography and ultrasonography and confirmed as sarcoma on histopathological analysis of incisional biopsies. Clinical signs dramatically improved following surgical biopsy before recurring three months later. Repeat epineurotomy of the deep branch of the radial nerve resulted in clinical improvement for a further month before signs once again returned. Epineurotomy as a palliative treatment for peripheral nerve sheath tumors has not been previously described, but may have a place in palliation of clinical signs in specific cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors in which limb amputation is not an option.

  2. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  3. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  4. Alterations at chromosome 17 loci in peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lothe, R.A.; Slettan, A.; Saeter, G.

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular genetic changes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Inactivation of the TP53 gene in l7p has been reported in a few tumors. The MPNST is one of the manifestations of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), suggesting that the NF1 gene in 17q might be important. We present a study of 15 neurofibromas and MPNST from nine individuals. Seven patients had NF1 and six of these developed MPNST. Genetic alterations at nine polymorphic loci on chromosome 17 were examined. Allelic imbalance was detected only in the malignant tumors from NF1 patients (4/6). Complete loss of heterozygosity of 17q loci was found in three of these tumors, all including loci within the NF1 gene. Two of the malignant tumors also showed deletions on 17p. No mutations were detected within exon 5-8 of the TP53 in any of the MPNST, and none of them were TP53 protein-positive using immunostaining with mono- and polyclonal antibodies against TP53. The numbers of chromosome 17 present in each tumor were evaluated by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on interphase nuclei with a centromere-specific probe. A deviation from the disomic status of chromosome 17 was observed in two of the MPNST from NF1 patients. These results support the hypothesis of inactivation of both NF1 gene alleles during development of MPNST in patients with NF1. In contrast to other reports, we did not find evidence for a homozygous mutated condition of the TP53 gene in the same tumors. Finally, FISH analysis was in accordance with the DNA analysis in the deduction of the numbers of chromosome 17 in these tumors. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor mimicking disc herniation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Cong; Xin, Xiaotang; Liu, Bo; Li, Wei; Yin, Dezhen; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in the sciatic nerve in the pelvic cavity are a rare occurrence and their symptomatology is usually misdiagnosed as intervertebral disc herniation. We herein report the case of a 46-year old woman presenting with pain, hypesthesia and weakness of the left lower extremity due to a giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the sciatic nerve. Prior to being referred to our institution, the patient was misdiagnosed as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and underwent an operation unsuccessfully, as there was little symptomatic improvement 2 months after the surgery. A magnetic resonance imaging examination of the pelvic cavity revealed a tumor of the sciatic nerve. The mass was resected via the posterior approach and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an uncommon cause of sciatica and are commonly misdiagnosed as lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Accurate diagnosis and complete surgical excision prior to metastasis are crucial for effective management of this condition. PMID:27900106

  6. Endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression through a pterional port.

    PubMed

    Beer-Furlan, André; Evins, Alexander I; Rigante, Luigi; Burrell, Justin C; Anichini, Giulio; Stieg, Philip E; Bernardo, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Since the first description of the intradural removal of the anterior clinoid process, numerous refinements and modifications have been proposed to simplify and enhance the safety of the technique. The growing use of endoscopes in endonasal and transcranial approaches has changed the traditional management of many skull base lesions. We describe an endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression through a minimally invasive pterional port. Minimally invasive optic nerve decompression, with endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy, through a pterional keyhole craniotomy was performed on five preserved cadaveric heads. The endoscopic pterional port provided a shorter and more direct route to the anterior clinoid region, and helped avoid unnecessary and extensive bone removal. An extradural approach helped minimize complications associated with infraction of the subdural space and allowed for the maintenance of visibility while drilling with continuous irrigation. Adequate 270° bone decompression of the optic canal was achieved in all specimens. Endoscopic extradural anterior clinoidectomy and optic nerve decompression is feasible through a single minimally invasive pterional port.

  7. A Rare Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Maxilla Mimicking a Periapical Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Álvares, Pamella; Silva, Luciano; Pereira dos Santos Neto, Alexandrino; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sayão, Sandra; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a malignant neoplasm that is rarely found in the oral cavity. About 50% of this tumor occurs in patients with neurofibromatosis type I and comprises approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas of head and neck region. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla is rare. This article is the first to address malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla presenting as a periapical radiolucency on nonvital endodontically treated teeth in the English medical literature. Surgical approaches to malignant soft tissue tumor vary based on the extent of the disease, age of the patient, and pathological findings. A rare case of intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is reported in a 16-year-old woman. The patient presented clinically with a pain involving the upper left incisors region and with defined unilocular periapical radiolucency lesion involved between the upper left incisors. An incisional biopsy was made. Histological and immunohistochemical examination were positive for S-100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein showed that the lesion was an intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla. Nine years after the surgery, no regional recurrence was observed. PMID:27994888

  8. Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy: The Case for Nerve Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Eric L.; Rivadeneira, Andres F.; Jouvin, Renato Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Plastic surgery has a tradition of caring for patients with facial deformity and hand deformity related to leprosy. The approach, however, to the progressive deformity and disability related to chronic nerve compression is underappreciated in the world today. A cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy from an indigenous area of leprosy in Ecuador was evaluated for the presence of chronic peripheral nerve compression, and 12 patients were chosen for simultaneous upper and lower extremity, unilateral, nerve decompression at multiple levels along the course of each nerve. The results at 1 year of follow-up show that 6 patients improved into the excellent category and 4 patients improved into the good category for improved function. Based on the early results in this small cohort of patients with leprous neuropathy, an approach to peripheral nerve decompression, encompassing the concept of multiple crush at multiple levels of each nerve, seems to offer optimism to improve upper and lower extremity limb function. Long-term studies with quality-of-life outcomes would be welcome. PMID:27257567

  9. Decompression of the Sciatic Nerve Entrapment Caused by Post-Inflammatory Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryeong; Jeun, Sin Soo; Lee, Sang-won

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of chronic pain of entrapment neuropathy of the sciatic nerve successfully relieved by surgical decompression is presented. A 71-year-old male suffered a chronic right buttock pain of duration of 7 years which radiating to the right distal leg and foot. His pain developed gradually over one year after underwenting drainage for the gluteal abscess seven years ago. A cramping buttock and intermittently radiating pain to his right foot on sitting, walking, and voiding did not respond to conventional treatment. An MRI suggested a post-inflammatory adhesion encroaching the proximal course of the sciatic nerve beneath the piriformis as it emerges from the sciatic notch. Upon exploration of the sciatic nerve, a fibrotic tendinous scar beneath the piriformis was found and released proximally to the sciatic notch. His chronic intractable pain was completely relieved within days after the decompression. However, thigh weakness and hypesthesia of the foot did not improve. This case suggest a need for of more prompt investigation and decompression of the chronic sciatic entrapment neuropathy which does not improve clinically or electrically over several months. PMID:25733994

  10. Successful surgical optic nerve decompression in a patient with hypertrophic pachymeningitis due to granulomatous polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, Joeri; Volovici, Victor; Dammers, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with subacute vision loss of first the left, and later the right eye. She was diagnosed with granulomatous polyangiitis with hypertrophic pachymeningitis and optic nerve compression. Her visual acuity could not be permanently restored with immune suppressants alone, so a surgical decompression of the right optic nerve, via a modified cranio-orbitozygomatic pretemporal approach, was performed. Her right eye regained 20/20 vision and has remained stable during 8 months of follow-up. PMID:25612758

  11. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  12. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) are aggressive malignancies that arise within peripheral nerves. These tumors occur with increased...and abnormal expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We previously found that MPNSTs express increased levels of the CD44 family...kinase activity (and not increased Ras-GTP) contributes to MPNST cell invasion. We further find that EGFR contributes at least part of the elevated Src

  13. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases as Targets for Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in NF 1 Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    EGFR patterns by interphase cytogenetics (FISH) in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms ...Armstrong,F., Delsol,G., Dastugue,N. and Brousset,P. (2003) Chronic myeloproliferative disorders with rearrangement of the platelet-derived growth

  14. “Well Digging” Subcraniotomy Strategy with Navigation for Optic Nerve Decompression in Frontoorbital Fibrous Dysplasia: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunhe; Yang, Junyi; Wu, Yingzhi; Pan, Sida; Lu, Jiawen

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the past decades, surgical intervention has been the primary treatment modality for frontoorbital fibrous dysplasia involving optic nerve. However, controversy has surrounded the role of optic nerve decompression in a number of ways. Herein, we describe 3 patients with frontoorbital fibrous dysplasia involving optic nerve, who underwent a “well digging” subcraniotomy strategy with navigation for intraorbital unit optic nerve decompression. Methods: From 2013 to 2015, 3 patients with frontoorbital fibrous dysplasia were investigated in a retrospective manner. They underwent unilateral intraorbital optic nerve decompression with the help of “well digging” strategy and navigation. The key procedures comprise preoperative software simulation, frontoorbital subcraniotomy (like digging a well), expanding cone-shaped surgical field, intraorbital unit optic nerve decompression with navigation, correcting frontal-orbital dystopias, and deformities. Results: Both at the immediate postoperative period and during the 3–12 months follow-up, 2 cases showed improvement of visual acuity in the affected eye and 1 case showed no deterioration. Other ocular examinations including eye movement were stable. Subsequent reconstruction yielded a satisfactory cosmetic result. No postoperative complications happened. Conclusions: In our philosophy, surgical management should be tailored to each patient, which is based on the most possible potential etiology. We consider that the intraorbital optic nerve decompression may be more feasible and safer with the help of “well digging” strategy and navigation, especially for those with exophthalmos, orbital volume decreasing, and nonacute visual loss. PMID:27975011

  15. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation

    PubMed Central

    Murovic, Judith A.; Charles Cho, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  16. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation.

    PubMed

    Murovic, Judith A; Charles Cho, S; Park, Jon

    2010-02-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  17. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  18. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  19. Superficial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from diffuse neurofibroma in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Kuwashiro, Maki; Misago, Noriyuki; Narisawa, Yutaka

    2014-07-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are regarded as sarcomas that arise from peripheral nerves or that display differentiation along the lines of the various elements of the nerve sheath. These tumors occur in deep soft tissues, but superficial primary MPNST with a cutaneous or subcutaneous origin have rarely been reported. A 70-year-old woman presented with a 3-4-year history of a slowly enlarging soft nodule on the left side of her neck. The histopathological diagnosis of the nodule was low-grade MPNST arising from diffuse neurofibroma. There was increased cellularity, but no necrosis or mitotic activity. These histopathological findings pose difficulties in differential diagnosis from a neurofibroma with atypical histological features. We report a rare case of superficial MPNST arising from diffuse neurofibroma associated with underlying occipital bone dysplasia in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient.

  20. Suprameatal extension of retrosigmoid approach for microvascular decompression of trigeminal nerve: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Holguin, Juan Carlos; Revuelta-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Almeida-Navarro, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia is produced in a significant number of cases by vascular compression at the level of cisternal segment of the nerve at the entry of the pons. It is common to find superior cerebellar artery (SCA) responsible for this compression. The retrosigmoid approach (RA), with asterional craniectomy, clearly exposes the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve (TN). Presentation of case We describe in this case report how vessels at the trigeminal pore level known as “Meckel’s segment” can compress the TN. This situation is unusual. One of the reasons why the compression of this Meckel’s segment level could be overlooked is a suprameatal tubercle (ST) prominence that would prevent trigeminal pore visualization through retrosigmoid approach. Discussion The suprameatal extension of this approach has been described for other purposes, especially in tumors invading Meckel’s cave resection. We could not find publications for the use of the resection of the suprameatal tubercle in the retrosigmoid approach for microvascular decompression of the trigeminal neuralgia. Conclusion Microvascular decompression of the TN is an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, however in some cases, in which vascular compression is not evident when exploring the cerebellopontine angle, it is important to note that association of a prominent ST can hide a vascular compression of the nerve in this region. PMID:26298243

  1. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Neven, Kars; Fernandez-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Berruezo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged. PMID:24669108

  2. Epicardial ablation: prevention of phrenic nerve damage by pericardial injection of saline and the use of a steerable sheath.

    PubMed

    Neven, Kars; Fernandez-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Berruezo, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged.

  3. Microvascular decompression of trigeminal nerve root for treatment of a patient with hemimasticatory spasm.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhong, Jun; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yong-Nan; Li, Shi-Ting

    2014-05-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disease; with little knowledge of the pathogenesis, it has still been intractable today. We presented a 56-year-old woman with involuntary painful spasm in her left masseter muscle for 11 years. The patient was successfully treated with microvascular decompression surgery. An offending superior cerebellar artery was found to contact with the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve root, which was then removed away and pieces of soft wadding were interposed between the nerve and the vessel to assure the separation. Postoperatively, the symptom totally disappeared and no recurrence was observed during the 7 months' follow-up. The treatment as well as the pathogenesis of the disease was reviewed, and we put forward a new hypothesis.

  4. Lost in translation: ambiguity in nerve sheath tumor nomenclature and its resultant treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Jones, Kevin B; Monument, Michael J; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R Lor

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  5. Sporadic Multifocal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor-A Rare Presentation: Multifocal MPNST.

    PubMed

    Leena, J B; Fernandes, Hilda; Swethadri, G K

    2013-06-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors(MPNST) are uncommon neoplasms with an incidence of 0.001% in general population. Multifocality is a rare manifestation of MPNST . A case of a 65 year old patient who presented with multiple swellings involving the neck, extremity and back without associated neurofibromatosis is reported for its rarity of presentation.. Diagnosis was made by FNAC and confirmed by peroperative findings and histopathology.

  6. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing CD44 expression partially inhibits MPNST ...depends on Src kinase and that Src kinase activity promotes MPNST invasion (Su et al., 2003a) . Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on

  7. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing Cc44 expression inhibits MPNST cell...Src kinase. Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on an autocrine loop involving MCF, an MCF activating enzyme (MGFA), and c-Met, all of

  8. Genetic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Archival and prospectively acquired plexiform neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) were collected...evaluated, whereas a relatively small number of MPNSTs have been collected for complete analysis. Immunohistochemical stains have been developed to...distinguish -high-grade versus low-grade MPNSTs and plexiform neurofibromas. The genome of plexiform neurofibromas is relatively stable, compared to the

  9. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0498 TITLE: Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...for each blot. Glyco-protein D is produced at extraordinarily high levels by our herpes simplex virus, and thus, it is quite common in herpes simplex

  10. [Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation (malignant perineurinoma) of the cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Dolzhikov, A A; Mukhina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation and at the rare site of the cervix uteri in a 57-year-old patient. The diagnosis was established on the basis of extensive immunohistochemical examination, by excluding the similar neoplasms and detecting an immunophenotype characteristic of perineural differentiation. There are data available in the literature on the morphological and immunophenotypical characteristics of this tumor.

  11. Induction of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in European hamsters with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH).

    PubMed

    Ernst, H; Rittinghausen, S; Wahnschaffe, U; Mohr, U

    1987-06-01

    A rate of up to 43% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) was induced in European hamsters (EH) after weekly s.c. administration of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH). The overall neoplastic response in the treated EH was also elevated as compared to the untreated controls. Histologically, the malignant PNST were neurofibrosarcomas and melanotic as well as unpigmented schwannomas. The occurrence of melanotic schwannomas is briefly discussed with regard to the histogenesis of this rare tumor type.

  12. A Vascular Malformation Presenting as a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Vikas; Haldeman, Clayton; Amaefuna, Steve; Hanna, Amgad S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a venous malformation (VM) masquerading as a schwannoma. VMs are thin-walled vascular dilations of various sizes that typically present as soft, compressible, blue masses that are associated with pain or dysesthesia. VMs are commonly found in the head and neck as well as the distal extremities. Notably, slow-flow VMs are hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging, and enhance markedly with contrast. However, VMs tend to be poorly circumscribed and fraught with venous lakes and phleboliths. Conservative therapy and sclerotherapy are the primary treatment options. In this case report, we present a VM presenting near the neurovascular bundle of the upper extremity axilla. Our case is unique in that the patient presented with symptoms and imaging qualities characteristic for a peripheral nerve schwannoma. PMID:28077959

  13. Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Chen, Pei-Ling; Lu, Dongsi; Lind, Anne C; Dehner, Louis P

    2014-02-01

    The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve

  14. Temporal Lobe Retraction Provides Better Surgical Exposure of the Peri-Geniculate Ganglion for Facial Nerve Decompression via Transmastoid Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Woo; Ryu, Nam Gyu; Lim, Byung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For the exposure of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, transmastoid approach is not usually considered due to being situated behind the superior semicircular canal. To obtain a better view and bigger field for manipulation in the peri-geniculate area during facial nerve decompression, retraction of temporal lobe after bony removal of tegmen mastoideum was designed via transmastoid approach. Materials and Methods Fifteen patients with traumatic facial paralysis [House-Brackmann (HB) grade IV–VI], 3 patients with Bell's palsy (HB grade V–VI), and 2 patients with herpes zoster oticus (HB grade V–VI) underwent facial nerve decompression surgery between January 2008 and July 2014. In all patients, we performed temporal lobe retraction for facial nerve decompression via the transmastoid approach. Patients were examined using pre operative tests including high-resolution computed tomography, temporal magnetic resonance imaging, audiometry, and electroneurography (degenerative ratio >90%). Facial function was evaluated by HB grading scale before and 6 months after the surgery. Results After the surgery, facial function recovered to HB grade I in 9 patients and to grade II in 11 patients. No problems due to surgical retraction of the temporal lobe were noted. Compared to the standard transmastoid approach, our method helped achieve a wider surgical view for improved manipulation in the peri-geniculate ganglion in all cases. Conclusion Facial nerve decompression via the transmastoid approach with temporal lobe retraction provides better exposure to the key areas around the geniculate ganglion without complications. PMID:27593878

  15. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the eighth cranial nerve arising without prior irradiation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Glasgow, Amy E; Raghunathan, Aditya; Link, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) of the eighth cranial nerve (CN) are exceedingly rare. To date the literature has focused on MPNSTs occurring after radiation therapy for presumed benign vestibular schwannomas (VSs), while MPNSTs arising without prior irradiation have received little attention. The objectives of the current study are to characterize the epidemiology, clinical presentation, disease course, and outcome using a large national cancer registry database and a systematic review of the English literature. Additionally, a previously unreported case is presented. METHODS The authors conducted an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, a systematic review of the literature, and present a case report. Data from all patients identified in the SEER database with a diagnosis of MPNST involving the eighth CN, without a history of prior radiation, were analyzed. Additionally, all cases reported in the English literature between January 1980 and March 2015 were reviewed. Finally, 1 previously unreported case is presented. RESULTS The SEER registries identified 30 cases between 1992 and 2012. The average incidence was 0.017 per 1 million persons per year (range 0.000-0.0687 per year). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years, and 16 (53%) were women. Thirteen cases were diagnosed upon autopsy. Of the 17 cases diagnosed while alive, the median follow-up was 118 days, with 3 deaths (18%) observed. When compared with the incidence of benign VS, 1041 VSs present for every 1 MPNST arising from the eighth CN. Including a previously unreported case from the authors' center, a systematic review of the English literature yielded 24 reports. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years, 50% were women, and the median tumor size at diagnosis was 3 cm. Eleven patients (46%) reported isolated audiovestibular complaints typical for VS while 13 (54%) exhibited facial paresis or other signs of a more aggressive process

  16. Optic nerve sheath fenestration using a Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Kozub, John; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optic nerve sheath fenestration is an established procedure for relief of potentially damaging overpressure on the optic nerve resulting from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Prior work showed that a mid-IR free-electron laser could be delivered endoscopically and used to produce an effective fenestration. This study evaluates the efficacy of fenestration using a table-top mid-IR source based on a Raman-shifted alexandrite (RSA) laser. Study Design/Materials and Methods Porcine optic nerves were ablated using light from an RSA laser at wavelengths of 6.09, 6.27 and 6.43 μm and pulse energies up to 3 mJ using both free-space and endoscopic beam delivery through 250-μm I.D. hollow-glass waveguides. Waveguide transmission was characterized, ablation thresholds and etch rates were measured, and the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration was evaluated for ex vivo exposures using both optical coherence tomography and histological analysis. Results Using endoscopic delivery, the RSA laser can effectively fenestrate porcine optic nerves. Performance was optimized at a wavelength of 6.09 μm and delivered pulse energies of 0.5-0.8 mJ (requiring 1.5-2.5 mJ to be incident on the waveguide). Under these conditions, the ablation threshold fluence was 0.8 ± 0.2 J/cm2, the ablation rate was 1-4 μm/pulse, and the margins of ablation craters showed little evidence of thermal or mechanical damage. Nonetheless, nominally identical exposures yielded highly variable ablation rates. This led to fenestrations that ranged from too deep to too shallow – either damaging the underlying optic nerve or requiring additional exposure to cut fully through the sheath. Of 48 excised nerves subjected to fenestration at 6.09 μm, 16 ex vivo fenestrations were judged as good, 23 as too deep, and 9 as too shallow. Conclusions Mid-IR pulses from the RSA laser, propagated through a flexible hollow waveguide, are capable of cutting through porcine optic nerve sheaths in

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath as a Novel Mechanical Load on the Globe in Ocular Duction

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optic nerve (ON) sheath's role in limiting duction has been previously unappreciated. This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate this constraint on adduction. Methods High-resolution, surface coil axial MRI was obtained in 11 normal adults, 14 subjects with esotropia (ET) having normal axial length (AL) < 25.8 mm, 13 myopic subjects with ET and mean AL 29.3 ± 3.3 (SD) mm, and 7 subjects with exotropia (XT). Gaze angles and ON lengths were measured for scans employing eccentric lateral fixation in which an ON became completely straightened. Results In all groups, ON straightening occurred only in the adducting, not abducting, eye. Adduction at ON straightening was 26.0 ± 8.8° in normal subjects, not significantly different from XT at 22.2 ± 11.8°. However, there was significant increase in comparable adduction in ET to 36.3 ± 9.3°, and in myopic ET to 33.6 ± 10.7° (P < 0.04). Optic nerve length at straightening was 27.6 ± 2.7 mm in normals, not significantly different from 28.2 ± 2.8 mm in ET and 27.8 ± 2.7 mm in XT. In myopic ET, ON length at straightening was significantly reduced to 24.0 ± 2.9 mm (P < 0.002) and was associated with globe retraction in adduction, suggesting ON tethering. Conclusions Large adduction may exhaust length redundancy in the normally sinuous ON and sheath, so that additional adduction must stretch the sheath and retract or deform the globe. These mechanical effects are most significant in ET with axial myopia, but may also exert traction on the posterior sclera absent strabismus or myopia. Tethering by the ON sheath in adduction is an important, novel mechanical load on the globe. PMID:27082297

  18. Pulsatile Dynamics of the Optic Nerve Sheath and Intracranial Pressure: An Exploratory In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Brekken, Reidar; Fieggen, Graham; Selbekk, Tormod

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) may lead to increased stiffness of the optic nerve sheath (ONS). OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for analyzing ONS dynamics from transorbital ultrasound and investigate a potential difference between patients with raised ICP vs normal ICP. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data from 16 patients (≤12 years old) for whom ultrasound image sequences of the ONS had been acquired from both eyes just before invasive measurement of ICP. Eight patients had an ICP ≥20 mm Hg. The transverse motion on each side of the ONS was estimated from ultrasound, and Fourier analysis was used to extract the magnitude of the displacement corresponding to the heart rate. By calculating the normalized absolute difference between the displacements on each side of the ONS, a measure of ONS deformation was obtained. This parameter was referred to as the deformability index. According to our hypothesis, because deformability is inversely related to stiffness, we expected this parameter to be lower for ICP ≥20 mm Hg compared with ICP <20 mm Hg. The one-sided Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The deformability index was significantly lower in the group with ICP ≥20 mm Hg (median value 0.11 vs 0.24; P = .002). CONCLUSION: We present a method for assessment of ONS pulsatile dynamics using transorbital ultrasound imaging. A significant difference was noted between the patient groups, indicating that deformability of the ONS may be relevant as a noninvasive marker of raised ICP. The clinical implications are promising and should be investigated in future clinical studies. ABBREVIATIONS: AUC, area under curve ICP, intracranial pressure ONS, optic nerve sheath ONSD, optic nerve sheath diameter ROC, receiver operating characteristic PMID:26813857

  19. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound and the Diagnosis of Increased Intracranial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Hylkema, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used for almost 30 years in a wide variety of clinical applications and environments. From the austerity of battlefields to the labor and delivery ward, ultrasound has the ability to give clinicians real-time, noninvasive diagnostic imaging. Ultrasound by emergency physicians (and all nonradiologists) has become more prevalent and has been used for examinations such as the transcranial Doppler to evaluate for stroke, cardiac function, FAST and EFAST examinations for trauma, and now increased intracranial pressure (ICP) via Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound (ONSD). The ONSD is a valid and reliable indicator of ICP.

  20. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) of mandible: solving the perplexity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa; Pathak, Jigna; Dekate, Kamlesh; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-03-11

    We present an extremely rare case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) in a 30-year-old woman without associated neurofibromatosis 1. The patient presented with an 8 cm×4 cm lesion extending from 46 to the retro molar region involving the ramus of the right mandible associated with regional paraesthesia. Incisional biopsy revealed spindle cells with vesicular nuclei arranged in fascicles leading to a diagnosis of spindle cell lesion. Posterior segmental mandibulectomy was performed under general anaesthesia. On excisional biopsy, a definitive diagnosis of low-grade MPNST was established on the basis of immunohistochemistry. The patient was then lost to follow-up.

  1. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT.

  2. Successful inferior alveolar nerve decompression for dysesthesia following endodontic treatment: report of 4 cases treated by mandibular sagittal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Jaques, Bertrand

    2004-05-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) resulting in disabling sensory disturbances such as pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia, hypoesthesia, or anesthesia. Two fundamental mechanisms are responsible for the injury: the chemical neurotoxicity and the mechanical compression caused by the extruded material. Although spontaneous resorption has been described for some materials, early surgical exploration with removal of the material and decompression of the IAN should be performed, irrespective of the material used, given that the importance of nerve damage increases with the duration of the injury. We report 4 cases of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of lower molars in which sagittal osteotomy was used to remove the endodontic paste and to perform nerve decompression. All the patients experienced immediate relief of dysesthesia and paresthesia.

  3. Giant Sporadic Low Grade Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath (MPNST) of Left Thigh.

    PubMed

    Nikumbh, Dhiraj B; Suryawanshi, K H; Dravid, N V; Patil, T B; Rokade, C M

    2013-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours (MPNST) are rare spindle- cell sarcomas which are derived from the schwann cells or the pleuripotent cells of the neural crest. MPNSTs are usually located in the peripheral nerve trunk roots, extremities and in the head and neck region. These tumours may arise as sporadic variants or in patients with neurofibromatosis1 (NF1). The estimated incidence of MPNSTs in the patients with NF1is 2-5% as compared to a 0.001% incidence in the general population. Herein, we are reporting a case of a giant sporadic (NF1 independent) low grade MPNST of the left thigh in 65 year female patient, which had a good prognosis.

  4. Effects of pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) on malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs).

    PubMed

    Demestre, Maria; Terzi, Menderes Yusuf; Mautner, Victor; Vajkoczy, Peter; Kurtz, Andreas; Piña, Ana Luisa

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an inherited genetic disease affecting 1 in 3,500 individuals. A prominent feature of NF1 is the formation of benign tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurofibromas). However, these can become malignant and form highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), which are usually fatal despite aggressive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recent studies have shown that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) can induce differentiation and inhibit angiogenesis in several kinds of tumours. The present study was designed to determine the in vitro and in vivo effects of PEDF on MPNST angiogenesis and tumour growth. PEDF inhibited proliferation and augmented apoptosis in S462 MPNST cells after 48 h of treatment in culture. In xenografts of S462 MPNST cells in athymic nude mice, PEDF suppressed MPNST tumour burden, due mainly to inhibition of angiogenesis. These results demonstrate for the first time inhibitory effects of PEDF on the growth of human MPNST via induction of anti-angiogenesis and apoptosis. Our results suggest that PEDF could be a novel approach for future therapeutic purposes against MPNST.

  5. Feline peripheral nerve sheath tumors: histologic, immunohistochemical, and clinicopathologic correlation (59 tumors in 53 cats).

    PubMed

    Schulman, F Y; Johnson, T O; Facemire, P R; Fanburg-Smith, J C

    2009-11-01

    Feline peripheral nerve sheath tumors are uncommonly reported, and their clinical behavior has not been well documented. Fifty-nine peripheral nerve sheath tumors were collected from 53 cats. All of the tumors involved skin, subcutis, skeletal muscle, and/or mucous membranes. Histologically, the tumors were composed of compact to loosely arranged streams and fascicles of spindled cells with eosinophilic, often wavy cytoplasmic processes; small to occasionally moderate amounts of collagenous to myxoid matrix; and nuclear palisading. Immunohistochemically, all tumors were positive for vimentin and S-100 protein, 44 of 59 were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and all were negative for muscle specific actin. The tumors fell into 3 histologic categories: 34 benign tumors with Antoni A areas that were S-100 protein and GFAP positive, 9 benign tumors that lacked Antoni A areas and were S-100 protein positive and GFAP negative, and 16 tumors with features of malignancy. Seventy-five percent of these cases involved the head, neck, or limbs. Recurrent tumors were submitted or tumors were reported to have recurred in 9 cases. Tumor recurrence was reported for all 3 of the histologic subtypes. None was documented as having metastasized.

  6. Breast metastases from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the kidney: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Alessio, Ricardo C.; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are extremely rare soft tissue sarcomas of ectomesenchymal origin. They are commonly seen in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), but can also occur without a history of NF (isolated MPNST). MPNSTs are most commonly located on the extremities (brachial and sacral plexus), head and neck, and trunk regions and are rarely reported in genitourinary organs. These tumors are aggressive, with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. MPNST involving the kidney is extremely rare, and review of the literature using PubMed from 2001 to 2014 revealed eight cases of MPNST involving the kidney (seven, primarily involving the kidney and one metastatic MPNST of the kidney). Herein, we describe a case of breast metastases from an MPNST of the kidney without a history of NF-1. The patient was initially diagnosed with a spindle cell neoplasm of the kidney with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation. Eventually, the patient developed a right breast mass that was diagnosed as metastatic MPNST. The patient refused any kind of treatment and died 6 months later in hospice care. PMID:27453670

  7. Optic nerve sheath diameter measurements by CT scan in ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Javed H; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences in optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) obstruction versus controls. Inpatients 0-15 years with confirmed VPS obstruction requiring neurosurgical intervention were identified using ICD9 codes. ONSDs, orbit, cranium, and foramen magnum sizes were measured on their pre-surgical CT. Controls included cases at times when their VPS was not obstructed and age and gender matched patients with a CT scan done in the emergency room for head trauma (normal CT findings). Paired T-tests were used for both case-control comparisons. In order to compare the optic nerve sheath size more accurately, the ONSD width was divided by the width of the orbit and by the foramen magnum (antero-posterior) length. Twenty patients were identified with 25 events of VPS obstruction. The right ONSD (RON) was chosen to study. RON/orbit width and RON/foramen magnum diameter for the VPS obstruction versus self-controls, were 0.22 and 0.22, compared to 0.19 and 0.18, respectively, for the non-obstructed self-controls (P = .044 and P = .008, respectively). The same measurements for the VPS obstruction versus age and gender matched controls were 0.22 and 0.21 for the VPS obstruction cases, respectively, compared to 0.17 and 0.16, respectively for the age and gender matched controls (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). This data confirms that the optic nerve diameter increases during a VPS obstruction. ONSD measurements by ultrasound could add to the evaluation for VPS obstruction.

  8. Direct Surgery of Previously Coiled Large Internal Carotid Ophthalmic Aneurysm for the Purpose of Optic Nerve Decompression.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shuhei; Toyota, Shingo; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Goto, Tetsu; Mori, Kanji; Taki, Takuyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Progressive visual loss after coil embolization of a large internal carotid ophthalmic aneurysm has been widely reported. It is generally accepted that the primary strategy for this complication should be conservative, including steroid therapy; however, it is not well known as to what approach to take when the conservative therapy is not effective. Case Presentation We report a case of a 55-year-old female presenting with progressive visual loss after the coiling of a ruptured large internal carotid ophthalmic aneurysm. As the conservative therapy had not been effective, we performed neck clipping of the aneurysm with optic canal unroofing, anterior clinoidectomy, and partial removal of the embolized coils for the purpose of optic nerve decompression. After the surgery, the visual symptom was improved markedly. Conclusions It is suggested that direct surgery for the purpose of optic nerve decompression may be one of the options when conservative therapy is not effective for progressive visual disturbance after coil embolization.

  9. [Teflon granuloma after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root in a patient with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, D A; Kulikova, E V; Moysak, G I; Voronina, E I; Ageeva, T A

    2016-01-01

    The use of a Teflon implant for Jannetta surgery in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is complicated in rare cases by the development of a Teflon granuloma and can cause recurrent facial pain. The article presents a clinical case of a Teflon granuloma developed after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root, describes the surgical findings and histological picture, and analyzes the literature, causes of granuloma development, and recommendations for treatment of these patients.

  10. Effects of decompression on behavioral, electrophysiologic, and histomorphologic recovery in a chronic sciatic nerve compression model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping-Hui; Yang, Cheng-Chang; Su, Wei-Ren; Wu, Po-Ting; Cheng, Shun-Chien; Jou, I-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine susceptibility to decompression surgery in diabetic and nondiabetic peripheral neuropathy using a chronic compression neuropathy model. Materials and methods Twenty-four streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into three groups: group I, chronic compression of the left sciatic nerve for 4 weeks with decompression; group II, similar without decompression; and group III, sham exposing the sciatic nerve only. The other 24 nondiabetic rats were assigned to groups IV–VI, which received compression–decompression, compression, and the sham operation, respectively. Mixed-nerve-elicited somatosensory evoked potentials (M-SSEPs) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were measured to verify the compression neuropathy in the posttreatment follow-up. Behavioral observations in thermal hyperalgesia tests were quantified before electrophysiologic examinations. Treated and contralateral nerves were harvested for histomorphologic analysis. Results Chronic compression of sciatic nerve induced significant reduction of amplitude and increment of latency of M-SSEP and CMAP in both diabetic and nondiabetic rats. Diabetic group changes were more susceptible. Decompression surgery significantly improved both sensory and motor conduction, thermal hyperalgesia, and the mean myelin diameter of the rat sciatic nerve in both diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Near full recovery of motor and sensory function occurred in the nondiabetic rats, but not in the diabetic rats 8 weeks postdecompression. Conclusion Behavioral, electrophysiologic, and histomorphologic findings indicate that decompression surgery is effective in both diabetic and nondiabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28360533

  11. Malignant nerve-sheath neoplasms in neurofibromatosis: distinction from benign tumors by using imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.; Wetzel, L.H.

    1987-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve-sheath neoplasms frequently complicate neurofibromatosis causing pain, enlarging masses, or neurologic deficits. However, similar findings sometimes also occur with benign nerve neoplasms. Our study was done retrospectively to determine if imaging techniques can differentiate malignant from benign nerve tumors in neurofibromatosis. Eight patients with symptomatic neoplasms (three benign, five malignant) were studied by CT in eight, MR in six, and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy in seven. Uptake of /sup 67/Ga occurred in all five malignant lesions but not in two benign neoplasms studied. On CT or MR, all eight lesions, including three benign neoplasms, showed inhomogeneities. Of five lesions with irregular, infiltrative margins on CT or MR, four were malignant and one was benign. Of three lesions with smooth margins, one was malignant and two were benign. One malignant neoplasm caused irregular bone destruction. Accordingly, CT and MR could not generally distinguish malignant from benign lesions with certainty. However, both CT and MR provided structural delineation to help surgical planning for both types of lesion. /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy appears promising as a screening technique to identify lesions with malignant degeneration in patients with neurofibromatosis. Any area of abnormal radiogallium uptake suggests malignancy warranting further evaluation by CT or MR. Biopsy of any questionable lesion is essential.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the canine brachial plexus in 18 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Susan; Ehrhart, E J; Gall, David; Klopp, Lisa; Gavin, Patrick; Tucker, Russ; Bagley, Rod; Kippenes, Hege; DeHaan, Constance; Pedroia, Vince; Partington, Beth; Olby, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations from 18 dogs with a histologically confirmed peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) of the brachial plexus were assessed retrospectively. Almost half (8/18) had a diffuse thickening of the brachial plexus nerve(s), six of which extended into the vertebral canal. The other 10/18 dogs had a nodule or mass in the axilla (1.2-338 cm3). Seven of those 10 masses also had diffuse nerve sheath thickening, three of which extended into the vertebral canal. The majority of tumors were hyperintense to muscle on T2-weighted images and isointense on T1-weighted images. Eight of 18 PNSTs had only minimal to mild contrast enhancement and many (13/18) enhanced heterogeneously following gadolinium DTPA administration. Transverse plane images with a large enough field of view (FOV) to include both axillae and the vertebral canal were essential, allowing in-slice comparison to detect lesions by asymmetry of structures. Higher resolution, smaller FOV, multiplanar examination of the cervicothoracic spine was important for appreciating nerve root and foraminal involvement. Short tau inversion recovery, T2-weighted, pre and postcontrast T1-weighted pulse sequences were all useful. Contrast enhancement was critical to detecting subtle diffuse nerve sheath involvement or small isointense nodules, and for accurately identifying the full extent of disease. Some canine brachial plexus tumors can be challenging to detect, requiring a rigorous multiplanar multi-pulse sequence MRI examination.

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the third eyelid in a 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback

    PubMed Central

    vom Hagen, Franziska; Romkes, Gwendolyna; Kershaw, Olivia; Eule, J Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented with conjunctivitis, enlargement of the third eyelid and a dorsotemporal deviation of the right eye. A mass within the third eyelid was detected and excised. The histopathologic examination showed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, which most likely is a neurofibrosarcoma based on immunohistochemistry. PMID:25678975

  14. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath (MPNST) Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas (PN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    convection enhanced delivery in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors or plexiform neurofibromas at this time. References Perrin GQ, Fishbein L...2007. 85(6): p. 1347-1357. Perrin GQ, Li H, Fishbein L, et al., An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential

  15. A huge malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with hepatic metastasis arising from retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Z H; Yang, Y S; Cheng, K L; Chen, G Q; Wang, L P; Li, W

    2013-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas (GNs) are the rarest and most benign of the neuroblastic tumors. We experienced a case of huge retroperitoneal GN which differentiated into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with hepatic metastasis. The tumor was located in the upper right quarter of the abdomen and pressed the right lobe of the liver, which was initially misdiagnosed as a liver carcinoma. The tumor shared blood supply with the right liver lob and had rich blood supplies from the abdominal aorta, renal artery and hepatic artery. It was also associated with skin pigment and recurrence shortly following resection. Our finding demonstrated that MPNST is a potent invasive malignant tumor and metastasis earlier with very poor prognosis.

  16. An atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumour with pseudoglandular architecture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Volmer, Christelle; Caplier, Laura; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Huet, Hélène; Owen, Roger A; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques

    2010-02-01

    This case describes a subcutaneous soft tissue tumour in a German Shepherd dog. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by proliferating ovoid cells, loosely arranged in a collagenous to myxoid stroma, and by numerous pseudoglandular structures lined by neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were labelled with vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100 antibodies, but not with cytokeratin, desmin and smooth muscle actin antibodies. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells were characterized by numerous mitochondria surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum and contained few secondary lysosomes. This tumour was diagnosed as a subcutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumour (PNST) with pseudoglandular architecture. This case illustrates the morphological diversity of PNST and provides new insight into the differential diagnosis of cutaneous tumours of similar morphology in the dog.

  17. Clinical course of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Rütten, Maja; Ruess-Melzer, Katja; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Lischer, Christoph; Oevermann, Anna; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    A 14-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was admitted with an ulcerating mass on the right thoracic wall. Radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation indicated 2 isolated cutaneous masses without any signs of metastasis. Histology of a Tru-Cut biopsy revealed an anaplastic sarcoma with giant cells. Both tumors were resected with appropriate normal tissue margins. The size of the defect did not allow primary closure of the wound; therefore, a mesh expansion technique was attempted. Three months later, the tiger had to be euthanized due to extensive metastasis to the lungs. Histomorphological features and immunohistochemical results confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. In contrast to domestic animal experience, the tumor had spread extensively to the lungs without local reccurrence in a short period of time. Correct diagnosis requires various immunohistochemical evaluations of the tumor tissue.

  18. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) when increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is suspected. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound since 2009 as a proxy for ICP in non-acute monitoring for space medicine purposes. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before launch. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Our data characterize the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, its longitudinal trends in long-duration spaceflight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased ICP outcomes.

  19. Primary peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the thyroid gland: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Liu, Zengguang; Su, Chang; Guan, Qiang; Wan, Fang; Dong, Bingfei; Bao, Liang; Zhang, Wenxin; Wang, Yinping; Wang, Guimin

    2016-02-01

    Primary peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) of the thyroid gland are rare, with fewer than 30 cases reported in the medical literature to date. Primary PNSTs of the thyroid gland are classified into malignant and benign PNSTs. The benign PNSTs may be further subclassified into neurofibromas and Schwannomas. This is the case report of a 51-year-old male patient presenting with multiple primary PNSTs involving the left lobe of the thyroid gland. The patient underwent total excision of the thyroid gland and the pathological results indicated a Schwannoma with Antoni type A and B cells. The literature was reviewed briefly and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of multiple primary PNSTs of the thyroid gland.

  20. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as orbito temporal lump: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Mishra, Sanjib; Das, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. The most common anatomical sites include the upper and lower extremities and trunk and less commonly the head and neck. To our knowledge, few patients with a cranial or facial MPNST have been reported. We report such a lesion in a 35-year-old woman who presented with left sided rapidly progressive proptosis and visual loss due to an orbital lump extending up to the temporal lobe. Cranial imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital wall and temporal bone. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. Preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology of the orbital mass came to be neurofibroma. Near total resection of the tumor was done. Histopathology revealed MPNST which was subsequently confirmed on the basis of immunopositivity for S-100. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery with an advice to attend cancer institute for possible radiotherapy. PMID:27057226

  1. BNIP3 regulates AT101 [(-)-gossypol] induced death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Niroop; Kohli, Latika; Graham, Christopher D; Klocke, Barbara J; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive Schwann cell-derived sarcomas and are the leading cause of mortality in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Current treatment modalities have been largely ineffective, resulting in a high rate of MPNST recurrence and poor five-year patient survival. This necessitates the exploration of alternative chemotherapeutic options for MPNST patients. This study sought to assess the cytotoxic effect of the BH3-mimetic AT101 [(-)-gossypol] on MPNST cells in vitro and to identify key regulators of AT101-induced MPNST cell death. We found that AT101 caused caspase-independent, non-apoptotic MPNST cell death, which was accompanied by autophagy and was mediated through HIF-1α induced expression of the atypical BH3-only protein BNIP3. These effects were mediated by intracellular iron chelation, a previously unreported mechanism of AT101 cytotoxicity.

  2. Synchronous Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouropoulos, Konstantinos; Farmakis, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNSTs) of the prostate are extremely rare. A very unusual case of simultaneous adenocarcinoma and MPNST of the prostate is reported. A 60-year-old Caucasian male presented for annual urologic examination. Digital rectal examination revealed a painless, toughish, and asymmetrically enlarged prostate. Serum prostate-specific antigen was 1 ng/mL. Radiologic examinations demonstrated a large mass, which was arising from the left peripheral lobe of the prostate. The patient underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate which revealed a smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential. Radical retropubic prostatectomy with en bloc removal of the mass and the seminal vesicles was performed and histology demonstrated low-grade MPNST and adenocarcinoma of the prostate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous prostatic adenocarcinoma and MPNST in the English literature. PMID:27872787

  3. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of Prostate: A Rare Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mid-aged male presented with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) for years. Huge prostate with low serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was detected. The specimen from transurethral resection revealed surprising pathology finding as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Considering its huge size (more than 300 gm) and location, we prescribed neoadjuvant chemotherapy firstly. The tumor became regressive and then radical surgical resection was achieved. Adjuvant multimodality treatment including concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and target therapy was given. However, he expired about one year later. MPNST originating from prostate is very rare and seldom reported before. We here present this extremely rare disease and share our treatment experience. PMID:27872789

  4. Epigenetic mechanisms drive the progression of neurofibromas to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Krish; Kliot, Tamara; Piunti, Andrea; Kliot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Thinking Outside the Box: The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a histone methyltransferase complex known to repress gene expression. There is a large body of experimental evidence that supports its role in promoting tumorigenicity by suppressing tumor suppressor genes. Here, we discuss the surprising findings that, in neurofibromas, it may have a completely different role as a tumor suppressor; mutations of PRC2 lead to conversion of benign neurofibromas into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) by de-repressing and thereby activating genes driving cell growth and development. These findings have potentially powerful clinical applications in both diagnosing and treating MPNSTs. Hypothesis: PRC2 loss drives malignant transformation of neurofibromas. PMID:27920939

  5. Multicentric benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors in two related bearded dragons, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Lemberger, K Y; Manharth, A; Pessier, A P

    2005-07-01

    Multiple subcutaneous masses from two sibling bearded dragons were removed. Nodules were well demarcated, restricted to the subcutis, and soft, white to yellow, resembling adipose tissue. Histologically, the masses were composed of short interlacing streams and bundles of spindle cells, with regions of vague nuclear palisading. Two of the tumors contained a subpopulation of polygonal cells with abundant periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive cytoplasmic granules. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for S100 and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) but negative for desmin and smooth muscle actin. Electron microscopy and reticulin stains demonstrated a continuous basal lamina separating intertwining cells. Histologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features were consistent with a peripheral nerve sheath origin. At 1 year postexcision, local reoccurrence of a single incompletely excised mass from the left shoulder was noted.

  6. Neurovascular decompression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla decreases blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Susumu; Tanda, Shuji; Hatta, Tsuguru; Morimoto, Satoshi; Takeda, Kazuo; Kizu, Osamu; Tamaki, Shinji; Saito, Mitsuru; Tamura, Yoji; Kondo, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the authors experienced four patients who had refractory hypertension and neurovascular compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). One of them, a 49-year-old woman, had undergone continuous intravenous drip injections of calcium channel blockers and β-blockers for more than 3 years because of severe and refractory hypertension. The patients had undergone microvascular decompression (MVD) of the RVLM, and the changes in blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve activities were recorded. In these patients, BP decreased to the normal range without any antihypertensive drugs 2 to 3 months after MVD. The tibial sympathetic nerve activities under resting and stress conditions significantly decreased, and plasma levels of norepinephrine, urinary levels of adrenaline, and plasma renin activity were also significantly decreased after MVD of RVLM. In some patients with refractory hypertension, arterial compression of the RVLM enhances sympathetic nerve activity and renin-angiotensin system to thereby increase BP. In these patients, the operative decompression of the RVLM could lower BP via restoration of sympathetic nerve activities and the renin-angiotensin system.

  7. Effects of acute controlled changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide on the diameter of the optic nerve sheath: a transorbital ultrasonographic study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, M; Han, J S; Fisher, J A; Chan, V W S; Venkatraghavan, L

    2017-02-08

    Transorbital ultrasonographic measurement of the diameter of the optic nerve sheath is a non-invasive, bed-side examination for detecting raised intracranial pressure. However, the ability of the optic nerve sheath diameter to predict acute changes in intracranial pressures remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the dynamic changes of the optic nerve sheath diameter in response to mild fluctuations in cerebral blood volume induced by changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide. We studied 11 healthy volunteers. End-tidal carbon dioxide was controlled by a model-based prospective end-tidal targeting system (RespirAct™). The volunteers' end-tidal carbon dioxide was targeted and maintained for 10 min each at normocapnia (baseline); hypercapnia (6.5 kPa); normocapnia (baseline 1); hypocapnia (3.9 kPa) and on return to normocapnia (baseline 2). A single investigator repeatedly measured the optic nerve sheath diameter for 10 min at each level of carbon dioxide. With hypercapnia, there was a significant increase in optic nerve sheath diameter, with a mean (SD) increase from baseline 4.2 (0.7) mm to 4.8 (0.8) mm; p < 0.001. On return to normocapnia, the optic nerve sheath diameter rapidly reverted back to baseline values. This study confirms dynamic changes in the optic nerve sheath diameter with corresponding changes in carbon dioxide, and their reversibly with normocapnia.

  8. Optic nerve sheath distention in Leber's optic neuropathy and the significance of the "Wallace mutation".

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Tse, D T; Byrne, S F; Johns, D R; Stone, E M

    1990-12-01

    We recently encountered a 27-year-old man who presented an atypical clinical picture of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: His family history was negative, visual loss continued steadily for over 8 months, circumpapillary microangiopathy was equivocal, the optic discs showed large physiologic cups, and both optic nerve sheaths were notably distended with increased subarachnoid fluid. The latter was confirmed by ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's asymptomatic brother also showed unimpressive circumpapillary microangiopathy in the fundi. The asymptomatic mother from France was then seen, and she showed classic circumpapillary microangiopathy in the fundi. Studies of mitochondrial DNA showed the classic point mutation at position 11778 as reported by Wallace in all three family members. Another patient previously seen with classic Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy recently had mitochondrial DNA studies along with three other affected family members and five unaffected family members in the maternal lineage. All nine of these individuals were completely normal at the Wallace locus. In fact, sequencing of the entire ND-4 gene from one affected individual revealed it to be perfectly normal at the amino acid level. The importance of obtaining quantitative ultrasonography and the 30 degrees test, and studying mitochondrial DNA in patients suspected of having Leber's optic nerve disease is emphasized.

  9. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST): the clinical implications of cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Katz, Daniela; Lazar, Alexander; Lev, Dina

    2009-10-19

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare malignancy accounting for 3-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Most MPNSTs arise in association with peripheral nerves or deep neurofibromas and may originate from neural crest cells, although the specific cell of origin is uncertain. Approximately half of MPNSTs occur in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of approximately one in 3500 persons; the remainder of MPNSTs develop sporadically. In addition to a variety of clinical manifestations, approximately 8-13% of NF1 patients develop MPNSTs, which are the leading cause of NF1-related mortality. Surgical resection is the mainstay of MPNST clinical management. However, because of invasive growth, propensity to metastasise, and limited sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation, MPNST has a guarded to poor prognosis. Five-year survival rates of only 20-50% indicate an urgent need for improved therapeutic approaches. Recent work in this field has identified several altered intracellular signal transduction cascades and deregulated tyrosine kinase receptors, posing the possibility of personalised, targeted therapeutics. However, expanded knowledge of MPNST molecular pathobiology will be needed to meaningfully apply such approaches for the benefit of afflicted patients.

  10. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  11. Early decompression of the injured optic nerve reduces axonal degeneration and improves functional outcome in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Marcus; Svensson, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    The putative beneficial role of an early decompression of injured CNS tissue following trauma remains controversial. In this study, we approach this scientific query using a standardized injury of the optic nerve in adult rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a standardized optic nerve constriction injury by applying a loose ligature around the nerve for 5 min, 1, 6 or 24 h. All animals were sacrificed at 28 dpi. Viable axons distal to the injury were quantified using semithin sections, and regenerative fibers were studied using antisera to neurofilament and GAP43. Axonal degeneration and glial scar development were analyzed using Fluoro-Jade staining and anti-GFAP, respectively. Visual function was studied with visual evoked potentials (VEP). No significant differences were observed between 1 and 6 h of optic nerve compression. However, the number of viable axons analyzed with neurofilament and on semithin sections, decreased significantly between 6 and 24 h, paralleled by an increase in Fluoro-Jade labeled axonal debris (P < 0.001). GFAP-IR density was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the 24 h compression group in comparison to 6 h. VEP showed preserved, but impaired visual function in animals subjected to compression up to 6 h, compared to an abolished cortical response at 24 h. Regenerative GAP43-positive sprouts were occasionally found distal to the lesion in animals subjected to compression up to 6 h, but not at 24 h. These findings suggest that early optic nerve decompression within hours after the initial trauma is beneficial for functional outcome.

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of adrenal gland with heterologus osseous differentiation in a case of Von Recklinghausen's disease.

    PubMed

    Baisakh, Manas R; Mohapatra, Nachiketa; Adhikary, Samiran D; Routray, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) of the adrenal gland is extremely rare. Most of them occur in association with neurofibromatosis, ganglioneuroma or as part of a composite tumor such as pheochromocytoma. Only seven cases of MPNST of the adrenal gland have been reported in the literature till date. Discriminating this entity from other soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the adrenal gland has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Moreover, the tumor size and pattern of expression for certain immunohistochemical markers may serve as independent predictors of aggressiveness. Herein we present a 24-years-old male with features of Von Recklinghausen's disease who presented with large left adrenal gland malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  13. Schwannoma of the tibial nerve sheath as a cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome--a case study.

    PubMed

    Milnes, Helen L; Pavier, Julian C

    2012-09-01

    A schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated and non-invasive tumour whose origin is derived from Schwann cells. Its incidence in the foot and ankle is rare. The etiology, incidence, clinical presentation, histology, differential diagnoses and surgical treatment are discussed. The authors present a case of a schwannoma of the tibial nerve sheath causing tarsal tunnel syndrome of the foot. The diagnosis in this case was delayed for eight years, which unfortunately is not uncommon with pedal schwannomas.

  14. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  15. Survivin Expression and Prognostic Significance in Pediatric Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, Daniela; Merlo, Anna; Gambini, Claudio; Ferrari, Andrea; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Martines, Annalisa; Bonaldi, Laura; De Salvo, Gian Luca; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067), and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038). Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24303016

  16. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular. PMID:27672598

  17. Primary uterine cervix melanoma resembling malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Bajetta, Emilio; Buzzoni, Roberto; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Platania, Marco; Del Vecchio, Michele; Ditto, Antonino

    2008-10-01

    A rare variant of malignant melanoma (MM) of the uterine cervix that mimics a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is described. A 43-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital complaining of genital discharge and vaginal bleeding. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-ovariectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed, and the diagnosis was MPNST, FIGO IIB. Pathological examination showed a diffuse proliferation of amelanotic spindle cells and large, highly atypical, frequently multinucleated, bizarre, and S100-, HMB-45-, vimentin-positive cells. The patient remained disease-free for 43 months, when an abdominal computed tomographic scan showed local polypoid vaginal lesions, with histological features of typical MM. A pathological review was obtained in our institution by a gynecological pathologist, who defined the primary neoplasm in the cervix as an MM, with a pattern of growth histologically simulating an MPNST, metastatic to the vagina. To our knowledge, this is the first report in literature of MM of the uterine cervix resembling MPNST. Despite its rarity, this variant of MM should be considered when a diagnosis of cervix MPNST is made. The histological and immunohistochemical features of these different entities should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Histopathology and clinical outcome of NF1-associated vs. sporadic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Christian; Zils, Ulrich; Peiper, Matthias; Kluwe, Lan; Gotthard, Stefan; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Zurakowski, David; von Deimling, Andreas; Mautner, Victor Felix

    2007-04-01

    The differences in the clinical course and histopathology of sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) were investigated retrospectively. The collective comprised 38 NF1 patients and 14 sporadic patients. NF1 patients were significantly younger at diagnosis (p<0.001) and had a significantly shorter survival time than sporadic patients (median survival 17 months vs. 42 months, Breslow p<0.05). The time interval to local recurrence and metastatic spread was also significantly shorter in NF1 patients (9.4 months vs. 30.0 months, p<0.01; 9.1 months vs. 33.2 months, p<0.001, respectively). In patients with the original histopathological data available (22 NF1 patients, 14 sporadic cases), NF1-associated MPNST showed a significantly higher cellularity compared to sporadic tumors (p<0.001) whereas sporadic MPNST featured a significantly higher pleomorphism (p<0.01). Most importantly, while histopathological variables correlated with French Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer grading in sporadic MPNST, this was not the case for NF1-associated tumors. The differences between NF1-associated and sporadic MPNST in regard to the clinical course and histopathology may reflect some fundamental differences in biology and pathomechanism of the two tumor groups. Our findings indicate the necessity for a separate grading scheme which takes into account the genetic background in NF1 patients.

  19. Trp53 Haploinsufficiency Modifies EGFR-Driven Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Otto, George M.; Watson, Adrienne L.; Choi, Kwangmin; Collins, Margaret H.; Wallace, Margaret; Webber, Beau R.; Forster, Colleen L.; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are genetically diverse, aggressive sarcomas that occur sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Reduced TP53 gene expression and amplification/overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene occur in MPNST formation. We focused on determining the cooperativity between reduced TP53 expression and EGFR overexpression for Schwann cell transformation in vitro (immortalized human Schwann cells) and MPNST formation in vivo (transgenic mice). Human gene copy number alteration data, microarray expression data, and TMA analysis indicate that TP53 haploinsufficiency and increased EGFR expression co-occur in human MPNST samples. Concurrent modulation of EGFR and TP53 expression in HSC1λ cells significantly increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Transgenic mice heterozygous for a Trp53-null allele and overexpressing EGFR in Schwann cells had a significant increase in neurofibroma and grade 3 PNST (MPNST) formation compared with single transgenic controls. Histological analysis of tumors identified a significant increase in pAkt expression in grade 3 PNSTs compared with neurofibromas. Array comparative genome hybridization analysis of grade 3 PNSTs identified recurrent focal regions of chromosomal gains with significant enrichment in genes involved in extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 signaling. Collectively, altered p53 expression cooperates with overexpression of EGFR in Schwann cells to enhance in vitro oncogenic properties and tumorigenesis and progression in vivo. PMID:24832557

  20. Survivin expression and prognostic significance in pediatric malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Alaggio, Rita; Turrini, Riccardo; Boldrin, Daniela; Merlo, Anna; Gambini, Claudio; Ferrari, Andrea; Dall'igna, Patrizia; Coffin, Cheryl M; Martines, Annalisa; Bonaldi, Laura; De Salvo, Gian Luca; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067), and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038). Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase inhibition: A potential treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Kivlin, Christine M; Watson, Kelsey L; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A; Belousov, Roman; Ingram, Davis R; Huang, Kai-Lieh; May, Caitlin D; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Landers, Sharon M; Kalam, Azad Abul; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, first evaluated nearly a decade ago, are primarily used in malignancies with known defects in DNA repair genes, such as alterations in breast cancer, early onset 1/2 (BRCA1/2). While no specific mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), MPNST cells could be effectively targeted with a PARP inhibitor to drive cells to synthetic lethality due to their complex karyotype and high level of inherent genomic instability. In this study, we assessed the expression levels of PARP1 and PARP2 in MPNST patient tumor samples and correlated these findings with overall survival. We also determined the level of PARP activity in MPNST cell lines. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 (Olaparib) in MPNST cell lines. We observed decreased MPNST cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in vitro at doses similar to, or less than, the doses used in cell lines with established defective DNA repair genes. Furthermore, AZD2281 significantly reduced local growth of MPNST xenografts, decreased the development of macroscopic lung metastases, and increased survival of mice with metastatic disease. Our results suggest that AZD2281 could be an effective therapeutic option in MPNST and should be further investigated for its potential clinical use in this malignancy.

  2. Appropriate modulation of autophagy sensitizes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to treatment with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Okano, Munehiro; Sakata, Naoki; Ueda, Satoshi; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), very rare in childhood, is a highly aggressive soft-tissue tumor. We experienced a case of a 7-year-old boy with MPNST who was treated with imatinib mesylate (imatinib) after the identification of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in his tumor. We were unable to observe clinical benefits of imatinib in this patient. Therefore, cellular reactions of imatinib were investigated in vitro using 3 MPNST cell lines. Imatinib induced cytotoxicity in vitro with variable IC50 values (11.7 to >30 μM). Induction of apoptosis was not a pivotal mechanism in the inhibitory effects. We found that the treatment of MPNST cell lines with imatinib induced autophagy. Suppression of the initiation of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against beclin-1 attenuated the imatinib-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, blocking the formation of autophagosomes or the development of autolysosomes using siRNA against microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, or an MEK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) enhanced the imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in MPNST cells. Our data showed that the imatinib-mediated autophagy can function as a cytotoxic mechanism and that appropriate modulation of autophagy may sensitize MPNST cells to imatinib, which in turn may be a novel therapeutic strategy for MPNST.

  3. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor as a cause of chronic cardiac insufficiency in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cardiac insufficiency was associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a cow. An eight-year-old cow developed a progressive condition (over a period of three months) characterized by an enhanced abdominal volume, reluctance to move, a positive jugular pulse, watery diarrhea and death. At necropsy, moderate subcutaneous edema and an enhanced hepatic lobular pattern were observed. A 23x20x11 cm firm, grayish-white mass adhered to and infiltrated the right atrium. Multiple firm, yellowish-white nodules of 0.5 to 12 cm in diameter were diffusely scattered in the epicardium and parietal pericardium. Histologically, the tumor was poorly circumscribed with foci of infiltration of the myocardium. The neoplastic cells had two major histologic patterns, Antoni types A and B. Within occasional foci, pleomorphic cells with an epithelioid appearance were present in addition to multinucleated cells with periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-positive cytoplasmic globules. Foci of cartilaginous and granular differentiations were interspersed among the neoplastic cells. Multiple vessels presented wall hyalinization and tumoral embolus. Large necrotic foci with mineralization and cholesterol clefts were also observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S100 protein, vimentin and neuron-specific enolase labeling. PMID:23369465

  4. Direct Surgery of Previously Coiled Large Internal Carotid Ophthalmic Aneurysm for the Purpose of Optic Nerve Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Shuhei; Toyota, Shingo; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Goto, Tetsu; Mori, Kanji; Taki, Takuyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Progressive visual loss after coil embolization of a large internal carotid ophthalmic aneurysm has been widely reported. It is generally accepted that the primary strategy for this complication should be conservative, including steroid therapy; however, it is not well known as to what approach to take when the conservative therapy is not effective. Case Presentation We report a case of a 55-year-old female presenting with progressive visual loss after the coiling of a ruptured large internal carotid ophthalmic aneurysm. As the conservative therapy had not been effective, we performed neck clipping of the aneurysm with optic canal unroofing, anterior clinoidectomy, and partial removal of the embolized coils for the purpose of optic nerve decompression. After the surgery, the visual symptom was improved markedly. Conclusions It is suggested that direct surgery for the purpose of optic nerve decompression may be one of the options when conservative therapy is not effective for progressive visual disturbance after coil embolization. PMID:28229036

  5. [A rare case of nerve-sheath sarcoma with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (malignant triton tumor)].

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Garofalo, A

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are spindle-cell sarcomas that appear in a setting of neurofibroma or schwannoma or are associated with peripheral nerves or demonstrate nerve sheath differentiation. Malignant triton tumor (MTT) is a subtype of MPNST that also contain tissue with skeletal muscle differentiation (embryonal, plemorphic and botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma). The estimated incidence of MPNSTs in patients with NF1 is 2-5% compared with 0.0001% in the general population and approximately 69% of the reported cases of MTT are associated with von Recklinghausen disease. In July 2002 a 37-year old man was readmitted to the Department of Oncologic Surgery of the S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital in Rome for both a right-sided retroperitoneal paravertebral not palpable mass, incidentally detected at a follow-up MRI, and a left-sided popliteal mass, discovered at clinical evaluation. Seventeen months before, when the patient underwent surgery at the same Department for both a left-sided paravertebral inferior mediastinal neurofibroma and a right-sided axillary neurofibroma, diagnosis of von Recklinghausen disease (NF1) was made, according to the criteria established by the NIH Consensus Development. Conference on Neurofibromatosis of 1987. A xifopubic laparotomy was performed: the tumor appeared to be localized, well-capsulated and strictly associated to the lumbar and sacral nervous radicles (L4, L5, S1) without evidence of invasion. The tumor was completely resected with sparing of the psoas muscle and the lumbar plexus through a subperineural dissection technique. No intra-operative pathologic examination was performed. Postoperative pathologic findings showed evidence for a trition tumor. The popliteal mass was resected too and resulted to be a neurofibroma just like the tumors resected 17 months before when diagnosis of von Recklinghausen disease was made. The patient was disease free 6 months after initial surgery. Sarcoma arising in anatomic site

  6. Pain Relief and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Improvement After Microsurgical Decompression of Entrapped Peripheral Nerves in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Guo, Zhuangli; Yu, Yanbing; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Li

    Surgery had been shown to be effective for superimposed peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), with pain relief and sensation restored. Few studies, however, have reported the quality-of-life outcomes of surgery for the treatment of painful DPN (PDPN). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of microsurgical decompression of multiple entrapped peripheral nerves on pain and health-related quality of life in patients with refractory PDPN of the lower limbs. Eleven patients with intractable PDPN of the lower limbs were recruited for the present study. All the patients underwent microsurgical decompression of the common peroneal nerve, deep peroneal nerve, and posterior tibial nerve. The pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale and health-related quality of life was measured using the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey. Six (54.6%) patients experienced >50% pain relief (both daytime pain and nocturnal pain) at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months postoperatively. Two (18.2%) patients experienced a >50% decrease in peak pain at the 2 weeks after the procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months. Additionally, the scores from the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey were significantly improved in the following 2 domains: bodily pain and general health at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure. Also, at 24 months postoperatively, 6 domains had significantly improved, including physical function, bodily pain, general health, social function, role emotional, and mental health. No significant side effects were recorded during the study. Microsurgical decompression of peripheral nerves is an effective and safe therapy for intractable PDPN with superimposed nerve compression.

  7. Noninvasive and quantitative intracranial pressure estimation using ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-juan; Yao, Yan; Feng, Liang-shu; Wang, Yu-zhi; Zheng, Nan-nan; Feng, Jia-chun; Xing, Ying-qi

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantitatively assess intracranial pressure (ICP) using optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements. We recruited 316 neurology patients in whom ultrasonographic ONSD was measured before lumbar puncture. They were randomly divided into a modeling and a test group at a ratio of 7:3. In the modeling group, we conducted univariate and multivariate analyses to assess associations between ICP and ONSD, age, sex, BMI, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure. We derived the mathematical function “Xing & Wang” from the modelling group to predict ICP and evaluated the function in the test group. In the modeling group, ICP was strongly correlated with ONSD (r = 0.758, p < 0.001), and this association was independent of other factors. The mathematical function was ICP = −111.92 + 77.36 × ONSD (Durbin-Watson value = 1.94). In the test group, a significant correlation was found between the observed and predicted ICP (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean difference between measurements of −0.07 ± 41.55 mmH2O. The intraclass correlation coefficient and its 95%CIs for noninvasive ICP assessments using our prediction model was 0.86 (0.79–0.90). Ultrasonographic ONSD measurements provide a potential noninvasive method to quantify ICP that can be conducted at the bedside. PMID:28169341

  8. Astounding recovery after resection of an intradural nerve sheath tumor in an adult male from Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul; Khan, Saleen; Inamullah, Ovais

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord tumors can be classified as intramedullary, intradural extramedullary, or extradural. The differential diagnosis of spinal cord tumors includes meningiomas, astrocytomas, ependymomas, metastasis, nerve sheath tumors such as schwannomas or neurofibromas, and multiple sclerosis plaques. Radiology can provide clues to the type of tumor, but a pathology evaluation of a specimen is necessary to provide an accurate diagnosis. These tumors can cause a variety of neurological symptoms from spinal cord compression including pain, weakness, and paresthesia. They are treated by surgical resection, with a variety of outcomes possible depending on the severity of the preoperative symptoms, location and extent of the tumor, and efficacy of the surgery performed. Case Description: A 59-year-old male from Vietnam came to the Atlanta Medical Center for evaluation of severe ride sided hemiparesis and paresthesias. He first noticed alterations in his handwriting and quickly deteriorated to the point of being unable to walk or move his right arm. A cervical spinal mass was identified and analyzed on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical resection was performed under a microscope in a joint operation between an orthopedic surgeon and neurosurgeon. A specimen of the tumor was sent to pathology for further evaluation. Conclusion: The mass was determined to be an intradural extramedullary schwannoma. The severity of the patient's symptoms and the location and size of the tumor made full recovery unlikely and postoperative quadriplegia a real possibility. The tumor was surgically resected, which led surprisingly, however, to a full and prompt resolution of the patient's symptoms. Less than 2 weeks after surgery, the patient was able to walk and had almost fully regained use of his hands. PMID:26425395

  9. Confirmation of mutation landscape of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Sohier, Pierre; Luscan, Armelle; Lloyd, Angharad; Ashelford, Kevin; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Vidaud, Dominique; Ortonne, Nicolas; Pasmant, Eric; Upadhyaya, Meena

    2017-05-01

    The commonest tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called neurofibromas. Malignant transformation of neurofibromas into aggressive MPNSTs may occur with a poor patient prognosis. A cooperative role of SUZ12 or EED inactivation, along with NF1, TP53, and CDKN2A loss-of-function, has been proposed to drive progression to MPNSTs. An exome sequencing analysis of eight MPNSTs, one plexiform neurofibroma, and seven cutaneous neurofibromas was undertaken. Biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene was observed in the plexiform neurofibroma and the MPNSTs, underlining that somatic biallelic NF1 inactivation is likely to be the initiating event for plexiform neurofibroma genesis, although it is unlikely to be sufficient for the subsequent MPNST development. The majority (5/8) of MPNSTs in our analyses demonstrated homozygous or heterozygous deletions of CDKN2A, which may represent an early event following NF1 LOH in the malignant transformation of Schwann cells from plexiform neurofibroma to MPNST. Biallelic somatic alterations of SUZ12 was also found in 4/8 MPNSTs. EED biallelic alterations were detected in 2 of the other four MPNSTs, with one tumor having a homozygous EED deletion. A missense mutation in the chromatin regulator KDM2B was also identified in one MPNST. No TP53 point mutations were found in this study, confirming previous data that TP53 mutations may be relatively rare in NF1-associated MPNSTs. Our study confirms the frequent biallelic inactivation of PRC2 subunits SUZ12 and EED in MPNSTs, and suggests the implication of KDM2B.

  10. Reproducibility and accuracy of optic nerve sheath diameter assessment using ultrasound compared to magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantification of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) by transbulbar sonography is a promising non-invasive technique for the detection of altered intracranial pressure. In order to establish this method as follow-up tool in diseases with intracranial hyper- or hypotension scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy need to be systematically investigated. Methods The right ONSD of 15 healthy volunteers (mean age 24.5 ± 0.8 years) were measured by both transbulbar sonography (9 – 3 MHz) and 3 Tesla MRI (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo sequences, HASTE) 3 and 5 mm behind papilla. All volunteers underwent repeated ultrasound and MRI examinations in order to assess scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy. Moreover, inter- and intra-observer variabilities were calculated for both techniques. Results Scan-rescan reproducibility was robust for ONSD quantification by sonography and MRI at both depths (r > 0.75, p ≤ 0.001, mean differences < 2%). Comparing ultrasound- and MRI-derived ONSD values, we found acceptable agreement between both methods for measurements at a depth of 3 mm (r = 0.72, p = 0.002, mean difference < 5%). Further analyses revealed good inter- and intra-observer reliability for sonographic measurements 3 mm behind the papilla and for MRI at 3 and 5 mm (r > 0.82, p < 0.001, mean differences < 5%). Conclusions Sonographic ONSD quantification 3 mm behind the papilla can be performed with good reproducibility, measurement accuracy and observer agreement. Thus, our findings emphasize the feasibility of this technique as a non-invasive bedside tool for longitudinal ONSD measurements. PMID:24289136

  11. Dissecting the roles of Ephrin-A3 in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengguang; Liu, Zhendong; Liu, Bo; Liu, Gengyan; Wu, Song

    2015-07-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare and aggressive soft tissue sarcoma for which effective treatments have not yet been established due to poor understanding of its pathogenesis. Our previous study indicated that miR-210-mediated Ephrin-A3 (EFNA3) promotion of proliferation and invasion of MPNST cells plays an important role in MPNST tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the roles of EFNA3 in MPNST. Constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and lentiviral vectors were transfected into MPNST ST88-14 (NF1 wild-type) and sNF96.2 (NF1 mutant type) cell lines to obtain gain- and loss-of-function cell lines for the EFNA3 function study. The results showed that the knockout of ENFA3 increased cellular viability and invasiveness of the MPNST cells. However, the adhesion ability of MPNST cells was enhanced or inhibited when EFNA3 was overexpressed or knocked out, respectively. It was also observed that knockout of EFNA3 significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) and the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) compared to that in the control cells, yet the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), GTPase, integrins, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-α) increased significantly. Inversely, overexpression of EFNA3 significantly increased the expression of p-FAK and TNF-α compared to that in the control cells, yet the expression of PI3K, GTPase, integrins, VEGF and HIF-α decreased significantly. The results indicated that EFNA3 serves as a tumor suppressor in MPNST cells and it may play a critical role in the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling and VEGF-associated tumor angiogenesis pathway. These findings may not only facilitate the better understanding of MPNST pathogenesis, but also suggest EFNA3 as a promising target for MPNST treatment.

  12. Neurofibromin specific antibody differentiates malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) from other spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Reuss, David E; Habel, Antje; Hagenlocher, Christian; Mucha, Jana; Ackermann, Ulrike; Tessmer, Claudia; Meyer, Jochen; Capper, David; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Mautner, Victor; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Schittenhelm, Jens; Hartmann, Christian; Hagel, Christian; Katenkamp, Kathrin; Petersen, Iver; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; von Deimling, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) derive from the Schwann cell or perineurial cell lineage and occur either sporadically or in association with the tumor syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). MPNST often pose a diagnostic challenge due to their frequent lack of pathognomonic morphological or immunohistochemical features. Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene are found in all NF1-associated and many sporadic MPNST. The presence of NF1 mutation may have the potential to differentiate MPNST from several morphologically similar neoplasms; however, mutation detection is hampered by the size of the gene and the lack of mutational hot spots. Here we describe a newly developed monoclonal antibody binding to the C-terminus of neurofibromin (clone NFC) which was selected for optimal performance in routinely processed formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. NFC immunohistochemistry revealed loss of neurofibromin in 22/25 (88 %) of NF1-associated and 26/61 (43 %) of sporadic MPNST. There was a strong association of neurofibromin loss with deletions affecting the NF1 gene (P < 0.01). In a series of 256 soft tissue tumors of different histotypes NFC staining showed loss of neurofibromin in 2/8 myxofibrosarcomas, 2/12 (16 %) pleomorphic liposarcomas, 1/16 (6 %) leiomyosarcomas, and 4/28 (14 %) unclassified undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas. However, loss of neurofibromin was not observed in 22 synovial sarcomas, 27 schwannomas, 23 solitary fibrous tumors, 14 low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas, 50 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 27 myxoid liposarcomas, 13 angiosarcomas, 9 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, and 7 epitheloid sarcomas. Immunohistochemistry using antibody NFC may substantially facilitate sarcoma research and diagnostics.

  13. Morphological spectrum of peripheral nerve sheath tumors: An insight into World Health Organization 2013 classification

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Boovalli, Mythri M.; Nathiyal, Velusamy; Venkataramappa, Srinivasamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are neuroectodermal in origin. Now these tumors are classified under World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone 2013. Objective: To study the morphological spectrum of PNST and to study the secondary degenerative changes associated with it. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from January 2010 to June 2015. The gross details of tumor and patient's demographic profiles were reviewed. The hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were reassessed and the lesions were categorized and classified as per the WHO 2013 classification. The tumors were also assessed for secondary degenerative changes. Results: Our study comprised 143 cases of PNST. Age of the patients ranged from 5 to 75 years. 21–30 years is the most common age of occurrence with head and neck being the most common site. The PNSTs observed in the present study were neurofibroma (NF) (61.5%), schwannoma (36%), malignant PNST (2%), and granular cell tumor (0.5%). Nearly 10% of NF fulfilled the criteria for neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Rare tumors such as plexiform schwannoma and granular cell tumor were also observed. Malignant tumors were larger in dimension than benign. Myxoid, cystic, and hyaline changes were commonly associated with benign tumors while necrosis, hemorrhage, and mitotic activity were seen with malignant tumors. Conclusion: This series highlights the pathological variants of PNST along with their morphological changes and NF1 association. It is essential to be familiar with all these variants of PNST for accurate diagnosis as they have varied biological behavior. PMID:27365950

  14. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Lyons, Andrew B; Bietz, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female), yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients), repetitive throwing (5 patients), deep massage (2 patients), repetitive overhead movement (1 patient), direct trauma (1 patient), motor bike accident (1 patient), and idiopathic causes (9 patients). Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months) consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN). Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98%) of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%). At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86%) cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered a primary

  15. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  16. [Usefulness of extradural optic canal unroofing and decompression of the optic nerve for improvement of visual acuity in traumatic optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sho; Otani, Naoki; Inaka, Yasufumi; Morinaga, Yusuke; Kimura, Shohei; Tomura, Satoshi; Osada, Hideo; Harimoto, Kohzou; Takeuchi, Masaru; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-11-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with poor visual acuity of the left eye, swelling of the left eyelid, and elevation of the left intraocular pressure after contusion of the left palpebral portion. CT revealed left ocular proptosis and left intraorbital hematoma. Traumatic optic neuropathy was suspected, and emergent optic nerve decompression was performed through extradural anterior clinoidectomy followed by optic canal release. Postoperatively, his left visual acuity was markedly improved and the elevated intraocular pressure decreased. Postoperative CT demonstrated improvement of the left ocular proptosis and decompression of the optic nerve. Emergent optic canal release has been recommended in patients who have suffered visual dysfunction caused by optic canal fracture or intraorbital hematoma. The advantages of extradural anterior clinoidectomy followed by optic canal release include a shorter surgical route and easy identification of the optic nerve, resulting in fewer surgical complications. In addition, this procedure can achieve intraorbital decompression. We recommend extradural anterior clinoidectomy followed by optic canal release as a safe and reliable procedure for optic nerve decompression in patients with traumatic optic neuropathy.

  17. Predictive Factors for Vision Recovery after Optic Nerve Decompression for Chronic Compressive Neuropathy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Andrew P.; Stippler, Martina; Myers, Orrin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Surgical optic nerve decompression for chronic compressive neuropathy results in variable success of vision improvement. We sought to determine the effects of various factors using meta-analysis of available literature. Design Systematic review of MEDLINE databases for the period 1990 to 2010. Setting Academic research center. Participants Studies reporting patients with vision loss from chronic compressive neuropathy undergoing surgery. Main outcome measures Vision outcome reported by each study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for predictor variables were calculated. Overall odds ratios were then calculated for each factor, adjusting for inter study heterogeneity. Results Seventy-six studies were identified. Factors with a significant odds of improvement were: less severe vision loss (OR 2.31[95% CI = 1.76 to 3.04]), no disc atrophy (OR 2.60 [95% CI = 1.17 to 5.81]), smaller size (OR 1.82 [95% CI = 1.22 to 2.73]), primary tumor resection (not recurrent) (OR 3.08 [95% CI = 1.84 to 5.14]), no cavernous sinus extension (OR 1.88 [95% CI = 1.03 to 3.43]), soft consistency (OR 4.91 [95% CI = 2.27 to 10.63]), presence of arachnoid plane (OR 5.60 [95% CI = 2.08 to 15.07]), and more extensive resection (OR 0.61 [95% CI = 0.4 to 0.93]). Conclusions Ophthalmologic factors and factors directly related to the lesion are most important in determining vision outcome. The decision to perform optic nerve decompression for vision loss should be made based on careful examination of the patient and realistic discussion regarding the probability of improvement. PMID:24436885

  18. Giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of thigh in an adolescent with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Serbest, Sancar; Turk, Bilge Aydın; Gumustas, Seyit Ali; Uludag, Abuzer

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare sarcomas of children and adolescents, and they are aggressive tumors with a high rate of local recurrence. We present a 15-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), who had a giant MPNST on the right thigh taking into account the available literature. Diagnosis of MPNST may be delayed in NF1 patients due to confusion with a neurofibroma and/or a plexiform neurofibroma. Malignancy should be considered, especially in cases with big masses, with heterogeneous involvement, or in the presence of cysts or necrotic nodules. The aim of surgical treatment is complete surgical excision. PMID:26604833

  19. Ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter: A point of care test helps in prognostication of Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arnab; Bala, Renu; Saini, Savita

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management to improve patient outcome. Measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter by ultrasound is a well studied modality for noninvasive assessment of ICP. Recent studies have shown it to correlate with invasively measured ICP. We utilized this technique in our ICU and found it to be of great help in guiding patient management and predicting the prognosis. A case series of four patients is reported illustrating its utility in ICU patients.

  20. 3D Computer graphics simulation to obtain optimal surgical exposure during microvascular decompression of the glossopharyngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Matsushima, Toshio; Kawashima, Masatou; Nakahara, Yukiko; Takahashi, Yuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Oishi, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2013-10-01

    The affected artery in glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) is most often the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from the caudal side or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) from the rostral side. This technical report describes two representative cases of GPN, one with PICA as the affected artery and the other with AICA, and demonstrates the optimal approach for each affected artery. We used 3D computer graphics (3D CG) simulation to consider the ideal transposition of the affected artery in any position and approach. Subsequently, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery based on this simulation. For PICA, we used the transcondylar fossa approach in the lateral recumbent position, very close to the prone position, with the patient's head tilted anteriorly for caudal transposition of PICA. In contrast, for AICA, we adopted a lateral suboccipital approach with opening of the lateral cerebellomedullary fissure, to visualize better the root entry zone of the glossopharyngeal nerve and to obtain a wide working space in the cerebellomedullary cistern, for rostral transposition of AICA. Both procedures were performed successfully. The best surgical approach for MVD in patients with GPN is contingent on the affected artery--PICA or AICA. 3D CG simulation provides tailored approach for MVD of the glossopharyngeal nerve, thereby ensuring optimal surgical exposure.

  1. Epithelioid Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Arising in a Schwannoma, in a Patient with “Neuroblastoma-like” Schwannomatosis and a Novel Germline SMARCB1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jodi M.; O'Hara, Carolyn; Dundas, George; Gilchrist, Dawna; Collins, Mark S.; Eaton, Katherine; Judkins, Alexander R.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Folpe, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in pre-existing schwannomas are extremely rare. We report an unusual example occurring in a patient with multiple schwannomas (schwannomatosis), all but one of which showed “neuroblastoma-like” histology. By immunohistochemistry, both the epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and the schwannomas showed a complete loss of the Smarcb1 protein. Subsequent genetic evaluation revealed the presence of a novel germline mutation in the SMARCB1/INI1 gene in the patient and three of her children, two of whom were diagnosed with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the brain. PMID:22082606

  2. Verticillin A Inhibits Leiomyosarcoma and Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zewdu, A; Lopez, G; Braggio, D; Kenny, C; Constantino, D; Bid, HK; Batte, K; Iwenofu, OH; Oberlies, NH; Pearce, CJ; Strohecker, AM; Lev, D; Pollock, RE

    2017-01-01

    Objective The heterogeneity of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) represents a major challenge for the development of effective therapeutics. Comprised of over 50 different histology subtypes of various etiologies, STS subsets are further characterized as either karyotypically simple or complex. Due to the number of genetic anomalies associated with genetically complex STS, development of therapies demonstrating potency against this STS cluster is especially challenging and yet greatly needed. Verticillin A is a small molecule natural product with demonstrated anticancer activity; however, the efficacy of this agent has never been evaluated in STS. Therefore, the goal of this study was to explore verticillin A as a potential STS therapeutic. Methods We performed survival (MTS) and clonogenic analyses to measure the impact of this agent on the viability and colony formation capability of karyotypically complex STS cell lines: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS). The in vitro effects of verticillin A on apoptosis were investigated through annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis and by measuring fluorescently-labeled cleaved caspase 3/7 activity. The impact on cell cycle progression was assessed via cytometric measurement of propidium iodide intercalation. In vivo studies were performed using MPNST xenograft models. Tumors were processed and analyzed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for verticillin A effects on growth (Ki67) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Results Treatment with verticillin A resulted in decreased STS growth and an increase in apoptotic levels after 24 h. 100 nM verticillin A induced significant cellular growth abrogation after 24 h (96.7, 88.7, 72.7, 57, and 39.7% reduction in LMS1, S462, ST88, SKLMS1, and MPNST724, respectively). We observed no arrest in cell cycle, elevated annexin, and a nearly two-fold increase in cleaved caspase 3/7 activity in all MPNST and LMS cell lines. Control normal human Schwann (HSC) and

  3. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  4. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique Into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara S.; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians recently adopted the use of ultrasonography to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as concomitant with increased intracranial pressure. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound capabilities since 2009 to consider this anatomical measure as a proxy for intracranial pressure in the microgravity environment. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before missions. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Data will be presented characterizing the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, longitudinal trends in-flight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased intracranial pressure outcomes.

  5. Primary hepatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor successfully treated with combination therapy: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Lee, Hyoung Uk; Ahn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Yong; Cho, Hyon Doek; Lee, Sang Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in a young female patient, not associated with neurofibromatosis type-I is extremely rare in the liver. A 33-year-old female was admitted with a right flank pain for a weak. The CT scan showed 12.5-cm-sized mass located at the right hepatic lobe. At laparotomy, about 20.0-cm-sized mass was on the right hepatic lobe with attachment to right diaphragmatic pleura. Right hepatic lobe and adherent part of diaphragmatic pleura were resected. On histology and immunohistochemistry, it was diagnosed MPNST. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the right diaphragmatic pleura and adjuvant chemotherapy with adriamycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin were sequentially performed. The prognosis of MPNST is generally poor and it is associated with a highly aggressive course of recurrence, metastases, and death. Our case is probably a first report about combination therapy. PMID:27904856

  6. Cytohistologic correlations of 24 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in 17 patients: the Institut Curie experience.

    PubMed

    Klijanienko, Jerzy; Caillaud, Jean-Michel; Lagacé, Réal; Vielh, Philippe

    2002-08-01

    Cytomorphological patterns of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) are insufficiently documented in the literature. Cytological and histological specimens in 24 tumors in 17 patients were correlated. The review of the original cytology reports showed that four (16.6%) tumors were correctly diagnosed, eight (33.3%) were diagnosed as sarcoma not otherwise specified, four (16.7%) as fibrosarcoma, three (12.5%) as synovial sarcoma, three (12.5%) as leiomyosarcoma, and one (4.2%) case each as malignant fibrous histiocytoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. At the review tumors were histologically reclassified as well-differentiated MPNST in 11 (45.9%) cases, anaplastic MPNST in 11 (45.9%) cases, and epithelioid MPNST and malignant Triton tumor in one (4.2%) case each. Cytologically, well-differentiated MPNST were composed of polymorphous oval to round cells, small spindle-shaped cells with wavy and comma-like naked nuclei, and a fibrillary, delicate stroma. Anaplastic MPNST, moreover, were composed of anaplastic giant and polymorphous cells. The malignant Triton tumor was composed of oval to round rhabdomyoblastic cells with eccentric nuclei and the epithelioid MPNST of polymorphous and round, epithelial-like cells. The cytological diagnosis of MPNST may be difficult, especially in anaplastic tumors. The correlation between the cytological features and the clinical information--origin of the tumor from a nerve trunk, a preexisting neurofibroma, patients with known history of neurofibromatosis 1--could be indicative of an MPNST diagnosis.

  7. Electrophoresis of polar fluorescent tracers through the nerve sheath labels neuronal populations for anatomical and functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, Matthew D.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of tracers into populations of neurons is essential to visualize their anatomy and analyze their function. In some model systems genetically-targeted expression of fluorescent proteins is the method of choice; however, these genetic tools are not available for most organisms and alternative labeling methods are very limited. Here we describe a new method for neuronal labelling by electrophoretic dye delivery from a suction electrode directly through the neuronal sheath of nerves and ganglia in insects. Polar tracer molecules were delivered into the locust auditory nerve without destroying its function, simultaneously staining peripheral sensory structures and central axonal projections. Local neuron populations could be labelled directly through the surface of the brain, and in-vivo optical imaging of sound-evoked activity was achieved through the electrophoretic delivery of calcium indicators. The method provides a new tool for studying how stimuli are processed in peripheral and central sensory pathways and is a significant advance for the study of nervous systems in non-model organisms. PMID:28084413

  8. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Timothy M.; Miller, John D.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Nickerson, D. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States. PMID:26055081

  9. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  10. Association of tumor location, extent of resection, and neurofibromatosis status with clinical outcomes for 221 spinal nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Parsa, Andrew T; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Weinstein, Philip R; Tihan, Tarik; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Intradural extramedullary spine tumors represent two-thirds of all primary spine neoplasms. Approximately half of these are peripheral nerve sheath tumors, mainly neurofibromas and schwannomas. Given the rarity of this disease and, thus, the limited analyses of clinical outcomes, the authors examined the association of tumor location, extent of resection, and neurofibromatosis (NF) status with clinical outcomes. METHODS Patients were identified through a search of the University of California, San Francisco, neuropathology database and a separate review of current procedural terminology codes. Data recorded included patient age, patient sex, clinical presentation, presence of NF, tumor type, tumor location, extent of resection (gross-total resection [GTR] or subtotal resection [STR]), and clinical follow-up. RESULTS Of 221 tumors in 199 patients (mean age 45 years), 53 were neurofibromas, 163 were schwannomas, and 5 were malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The most common presenting symptom was spinal pain (76%), followed by weakness (36%) and sensory abnormalities (34%). Mean symptom duration was 16 months. In terms of spinal location, neurofibromas were more common in the cervical spine (74% vs 27%, p < 0.001), and schwannomas were more common in the thoracic and lumbosacral spine (73% vs 26%, p < 0.001). Rates of GTR were lower for neurofibromas than schwannomas (51% vs 83%, p < 0.001), regardless of location. Rates of GTR were lower for cervical (54%) than thoracic (90%) and lumbosacral (86%) lesions (p < 0.001). NF was associated with lower rates of GTR among all tumors (43% vs 86%, p < 0.001). The mean follow-up time was 32 months. Recurrence/progression was more common for neurofibromas than schwannomas (17% vs 7%, p = 0.03), although the mean time to recurrence/progression did not differ according to tumor type (45 vs 53 months, p = 0.63). As expected, GTR was associated with lower recurrence rates (4% vs 22%, p < 0.001). According to

  11. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-Del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-05-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7-10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor-orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a BRAF

  12. Order-disorder phenomena in myelinated nerve sheaths: V. Effects of temperature on rat sciatic and optic nerves, and structural differences between the two types of nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Luzzati, V; Vonasek, E; Mateu, E; Villegas, G M; Vargas, R

    1995-01-13

    We describe in this work X-ray scattering and electron microscope studies of rat sciatic and optic nerves as a function of temperature. The scattering experiments were analyzed as described in the previous papers of this series: a variety of parameters were determined, some of which characterize the lattice disorder, others the structure of the motif. The main results are the following. All the parameters determined by the X-ray scattering study vary with temperature and the temperature-dependence is specific for the type of nerve (sciatic or optic). Most of the disorder-related parameters display a minimum or a maximum in the vicinity of physiological temperature (38 degrees C in rat); this observation, strongly supported by the electron microscope study, shows that the degree of organization of myelin is highest near physiological temperature. The structure of the motif, as revealed by the electron density profile, is fairly different in the two types of nerves (in contrast with the assumption made by previous workers); the structure also varies with temperature and the temperature-induced alterations are nerve-type specific. In the two types of nerve the thickness of the lipid bilayer varies with temperature as expected for a lipid-containing system with hydrocarbon chains in the disordered conformation. In sciatic nerve the thickness of the (thinner) cytoplasmic polar layer, which is also the layer most affected by lattice disorder in this type of nerve, decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In optic nerve, in which lattice disorder predominantly affects the extracellular layer, the thickness of both the cytoplasmic and the extracellular layer is barely affected by temperature.

  13. Primary Intraosseous Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Medial Cuneiform: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Saravanaraja; Conway, Sheila A; Pitcher, J David; Temple, H Thomas

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (benign and malignant) usually arise in the soft tissues and are unusual in bone. Intraosseous peripheral nerve sheath tumors are usually benign and constitute approximately 0.2% of all bone tumors. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are uncommon and usually result from secondary invasion. Only a few cases of primary intraosseous MPNSTs have been reported in published studies, and these were localized mostly in the mandible (approximately 50%) or maxilla, spine, and, occasionally, in the appendicular skeleton. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of primary intraosseous MPNST involving a midtarsal bone (medial cuneiform). The patient was a 62-year-old female who presented with pain and tenderness but without swelling. Imaging revealed nonspecific findings, and the preoperative computed tomography-guided biopsy findings were consistent with MPNST. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy, followed by wide local excision and allograft reconstruction. At the final follow-up examination (24 months), the graft had been incorporated without evidence of local recurrence or distant disease. The patient with primary intraosseous MPNST of the medial cuneiform described in the present report presented with nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Thus, a high index of suspicion and histopathologic examination, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  14. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  15. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Lefort, Thibaud; D'hombres, Anne; Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain; Mornex, Francoise

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  16. Multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma) in a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius): morphopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Khordadmehr, M

    2011-11-01

    During postslaughter inspection of a 4-year-old male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), numerous small nodules to large masses up to 4 cm in diameter were found on the serosal surfaces of forestomachs, large intestines, mesentery, liver, and spleen. Grossly, the masses were discrete, round, smooth, and white to gray that bulged from the serosal layer. Cut surfaces of the masses were discrete, round, white, and relatively homogeneous without any necrotic foci. Histopathologically, the masses were encapsulated and composed of a mixture of round and spindle-shaped cells in loose whorls of neoplastic cells with small elongated hyperchromatic wavy nuclei and a small amount of pale eosinophilic, poorly defined cytoplasm. Masson's trichrome staining showed mild amounts of collagen fibers forming an irregular, loose stroma. In immunohistochemistry, immunoreactivity for the Schwann cell marker (S100) was diffusely positive in the neoplastic cells. The immunoreactivity for CK, c-kit, and CD34 were negative. Ultrastructural examination confirmed the tumor was entirely formed of neoplastic Schwann cells. On the basis of the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings, the tumors were diagnosed as multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma). This tumor has not been previously recorded in camel worldwide.

  17. Photothermal therapy improves the efficacy of a MEK inhibitor in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Elizabeth E.; Burga, Rachel A.; Li, Chaoyang; Zhu, Yuan; Fernandes, Rohan

    2016-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive tumors with low survival rates and the leading cause of death in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients under 40 years old. Surgical resection is the standard of care for MPNSTs, but is often incomplete and can generate loss of function, necessitating the development of novel treatment methods for this patient population. Here, we describe a novel combination therapy comprising MEK inhibition and nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy (PTT) for MPNSTs. MEK inhibitors block activity driven by Ras, an oncogene constitutively activated in NF1-associated MPNSTs, while PTT serves as a minimally invasive method to ablate cancer cells. Our rationale for combining these seemingly disparate techniques for MPNSTs is based on several reports demonstrating the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy with local PTT. We combine the MEK inhibitor, PD-0325901 (PD901), with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as PTT agents, to block MEK activity and simultaneously ablate MPNSTs. Our data demonstrate the synergistic effect of combining PD901 with PBNP-based PTT, which converge through the Ras pathway to generate apoptosis, necrosis, and decreased proliferation, thereby mitigating tumor growth and increasing survival of MPNST-bearing animals. Our results suggest the potential of this novel local-systemic combination “nanochemotherapy” for treating patients with MPNSTs.

  18. Combinatorial therapeutic targeting of BMP2 and MEK-ERK pathways in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Sidra; Ge, Yubin; Tainsky, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is challenging not only due to its aggressive and invasive nature, but also limited therapeutic options. Using gene expression profiling, our lab identified BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating MPNSTs. In this study, we explored the therapeutic impact of targeting BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway in conjunction with RAS-MEK-ERK signaling, which is constitutively activated in MPNSTs. Our results indicated that single agent treatment with LDN-193189, a BMP2 Type I receptor inhibitor, did not affect the growth and survival of MPNST cells at biochemically relevant inhibitory concentrations. However, addition of a MEK1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, to LDN-193189-treated cells resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth and induction of cell death. LDN-193189 at biochemically effective concentrations significantly inhibited motility and invasiveness of MPNST cells, and these effects were enhanced by the addition of selumetinib. Overall, our results advocate for a combinatorial therapeutic approach for MPNSTs that not only targets the growth and survival via inhibition of MEK1/2, but also its malignant spread by suppressing the activation of BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway. Importantly, these studies were conducted in low-passage patient-derived MPNST cells, allowing for an investigation of the effects of the proposed drug treatments in a biologically-relevant context. PMID:27494873

  19. Combinatorial therapeutic targeting of BMP2 and MEK-ERK pathways in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Sidra; Ge, Yubin; Tainsky, Michael A

    2016-08-30

    The clinical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is challenging not only due to its aggressive and invasive nature, but also limited therapeutic options. Using gene expression profiling, our lab identified BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating MPNSTs. In this study, we explored the therapeutic impact of targeting BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway in conjunction with RAS-MEK-ERK signaling, which is constitutively activated in MPNSTs. Our results indicated that single agent treatment with LDN-193189, a BMP2 Type I receptor inhibitor, did not affect the growth and survival of MPNST cells at biochemically relevant inhibitory concentrations. However, addition of a MEK1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, to LDN-193189-treated cells resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth and induction of cell death. LDN-193189 at biochemically effective concentrations significantly inhibited motility and invasiveness of MPNST cells, and these effects were enhanced by the addition of selumetinib. Overall, our results advocate for a combinatorial therapeutic approach for MPNSTs that not only targets the growth and survival via inhibition of MEK1/2, but also its malignant spread by suppressing the activation of BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway. Importantly, these studies were conducted in low-passage patient-derived MPNST cells, allowing for an investigation of the effects of the proposed drug treatments in a biologically-relevant context.

  20. Combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine effectively inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by targeting complementary signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C; Roth, Kevin A; Carroll, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. In addition, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis.

  1. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in the spine: a retrospective analysis of clinical and molecular prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yin, Huabin; Han, Shuai; Yang, Xinhai; Wang, Jing; Huang, Quan; Yan, Wangjun; Zhou, Wang; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-04-01

    Spinal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are relatively rare. There is little information published in the literature regarding this subject. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors that may affect the outcomes of patients with spinal MPNSTs by reviewing 43 patients with spinal MPNST who were treated in our hospital between 2001 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic variables relative to patient and tumor characteristics, treatment modality and molecules. All 43 MPNST patients (25 men and 18 women; median age 49 years) underwent surgical resection, of whom 15 patients also underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in 21 (48.8 %) patients. Twenty-two (51.2 %) patients died during the follow-up periods with a median survival time of 49 months. The 5-year recurrence and survival rate was 53 and 44 % respectively. The statistical analyses suggested that high-grade malignancy and osteolytic destruction were closely associated with recurrence and death. A total of 38 cases accepted postoperative immunohistochemisty examine. S-100 was identified as an independent factor related to both recurrence and survival, adjusting for clinical factors. In conclusion, we confirmed that malignant grade and osteolytic destruction were the two independent factors for both recurrence and survival, while patients with S-100 protein negative had a higher recurrence rate and a lower survival rate.

  2. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  3. Pediatric and adult malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program.

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Goodman, J Clay; New, Pamela; Scheurer, Michael E

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare soft tissue sarcomas that arise predominantly from Schwann cells. Despite the fact that MPNSTs have high local recurrence rates and are generally associated with poor prognosis, little is known about prognostic factors or effective clinical management for this tumor type. The purpose of this study was to describe the distributions of patient and tumor characteristics and to identify predictors of cause-specific survival among MPNST cases reported to SEER between 1973 and 2008. Patient and tumor characteristics were compared between pediatric and adult MPNST cases. Cox regression and tree-based survival analysis were used to examine factors associated with MPNST-related mortality separately among adults and children. A total of 1,315 MPNST cases were isolated from the 1973-2008 SEER dataset. Among pediatric cases, sex, race, and radiation therapy predicted MPNST survival, whereas among adults, tumor site, tumor grade, number of primary tumors, and tumor size were significant predictors. As tumor size at diagnosis/resection may be the only somewhat "modifiable" prognostic factor, future studies should aim to identify biological and social attributes associated with tumor size at diagnosis, separately among individuals with and without NF-1, in order to help identify earlier opportunities for clinical intervention.

  4. Involvement of PACAP/ADNP signaling in the resistance to cell death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells.

    PubMed

    Castorina, Alessandro; Giunta, Salvatore; Scuderi, Soraya; D'Agata, Velia

    2012-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas able to grow under conditions of metabolic stress caused by insufficient nutrients or oxygen. Both pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) have glioprotective potential. However, whether PACAP/ADNP signaling is involved in the resistance to cell death in MPNST cells remains to be clarified. Here, we investigated the involvement of this signaling system in the survival response of MPNST cells against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-evoked death both in the presence of normal serum (NS) and in serum-starved (SS) cells. Results showed that ADNP levels increased time-dependently (6-48 h) in SS cells. Treatment with PACAP38 (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) dose-dependently increased ADNP levels in NS but not in SS cells. PAC(1)/VPAC receptor antagonists completely suppressed PACAP-stimulated ADNP increase and partially reduced ADNP expression in SS cells. NS-cultured cells exposed to H(2)O(2) showed significantly reduced cell viability (~50 %), increased p53 and caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation, without affecting ADNP expression. Serum starvation significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced detrimental effects in MPNST cells, which were not further ameliorated by PACAP38. Altogether, these finding provide evidence for the involvement of an endogenous PACAP-mediated ADNP signaling system that increases MPNST cell resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced death upon serum starvation.

  5. Preclinical evaluation of the combination of mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiotherapy in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, A S; Baia, G S; Ho, J S Y; Velarde, E; Wong, J; Gallia, G L; Belzberg, A J; Kimura, E T; Riggins, G J

    2014-05-01

    About one half of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) have Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) mutations. NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene essential for negative regulation of RAS signaling. Survival for MPNST patients is poor and we sought to identify an effective combination therapy. Starting with the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin and everolimus, we screened for synergy in 542 FDA approved compounds using MPNST cells with a native NF1 loss in both alleles. We further analyzed the cell cycle and signal transduction. In vivo growth effects of the drug combination with local radiation therapy (RT) were assessed in MPNST xenografts. The synergistic combination of mTOR inhibitors with bortezomib yielded a reduction in MPNST cell proliferation. The combination of mTOR inhibitors and bortezomib also enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of radiation in vitro. In vivo, the combination of mTOR inhibitor (everolimus) and bortezomib with RT decreased tumor growth and proliferation, and augmented apoptosis. The combination of approved mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiation showed a significant reduction of tumor growth in an animal model and should be investigated and optimized further for MPNST therapy.

  6. Photothermal therapy improves the efficacy of a MEK inhibitor in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Elizabeth E.; Burga, Rachel A.; Li, Chaoyang; Zhu, Yuan; Fernandes, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive tumors with low survival rates and the leading cause of death in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients under 40 years old. Surgical resection is the standard of care for MPNSTs, but is often incomplete and can generate loss of function, necessitating the development of novel treatment methods for this patient population. Here, we describe a novel combination therapy comprising MEK inhibition and nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy (PTT) for MPNSTs. MEK inhibitors block activity driven by Ras, an oncogene constitutively activated in NF1-associated MPNSTs, while PTT serves as a minimally invasive method to ablate cancer cells. Our rationale for combining these seemingly disparate techniques for MPNSTs is based on several reports demonstrating the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy with local PTT. We combine the MEK inhibitor, PD-0325901 (PD901), with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as PTT agents, to block MEK activity and simultaneously ablate MPNSTs. Our data demonstrate the synergistic effect of combining PD901 with PBNP-based PTT, which converge through the Ras pathway to generate apoptosis, necrosis, and decreased proliferation, thereby mitigating tumor growth and increasing survival of MPNST-bearing animals. Our results suggest the potential of this novel local-systemic combination “nanochemotherapy” for treating patients with MPNSTs. PMID:27833160

  7. [Diagnostic difficulties in the laryngeal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Woźniak, Aldona; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Witold

    2004-01-01

    The malignant tumor deriving from the peripheral nerve sheet, previously described as malignant Schwannoma or neurosarcoma is extremely rare as malignancy localized in the larynx. The half of cases has been developing on the basis of neurofibromatosis in von Recklinghausen disease type I or seldom, type II. The high grade of malignancy end tendency to reccurences and distant metastases is typical for this tumors. The case of 64 year old man with larynx neurosarcoma was presented. The diagnostic difficulties were caused by clinical presentation of the smooth tumor covered by unchanged mucosa and typical histological features of the tumor. The final histological assessment was complemented by positive immunohistochemical reaction (antigens against protein S-100, NSE and PG 9.5).

  8. Modelling the effects of electric fields on nerve fibres: influence of the myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A G; McIntyre, C C; Grill, W M

    2000-07-01

    The excitation and conduction properties of computer-based cable models of mammalian motor nerve fibres, incorporating three different myelin representations, are compared. The three myelin representations are a perfectly insulating single cable (model A), a finite impedance single cable (model B) and a finite impedance double cable (model C). Extracellular stimulation of the three models is used to study their strength-duration and current-distance (I-X) relationships, conduction velocity (CV) and action potential shape. All three models have a chronaxie time that is within the experimental range. Models B and C have increased threshold currents compared with model A, but each model has slope to the I-X relationship that matches experimental results. Model B has a CV that matches experimental data, whereas the CV of models A and C are above and below the experimental range, respectively. Model C is able to produce a depolarising afterpotential (DAP), whereas models A and B exhibit hyperpolarising afterpotentials. Models A and B are determined to be the preferred models when low-frequency stimulation (< approximately 25 Hz) is used, owing to their efficiency and accurate excitation and conduction properties. For high frequency stimulation (approximately 25 Hz and greater), model C, with its ability to produce a DAP, is necessary accurately to simulate excitation behaviour.

  9. Intraoperative monitoring during decompression of the spinal cord and spinal nerves using transcranial motor-evoked potentials: The law of twenty percent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirao, Jun; Oka, Hidehiro; Akimoto, Jiro; Takanashi, Junko; Yamada, Junichi

    2015-09-01

    Motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring was performed during 196 consecutive spinal (79 cervical and 117 lumbar) surgeries for the decompression of compressive spinal and spinal nerve diseases. MEP monitoring in spinal surgery has been considered sensitive to predict postoperative neurological recovery. In this series, transcranial stimulation consisted of trains of five pulses at a constant voltage (200-600 V). For the normalization of MEP, we recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) after peripheral nerve stimulation, usually on the median nerve at the wrist 2 seconds before or after each transcranial stimulation of the motor area, for all operations. The sensitivity and specificity of MEP monitoring was 100% and 97.4%, respectively, or 96.9% with or without CMAP compensation (if the threshold of postoperative motor palsy was defined as 20% relative amplitude rate [RAR]). The mean RAR after CMAP normalization, of the most affected muscle in the patient group with excellent postoperative results (recovery rate of a Japan Orthopedic Association score of more than 50%) was significantly higher than that in the other groups (p=0.0224). All patients with an amplitude increase rate (AIR) with CMAP normalization of more than 20% achieved neurological recovery postoperatively. Our results suggest that if the RAR is more than 20%, postoperative motor palsy can be avoided in spinal surgery. If the AIR with normalization by CMAP after peripheral nerve stimulation is more than 20%, neurological recovery can be expected in spinal surgery.

  10. Optimal optic nerve sheath diameter threshold for the identification of elevated opening pressure on lumbar puncture in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Feng, Liangshu; Yao, Yan; Wang, Yuzhi; Chen, Ying; Feng, Jiachun; Xing, Yingqi

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is a non-invasive and rapid method that might be helpful in the identification of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). The use of an ONSD greater than 5 mm on ultrasound as an indicator of increased ICP in a Caucasian population has been studied. However, the cut-off point of this predictor in Chinese patients has not been established. Thus, we conducted this study to identify the ONSD criterion for the detection of elevated opening pressure on lumbar puncture (LP) in a Chinese population and to investigate the influencing factors. This study was a blind cross-sectional study. Patients who presented with suspected increased ICP were included. The opening pressure on LP of each participant was confirmed. We analyzed the clinical differences between the groups of patients with abnormal and normal opening pressures on LP. A receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed to determine the ONSD cut-off point for the identification of abnormal opening pressure on LP. In total, 279 patients were recruited, and 101 patients presented with elevated opening pressure on LP. ONSD was a significant independent predictor of elevated opening pressure on LP (p<0.001). However, no statistical significance was observed regarding the factors that might have affected this relationship including gender, age, body mass index, waistline, head circumference, hypertension and pathological subtype. The ONSD cut-off point for the identification of elevated opening pressure on LP was 4.1 mm; this cut-off yielded a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92%. ONSD is a strong and accurate predictor of elevated opening pressure on LP. The cut-off point of this predictor in a Chinese population was remarkably lower than that found in a Caucasian population. Thus, ethnic differences should be noted when using the ONSD as an indicator of increased ICP.

  11. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising in diffuse-type neurofibroma: clinicopathologic characterization in a series of 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Fletcher, Christopher D M

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse-type neurofibroma, an uncommon variant of neurofibroma, is associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 in ∼60% of cases. Typically presenting in young adults as ill-defined plaque-like dermal/subcutaneous thickening, most cases are located on the trunk or the head and neck region. Malignant transformation is extremely rare. Nine cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising in diffuse-type neurofibroma (identified in consult files) are described, including clinicopathologic features and follow-up. Five patients were male and 4 female, aged 31 to 59 years (median 49 y). All diffuse-type neurofibromas contained Meissner corpuscles, with tumor sizes ranging between 3.6 and 45 cm (median, 7.4 cm). Five patients had a clinical history of neurofibromatosis type 1, and 1 had Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome. Six tumors arose on the trunk and 1 each on the leg, arm, and scalp. Increased cellularity, nuclear atypia, and mitoses (range, 1 to 63/50 high-power fields) indicated transition to MPNST, classified as low grade in 5, intermediate to high grade in 1, and high grade in 3 cases, 1 of which exhibited heterologous angiosarcomatous differentiation. S-100 expression was quite strong and diffuse in the neurofibroma components and less extensive or weaker in MPNST. Follow-up, available for all patients (median, 80.5 mo, except 1 recent case), revealed that 1 patient developed local recurrence after 9 months; 1 with metastases at the time of initial diagnosis died 1 month after tumor resection. All other patients were alive without evidence of disease at 15 to 145 months (median, 83 mo). Diffuse-type neurofibroma may show transformation to MPNST in very rare instances. It is important to be aware of possible malignant change, requiring thorough sampling of resection specimens and long-term clinical follow-up of patients with unexcised lesions.

  12. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition induces anti-proliferative effect in NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hivelin, Mikael; Nusbaum, Patrick; Hubas, Arnaud; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Lantieri, Laurent; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Vidaud, Michel; Pasmant, Eric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Parfait, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30-50% of individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 develop benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). PNFs can undergo malignant transformation to highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in 5-10% of NF1 patients, with poor prognosis. No effective systemic therapy is currently available for unresectable tumors. In tumors, the NF1 gene deficiency leads to Ras hyperactivation causing the subsequent activation of the AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and inducing multiple cellular responses including cell proliferation. In this study, three NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines (90-8, 88-14 and 96-2), STS26T sporadic MPNST cell line and PNF-derived primary Schwann cells were used to test responses to AZD8055, an ATP-competitive “active-site” mTOR inhibitor. In contrast to rapamycin treatment which only partially affected mTORC1 signaling, AZD8055 induced a strong inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in MPNST-derived cell lines and PNF-derived Schwann cells. AZD8055 induced full blockade of mTORC1 leading to an efficient decrease of global protein synthesis. A higher cytotoxic effect was observed with AZD8055 compared to rapamycin in the NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines with IC50 ranging from 70 to 140 nM and antiproliferative effect was confirmed in PNF-derived Schwann cells. Cell migration was impaired by AZD8055 treatment and cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest. Combined effects of AZD8055 and PD0325901 MEK inhibitor as well as BRD4 (BromoDomain-containing protein 4) inhibitors showed a synergistic antiproliferative effect. These data suggest that NF1-associated peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an ideal target for AZD8055 as a single molecule or in combined therapies. PMID:26840085

  13. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition induces anti-proliferative effect in NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Varin, Jennifer; Poulain, Laury; Hivelin, Mikael; Nusbaum, Patrick; Hubas, Arnaud; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Lantieri, Laurent; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Vidaud, Michel; Pasmant, Eric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Parfait, Béatrice

    2016-06-14

    Approximately 30-50% of individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 develop benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). PNFs can undergo malignant transformation to highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in 5-10% of NF1 patients, with poor prognosis. No effective systemic therapy is currently available for unresectable tumors. In tumors, the NF1 gene deficiency leads to Ras hyperactivation causing the subsequent activation of the AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and inducing multiple cellular responses including cell proliferation. In this study, three NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines (90-8, 88-14 and 96-2), STS26T sporadic MPNST cell line and PNF-derived primary Schwann cells were used to test responses to AZD8055, an ATP-competitive "active-site" mTOR inhibitor. In contrast to rapamycin treatment which only partially affected mTORC1 signaling, AZD8055 induced a strong inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in MPNST-derived cell lines and PNF-derived Schwann cells. AZD8055 induced full blockade of mTORC1 leading to an efficient decrease of global protein synthesis. A higher cytotoxic effect was observed with AZD8055 compared to rapamycin in the NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines with IC50 ranging from 70 to 140 nM and antiproliferative effect was confirmed in PNF-derived Schwann cells. Cell migration was impaired by AZD8055 treatment and cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest. Combined effects of AZD8055 and PD0325901 MEK inhibitor as well as BRD4 (BromoDomain-containing protein 4) inhibitors showed a synergistic antiproliferative effect. These data suggest that NF1-associated peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an ideal target for AZD8055 as a single molecule or in combined therapies.

  14. Somatostatin Receptor SPECT/CT using 99mTc Labeled HYNIC-TOC Aids in Diagnosis of Primary Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare, benign and slow growing tumor involving the intra-orbital/intra-canalicular segment of the optic nerve. Untreated, they can potentially lead to visual deterioration. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing the entity. Often, a clinical dilemma exists to narrow the differential diagnosis of an enhancing intra-orbital mass on MR. Molecular imaging provides a high degree of precision in diagnosing meningioma in view of relatively high levels of somatostatin receptor expression by these tumors. The following case demonstrates the potential clinical utility of somatostatin receptor SPECT using 99mTc- labeled HYNIC-TOC in clinical diagnosis of ONSM. PMID:28242992

  15. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  16. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival Via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brossier, Nicole M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators, (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  17. Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on the Sonographic Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter as a Surrogate for Intracranial Pressure during Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Wook-Jong; Lee, Joonho; Han, Yun A.; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Cho, Seong-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can increase intracranial pressure. Pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position are associated with an increased intracranial pressure. We investigated whether PEEP ventilation could additionally influence the sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter as a surrogate for intracranial pressure during pneumoperitoneum combined with the Trendelenburg position in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Methods After anesthetic induction, 38 patients were randomly allocated to a low tidal volume ventilation (8 ml/kg) without PEEP group (zero end-expiratory pressure [ZEEP] group, n = 19) or low tidal volume ventilation with 8 cmH2O PEEP group (PEEP group, n = 19). The sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter was measured prior to skin incision, 5 min and 30 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position, and at the end of surgery. The study endpoint was the difference in the sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter 5 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position between the ZEEP and PEEP groups. Results Optic nerve sheath diameters 5 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position did not significantly differ between the groups [least square mean (95% confidence interval); 4.8 (4.6–4.9) mm vs 4.8 (4.7–5.0) mm, P = 0.618]. Optic nerve sheath diameters 30 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position also did not differ between the groups [least square mean (95% confidence interval); 4.5 (4.3–4.6) mm vs 4.5 (4.4–4.6) mm, P = 0.733]. Conclusions An 8 cmH2O PEEP application under low tidal volume ventilation does not induce an increase in the optic nerve sheath diameter during pneumoperitoneum combined with the steep Trendelenburg position, suggesting that there might be no detrimental effects of PEEP on the intracranial pressure during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02516566 PMID:28107408

  18. Comprehensive adipocytic and neurogenic tissue microarray analysis of NY-ESO-1 expression - a promising immunotherapy target in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shurell, Elizabeth; Vergara-Lluri, Maria E.; Li, Yunfeng; Crompton, Joseph G.; Singh, Arun; Bernthal, Nicholas; Wu, Hong; Eilber, Fritz C.; Dry, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy targeting cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 shows promise for tumors with poor response to chemoradiation. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and liposarcomas (LPS) are chemoresistant and have few effective treatment options. Materials Methods Using a comprehensive tissue microarray (TMA) of both benign and malignant tumors in primary, recurrent, and metastatic samples, we examined NY-ESO-1 expression in peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) and adipocytic tumors. The PNST TMA included 42 MPNSTs (spontaneous n = 26, NF1-associated n = 16), 35 neurofibromas (spontaneous n = 22, NF-1 associated n = 13), 11 schwannomas, and 18 normal nerves. The LPS TMA included 48 well-differentiated/dedifferentiated (WD/DD) LPS, 13 myxoid/round cell LPS, 3 pleomorphic LPS, 8 lipomas, 1 myelolipoma, and 3 normal adipocytic tissue samples. Stained in triplicate, NY-ESO-1 intensity and density were scored. Results NY-ESO-1 expression was exclusive to malignant tumors. 100% of myxoid/round cell LPS demonstrated NY-ESO-1 expression, while only 6% of WD/DD LPS showed protein expression, one of which was WD LPS. Of MPNST, 4/26 (15%) spontaneous and 2/16 (12%) NF1-associated MPNSTs demonstrated NY-ESO-1 expression. Strong NY-ESO-1 expression was observed in myxoid/round cell and dedifferentiated LPS, and MPNST in primary, neoadjuvant, and metastatic settings. Conclusions We found higher prevalence of NY-ESO-1 expression in MPNSTs than previously reported, highlighting a subset of MPNST patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. This study expands our understanding of NY-ESO-1 in WD/DD LPS and is the first demonstration of staining in a WD LPS and metastatic/recurrent myxoid/round cell LPS. These results suggest immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1 may benefit patients with aggressive tumors resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:27655679

  19. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    sheath tumors or plexiform neurofibromas. References: Perrin GQ, Fishbein L, Thomson SA, et al., Plexiform-like neurofibromas develop in the...mouse by intraneural xenograft of an NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line. J Neurosci Res, 2007. 85(6): p. 1347-1357. 3 Perrin GQ, Li H, Fishbein L

  20. Characterizing the immune microenvironment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor by PD-L1 expression and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun S.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Jensen, Sarah; Li, Yunfeng; Dry, Sarah; Nelson, Scott; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Bernthal, Nicholas; Federman, Noah; Tumeh, Paul; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an aggressive sarcoma with few treatment options. Tumor immune state has not been characterized in MPNST, and is important in determining response to immune checkpoint blockade. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in MPNST, and correlate these findings with clinical behavior and outcome. Results PD-L1 staining of at least 1% was seen in 0/20 nerves, 2/68 benign lesions and 9/53 MPNST. Two of 68 benign lesions and 7/53 (13%) MPNST had at least 5% PD-L1 staining. CD8 staining of at least 5% was seen in 1/20 (5%) nerves, 45/68 (66%) benign lesions and 30/53 (57%) MPNST. PD-L1 was statistically more prevalent in MPNST than both nerves and benign lesions (p=0.049 and p=0.008, respectively). Expression of PD-1 was absent in all tissue specimens. There was no correlation of PD-L1 or CD8 expression with disease state (primary versus metastatic) or patient survival. Methods A comprehensive PNST tissue microarray was created from 141 surgical specimens including primary, recurrent, and metastatic MPNST (n=53), neurofibromas (n=57), schwannoma (n=11), and normal nerve (n=20). Cores were stained in triplicate for PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8, and expression compared between tumor types. These data were then examined for survival correlates in 35 patients with primary MPNST. Conclusions MPNST is characterized by low PD-L1 and absent PD-1 expression with significant CD8+ TIL presence. MPNST immune microenvironment does not correlate with patient outcome. PMID:27588404

  1. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin-tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  2. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-02-23

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development-a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  3. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development—a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  4. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Hirbe, Angela C; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M; Clapp, D Wade; Gutmann, David H

    2016-02-16

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ~60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1(flox/flox) mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ~70% of Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1(flox/null) mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/- stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy.

  5. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    povidone-iodine swabs or gauzes. 70% alcohol swab or gauze is used to remove the remaining povidone-iodine from the skin. ~100μL 1% lidocaine is...site. A few drops of lidocaine are dropped on the nerve. A 34 Gauge fused silica (WPI) cannula is inserted at a sharp angle (~10°) along the nerve...remove the remaining povidone-iodine from the skin. ~100μL 1% lidocaine is injected along the incision line to ensure adequate analgesia. A 15mm dorsal

  6. Sacrotuberous Ligament Healing following Surgical Division during Transgluteal Pudendal Nerve Decompression: A 3-Tesla MR Neurography Study

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jan; Fritz, Benjamin; Dellon, A. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic pain due to chronic pudendal nerve (PN) compression, when treated surgically, is approached with a transgluteal division of the sacrotuberous ligament (STL). Controversy exists as to whether the STL heals spontaneously or requires grafting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine how surgically divided and unrepaired STL heal. A retrospective evaluation of 10 patients who had high spatial resolution 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) exams of the pelvis was done using an IRB-approved protocol. Each patient was referred for residual pelvic pain after a transgluteal STL division for chronic pudendal nerve pain. Of the 10 patients, 8 had the STL divided and not repaired, while 2 had the STL divided and reconstructed with an allograft tendon. Of the 8 that were left unrepaired, 6 had bilateral surgery. Outcome variables included STL integrity and thickness. Normative data for the STL were obtained through a control group of 20 subjects. STL integrity and thickness were measured directly on 3 T MR Neurography images, by two independent Radiologists. The integrity and thickness of the post-surgical STL was evaluated 39 months (range, 9–55) after surgery. Comparison was made with the native contra-lateral STL in those who had unilateral STL division, and with normal, non-divided STL of subjects of the control group. The normal STL measured 3 mm (minimum and maximum of absolute STL thickness, 2–3 mm). All post-operative STL were found to be continuous regardless of the surgical technique used. Measured at level of Alcock’s canal in the same plane as the obturator internus tendon posterior to the ischium, the mean anteroposterior STL diameter was 5 mm (range, 4–5 mm) in the group of prior STL division without repair and 8 mm (range, 8–9 mm) in the group with the STL reconstructed with grafts (p<0.05). The group of healed STLs were significantly thicker than the normal STL (p<0.05). We conclude that a surgically divided STL will heal

  7. Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration Associated with NF1 Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Infiltrating peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are associated with significant neurological deficits and nerve damage. An initial aim of this project is...nerve graft implanted to bridge the gap and restore nerve continuity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS peripheral nerve sheath tumor, neurofibroma, photodynamic...7 1 INTRODUCTION Infiltrating   peripheral  nerve  sheath  tumors  (PNST

  8. A novel NF1 mutation in a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tong, H-X; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, J; Lu, W-Q

    2012-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; OMIM#162200) is a common neurocutaneous disorder that is characterized by multiple café-au-lait, skinfold freckling, Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. Mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the neurofibromin protein, have been identified as the pathogenic gene of NF1. In this study, we present a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait in NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body, axillary freckling, and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas. He also had a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormalities. The germline mutational analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 13. It is a novel heterozygous nucleotide G>A transition at position 2241 of the NF1 gene. We found no mutation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor DNA from this patient. This expands the database for NF1 gene mutations in NF1. Its absence in the normal chromosomes suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of giant café-au-lait macule in NF1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

  9. The Challenge of Cancer Genomics in Rare Nervous System Neoplasms: Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors as a Paradigm for Cross-Species Comparative Oncogenomics.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive genomic analyses of common nervous system cancers provide new insights into their pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Although analogous studies of rare nervous system tumors are needed, there are major barriers to performing such studies. Cross-species comparative oncogenomics, identifying driver mutations in mouse cancer models and validating them in human tumors, is a promising alternative. Although still in its infancy, this approach is being applied to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), rare Schwann cell-derived malignancies that occur sporadically, after radiotherapy, and in neurofibromatosis type 1. Studies of human neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumors suggest that NF1 tumor suppressor loss in Schwann cells triggers cell-autonomous and intercellular changes, resulting in development of benign neurofibromas; subsequent neurofibroma-MPNST progression is caused by aberrant growth factor signaling and mutations affecting the p16(INK4A)-cyclin D1-CDK4-Rb and p19(ARF)-Mdm2-p53 cell cycle pathways. Mice with Nf1, Trp53, and/or Cdkn2a mutations that overexpress the Schwann cell mitogen neuregulin-1 or overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor validate observations in human tumors and, to various degrees, model human tumorigenesis. Genomic analyses of MPNSTs arising in neuregulin-1 and epidermal growth factor receptor-overexpressing mice and forward genetic screens with Sleeping Beauty transposons implicate additional signaling cascades in MPNST pathogenesis. These studies confirm the utility of mouse models for MPNST driver gene discovery and provide new insights into the complexity of MPNST pathogenesis.

  10. EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 pathway regulates malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour cell survival and tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingyu; Garnett, Jeannine; Creighton, Chad J; Al Sannaa, Ghadah Abbas; Igram, Davis R; Lazar, Alexander; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Changgong; Pollock, Raphael E

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs), which develop sporadically or from neurofibromatosis, recur frequently with high metastatic potential and poor outcome. The polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) is an important regulator for various human malignancies. However, the function of EZH2 in MPNSTs is unknown. Here we report that the EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 signalling pathway is critical for MPNST tumour cell survival in vitro and tumourigenicity in vivo. Up-regulated EZH2 in MPNST inhibits miR-30d transcription via promoter binding activity, leading to enhanced expression of the nuclear transport receptor KPNB1 that is inhibited by miR-30d targeting of KPNB1 3' UTR region. Furthermore, inhibition of EZH2 or KPNB1, or miR-30d over-expression, induces MPNST cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumourigenesis in vivo. More importantly, forced over-expression of KPNB1 rescues MPNST cell apoptosis induced by EZH2 knockdown. Immunohistochemical analyses show that EZH2 and KPNB1 over-expression is observed in human MPNST specimens and is negatively associated with miR-30d expression. Our findings identify a novel signalling pathway involved in MPNST tumourigenesis, and also suggest that EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 signalling represents multiple potential therapeutic targetable nodes for MPNST.

  11. TAGLN expression is upregulated in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by hypomethylation in its promoter and subpromoter regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Hoo; Lee, Su-Jin; Yim, Hyunee; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyon J; Sohn, Young-Bae; Ko, Jung Min; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2014-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) caused by NF1 gene mutation is a commonly inherited autosomal dominant disorder. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), a type of aggressive sarcoma, are a major cause of mortality in NF1 patients. The malignant transformation of benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) to MPNSTs is a marked peculiarity in NF1 patients, yet the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We found that an actin-associated protein transgelin (SM22) was highly expressed in NF1-deficient MPNST tissues compared to NF1-deficient PN tissues using immunohistological staining and primary cultured MPNST cells in western blot analysis. We further found that this transgelin upregulation was caused by increased transcriptional expression of the TAGLN gene encoding transgelin. Comparison of DNA methylation values in the promoter and subpromoter regions of the TAGLN gene in three types of NF1-deficient primary-cultured cells, derived from an NF1 patient's normal phenotype, a benign PN and MPNST tissues, revealed that the TAGLN gene was hypomethylated in the MPNST cells. Next, to determine the functional role of transgelin in MPNST pathogenesis, we manipulated the TAGLN gene expression and investigated the alteration of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the normal-phenotypic and malignant tumor cells. The downregulation of TAGLN expression in NF1-deficient MPNST tumor cells through the treatment of the small interfering RNA resulted in a decrease in the RAS activation (GTP-RAS) and the downstream ERK1/2 activation (phosphorylated ERK1/2), while the overexpression of TAGLN in normal-phenotypic NF1-deficient cells caused an increase in RAS and ERK1/2 activation. These results indicate that upregulation of transgelin caused by hypomethylation of the TAGLN gene is closely involved in tumor progression in NF1.

  12. Protein expression of BIRC5, TK1, and TOP2A in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours--A prognostic test after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Matthias; Høland, Maren; Lind, Guro E; Ågesen, Trude H; Skotheim, Rolf I; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Mandahl, Nils; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Mertens, Fredrik; Davidson, Ben; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2015-06-01

    No consensus treatment regime exists beyond surgery for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), and the purpose of the present study was to find new approaches to stratify patients with good and poor prognosis and to better guide therapeutic intervention for this aggressive soft tissue cancer. From a total of 67 MPNSTs from Scandinavian patients with and without neurofibromatosis type 1, 30 MPNSTs were investigated by genome-wide RNA expression profiling and 63 MPNSTs by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis, and selected genes were submitted to analyses of disease-specific survival. The potential drug target genes survivin (BIRC5), thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), and topoisomerase 2-alpha (TOP2A), all encoded on chromosome arm 17q, were up-regulated in MPNST as compared to benign neurofibromas. Each of them was found to be independent prognostic markers on the gene expression level, as well as on the protein level. A prognostic profile was identified by combining the nuclear expression scores of the three proteins. For patients with completely resected tumours only 15% in the high risk group were alive after two years, as compared to 78% in the low risk group. In conclusion, we found a novel protein expression profile which identifies MPNST patients with inferior prognosis even after assumed curative surgery. The tested proteins are drug targets; therefore the expression profile may provide predictive information guiding the design of future clinical trials. Importantly, as the effect is seen on the protein level using IHC, the biomarker panel can be readily implemented in routine clinical testing.

  13. Decompression Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-25

    new experiments at 30 m ( 4 ATA) is appropriate for comparing N2 and He with respect to half times and surfacing ratios. Table 4 demonstrates the...THEORY C4 i t44 4 ’I9 41-*1 ai4 p80 7 10 009 UM"tUBNC*nm N4MDOf 29WS (DT) 6-25-80 The Seventeenth Undersea Medical Society Workshop DECOMPRESSION...Hamilton, Jr., Ph.D. Edward L Beckman, M.D. Hamilton Research Ltd. University of Hawaii 80 Grove Street School of Medicine Tarrytown, New York 10591

  14. Endoscopic Decompression of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Release of the Plantar Aponeurosis for Chronic Heel Pain.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve is a commonly missed cause of recalcitrant plantar heel pain. The diagnosis is made on a clinical ground with maximal tenderness at the site of nerve entrapment. Treatment of the nerve entrapment is similar to that for plantar fasciitis, with rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stretching exercise, and local steroid injection. Surgical release of the deep abductor hallucis fascia is indicated when conservative treatment failed. Endoscopic release of the nerve through the dorsal and plantar portals, as well as endoscopic plantar aponeurosis release, is a feasible approach.

  15. Optic nerve sheath diameter threshold by ocular ultrasonography for detection of increased intracranial pressure in Korean adult patients with brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Un; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Lee, Hannah; Han, Jung Ho; Seo, Mingu; Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Cho, Won-Sang; Ryu, Ho Geol; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Jang, Kyung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) seen on ocular US has been associated with increased intracranial pressure (IICP). However, most studies have analyzed normal range of ONSD and its optimal cut-off point for IICP in Caucasian populations. Considering ONSD differences according to ethnicity, previous results may not accurately reflect the association between IICP and ONSD in Koreans. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate normal range of ONSD and its optimal threshold for detecting IICP in Korean patients. This prospective multicenter study was performed for patients with suspected IICP. ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe using a 13-MHz US probe. IICP was defined as significant brain edema, midline shift, compression of ventricle or basal cistern, effacement of sulci, insufficient gray/white differentiation, and transfalcine herniation by radiologic tests. The results of the ONSD are described as the median (25th–75th percentile). The differences of ONSD according to disease entity were analyzed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to determine the optimal cut-off point for identifying IICP. A total of 134 patients were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups as follows: patients with IICP, n = 81 (60.5%); patients without IICP, n = 27 (20.1%); and control group, n = 26 (19.4%). ONSD in patients with IICP (5.9 mm [5.8–6.2]) is significantly higher than those without IICP (5.2 mm [4.8–5.4]) (P < 0.01) and normal control group (4.9 mm [4.6–5.2]) (P < 0.001). Between patients without IICP and normal control group, the difference of ONSD did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.31). ONSD >5.5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 98.77% (95% CI: 93.3%–100%) and a specificity of 85.19% (95% CI: 66.3%–95.8%). In conclusion, the optimal cut-off point of ONSD for identifying IICP was 5.5 mm. ONSD seen on ocular US can be a feasible method for detection and serial monitoring of ICP in

  16. NF1 deficiency causes Bcl-xL upregulation in Schwann cells derived from neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Jin; Lee, Su-Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Jin, Hyun-Seok; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Young-Bae; Yim, Hyunee; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2013-02-01

    Since the bi-allelic inactivation of both neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene alleles (NF1(-/-)) in Schwann cells (SCs) is common in both benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), other genetic alterations in SCs may be required for tumor progression of PNs to MPNSTs. We found that the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein is upregulated in MPNST tissues compared to PN tissues from patients with NF1 by immunohistological staining. In addition, we investigated whether Bcl-xL is upregulated in SCs derived from MPNSTs and found a significantly higher Bcl-xL expression level in sNF96.2 MPNST-derived SCs compared to normal human SCs (HSCs). We also discovered that the increased Bcl-xL expression caused an increase in drug resistance to doxorubicin in MPNST-derived SCs. Manipulation of NF1 gene expression levels by treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpression of the neurofibromin GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD) demonstrated that upregulated Bcl-xL expression in MPNST-derived SCs was caused by NF1 deficiency. Treatment with the Erk1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, resulted in a slight increase in Bcl-xL levels in neurofibromin-depleted normal HSCs, indicating that Bcl-xL upregulation in MPNST-derived SCs is mediated by activated Erk1/2, which is a Ras downstream protein regulated by neurofibromin. As the reduction of Bcl-xL expression restored sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, we examined the effect of the small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 on sNF96.2 cells. A very low dose of ABT-737 combined with doxorubicin synergistically enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, suggesting that ABT-737 and doxorubicin may be a good combination to effectively treat NF1-associated MPNSTs with minimal side-effects. Collectively, our results suggest that upregulation of Bcl-xL in MPNST-derived SCs may be caused by the NF1 deficiency

  17. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop in patients with underlying NF1, and usually arise as a result of malignant transformation of a pre-existing plexiform neurofibroma. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities reported in primary MPNST include complex karyotypes with chromosome numbers in the triploid or tetraploid range with recurrent abnormalities of several chromosomes including losses or imbalances. As a prelude to cell biological, pharmacological, and functional studies to investigate pathways and gene(s) associated with multistep tumorigenesis, which includes progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy in MPNST, detailed molecular cytogenetic and genetic analyses of cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent MPNST with underlying NF1 disorder have been performed. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities detected in the primary tumor cell line were similar to those observed in primary cultures of this tumor. Due to the complexity of the rearrangements seen by G-banded karyotype analysis, further characterization of the clonal abnormalities in these three cell lines was performed by molecular cytogenetic techniques, including CGH and SKY. CGH analysis detected recurrent deletions of 9p, 12q21-q32, complete losses of the X-chromosome, and gains of the chromosomal segment 17q25 in all three cell lines. SKY analysis detected extensive clonal abnormalities in these cell lines. The nature and the alterations of the cell cycle regulators, particularly those associated with G1-S checkpoints and known to be deregulated in MPNST, were studied. These cell cycle regulators included those associated with Rb1-cyclin D1 and the p53 pathways. The findings are consistent with the argument that an imbalance between the cyclin activators of CDKs and inhibitory proteins such as p16 result in uncontrollable proliferation in the cell lines, associated with progression of the disease. LOH and expression of the p53 gene in metastatic and recurrent cell

  18. Endoscopically Assisted Anterior Subcutaneous Transposition of Ulnar Nerve.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Ulnar nerve compression at the elbow is the most common neuropathy of the upper extremity. Surgical options include in situ decompression, decompression with anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve, and medial epicondylectomy with or without decompression. With the advancement of endoscopic surgery, techniques of endoscopic in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve and endoscopic anterior transposition of ulnar nerve have been reported. This article describes a technique of endoscopically assisted anterior subcutaneous transposition of ulnar nerve that is composed of an open release and mobilization of the ulnar nerve at and distal to the cubital tunnel and endoscopic release and mobilization of the ulnar nerve proximal to the cubital tunnel.

  19. The effects of tumor location on diagnostic criteria for canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and the markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and canine perivascular wall tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-07-01

    Canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) occur not only in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but also in soft tissue and various organs (non-PNS). The most important diagnostic criterion is proof of peripheral nerve sheath origin. This is difficult in non-PNS MPNSTs, and its differential diagnosis is challenging. Canine perivascular wall tumors (PWTs) also commonly arise in soft tissue. Their histopathological features are quite similar to those of canine MPNSTs, making their differential diagnosis challenging. To elucidate whether the morphological features are applicable to diagnose non-PNS MPNSTs and to demonstrate useful markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and PWTs, the authors examined 30 canine MPNSTs and 31 PWTs immunohistochemically for S100, nestin, NGFR, Olig2, claudin-1, CD57, PRX, α-SMA, desmin, and calponin. Among canine MPNSTs, the PNS tumors displayed significantly higher S100 and Olig2 expression than the non-PNS tumors. The expression levels of the other markers did not differ significantly, suggesting that the same morphological diagnostic criteria are applicable regardless of their location. The PWT cells displayed significantly weaker immunoreactivity than MPNSTs to markers used except α-SMA and desmin. Cluster analysis sorted most canine MPNSTs and PWTs into 2 distinctly different clusters, whereas 3 MPNSTs and 6 PWTs were assigned to the opposing cluster. These 3 MPNSTs were negative for almost all markers, while these 6 PWTs were positive for only neuronal markers. In particular, NGFR and Olig2 were almost negative in the rest of PWT cases. These findings suggest that NGFR and Olig2 are useful to distinguish these 2 tumors.

  20. Nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness after posterior decompression.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Hideaki; Toyoda, Kouichiro; Kawai, Shinya

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded intraoperatively following nerve root stimulation in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A total of 19 upper limbs in 12 patients aged 55-72 years (mean, 65.5 years) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined. CMAPs were recorded from deltoid and biceps brachii muscle following C5 and C6 root stimulation. Although both C5 and C6 roots were innervated for deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in all subjects, the amplitude ratio of CMAPs (C5/C6) differed individually depending on the symptomatic intervertebral levels of the spinal cord. The C5 root predominantly innervated both deltoid and biceps brachii in patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C4-C5 intervertebral level compared to patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C5-C6 intervertebral level. Although no patients sustained postoperative radiculopathy in our study, severe weakness and unfavorable recovery are expected when the C5 root in patients with C4-C5 myelopathy is damaged. From the electrophysiological aspect, C4-C5 cord lesions are likely to be a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness in patients with compressive cervical myelopathy.

  1. Pre-Operative Image-based Segmentation of the Cranial Nerves and Blood Vessels in Microvascular Decompression: Can we Prevent Unnecessary Explorations?

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, P; Golby, A; Eichberg, D; Abolfotoh, M; Dunn, IF; Mukundan, S; Hulou, MM; Al-Mefty, O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based pre-operative segmentation using the gold standard endoscopic and microscopic findings for localization and pre-operative diagnosis of the offensive vessel. Patients and Methods Fourteen TN and 6 HS cases were randomly selected. All patients had 3T MRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE Sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet and fused. Individual segmentation of the affected cranial nerves and the compressing vascular structure was performed by a neurosurgeon, and the results were compared with the microscopic and endoscopic findings by two blinded neurosurgeons. For each case, at least three neurovascular landmarks were targeted. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe over each target, and errors of localization were measured in mm. Results All patients underwent retro-sigmoid craniotomy and MVD using both microscope and endoscope. Based on image segmentation, the compressing vessel was identified in all cases except one, which was also negative intraoperatively. Perfect correspondence was found between image-based segmentation and endoscopic and microscopic images and videos (Dice coefficient of 1). Measurement accuracy was 0.45+/-0.21 mm (mean +/-SD). Conclusion Image-based segmentation is a promising method for pre-operative identification and localization of offending blood vessels causing HFS and TN. Using this method may prevent some unnecessary explorations on especially atypical cases with no vascular contacts. However, negative pre-operative image segmentation may not preclude one from exploration in classic cases of TN or HFS. A multicenter study with larger number of cases is recommended. PMID:26476700

  2. Surgical decompression for notalgia paresthetica: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric H; Rosson, Gedge D; Elsamanoudi, Ibrahim; Dellon, A Lee

    2010-01-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a rare nerve compression. From the Greek word noton, meaning "back," and algia, meaning "pain," "notalgia paresthetica" implies that symptoms of burning pain, itching, and/or numbness in the localized region between the spinous processes of T2 through T6 and the medial border of the scapula constitute a nerve compression syndrome. The compressed nerve is the dorsal branch of the spinal nerve. It is compressed by the paraspinous muscles and fascia against the transverse process of these spinal segments. This is the first report of symptomatic relief by decompression of this nerve.

  3. Neurovascular Bundle Decompression without Excessive Dissection for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Kyongsong; ISU, Toyohiko; MORIMOTO, Daijiro; SASAMORI, Toru; SUGAWARA, Atsushi; CHIBA, Yasuhiro; ISOBE, Masahiro; KOBAYASHI, Shiro; MORITA, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel. We present our less invasive surgical treatment of TTS in 69 patients (116 feet) and their clinical outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 64.6 months. With the patient under local anesthesia we use a microscope to perform sharp dissection of the flexor retinaculum and remove the connective tissues surrounding the posterior tibial nerve and vessels. To prevent postoperative adhesion and delayed neuropathy, decompression is performed to achieve symptom improvement without excessive dissection. Decompression is considered complete when the patient reports intraoperative symptom abatement and arterial pulsation is sufficient. The sensation of numbness and/or pain and of foreign substance adhesion was reduced in 92% and 95% of our patients, respectively. In self-assessments, 47 patients (68%) reported the treatment outcome as satisfactory, 15 (22%) as acceptable, and 7 (10%) were dissatisfied. Of 116 feet, 4 (3%) required re-operation, initial decompression was insufficient in 2 feet and further decompression was performed; in the other 2 feet improvement was achieved by decompression of the distal tarsal tunnel. Our surgical method involves neurovascular bundle decompression to obtain sufficient arterial pulsation. As we use local anesthesia, we can confirm symptom improvement intraoperatively, thereby avoiding unnecessary excessive dissection. Our method is simple, safe, and without detailed nerve dissection and it prevents postoperative adhesion. PMID:25367582

  4. Neurovascular bundle decompression without excessive dissection for tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Morimoto, Daijiro; Sasamori, Toru; Sugawara, Atsushi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Isobe, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel. We present our less invasive surgical treatment of TTS in 69 patients (116 feet) and their clinical outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 64.6 months. With the patient under local anesthesia we use a microscope to perform sharp dissection of the flexor retinaculum and remove the connective tissues surrounding the posterior tibial nerve and vessels. To prevent postoperative adhesion and delayed neuropathy, decompression is performed to achieve symptom improvement without excessive dissection. Decompression is considered complete when the patient reports intraoperative symptom abatement and arterial pulsation is sufficient. The sensation of numbness and/or pain and of foreign substance adhesion was reduced in 92% and 95% of our patients, respectively. In self-assessments, 47 patients (68%) reported the treatment outcome as satisfactory, 15 (22%) as acceptable, and 7 (10%) were dissatisfied. Of 116 feet, 4 (3%) required re-operation, initial decompression was insufficient in 2 feet and further decompression was performed; in the other 2 feet improvement was achieved by decompression of the distal tarsal tunnel. Our surgical method involves neurovascular bundle decompression to obtain sufficient arterial pulsation. As we use local anesthesia, we can confirm symptom improvement intraoperatively, thereby avoiding unnecessary excessive dissection. Our method is simple, safe, and without detailed nerve dissection and it prevents postoperative adhesion.

  5. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  6. Treatment of hemimasticatory spasm with microvascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Nan; Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Jiao, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disorder characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. As the ideology and pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear, there has been no treatment that could give rise to a good outcome so far. Herein, we tried to use surgical management to cure the disease. Six patients with the disease were included in this study. These patients underwent microvascular decompression of the motor fibers of the trigeminal root. After the operation, all faces of the patients felt relaxed at varied degrees, except for 1 patient. Our study showed that microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve could lead to a better outcome. However, a control study with a large sample is needed before this technique is widely used.

  7. Intra-operative neurophysiology during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Conejero, I; Ulkatan, S; Sen, C; Deletis, V

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that primary hemifacial spasm (HFS) in the majority of patients is related to a vascular compression of the facial nerve at its root exit zone (REZ). As a consequence, the hyperexcitability of facial nerve generates spasms of the facial muscles. Microvascular decompression (MVD) of the facial nerve near its REZ has been established as an effective treatment of HFS. Intra-operative disappearance of abnormal muscle responses (lateral spread) elicited by stimulating one of the facial nerve branches has been used as a method to predict MVD effectiveness. Other neurophysiologic techniques, such as facial F-wave, blink reflex and facial corticobulbar motor evoked potentials (FCoMEP), are feasible to intra-operatively study changes in excitability of the facial nerve and its nucleus during MVDs. Intra-operative neuromonitoring with the mentioned techniques allows a better understanding of HFS pathophysiology and helps to optimise the MVD.

  8. THE AMELIORATIVE EFFECTS OF HEPARIN AND DEPOLYMERIZED HYALURONATE ON DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS IN RATS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, DRUGS), (* MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES , DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*HEPARIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*ANTICOAGULANTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, COUMARINS, BLOOD COAGULATION, DOSAGE, LIPIDS, CANADA

  9. Neurophysiological assessment of divers with medical histories of neurological decompression illness.

    PubMed Central

    Murrison, A W; Glasspool, E; Pethybridge, R J; Francis, T J; Sedgwick, E M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the possibility that subclinical damage may persist after clinical recovery from neurological decompression illness. METHODS--The neuraxes of 71 divers with medical histories of neurological decompression illness and 37 non-diver controls were examined by recording the somatosensory evoked potentials produced on stimulation of the posterior tibial and median nerves. RESULTS--Although the tests gave some objective support for the presence of "soft" residual neurological symptoms and signs, no evidence was given for the presence of subclinical damage. CONCLUSIONS--The contention that neurological damage persists after full clinical recovery from the neurological decompression illness was not supported. PMID:7849848

  10. Decompression apparatus for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.

    1987-09-29

    In a decompression apparatus for an engine having a camshaft, a cam gear is described having a longitudinal bore along a central axis thereof, and a tappet engaging with an actuating cam on the camshaft. The improvement comprises: a releasing lever comprising a shaft and a weight secured to the shaft; the shaft forming a semicircular cam at one end; the camshaft having a first recess in a longitudinal direction; the cam gear having a second recess adjacent the bore; a bearing member for engaging with the first and second recesses and for rotatably supporting the shaft; a flat bottom notch for supporting the semicircular cam and being provided on the camshaft lose to the actuating cam; and the semicircular cam being arranged to project beyond a periphery of the actuating cam when engine operation is stopped.

  11. [Post-traumatic infraorbital nerve neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Sakavicius, Dalius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2002-01-01

    The authors have investigated functional state of infraorbital nerve of 479 patients with zygomatic fractures. The degree of nerve damage was evaluated according to changes of pain threshold during damaged nerve stimulation. It was estimated that in 64.3% of zygomatic fractures the infraorbital nerve was affected. The nerve damage degree could be mild, moderate and severe. In 43.18% of moderate and severe nerve damage cases the neuropathy develops. The symptoms, signs and treatment of neuropathy have been described. The neuropathy with clinical symptoms as permanent soreness and paresthesias (itch, "running ant", fibrillations of cheek tissues etc.) in the infraorbital nerve innervation zone occur to 43.18% of the patients after moderate and severe damage of the nerve. The treatment of neuropathy was analysed. In cases of moderate and severe nerve damages, authors recommend to perform decompression of the nerve, because if not applied, the function of nerve does not recover.

  12. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  13. Vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh: a comparative study in peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Lolley, R D; Bose, W J; Bastian, F; Bassam, B; Meyer, F N; Anderson, L D

    1995-09-01

    We investigated three sheathing materials (autogenous vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh) using the rat model. Forty rats were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group A animals underwent transection of the sciatic nerve but had no repair. In Group B, a standard epineural repair was performed. In Groups C, D, and E, the nerve was repaired as in Group B with the addition of autogenous vein, Silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh sheaths, respectively. Nerve regeneration and function were assessed using sciatic functional index, nerve conduction studies, and light microscopy. Sheathing methods showed no statistically significant advantage to standard epineural repair without a sheath.

  14. Peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1985-05-01

    In treating the three main surgical problems of peripheral nerves--nerve sheath tumors, entrapment neuropathies, and acute nerve injuries--the overriding consideration is the preservation and restoration of neurologic function. Because of this, certain other principles may need to be compromised. These include achieving a gross total excision of benign tumors, employing conservative therapy as long as a disease process is not clearly progressing, and delaying repair of a nerve transection until the skin wound has healed. Only three pathophysiologic processes need be considered: neurapraxia (focal segmental dymyelination), axonotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that does not disrupt fascicles of nerve fibers), and neurotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that interrupts fascicles). With nerve sheath tumors and entrapment neuropathies, the goal is minimize the extent to which neurapraxia progresses to axonotmesis. The compressive force is relieved without carrying out internal neurolysis, a procedure that is poorly tolerated, presumably because a degree of nerve ischemia exists with any long-standing compression. When the nerve has sustained blunt trauma (through acute compression, percussion, or traction), the result can be a total loss of function and an extensive neuroma-in-continuity (scarring within the nerve). However, the neural pathophysiology may amount to nothing more than axonotmesis. Although this lesion, in time, leads to full and spontaneous recovery, it must be differentiated from the neuroma-in-continuity that contains disrupted fascicles requiring surgery. Finally, with open nerve transection, the priority is to match the fascicles of the proximal stump with those of the distal stump, a goal that is best achieved if primary neurorrhaphy is carried out.

  15. Continuum kinetic and multi-fluid simulations of classical sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, P.; Hakim, A.; Juno, J.; Srinivasan, B.

    2017-02-01

    The kinetic study of plasma sheaths is critical, among other things, to understand the deposition of heat on walls, the effect of sputtering, and contamination of the plasma with detrimental impurities. The plasma sheath also provides a boundary condition and can often have a significant global impact on the bulk plasma. In this paper, kinetic studies of classical sheaths are performed with the continuum kinetic code, Gkeyll, which directly solves the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The code uses a novel version of the finite-element discontinuous Galerkin scheme that conserves energy in the continuous-time limit. The fields are computed using Maxwell equations. Ionization and scattering collisions are included; however, surface effects are neglected. The aim of this work is to introduce the continuum kinetic method and compare its results with those obtained from an already established finite-volume multi-fluid model also implemented in Gkeyll. Novel boundary conditions on the fluids allow the sheath to form without specifying wall fluxes, so the fluids and fields adjust self-consistently at the wall. The work presented here demonstrates that the kinetic and fluid results are in agreement for the momentum flux, showing that in certain regimes, a multi-fluid model can be a useful approximation for simulating the plasma boundary. There are differences in the electrostatic potential between the fluid and kinetic results. Further, the direct solutions of the distribution function presented here highlight the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons in the sheath, emphasizing the need for a kinetic model. The densities, velocities, and the potential show a good agreement between the kinetic and fluid results. However, kinetic physics is highlighted through higher moments such as parallel and perpendicular temperatures which provide significant differences from the fluid results in which the temperature is assumed to be isotropic. Besides decompression cooling, the heat flux

  16. A neurogenic tumor containing a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) component with loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/p16: a case report showing progression from a neurofibroma to a high-grade MPNST.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is a stepwise process that involves the alteration of many cell cycle regulators and the double inactivation of the NF1 gene. Inactivation of the TP53 gene and deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene are known to play an important role in the process. Herein, we present a 19-year-old man with a familial history of neurofibromatosis type 1, in whom the tumor arose from the intercostal nerve and showed 3 components: a neurofibroma, a low-grade MPNST, and a high-grade MPNST. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene were observed in both the low-grade and the high-grade MPNST. In contrast to low-grade MPNSTs, high-grade MPNSTs generally tend to lose expression of p16 and harbor homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene in low-grade MPNST in our case might be related to its progression to high-grade MPNST. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study correlating the p16 expression status and CDKN2A/p16 gene alteration in low-grade MPNSTs.

  17. Outcomes and safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gkotsoulias, Efthymios N; Simonson, Devin C; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-02-01

    Open surgical decompression of the tarsal tunnel is the standard surgical approach for compression of the tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel. Complications associated with this approach can be significant and periods of non-weight bearing are required. An alternative approach allowing for minimal soft tissue trauma and reduced time to ambulation is therefore desirable. Endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression may provide such an alternative. The authors performed a systematic review of electronic databases and other relevant sources to identify material regarding the safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression. Only articles that included clear information concerning the safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression with a follow-up of at least 12 months were included. Three studies were identified involving 37 feet, with a weighted mean follow-up of 27 months. There were no permanent complications relating to iatrogenic nerve injury, deep infection, or prolonged wound healing problems documented despite initiating ambulation within one week of surgery. Two patients (5.6%) developed recurrence more than 2 years postoperative and one (2.7%) showed no improvement. Endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression is a safe procedure with a low rate of recurrence or failure and allows for near-immediate ambulation. However, additional prospective investigations comparing open and endoscopic approaches to tarsal tunnel decompression are warranted.

  18. Two Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Dilokhuttakarn, Thitinut

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with percutaneous endoscopic decompression, focusing on the results of clinical evaluations. Overview of Literature There are no studies about two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Medical and surgical complications were examined and clinical results were analyzed for 30 patients who consecutively underwent two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis were reviewed. The operations were performed by unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression. Results All patients displayed clinical improvement when were evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS) score of pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Macnab criteria. The improvement of VAS and ODI was 8.3±0.7 to 2.3±2.6 and 65.2±13.7 to 24.0±15.5, respectively (both p<0.05). Complications were the same as for open decompression. The most common complication was transient nerve root paresthesia. Conclusions Surgical decompression with two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression has initial benefits, but long-term studies should pay more attention to the risks of postoperative instability and restenosis as well as the need for re-operation. Further investigations with long-term results are thus required. PMID:27114776

  19. A Start Toward Micronucleus-Based Decompression Models; Altitude Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Liew, H. D.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    Do gaseous micronuclei trigger the formation of bubbles in decompression sickness (DCS)? Most previous instructions for DCS prevention have been oriented toward supersaturated gas in tissue. We are developing a mathematical model that is oriented toward the expected behavior of micronuclei. The issue is simplified in altitude decompressions because the aviator or astronaut is exposed only to decompression, whereas in diving there is a compression before the decompression. The model deals with four variables: duration of breathing of 100% oxygen before going to altitude (O2 prebreathing), altitude of the exposure, exposure duration, and rate of ascent. Assumptions: a) there is a population of micronuclei of various sizes having a range of characteristics, b) micronuclei are stable until they grow to a certain critical nucleation radius, c) it takes time for gas to diffuse in or out of micronuclei, and d) all other variables being equal, growth of micronuclei upon decompression is more rapid at high altitude because of the rarified gas in the micronuclei. To estimate parameters, we use a dataset of 4,756 men in altitude chambers exposed to various combinations of the model s variables. The model predicts occurrence of DCS symptoms quite well. It is notable that both the altitude chamber data and the model show little effect of O2 prebreathing until it lasts more than 60 minutes; this is in contrast to a conventional idea that the benefit of prebreathing is directly due to exponential washout of tissue nitrogen. The delay in response to O2 prebreathing can be interpreted as time required for outward diffusion of nitrogen; when the micronuclei become small enough, they are disabled, either by crushing or because they cannot expand to a critical nucleation size when the subject ascends to altitude.

  20. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  2. COMPUTERIZED EXPERT SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF AUTOMATED VISUAL FIELDS FROM THE ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY DECOMPRESSION TRIAL: METHODS, BASELINE FIELDS, AND SIX-MONTH LONGITUDINAL FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Feldon, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To validate a computerized expert system evaluating visual fields in a prospective clinical trial, the Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial (IONDT). To identify the pattern and within-pattern severity of field defects for study eyes at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Design Humphrey visual field (HVF) change was used as the outcome measure for a prospective, randomized, multi-center trial to test the null hypothesis that optic nerve sheath decompression was ineffective in treating nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to ascertain the natural history of the disease. Methods An expert panel established criteria for the type and severity of visual field defects. Using these criteria, a rule-based computerized expert system interpreted HVF from baseline and 6-month visits for patients randomized to surgery or careful follow-up and for patients who were not randomized. Results A computerized expert system was devised and validated. The system was then used to analyze HVFs. The pattern of defects found at baseline for patients randomized to surgery did not differ from that of patients randomized to careful follow-up. The most common pattern of defect was a superior and inferior arcuate with central scotoma for randomized eyes (19.2%) and a superior and inferior arcuate for nonrandomized eyes (30.6%). Field patterns at 6 months and baseline were not different. For randomized study eyes, the superior altitudinal defects improved (P = .03), as did the inferior altitudinal defects (P = .01). For nonrandomized study eyes, only the inferior altitudinal defects improved (P = .02). No treatment effect was noted. Conclusions A novel rule-based expert system successfully interpreted visual field defects at baseline of eyes enrolled in the IONDT. PMID:15747764

  3. Ischiofemoral Space Decompression Through Posterolateral Approach: Cutting Block Technique

    PubMed Central

    Howse, Elizabeth A.; Mannava, Sandeep; Tamam, Cüneyt; Martin, Hal D.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2014-01-01

    Ischiofemoral space impingement has become an increasingly recognized extracapsular cause of atypical hip, deep gluteal, and groin pain that can be treated endoscopically. We present a minimally invasive posterolateral technique that preserves the attachment of the iliopsoas tendon and quadratus femoris insertion while decompressing the ischiofemoral space by resecting the lesser trochanter. Furthermore, we present tips to perform this technique in a manner that minimizes the potential for damage to the sciatic nerve. This technique also allows the surgeon to treat concurrent hip pathology arthroscopically. PMID:25685670

  4. Electromagnetic induction between axons and their schwann cell myelin-protein sheaths.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G; Bercovich, D

    2013-12-01

    Two concepts have long dominated vertebrate nerve electrophysiology: (a) Schwann cell-formed myelin sheaths separated by minute non-myelinated nodal gaps and spiraling around axons of peripheral motor nerves reduce current leakage during propagation of trains of axon action potentials; (b) "jumping" by action potentials between successive nodes greatly increases signal conduction velocity. Long-held and more recent assumptions and issues underlying those concepts have been obscured by research emphasis on axon-sheath biochemical symbiosis and nerve regeneration. We hypothesize: mutual electromagnetic induction in the axon-glial sheath association, is fundamental in signal conduction in peripheral and central myelinated axons, explains the g-ratio and is relevant to animal navigation.

  5. Microparticles generated by decompression stress cause central nervous system injury manifested as neurohypophysial terminal action potential broadening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul; Salzberg, Brian M; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bhopale, Veena M; Thom, Stephen R

    2013-11-01

    The study goal was to use membrane voltage changes during neurohypophysial action potential (AP) propagation as an index of nerve function to evaluate the role that circulating microparticles (MPs) play in causing central nervous system injury in response to decompression stress in a murine model. Mice studied 1 h following decompression from 790 kPa air pressure for 2 h exhibit a 45% broadening of the neurohypophysial AP. Broadening did not occur if mice were injected with the MP lytic agent polyethylene glycol telomere B immediately after decompression, were rendered thrombocytopenic, or were treated with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase-2 (iNOS) prior to decompression, or in knockout (KO) mice lacking myeloperoxidase or iNOS. If MPs were harvested from control (no decompression) mice and injected into naive mice, no AP broadening occurred, but AP broadening was observed with injections of equal numbers of MPs from either wild-type or iNOS KO mice subjected to decompression stress. Although not required for AP broadening, MPs from decompressed mice, but not control mice, exhibit NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inherent differences in MPs from decompressed mice, rather than elevated MPs numbers, mediate neurological injury and that a component of the perivascular response to MPs involves iNOS. Additional study is needed to determine the mechanism of AP broadening and also mechanisms for MP generation associated with exposure to elevated gas pressure.

  6. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  7. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  8. Spaceflight Decompression Sickness Contingency Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the Decompression Sickness (DCS) Contingency Plan for manned spaceflight is shown. The topics include: 1) Approach; 2) DCS Contingency Plan Overview; 3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Cuff Classifications; 4) On-orbit Treatment Philosophy; 5) Long Form Malfunction Procedure (MAL); 6) Medical Checklist; 7) Flight Rules; 8) Crew Training; 9) Flight Surgeon / Biomedical Engineer (BME) Training; and 10) DCS Emergency Landing Site.

  9. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  10. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  11. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  12. Subatmospheric Decompression Sickness in Man,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-04-01

    ashtray instead of an adjacent cup. spilling tea when pouring it owing to tremor and he lay down on his bed. He felt very thirsty. When he went to...duties to perform, he went back to the mess, ate his tea at about 4 p. m. and retired to bed, where he had severe nau- sea. frontal headache, pain...1907. Hall, A. L., 1955A. ’Some effects of explosive decompression on albino rats: preliminary studies’. U.S. Navy School Aviat. Med., Res. Proj. NM

  13. Postoperative Analgesia Using Psoas Sheath Block Versus Three-in-One Block in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    were blocked and two cases where all nerves were blocked. Key Words: Regional Anesthesia; Lumbar Plexus Block, Postoperative Pain Management; Pre...and sciatic(Lumbar4-Sacral3). A "psoas sheath block" and a "three-in-one block" are two techniques used to block the lumbar plexus from which the...nerve blockade Operational definition. A regional anesthetic technique used to block transmission of the nerves of the lumbar plexus including the

  14. Thalmann Algorithm Decompression Table Generation Software Design Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Decompression Table Generation Software Design Document Navy Experimental Diving Unit Author...TITLE (Include Security Classification) (U) THALMANN ALGORITHM DECOMPRESSION TABLE GENERATION SOFTWARE DESIGN DOCUMENT 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...1 2. Decompression Table Generator (TBLP7R

  15. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  16. Dust in the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2007-09-15

    In the present work the structure of the magnetized sheath is investigated in the multifluid framework. The ambient magnetic field is assumed parallel to the wall and the effect of the plasma magnetization, plasma ionization, and plasma-neutral collisions on the sheath is examined. It is shown that the width of the non-neutral boundary layer is dependent on the collision frequencies as well as on the plasma magnetization. The size of the sheath layer can decrease with the increase in magnetic field. The increase in the ion-neutral collision can also adversely affect the sheath size. The equilibrium and levitation of the dust particles in a collisional magnetized sheath are shown to depend on the collision frequencies and on the magnetization. Further, the increase in the collision or magnetization invariably leads to the presence of the positively charged grains near the plasma wall suggesting that the grain levitation inside the charged layer is implicitly dependent on the plasma parameters in a nontrivial way.

  17. Surgical Decompression in the Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William Charles; Chen, Zenggan; Hu, Junda; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Background Over the last decade, surgical decompression procedures have been commonly used in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the effectiveness of them remains to be proved. Methods A comprehensive literature search of databases including PubMed-Medline, Ovid-EMBASE, and Cochrane Library was performed to collect the related literatures. The Medical Subject Headings used were "diabetic neuropathy," "surgical decompression," and "outcomes." The methodological index for nonrandomized studies was adopted for assessing the studies included in this review. Analyses were performed with Review Manager (Version 5.3, Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, the Cochrane Collaboration, 2014). Results A total of 12 literatures (including 8 prospective and 4 retrospective) encompassing 1,825 patients with DPN were included in the final analysis. Only one literature was identified as a randomized controlled trial. The remaining 11 literatures were observational studies; 7 of them were classified as upper-extremity nerve decompression group and 4 of them were classified as lower-extremity nerve decompression group. Meta-analysis shows that Boston questionnaire symptom severity and functional status of upper extremities, and distal motor latency and sensory conduction velocity of median nerve of DPN patients are significantly improved after carpal tunnel release. Besides, visual analog scale and two-point discrimination are considered clinically and statistically significant in lower extremities after operation. Conclusions The findings from our review have shown the efficacy of surgical decompression procedures in relieving the neurologic symptoms and restoring the sensory deficits in DPN patients. As there are few high-quality randomized controlled trials or well-designed prospective studies, more data are needed to elucidate the role of surgical procedures for DPN treatment in the future.

  18. Graphics processing unit-assisted lossless decompression

    DOEpatents

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2016-04-12

    Systems and methods for decompressing compressed data that has been compressed by way of a lossless compression algorithm are described herein. In a general embodiment, a graphics processing unit (GPU) is programmed to receive compressed data packets and decompress such packets in parallel. The compressed data packets are compressed representations of an image, and the lossless compression algorithm is a Rice compression algorithm.

  19. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  20. SEROTONIN AND OTHER VASOACTIVE AGENTS IN EXPERIMENTAL DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEROTONIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*VASOACTIVE AGENTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, EXERCISE(PHYSIOLOGY), DOSAGE, CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, BLOOD ANALYSIS, TOXICITY, BLOOD CIRCULATION, MORTALITY RATES , CANADA

  1. Relationship between myelin sheath diameter and internodal length in axons of the anterior medullary velum of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Butt, A M; Berry, M

    1995-11-01

    Relations between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths were measured in whole mounts of osmium stained intact anterior medullary velum (AMV) from glutaraldehyde perfused adult rats. The AMV is a sheet of CNS tissue which roofs the IVth ventricle and contains fascicles of myelinated fibres which arise mainly from the nucleus of the IVth cranial nerve. These fibers displayed a broad range of myelin sheath external diameters and internodal lengths, from < 1-12 microns and 50-750 microns, respectively. Myelin sheath external diameter was a measurement of the axonal diameter plus the thickness of its myelin sheath, while internodal length was measured as the distance between consecutive nodes. There was a broadly linear relationship between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths, with the smaller diameter sheaths tending to have shorter internodes than the larger. However, the correlation was weak and for any given diameter myelin sheaths displayed considerable variation in their internodal lengths. The smallest diameter myelin sheaths, < 4 microns, consistently had shorter internodes than predicted by a linear regression and, in an analysis of consecutive internodes in single fibres, the slope was flattened in fibres with a diameter > 4 microns. Our results indicated that small and large calibre fibres may have different myelin sheath diameter-internodal length interrelations.

  2. Pressureless Orbital Decompression for Myopic Proptosis.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Saul N; McGovern, Richard A; Selva, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Orbital decompression surgery increases the orbital volume. It has rarely been used for proptosis of the large highly myopic globe. However, external decompression surgery carries significant risks because of the large thin-walled globe. The authors report the first use of endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression surgery in this setting to obviate the risk of globe pressure.Endoscopic medial wall decompression brought about a 4 mm reduction of proptosis, correction of exotropia and elimination of retrobulbar ache providing good symmetry with the fellow eye.Endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression can be very effective for correcting the proptosis of high myopia and minimizes the risk of damage to the very large, thin-walled globe.

  3. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2015-10-15

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS.

  4. Progress on Quantitative Modeling of rf Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; Kohno, H.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new quantitative approach for computing the rf sheath potential is described, which incorporates plasma dielectric effects and the relative geometry of the magnetic field and the material boundaries. The new approach uses a modified boundary condition ("rf sheath BC") that couples the rf waves and the sheaths at the boundary. It treats the sheath as a thin vacuum region and matches the fields across the plasma-vacuum boundary. When combined with the Child-Langmuir Law (relating the sheath width and sheath potential), the model permits a self-consistent determination of the sheath parameters and the rf electric field at the sheath-plasma boundary. Semi-analytic models using this BC predict a number of general features, including a sheath voltage threshold, a dimensionless parameter characterizing rf sheath effects, and the existence of sheath plasma waves with an associated resonance. Since the sheath BC is nonlinear and dependent on geometry, computing the sheath potential numerically is a challenging computational problem. Numerical results will be presented from a new parallel-processing finite-element rf wave code for the tokamak scrape-off layer (called "rfSOL"). The code has verified the physics predicted by analytic theory in 1D, and extended the solutions into model 2D geometries. The numerical calculations confirm the existence of multiple roots and hysteresis effects, and parameter studies have been carried out. Areas for future work will be discussed.

  5. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  6. [Classification of altitude decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Katuntsev, V P

    2000-01-01

    The article is devoted to the discussion of principles of and approaches to classification of altitude decompression sickness (DCS), one of the most methodically formidable aspects of the problem. Based on his own multiyear experience in altitude DCS investigations and critical review of literature, the author reasons his concept of clinical classification of altitude DCS. The author's concept places emphasis on obligatory consideration of three stages in DCS development: A--pre-disease (the premorbid syndrome), B--uncomplicated (light) and C--complicated (severe) forms. The objective sign of the premorbid state is "silent" gas bubbles in organism detectable by ultrasonic devices. Signs of uncomplicated altitude DCS are musculoarticular pains, local edema and skin itching. Complicated altitude DCS is diagnosed by systemic (respiratory, neurological and cardiovascular) disorders.

  7. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  8. Morphology of human intracardiac nerves: an electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    PAUZIENE, NERINGA; PAUZA, DAINIUS H.; STROPUS, RIMVYDAS

    2000-01-01

    Since many human heart diseases involve both the intrinsic cardiac neurons and nerves, their detailed normal ultrastructure was examined in material from autopsy cases without cardiac complications obtained no more than 8 h after death. Many intracardiac nerves were covered by epineurium, the thickness of which was related to nerve diameter. The perineurial sheath varied from nerve to nerve and, depending on nerve diameter, contained up to 12 layers of perineurial cells. The sheaths of the intracardiac nerves therefore become progressively attenuated during their course in the heart. The intraneural capillaries of the human heart differ from those in animals in possessing an increased number of endothelial cells. A proportion of the intraneural capillaries were fenestrated. The number of unmyelinated axons within unmyelinated nerve fibres was related to nerve diameter, thin cardiac nerves possessing fewer axons. The most distinctive feature was the presence of stacks of laminated Schwann cell processes unassociated with axons that were more frequent in older subjects. Most unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibres showed normal ultrastructure, although a number of profiles displayed a variety of different axoplasmic contents. Collectively, the data provide baseline information on the normal structure of intracardiac nerves in healthy humans which may be useful for assessing the degree of nerve damage both in autonomic and sensory neuropathies in the human heart. PMID:11117629

  9. Is carpal tunnel decompression warranted for HNPP?

    PubMed

    Earle, Nicholas; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2013-12-01

    The role of carpal tunnel decompression surgery for patients that have hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is currently unknown. Since recovery from carpal tunnel compression is often associated with remyelination or nodal reconstruction rather than axonal regeneration, it is uncertain whether the PMP22 deletion associated with HNPP interrupts myelin or nodal reconstitution. We describe two patients with genetically confirmed HNPP and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome that had clinical and electrophysiological improvement after surgical decompression. The findings indicate a capacity for conduction repair in HNPP. They also suggest a need for further investigation and discussion around whether to offer carpal tunnel decompression to symptomatic HNPP patients.

  10. Generalized sheath criterion for arbitrary degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we study the generalized sheath criterion for plasmas with an arbitrary degree of electron degeneracy and temperature, ranging from the classical dilute regime to the fully degenerate quantum plasmas. The latter may be relevant to warm dense matter and/or laboratory high energy density matter or even astrophysical stellar plasmas. The hydrostatic one dimensional model is used to establish the generalized Bohm's criterion for sheath entrance ion speed limits, and the small amplitude theory of the sheath problem, which accurately describes the sheath parameters for lower ion acoustic Mach numbers, is developed. Our results indicate that the sheath characteristic parameters such as electrostatic potential and density profiles, as well as the wall potential and the sheath length, are significantly affected by plasma parameters such as the ion and electron temperature and number densities in the plasma region. In particular, there are fundamental differences between sheath structures of the dilute classical plasmas and those of dense quantum ones.

  11. Auto-decompression system for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, T.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes a valve control device for an engine having a combustion chamber, a valve controlling communication with the chamber, a camshaft rotatably mounted in the engine, a valve motion cam fixed to the camshaft for rotation therewith, and a valve actuation mechanism including a cam follower engageable with the valve motion cam, the valve control device comprising: a decompression cam carried by the camshaft axially adjacent the valve motion cam, the decompression cam including a base circle portion defining an outer peripheral surface smaller in radial extent than the outer peripheral surface of the valve motion cam and having an inner bore to loosely encircle the camshaft; means for adjusting the position of the decomposition cam with respect to the camshaft between two locations including a first location on which the outer peripheral surface of the decompression cam extends radially outwardly from the axis of the camshaft to an extent greater than that of the valve motion cam to engage the cam follower for decompression operation of the valve, and a second location at which the outer peripheral surface of the decompression cam extends radially outwardly from the axis of the camshaft to an extent less than that of the valve motion cam whereby the valve motion cam engages the cam follower for normal operation of the valve; and means responsive to the rotational speed of the camshaft for automatically moving the decompression cam between the first and second locations.

  12. Chapter 2: Development of the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Suleyman; Odaci, Ersan; Unal, Bunyami; Sahin, Bunyamin; Fornaro, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Normal function of the peripheral nerve (PN) is based on morphological integrity and relationship between axons, Schwann cells, and connective sheaths, which depends on the correct development of all these components. Most of the relevant studies in this field were carried out using animal models, since reports on the development of the human PNs from the time of prenatal formation to postnatal development are limited as it is quite difficult to find many nerves in fetuses. In this review paper, we will address the main developmental stages of axons, Schwann cells, and connective tissue sheaths in PNs. Knowledge on the development of PNs and their main components is important for the study of nerve repair and regeneration. This knowledge can be helpful for designing innovative treatment strategies since, like with other organs, the development and regeneration processes share many biological features.

  13. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, ERBB2 and KIT in adult soft tissue sarcomas: a clinicopathologic study of 281 cases. Cancer 103: 1881-90...TERMS miRNA microarrays, expression profiling, tissue microarrays Immunohistochemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...features of the transition of NF to MPNST (see 3rd annual report). We hypothesize that microRNA ( miRNA ) expression differences, as yet unstudied in

  14. Acclimation to decompression sickness in rats.

    PubMed

    Montcalm-Smith, E A; McCarron, R M; Porter, W R; Lillo, R S; Thomas, J T; Auker, C R

    2010-03-01

    Protection against decompression sickness (DCS) by acclimation to hyperbaric decompression has been hypothesized but never proven. We exposed rats to acclimation dives followed by a stressful "test" dive to determine whether acclimation occurred. Experiments were divided into two phases. Phase 1 rats were exposed to daily acclimation dives of hyperbaric air for 30 min followed by rapid decompression on one of the following regimens: 70 ft of seawater (fsw) for 9 days (L70), 70 fsw for 4 days (S70), 40 fsw for 9 days (L40), 40 fsw for 4 days (S40), or unpressurized sham exposure for 9 days (Control). On the day following the last exposure, all were subjected to a "test" dive (175 fsw, 60 min, rapid decompression). Both L70 and S70 rats had significantly lower incidences of DCS than Control rats (36% and 41% vs. 62%, respectively). DCS incidences for the other regimens were lower than in Control rats but without statistical significance. Phase 2 used the most protective regimen from phase 1 (L70); rats were exposed to L70 or a similar regimen with a less stressful staged decompression. Another group was exposed to a single acclimation dive (70 fsw/30 min) on the day before the test dive. We observed a nonsignificant trend for the rapidly decompressed L70 dives to be more protective than staged decompression dives (44% vs. 51% DCS incidence). The single acclimation dive regimen did not provide protection. We conclude that protection against DCS can be attained with acclimating exposures that do not themselves cause DCS. The deeper acclimation dive regimens (70 fsw) provided the most protection.

  15. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is a well-recognized phenomenon consisting of bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during ocular surgery or other manipulations in and around the orbit. Thus far, it could bee shown that central stimulation of the trigeminal nerve during transsphenoidal surgery and surgery for tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can lead to TCR. In cases of microvascular trigeminal decompression for trigeminal neuralgia, no data of the possible occurrence of TCR are available. TCR was defined as a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the heart rate (HR) of more than 20% to the baseline values before the stimulus and coinciding with the manipulation of the trigeminal nerve. Electronic anesthetic recorded perioperative HR and MABP values were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients who received microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and were divided into two subgroups on the basis of occurrence of TCR during surgery. Of the 28 patients, 5 (18%) showed evidence of TCR during manipulation at the trigeminal radix by separation from microvascular structures. Their HR fell 46% and their MABP 57% during operative procedures near the trigeminal nerve as compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. After cessation of manipulation, HR and MABP returned (spontaneously) to levels before the stimulus. Risk factors of TCR were compared with results from the literature. In conclusion, the present results give evidence of TCR during manipulation of the central part of the trigeminal nerve during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia under a standardized anesthetic protocol.

  16. Microvascular decompression for elderly patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J; Dexter, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) has been demonstrated to be an excellent surgical treatment approach in younger patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). However, it is not clear whether there are additional morbidity and mortality risks for MVD in the elderly population. We performed a systematic literature review using six electronic databases for studies that compared outcomes for MVD for TN in elderly (cut-off ⩾60, 65, 70years) versus younger populations. Outcomes examined included success rate, deaths, strokes, thromboembolism, meningitis, cranial nerve deficits and cerebrospinal fluid leaks. There were 1524 patients in the elderly cohort and 3488 patients in the younger cohort. There was no significant difference in success rates in elderly versus younger patients (87.5% versus 84.8%; P=0.47). However, recurrence rates were lower in the elderly (11.9% versus 15.6%; P=0.03). The number of deaths in the elderly cohort was higher (0.9% versus 0.1%; P=0.003). Rates of stroke (2.5% versus 1%) and thromboembolism (1.1% versus 0%) were also higher for elderly TN patients. No differences were found for rates of meningitis, cranial nerve deficits or cerebrospinal fluid leak. MVD remains an effective and reasonable strategy in the elderly population. There is evidence to suggest that rates of complications such as death, stroke, and thromboembolism may be significantly higher in the elderly population. The presented results may be useful in the decision-making process for MVD in elderly patients with TN.

  17. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  18. Effects of melatonin on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2011-05-01

    In the available literature, there are thousands of studies on peripheral nerve regeneration using many nerves of several animals at different ages with various types of lesions and different methods of evaluation at certain time of follow-up. Despite many experimental data and clinical observations, there is still no ideal treatment method enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration. In clinical practice, various types of surgical nerve repair techniques do not frequently result in complete recovery due to neuroma formation, lipid peroxidative damage, ischemia and other factors. Recently, a number of neuroscientists demonstrated that pineal neurohormone melatonin (MLT) has an effect on the morphologic features of the nerve tissue, suggesting its neuroprotective, free radical scavenging, antioxidative, and analgesic effects in degenerative diseases of peripheral nerves. At present, it is widely accepted that MLT has a useful effect on axon length and sprouting after traumatic events to peripheral nerves. Our studies using various experimental injury models clearly suggest positive effects of MLT on the number of axons, thickness of myelin sheath by inhibition of collagen accumulation and neuroma formation following traumatic events to peripheral nerves, myelination of developing peripheral nerve after intrauterine ethanol exposure. Nevertheless, further experimental and randomized controlled clinical studies are vital to identify the clinical use of MLT hormone. This is an overview of recent patents and current literature in terms of the effects of MLT on peripheral nerve regeneration based on a critical analysis of electrophysiological, biochemical and light and electron microscopic findings, in addition to functional observations.

  19. Peroneal palsy after bariatric surgery; is nerve decompresion always necessary?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero, Antonio; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present two patients who underwent successful bariatric surgery and developed peroneal nerve palsy six months after the procedure. This is an unusual complication which determines a significant functional limitation, mainly because of foot drop, and its presence may be a hallmark of excessive and rapid weight loss. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic options, and we emphasize the important role of an adequate nutritional management, in order to avoid the need for a surgical nerve decompression.

  20. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  1. The U.S. Navy decompression computer.

    PubMed

    Butler, F K; Southerland, D

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has recently approved the Cochran NAVY decompression computer (DC) for use in Naval Special Warfare diving. This action represents the first approval of a diver-worn DC for use in the U.S. Navy. This paper reviews the development and testing of both the decompression algorithm and the hardware chosen for the Navy's DC. The decompression software in the Cochran NAVY is the VVAL 18 algorithm developed at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) by Captain Ed Thalmann. A discussion of the relative conservatism of the VVAL18 algorithm in comparison to the U.S. Navy Standard Air Tables and the basis for the differences between the two is provided. The initial guidelines establishing DC diving practice for the Navy SEAL community are outlined as are plans for future research efforts in U.S. Navy DC diving.

  2. Simple transposition technique for microvascular decompression using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene "belt": technical note.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichiro; Uchida, Masashi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Hiramoto, Jun; Yoshida, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-17

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a standard surgical procedure for treating vascular compression syndromes. There are two basic ways to perform MVD: interposition using a prosthesis and transposition. With the transposition technique, adhesions and granuloma around the decompression site are avoided, but the required operation is more complex than that for the interposition method. We describe a simple, quick MVD transposition procedure that uses a small "belt" cut from a sheet of 0.3-mm-thick expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. The belt has a hole at the wide end and the other end tapered to a point. The belt is encircled around offending vessels by inserting the pointed end into the hole. The pointed end is then passed through a dural tunnel over the posterior wall of the petrous bone and is tied two or three times. This method avoids the risks involved in handling a surgical needle close to the cranial nerves and vessels.

  3. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  4. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  5. Hypobaric decompression prebreathe requirements and breathing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce incidence of decompression sickness (DCS), prebreathing 100 percent oxygen to denitrogenate is required prior to hypobaric decompressions from a sea level pressure breathing environment to pressures lower than 350 mm Hg (20,000 ft; 6.8 psia). The tissue ratio (TR) of such exposures equals or exceeds 1.7; TR being the tissue nitrogen pressure prior to decompression divided by the total pressure after decompression (((0.781)(14.697))/6.758). Designing pressure suits capable of greater pressure differentials, lower TR's, and procedures which limit the potential for DCS occurrence would enhance operational efficiency. The current 10.2 psia stage decompression prior to extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Shuttle in the 100 percent oxygen, 4.3 psia suit, results in a TR of 1.65 and has proven to be relatively free of DCS. Our recent study of zero-prebreathe decompressions to 6.8 psia breathing 100 percent oxygen (TR = 1.66) also resulted in no DCS (N = 10). The level of severe, Spencer Grades 3 or 4, venous gas emboli (VGE) increased from 0 percent at 9.5 psia to 40 percent at 6.8 psia yielding a Probit curve of VGE risk for the 51 male subjects who participated in these recent studies. Earlier, analogous decompressions using a 50 percent oxygen, 50 percent nitrogen breathing mixture resulted in one case of DCS and significantly higher levels of severe VGE, e.g., at 7.8 psia, the mixed gas breathing environment resulted in a 56 percent incidence of severe VGE versus 10 percent with use of 100 percent oxygen. The report of this study recommended use of 100 percent oxygen during zero-prebreathe exposure to 6.8 psia if such a suit could be developed. For future, long-term missions, we suggest study of the effects of decompression over several days to a breathing environment of 150 mmHg O2 and approximately 52 mmHg He as a means of eliminating DCS and VGE hazards during subsequent excursions. Once physiologically adapted to a 4 psia vehicle, base, or space

  6. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H. III; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) is identified by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space, as defined in the HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD). This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility that decompression sickness may occur.

  7. Orbital decompression for severe dysthyroid eye disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fells, P

    1987-01-01

    Current methods of medical treatment of this difficult condition are briefly reviewed, with comments on the generally unsatisfactory response. Attention is therefore directed to surgical methods and a short history given of the various routes used for orbital decompression. The author's own results of transantral, and more recently ethmoidal, decompression are given, with a detailed description of the technique for the latter approach. An interesting frequent consequence of postoperative A pattern to the ocular movements is discussed in the light of Koornneef's concept of orbital fascial anatomy, and suggestions are made for its avoidance. Images PMID:3828262

  8. 1991 Volvo Award in experimental studies. Cauda equina syndrome: neurologic recovery following immediate, early, or late decompression.

    PubMed

    Delamarter, R B; Sherman, J E; Carr, J B

    1991-09-01

    An animal model of cauda equina syndrome was developed. Neurologic recovery was analyzed following immediate, early, and delayed decompression. Five experimental groups, each containing six dogs, were studied. Compression of the cauda equina was performed in all 30 dogs following an L6-7 laminectomy. The cauda equina was constricted by 75% in each group. The first group was constricted and immediately decompressed. The remaining groups were constricted for 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 1 week, respectively, before being decompressed. Somatosensory evoked potentials were performed before and after surgery, before and immediately after decompression, and 6 weeks following decompression. Daily neurologic exams using the Tarlov grading scale were performed. At 6 weeks postdecompression, all dogs were killed, and the neural elements analyzed histologically. Following compression, all 30 dogs had significant lower extremity weakness, tail paralysis, and urinary incontinence. All dogs recovered significant motor function 6 weeks following decompression. The dogs with immediate decompression generally recovered neurologic function within 2-5 days. The dogs receiving 1-hour and 6-hour compression recovered within 5-7 days. The dogs receiving 24-hour compression remained paraparetic 5-7 days, with bladder dysfunction for 7-10 days and tail dysfunction persisting for 4 weeks. The dogs with compression for 1 week were paraparetic (Tarlov Grade 2 or 3) and incontinent during the duration of cauda equina compression. They recovered to walking by 1 week and Tarlov Grade 5 with bladder and tail control at the time of euthanasia. Immediately after compression, all five groups demonstrated at least 50% deterioration of the posterior tibial nerve evoked potential amplitudes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981 ± 83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251 ± 32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p < 0.01). In addition, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were higher and distal motor latency values were lower in the Nanofiber conduit group compared to the Microfiber group. This study demonstrated the impact of fibre size on peripheral nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs.

  10. A Pottery Electric Kiln Using Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Minoru; Minamide, Akiyuki; Takemata, Kazuya

    This paper presents a novel type electric kiln which fires the pottery using the decompression. The electric kiln is suitable for the environment and the energy saving as the pottery furnace. This paper described the baking principle and the baking characteristic of the novel type electric kiln.

  11. Decompression Sickness Risk Versus Time and Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    M, Wiegman J, Pilmanis exposure at 22,500 ft (Fig. 1-2) should raise AA. Prebreathe enhancement with concern since that level of decompression is...Andrew A. P11manis in a research phyniologist 2. Fischer MO, Wiegman JF, McLean SA, Olson Andrew A. ihi ish resiarch poycioo SRM. Evaluation of four

  12. [Electrophysiological monitoring of cranial motor nerves (V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII)].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P; Neves, D O; Vial, C

    2009-04-01

    In various neurosurgical operations, there is a risk of cranial nerve lesion that can be avoided or minimized with intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. Regarding motor function of the cranial nerves, stimulodetection techniques are used, including electrical stimulation of nerve trunks and electromyographic recording of evoked motor responses. These techniques can be used for monitoring the trigeminal nerve (Vth cranial nerve), facial nerve (VIIth), glossopharyngeal nerve (IXth), pneumogastric nerve (Xth), spinal accessory nerve (XIth), and hypoglossal nerve (XIIth), in particular during surgical removal of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle or skull base. When beginning an operation, electrical stimulation is only used to identify the nerve structures. As removal of the tumor progresses, the goal is to verify that a surgical injury to the nerve is avoided by looking for the absence of any change regarding amplitude, morphology, and latency of motor responses. Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring can also be applied during the surgical treatment of primary hemifacial spasm by microvascular decompression. An effective decompression is usually associated with the disappearance of "lateral spread" motor responses to facial nerve branch stimulation. Therefore, the intraoperative disappearance of the lateral spread responses can be considered a predictive factor of good postoperative clinical outcome, even if this assertion remains a matter of debate.

  13. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  14. Ethmoidectomy decompression for the treatment of Graves' optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, J J; Freeman, J L; Eplett, C J; Fliss, D M; Avram, D R

    1992-10-01

    When orbital decompression becomes necessary in Graves' optic neuropathy, medial wall decompression is a necessary component of the decompression procedure. The ethmoidectomy approach allows more direct visualization of the posterior ethmoids and sphenoids to effect maximum decompression. This is particularly important in cases in which computed tomography shows the medial rectus muscle to be enlarged posteriorly in the orbit. The procedure provides excellent visualization of the medial rectus. As with any medial wall decompression procedure, postoperative restriction of horizontal motility is a frequent complication, often necessitating more than one subsequent operation. The authors describe their experience with the procedure in 25 patients with Graves' optic neuropathy.

  15. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  16. Interactions of Glial Proteins from the Regenerating Goldfish (C. auratus) Optic Nerve with Retinotectal Axons,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    regenerating goldfish optic nerve with retinotectal.. 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Michael A. Deaton, Susan E. Bock, and John A. Freeman 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...nerve sheath cells during development. Soc Neurosci 1983; 9: Abstr No. 17.33. 26. Ignatius MJ, Gebicke- Harter PJ, Skene JHP, Schilling JW, Weisgraber

  17. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    SciTech Connect

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  18. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGES

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; ...

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  19. The Anatomic Relationship of the Tibial Nerve to the Common Peroneal Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa: Implications for Selective Tibial Nerve Block in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Eric R.; Vydyanathan, Amaresh; Gritsenko, Karina; Shaparin, Naum; Singh, Nair; Downie, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. A recently described selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease presents a viable alternative to sciatic nerve block for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this two-part investigation, we describe the effects of a tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease. Methods. In embalmed cadavers, after the ultrasound-guided dye injection the dissection revealed proximal spread of dye within the paraneural sheath. Consequentially, in the clinical study twenty patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty received the ultrasound-guided selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease, which also resulted in proximal spread of local anesthetic. A sensorimotor exam was performed to monitor the effect on the peroneal nerve. Results. In the cadaver study, dye was observed to spread proximal in the paraneural sheath to reach the sciatic nerve. In the clinical observational study, local anesthetic was observed to spread a mean of 4.7 + 1.9 (SD) cm proximal to popliteal crease. A negative correlation was found between the excess spread of local anesthetic and bifurcation distance. Conclusions. There is significant proximal spread of local anesthetic following tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease with possibility of the undesirable motor blocks of the peroneal nerve. PMID:28260964

  20. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  1. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  2. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Golash, Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:21124654

  3. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  5. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, K; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a marked loss of fibres in the 73 week animals. Intercostal and saphenous nerves had intermediary patterns. There was evidence of subpopulations myelinating at different times. Measurements of myelin sheath thickness showed variations of relative sheath thickness with age, between nerves and for subpopulations of nerves. Late myelination corresponded to relatively thin myelin sheaths. Statistical two-stage-density cluster analysis by computer was used for analysing complex fibre populations. The developmental changes of three subpopulations of the intercostal nerve are documented. Nerves also differed in their rates of axon growth. The increment in axon calibre was small and late for sympathetic fibres. Intercostal and facial nerve fibres had rapid axon growth with different growth rates for subpopulations. PMID:3248966

  6. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  7. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  8. Reversal of dysthyroid optic neuropathy following orbital fat decompression

    PubMed Central

    Kazim, M.; Trokel, S.; Acaroglu, G.; Elliott, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To document the successful treatment of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy by orbital fat decompression instead of orbital bone decompression after failed medical therapy.
METHODS—Eight orbits of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy were selected for orbital fat decompression as an alternative to bone removal decompression. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids and/or orbital radiotherapy was either unsuccessful or contraindicated in each case. All patients satisfied clinical indications for orbital bone decompression to reverse the optic neuropathy. High resolution computerised tomographic (CT) scans were performed in all cases and in each case showed signs of enlargement of the orbital fat compartment. As an alternative to bone decompression, orbital fat decompression was performed on all eight orbits.
RESULTS—Orbital fat decompression was performed on five patients (eight orbits) with optic neuropathy. Optic neuropathy was reversed in all cases. There were no cases of postoperative diplopia, enophthalmos, globe ptosis, or anaesthesia. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year.
CONCLUSIONS—In a subset of patients with an enlarged orbital fat compartment and in whom extraocular muscle enlargement is not the solitary cause of optic neuropathy, fat decompression is a surgical alternative to bony decompression.

 PMID:10837384

  9. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression–induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  10. Carotid sheath haematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jayanthi; Badkur, D S; Arora, Arneet

    2009-10-01

    Carotid sheath haematoma is a rare finding, sometimes the only injury found in cases of manual strangulation without any associated external or internal injury to the neck. One such rare case is reported in an 8 year old female victim where presence of carotid sheath haematoma not only helped to ascertain the cause of death but also helped in the reconstruction of mechanism of infliction of force on the neck.

  11. Lipoma arborescens of the biceps tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    White, Eric A; Omid, Reza; Matcuk, George R; Domzalski, Jerome T; Fedenko, Alexander N; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; Patel, Dakshesh B

    2013-10-01

    Lipoma arborescens, described as lipomatous infiltration and distention of synovial villi resulting in a frond-like appearance, most frequently affects the suprapatellar recess of the knee. While there have been reports of this entity involving the upper extremity joints, bursa, and tendon sheaths, we present the first reported case of lipoma arborescens isolated to the biceps tendon sheath. We describe imaging and histologic findings with clinical correlation.

  12. Recreational technical diving part 2: decompression from deep technical dives.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Mitchell, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers perform deep, mixed-gas 'bounce' dives, which are inherently inefficient because even a short duration at the target depth results in lengthy decompression. Technical divers use decompression schedules generated from modified versions of decompression algorithms originally developed for other types of diving. Many modifications ostensibly produce shorter and/or safer decompression, but have generally been driven by anecdote. Scientific evidence relevant to many of these modifications exists, but is often difficult to locate. This review assembles and examines scientific evidence relevant to technical diving decompression practice. There is a widespread belief that bubble algorithms, which redistribute decompression in favour of deeper decompression stops, are more efficient than traditional, shallow-stop, gas-content algorithms, but recent laboratory data support the opposite view. It seems unlikely that switches from helium- to nitrogen-based breathing gases during ascent will accelerate decompression from typical technical bounce dives. However, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) after dives conducted breathing only helium-oxygen than those with nitrogen-oxygen. There is also weak evidence suggesting less neurological DCS occurs if helium-oxygen breathing gas is switched to air during decompression than if no switch is made. On the other hand, helium-to-nitrogen breathing gas switches are implicated in the development of inner-ear DCS arising during decompression. Inner-ear DCS is difficult to predict, but strategies to minimize the risk include adequate initial decompression, delaying helium-to-nitrogen switches until relatively shallow, and the use of the maximum safe fraction of inspired oxygen during decompression.

  13. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  14. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  15. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  16. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. Evaluation and treatment of failed ulnar nerve release at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Nellans, Kate; Tang, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Failure after ulnar nerve decompression at the elbow can be defined as either no change in the patient's symptoms or an initial improvement with recurrence, making the patient history essential in the work-up. Failure may be due to diagnostic, technical, or biologic factors. Technical errors and the development of perineural fibrosis necessitate revision surgery, while nerve damage due to chronic severe compression should be observed. We do not believe any one procedure is superior in the revision setting as long as a complete decompression is achieved with a compression free, stable transposition of the surgeon's choice.

  18. Supine No-Retractor Method in Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm: Results of 100 Consecutive Operations

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Masaki; Wada, Akira; Sugiyama, Tatsuya; Tanioka, Daisuke; Okumura, Hirotaka; Fujishima, Hirotake; Nakajo, Takato; Nakayama, Sadayoshi; Yabuzaki, Hajime; Mizutani, Tohoru

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS), the patient is placed in the lateral or park-bench position that is complicated and uncomfortable for anesthesiologists, nurses, and even the patient. Careless retraction of the cerebellum by a spatula could be the major cause of surgical complications. In our method, a patient is laid supine avoiding the complicated positioning. The subfloccular approach from a small cranial window sited on the more lateral and basal side of the occipital cranium enables the surgeon to reach all the segments of the facial nerve root without a spatula. We introduce our surgical procedures in detail along with our excellent results. Methods A total of 100 consecutive patients experiencing primary HFS were operated on with MVD by a single surgeon in our institution from August 2012 to April 2014. Results Overall, 94 patients showed the complete disappearance or a satisfactory alleviation of HFS. De novo neurologic deficits were not encountered after surgery including hearing impairment. In 47 cases, multiple offending vessels were observed in multiple possible affected sites in addition to the root entry/exit zone. Conclusions We believe this approach is superior for the safe and precise decompression of any part of the facial nerve root. PMID:26225302

  19. Fetal anatomy of the human carotid sheath and structures in and around it.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Naritomo; Hayashi, Shogo; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Kitano, Hiroya

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find basic rules governing the morphological development of the typical neurovascular sheath. We carried out histological examination of 15 paraffin-embedded mid-term fetuses at 9-25 weeks of gestation (three fetuses each at 9, 12, 15, 20, and 25 weeks). As the result, the vagus nerve showed a high propensity to change its topographical relationship with the common carotid artery (CCA) during 9-20 weeks of gestation: that is, from a primitive ventral course to a final dorsal course. The adventitia of the great arteries, which was distinct from other fascial structures, became evident by 15 weeks. The carotid sheath appeared at and after 20 weeks: it was clearly separated from the prevertebral lamina of the deep cervical fasciae, but fused with the pretracheal lamina covering the strap muscles. Thus the carotid sheath, as well as the topographical relationships of structures within it, seems to become established much later than the prevertebral and pretracheal laminae of the deep cervical fasciae. However, the adventitia of the cervical great arteries consistently becomes evident much earlier than the sheath, and it seems to be regarded as one of the basic components of the fetal deep cervical fasciae.

  20. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Idiopathic Optic Perineuritis using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Ik Soo; Jung, Jae Ho; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Je Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Hee-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effect of idiopathic Optic perineuritis on the retinal nerve fiber layer, and determine the ability of optical coherence tomography to evaluate retinal nerve fiber loss after idiopathic Optic perineuritis. Four patients were assessed in this study. In all cases, average retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in the affected eye in comparison with the normal reference value and with the value for the contralateral normal eye at 12 months after the onset of optic perineuritis. Our study revealed that retinal nerve fiber layer loss occurs in idiopathic optic nerve sheath inflammation. PMID:27928329

  1. Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebrobasilar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Pyung; Choi, Seok Keun; Rhee, Bong Arm; Lim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is considered as a reversible pathophysiological condition mainly induced by continuous vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone (REZ) at the cerebellopontine angle. As an offending vessel, vertebrobasilar artery tends to compress much more heavily than others. The authors analyzed HFS caused by vertebrobasilar artery and described the relationships between microsurgical findings and clinical courses. Methods Out of 1,798 cases treated with microvascular decompression (MVD) from Jan. 1980 to Dec. 2004, the causative vessels were either vertebral artery or basilar artery in 87 patients. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled in this study. Preoperatively, computed tomography (CT) or brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 3-dimentional short range MR technique was performed and CT was checked immediately or 2-3 days after anesthetic recovery. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, the compression patterns of the vessels at the time of surgery and treatment outcomes. Results There were 47 were male and 32 female patients. HFS developed on the left side in 52 cases and on the right side in 27. The mean age of onset was 52.3 years (range 19-60) and the mean duration of symptoms was 10.7 years. Many patients (39 cases; 49.1%) had past history of hypertension. HFS caused only by the vertebral artery was 8 cases although most of the other cases were caused by vertebral artery (VA) in combination with its branching arteries. Most frequently, the VA and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were the simultaneous causative blood vessels comprising 32 cases (40.5%), and in 27 cases (34.2%) the VA and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) were the offenders. Facial symptoms disappeared in 61 cases (77.2%) immediately after the operation and 68 cases (86.1%) showed good outcome after 6 months. Surgical outcome just after the operation was poor in whom the perforators arose from the offending

  2. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  3. Correct the Coagulopathy and Scoop It Out: Complete Reversal of Anuric Renal Failure through the Operative Decompression of Extraperitoneal Hematoma-Induced Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Paul B; Dunham, Michael; Ball, Chad G; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of extraperitoneal compression of the intra-abdominal space resulting in abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) with overt renal failure, which responded to operative decompression of the extra-peritoneal spaces. This discussion includes patient presentation, clinical course, diagnosis, interventions, and outcomes. Data was collected from the patient's electronic medical record and a radiology database. ACS appears to be a rare but completely reversible complication of both retroperitoneal hematoma (RH) and rectus sheath hematoma (RSH). In patients with large RH or RSH consideration of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) monitoring combined with aggressive operative drainage after correction of the coagulopathy should be considered. These two cases illustrate how a relatively benign pathology can result in increased IAP, organ failure, and ultimately ACS. Intervention with decompressive laparotomy and evacuation of clot resulted in return to normal physiologic function.

  4. Attic construction with sheathing-applied insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Two years of study at a building research laboratory have been applied to cathedralized residential attic construction. Cathedralized attics are rafter-framed or truss-framed attics with flat ceilings in which the insulation is placed against the underside of the roof sheathing rather than on top of the ceiling drywall. The potential benefits of sheathing-applied insulation are considerable and are due to the fact that the attic space becomes part of the conditioned volume. Concern is often expressed that moisture damage may occur in the sheathing. The intent of the current study was to address those concerns. This study allowed an assessment of the performance of cathedralized ceilings, given the following construction variables: (1) ventilation vs. no ventilation, (2) continuous air chute construction vs. stuffed insulation construction, and (3) opens joints in exposed kraft facing vs. taped joints. The results were compared to a concurrent study of the performance of cathedral ceilings with sloped ceiling drywall. The results show that having an air chute that ensures an air gap between the sheathing and the top of the insulation is the critical factor. Ventilation and the taping of joints were minor determinants of the moisture performance of the sheathing. These results are consistent with the results of normal cathedral ceiling construction performance.

  5. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves. PMID:28197200

  6. Peripheral nerve surgery--today and looking ahead.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1986-04-01

    The trend in peripheral nerve surgery is toward earlier definitive treatment of the lesion, based on the optimal use of preoperative and intraoperative electrodiagnostic techniques. Newer diagnostic tools include computed tomography (CT) and thermography. Knowledge is still being gained about the technology and limitations of the autogenous nerve grafts that are being used to overcome nerve gaps. The technique of nerve anastomosis is undergoing rapid improvement, and better methods have been developed for identifying motor and sensory fascicles at the time of operation. Research activity into the problem of nerve damage produced at the time of trimming nerve stumps promises to change to the technology of nerve repair in the near future. For benign nerve sheath tumors (schwannoma, neurofibroma), the trend is away from nerve excision and in the direction of tumor enucleation. Histologic methods for diagnosing malignant nerve tumors have been improved, making it possible to embark on radical excision with less hesitation. The pain syndromes (causalgia, phantom limb pain, and stump pain) that may follow nerve injury continue to present a problem in management, but steady progress is being made toward a rational program of management. A more distant prospect is for pharmacologic and electrophysiologic methods to accelerate axonal regeneration.

  7. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves.

  8. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  9. Effect of surface pore structure of nerve guide conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-03-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration.

  10. [Ethmoidectomy and orbital decompression in endocrine ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Richter, W C; Kley, W; Buschmann, W

    1984-07-01

    23 orbita decompression operations were performed in patients suffering from endocrine exophthalmos (Grave's disease) after normalization of thyroid metabolism and systemic corticoid therapy remained unsuccessful. We developed a modification of an external ethmoidectomy. The lamina of the middle nasal concha is carefully preserved, any opening to the nasal cavity is closed. Flap door incisions of the periorbita complete this procedure. Results are good and were followed up for a period of 30 months. The operation resulted in prompt restitution of normal eye position with fast normalization of visual acuity and field. Squint surgery was done in addition.

  11. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair. PMID:25206505

  12. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  13. Numbness after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization: the Results from a Nerve Conduction Study of the Superficial Radial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho-Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Han, Jae Deok; Lee, Hyun Jong; Kim, Je Sang; Park, Jin Sik; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Choi, Young Jin; Shim, Won-Heum; Kwon, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Numbness on the hand occurs infrequently after a transradial cardiac catheterization (TRC). The symptom resembles that of neuropathy. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, the predicting factors and the presence of neurological abnormalities of numbness, using a nerve conduction study (NCS). Subjects and Methods From April to December 2013, all patients who underwent a TRC were prospectively enrolled. From among these, the patients who experienced numbness on the ipsilateral hand were instructed to describe their symptoms using a visual analogue scale; subsequently, NCSs were performed on these patients. Results Of the total 479 patients in the study sample, numbness occurred in nine (1.8%) following the procedure. The NCS was performed for eight out of the nine patients, four (50%) of which had an abnormal NCS result at the superficial radial nerve. A larger sheath and history of myocardial infarction (p=0.14 and 0.08 respectively) tended towards the occurrence of numbness; however, only the use of size 7 French sheaths was an independent predictor for the occurrence of numbness (odds ratio: 5.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-28.58, p=0.042). The symptoms disappeared for all patients but one, within four months. Conclusion A transient injury of the superficial radial nerve could be one reason for numbness after a TRC. A large sheath size was an independent predictor of numbness; therefore, large sized sheaths should be used with caution when performing a TRC. PMID:27014346

  14. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  15. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  16. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models.

  17. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  18. Crystallization kinetics in magmas during decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; Carroll, Michael R.

    2016-04-01

    Many variables play a role during magma crystallization at depth or in a volcanic conduit, and through experimentally derived constraints we can better understand pre- and syn-eruptive magma crystallization behavior. The thermodynamic properties of magmas have been extensively investigated as a function of T, P, fO2 and magma composition [1], and this allows estimation of the stability of equilibrium phases and physical parameters (e.g., density, viscosity). However, many natural igneous rocks contain geochemical, mineralogical and textural evidence of disequilibrium, suggesting that magmas frequently follow non-equilibrium, time-dependent pathways that are recorded in the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the rocks. There are currently no suitable theoretical models capable of calculating nucleation and growth rates in disequilibrium conditions without experimental constraints. The aim of this contribution is provide quantitative data on growth and nucleation rates of feldspar crystals in silicate melts obtained through decompression experiments, in order to determine the magma evolution in pre- and sin-eruptive conditions. Decompression is one of the main processes that induce the crystallization of feldspar during the magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. Decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic and basaltic melts to investigate crystallization kinetics of feldspar as a function of the effect of the degassing, undercooling and time on nucleation and crystal growth process [2; 3]. Furthermore, feldspar is the main crystals phase present in magmas, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. Crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts show that long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations [2]. This is an important

  19. Evaluation of quality of life in patients with Graves´ ophthalmopathy, before and after orbital decompression.

    PubMed

    Iacobæus, Lykke; Sahlin, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a potentially sight threatening orbital disease that can have a large negative impact on the quality of life of the patient. Studies on long-term effects of GO on the quality of life are few. The aim of this study is to evaluate the health-related quality of life in patients with GO, before and after orbital decompression surgery. This is a prospective, longitudinal, interventional study in which patients who had orbital decompression were given the Graves´ ophthalmopathy quality of life questionnaire (GO-QOL) before and after surgery. The GO-QOL is a disease specific instrument to measure health-related quality of life. The answers are transformed into scores from 0-100 on 2 subscales. Higher score indicates better health. An additional patient satisfaction questionnaire was also given post-surgery. A significant, long-term, improvement in quality of life after orbital decompression was noted (p < 0.001, paired t-test). 50 patients were included and follow-up time was 5.3 ± 1.2 years (mean ± SD). The QOL-scores increased 28 ± 35 and 26 ± 31 points, respectively, on the two subscales, "visual functioning" and "appearance" (mean ± SD). The patient satisfaction questionnaire showed that 88% of the patients would recommend orbital decompression to a fellow patient. Persistent disturbing oscillopsia was seen in 2% and persistent disturbing infraorbital nerve hypoesthesia in 8% of the patients. Orbital decompression surgery has a positive effect on quality of life for patients with severe GO. The GO-QOL questionnaire showed significant improvement in QOL-scores even many years after surgery.

  20. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  1. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  2. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Spacewalk Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS. METHODS Four experiments will replicate the CEVIS exercise-enhanced oxygen prebreathe protocol, each with a different exception. The first of these is currently underway. Experiment 1 - Subjects complete controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining nonambulatory throughout. Experiment 2 - Subjects remain non-ambulatory during the preflight period and ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 3 - Subjects ambulate during the preflight period and remain non-ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 4 - The order of heavy and light exercise employed in the CEVIS protocol is

  3. Latero-terminal neurorrhaphy without removal of the epineural sheath. Experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, F; Trindade, J C; Hoshino, K; Mazzoni Neto, A

    1992-01-01

    Termino-lateral neurorrhaphies have been used up to the beginning of this century. After this period, they have no longer been reported. We tested the efficacy of a new type of latero-terminal neurorrhaphy and evaluated the role of the epineural sheath. A group of 10 rats had the fibular nerve sectioned and the distal ending was sutured to the lateral face of the tibial nerve without removing the epineurium. All experiments were made on the right side, the left one remaining untouched in half of the animals of each group. The other half were denervated by sectioning and inverting the endings of the fibular nerves. In this way, tibial cranial muscles were either normal or denervated in the left side and reinnervated through latero-terminal neurorrhaphy in the right side. After 7.7 months, the animals were subjected to electrophysiological tests, sacrificed, and the nerves and muscles were taken for histological exams. A response of the tibial cranial muscle was obtained in 75% of the animals. The distal ending of the fibular nerve showed an average of 498 nerve fibers. The average areas of the reinnervated tibial cranial muscles were (mu 2):841.30 for M2n and 1798.33 for M2d. We concluded that the termino-lateral neurorrhaphy was functional, conducting electrical stimuli and allowing the passage of axons from the lateral surface of a healthy nerve, to reconstitute the distal segment of a sectioned nerve. The presence of the epineurium was no impediment to axonal regeneration or to the passage of electrical stimuli.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  10. Re-innervation of facial nerve territory using a composite hypoglossal nerve--muscle autograft--facial nerve bridge. An experimental model in sheep.

    PubMed

    Drew, S J; Fullarton, A C; Glasby, M A; Mountain, R E; Murray, J A

    1995-04-01

    The hypoglossal nerve has been used both entirely and in part to repair the facial nerve. Using the partial technique it may be difficult to obtain sufficient length and a free interposed graft is then required to extend the hypoglossal element. In six sheep the facial nerve was excised between its emergence from the stylomastoid foramen and its bifurcation in the parotid gland. The hypoglossal nerve was exposed and split longitudinally producing a limb which was reflected towards the distal stump of the facial nerve. This left a gap of 4-5 cm which was bridged with a freeze-thawed coaxially aligned skeletal muscle autograft. The sheep were examined at 8 months. Laser doppler blood-flow studies showed the blood-flow distal to the graft to be about 25% of that at an equivalent site on the normal side. Peak nerve conduction velocities were also reduced on the repaired side but stimulation of the proximal hypoglossal nerve was nevertheless capable of causing adequate contraction of both facial and tongue muscles. Histological comparison of the repaired facial nerves with equivalent sites on the normal side showed a reduction in mean axon and fibre diameters with normal myelin sheath thickness for the regenerated axon sizes. All of these features are to be expected in a regenerated nerve and are consistent with a good level of recovery of function.

  11. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  13. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  14. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  15. Sheath waves observed on OEDIPUS A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Balmain, K. G.; Bantin, C. C.; Hulbert, G. W.

    1995-01-01

    An important novel feature of the tethered sounding rocket experiment OEDIPUS A (Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma—A Unique Strategy) was its direct excitation and detection of electromagnetic waves on conductors in space plasmas. We present quantitative evidence about sheath waves excited in the ionosphere by a high-frequency transmitter on one end of the 1-km tether and detected by a synchronized receiver on the other end. An important characteristic of sheath waves is their sequence of sharply defined passbands and stop bands in the frequency range 0.1-5 MHz. The lowest passband is between 0.1 MHz and the plasma frequency near 2 MHz, the bandwidth where existing theory predicts sheath waves. Resonance fringes in this band have been scaled to determine the phase and group refractive indices of sheath waves. These agree reasonably well with the theory, considering the approximations therein. Passbands and stop bands observed in the range between 2 and 5 MHz are not expected on the basis of the current theory. In this range, band limits have clear signatures of the interaction of the tether fields with electrostatic cyclotron waves. Finite wire moment method modeling of the payload shows that in the low-frequency passband, RF coupling along the tether is increased by 20 dB over vacuum conditions. Similarly, isolation is greater than vacuum isolation in the stop bands. Because sheath waves at frequencies up to 2 MHz are guided efficiently along conductors in plasma, they are a significant design issue in the electromagnetic compatibility of avionics at frequencies up to HF on large metal space structures.

  16. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  17. Automatic decompression device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumiyama, Y.

    1986-10-07

    A decompression device is described for an internal combustion engine comprising: a holder secured to a camshaft supporting cams for controlling suction and exhaust valves of the engine, the cams having a contour and the holder having secured thereto a first cylindrical pin and a stopper pin; engine speed-responsive means including a first centrifugal weight supported by the holder for pivotal movement about the first pin and a second centrifugal weight supported on the first centrifugal weight for pivotal movement about a second pin having an axis parallel to the camshaft; cam means including a cylindrical pillar disposed on the second weight radially inwardly of the second pin and extending axially of the camshaft toward the cams for engagement with a valve operating member associated with one of the cams; and tension spring means mounted between the first centrifugal weight and the second centrifugal for moving the weights between a first position and a second position.

  18. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and the etiology of neurologic decompression sickness during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, W. T.; Powell, M. R.; Kumar, K. Vasantha; Waligora, J.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of gas bubbles in the arterial circulation can occur from iatrogenic mishaps, cardiopulmonary bypass devices, or following decompression, e.g., in deep-sea or SCUBA diving or in astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA). We have examined the pathophysiology of neurological decompression sickness in human subjects who developed a large number of small gas bubbles in the right side of the heart as a result of hypobaric exposures. In one case, gas bubbles were detected in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the subject developed neurological symptoms; a 'resting' patent foramen ovalae (PFO) was found upon saline contrast echocardiography. A PFO was also detected in another individual who developed Spencer Grade 4 precordial Doppler ultrasound bubbles, but no evidence was seen of arterialization of bubbles upon insonation of either the MCA or common carotid artery. The reason for this difference in the behavior of intracardiac bubbles in these two individuals is not known. To date, we have not found evidence of right-to-left shunting of bubbles through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubbles present following decompression is examined and compared with the number arising from saline contrast injection. The estimates are comparable.

  19. Decompression sickness ('the bends') in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    García-Párraga, D; Crespo-Picazo, J L; de Quirós, Y Bernaldo; Cervera, V; Martí-Bonmati, L; Díaz-Delgado, J; Arbelo, M; Moore, M J; Jepson, P D; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-10-16

    Decompression sickness (DCS), as clinically diagnosed by reversal of symptoms with recompression, has never been reported in aquatic breath-hold diving vertebrates despite the occurrence of tissue gas tensions sufficient for bubble formation and injury in terrestrial animals. Similarly to diving mammals, sea turtles manage gas exchange and decompression through anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations. In the former group, DCS-like lesions have been observed on necropsies following behavioral disturbance such as high-powered acoustic sources (e.g. active sonar) and in bycaught animals. In sea turtles, in spite of abundant literature on diving physiology and bycatch interference, this is the first report of DCS-like symptoms and lesions. We diagnosed a clinico-pathological condition consistent with DCS in 29 gas-embolized loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta from a sample of 67. Fifty-nine were recovered alive and 8 had recently died following bycatch in trawls and gillnets of local fisheries from the east coast of Spain. Gas embolization and distribution in vital organs were evaluated through conventional radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Additionally, positive response following repressurization was clinically observed in 2 live affected turtles. Gas embolism was also observed postmortem in carcasses and tissues as described in cetaceans and human divers. Compositional gas analysis of intravascular bubbles was consistent with DCS. Definitive diagnosis of DCS in sea turtles opens a new era for research in sea turtle diving physiology, conservation, and bycatch impact mitigation, as well as for comparative studies in other air-breathing marine vertebrates and human divers.

  20. Outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Gopal, R Krishna; Yalamanchili, Ranjith K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis, is a disabling condition that responds well to the conventional methods of treatment. Patients who do not respond to conservative treatment may require surgical intervention. This study evaluates the outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis, with resection of posterosuperior eminence of the calcaneum. Materials and Methods: This present study included 25 heels from 23 consecutive patients with posterior heel pain, who did not respond to conservative treatment and underwent endoscopic decompression of the retrocalcaneal bursae and excision of bony spurs. The functional outcome was evaluated by comparing the pre and postoperative American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores. The Maryland ankle and foot score was used postoperatively to assess the patient's satisfaction at the one-year followup. Results: The University of Maryland scores of 25 heels were categorized as the nonparametric categories, and it was observed that 16 patients had an excellent outcome, six good, three fair and there were no poor results. The AOFAS scores averaged 57.92 ± 6.224 points preoperatively and 89.08 ± 5.267 points postoperatively (P < 0.001), at an average followup of 16.4 months. The 12 heels having noninsertional tendinosis on ultrasound had low AOFAS scores compared to 13 heels having retrocalcaneal bursitis alone. At one year followup, correlation for preoperative ultrasound assessment of tendoachilles degeneration versus postoperative Maryland score (Spearman correlation) had shown a strong negative correlation. Conclusion: Endoscopic calcaneal resection is highly effective in patients with mild or no degeneration and yields cosmetically better results with fewer complications. Patients with degenerative changes in Achilles tendon had poorer outcomes in terms of subjective satisfaction. PMID:23325968

  1. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  2. Late sciatic nerve axonotmesis following acetabular reconstruction plate.

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Foruria, X; Labayru, F

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures can be post-traumatic, perioperative or postoperative. Late postoperative injury is very uncommon and can be due to heterotopic ossifications, muscular scarring, or implant migration. A case is presented of a patient with a previous transverse acetabular fracture treated with a reconstruction plate for the posterior column. After 17 years, she presented with progressive pain and motor deficit in the sciatic territory. Radiological and neurophysiological assessments were performed and the patient underwent surgical decompression of the sciatic nerve. A transection of the nerve was observed that was due to extended compression of one of the screws. At 4 years postoperatively, her pain had substantially diminished and the paresthesias in her leg had resolved. However, her motor symptoms did not improve. This case report could be relevant due to this uncommon delayed sciatic nerve injury due to prolonged hardware impingement.

  3. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z.; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  4. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach.

  5. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Pragmatical Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-11-01

    Most plasmas have very thin sheath compared with plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculation of plasma and sheath. Bohm criterion provides boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy is reported. Additional information on the subject will be posted in http://www.pppl.gov/pub/report/2002/ http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/ Work supported by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory through a University Research Support Program.

  6. Measurement of the sheath capacitance of a planar probe

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Young-Kwang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-10-15

    The sheath capacitance was measured on a planar probe dc-biased with respect to the plasma potential using the phase sensitive detection method in the region separated from the rf discharge plasmas by an immersed grid. It was observed that the sheath capacitance was negative when the collecting electrode of the probe was positioned downward toward the grid and biased near the plasma potential. This indicates that a double sheath had built up near the probe electrode. This tendency can be explained by the sheath capacitance, which is calculated using Poisson's equation with a non-zero electrical field and an ion velocity condition at the sheath edge.

  7. Cleaning and decompression of inferior alveolar canal to treat dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of a third molar.

    PubMed

    Scala, Rudy; Cucchi, Alessandro; Cappellina, Luca; Ghensi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We report a case of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia of a 70-year-old man after endodontic treatment of his mandibular left third molar that caused leakage of root canal filling material into the mandibular canal. After radiographic evaluation, extraction of the third molar and distal osteotomy, a surgical exploration was performed and followed by removal of the material and decompression of the IAN. The patient reported an improvement in sensation and immediate disappearance of dysesthesia already from the first postoperative day.

  8. Laminin targeting of a peripheral nerve-highlighting peptide enables degenerated nerve visualization

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael A.; Gross, Larry A.; Friedman, Beth; Adams, Stephen R.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Hussain, Timon; Frei, Andreas P.; Novy, Karel; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Target-blind activity-based screening of molecular libraries is often used to develop first-generation compounds, but subsequent target identification is rate-limiting to developing improved agents with higher specific affinity and lower off-target binding. A fluorescently labeled nerve-binding peptide, NP41, selected by phage display, highlights peripheral nerves in vivo. Nerve highlighting has the potential to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating intraoperative nerve identification, reducing accidental nerve transection, and facilitating repair of damaged nerves. To enable screening of molecular target-specific molecules for higher nerve contrast and to identify potential toxicities, NP41’s binding target was sought. Laminin-421 and -211 were identified by proximity-based labeling using singlet oxygen and by an adapted version of TRICEPS-based ligand-receptor capture to identify glycoprotein receptors via ligand cross-linking. In proximity labeling, photooxidation of a ligand-conjugated singlet oxygen generator is coupled to chemical labeling of locally oxidized residues. Photooxidation of methylene blue–NP41-bound nerves, followed by biotin hydrazide labeling and purification, resulted in light-induced enrichment of laminin subunits α4 and α2, nidogen 1, and decorin (FDR-adjusted P value < 10−7) and minor enrichment of laminin-γ1 and collagens I and VI. Glycoprotein receptor capture also identified laminin-α4 and -γ1. Laminins colocalized with NP41 within nerve sheath, particularly perineurium, where laminin-421 is predominant. Binding assays with phage expressing NP41 confirmed binding to purified laminin-421, laminin-211, and laminin-α4. Affinity for these extracellular matrix proteins explains the striking ability of NP41 to highlight degenerated nerve “ghosts” months posttransection that are invisible to the unaided eye but retain hollow laminin-rich tubular structures. PMID:27791138

  9. Microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Takatani, Tsunenori; Park, Hun-Soo; Kotani, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Gurung, Pritam; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) is a rare functional disorder representing around 1% of cases of trigeminal neuralgia. Lancinating throat and ear pain while swallowing are the typical manifestations, and are initially treated using anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine. Medically refractory GN is treated surgically. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is reportedly effective against GN, superseding rhizotomy and tractotomy. Methods: We encountered three patients with medically refractory GN who underwent MVD using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). The offending vessels were the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, which were confirmed intraoperatively via a transcondylar fossa approach to be affecting the root exit zones of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves. As IONM, facial motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were monitored during microsurgery in all three patients. Pharyngeal and vagal MEPs were added for two patients to avoid postoperative dysphagia. Results: GN disappeared immediately after surgery with complete preservation of hearing acuity and facial nerve function. Transient mild swallowing disturbance was observed in 1 patient without pharyngeal or vagal MEPs, whereas the remaining two patients with pharyngeal and vagal MEPs demonstrated no postoperative dysphagia. Conclusion: Although control of severe pain is expected in surgical intervention for GN, lower cranial nerves are easily damaged because of their fragility, even in MVD. IONM including pharyngeal and vagal MEPs appears very useful for avoiding postoperative sequelae during MVD for GN. PMID:26862458

  10. The effects of testosterone deficiency on the structural integrity of the penile dorsal nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armagan, A; Hatsushi, K; Toselli, P

    2008-01-01

    Androgens play a vital role in erectile function and are known to have a neuroprotective role in the nervous system. This study investigated, in a rat model, the effects of testosterone deprivation and replacement on the morphology of the dorsal nerve of the rat penis at the light microscopy level. Two weeks after castration, male rats were infused with vehicle alone or 44 mug of testosterone for 2 weeks. Age-matched, sham-operated control animals were used for comparisons. Penile tissue samples were removed for histological analyses. The following parameters were assessed: (1) total myelin sheath thickness; (2) density of nerve fibers; and (3) axon cross-sectional area per nerve fiber. Castration resulted in a significant increase in axon cross-sectional area compared to that of the control and testosterone-treated animals (6.97+/-0.59 microm(2) per fiber in control animals to 14.32+/-0.44 microm(2) per fiber in castrated animals). Qualitatively, there were signs of nerve degeneration, particularly myelin sheath degeneration, in all sample groups. We did not observe statistically significant changes in myelin sheath thickness. There was a trend of reduced nerve density. Nerve degeneration was not quantified since this study was performed at the light microscopic level. This study suggests that testosterone has a neuroprotective role in the nerve fibers of the dorsal nerve and testosterone deficiency may lead to different forms of nerve degeneration resulting in anatomic alterations, thus contributing to erectile dysfunction.

  11. Benchmarking sheath subgrid boundary conditions for macroscopic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, T. G.; Smithe, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of sheaths near metallic or dielectric-coated wall materials in contact with a plasma is ubiquitous, often giving rise to physical phenomena (sputtering, secondary electron emission, etc) which influence plasma properties and dynamics both near and far from the material interface. In this paper, we use first-principles PIC simulations of such interfaces to formulate a subgrid sheath boundary condition which encapsulates fundamental aspects of the sheath behavior at the interface. Such a boundary condition, based on the capacitive behavior of the sheath, is shown to be useful in fluid simulations wherein sheath scale lengths are substantially smaller than scale lengths for other relevant physical processes (e.g. radiofrequency wavelengths), in that it enables kinetic processes associated with the presence of the sheath to be numerically modeled without explicit resolution of spatial and temporal sheath scales such as electron Debye length or plasma frequency.

  12. Structural characterization of highly branched glucan sheath from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Koichi; Kaida, Rumi; Hayashi, Takahisa; Takabe, Keiji; Watanabe, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Wood rotting basidiomycetes produce extracellular mucilaginous sheaths interfacing fungal hyphae and plant biomass. While the versatility of these fungal sheaths has been addressed, sheaths generated by selective white-rot fungi remain poorly understood. To fill this gap, the sheath produced by the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, which degrades lignin while inflicting limited cellulose damage, was analyzed in this study. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the sheath formed three days after inoculation into a beech wood slice on an agar plate and was embedded at the interface between fungal hyphae and wood cell walls. The sheath's chemical structure was evaluated from fungus cultures in a liquid medium containing [U-(13)C6]-d-glucose and beech wood slices. Compositional analysis, methylation analysis, and (13)C NMR demonstrated that the sheath mainly consisted of a comb-like β-1,6-glucopyranose residue-branched β-1,3-glucan, which is advantageous to retain water and extracellular secondary metabolites.

  13. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  14. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset.

  15. Variations in the origin of the medial calcaneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee; Kim, Jaesuk; Spaulding, Cecily M

    2002-02-01

    Previous anatomic studies of the medial heel region were done on embalmed human cadavers. Here, the innervation of the medial heel region was studied by dissecting living tissue with the use of 3.5-power loupe magnification during decompression of the medial ankle for tarsal tunnel syndrome in 85 feet. The medial heel was found to be innervated by just one medial calcaneal nerve in 37% of the feet, by two medial calcaneal nerves in 41%, by three medial calcaneal nerves in 19%, and by four medial calcaneal nerves in 3%. An origin for a medial calcaneal nerve from the medial plantar nerve was found in 46% of the feet. This nerve most often innervates the skin of the posteromedial arch, where it is at risk for injury during calcaneal spur removal or plantar fasciotomy. Knowledge of the variations in location of the medial calcaneal nerves may prevent neuroma formation during surgery and provide insight into the variability of heel symptoms associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials. PMID:28287100

  17. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-03-13

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials.

  18. Continuum-kinetic approach to sheath simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, Petr; Hakim, Ammar; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-10-01

    Simulations of sheaths are performed using a novel continuum-kinetic model with collisions including ionization/recombination. A discontinuous Galerkin method is used to directly solve the Boltzmann-Poisson system to obtain a particle distribution function. Direct discretization of the distribution function has advantages of being noise-free compared to particle-in-cell methods. The distribution function, which is available at each node of the configuration space, can be readily used to calculate the collision integrals in order to get ionization and recombination operators. Analytical models are used to obtain the cross-sections as a function of energy. Results will be presented incorporating surface physics with a classical sheath in Hall thruster-relevant geometry. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0193.

  19. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  20. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury.

  1. Circumferential decompression of the foramen magnum for the treatment of syringomyelia associated with basilar invagination.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Frederic P; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Krauss, William E

    2004-07-01

    Posterior fossa decompression utilizing suboccipital craniectomy and duraplasty remains the standard surgical treatment for Chiari-associated syringomyelia. In the presence of basilar invagination, anterior decompression, typically transoral odontoidectomy, or posterior decompression may be performed. We report two cases in which anterior and posterior (circumferential) decompression of the foramen magnum was used to treat cervical syringomyelia successfully. These cases demonstrate that circumferential decompression of the foramen magnum may be necessary in some cases of cervical syringomyelia associated with basilar invagination and Chiari malformation.

  2. The probability and severity of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Ethan A.; Vann, Richard D.; Denoble, Petar J.

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild—Type I (manifestations 4–6)–and serious–Type II (manifestations 1–3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild–Type A (manifestations 3–6)–and serious–Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p << 0.01) improvement in trinomial model fit over the binomial (2-state) model. With the Type I/II definition, we found that the predicted probability of ‘mild’ DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed. PMID:28296928

  3. The probability and severity of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E; Weber, Paul W; Hada, Ethan A; Vann, Richard D; Denoble, Petar J

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild-Type I (manifestations 4-6)-and serious-Type II (manifestations 1-3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild-Type A (manifestations 3-6)-and serious-Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p < 0.01) improvement in trinomial model fit over the binomial (2-state) model. With the Type I/II definition, we found that the predicted probability of 'mild' DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed.

  4. Experimental Observation of Sheath-presheath Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kella, Vara Prasad; Ghosh, Joydeep; Sharma, Devendra; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Instabilities in the Sheath-presheath regime are most important phenomena that can affect the plasma-wall interaction. These instabilities can modify the particle flow velocities and distribution functions in that regime. In this present work, instabilities exists in the sheath-presheath in a low temperature plasma are observed. Experiments are carried in single ion species argon plasma and multi ion species Ar-He plasma. Experiments are carried in a stainless steel chamber with filament discharge plasma. Sheath is produced around a stainless steel grid at center of the chamber. Fluctuations from the grid and cylindrical Langmuir probe are recorded. Langmuir probe is used to get the floating potential fluctuations from presheath and bulk plasma as well. In single ion species argon plasma, there are two instabilities observed namely ion-ion counter streaming instability through mesh grid and ion acoustic instability respectively arises in the presheath. In case of multi-ion Ar-He plasma, two stream instability also explored. The neutral pressure threshold for the sustain of these instabilities also observed.

  5. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  6. Sub-diffraction Imaging via Surface Plasmon Decompression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-08

    of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved metal surfaces. The views, opinions and/or findings...adiabatic decompression of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved metal surfaces. Conference Name...diffraction imaging based on a process of adiabatic decompression of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved

  7. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  8. Cases from the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G N

    2000-12-01

    Decompression sickness is an uncommon but serious risk associated with flying and SCUBA diving with potential for significant morbidity and mortality. It can occur in both novice and experienced individuals. This case illustrates an atypical presentation of decompression sickness in an experienced amateur SCUBA diver. Clinical suspicion must be high, since the presenting symptoms can be nonspecific as in this case. Early recognition and treatment are important for maximum recovery.

  9. Investigation of Hematologic and Pathologic Response to Decompression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-10

    advanced case of osteonecrosjs did not manifest itself radiographically. In addition to -extensive necrosis of the cortical bone with peniosteal new...weeks of the ini tial decompression (6 , 7) . His tologic study of these cases of osteonecrosis , as well as evid ence presented by other investi gators...thrombotic therapy remains to be determined. I 45. I. . References 1. Rivera , T.C. Decompression sickness among div e rs: An analysis of 935 cases . M

  10. Patterns and Variations in Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; GOTO, Masanori; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a highly effective surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although there is little prospective clinical evidence, accumulated observational studies have demonstrated the benefits of MVD for refractory TN. In the current surgical practice of MVD for TN, there have been recognized patterns and variations in surgical anatomy and various decompression techniques. Here we provide a stepwise description of surgical procedures and relevant anatomical characteristics, as well as procedural options. PMID:25925756

  11. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  12. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  13. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  14. Electron Sheaths and Non-ambipolar Diffusion in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-10-01

    Electron sheaths were first predicted by Langmuir in 1929 when he stated that, ``with a large area, A, an anode sheath is a positive ion sheath, but that as A decreases, a point is reached where the positive ion sheath disappears and it is replaced by an electron sheath.''. We show that electron sheath formation near a positive anode depends on the anode area, Aa, as well as the area available for ion loss, Ai. When Aa/Ai< (me/mi)^1/2, the electron sheath potential monotonically decreases from the anode to the bulk plasma. When the anode is larger than this, a potential dip forms in the electron sheath to reduce the electron current lost to the anode. This potential dip is necessary to preserve global current balance and when it is present, total non-ambipolar diffusion can occur where all electrons are lost from the plasma through an electron sheath and all positive ions are lost elsewhere. Additional measurements were carried out to identify the transition from positive (ion) to negative (electron) sheaths. Data were taken in low-pressure argon plasma generated by hot filaments and confined in a multidipole chamber. I. Langmuir, Physical Review. 33, 954 (1929).

  15. Neurofibrosarcoma of the radial nerve in von Recklinghausen's disease with metastatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, R A

    1978-01-01

    A case of von Recklinghausen's disease with multiple neurofibromatosis is described in which death was caused by intracerebral haemorrhage due to metastatic angiosarcoma. The primary site was a peripheral nerve tumour which, on microscopic examination, showed both angiosarcoma and neurofibrosarcoma with transitional zones between the two. This is interpreted as another example of divergent differentiation in malignant nerve sheath tumours, and the case is compared with the two similar examples found in the literature. Images PMID:96219

  16. [The structure of the optic nerve in experimental glaucoma and in the means for its treatment].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V F; Mikheeva, E A; Karelina, V E; Alekseev, V N

    2000-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopy disorders of structure of the optic nerve were studied in rabbits with adrenaline induced glaucoma and after the action of antioxidants (Emoxipine, Erisode) used for preventive and medical purposes. Changes in glaucoma and after administration of drugs in axons and their myelinated sheath were similar but differently pronounced in right and left eye of the same animal. Positive effect of Erisode used for preventive and medical purposes was noted. Emoxipine enhanced the disturbances in optic nerve structure.

  17. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve transposition: Renaissance of an old concept in the light of new anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Amgad S

    2017-04-01

    Meralgia paresthetica causes pain in the anterolateral thigh. Most surgical procedures involve nerve transection or decompression. We conducted a cadaveric study to determine the feasibility of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) transposition. In three cadavers, the LFCN was exposed in the thigh and retroperitoneum. The two layers of the LFCN canal superficial and deep to the nerve were opened. The nerve was then mobilized medially away from the ASIS, by cutting the septum medial to sartorius. It was possible to mobilize the nerve for 2 cm medial to the ASIS. The nerve acquired a much straighter course with less tension. A new technique of LFCN transposition is presented here as an anatomical feasibility study. The surgical technique is based on the new understanding of the LFCN canal. Clin. Anat. 30:409-412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Suprascapular nerve injury: A cause to consider in shoulder pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kaihan; Yew, Wei Ping

    2016-05-13

    Suprascapular nerve injury is increasingly being recognized as an important cause of shoulder dysfunction. The non-specific clinical features of suprascapular nerve injury can make diagnosis difficult. However, it is essential for clinicians to consider it as part of the differential diagnoses in patients with vague pain or sensory disturbances over the posterosuperior part of their shoulder or have unexplained atrophy and weakness of their supraspinatus or infraspinatus muscle. Electrodiagnostic studies are useful in confirming and localising the nerve injury, while MRIs can be employed to determine the cause of nerve injury and assess the integrity of the rotator cuff muscles. Isolated suprascapular nerve injury can be managed with a trial of conservative management for at least 6 months. Subsequently, decompression of the nerve through open or arthroscopic techniques can be considered - both are associated with high rates of pain relief and functional improvement.

  19. Sudden peroneal nerve palsy in an osteoarthritic knee: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Nayak, Mayur; Ansari, Tahir; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Peroneal nerve injuries have been reported in association with various causes around the knee such as traumatic varus injury, traumatic dislocation, upper tibial osteotomy, knee arthroscopy and total knee arthroplasty. Two instances of varus arthritic knee associated with a peroneal nerve palsy have been reported so far. One presented with gradual onset peroneal nerve palsy that recovered with time and the other with sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy that did not recover. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a symptomatic varus arthritic knee and sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy with synovial cysts over the lateral aspect of the knee. We performed a total knee arthroplasty with decompression of the synovial cyst in the same patient. Three months following the surgery the patient was walking pain free with a completely recovered nerve palsy. PMID:28287389

  20. Rare Intradural Cervical Nerve Root Metastasis of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Elena; Hanna, George; Gospodarev, Vadim; Raghavan, Ravi; Ghostine, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Intradural extramedullary nerve root metastasis is extremely unusual with only a handful of cases reported, and it presents most commonly in the thoracic and lumbosacral regions. We report the first case of metastasis to a ventral cervical nerve root in a patient with low-grade follicular thyroid carcinoma thought to be in remission for several years. Histopathology demonstrated malignant transformation and invasion of the nerve root. This case underscores that any history of malignancy regardless of staging, grading, or remission status should raise the suspicion of metastasis as it can mimic other spine and nerve sheath tumors and represent malignant transformation. Gross total resection can be safely achieved with intraoperative neuromonitoring and result in improved function; however, treatment is likely palliative. PMID:28018768

  1. Experimental respiratory decompression sickness in sheep.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Lehner, C E; Beck, K A; Dubielzig, R R; Nordheim, E V; Lanphier, E H

    1988-09-01

    Respiratory decompression sickness (RDCS, "the chokes") is a potentially lethal consequence of ambient pressure reduction. Lack of a clearly suitable animal model has impeded understanding of this condition. RDCS, unaccompanied by central nervous system signs, occurred in 17 of 18 unanesthetized sheep exposed to compressed air at 230 kPa (2.27 ATA) for 22 h, returned to normal pressure for approximately 40 min, and taken to simulated altitude (0.75 ATA, 570 Torr). Respiratory signs, including tachypnea, sporadic apnea, and labored breathing, were accompanied by precordial Doppler ultrasound evidence of marked venous bubble loading. Pulmonary arterial pressures exceeded 30 Torr in five catheterized sheep that died or became moribund. Hypoxemia (arterial Po2 less than 40 Torr), neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed. Peribronchovascular edema was the most prominent necropsy finding. Chest radiography indicated interstitial edema in most affected sheep. High body weight and catheterization predisposed the sheep to severe RDCS. It appears that this protocol reliably provides a useful animal model for studies of RDCS and obstructive pulmonary hypertension, that the precipitating event is massive pulmonary embolization by bubbles, and that venous bubbles, detected by Doppler ultrasound, can signal impending RDCS.

  2. Use of ultrasound in altitude decompression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Robert M.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    A model that predicts the probability of developing decompression sickness (DCS) with various denitrogenation schedules is being developed by the Armstrong Laboratory, using human data from previous exposures. It was noted that refinements are needed to improve the accuracy and scope of the model. A commercially developed ultrasonic echo imaging system is being used in this model development. Using this technique, bubbles images from a subject at altitude can be seen in the gall bladder, hepatic veins, vena cava, and chambers of the heart. As judged by their motion and appearance in the vena cava, venous bubbles near the heart range in size from 30 to 300 M. The larger bubbles skim along the top, whereas the smaller ones appear as faint images near the bottom of the vessel. Images from growing bubbles in a model altitude chamber indicate that they grow rapidly, going from 20 to 100 M in 3 sec near 30,000 ft altitude. Information such as this is valuable in verifying those aspects of the DCS model dealing with bubble size, their growth rate, and their site of origin.

  3. A systematic review of factitious decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Kenedi, Christopher; Sames, Christopher; Paice, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of factitious decompression sickness (DCS) involving a patient emergently treated at a hyperbaric medicine facility in New Zealand. Patients with factitious disorder feign illnesses such as DCS in order to receive care and attention despite the lack of an underlying illness. Other studies have suggested that 0.6% to as many as 9.3% of hospital admissions are factitious in nature. Therefore we believe that factitious DCS is occurring more often than hyperbaric clinicians suspect. DCS can be life-threatening, and hyperbaric medicine clinicians will almost always "err on the side of caution" when patients are referred with symptoms of DCS. Because DCS can be diagnosed based on subjective symptoms and self-reported history, there are opportunities for factitious patients to receive hyperbaric therapy. The costs associated with factitious DCS include transport, staff resources and preventing patients with treatable conditions from accessing the hyperbaric chamber. We performed a systematic review of the literature and found eight additional reported cases of confirmed or suspected factitious DCS. We report our findings and recommendations for hyperbaric medicine specialists regarding the recognition and management of factitious DCS.

  4. Strain differences in the branching of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Rupp, A; Schmahl, W; Lederer, W; Matiasek, K

    2007-06-01

    The sciatic nerve in the rat is the site most often used for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. The length of sciatic nerve available for research, however, depends on the point at which the sciatic nerve divides into the peroneal and tibial nerves. In the present study, the hind limbs of 150 adult male rats of five different strains (Sprague-Dawley, Fischer 344, Wistar-Han, Lewis and Nude) were analysed with regard to femur length, the point at which the sciatic nerve divides into the tibial and peroneal nerves, and where these are surrounded by the same epineurium, and the point at which they are encased in individual epineurial sheaths. The results indicate that the lengths of sciatic nerve are fairly constant in all strains of rats. In absolute terms, they amount to about one-third of the length of the femur for stretches of undivided sciatic nerve, and up to nearly half of the femur length for stretches where the tibial and peroneal nerves are already present, but are still enclosed by the same epineurium. In 61.7% of the hind limbs examined in Fischer rats, however, no sciatic nerve could be seen as such, but only in the form of its successors surrounded by the separate epineuria. This makes it highly advisable not to use male adult Fischer rats in peripheral nerve regeneration studies with the sciatic nerve as the point of focus.

  5. Simulation study of the magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.; Mehdipour, H.; Zahed, H.

    2009-10-15

    Numerical solutions of stationary multifluid equations are used to study the formation and properties of the magnetized sheath near the boundary of a dusty plasma. The impacts of the strength of the magnetic field, the dust and plasma number densities, and the electron temperature on the sheath structure and spatial distributions of various quantities are investigated. It is shown that for a given angle of incidence of the magnetic field, there is a threshold magnetic field intensity above which some kind of large regular inhomogeneities develop on the spatial profile of the dust particles. The sheath thickness, the electron and ion number densities, and the absolute dust charge are strongly affected by the variation in the dust number density. The sheath demonstrates a nonlinear dependence on the electron temperature; as the electron temperature rises, the sheath first is broadened and the absolute wall potential decreases but then at higher temperatures the sheath becomes narrower and the absolute wall potential increases.

  6. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  7. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min‑1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ‑1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1‑e‑r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 ‑ Thr ‑ Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  9. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min−1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ−1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1−e−r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 − Thr − Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:28150725

  10. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9-15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9-156 ATA • min(-1)). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb - Ptiss) • τ(-1) dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1-e(-r), where r = ∫(PtissN2 - Thr - Pamb) • Pamb(-1) dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  11. Nondestructive testing of metallic sheath for internally cooled superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.W.; Cook, K.V.; Dodd, C.V.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    For quality assurance in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program, we developed ultrasonic and eddy-current techniques to examine the JBK-75 alloy sheath for superconducting cable for a large magnet. Ultrasound was used to examine the strip before forming into the sheath, and eddy currents were used to examine the seam weld after the sheath had been formed around the cable.

  12. Steerable sheath technology in the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jubin; Wong, Kelvin C K; Ginks, Matthew R; Bashir, Yaver; Betts, Timothy R; Rajappan, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Steerable sheaths have been shown to reduce procedure time in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), where catheter positioning and stability is typically challenging. This review critically addresses and highlights the recent developments in design of sheaths used to manipulate the ablation catheter and how these developments may impact on the ablation procedure itself, in particular the likelihood of first-time success. Patents relating to steerable sheaths are reviewed and discussed to gauge potential future developments in this area.

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  14. Continuous intraoperative monitoring of abnormal muscle response in microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm; a real-time navigator for complete relief.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Yamakami, Iwao; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2014-04-01

    Intermittent monitoring of abnormal muscle response (iAMR) has been reported to be useful for improving the surgical outcome of microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, iAMR has not elucidated the relationship between AMR change and the corresponding surgical procedure, or the pathogenesis of AMR and HFS. The purpose of this study is to clarify the usefulness of continuous AMR monitoring (cAMR) for improving the surgical results of MVD and for understanding the relationship between AMR change and corresponding surgical procedure, and the pathogenesis of AMR and HFS. Fifty consecutive patients with HFS treated by MVD under cAMR monitoring, which continuously records AMR every minute throughout the surgical period, were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were assessed for the presence of HFS 1 week after the surgery and at final follow-up. Forty-six patients showed the complete disappearance of HFS. In 32, AMR disappeared abruptly and simultaneously with decompression of an offending vessel. AMR showed dynamic and various changes including temporary disappearance, or sudden, gradual, or componential disappearance before and during the decompression procedure, and even during the dural and skin closure after the initial decompression procedure. Facial spasm remained in four patients despite permanent AMR disappearance. cAMR monitoring improves the outcome of MVD. Although the main cause of HFS and AMR is vascular compression at the facial nerve, hyperexcitability of the facial nucleus is also involved in the pathogenesis of HFS and AMR. The proportional involvement of these causes differs between patients.

  15. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  16. Automatic morphometry of nerve histological sections.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Cuisenaire, O; Denef, J F; Delbeke, J; Macq, B; Veraart, C

    2000-04-15

    A method for the automatic segmentation, recognition and measurement of neuronal myelinated fibers in nerve histological sections is presented. In this method, the fiber parameters i.e. perimeter, area, position of the fiber and myelin sheath thickness are automatically computed. Obliquity of the sections may be taken into account. First, the image is thresholded to provide a coarse classification between myelin and non-myelin pixels. Next, the resulting binary image is further simplified using connected morphological operators. By applying semantic rules to the zonal graph axon candidates are identified. Those are either isolated or still connected. Then, separation of connected fibers is performed by evaluating myelin sheath thickness around each candidate area with an Euclidean distance transformation. Finally, properties of each detected fiber are computed and false positives are removed. The accuracy of the method is assessed by evaluating missed detection, false positive ratio and comparing the results to the manual procedure with sampling. In the evaluated nerve surface, a 0.9% of false positives was found, along with 6.36% of missed detections. The resulting histograms show strong correlation with those obtained by manual measure. The noise introduced by this method is significantly lower than the intrinsic sampling variability. This automatic method constitutes an original tool for morphometrical analysis.

  17. MMP19 expression in the human optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chirco, Kathleen R.; Hazlewood, Ralph J.; Miller, Kathy; Workalemahu, Grefachew; Jampol, Lee M.; Lesser, G. Robert; Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Fingert, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The defining feature of glaucoma is excavation of the optic nerve head; however, the mechanism of this loss of tissue is not well understood. We recently discovered a copy number variation upstream of matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP19) in a large, autosomal dominant pedigree with a congenital malformation of the optic disc called cavitary optic disc anomaly (CODA). Patients with CODA have abnormal optic discs that exhibit an excavated shape similar to cupping seen in glaucoma. The goal of this study is to characterize the localization of MMP19 within the human optic nerve. Methods The MMP19 protein in the optic nerve was evaluated with western blot analysis and with immunohistochemistry in sagittal and en face/cross sections of optic nerves obtained from healthy human donor eyes. Results The MMP19 protein was detected in the human optic nerve, retina, and RPE/choroid with western blot analysis, with highest expression in the retina and the optic nerve. Using immunohistochemistry, MMP19 was localized within the optic nerve to the extracellular space within the septa that separate bundles of optic nerve axons into fascicles. The presence of MMP19 within the optic nerve septa was further confirmed by the colocalization of MMP19 to this structure with type IV collagen. Strong labeling of MMP19 was also detected in the arachnoid layer of the optic nerve sheath. Finally, immunohistochemistry of the optic nerve cross sections demonstrated that MMP19 shows a peripheral to central gradient, with more abundant labeling along the edges of the optic nerve and in the arachnoid layer than in the center of the nerve. Conclusions Abundant MMP19 was detected in the optic nerve head, the primary site of pathology in patients with CODA. The localization of MMP19 to the optic nerve septa is consistent with its predicted secretion and accumulation within the extracellular spaces of this tissue. Moreover, the lateral localization of MMP19 observed in the optic nerve cross

  18. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  19. Dynamic Heating and Decompression Experiments on Dacite and Rhyolite Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Waters, L.; Grocke, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral reaction rims, zoned crystals, and myriad growth or dissolution textures provide evidence for changes in magma pressure, temperature, or composition. Quantifying the magnitudes, timescales and length scales of those variations is a fundamental challenge of volcanology and igneous petrology; experiments provide quantitative insights into how magmas react to changes in pressure and temperature that can be used to address that challenge. We use single-step and dynamic experiments conducted in cold seal pressure vessels to study the responses of dacite and rhyolite magmas to heating and decompression events. During single-step decompression (or heating) experiments, conditions are changed nearly instantaneously from the initial to final state in one step, or several smaller steps, whereas "dynamic experiments" have continuous variation in pressure and/or temperature. These two types of experiments yield useful and complementary information describing crystal nucleation, growth, and reaction rates in response to changing (as opposed to steady state) conditions. Here we discuss isothermal decompression experiments that show substantial path-dependence for runs with equivalent time-averaged decompression rates as slow as 0.27 MPa/h for >500 h. Continuous decompression experiments often contain fewer but larger plagioclase crystals than are present in single-step runs, and those new crystals often show complex growth textures. Our results suggest that even slow changes in storage conditions can disrupt melt structure and greatly retard nucleation provided the changes are steady. We hypothesize that if the decompression path remains steady and continuous (absent a stall on and/or rapid decompression), the magma can remain in a growth-dominated regime even though it is far from equilibrium.

  20. Novel Anti-Adhesive CMC-PE Hydrogel Significantly Enhanced Morphological and Physiological Recovery after Surgical Decompression in an Animal Model of Entrapment Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Urano, Hideki; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Michiro; Ohnisi, Tetsuro; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Endo, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel hydrogel derived from sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) in which phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was introduced into the carboxyl groups of CMC to prevent perineural adhesions. This hydrogel has previously shown excellent anti-adhesive effects even after aggressive internal neurolysis in a rat model. Here, we confirmed the effects of the hydrogel on morphological and physiological recovery after nerve decompression. We prepared a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression using silicone tubing. Morphological and physiological recovery was confirmed at one, two, and three months after nerve decompression by assessing motor conduction velocity (MCV), the wet weight of the tibialis anterior muscle and morphometric evaluations of nerves. Electrophysiology showed significantly quicker recovery in the CMC-PE group than in the control group (24.0 ± 3.1 vs. 21.0± 2.1 m/s (p < 0.05) at one months and MCV continued to be significantly faster thereafter. Wet muscle weight at one month significantly differed between the CMC-PE (BW) and control groups (0.148 ± 0.020 vs. 0.108 ± 0.019%BW). The mean wet muscle weight was constantly higher in the CMC-PE group than in the control group throughout the experimental period. The axon area at one month was twice as large in the CMC-PE group compared with the control group (24.1 ± 17.3 vs. 12.3 ± 9 μm2) due to the higher ratio of axons with a larger diameter. Although the trend continued throughout the experimental period, the difference decreased after two months and was not statistically significant at three months. Although anti-adhesives can reduce adhesion after nerve injury, their effects on morphological and physiological recovery after surgical decompression of chronic entrapment neuropathy have not been investigated in detail. The present study showed that the new anti-adhesive CMC-PE gel can accelerate morphological and physiological recovery of nerves after decompression surgery.

  1. Novel Anti-Adhesive CMC-PE Hydrogel Significantly Enhanced Morphological and Physiological Recovery after Surgical Decompression in an Animal Model of Entrapment Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Hideki; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Michiro; Ohnisi, Tetsuro; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Endo, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel hydrogel derived from sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) in which phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was introduced into the carboxyl groups of CMC to prevent perineural adhesions. This hydrogel has previously shown excellent anti-adhesive effects even after aggressive internal neurolysis in a rat model. Here, we confirmed the effects of the hydrogel on morphological and physiological recovery after nerve decompression. We prepared a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression using silicone tubing. Morphological and physiological recovery was confirmed at one, two, and three months after nerve decompression by assessing motor conduction velocity (MCV), the wet weight of the tibialis anterior muscle and morphometric evaluations of nerves. Electrophysiology showed significantly quicker recovery in the CMC-PE group than in the control group (24.0 ± 3.1 vs. 21.0± 2.1 m/s (p < 0.05) at one months and MCV continued to be significantly faster thereafter. Wet muscle weight at one month significantly differed between the CMC-PE (BW) and control groups (0.148 ± 0.020 vs. 0.108 ± 0.019%BW). The mean wet muscle weight was constantly higher in the CMC-PE group than in the control group throughout the experimental period. The axon area at one month was twice as large in the CMC-PE group compared with the control group (24.1 ± 17.3 vs. 12.3 ± 9 μm2) due to the higher ratio of axons with a larger diameter. Although the trend continued throughout the experimental period, the difference decreased after two months and was not statistically significant at three months. Although anti-adhesives can reduce adhesion after nerve injury, their effects on morphological and physiological recovery after surgical decompression of chronic entrapment neuropathy have not been investigated in detail. The present study showed that the new anti-adhesive CMC-PE gel can accelerate morphological and physiological recovery of nerves after decompression surgery. PMID:27741280

  2. Delayed Recompression for Decompression Sickness: Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, Amir; Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Bergan, Jacob; Friedman, Mony; Maliar, Amit; Efrati, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most cases of decompression sickness (DCS) occur soon after surfacing, with 98% within 24 hours. Recompression using hyperbaric chamber should be administrated as soon as feasible in order to decrease bubble size and avoid further tissue injury. Unfortunately, there may be a significant time delay from surfacing to recompression. The time beyond which hyperbaric treatment is non effective is unclear. The aims of the study were first to evaluate the effect of delayed hyperbaric treatment, initiated more than 48h after surfacing for DCS and second, to evaluate the different treatment protocols. Methods From January 2000 to February 2014, 76 divers had delayed hyperbaric treatment (≥48h) for DCS in the Sagol center for Hyperbaric medicine and Research, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel. Data were collected from their medical records and compared to data of 128 patients treated earlier than 48h after surfacing at the same hyperbaric institute. Results There was no significant difference, as to any of the baseline characteristics, between the delayed and early treatment groups. With respect to treatment results, at the delayed treatment divers, complete recovery was achieved in 76% of the divers, partial recovery in 17.1% and no improvement in 6.6%. Similar results were achieved when treatment started early, where 78% of the divers had complete recovery, 15.6% partial recovery and 6.2% no recovery. Delayed hyperbaric treatment using US Navy Table 6 protocol trended toward a better clinical outcome yet not statistically significant (OR=2.786, CI95%[0.896-8.66], p=0.07) compared to standard hyperbaric oxygen therapy of 90 minutes at 2 ATA, irrespective of the symptoms severity at presentation. Conclusions Late recompression for DCS, 48 hours or more after surfacing, has clinical value and when applied can achieve complete recovery in 76% of the divers. It seems that the preferred hyperbaric treatment protocol should be based on US Navy Table 6. PMID

  3. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  4. Sheath effects on DEMETER ion drift measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Richard; Knutson, Nelson; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2010-08-01

    The "Instrument d'Analyse du Plasma" on DEMETER includes an ion drift meter used to measure the direction of the incoming ram plasma ( Berthelier et al., 2006a, b ). Given the velocity of the satellite, and expected flow velocities of plasma along DEMETER's orbit, it is estimated that at mid latitudes, the direction of incident plasma as measured by IAP should be within approximately 2° of the ram direction. Yet, significantly larger angular deviations are measured routinely. An important assumption made in the interpretation of onboard instruments, such as IAP, is that neither the spacecraft nor the instrument significantly perturb the plasma that is being measured. In view of the large observed angular deviations, this paper examines the possible effect of the electrostatic sheath surrounding IAP. This is done with the 3D PIC simulation code PTetra. The model uses a full 3D particle in cell code with unstructured tetrahedral mesh capable of accurately representing the satellite geometry. The mesh is also adaptive so as to provide a fine spatial resolution in the vicinity of the particle sensor where it is needed, and a coarse resolution in regions where plasma parameters vary over a longer scale length. Calculation results show that while particle deflection associated with the electrostatic sheath near IAP can account for appreciable angular deflections for representative ionospheric plasmas, they are typically smaller than the ones observed. Additionally, the model is unable to reproduce the latitudinal dependence of the observed large deflection angles. It is concluded that sheath effects may cause appreciable distortions on the IAP type of ion flow meter instruments, and on other particle sensors in general. The larger observed deviations and their latitudinal dependence, however, must be attributable to other physical processes not accounted for in the model.

  5. Lunar photoelectron sheath and levitation of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    The decision to launch Luna Glob and Luna Resus satellites, carrying instrumentation to investigate the structure of photoelectron sheath and levitation of dust particles in the sheath, adjacent to the surface of the moon has intensified interest in this exciting area. The present analysis incorporates the following novel features: (i) In contrast to intuitive half Maxwellian (M) distribution of velocities of the photoelectrons, emitted from the surface of the moon, which corresponds to an arbitrary temperature, a well-established half Fermi Dirac (F-D) distribution [R. H. Fowler, Phys. Rev. 38, 45 (1931)] has been used, (ii) the profiles for electric potential, electric field, and electron density have been derived (not a priori assumed), (iii) an expression for the rate of electron accretion on a positively charged dust particle, which takes account of the anisotropic flux of electrons has been derived and used in the analysis, and (iv) a derived (rather than intuitive) expression for the rate of photoelectron emission from a positively charged dust particle has been used for the first time in such analyses. The profiles of the electric potential, electric field, and electron density in the photoelectric sheath have been evaluated for typical lunar environment and used to obtain the profile of the radius of a dust particle for levitation. The dependence of the electric potential on the surface of the moon on the parameters of the solar wind and photo-efficiency of the material of moon's surface has also been discussed. It is seen that the results based on half F-D distribution are significantly different from those obtained on the basis of M-distribution.

  6. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  7. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  8. Controversies in ureteroscopy: Wire, basket, and sheath

    PubMed Central

    Rizkala, Emad R; Monga, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    In the last one to two decades, flexible ureteroscopy has rapidly expanded its role in the treatment of urologic stone disease. With the frequent and expanded use of flexible ureteroscopy, other ancillary instruments were developed in order to ease and facilitate this technique, such as ureteral access sheaths (UAS) and a variety of wires and baskets. These developments, along with improved surgeon ureteroscopic competence, have often brought into question the need to implement the “traditional technique” of flexible ureteroscopy. In this review, we discuss a brief history of flexible ureteroscopy, its expanded indications, and the controversy surrounding the use of UAS, wires, and baskets. PMID:24082447

  9. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  10. Enhanced rat sciatic nerve regeneration through silicon tubes filled with pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiqing; Li, Haohuan; Ou Yang, Jingping; Peng, Hao; Wu, Ke; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Jingwei

    2005-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is an antioxidant that also stimulates nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis and secretion. In an earlier pilot study in our laboratory, Schwann cell growth was accelerated, and NGF mRNA expression and NGF secretion were promoted. The present study was designed to explore the possible nerve-inducing effect of PQQ on a nerve tube model over a 1-cm segmental deficit. An 8-mm sciatic nerve deficit was created in a rat model and bridged by a 1-cm silicone tube. Then,10 mul of 0.03 mmol/l PQQ were perfused into the silicone chamber in the PQQ group. The same volume of normal saline was delivered in the control group. Each animal underwent functional observation (SFI) at 2-week intervals and electrophysiological studies at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed at the end of the experiment, 12 weeks after tube implantation. Using a digital image-analysis system, thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity and amplitude of activity potential), and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath) in nerve regeneration between the PQQ group and controls (P < 0.05). More mature, high-density, newly regenerated nerve was observed in the PQQ group. We conclude that PQQ is a potent enhancer for the regeneration of peripheral nerves.

  11. Intraoperative conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots associated with spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Popa, Iulian; Poenaru, Dan V; Oprea, Manuel D; Andrei, Diana

    2013-07-01

    Lumbosacral nerve roots anomalies may produce low back pain. These anomalies are reported to be a cause for failed back surgery. They are usually left undiagnosed, especially in endoscopic discectomy techniques. Any surgery for entrapment disorders, performed on a patient with undiagnosed lumbosacral nerve roots anomaly, may lead to serious neural injuries because of an improper surgical technique or decompression. In this report, we describe our experience with a case of L5-S1 spondylolisthesis and associated congenital lumbosacral nerve root anomalies discovered during the surgical intervention, and the difficulties raised by such a discovery. Careful examination of coronal and axial views obtained through high-quality Magnetic Resonance Imaging may lead to a proper diagnosis of this condition leading to an adequate surgical planning, minimizing the intraoperatory complications.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of nerve fibers. A study of membrane lipids under steady state conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Pézolet, M; Georgescauld, D

    1985-01-01

    The molecular structures of different nerve fibers kept in good physiological conditions were studied by laser Raman spectroscopy. For myelinated nerves like the rat sciatic nerve, the Raman spectrum is dominated by bands due to the lipid component of the myelin sheath. The temperature dependence of these bands does not reveal any thermotropic phase transition between 0 and 40 degrees C. There is, however, with temperature, a linear increase in the intermolecular disorder that is accompanied by an increase in the number of gauche bonds of the phospholipid acyl chains. For unmyelinated nerves such as the lobster leg nerve, the C-H stretching region of the Raman spectrum is covered by bands arising from the protein component of the axoplasm. However, for the garfish olfactory nerve that has a high density of excitable membranes, phospholipid bands are observed and can be used as intrinsic structural probes of the excitable membranes. The relative intensity of these bands is also temperature dependent. PMID:3978206

  13. Investigation of infraorbital nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Sakavicius, D; Juodzbalys, G; Kubilius, R; Sabalys, G P

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the severity of infraorbital nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures and to estimate the treatment methods facilitating its functional recovery. A total of 478 patients with unilateral zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures were treated. Infraorbital nerve sensory disturbances were diagnosed in 64.4% of the patients. Injury of the infraorbital nerve was expressed as asymmetry index, which was calculated as a ratio between the affected side and the intact side electric pain detection thresholds at the innervation zone skin before treatment and 14 days, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. A mean asymmetry index of 0.6 +/- 0.03 and 1.9 +/- 0.5 was registered for 57 (11.9%) patients with hyperalgesia and for 251 (52.5%) patients with hypoalgesia, respectively. As a result of retrospective analysis of infraorbital nerve sensory disturbances and its functional recovery, infraorbital nerve injury severity was classified as mild, moderate and severe. It was found that the dynamics and outcome of the functional infraorbital nerve recovery depend on the severity of the injury and the presence of infraorbital canal damage. Function was completely recovered within 3 months after treatment in cases with mild nerve injury. In moderate cases, complete recovery was seen within 6 months and in 34.6% of the severe cases, within a 12-month period after treatment when infraorbital nerve decompression was performed according to the stated indication. Treatment based on infraorbital nerve injury classification offers a better prognosis for complete recovery of the infraorbital nerve function.

  14. The risks of scuba diving: a focus on Decompression Illness.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or "off-gassed," resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport.

  15. The Risks of Scuba Diving: A Focus on Decompression Illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or “off-gassed,” resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport. PMID:25478296

  16. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Jiaxin; Li, Wenwang; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Ping; Zheng, Gaofeng

    2016-11-01

    Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  17. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  18. Electrohydrodynamic direct-writing orderly pattern with sheath gas focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianyi; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Jiaxin; He, Guangqi; Xu, Lei; Liu, Yifang; Liu, Juan; Wu, Dezhi; Zheng, Gaofeng

    2016-11-01

    Laminar sheath gas is introduced to increase the stability of Electrohydrodynamic Direct-Writing (EDW). The external stretching force from sheath gas promotes the ejection threshold, the diameter of jet and printed fibers as well. The critical voltage decreases with the increase of sheath gas pressure. The stretching force from sheath gas decreases the diameter of printed fiber as well as that of charged jet. As sheath gas pressure increases from 0 to 25 kPa, the average diameter of micro/nano structure reduces from 4.46 μ m to 845.25 nm. The laminar field flow of sheath gas shelters the charged jet free from the surrounding interferences, and helps charged jet to move in a straight line. With the help of sheath gas, the stability of charged jet can be improved to direct-write precise complex micro-pattern. The position precision of direct-written pattern is less than 5 μ m . As a novel method, EDW with laminar sheath gas would promote the deposition precision of printed micro/nano structure and its application.

  19. Dynamic reversibility of hydrodynamic focusing for recycling sheath fluid.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Nastaran; Howell, Peter B; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2010-08-07

    The phenomenon of "unmixing" has been demonstrated in microfluidic mixers, but here we manipulate laminar flow streams back to their original positions in order to extend the operational utility of an analytical device where no mixing is desired. Using grooves in the channel wall, we passively focus a sample stream with two sheath streams to center it in a microchannel for optical analysis. Even though the sample stream is completely surrounded by sheath fluid, reversing the orientation of the grooves in the channel walls returns the sample stream to its original position with respect to the sheath streams. We demonstrate the separation of the sample stream from the contiguous sheath streams and the recycling of the sheath fluid using the reversibility of laminar flow. Polystyrene microspheres and fluorescent dye were used to quantify the performance of the unsheathing process. We found that the maximum numbers of microspheres and all of the fluorescent dye were recaptured at sheath recycling levels <92%. The use of this sheathing technique has previously been demonstrated in a sensitive microflow cytometer; the unsheathing capability now provides the opportunity to recover particles from the sensor with minimal dilution or to recycle the sheath fluid for long-term unattended operation.

  20. Two simple and rugged designs for creating microfluidic sheath flow

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Peter B.; Golden, Joel P.; Hilliard, Lisa R.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Mott, David R.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2009-01-01

    A simple design capable of 2-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing is proposed and successfully demonstrated. In the past, most microfluidic sheath flow systems have often only confined the sample solution on the sides, leaving the top and bottom of the sample stream in contact with the floor and ceiling of the channel. While relatively simple to build, these designs increase the risk of adsorption of sample components to the top and bottom of the channel. A few designs have been successful in completely sheathing the sample stream, but these typically require multiple sheath inputs and several alignment steps. In the designs presented here, full sheathing is accomplished using as few as one sheath input, which eliminates the need to carefully balance the flow of two or more sheath inlets. The design is easily manufactured using current microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, the sample and sheath fluid can be subsequently separated for recapture of the sample fluid or re-use of the sheath fluid. Designs were demonstrated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using soft lithography and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using micromilling and laser ablation. PMID:18584084

  1. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  2. Intraoral Neurinoma of the Lingual Nerve: An Uncommon Tumor in Floor of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Kumar kuppusamy, Santhosh; Ramkumar, Subramaniyam; Narasimhan, Malathi; Azariah Dhiravia Sargunam, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Neurinoma or schwannoma is an uncommon benign tumor that arises primarily from the nerve sheath of Schwann cells. About 25% has been reported in head and neck region extracranially, but only 1% in the intraoral origin. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, lips and buccal mucosa. In review of literature, intraoral schwannoma of the lingual nerve origin has not been reported frequently. So, we present a case of intraoral neurinoma of the lingual nerve. PMID:24639903

  3. A quantitative study of the facial nerve in mice prenatally exposed to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Suguru; Sasaki, Yasuo; Shiota, Kohei

    2003-03-01

    Pregnant ICR mice were given 20% ethanol intraperitoneally twice on day 13 of gestation and allowed to give birth to offspring. The offspring were killed at 56 days of age and the motor root of their facial nerve was examined histologically and morphometrically. The cross-sectional area of the facial nerve of mice prenatally exposed to ethanol was significantly smaller than that of the control mice. There was no significant difference in the total number of myelinated axons or the mean axonal diameter between control and ethanol-exposed mice, but the mean diameter of myelinated fibers (axon + myelin sheath) and the thickness of myelin sheath were significantly decreased in the treated group. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to ethanol disturbs myelination of the motor root of the facial nerve and may cause permanent neurological effects.

  4. Decompression experiments identify kinetic controls on explosive silicic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Sisson, T.W.; Hankins, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Eruption intensity is largely controlled by decompression-induced release of water-rich gas dissolved in magma. It is not simply the amount of gas that dictates how forcefully magma is propelled upwards during an eruption, but also the rate of degassing, which is partly a function of the supersaturation pressure (??Pcritical) triggering gas bubble nucleation. High temperature and pressure decompression experiments using rhyolite and dacite melt reveal compositionally-dependent differences in the ??Pcritical of degassing that may explain why rhyolites have fueled some of the most explosive eruptions on record.

  5. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  6. What is the size of a floating sheath? An answer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Farina; Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a non-neutral boundary sheath in front of material surfaces is universal plasma phenomenon. Despite several decades of research, however, not all related issues are fully clarified. In a recent paper, Chabert pointed out that this lack of clarity applies even to the seemingly innocuous question ``What the size of a floating sheath?'' This contribution attempts to provide an answer that is not arbitrary: The size of a floating sheath is defined as the plate separation of an equivalent parallel plate capacitor. The consequences of the definition are explored with the help of a self-consistent sheath model, and a comparison is made with other sheath size definitions. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB TR 87.

  7. Gas insulated transmission line having low inductance intercalated sheath

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1978-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line including an outer sheath, an inner conductor disposed within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas between the inner conductor and the outer sheath. The outer sheath comprises an insulating tube having first and second ends, and having interior and exterior surfaces. A first electrically conducting foil is secured to the interior surface of the insulating tube, is spirally wound from one tube end to the second tube end, and has a plurality of overlapping turns. A second electrically conducting foil is secured to the exterior surface of the insulating tube, and is spirally wound in the opposite direction from the first electrically conducting foil. By winding the foils in opposite directions, the inductances within the intercalated sheath will cancel each other out.

  8. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  9. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Pragmatical Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-10-01

    Most plasmas have very thin sheath compared with plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculation of plasma and sheath. Bohm criterion provides boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy is reported. Additional information on the subject is posted on the web http://www.pppl.gov/pub/report/2002/ http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0208041. Work supported by the Department of Energy via the University Research Support Program of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  10. The snapping medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; O'driscoll, Shawn W; Smith, Jay; Skinner, John A; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Snapping elbow is a well-known condition where elbow flexion and extension elicits a painful, popping sensation. The most frequent etiology is anterior dislocation of the ulnar nerve over the medial epicondyle. Four patients (3 females and 1 male) presented with complaints of a popping sensation in the elbow, pain over the medial aspect of the forearm, and ulnar neuritis. All patients underwent preoperative dynamic ultrasound and surgical exploration of the medial elbow. Intraoperatively, snapping of the MABC over the medial epicondyle was discovered in all four patients. In three patients, there was abnormal displacement of the medial triceps and ulnar nerve: in two of these, both structures dislocated over the medial epicondyle and in one patient both structures subluxated. In each case, the MABC was decompressed (n = 1) and transposed (n = 3), and in three cases, the medial triceps and ulnar nerve were addressed as well. Symptomatic improvement was achieved in all cases. Retrospective review of the ultrasound revealed the snapping MABC, though it was less effective prospectively in the cases when snapping MABC was not suspected. In conclusion, snapping of the MABC broadens the spectrum of disorders that results in snapping elbow. To our knowledge, we are unaware of prior reports of this entity.

  11. [Intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve. A case report].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, J; Kortmann, K-B; Engelhardt, M

    2010-09-01

    This is a report of a 70-year-old patient with spontaneous pain of the dorsum area of the left foot. A few days later there was a sudden onset of foot drop. First, an idiopathic peroneal palsy was assessed but an MRI showed a cystic tumour near the fibular head. These findings resulted in the patient attending our clinic for surgical treatment. During the operation we found an intraneural ganglion of the deep peroneal nerve and the common peroneal nerve. There was no connection with the superior tibiofibular joint. The ganglion was therefore removed. Two months after the operation the patient reported an improvement of the pain but no improvement of movement of the foot. An intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve derives from the superior tibiofibular joint. Given access to the articular branch, the cyst typically spreads out proximally from the deep peroneal nerve to the common peroneal nerve and to the point of the sciatic nerve. The clinical symptoms are correlated with the extent of cyst propagation. Recommended therapy would include the ligation of the aricular branch, or synovectomy, or resection of the superior tibiofibular joint and decompression of the cyst.

  12. Eruptive dynamics during magma decompression: a laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Wadsworth, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of eruptive styles characterizes the activity of a given volcano. Indeed, eruptive styles can range from effusive phenomena to explosive eruptions, with related implications for hazard management. Rapid changes in eruptive style can occur during an ongoing eruption. These changes are, amongst other, related to variations in the magma ascent rate, a key parameter affecting the eruptive style. Ascent rate is in turn dependent on several factors such as the pressure in the magma chamber, the physical properties of the magma and the rate at which these properties change. According to the high number of involved parameters, laboratory decompression experiments are the best way to achieve quantitative information on the interplay of each of those factors and the related impact on the eruption style, i.e. by analyzing the flow and deformation behavior of the transparent volatile-bearing analogue fluid. We carried out decompression experiments following different decompression paths and using silicone oil as an analogue for the melt, with which we can simulate a range of melt viscosity values. For a set of experiments we added rigid particles to simulate the presence of crystals in the magma. The pure liquid or suspension was mounted into a transparent autoclave and pressurized to different final pressures. Then the sample was saturated with argon for a fixed amount of time. The decompression path consists of a slow decompression from the initial pressure to the atmospheric condition. Alternatively, samples were decompressed almost instantaneously, after established steps of slow decompression. The decompression path was monitored with pressure transducers and a high-speed video camera. Image analysis of the videos gives quantitative information on the bubble distribution with respect to depth in the liquid, pressure and time of nucleation and on their characteristics and behavior during the ongoing magma ascent. Furthermore, we also monitored the evolution of

  13. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  14. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots: current aspects of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, J; Petrovitch, A; Sörös, P; Malich, A; Hussein, S; Kaiser, W A

    2004-03-01

    Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots (CLNR) are the most common anomalies involving the lumbar nerve structures which can be one of the origins of failed back syndromes. They can cause sciatica even without the presence of a additional compressive impingement (such as disc herniation, spondylolisthesis or lateral recess stenosis), and often congenital lumbosacral spine anomalies (such as bony defects) are present at the "conjoined sheaths". This congenital anomaly has been reported in 14% of cadaver studies, but myelographic or computed tomographic studies have revealed an incidence of approximately 4% only. Diagnostic methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are helpful for determination of the exact anatomical relations in this context. We present five typical cases of conjoined nerve roots observed during a 1 year period, equivalent to 6% of our out-patients without a history of surgical treatment on the lumbar spine. In all cases with suspicious radiological findings MRI or lumbar myelography combined with CT and multiplanar reconstructions is recommended.

  15. Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Horikoshi, Tomo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should definitely be considered as an option. PMID:27413579

  16. Ultrasound-stimulated peripheral nerve regeneration within asymmetrically porous PLGA/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduit.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Se Heang; Seo, Tae Beom; Namgung, Uk; Kim, Jin Man; Lee, Jin Ho

    2010-08-01

    Recently, we developed a novel method to fabricate a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with asymmetrical pore structure and hydrophilicity using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and Pluronic F127 by a modified immersion precipitation method. From the animal study using a rat model (sciatic nerve defect of rat), we recognized that the unique PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube provided good environments for nerve regeneration. In this study, we applied low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as a simple and noninvasive stimulus at the PLGA/F127 NGC-implanted site transcutaneously in rats to investigate the feasibility of ultrasound for the enhanced nerve regeneration through the tube. The nerve regeneration behaviors within the ultrasound-stimulated PLGA/Pluronic F127 NGCs were compared with the NGCs without the ultrasound treatment as well as normal nerve by histological and immunohistochemical observations. It was observed that the PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube-implanted group applied with the ultrasound had more rapid nerve regeneration behavior (approximately 0.71 mm/day) than the tube-implanted group without the ultrasound treatment (approximately 0.48 mm/day). The ultrasound-treated tube group also showed greater neural tissue area as well as larger axon diameter and thicker myelin sheath than the tube group without the ultrasound treatment, indicating better nerve regeneration. The better nerve regeneration behavior in the our NGC/ultrasound system may be caused by the synergistic effect of the asymmetrically porous PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube with unique properties (selective permeability, hydrophilicity, and structural stability, which can provide good environment for nerve regeneration) and physical stimulus (stimulation of the Schwann cells and activation of the neurotrophic factors).

  17. Decompressive Craniectomy and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is the largest cause of death in young patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Decompressive craniectomy is part of the second level measures for the management of increased intracranial pressure refractory to medical management as moderate hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The literature lack of concepts is their indications. We present a review on the state of the art. PMID:27162826

  18. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  19. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  20. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  1. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  2. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  3. A Log Logistic Survival Model Applied to Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a complex, multivariable problem. A mathematical description or model of the likelihood of DCS requires a large amount of quality research data, ideas on how to define a decompression dose using physical and physiological variables, and an appropriate analytical approach. It also requires a high-performance computer with specialized software. I have used published DCS data to develop my decompression doses, which are variants of equilibrium expressions for evolved gas plus other explanatory variables. My analytical approach is survival analysis, where the time of DCS occurrence is modeled. My conclusions can be applied to simple hypobaric decompressions - ascents lasting from 5 to 30 minutes - and, after minutes to hours, to denitrogenation (prebreathing). They are also applicable to long or short exposures, and can be used whether the sufferer of DCS is at rest or exercising at altitude. Ultimately I would like my models to be applied to astronauts to reduce the risk of DCS during spacewalks, as well as to future spaceflight crews on the Moon and Mars.

  4. The Design and Development of the Topside Decompression Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    4 Subsea Cable CE-3T-6-100UC ................................................... 5 Diver-Worn Depth Sensor ...laptop computer, instrumentation case, diver instrumentation cable, and diver-worn depth sensor ; its software components include a decompression program...1 Sensor Instrumentation Case ................................................................. 1 Diver

  5. The plasma drag and dust motion inside the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Samarian, A.

    2011-05-15

    The motion of micron size dust inside the sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated by self-consistently calculating the charge and various forces acting on the dust. It is shown that the dust trajectory inside the sheath, which is like an Archimedean spiral swinging back and forth between the wall and the plasma-sheath boundary, depends only indirectly on the orientation of the magnetic field. When the Lorentz force is smaller than the collisional momentum exchange, the dust dynamics is insensitive to the obliqueness of the magnetic field. Only when the magnetic field is strong enough, the sheath structure and, thus, the dust dynamics are significantly affected by the field orientation. Balance between the plasma drag, sheath electrostatic field, and gravity plays an important role in determining how far the dust can travel inside the sheath. The dust equilibrium point shifts closer to the wall in the presence of gravity and plasma drag. However, in the absence of plasma drag, dust can sneak back into the plasma if acted only by gravity. The implication of our results to the usability of dust as a sheath probe is discussed.

  6. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-06-03

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths.

  7. Morphogenesis of the fibrous sheath in the marsupial spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ricci, M; Breed, W G

    2005-08-01

    The spermatozoon fibrous sheath contains longitudinal columns and circumferential ribs. It surrounds the axoneme of the principal piece of the mammalian sperm tail, and may be important in sperm stability and motility. Here we describe its assembly during spermiogenesis in a marsupial, the brush-tail possum, and compare its structural organization with that of eutherian mammals, birds and reptiles. Transmission electron microscopy showed that possum fibrous sheath assembly is a multistep process extending in a distal-to-proximal direction along the axoneme from steps 4 to 14 of spermiogenesis. For the most part, assembly of the longitudinal columns occurs before that of the circumferential ribs. Immunohistochemical and immunogold labelling showed that fibrous sheath proteins are first present in the spermatid cytoplasm; at least some of the proteins of the sheath precursors differ from those in the mature fibrous sheath. That immunoreactivity develops after initiation of chromatin condensation suggests that fibrous sheath proteins, or their mRNAs, are stored within the spermatid cytoplasmic lobule prior to their assembly along the axoneme. These findings are similar to those in laboratory rats, and thus suggests that the mode of fibrous sheath assembly evolved in a common ancestor over 125 million years ago, prior to the divergence of marsupial and eutherian lineages.

  8. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  9. Morphogenesis of the fibrous sheath in the marsupial spermatozoon

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M; Breed, WG

    2005-01-01

    The spermatozoon fibrous sheath contains longitudinal columns and circumferential ribs. It surrounds the axoneme of the principal piece of the mammalian sperm tail, and may be important in sperm stability and motility. Here we describe its assembly during spermiogenesis in a marsupial, the brush-tail possum, and compare its structural organization with that of eutherian mammals, birds and reptiles. Transmission electron microscopy showed that possum fibrous sheath assembly is a multistep process extending in a distal-to-proximal direction along the axoneme from steps 4 to 14 of spermiogenesis. For the most part, assembly of the longitudinal columns occurs before that of the circumferential ribs. Immunohistochemical and immunogold labelling showed that fibrous sheath proteins are first present in the spermatid cytoplasm; at least some of the proteins of the sheath precursors differ from those in the mature fibrous sheath. That immunoreactivity develops after initiation of chromatin condensation suggests that fibrous sheath proteins, or their mRNAs, are stored within the spermatid cytoplasmic lobule prior to their assembly along the axoneme. These findings are similar to those in laboratory rats, and thus suggests that the mode of fibrous sheath assembly evolved in a common ancestor over 125 million years ago, prior to the divergence of marsupial and eutherian lineages. PMID:16050902

  10. Nonextensive statistics and the sheath criterion in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-01-15

    The Bohm criterion in an electropositive plasma containing nonextensively distributed electrons and warm ions is investigated by using a steady state two-fluid model. Taking into account the ion-neutral collisions and finite temperature of ions, a modified Bohm criterion is derived which limits both maximum and minimum allowable velocity of ions at the sheath edge (u{sub 0i}). It is found that the degree of nonextensivity of electrons (q) and temperature of positive ions (T{sub i}) affect only the lower limit of the entrance velocity of ions into the sheath while the degree of ion collisionality (α) influences both lower and upper limits of the ion velocities at the sheath edge. In addition, depending on the value of q, it is shown that the minimum velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge can be greater or smaller than its Maxwellian counterpart. Moreover, it is shown that, depending on the values of α and T{sub i}, the positive ions with subsonic velocity may enter the sheath for either q > 1 or −1 < q < 1. Finally, as a practical application, the density distribution of charged particles in the sheath region is studied for different values of u{sub 0i}, and it is shown that monotonical reduction of the positive ion density distribution occurs only when the velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge lies between two above mentioned limits.

  11. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  12. [Anterior clinoid process mucocele causing optic nerve compression].

    PubMed

    Moisseiev, Elad; Regenbogen, Michael; Segev, Yoram

    2013-02-01

    A mucocele is a collection of mucus lined by mucus-secreting epithelium of a paranasal sinus. The anterior clinoid process may become pneumatized during the development of the skull base. Rarely, an anterior clinoid process mucocele may form in this air space. We report a patient with anterior clinoid process mucocele who presented with visual loss and limited motility in the affected eye, and underwent surgery to decompress the orbital apex and optic nerve. We also review the literature regarding this rare diagnosis.

  13. Role of Inflammatory Reponse in Experimental Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Little, T.

    1999-01-01

    Decompression to altitude can result in gas bubble formation both in tissues and in the systemic veins. The venous gas emboli (VGE) are often monitored during decompression exposures to assess risk for decompression sickness (DCS). Astronauts are at risk for DCS during extravehicular activities (EVA), where decompression occurs from the Space Shuttle or Space Station atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch (PSI) to that of the space suit pressure of 4.3 PSI. DCS symptoms include diffuse pain, especially around joints, inflammation and edema. Pathophysiological effects include interstitial inflammatory responses and recurring injury to the vascular endothelium. Such responses can result in vasoconstriction and associated hemodynamic changes.The granulocyte cell activation and chemotaxin release results in the formation of vasoactive and microvascular permeability altering mediators, especially from the lungs which are the principal target organ for the venous bubbles, and from activated cells (neutrophils, platelets, macrophages). Such mediators include free arachidonic acid and the byproducts of its metabolism via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways (see figure). The cyclooxygenase pathway results in formation of prostacyclin and other prostaglandins and thromboxanes that cause vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction and platelet aggregation. Leukotrienes produced by the alternate pathway cause pulmonary and bronchial smooth muscle contraction and edema. Substances directly affecting vascular tone such as nitric oxide may also play a role in the respose to DCS. We are studying the role and consequent effects of the release inflammatory bioactive mediators as a result of DCS and VGE. More recent efforts are focused on identifying the effects of the body's circadian rhythm on these physiological consequences to decompression stress. al

  14. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  15. Rectus sheath haematoma: a rare masquerader for abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Saleem, Saad; Ghous, Ghulam

    2017-04-13

    Rectus sheath haematoma is a rare cause of abdominal pain. It can be easily confused for other causes of acute abdomen and may even lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Our patient has the rectus sheath haematoma because of violent coughing and on presentation had no obvious clinical sign pointing to the same. Diagnosis was made by a CT scan of the abdomen, and patient was treated conservatively. Rectus sheath haematomas are usually present on the posterior aspect of the rectus muscles and thus may not be clinically appreciable.

  16. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath.

    PubMed

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  17. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  18. Absence of Debye Sheaths Due to Secondary Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    M.D. Campanell, A. Khrabrov and I. D. Kaganovich

    2012-05-11

    A bounded plasma where the hot electrons impacting the walls produce more than one secondary on average is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that no classical Debye sheath or space-charge limited sheath exists. Ions are not drawn to the walls and electrons are not repelled. Hence the unconfined plasma electrons travel unobstructed to the walls, causing extreme particle and energy fluxes. Each wall has a positive charge, forming a small potential barrier or "inverse sheath" that pulls some secondaries back to the wall to maintain the zero current condition.

  19. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-02-15

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  20. Rupture of the cell envelope by decompression of the deep-sea methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Beum; Clark, Douglas S

    2002-03-01

    The effect of decompression on the structure of Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen, was studied in a novel high-pressure, high-temperature bioreactor. The cell envelope of M. jannaschii appeared to rupture upon rapid decompression (ca. 1 s) from 260 atm of hyperbaric pressure. When decompression from 260 atm was performed over 5 min, the proportion of ruptured cells decreased significantly. In contrast to the effect produced by decompression from hyperbaric pressure, decompression from a hydrostatic pressure of 260 atm did not induce cell lysis.

  1. Effects of brevetoxin-B on motor nerve terminals of mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M. C.; Chen, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of brevetoxin-B, a red tide toxin, on motor nerve terminal activity were assessed on mouse triangularis sterni nerve-muscle preparations. The perineural waveforms were recorded with extracellular electrodes placed in the perineural sheaths of motor nerves. 2. At 0.11 microM, brevetoxin-B increased the components of waveforms associated with sodium and potassium currents while it decreased the calcium activated potassium current and the slow calcium current of the nerve terminal. The fast calcium current and slow potassium current were not affected. 3. At 1.11 microM, brevetoxin-B decreased all of the components of waveforms associated with sodium, potassium and calcium currents. 4. It is concluded that brevetoxin-B affects sodium, potassium as well as calcium currents in the nerve terminal. The effects may contribute to its pharmacological actions on synaptic transmission. PMID:1652340

  2. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes.

  3. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  4. Ultrastructural analysis of guided nerve regeneration using progesterone- and pregnenolone-loaded chitosan prostheses.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Delgado, M E; Gomez-Pinedo, U; Feria-Velasco, A; Huerta-Viera, M; Castañeda, S Castro; Toral, F A López-Dellamary; Parducz, A; Anda, S Luquín-De; Mora-Galindo, J; García-Estrada, J

    2005-07-01

    Recently, numerous guide chambers for the treatment of injured nerves made up of different biomaterials have been designed, capable of hosting living cells or carrying neurotrophic or neuroactive substances to be directly released to the injured tissue. In this study, chitosan prostheses containing neurosteroids (progesterone and pregnenolone) were used for bridging a 10-mm gap in the rabbit facial nerve. Gas chromatography was used to quantify neurosteroid content in the prostheses prior to and after subcutaneous implantation at different periods of up to 60 days. The regeneration of the nerve fibers were evaluated at 15 and 45 days after axotomy by means of ultrastructural morphometric analysis. Different nerve fibers regenerative patterns were seen depending the groups studied and the analyzed stages. At 15 days after axotomy, the newly regenerating tissue revealed Schwann cells holding nonmyelinated nerve fiber bundles in an incipient and organized regenerative pattern. At 45 days, the regenerating tissue showed myelinated nerve fibers of different sizes, shapes, and myelin sheath thickness. Although the regeneration of the nerve fibers under neurosteroid treatment showed statistically significant differences in comparison with vehicle regenerated tissue, progesterone-loaded chitosan prostheses produced the best guided nerve regeneration response. These findings indicate that chitosan prostheses allowed regeneration of nerve fibers in their lumen, and when containing neurosteroids produced a faster guided nerve regeneration acting as a long-lasting release delivery vehicle.

  5. [A method for evaluating the safety of decompression regimens for divers].

    PubMed

    Volkov, L K; Voĭtsekhovich, I A; Liapin, V M; Miasnikov, A A

    1996-09-01

    The authors offer a way of estimation of safety modes of decompression, based on definition of intensity of venous gas embolism (VGE) at each decompression and account of probability of illness of divers in series of tests. Intensity of VGE was determined with the help of ultrasonic gas bubbles Doppler radar. Comparative safety of standard modes of decompression of divers of the Navy was estimated, and also the modes, designed in accordance with mathematical model of decompression, offered by I. A. Voĭtsekhovich (1990), were done. The results testify, that use of ultrasonic radar for estimation of intensity of VGE at decompression and account of average and maximum probability of decompression illness in series of tests of modes permit to receive the comparative characteristic of safety of modes at small number of decompressions.

  6. On diver thermal status and susceptibility to decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Wayne A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent Letter to the Editor, Clarke, et al, indicated that divers who deliberately chill themselves on a dive to reduce risk of decompression sickness (DCS) may be misinterpreting our 2007 Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) report. Indeed, we did not advocate that divers should risk hypothermia on bottom to reduce risk of DCS, nor do we dispute the authors' overall admonition to avoid diving cold unnecessarily. However, Clarke, et al, imply more generally that results of our study are not applicable to recreational or technical divers because the dives we tested were atypical of dives undertaken by such divers. We wish to clarify that our study does have implications for recreational and technical divers, implications that should not be ignored. The dives we tested were not intended to be typical of dives undertaken in any actual operational context. Instead, we chose to expose divers to temperatures at the extremes of their thermal tolerance in order to ensure that effects of diver thermal status on DCS susceptibility would be found if such effects existed. Our initial test dive profile provided appreciable time both on bottom and during decompression to allow any differential thermal effects during these two dive phases to manifest, while affording a baseline risk of DCS that could be altered by thermal effects without exposing subjects to inordinately high risks of DCS. Our results strongly indicate that the optimal diver thermal conditions for mitigation of DCS risk or minimization of decompression time entail remaining cool during gas uptake phases of a dive and warm during off-gassing phases. While the dose-response characteristics of our observed thermal effects are almost certainly non-linear in both exposure temperature and duration, it is only reasonable to presume that the effects vary monotonically with these factors. We have no reason to presume that such responses and effects under less extreme conditions would be in directions opposite to

  7. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  8. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  10. Use of a straight, side-hole delivery sheath for improved delivery of Amplatzer ASD occluder.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Shelby; Asnes, Jeremy D; Srinath, Gowdagere; Preminger, Tamar J; Prieto, Lourdes R; Latson, Larry A

    2007-01-01

    The Amplatzer ASD occluder may be difficult to position in some patients with a large atrial septal defect (ASD) or deficiency of one or more atrial septal rims. We developed a method to modify a Mullins transseptal sheath to enhance delivery. The resulting sheath is straight and has an exit orifice essential in the side of the distal portion of the sheath-a straight, side-hole (SSH) delivery sheath. We have used this modified delivery sheath in 140 successive patients with excellent results. The techniques of sheath modification and delivery of the device using the modified sheath are described.

  11. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  12. Detail of trusses and wood sheathing in the leanto bay ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of trusses and wood sheathing in the lean-to bay of the roundhouse and car repair shop looking north. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Auxiliary Buildings, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  13. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  14. Porous protective solid phase micro-extractor sheath

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Randich, Erik

    2005-03-29

    A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid phase microextraction (SPME). The sheath permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal with GC-MS septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Use of the porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of: 1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, 2) active media coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment; and 3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

  15. 32. DETAIL OF GEARS LOOKING NORTH WITH SHEATHING REMOVED AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF GEARS LOOKING NORTH WITH SHEATHING REMOVED AND SHAFT OF KING GEAR BEYOND - Caleb Crosby Threshing Barn, Noeton (moved to Norris Dam State Park, Lake City), Morristown, Hamblen County, TN

  16. Decompression Sickness during Construction of the Dartford Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Golding, F. Campbell; Griffiths, P.; Hempleman, H. V.; Paton, W. D. M.; Walder, D. N.

    1960-01-01

    A clinical, radiological and statistical survey has been made of decompression sickness during the construction of the Dartford Tunnel. Over a period of two years, 1,200 men were employed on eight-hour shifts at pressures up to 28 pounds per square inch (p.s.i.). There were 689 cases of decompression sickness out of 122,000 compressions, an incidence of 0·56%. The majority of cases (94·9%) were simple “bends”. The remainder (5·1%) exhibited signs and symptoms other than pain and were more serious. All cases were successfully treated and no fatality or permanent disability occurred. In two serious cases, cysts in the lungs were discovered. It is suggested that these gave rise to air embolism when the subjects were decompressed, and pulmonary changes may contribute more than hitherto believed to the pathogenesis of bends. Some other clinical features are described, including “skin-mottling” and an association between bends and the site of an injury. The bends rate is higher for the back shift (3 p.m. to 11 p.m.) and the night shift (11 p.m. to 7 a.m.) than for the day shift. In the treatment of decompression sickness it appears to be more satisfactory to use the minimum pressure required for relief of symptoms followed by slow decompression with occasional “soaks”, than to attempt to drive the causative bubbles into solution with high pressures. During the contract the decompression tables recently prescribed by the Ministry of Labour were used. Evidence was obtained that they could be made safer, and that the two main assumptions on which they are based (that sickness will not occur at pressures below 18 p.s.i., and that a man saturates in four hours) may be incorrect. It is desirable to test tables based on 15 p.s.i. and eight-hour saturation. The existence of acclimatization to pressure was confirmed; it is such that the bends rate may fall in two to three weeks to 0·1% of the incidence on the first day of exposure. Acclimatization is lost again

  17. Investigating degassing dynamics into the shallow conduit through decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    The history of bubbles' growth and interaction, as well as their spatial distribution in the shallow conduit, is deeply interconnected with the style of the eruptions. According to the fundamental role played by volatiles in the eruptive process, more effort is required in determining how the key factors of volcanic systems (i.e., magma properties, decompression rate) influence the dynamics of degassing. Therefore, our aim is to provide, through the analysis of decompression experiments on analogue materials, insights on such relations. We performed several decompression experiments with a shock-tube apparatus, and using silicon oil as laboratory-analogue for the magmatic melt. The sample was placed in a transparent autoclave, saturated with Argon for an established amount of time under a fixed pressure (up to a maximum of 10 MPa). Successively it was decompressed to atmospheric conditions, by releasing gas through a control valve. The dynamics of gas exsolution processes were recorded by using pressure sensors and a high speed camera. A range of viscosity values (1, 10, 100, 1000 Pa s) was investigated, for the same decompression path. Furthermore, some experiments were carried out with the addition of glass beads, as analogue to crystals, to the pure liquid. The height of the expanding column was monitored, in conjunction with images recorded during the experiments, and the growth rate of bubbles was measured at different times and depth. Finally, bubble size distribution has been evaluated at various stages for some experiments, in order to achieve a spatial map of the ongoing degassing phenomena. Results allowed us to define different regimes occurring during the decompression, whose features and characteristics are strongly affected by fluid viscosity. Indeed, several degassing phases were observed, from bubbly fluid to the eventual buildup of a more or less "foamy" phase, which ultimately experiences periodical oscillations around an average equilibrium level

  18. Risk of decompression sickness in the presence of circulating microbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. Vasantha; Powell, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we examined the association between microbubbles formed in the circulation from a free gas phase and symptoms of altitude decompression sickness (DCS). In a subgroup of 59 males of mean (S.D) age 31.2 (5.8) years who developed microbubbles during exposure to 26.59 kPa (4.3 psi) under simulated extravehicular activities (EVA), symptoms of DCS occurred in 24 (41 percent) individuals. Spencer grade 1 microbubbles occurred in 4 (7 percent), grade 2 in 9 (15 percent), grade 3 in 15 (25 percent), and grade 4 in 31 (53 percent) of subjects. Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression showed that individuals with less than grade 3 CMB showed 2.46 times (95 percent confidence interval = 1.26 to 5.34) higher risk of symptoms. This information is crucial for defining the risk of DCS for inflight Doppler monitoring under space EVA. Altitude decompression sickness (DCS) occurs when there is acute reduction in ambient pressure. The symptoms of DCS are due to the formation of a free gas phase (in the form of gas microbubbles) in tissues during decompression. Musculo-skeletal pain of bends is the commonest form of DCS in altitude exposures. In the space flight environment, there is a risk of DCS when astronauts decompress from the normobaric shuttle pressure into the hypobaric space suit pressure (currently about 29.65 kPa (4.3 psi) for extra-vehicular activities (EVA). This risk is counterbalanced by a judicious combination of prior denitrogenation and staged decompression. Studies of DCS are limited by the duration of the test at reduced pressure. Since only a proportion of subjects tested develop symptoms, the information on DCS is generally incomplete or 'censored'. Many studies employ Doppler ultrasound monitoring of the precordial area for detecting circulating microbubbles (CMB). Although the association between CMB and bends pain is not causal, CMB are frequently monitored during decompression. In this paper, we examine the association

  19. Superficial peroneal nerve paresis in a dancer caused by a midfoot ganglion: case report.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darrell; Dowling, Jamie; Rowan, Fiachra; Casey, Mary; O'Grady, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Ganglion cysts are common benign masses, usually occurring in the hands and feet. This report describes the case of a young female Irish dancer who presented with paresthesia of her foot due to a ganglion in near proximity to the superficial peroneal nerve. Midfoot ganglia in young girls engaged in Irish dance can limit their ability to participate. This pathology requires further epidemiological studies to investigate its prevalence. In the event of failed conservative management, surgical intervention to excise the cyst and decompress the nerve is an effective treatment to facilitate return to dancing.

  20. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  1. Sheath ionization model of beam emissions from large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, S. T.; Cohen, H. A.; Bhavnani, K. H.; Tautz, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of the charging of a spacecraft emitting electron and ion beams has been applied to the case of large spacecraft. In this model, ionization occurs in the sheath due to the return current. Charge neutralization of spherical space charge flow is examined by solving analytical equations numerically. Parametric studies of potential large spacecraft are performed. As in the case of small spacecraft, the ions created in the sheath by the returning current play a large role in determining spacecraft potential.

  2. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  3. Rectus sheath tunnels for continent stomas.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Alan P; Khalil, Basem A; Cervellione, Raimondo M

    2008-03-01

    Continent stoma rectus sheath tunnel (CSRST) has been used in antegrade colonic enema (ACE) and urinary continent cutaneous diversion (UCCD) stomas to reduce leakage and to support a straight track for the continent conduit. All patients that underwent CSRST between 1995 and 2005 were identified and their case notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: the ACE group and the UCCD group. Demographic data, age at surgery and complications including stenosis and leakage were recorded. Forty patients underwent CSRST between 1995 and 2005. The mean age and standard deviation (SD) at surgery was 6.8 (2.1) years. Eighteen patients underwent ACE with a mean (SD) follow-up of 7.6 (3.1) years. No patient has faecal leakage. No patient had stomal revision, but one patient (5.5%) required an indwelling gastrostomy button to maintain patency. Twenty-two patients underwent UCCD with a mean (SD) follow-up of 8.1 (2.8) years. No patient developed urinary leakage. Two patients (9%) required revision of the stoma and one (4.5%) required an indwelling catheter because of recurring stomal stenosis. CSRST prevents stoma leakage. Revision surgery rate after CSRST is low, particularly after ACE reconstruction.

  4. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described.

  5. Boundary conditions for electropositive and electronegative radio-frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Plasma sheaths play a dominant role in determining ion bombardment energies. To optimize plasma processes, sheaths must be understood and carefully controlled, which requires predictive models. One very efficient approach is to only model the sheath, excluding the bulk plasma. This approach, however, requires boundary conditions at the plasma/sheath boundary. Models that use the step approximation for electron density require initial ion velocities. More exact models with Boltzmann electrons (and, for electronegative discharges, negative ions) require the electron temperature (and the temperature and relative density of negative ions). It is often assumed that these boundary conditions have negligible effects on ion energies, but, for certain conditions in radio-frequency sheaths, this is not true. Analytic models as well as numerical simulations show that, at low frequencies (<= 1 MHz) and high bias voltages, the amplitude of the low-energy peak in ion energy distributions (IEDs) at the electrode is very sensitive to the boundary conditions. By measuring IEDs and sheath voltage waveforms, we obtain the most appropriate values of the boundary conditions for electropositive (Ar) as well as electronegative (CF4) discharges and insight into their presheath dynamics.

  6. Photoelectric sheath formation around small spherical objects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath around positively charged small (∼cm) spherical objects roaming in near earth space due to the solar radiation (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. The sheath structure has been derived, taking into account anisotropic photoelectron flux with the Poisson equation, spherical geometry of the object, and half Fermi Dirac distribution of photoelectron velocities. Two cases, viz., when the object is illuminated by (i) isotropic or (ii) unidirectional (parallel beam) radiation, have been analyzed. The analysis predicts a spherically symmetric sheath in case of isotropic illumination, while a symmetry in sheath about a θ=π/4 is seen in case of parallel beam illumination; θ is the angle of incidence which is the angle made by the normal to a surface element with the direction of incidence of solar radiation. The radial and angular profiles of the electric potential and electron density in the photoelectron sheath have been evaluated and illustrated graphically; the dependence of the sheath structure on the solar wind plasma parameters, material properties of the spherical object, and its size have been discussed.

  7. The sheath effect on the floating harmonic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-15

    The floating harmonic method biases sinusoidal voltage to a probe sheath, and as its response, harmonic currents can be obtained. These currents can be used to determine the plasma parameters. However, different shapes of probes have different shapes of sheaths that can affect the diagnostic results. However, no research has been done on the sheath effect on the floating harmonic method. Therefore, we investigate the effect of the sheath during floating harmonic diagnostics by comparing cylindrical and planar probes. While the sinusoidal voltages were applied to a probe, because the sheath oscillated, the time variant ion current and their harmonic currents were added to the electron harmonic currents. In the floating harmonic method, the harmonic currents are composed of only the electron harmonic currents. Therefore, the ion harmonic currents affect the diagnostic results. In particular, the electron temperature obtained by the small probe tip was higher than that of the large probe tip. This effect was exacerbated when the ratio of the probe tip radius to the sheath length was smaller.

  8. Comment on 'Sheath model for dual-frequency capacitive discharges'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Cong; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2015-07-01

    Boyle et al (2004 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37 1451) introduced a sheath model for dual-frequency capacitive discharges. The electron sheath edge position s and the dc potential Φdc in the sheath are obtained with the assumption α/β  >> 1 (where α/β is the ratio of the low-frequency electric field to the high-frequency electric field). However, α/β  ≤  4 is usually found in processing applications. Under this condition, we show that the Boyle et al model gives multiple values for the dc potential Φdc(x) at any given position x in the sheath. For this reason, we introduce a model without the assumption α/β  >> 1. By comparing the results from the two models, it is found that, as the ratio α/β approaches 1, the sheath thickness sm and the sheath dc voltage Vdc obtained with the Boyle et al model are significantly underestimated.

  9. Structure of the magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdipour, H.; Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2010-12-15

    A three-component fluid model for a dusty plasma-sheath in an oblique magnetic field is presented. The study is carried out for the conditions when the thermophoretic force associated with the electron temperature gradient is one of the most important forces affecting dust grains in the sheath. It is shown that the sheath properties (the sheath size, the electron, ion and dust particle densities and velocities, the electric field potential, and the forces affecting the dust particles) are functions of the neutral gas pressure and ion temperature, the dust size, the dust material density, and the electron temperature gradient. Effects of plasma-dust collisions on the sheath structure are studied. It is shown that an increase in the forces pushing dust particles to the wall is accompanied by a decrease in the sheath width. The results of this work are particularly relevant to low-temperature plasma-enabled technologies, where effective control of nano- and microsized particles near solid or liquid surfaces is required.

  10. [Pre-surgical simulation of microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm using 3D-models].

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Toshihiro; Yang, Qiang; Kaneko, Naoki; Konno, Takehiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    We have been performing pre-surgical simulations using custom-built patient-specific 3D-models. Here we report the advantageous use of 3D-models for simulating microvascular decompression(MVD)for hemifacial spasms. Seven cases of MVD surgery were performed. Two types of 3D-printers were used to fabricate the 3D-models:one using plaster as the modeling material(Z Printer®450, 3D systems, Rock Hill, SC, USA)and the other using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene(ABS)(UP! Plus 3D printer®, Beijing Tiertime Technology, Beijing). We tested three types of models. Type 1 was a plaster model of the brainstem, cerebellum, facial nerve, and the artery compressing the root exit zone of the facial nerve. Part of the cerebellum was digitally trimmed off to observe "the compressing point" from the same angle as that used during actual surgery. Type 2 was a modified Type 1 in which part of the skull was opened digitally to mimic a craniectomy. Type 3 was a combined model in which the cerebellum and the artery of the Type 2 model were replaced by a soft retractable cerebellum and an elastic artery. The cerebellum was made from polyurethane and cast from a plaster prototype. To fabricate elastic arteries, liquid silicone was painted onto the surface of an ABS artery and the inner ABS model was dissolved away using solvent. In all cases, the 3D-models were very useful. Although each type has advantages, the Type-3 model was judged extremely useful for training junior surgeons in microsurgical approaches.

  11. Microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia through a microasterional approach: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Rogelio; Morales-Martínez, Andres Humberto; Mejías-Soto, Carolina; Martínez-Anda, Jaime Jesús; Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) is an uncommon craniofacial pain syndrome. It is characterized by a sudden onset lancinating pain usually localized in the sensory distribution of the IX cranial nerve associated with excessive vagal outflow, which leads to bradycardia, hypotension, syncope, or cardiac arrest. This study aims to review our surgical experience performing microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with GPN. Methods: Over the last 20 years, 14 consecutive cases were diagnosed with GPN. MVD using a microasterional approach was performed in all patients. Demographic data, clinical presentation, surgical findings, clinical outcome, complications, and long-term follow-up were reviewed. Results: The median age of onset was 58.7 years. The mean time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 8.8 years. Glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve compression was from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery in eleven cases (78.5%), vertebral artery in two cases (14.2%), and choroid plexus in one case (7.1%). Postoperative mean follow-up was 26 months (3–180 months). Pain analysis demonstrated long-term pain improvement of 114 ± 27.1 months and pain remission in 13 patients (92.9%) (P = 0.0001) two complications were documented, one patient had a cerebrospinal fluid leak, and another had bacterial meningitis. There was no surgical mortality. Conclusions: GPN is a rare entity, and secondary causes should be discarded. MVD through a retractorless microasterional approach is a safe and effective technique. Our series demonstrated an excellent clinical outcome with pain remission in 92.9%. PMID:27213105

  12. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Laurinda; Alegria, Carlos; Oliveira, Joana; Machado, Ana; Oliveira, Pedro; Almeida, Armando

    2011-01-01

    In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1) a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol]), (2) the association of gabapentin (GBP) and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP) (GBP+ROP protocol), and (3) a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol). Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols) from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22) due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug therapies, while after MDV surgery several patients showed important side effects. Data reinforce that, (1) TN patients should be carefully evaluated before choosing therapy for pain control, (2) different pharmacological approaches are available to initiate pain control at low costs, and (3) criteria for surgical interventions should be clearly defined due to important side effects, with the initial higher costs being strongly reduced with time. PMID:21941455

  13. Abducens nerve palsy caused by basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Y; Sagoh, M; Mayanagi, K; Murakami, H

    1998-06-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with abducens nerve palsy due to basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation manifesting as slowly progressive bilateral trigeminal neuralgia and diplopia in the right lateral gaze. X-ray and computed tomography of the skull confirmed the diagnosis of basilar impression and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and magnetic resonance imaging disclosed tightness of the posterior cranial fossa. Surgical suboccipital decompression resulted in gradual resolution of the patient's complaints, and no additional symptoms were recognized. Impairment of the sixth cranial nerve is a rare symptom compared to those of the fifth or the eighth cranial nerve in a patient with a craniocervical malformation. However, the present case shows the possibility of cranial nerve dysfunction due to tightness of the posterior cranial fossa, and suggests that surgical treatment for basilar impression with atlanto-occipital assimilation should be considered in patients with uncommon and unusual symptoms.

  14. Bayesian approach to decompression sickness model parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Howle, L E; Weber, P W; Nichols, J M

    2017-03-01

    We examine both maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches for estimating probabilistic decompression sickness model parameters. Maximum likelihood estimation treats parameters as fixed values and determines the best estimate through repeated trials, whereas the Bayesian approach treats parameters as random variables and determines the parameter probability distributions. We would ultimately like to know the probability that a parameter lies in a certain range rather than simply make statements about the repeatability of our estimator. Although both represent powerful methods of inference, for models with complex or multi-peaked likelihoods, maximum likelihood parameter estimates can prove more difficult to interpret than the estimates of the parameter distributions provided by the Bayesian approach. For models of decompression sickness, we show that while these two estimation methods are complementary, the credible intervals generated by the Bayesian approach are more naturally suited to quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters.

  15. Report on computation of repetitive hyperbaric-hypobaric decompression tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edel, P. O.

    1975-01-01

    The tables were constructed specifically for NASA's simulated weightlessness training program; they provide for 8 depth ranges covering depths from 7 to 47 FSW, with exposure times of 15 to 360 minutes. These tables were based up on an 8 compartment model using tissue half-time values of 5 to 360 minutes and Workmanline M-values for control of the decompression obligation resulting from hyperbaric exposures. Supersaturation ratios of 1.55:1 to 2:1 were used for control of ascents to altitude following such repetitive dives. Adequacy of the method and the resultant tables were determined in light of past experience with decompression involving hyperbaric-hypobaric interfaces in human exposures. Using these criteria, the method showed conformity with empirically determined values. In areas where a discrepancy existed, the tables would err in the direction of safety.

  16. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus complicating decompression surgery of the craniovertebral junction

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Ryuji; Saito, Nobuhito; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus has been described as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation. However, there are few reports of obstructive hydrocephalus after spinal surgery for other pathologies of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). The authors herein report a 52-year-old female with achondroplasia presenting with an 8-month history of myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at CVJ. She underwent resection of the C1 posterior arch and part of the edge of the occipital bone. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained 1-week after the surgery revealed bilateral infratentorial fluid collection. The patient was first managed conservatively; however, on the 17th day, her consciousness level showed sudden deterioration. Emergency CT demonstrated marked hydrocephalus due to obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus can occur late after decompression surgery at the CVJ, and thus should be included in the differential diagnosis of a deteriorating mental status. PMID:27366268

  17. Predictive modeling of altitude decompression sickness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, D. J.; Hamilton, R. W., Jr.; Colley, I. A.; Schreiner, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The coding of data on 2,565 individual human altitude chamber tests is reported as part of a selection procedure designed to eliminate individuals who are highly susceptible to decompression sickness, individual aircrew members were exposed to the pressure equivalent of 37,000 feet and observed for one hour. Many entries refer to subjects who have been tested two or three times. This data contains a substantial body of statistical information important to the understanding of the mechanisms of altitude decompression sickness and for the computation of improved high altitude operating procedures. Appropriate computer formats and encoding procedures were developed and all 2,565 entries have been converted to these formats and stored on magnetic tape. A gas loading file was produced.

  18. [Modern algorithm for treating pudendal neuralgia: 212 cases and 104 decompressions].

    PubMed

    Bautrant, E; de Bisschop, E; Vaini-Elies, V; Massonnat, J; Aleman, I; Buntinx, J; de Vlieger, J; Di Constanzo, M; Habib, L; Patroni, G; Siboni, S; Céas, B; Schiby, V; Uglione-Céas, M

    2003-12-01

    Clinical signs and symptoms of the pudendal neuralgia are very rich, with a great individual variability. The clinical diagnosis is difficult. It is confirmed or invalidated by the electrophysiologicals tests. Since October 1998 patient selection has been possible using a diagnosis score. Over a four-year period, the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia was confirmed by electrophysiological investigations in 212 subjects. We rejected 12 patients because of a radiculo-medullary organic etiology. We only describe here cases of women with a peripheral pudendal nerve injury (200 patients). Thirty-eight neuropathies free of canal symptoms (obstetrical, post-traumatic...) were treated by infiltration therapy. The study of a total of 162 canal syndromes showed prevalent injury at the sacro-spino-tuberal ligamental grip which was observed in 68% of the cases, compared to the Alcock canal which was present in only 20% of the cases. One hundred four of these patients underwent surgical decompression via a trans-ischio-rectal approach after negative results of the infiltration therapy. We report here the surgical methodology, the post-op follow-up and the results, which appear quite successful: after one year 86% of the subjects are symptom-free or with a significant reduction of pain.

  19. Large Cervical Vagus Nerve Tumor in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Treated with Gross Total Resection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bray, David P.; Chan, Andrew K.; Chin, Cynthia T.; Jacques, Line

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors that occur commonly in individuals with neurocutaneous disorders such as neurofibromatosis type 1. Vagal nerve neurofibromas, however, are a relatively rare occurrence. We present the case of a 22-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 with a neurofibroma of the left cervical vagal nerve. The mass was resected through an anterior approach without major event. In the postoperative course, the patient developed left vocal cord paralysis treated with medialization with injectable gel. We then present a comprehensive review of the literature for surgical resection of vagal nerve neurofibromas. PMID:28077961

  20. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.